Science.gov

Sample records for rayonnements ionisants cancers

  1. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk.

  2. Influence du traitement ionisant par rayonnement γ sur le pouvoir antioxydant de fractions polyphénoliques issues de substances d'origine végétale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuyck, S.; Connaulte, J.; Lesgards, G.; Prost, M.; Raffi, J.

    1998-04-01

    Ionizing radiation of vegetables is a cleaning up and preservation physical treatment which consists in submitting them to γ radiation, X radiation or electrons beam. This study deals with the influence of γ radiation on antioxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts. In that purpose, we use a simple biological test based on erythrocytes haemolysis. Le traitement ionisant des produits végétaux est un procédé physique d'assainissement et de conservation qui consiste à les soumettre à l'action de rayonnements γ, de rayons X ou de faisceaux d'électrons. Ce travail porte sur l'étude de l'influence des rayonnements γ sur le pouvoir antioxydant de fractions polyphénoliques issues de substances d'origine végétale. Pour cela, un test biologique basé sur l'hémolyse d'érythrocytes est utilisé.

  3. Ionisation en couche K et effet biologique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Hoir, A.; Herve Du Penhoat, M. A.; Champion, C.; Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Abel, F.; Politis, M. F.; Despiney-Bailly, I.; Sabatier, L.; Chetioui, A.

    1998-04-01

    Initial steps of radiation action mechanism on biological targets are still undnown. The strong correlation observed between inactivation cross sections by heavy ions and K-vacancy production cross sections has drawn the attention on this process. Although quite minor in the energy deposition of these particles, the K-ionization process gives rise to quite efficient ionization clusters. Values of K-ionization biological effectivenesses extracted from measured relative biological efficiencies of ultra soft X-rays support the idea of a major -may be a dominant- contribution of the K-vacancy process to the biological effect of heavy ions. Les étapes initiales des mécanismes d'effet biologique des radiations sont encore mal connues. La forte corrélation observée entre sections efficaces d'inactivation par ions lourds et sections efficaces d'ionisation K a attiré l'attention sur ce processus. Bien que de faible probabilité, l'ionisation K engendre des grappes d'ionisation très efficaces. Les valeurs de rendement létal extraites des efficacités biologiques relatives mesurées pour les rayonnements X ultra-mous suggèrent une contribution majeure -peut-être dominante- de l'ionisation K à l'effet biologique des ions.

  4. Cell culture conditions potentiate differences in the response to ionising radiation of peripheral blood leukocytes isolated from breast cancer patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Adzić, Miroslav; Nićiforović, Ana; Zarić, Bozidarka; Nesković-Konstantinović, Zora; Spasić, Snezana D; Jones, David R; Radojcić, Marija B

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effects of ionising radiation on leukocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy subjects ex vivo, the level of NF-kappaB and the antioxidant enzymes manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and catalase (CAT) in combination with flow cytometric analysis of CD4+ lymphocytes was performed. The level of Mn-SOD protein was significantly increased in the breast cancer study group both before (P < 0.001) and after (P < 0.001) irradiation when compared with healthy subjects. Measurements in parallel indicated that the level of CAT protein was significantly higher in the breast cancer study group after irradiation (2 Gy [P < 0.001] and 9 Gy [P < 0.05]) when compared with healthy subjects. Although the initial number of lymphocytes in the blood of breast cancer patients was not different from healthy subjects, the percentage of apoptotic CD4+ cells was significantly (P < 0.001) lower both before and after irradiation indicating that cell culture conditions induced radioresistance of CD4+ cells in the blood of breast cancer patients. The data presented in this current study indicate that brief ex vivo culture of peripheral blood leukocytes potentiates oxidative stress imposed by a breast cancer tumour.

  5. Identification of serum proteins discriminating colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls using surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engwegen, Judith YMN; Helgason, Helgi H; Cats, Annemieke; Harris, Nathan; Bonfrer, Johannes MG; Schellens, Jan HM; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the new serum biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC) by serum protein profiling with surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation - time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). METHODS: Two independent serum sample sets were analysed separately with the ProteinChip technology (set A: 40 CRC + 49 healthy controls; set B: 37 CRC + 31 healthy controls), using chips with a weak cation exchange moiety and buffer pH 5. Discriminative power of differentially expressed proteins was assessed with a classification tree algorithm. Sensitivities and specificities of the generated classification trees were obtained by blindly applying data from set A to the generated trees from set B and vice versa. CRC serum protein profiles were also compared with those from breast, ovarian, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancer. RESULTS: Mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) 3.1×103, 3.3×103, 4.5×103, 6.6×103 and 28×103 were used as classifiers in the best-performing classification trees. Tree sensitivities and specificities were between 65% and 90%. Most of these discriminative m/z values were also different in the other tumour types investigated. M/z 3.3×103, main classifier in most trees, was a doubly charged form of the 6.6×103-Da protein. The latter was identified as apolipoprotein C-I. M/z 3.1×103 was identified as an N-terminal fragment of albumin, and m/z 28×103 as apolipoprotein A-I. CONCLUSION: SELDI-TOF MS followed by classification tree pattern analysis is a suitable technique for finding new serum markers for CRC. Biomarkers can be identified and reproducibly detected in independent sample sets with high sensitivities and specificities. Although not specific for CRC, these biomarkers have a potential role in disease and treatment monitoring. PMID:16570345

  6. Ionisers in the management of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nogrady, S G; Furnass, S B

    1983-01-01

    Because of recent interest in the possible benefits to asthmatic patients of negative ion generators and the largely uncontrolled and inconclusive nature of earlier studies a double blind crossover study of this treatment was carried out in 20 subjects with stable asthma over six months. After an initial two week period without an ioniser, active or placebo ionisers were installed in subjects' bedrooms for two eight week periods separated by a four week "washout" period when no ioniser was present. The study was completed by a final four week period when no ioniser was present. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive an active or a placebo ioniser first. Subjects recorded their peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) twice daily, completed a daily symptom score questionnaire, and noted any treatment they took on a diary card. Recordings were completed throughout the trial. Ion counts and dust concentrations were measured in subjects' bedrooms during the study. Mean ion counts rose considerably when ionisers were activated (p less than 0.001). There were no significant differences in PEFR, symptom score, or consumption of medication between the periods that active ionisers and either no ionisers or placebo ionisers were in operation. This study has failed to show a statistically significant benefit in asthmatic subjects from the use of negative ion generators. PMID:6364442

  7. Selective laser ionisation of radionuclide 63Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, G. O.; D’yachkov, A. B.; Gorkunov, A. A.; Labozin, A. V.; Mironov, S. M.; Firsov, V. A.; Panchenko, V. Ya.

    2017-02-01

    We report a search for a scheme of selective laser stepwise ionisation of radionuclide 63Ni by radiation of a dye laser pumped by a copper vapour laser. A three-stage scheme is found with ionisation through an autoionising state (AIS): 3d 84s2 3F4(E = 0) → 3d 94p 1Fo3(31030.99 cm‑1) → 3d 94d 2[7/2]4(49322.56 cm‑1) → AIS(67707.61 cm‑1) which, by employing saturated radiation intensities provides the ionisation selectivity of above 1200 for 63Ni.

  8. Tunnelling time in strong field ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Alexandra S.; Keller, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    We revisit the common approaches to tunnelling time in the context of attoclock experiments. These experiments measure tunnelling time using close-to-circularly polarised light of the infrared ultrashort laser pulse. We test the sensitivity of the attoclock measurements of tunnelling time to non-adiabatic effects, as described by a well-known theoretical model first developed by Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev. We find that in the case of ionisation of helium, both adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories give very similar predictions for ionisations times over a wide intensity range typical of ultrafast experiments.

  9. Background ionising radiation: a pictorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Giovanni; Piotto, Lino

    2014-09-01

    Ionising radiation from natural sources, known as background radiation, has existed on earth since the earth's formation. The exposure of humans and other living creatures to this radiation is a feature of the earth's environment which is continuing and inescapable. The word "radiation" brings fear to many people: a fear of the unknown, as human's senses cannot detect the presence of ionising radiation. In this study, a catalogue of images of the distribution of radioactivity in every day objects and foods has been produced using an imaging plate from a computed radiography cassette. The aim of the study is that by visually demonstrating that every day objects and foods are radioactive would alleviate the fear of "radiation" by becoming aware that we live in a radioactive environment and even our body is radioactive.

  10. Occupational exposure to ionising radiation and mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; Castaño Lara, S; de Andrés Manzano, B; García Ferruelo, M; Iglesias Martín, L; Calero, J R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firstly, to ascertain whether mortality among workers of the former Spanish Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energía Nuclear-JEN) was higher than that for the Spanish population overall; and secondly, if this were so, to ascertain whether this difference was associated with exposure to ionising radiation. METHODS: A retrospective follow up of a cohort of 5657 workers was carried out for the period 1954-92. Cohort mortality was compared with that for the Spanish population overall, with standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) adjusted for sex, age, and calendar period. Also, Poisson models were used to analyse mortality from lung cancer in the cohort by level of exposure to ionising radiation. RESULTS: Workers' median and mean cumulative exposures were 4.04 and 11.42 mSv, respectively. Mean annual exposure was 1.33 mSv. Excess mortality due to bone tumours was found for the cohort as a whole (six deaths observed; SMR 2.95; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.08 to 6.43). Among miners, excess mortality was found for non-malignant respiratory diseases (SMR 2.94; 95% CI 2.27 to 3.75), and for lung cancer bordering on statistical significance (SMR 1.50; 95% CI 0.96 to 2.23; P = 0.055). Relative risks of dying of lung cancer from ionising radiation in the dose quartiles 2, 3, and 4 versus the lowest dose quartile, were 1.00, 1.64, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality from lung cancer was found among JEN miners. Nevertheless, no clear relation was found between mortality from lung cancer and level of exposure to ionising radiation in the JEN cohort. Continued follow up of the cohort is required to confirm excess mortality from bone tumours. PMID:9155782

  11. Medical effects and risks of exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Fred A

    2012-03-01

    Effects and risk from exposure to ionising radiation depend upon the absorbed dose, dose rate, quality of radiation, specifics of the tissue irradiated and other factors such as the age of the individual. Effects may be apparent almost immediately or may take decades to be manifest. Cancer is the most important stochastic effect at absorbed doses of less than 1 Gy. The risk of cancer induction varies widely across different tissues; however, the risk of fatal radiation-induced cancer for a general population following chronic exposure is about 5% Sv(-1). Quantification of cancer risk at doses of less than 0.1 Gy remains problematic. Hereditary risks from irradiation that might result in effects to offspring of humans appear to be much lower and any such potential risks can only be estimated from animal models. At high doses (over 1 Gy) cell killing and modification causes deterministic effects such as skin burns, and bone marrow depression, in which case immunosuppression becomes a critical issue. Acute whole body penetrating gamma irradiation at doses in excess of 2 Gy results in varying degrees of acute radiation sickness and doses over 10 Gy are usually lethal as a result of combined organ injury.

  12. Students' Conceptions of Ionisation Energy: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Taber, Keith S.; Liu, Xiufeng; Coll, Richard K.; Lorenzo, Mercedes; Li, Jia; Goh, Ngoh Khang; Chia, Lian Sai

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that A-level students in the UK and Singapore have difficulty learning the topic of ionisation energy. A two-tier multiple-choice instrument developed in Singapore in an earlier study, the Ionisation Energy Diagnostic Instrument, was administered to A-level students in the UK, advanced placement high school students…

  13. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  14. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  15. Apport du rayonnement synchrotron à l'étude de cheveux archéologiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, L.; Chevallier, P.; Doucet, J.; Simionovici, A.; Tsoucaris, G.; Walter, P.

    2002-07-01

    La préservation dans certains contextes archéologiques des cheveux humains et des fibres animales est favorisée par leur transformation chimique au contact d'objets métalliques. Afin de mieux comprendre les phénomènes complexes mis en jeu, nous avons étudié expérimentalement la fixation de cations métalliques (Cu et Pb) dans des cheveux modèles à partir de différentes méthodes de caractérisation utilisant le rayonnement X synchrotron. Nous avons ainsi pu mettre en évidence la fixation spécifique d'une partie de ces cations au sein des lipides structurés du cheveu. La comparaison entre échantillons modèles et archéologiques apporte de nouvelles données concernant les premières étapes d'altération des cheveux archéologiques.

  16. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality.

  17. Binary-Encounter-Bethe ionisation cross sections for simulation of DNA damage by the direct effect of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Plante, I; Cucinotta, F A

    2015-09-01

    DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionising radiation. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) cross sections was developed. The differential cross sections for ionisation of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates are calculated using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of each orbital as parameters. The resulting cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use for Monte-Carlo codes that randomly sample the energy loss occurring during an ionisation event. We also describe an algorithm to simulate the interactions of electrons with DNA in the radiation transport code RITRACKS using the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates.

  18. Comparison of low and high dose ionising radiation using topological analysis of gene coexpression networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growing use of imaging procedures in medicine has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR). While the disastrous effects of high dose ionising radiation (HDIR) is well documented, the detrimental effects of LDIR is not well understood and has been a topic of much debate. Since little is known about the effects of LDIR, various kinds of wet-lab and computational analyses are required to advance knowledge in this domain. In this paper we carry out an “upside-down pyramid” form of systems biology analysis of microarray data. We characterised the global genomic response following 10 cGy (low dose) and 100 cGy (high dose) doses of X-ray ionising radiation at four time points by analysing the topology of gene coexpression networks. This study includes a rich experimental design and state-of-the-art computational systems biology methods of analysis to study the differences in the transcriptional response of skin cells exposed to low and high doses of radiation. Results Using this method we found important genes that have been linked to immune response, cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, we also were able to identify genes such as BRCA1, ABCA1, TNFRSF1B, MLLT11 that have been associated with various types of cancers. We were also able to detect many genes known to be associated with various medical conditions. Conclusions Our method of applying network topological differences can aid in identifying the differences among similar (eg: radiation effect) yet very different biological conditions (eg: different dose and time) to generate testable hypotheses. This is the first study where a network level analysis was performed across two different radiation doses at various time points, thereby illustrating changes in the cellular response over time. PMID:22594378

  19. Chemical profile of mango (Mangifera indica L.) using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Bruno G; Costa, Helber B; Ventura, José A; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Barroso, Maria E S; Correia, Radigya M; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Pinto, Fernanda E; Endringer, Denise C; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-08-01

    Mangifera indica L., mango fruit, is consumed as a dietary supplement with purported health benefits; it is widely used in the food industry. Herein, the chemical profile of the Ubá mango at four distinct maturation stages was evaluated during the process of growth and maturity using negative-ion mode electrospray ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI(-)FT-ICR MS) and physicochemical characterisation analysis (total titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio, and total polyphenolic content). Primary (organic acids and sugars) and secondary metabolites (polyphenolic compounds) were mostly identified in the third maturation stage, thus indicating the best stage for harvesting and consuming the fruit. In addition, the potential cancer chemoprevention of the secondary metabolites (phenolic extracts obtained from mango samples) was evaluated using the induction of quinone reductase activity, concluding that fruit polyphenols have the potential for cancer chemoprevention.

  20. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  1. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  2. Application des codes de Monte Carlo à la radiothérapie par rayonnement à faible TEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcié, S.

    1998-04-01

    In radiation therapy, there is low LET rays: photons of 60Co, photons and electrons to 4 at 25 MV created in a linac, photons 137Cs, of 192Ir and of 125I. To know the most exactly possible the dose to the tissu by this rays, software and measurements are used. With the development of the power and the capacity of computers, the application of Monte Carlo codes expand to the radiation therapy which have permitted to better determine effects of rays and spectra, to explicit parameters used in dosimetric calculation, to verify algorithms , to study measuremtents systems and phantoms, to calculate the dose in inaccessible points and to consider the utilization of new radionuclides. En Radiothérapie, il existe une variété, de rayonnements ? faible TLE : photons du cobalt 60, photons et ,électron de 4 à? 25 MV générés dans des accélérateurs linéaires, photons du césium 137, de l'iridium 192 et de l'iode 125. Pour connatre le plus exactement possible la dose délivrée aux tissus par ces rayonnements, des logiciels sont utilisés ainsi que des instruments de mesures. Avec le développement de la puissance et de la capacité, des calculateurs, l'application des codes de Monte Carlo s'est ,étendue ? la Radiothérapie ce qui a permis de mieux cerner les effets des rayonnements, déterminer les spectres, préciser les valeurs des paramètres utilisés dans les calculs dosimétriques, vérifier les algorithmes, ,étudier les systèmes de mesures et les fantomes utilisés, calculer la dose en des points inaccessibles ?à la mesure et envisager l'utilisation de nouveaux radio,éléments.

  3. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  4. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  5. IEC standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Ambrosi, P; Behrens, R; Chiaro, P

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation' and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  6. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  7. Erich Regener and the ionisation maximum of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, P.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the 1930s the German physicist Erich Regener (1881-1955) did important work on the measurement of the rate of production of ionisation deep under water and in the atmosphere. Along with one of his students, Georg Pfotzer, he discovered the altitude at which the production of ionisation in the atmosphere reaches a maximum, often, but misleadingly, called the Pfotzer maximum. Regener was one of the first to estimate the energy density of cosmic rays, an estimate that was used by Baade and Zwicky to bolster their postulate that supernovae might be their source. Yet Regener's name is less recognised by present-day cosmic ray physicists than it should be, largely because in 1937 he was forced to take early retirement by the National Socialists as his wife had Jewish ancestors. In this paper we briefly review his work on cosmic rays and recommend an alternative naming of the ionisation maximum. The influence that Regener had on the field through his son, his son-in-law, his grandsons and his students, and through his links with Rutherford's group in Cambridge, is discussed in an appendix. Regener was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics by Schrödinger in 1938. He died in 1955 at the age of 73.

  8. CAPELLA : une source de rayonnement extrême UV à 13.5 nm par décharge capillaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarroukh, O.; Robert, E.; Gonthiez, T.; Thomann, A. L.; Viladrosa, R.; Fleurier, C.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Cachoncinlle, C.

    2003-06-01

    Au GREMI, nous étudions le fonctionnement d'une lampe de rayonnement Extrême Ultraviolet (EUV) émettant à 13.5nm: CAPELLA. Cette lampe consiste en une décharge capillaire dans un flux de xénon continu à basse pression. L'utilisation de Xénon à basse pression dans cette décharge permet la production de photons de faible longueur d'onde dans l'EUV. Dans cet article, nous présentons l'étude et la caractérisation de cette lampe ainsi que ses principales performances, en particulier les résultats des analyses des débris émis par la lampe pendant quelques millions de tirs.

  9. Laboratory astrophysics experiments relating to ionising and weakly radiative shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Joseph; Foster, John; Graham, Peter; Busschaert, Clotilde; Charpentier, Nicolas; Danson, Colin; Doyle, Hugo; Drake, R. Paul; Falize, Emeric; Fyrth, Jim; Gumbrell, Edward; Koenig, Michel; Kuranz, Carolyn; Loupias, Berenice; Michaut, Claire; Patankar, Sid; Skidmore, Jonathan; Spindloe, Christopher; Tubman, Ellie; Woolsey, Nigel; Yurchak, Roman; Gregori, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the POLAR project is to simulate, in the laboratory, the accretion shock region of a magnetic cataclysmic variable binary star system. Scaling laws have shown that laser experiments can be related to astrophysical phenomena by matching relevant dimensionless parameters. As well as forming a reverse shock, relevant to the POLAR project, the experimental system is also likely formed of a weakly radiating shock and an ionisation front. Results from our experiment at the Orion Laser are presented here, alongside comparisons to simulation and the astrophysical case (of relevance to triggered star formation).

  10. Intercomparison of ionisation chamber measurements from (125)I seeds.

    PubMed

    Davies, J B; Enari, K F; Baldock, C

    2007-05-01

    The reference air kerma rates of a set of individual (125)I seeds were calculated from current measurements of a calibrated re-entrant ionisation chamber. Single seeds were distributed to seven Australian brachytherapy centres for the same measurement with the user's instrumentation. Results are expressed as the ratio of the reference air kerma rate measured by the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) to the reference air kerma rate measured at the centre. The intercomparison ratios of all participants were within +/-5% of unity.

  11. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  12. Feedback regulated escape of ionising radiation from high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitsch, M.; Blaizot, J.

    2016-12-01

    Small galaxies are thought to provide the bulk of the radiation necessary to reionise the Universe by z ˜ 6. Their ionising efficiency is usually quantified by their escape fraction f_{esc}, but it is extremely hard to constrain from observations. With the goal of studying the physical processes that determine the values of the escape fraction, we have run a series of high resolution, cosmological, radiative hydrodynamics simulations centred on three galaxies. We find that the variability of the escape fraction follows that of the star formation rate, and that local feedback is necessary for radiation to escape.

  13. Kr-81m calibration factor for the npl ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Lena; Stroak, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A general method has been developed for the measurement of the activity concentration of 81mKr gas. Due to its short half-life, 13.1s, this gas has to be eluted from a 81Rb/81mKr generator. The 81Rb parent has a half-life of about 4.6 h. The calibration was done in two steps: firstly, a gamma-ray spectrometer was calibrated using 51Cr and 139Ce sources, nuclides with gamma-ray energies bracketing that of 81mKr (190.5 keV). The measurement geometry was equivalent to that of the 81mKr measurement; the sources were inserted into two collimated PTFE tubes in front of the gamma-ray detector. Secondly, a calibration factor for the NPL radionuclide calibrator was determined with a specially designed ionisation chamber insert. The 81mKr gas passed in front of the gamma-ray detector in PTFE tubing before and after entering the ionisation chamber. The calibration factor for 81mKr in the radionuclide calibrator with this geometry was independent of the gas flow rate within determined limits. The analytical calculations of the activity determination, uncertainties and measurement criteria are discussed.

  14. Partial ionisation cross-sections of 2-propanol and ethanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, J. R.; Jorand, F.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Pasquiers, S.

    2006-04-01

    Electron impact ionisation of 2-propanol and ethanal is studied using mass spectrometry. Cross-sections of the formation of molecular ions and ionic fragments are measured between 14 and 86 eV. Free energy changes are evaluated using ab initio calculations. For 2-propanol, two ions, identified as CH 3CHOH + (45 amu) and CH3CHCH3+ (43 amu), contribute more than 75% to the total cross-section over the whole range of electron energies and are produced by simple bond cleavage in the molecular ion. Both processes occur spontaneously, leaving the molecular ion as a minority species. For ethanal, two ions, identified as HCO + (29 amu) and CH 3CO + (43 amu), and the molecular ion (44 amu) contribute more than 80% to the total cross-section. The ions of 29 and 43 amu result from a simple bond cleavage in the molecular ion. These sprocesses are not spontaneous and the contribution of the molecular ion becomes predominant at 15 eV and is therefore significant over the whole range of ionisation energies.

  15. Hazards of ionising radiation: 100 years of observations on man.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.

    1995-01-01

    In November 1895, when Conrad Röntgen serendipitously discovered X-rays, epidemiology was effectively limited to the study of infectious disease. What little epidemiological work was done in other fields was done as part of clinical medicine or under the heading of geographical pathology. The risks from exposure to X-rays and subsequently from other types of ionising radiation were consequently discovered by qualitative association or animal experiment. They did not begin to be quantified in humans until half a century later, when epidemiology emerged as a scientific discipline capable of quantifying risks of non-infectious disease and the scientific world was alerted to the need for assessing the effects of the radiation to which large populations might be exposed by the use of nuclear energy in peace and war. PMID:8519643

  16. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron hydrogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Limtrakul, Jumras; Probst, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We computed electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron hydrogen clusters, FeH n with n = 1,2, ...,10, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The maxima of the cross sections for the iron hydrogen clusters range from 6.13 × 10-16 cm2 at 60 eV to 8.76 × 10-16 cm2 at 76 eV for BEB-AE (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from all-electron basis sets) calculations, from 4.15 × 10-16 cm2 at 77 eV to 7.61 × 10-16 cm2 at 80 eV for BEB-ECP (BEB method based on quantum-chemical data from effective-core potentials for inner-core electrons) calculations and from 2.49 × 10-16 cm2 at 43.5 eV to 7.04 × 10-16 cm2 at 51 eV for the DM method. Cross sections calculated via the BEB method are substantially higher than the ones obtained via the DM method, up to a factor of about two for FeH and FeH2. The formation of Fe-H bonds depopulates the iron 4 s orbital, causing significantly lower cross sections for the small iron hydrides compared to atomic iron. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted perfectly against a simple expression used in modelling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. The energetics of the iron hydrogen clusters change substantially when exact exchange is present in the density functional, while the cluster geometries do not depend on this choice.

  17. Migration levels of PVC plasticisers: Effect of ionising radiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Zygoura, Panagiota D; Paleologos, Evangelos K; Kontominas, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Migration levels of commercial plasticisers [di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC)] from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film into the EU specified aqueous food simulants (distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid and 10% v/v ethanol) were monitored as a function of time. Migration testing was carried out at 40°C for 10days (EEC, 1993). Determination of the analytes was performed by applying the analytical methodology based on surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction prior to gas chromatographic-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) recently proposed by our group. The study focuses on the determination of the effect of gamma radiation on plasticiser migration into the selected simulants. PVC cling film used was subjected to ionising treatment with a [(60)Co] source at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25kGy. DEHA and ATBC migration into the EU aqueous simulating solvents was limited, yielding final concentrations in the respective ranges 10-100μg/l and 171-422μg/l; hence, ATBC demonstrated a stronger interaction with all three simulants compared to DEHA. Migration data, with respect to ATBC, showed that the most aggressive simulant seemed to be the 10% ethanol, while in the case of DEHA the 3% aqueous acetic acid exhibited the highest extraction efficiency; distilled water demonstrated the lowest migration in both cases. With regard to PVC treatment with gamma rays, high radiation doses up to 25kGy produced a statistically significant (p<0.05) effect on the migration of both plasticisers.

  18. Diffusion des rayonnements X et visibles ; microscopie en champ proche : utilisation comparée pour la caractérisation des surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollens, E.; Menecier, S.; Haidar, Y.; Zerrouki, C.; Chassevent, M.; de Fornel, F.; Bonnet, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    Trois méthodes ont été utilisées pour caractériser la rugosité de quelques échantillons. Deux de ces méthodes sont basées sur la mesure du rayonnement diffusé (visible et X). La troisième utilise la microscopie en champ proche (MCP). Dans un premier temps, une comparaison des deux premières techniques a été menée en utilisant une même théorie vectorielle de la diffusion. Bien adaptée au domaine du visible, cette théorie peut aussi être utilisée dans le cas du rayonnement X. Les densités spectrales de puissance (dsp) de la rugosité, déterminées expérimentalement pour deux échantillons d'Alacrite XSH (alliage quaternaire à base de cobalt utilisé en métrologie des masses), montrent des allures identiques dans le cas du visible et du rayonnement X à des incidences très rasantes. Dans un deuxième temps, la hauteur quadratique moyenne δ , caractéristique de la rugosité de ces deux échantillons, a été déterminée de façon "directe" par microscopie en champ proche, et à partir des dsp pour les deux autres techniques. La restriction à une bande commune des fréquences spatiales accessibles à ces techniques, conduit à des valeurs de δ comparables aux incertitudes près. Une validation des mesures X ainsi faite, un accent est mis sur leur apport complémentaire par rapport au visible.

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, N. I.; Shaparev, N. Ya

    2006-04-01

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo.

  20. Differential ionisation of natural antioxidant polyenes in electrospray and nanospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guaratini, Thais; Gates, Paul J; Pinto, Ernani; Colepicolo, Pio; Lopes, Norberto P

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids are natural products with high economic relevance for the pharmaceutical industries and are a common subject for biochemical research. Reported here is a comparative study of the ionisation of carotenoids by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and nanospray mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS). The results demonstrate that, along with solvent choice, the influence of the different ionisation processes of ESI and nanoESI are fundamental in determining how ionisation is achieved and which ions (molecular ion or protonated molecule) are observed in MS. The increased understanding afforded by this study will help in the development of unequivocal microanalytical methods for carotenoids and related antioxidant polyenes.

  1. Ionisation effect on the electron localisation in the subcycle waveform shaping scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Feng, Zhengpeng; Long, Hua

    2015-03-01

    We have theoretically studied the ionisation effect on the asymmetric dissociation of H+2 exposed to the synthesised multicycle infrared pulses of different wavelengths by solving the time-dependent Schr?dinger equation without using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. It has been demonstrated that the ionisation does slightly influence the electron localisation for the relatively low pulse intensity (less than 1014 W/cm2). However, our further results show that the ionisation effect becomes much more significant when increasing the pulse intensity, leading to a distinctly different mechanism responsible for the enhancement of the electron localisation.

  2. Ionisation Mechanisms in AN Optically Pumped Mercury Vapour.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. A plasma formed in a mercury vapour by optical pumping at visible and U.V. wavelengths from a high current mercury discharge, has been investigated with a view to gaining an understanding of the ionisation processes giving rise to the plasma. These were believed to generate both atomic and molecular ions. The results of this work have applications in the fields of fluorescent lighting and the mercury-nitrogen laser. The plasma was studied with a variety of diagnostic tools. Electron number densities and temperatures were determined using Langmuir probes operating in the orbital motion limited regime. Populations of the 6^3 P triplet states, believed to be the only significantly populated excited states in the plasma, were determined using absorption spectroscopy. Lastly, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, coupled to the plasma with an electrostatic ion transport system, was used to investigate the flux of atomic and molecular ions to a body at floating potential in the plasma. The Langmuir probe and absorption spectroscopy results were included into a model describing ion motions in the plasma, based around the ion fluid equations and including source terms for the generation of atomic and molecular ions, both by electron impact and by binary collisions of atoms in the 6^3P triplet states. Where possible, ionisation rats in the model were calculated using published cross-sections. However, for the heavy body collisional processes in particular, many of these are unknown. Consequently, an attempt was made to determine these cross-sections by generating results from the model that could be compared to experimental measurements of the atomic and molecular ion fluxes to the mass spectrometer. A number of computational experiments were carried out, varying the cross-sections until a good fit to the experimental measurements was achieved. Using this technique it was possible to estimate cross

  3. Ionisation Chambers and Secondary Emission Monitors at the PROSCAN Beam Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölling, Rudolf

    2006-11-01

    PROSCAN, the dedicated new medical facility at PSI using proton beams for the treatment of deep seated tumours and eye melanoma, is now in the commissioning phase. Air filled ionisation chambers in several configurations are used as current monitors, profile monitors, halo, position and loss monitors at the PROSCAN beam lines. Similar monitors based on secondary emission are used for profile and current measurements in the regime where saturation deteriorates the accuracy of the ionisation chambers.

  4. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  5. Development of a new ionisation chamber, for HP(10) measurement, using Monte-Carlo simulation and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Silva, H; Cardoso, J; Oliveira, C

    2011-03-01

    An ionisation chamber that directly measures the quantity personal dose equivalent, H(p)(10), is used as a secondary standard in some metrology laboratories. An ionisation chamber of this type was first developed by Ankerhold. Using the Monte-Carlo simulation, the dose in the sensitive volume as a function of the IC dimensions and the effects of the several components of the ionising chamber have been investigated. Based on these results, a new ionising chamber, lighter than the previous ones, is constructed and experimentally tested.

  6. Multicolour FISH analysis of ionising radiation induced micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Bertucci, Antonella; Taveras, Maria; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Micronucleation of chromosomal DNA is an effective indicator of DNA damage and micronucleus (MN) analysis is a valuable tool for radiation biodosimetry studies. To gain a comprehensive knowledge of micronucleation process after ionising radiation (IR) exposure, whole genome-wide chromosome analysis is desirable. With this objective, multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) technique was utilised in the present study to characterise the chromosome content of spontaneous and IR-induced micronuclei in three human donors. M-FISH analysis revealed a radiation dose-dependant increase in the number of micronuclei with multi-chromosome material above 2 Gy and as many as 3–6 multicolour signals were detected in micronuclei after high γ-rays radiation doses (5–10 Gy). Involvement of each human chromosome material was more frequently detected in multicoloured micronuclei than in single-coloured micronuclei at high radiation doses (>2 Gy). Observation of dose-dependant increase in the MN frequency with multi-chromosome material may be due to misrepair of DNA double-strand breaks involving multiple chromosomes leading to asymmetric dicentric or ring chromosomes and acentric fragments. Chromosomes belonging to groups A (1, 2 and 3) and B (4 and 5) were frequently detected in 35–45% of the total micronuclei either as single entities or in combination with other chromosomes. Among the A and B groups, chromosome 1 material was consistently detected at high MN frequencies after radiation exposure in all the donors. Additionally, chromosomes 13 and 19 were more frequently observed in micronuclei than the expected frequency based on DNA content. Our whole genome approach utilising the M-FISH technique revealed that MN formation at high radiation doses might be complex involving multiple chromosome fragments. Understanding the fate and biological consequences of these multi-chromosome-containing micronuclei may provide key molecular insights for some aspects of IR

  7. Surface ionisation of molecular H2 and atomic H Rydberg states at doped silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashikesh, G.; So, E.; Ford, M. S.; Softley, T. P.

    2014-09-01

    The detection of ions or electrons from the surface ionisation of molecular H2 and atomic H Rydberg states incident at doped Si surfaces is investigated experimentally to analyse the effect of the dopant charge distribution on the surface-ionisation processes. In both experimental studies, the molecular H2 and atomic H Rydberg states are generated via two-colour vacuum ultraviolet--ultraviolet (VUV-UV) resonant excitation. For H2, various Stark states of the N+ = 2, n = 17 manifold are populated in the presence of an electric field. The variation of the observed surface-ionisation signal with surface dopant concentration and type, shows similar characteristics for all the Stark states. A comparison is made between these ion-detected surface-ionisation profiles and those obtained via electron detection. Different trends as a function of dopant concentration and type are observed for the two cases, explained by the greater effect of surface charges on the post-ionisation ion trajectory compared to the electron trajectory. For the atomic-H Rydberg states with principal quantum number ? populated in the absence of a Stark field, the observed behaviour is similar to the interaction of molecular H2 Rydberg states at the same surfaces, and these measurements confirm that the observed effects are attributable to the nature of the target surface rather than the specific atomic or molecular Rydberg species.

  8. Ionising irradiation alters the dynamics of human long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (LINE1) retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nakatani, Youko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Wada, Seiichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Mori, Takahisa; Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-09-01

    It is important to identify the mechanism by which ionising irradiation induces various genomic alterations in the progeny of surviving cells. Ionising irradiation activates mobile elements like retrotransposons, although the mechanism of its phenomena consisting of transcriptions and insertions of the products into new sites of the genome remains unclear. In this study, we analysed the effects of sparsely ionising X-rays and densely ionising carbon-ion beams on the activities of a family of active retrotransposons, long interspersed nuclear elements 1 (L1). We used the L1/reporter knock-in human glioma cell line, NP-2/L1RP-enhanced GFP (EGFP), that harbours full-length L1 tagged with EGFP retrotransposition detection cassette (L1RP-EGFP) in the chromosomal DNA. X-rays and carbon-ion beams similarly increased frequencies the transcription from L1RP-EGFP and its retrotransposition. Short-sized de novo L1RP-EGFP insertions with 5'-truncation were induced by X-rays, while full-length or long-sized insertions (>5 kb, containing ORF1 and ORF2) were found only in cell clones irradiated by the carbon-ion beams. These data suggest that X-rays and carbon-ion beams induce different length of de novo L1 insertions, respectively. Our findings thus highlight the necessity to investigate the mechanisms of mutations caused by transposable elements by ionising irradiation.

  9. Impact ionisation mass spectrometry of polypyrrole-coated pyrrhotite microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Jon K.; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Armes, Steven P.; Fielding, Lee A.; Postberg, Frank; Bugiel, Sebastian; Drake, Keith; Srama, Ralf; Kearsley, Anton T.; Trieloff, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Cation and anion impact ionization mass spectra of polypyrrole-coated pyrrhotite cosmic dust analogue particles are analysed over a range of cosmically relevant impact speeds. Spectra with mass resolutions of 150-300 were generated by hypervelocity impacts of charged particles, accelerated to up to 37 km s-1 in a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator, onto a silver target plate in the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA) spectrometer. Ions clearly indicative of the polypyrrole overlayer are identified at masses of 93, 105, 117, 128 and 141 u. Organic species, predominantly derived from the thin (20 nm) polypyrrole layer on the surface of the particles, dominate the anion spectra even at high (>20 km s-1) impact velocities and contribute significantly to the cation spectra at velocities lower than this. Atomic species from the pyrrhotite core (Fe and S) are visible in all spectra at impact velocities above 6 km s-1 for 56Fe+, 9 km s-1 for 32S+ and 16 km s-1 for 32S- ions. Species from the pyrrhotite core are also frequently visible in cation spectra at impact speeds at which surface ionisation is believed to dominate (<10 km s-1), although the large number of organic peaks complicates the identification of characteristic molecular species. A thin oxidised surface layer on the pyrrhotite particles is indicated by weak spectral features assigned to iron oxides and iron oxy-hydroxides, although the definitive identification of sulfates and hydrated sulfates from the oxidation process was not possible. Silver was confirmed as an excellent choice for the target plate of an impact ionization mass spectrometer, as it provided a unique isotope signature for many target-projectile cluster peaks at masses above 107-109 u. The affinity of Ag towards a dominant organic fragment ion (CN-) derived from fragmentation of the polypyrrole component led to molecular cluster formation. This resulted in an enhanced sensitivity to a particular particle component, which may be of great use

  10. Simulation studies on a prototype ionisation chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, J; Carvalho, A F; Oliveira, C

    2007-01-01

    A prototype ionisation chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), similar to the one developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesantalt (PTB), was designed and constructed by the Metrological Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation (LMRI) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN). Tests already performed have shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very similar to the PTB chamber, mainly the energy dependence for the X-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137Cs and 60Co. However, the results obtained also show a dependence on the energy and angles of incident radiation and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionisation chamber. In order to optimise the performance of the chamber, the LMRI initiated numerical simulation of this ionisation chamber by Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX code.

  11. The ionisation energy of cyclopentadienone: a photoelectron-photoion coincidence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormond, Thomas K.; Hemberger, Patrick; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-08-01

    Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O and C5D4=O) have been measured at the Swiss Light Source Synchrotron (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland) at the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Beamline. Complementary to the photoelectron spectra, photoionisation efficiency curves were measured with tunable VUV radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA). For both experiments, molecular beams diluted in argon and helium were generated from the vacuum flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulphite in a resistively heated microtubular SiC flow reactor. The Franck-Condon profiles and ionisation energies were calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory, and are in excellent agreement with the observed iPEPICO spectra. The ionisation energies of both cyclopentadienone-d0, IE(C5H4=O), and cyclopentadienone-d4, IE(C5D4=O), were observed to be the same: 9.41 ± 0.01 eV. The mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectrum (ms-TPES) of cyclopentadienone reveals that the C=C stretch in the ground state of the cation is excited upon ionisation, supporting computational evidence that the ground state of the cation is ? 2A2, and is in agreement with previous studies. However, the previously reported ionisation potential has been improved considerably in this work. In addition, since o-benzoquinone (o-O=C6H4=O and o-O=C6D4=O) is also produced in this process, its ms-TPES has been recorded. From the iPEPICO and photoionisation efficiency spectra, we infer an adiabatic ionisation energy of IE(o-O=C6H4=O) = 9.3 ± 0.1 eV, but the rather structureless spectrum indicates a strong change in geometry upon ionisation making this value less reliable.

  12. Molybdic acid ionisation under hydrothermal conditions to 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minubayeva, Z.; Seward, T. M.

    2010-08-01

    This UV spectrophotometric study was aimed at providing precise, experimentally derived thermodynamic data for the ionisation of molybdic acid (H 2MoO 4) from 30 to 300 °C and at equilibrium saturated vapour pressures. The determination of the equilibrium constants and associated thermodynamic parameters were facilitated by spectrophotometric measurements using a specially designed high temperature optical Ti-Pd flow-through cell with silica glass windows. The following van't Hoff isochore equations describe the temperature dependence of the first and second ionisation constants of molybdic acid up to 300 °C:

  13. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  14. Annealing of GaSb Single Crystals in Ionised Hydrogen Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    and Applications 46 of Single Crystals, Antoni Rogaski, Krzysztof Adamiec, Pawel Madejczyk, Editors, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4412 (2001) © 2001...1-50 hours. Hydrogen ionised by means of a deuterium lamp flew through this annealing reactor. After cooling the quartz ampoule, the carrier

  15. The impact of high and low dose ionising radiation on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Betlazar, Calina; Middleton, Ryan J; Banati, Richard B; Liu, Guo-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Responses of the central nervous system (CNS) to stressors and injuries, such as ionising radiation, are modulated by the concomitant responses of the brains innate immune effector cells, microglia. Exposure to high doses of ionising radiation in brain tissue leads to the expression and release of biochemical mediators of 'neuroinflammation', such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to tissue destruction. Contrastingly, low dose ionising radiation may reduce vulnerability to subsequent exposure of ionising radiation, largely through the stimulation of adaptive responses, such as antioxidant defences. These disparate responses may be reflective of non-linear differential microglial activation at low and high doses, manifesting as an anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functional state. Biomarkers of pathology in the brain, such as the mitochondrial Translocator Protein 18kDa (TSPO), have facilitated in vivo characterisation of microglial activation and 'neuroinflammation' in many pathological states of the CNS, though the exact function of TSPO in these responses remains elusive. Based on the known responsiveness of TSPO expression to a wide range of noxious stimuli, we discuss TSPO as a potential biomarker of radiation-induced effects.

  16. Exploring Learners' Conceptual Resources: Singapore a Level Students' Explanations in the Topic of Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes findings from a study to explore Singapore A-level (Grades 11 and 12, 16-19 yr old) students' understanding of ionisation energy, an abstract and complex topic that is featured in school chemistry courses. Previous research had reported that students in the United Kingdom commonly use alternative notions based on the perceived…

  17. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in "J Chem Educ" 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by…

  18. For discussion: obtaining consent for ionising radiation: has the time come?

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Richard M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to promote debate on the issues surrounding the provision of information to, and the obtaining of valid consent from patients exposed to ionising radiation (IR) from diagnostic and interventional imaging procedures. This is especially pertinent in view of recent interest in the risks of IR expressed in the medical and lay press.

  19. Identification of carbohydrates by matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Stecher, Guenther; Bakry, Rania; Kasemsook, Saowapak; Blassnig, Bernhard; Feuerstein, Isabel; Abel, Gudrun; Popp, Michael; Bobleter, Ortwin; Bonn, Guenther K

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a sensitive mass spectrometric technique which utilises acidic materials as matrices for laser energy absorption, desorption and ionisation of analytes. These matrix materials produce background signals particularly in the low-mass range and make the detection and identification of small molecules difficult and nearly impossible. To overcome this problem this paper introduces matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (mf-MELDI-MS) for the screening and analysis of small molecules such as carbohydrates. For this purpose, 4,4'-azo-dianiline was immobilised on silica gel enabling the absorption of laser energy sufficient for successful desorption and ionisation of low molecular weight compounds. The particle and pore sizes, the solvent system for suspension and the sample preparation procedures have been optimised. The newly synthesised MELDI material delivered excellent spectra with regard to signal-to-noise ratio and detection sensitivity. Finally, wheat straw degradation products and Salix alba L. plant extracts were analysed proving the high performance and excellent behaviour of the introduced material.

  20. Destruction of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation and the implications for life detection on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Page, Kristian; Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Wright, Gary; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J; Ward, John M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2012-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very effective approach for the detection of microorganisms colonising hostile environments on Earth. The ExoMars rover, due for launch in 2018, will carry a Raman laser spectrometer to analyse samples of the martian subsurface collected by the probe's 2-m drill in a search for similar biosignatures. The martian surface is unprotected from the flux of cosmic rays, an ionising radiation field that will degrade organic molecules and so diminish and distort the detectable Raman signature of potential martian microbial life. This study employs Raman spectroscopy to analyse samples of two model organisms, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and the extremely radiation resistant polyextremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, that have been exposed to increasing doses of ionising radiation. The three most prominent peaks in the Raman spectra are from cellular carotenoids: deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans and β-carotene in Synechocystis. The degradative effect of ionising radiation is clearly seen, with significant diminishment of carotenoid spectral peak heights after 15 kGy and complete erasure of Raman biosignatures by 150 kGy of ionising radiation. The Raman signal of carotenoid in D. radiodurans diminishes more rapidly than that of Synechocystis, believed to be due to deinoxanthin acting as a superior scavenger of radiolytically produced reactive oxygen species, and so being destroyed more quickly than the less efficient antioxidant β-carotene. This study highlights the necessity for further experimental work on the manner and rate of degradation of Raman biosignatures by ionising radiation, as this is of prime importance for the successful detection of microbial life in the martian near subsurface.

  1. Electron impact ionisation of encapsulated 99mTc@C 60 and 99mTc@C 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đustebek, J. B.; Đorđević, V. R.; Cvetićanin, J. M.; Veličković, S. R.; Veljković, M. V.; Nešković, O. M.; Rakočević, Z. L.; Bibić, N. M.

    2010-03-01

    The present study shows simultaneous surface ionisation and electron impact ionisation during the formation and investigation of endohedral fullerenes 99mTc@C 60 and 99mTc@C 70. The endohedral fullerenes were generated using a mass spectrometer with a triple rhenium filament as an ion source. The ionisation energies (IE) determined were: 8.52 ± 0.25 eV for 99mTc@C 60 and 9.57 ± 0.25 eV for 99mTc@ C 70.

  2. Angular distribution of electrons in multiphoton ionisation of polarised Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova, Yu. A.; Marmo, S. I.; Meremianin, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    The asymmetry of the angular distributions of photoelectrons in the photoionisation of polarised alkali atoms is investigated. The general formulas for the amplitude of the multiphoton ionisation of np-states are given. In these formulas the dynamical and kinematical factors are explicitly separated. Our calculations within Fues model potential approach demonstrate that, under the experimental conditions essentially similar to those employed in [M. Schuricke, Ganjun Zhu, J. Steinmann, K. Simeonidis, I. Ivanov, A. Kheifets, A.N. Grum-Grzhimailo, K. Bartschat, A. Dorn, J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. A 83 (2011) 023413(11)], the relative magnitude of the linear magnetic dichroism in three-photon ionisation of Li can be as large as 30%.

  3. Exploring the Powerful Ionised Wind in the Seyfert Galaxy PG1211+143

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Highly-ionised high-speed winds in AGN (UFOs) were first detected with XMM-Newton a decade ago, and are now established as a key factor in the study of SMBH accretion, and in the growth and metal enrichment of their host galaxies. However, information on the ionisation and dynamical structure, and the ultimate fate of UFOs remains very limited. We request a 600ks extended XMM-Newton study of the prototype UFO PG1211+143 in AO-13, to obtain high quality EPIC and RGS spectra, to map the flow structure and variability, while seeking evidence for the anticipated interaction with the ISM and possible conversion of the energetic wind to a momentum-driven flow.

  4. How do air ions reflect variations in ionising radiation in the lower atmosphere in a boreal forest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuemeng; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Paatero, Jussi; Paasonen, Pauli; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-11-01

    Most of the ion production in the atmosphere is attributed to ionising radiation. In the lower atmosphere, ionising radiation consists mainly of the decay emissions of radon and its progeny, gamma radiation of the terrestrial origin as well as photons and elementary particles of cosmic radiation. These types of radiation produce ion pairs via the ionisation of nitrogen and oxygen as well as trace species in the atmosphere, the rate of which is defined as the ionising capacity. Larger air ions are produced out of the initial charge carriers by processes such as clustering or attachment to pre-existing aerosol particles. This study aimed (1) to identify the key factors responsible for the variability in ionising radiation and in the observed air ion concentrations, (2) to reveal the linkage between them and (3) to provide an in-depth analysis into the effects of ionising radiation on air ion formation, based on measurement data collected during 2003-2006 from a boreal forest site in southern Finland. In general, gamma radiation dominated the ion production in the lower atmosphere. Variations in the ionising capacity came from mixing layer dynamics, soil type and moisture content, meteorological conditions, long-distance transportation, snow cover attenuation and precipitation. Slightly similar diurnal patterns to variations in the ionising capacity were observed in air ion concentrations of the cluster size (0.8-1.7 nm in mobility diameters). However, features observed in the 0.8-1 nm ion concentration were in good connection to variations of the ionising capacity. Further, by carefully constraining perturbing variables, a strong dependency of the cluster ion concentration on the ionising capacity was identified, proving the functionality of ionising radiation in air ion production in the lower atmosphere. This relationship, however, was only clearly observed on new particle formation (NPF) days, possibly indicating that charges after being born underwent different

  5. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. V.; Mavritskii, O. B.; Egorov, A. N.; Pechenkin, A. A.; Savchenkov, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed.

  6. Migration to new ampoule types for the NPL secondary standard ionisation chambers.

    PubMed

    Baker, M; Fenwick, A; Ferreira, K; Keightley, J; Johansson, L; Collins, S

    2014-05-01

    As the pre-calibrated sample containers used for activity assay in the two NPL secondary standards ionisation chambers are being phased out, suitable replacements have been identified. Characterisation checks have been carried out on the new ISO ampoules and a long-term recalibration schedule has been devised. Around 40 calibration factors have been determined so far and comparison of ion chamber responses for the two ampoule types showed variations of up to 7% for low energy photon emitting radionuclides.

  7. Ionisation and discharge in cloud-forming atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch; Rimmer, P. B.; Rodriguez-Barrera, I. M.; Wood, Kenneth; Robertson, G. B.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Brown dwarfs and giant gas extrasolar planets have cold atmospheres with rich chemical compositions from which mineral cloud particles form. Their properties, like particle sizes and material composition, vary with height, and the mineral cloud particles are charged due to triboelectric processes in such dynamic atmospheres. The dynamics of the atmospheric gas is driven by the irradiating host star and/or by the rotation of the objects that changes during its lifetime. Thermal gas ionisation in these ultra-cool but dense atmospheres allows electrostatic interactions and magnetic coupling of a substantial atmosphere volume. Combined with a strong magnetic field \\gg {{B}\\text{Earth}} , a chromosphere and aurorae might form as suggested by radio and x-ray observations of brown dwarfs. Non-equilibrium processes like cosmic ray ionisation and discharge processes in clouds will increase the local pool of free electrons in the gas. Cosmic rays and lighting discharges also alter the composition of the local atmospheric gas such that tracer molecules might be identified. Cosmic rays affect the atmosphere through air showers in a certain volume which was modelled with a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to be able to visualise their spacial extent. Given a certain degree of thermal ionisation of the atmospheric gas, we suggest that electron attachment to charge mineral cloud particles is too inefficient to cause an electrostatic disruption of the cloud particles. Cloud particles will therefore not be destroyed by Coulomb explosion for the local temperature in the collisional dominated brown dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres. However, the cloud particles are destroyed electrostatically in regions with strong gas ionisation. The potential size of such cloud holes would, however, be too small and might occur too far inside the cloud to mimic the effect of, e.g. magnetic field induced star spots.

  8. Is copper-silver ionisation safe and effective in controlling legionella?

    PubMed

    Cachafeiro, S Perez; Naveira, I Mato; García, I González

    2007-11-01

    Copper-silver ionisation is gaining popularity worldwide as a water disinfection method. We review the literature that supports the effectiveness and safety of the copper-silver ionisation pertaining to legionella control in water distribution systems. A search between January 1997 and January 2007 was conducted in relevant health databases: Medline, Embase, NHS CRD, Cochrane Library Plus, Web of Knowledge, IME (Spanish Medical Index) and IBECS (Health Sciences Bibliographic Index). Ten published studies were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria previously established; most of these were experimental. Legionella levels decrease with the application of any of the procedures used in these studies and the procedures can be combined to obtain better outcomes. No studies containing an economic evaluation were found. We conclude that copper-silver ionisation is an effective method to control legionella, bearing in mind that eradication cannot be achieved by any method in isolation. Maintaining high temperatures in the water system can maximise effectiveness of the method. Copper-silver appears to be safe, as long as ion levels are monitored and kept within international recommended levels. More studies with concurrent control group, long follow-up and economic evaluation are required to properly assess this procedure.

  9. A Carbon Nano Tube electron impact ionisation source for low-power, compact spacecraft mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, S.; Bardwell, M. W.; Morse, A. D.; Morgan, G. H.

    2012-04-01

    A novel ionisation source which uses commercially available Carbon Nano Tube devices is demonstrated as a replacement for a filament based ionisation source in an ion trap mass spectrometer. The carbon nanotube ion source electron emission was characterised and exhibited typical emission of 30 ± 1.7 μA with an applied voltage differential of 300 V between the carbon nanotube tips and the extraction grid. The ion source was tested for longevity and operated under a condition of continuous emission for a period of 44 h; there was an observed reduction in emission current of 26.5% during operation. Spectra were generated by installing the ion source into a Finnigan Mat ITD700 ion trap mass spectrometer; the spectra recorded showed all of the characteristic m/z peaks from m/z 69 to m/z 219. Perfluorotributylamine spectra were collected and averaged contiguously for a period of 48 h with no significant signal loss or peak mass allocation shift. The low power requirements and low mass of this novel ionisation source are considered be of great value to future space missions where mass spectrometric technology will be employed.

  10. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in J Chem Educ 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by considering which atomic models are used in pre-service teachers' explanations and how that relates to the causality ideas expressed. Thirty-one pre-service teachers were interviewed. Each was asked to describe and explain four different atomic representations (Rutherford, Electron cloud micrograph, Bohr and Schrödinger types) in as much detail as they could. They also provided an explanation for the subsequent ionisation energy values for an oxygen atom and identified which representations were helpful in explaining the values. Significantly, when pre-service teachers only used Bohr type representations, they did not use repelling electron ideas in their explanations. However, arguments that were based on electron-electron repulsion used features from Schrödinger type atoms. These findings suggest that many pre-service teachers need to develop their atomic modelling skills so that they select and use models more expertly and that subsequent ionisation explanations offer a context in which to explore different atomic models' limitations and their deployment as explanatory resources.

  11. Radiation in the workplace-a review of studies of the risks of occupational exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals are, or have been, exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations, such as the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Moreover, workplace exposure to radiation usually involves irradiation conditions that are of direct relevance to the principal concern of radiological protection: protracted exposure to low level radiation. Further, some workers have been exposed to radioactive material that has been inadvertently taken into the body, and the study of these groups leads to risk estimates derived directly from the experience of those irradiated by these 'internal emitters', intakes of alpha-particle-emitters being of particular interest. Workforces that have been the subject of epidemiological study include medical staff, aircrews, radium dial luminisers, underground hard-rock miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons test participants and nuclear industry workers. The first solid epidemiological evidence of the stochastic effects of irradiation came from a study of occupational exposure to medical x-rays that was reported in 1944, which demonstrated a large excess risk of leukaemia among US radiologists; but the general lack of dose records for early medical staff who tended to experience the highest exposures hampers the derivation of risks per unit dose received by medical workers. The instrument dial luminisers who inadvertently ingested large amounts of radium-based paint and underground hard-rock miners who inhaled large quantities of radon and its decay products suffered markedly raised excess risks of, respectively, bone and lung cancers; the miner studies have provided standard risk estimates for radon-induced lung cancer. The large numbers of nuclear industry

  12. Expression of the progenitor marker NG2/CSPG4 predicts poor survival and resistance to ionising radiation in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Agnete; Verhoeff, Joost J C; Immervoll, Heike; Brøgger, Jan C; Kmiecik, Justyna; Poli, Aurelie; Netland, Inger A; Prestegarden, Lars; Planagumà, Jesús; Torsvik, Anja; Kjersem, Anneli Bohne; Sakariassen, Per Ø; Heggdal, Jan I; Van Furth, Wouter R; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Enger, Per Ø; Felsberg, Joerg; Brons, Nicolaas H C; Tronstad, Karl J; Waha, Andreas; Chekenya, Martha

    2011-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain tumour, where patients respond poorly to radiotherapy and exhibit dismal survival outcomes. The mechanisms of radioresistance are not completely understood. However, cancer cells with an immature stem-like phenotype are hypothesised to play a role in radioresistance. Since the progenitor marker neuron-glial-2 (NG2) has been shown to regulate several aspects of GBM progression in experimental systems, we hypothesised that its expression would influence the survival of GBM patients. Quantification of NG2 expression in 74 GBM biopsies from newly diagnosed and untreated patients revealed that 50% express high NG2 levels on tumour cells and associated vessels, being associated with significantly shorter survival. This effect was independent of age at diagnosis, treatment received and hypermethylation of the O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) DNA repair gene promoter. NG2 was frequently co-expressed with nestin and vimentin but rarely with CD133 and the NG2 positive tumour cells harboured genetic aberrations typical for GBM. 2D proteomics of 11 randomly selected biopsies revealed upregulation of an antioxidant, peroxiredoxin-1 (PRDX-1), in the shortest surviving patients. Expression of PRDX-1 was associated with significantly reduced products of oxidative stress. Furthermore, NG2 expressing GBM cells showed resistance to ionising radiation (IR), rapidly recognised DNA damage and effectuated cell cycle checkpoint signalling. PRDX-1 knockdown transiently slowed tumour growth rates and sensitised them to IR in vivo. Our data establish NG2 as an important prognostic factor for GBM patient survival, by mediating resistance to radiotherapy through induction of ROS scavenging enzymes and preferential DNA damage signalling.

  13. KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSE RESPONSE: LONG OVERDUE CONFRONTATION WITH THE EFFECTS OF IONISATION DENSITY.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Eliyahu, I; Oster, L

    2016-12-01

    The reader will time-travel through almost seven decades of kinetic models and mathematical simulations of thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics based on the band-gap theory of the solid state. From post-World-War II, ideas concerning electron trapping mechanisms to the highly idealised one trap-one recombination (OTOR) model first elaborated in 1956 but still in 'high gear' today. The review caresses but purposely avoids in-depth discussion of the endless stream of papers discussing the intricacies of glow peak shapes arising from first-order, second-order, mixed-order and general-order kinetics predominantly based on non-interacting systems, and then on to the more physically realistic scenarios that have attempted to analyse complex systems involving ever greater numbers of interacting trapping centres, luminescent centres and non-luminescent centres. The review emphasises the difficulty the band-gap models have in the simulation of dose response linear/supralinear behaviour and especially the dependence of the supralinearity on ionisation density. The significance of the non-observation of filling-rate supralinearity in the absorption stage is emphasised since it removes from consideration the possibility of TL supralinearity arising from irradiation stage supralinearity. The importance of the simultaneous action of both localised and delocalised transitions has gradually penetrated the mindset of the community of kinetic researchers, but most simulations have concentrated on the shape of glow peaks and the extraction of the glow peak parameters, E (the thermal activation energy) and s (the attempt-to-escape frequency). The simulation of linear/supralinear dose response and its dependence on ionisation density have been largely avoided until recently due to the fundamental schism between the effects of ionisation density and some basic assumptions of the band-gap model. The review finishes with an in-depth presentation and discussion of the most recent

  14. Monte Carlo configuration interaction applied to multipole moments, ionisation energies and electron affinities.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jeremy P; Taylor, Daniel J; Paterson, Martin J

    2013-05-15

    The method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction (MCCI) (Greer, J. Chem. Phys. 1995a, 103, 1821; Tong, Nolan, Cheng, and Greer, Comp. Phys. Comm. 2000, 142, 132) is applied to the calculation of multipole moments. We look at the ground and excited state dipole moments in carbon monoxide. We then consider the dipole of NO, the quadrupole of N2 and of BH. An octupole of methane is also calculated. We consider experimental geometries and also stretched bonds. We show that these nonvariational quantities may be found to relatively good accuracy when compared with full configuration interaction results, yet using only a small fraction of the full configuration interaction space. MCCI results in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis are seen to generally have reasonably good agreement with experiment. We also investigate the performance of MCCI when applied to ionisation energies and electron affinities of atoms in an aug-cc-pVQZ basis. We compare the MCCI results with full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (Booth and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 132, 174104; Cleland, Booth, and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 024112) and "exact" nonrelativistic results (Booth and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 132, 174104; Cleland, Booth, and Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 024112). We show that MCCI could be a useful alternative for the calculation of atomic ionisation energies however electron affinities appear much more challenging for MCCI. Due to the small magnitude of the electron affinities their percentage errors can be high, but with regards to absolute errors MCCI performs similarly for ionisation energies and electron affinities.

  15. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science.

  16. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  17. EVOLUTION OF THE IEC AND EN STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION.

    PubMed

    Voytchev, M; Behrens, R; Ambrosi, P; Radev, R; Chiaro, P

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the evolution of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the European standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation issued, respectively, from the committees IEC/Sub Committee 45B and European Committee for Electro-technical Standardization/Technical Committee 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation'. Standards for passive individual photon and beta dosimetry systems as well as those for active individual monitors are discussed. A neutron ambient dose equivalent (rate) meter standard and a technical report concerning the determination of uncertainty in measurement are also covered.

  18. The WISSH quasars project. I. Powerful ionised outflows in hyper-luminous quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischetti, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Vietri, G.; Bongiorno, A.; Fiore, F.; Sani, E.; Marconi, A.; Duras, F.; Zappacosta, L.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Feruglio, C.; Giallongo, E.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Martocchia, S.; Ricci, F.; Schneider, R.; Testa, V.; Vignali, C.

    2017-02-01

    Models and observations suggest that both the power and effects of AGN feedback should be maximised in hyper-luminous (LBol > 1047 erg s-1) quasars, i.e. objects at the brightest end of the AGN luminosity function. In this paper, we present the first results of a multiwavelength observing programme, focusing on a sample of WISE/SDSS selected hyper-luminous (WISSH) broad-line quasars at z ≈ 1.5-5. The WISSH quasars project has been designed to reveal the most energetic AGN-driven outflows, estimate their occurrence at the peak of quasar activity, and extend the study of correlations between outflows and nuclear properties up to poorly investigated, extreme AGN luminosities, i.e. LBol 1047 - 1048 erg s-1. We present near-infrared, long-slit LBT/LUCI1 spectroscopy of five WISSH quasars at z ≈ 2.3 - 3.5, showing prominent [OIII] emission lines with broad (FWHM 1200-2200 km s-1) and skewed profiles. The luminosities of these broad [OIII] wings are the highest measured so far, with L[OIII]broad ≳ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and reveal the presence of powerful ionised outflows with associated mass outflow rates Ṁ ≳ 1700M⊙ yr-1 and kinetic powers Ėkin ≳ 1045 erg s-1. Although these estimates are affected by large uncertainties because of the use of [OIII] as a tracer of ionised outflows and the very basic outflow model adopted here, these results suggest that in our hyper-luminous targets the AGN is highly efficient at pushing large amounts of ionised gas outwards. Furthermore, the mechanical outflow luminosities measured for WISSH quasars correspond to higher percentages ( 1-3%) of LBol than those derived for AGN with lower LBol. Our targets host very massive (MBH ≳ 2 × 109M⊙) black holes that are still accreting at a high rate (i.e. a factor of 0.4-3 of the Eddington limit). These findings clearly demonstrate that WISSH quasars offer the opportunity to probe the extreme end of both luminosity and supermassive black holes (SMBH) mass functions and revealing

  19. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  20. Derivatisation and gas chromatography-chemical ionisation mass spectrometry of selected synthetic and natural endocrine disruptive chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Oliver; Zinn, Peter

    2003-03-28

    Methods for ultra trace detection of endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) are needed because of their low levels of impact. Twenty-one EDCs were selected, including 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, 17beta-testosterone and bisphenol A. Derivatisation with eight different fluorine containing compounds was examined. All EDCs could be derivatised automatedly (autosampler) with heptafluorobutyric acid (HFB) anhydride and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) anhydride, respectively. The detection of these HFB and TFA derivatives in different chemical ionisation modes was studied. Fourteen different reagent gases, including methane, ammonia, acetone and water, were tested with the HFB and TFA derivatives in the negative chemical ionisation mode. Furthermore both types of derivatives were measured in positive chemical ionisation mode. Methane or water provide a good detection of all 21 TFA derivatives and create mass spectra with few fragmentation and characteristic mass peaks. This could serve as a basis for tandem or multiple mass spectrometric measurements.

  1. Using photo-ionisation models to derive carbon and oxygen gas-phase abundances in the rest UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Amorín, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method to derive oxygen and carbon abundances using the ultraviolet (UV) lines emitted by the gas-phase ionised by massive stars. The method is based on the comparison of the nebular emission-line ratios with those predicted by a large grid of photo-ionisation models. Given the large dispersion in the O/H - C/O plane, our method firstly fixes C/O using ratios of appropriate emission lines and, in a second step, calculates O/H and the ionisation parameter from carbon lines in the UV. We find abundances totally consistent with those provided by the direct method when we apply this method to a sample of objects with an empirical determination of the electron temperature using optical emission lines. The proposed methodology appears as a powerful tool for systematic studies of nebular abundances in star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

  2. The effect of non ionising electromagnetic radiation on RAAF personnel during World War II.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, J A

    1994-05-01

    Did exposure to non ionising electromagnetic radiation during World War II in the short term have a stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland, and in turn on the gonads of both sexes, since the figures obtained appeared to affect the sexes equally? Is it that the long-term effect of microwave radiation on personnel is to cause adenoma and carcinoma? Is this long-term effect similar to the long-term effect of X-rays on infants, children and adolescents? According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 1980 (page 1710): "X-rays to the head and neck in infancy, childhood or adolescence is associated with a high incidence of thyroid disease later in life. Nodular disease is found to be particularly common on 20% of patients at risk, and may not be apparent until 30 years or more after exposure. One-third of the nodular type are found to be carcinomatous." The effect of non ionising electromagnetic and microwave radiation on those who work in these fields certainly needs much more investigation. What will be the long-term effect of using micro-ovens on the rising generation?

  3. Characterisation of PRESAGE: A new 3-D radiochromic solid polymer dosemeter for ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Adamovics, J; Maryanski, M J

    2006-01-01

    For the past 50 years there has been interest in developing 3-D dosemeters for ionising radiation. Particular emphasis has been put on those dosemeters that change their optical properties in proportion to the absorbed dose. Many of the dosemeters that have been evaluated have had limitations such as lack of transparency, diffusion of the image of the dose distribution or poor stability of baseline optical density. Many of these performance limitations have been overcome by the development of PRESAGE, an optically clear polyurethane-based radiochromic 3-D dosemeter. The solid PRESAGE dosemeter is formulated with a free radical initiator and a leuco dye and it does not require a container to maintain its shape. The polyurethane matrix is tissue equivalent and prevents the diffusion of the dose distribution image. There is a linear dose-response, which is independent of both photon energy and dose rate. Simple precautions such as preventing long-term exposure to additional ionising radiation including ultraviolet and controlling storage temperatures prevent the bleaching of the radiochromic response field within the irradiated dosemeter.

  4. Measuring technique for thermal ionisation mass spectrometry of human tracer kinetic study with stable cerium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Teresa; Höllriegl, Vera; Giussani, Augusto; Oeh, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) method has been developed for the simultaneous detection of different cerium isotopes in biological samples (i.e., blood and urine) at very low concentrations. The work has been done in the frame of a biokinetic study, where different stable cerium isotopes have been administered orally and intravenously as tracers to the human body. In order to develop an appropriate detection method for the tracers in the biological samples, an optimum sample preparation technique has been set and adapted to the specific requirements of the analysis technique used, i.e., TIMS. For sample evaporation and ionisation, the double tantalum filament technique showed the best results. The ions produced were simultaneously collected on a secondary electron multiplier so that the isotopic ratios of the cerium isotopes in the biological samples could be measured. The technique has been optimised for the determination of cerium down to 1 ng loaded on the evaporation filament corresponding to cerium concentrations of down to 1 ng ml(-1) in the blood or urine samples. It has been shown that the technique is reliable in application and enables studies on cerium metabolism and biokinetics in humans without employing radioactive tracers.

  5. An experimental and theoretical study of core-valence double ionisation of acetaldehyde (ethanal).

    PubMed

    Zagorodskikh, S; Vapa, M; Vahtras, O; Zhaunerchyk, V; Mucke, M; Eland, J H D; Squibb, R J; Linusson, P; Jänkälä, K; Ågren, H; Feifel, R

    2016-01-28

    Core-valence double ionisation spectra of acetaldehyde (ethanal) are presented at photon energies above the carbon and oxygen 1s ionisation edges, measured by a versatile multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy technique. We use this molecule as a testbed for analyzing core-valence spectra by means of quantum chemical calculations of transition energies. These theoretical approaches range from two simple models, one based on orbital energies corrected by core valence interaction and one based on the equivalent core approximation, to a systematic series of quantum chemical electronic structure methods of increasing sophistication. The two simple models are found to provide a fast orbital interpretation of the spectra, in particular in the low energy parts, while the coverage of the full spectrum is best fulfilled by correlated models. CASPT2 is the most sophisticated model applied, but considering precision as well as computational costs, the single and double excitation configuration interaction model seems to provide the best option to analyze core-valence double hole spectra.

  6. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  7. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Effects of ionised or chelated water-soluble mineral mixture supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, meat quality and intestinal microbiota in broilers.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Lee, B R; Kim, I H

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary supplementation of water-soluble ionised or chelated mineral mixture on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics, relative organ weight, meat quality and excreta microflora in broilers. A total of 408 Arbor Acres broilers (17 birds in 8 replicate pens) were randomly allocated into one of the following three treatments: (1) Control/basal diet (CON), (2) T1 (basal diet + 0.5% ionised mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0) and (3) T2 (basal diet + 0.5% chelated mineral mixture solution, pH 3.0). The body weight gain was greater and feed conversion ratio was lower in broilers supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral liquid complex compared to CON during the grower and overall phase of the experiment. No significant effect in the concentration of Ca and P in the blood was observed in birds supplemented with ionised or chelated mineral mixture solution. No adverse effects were observed in organ weight and meat quality with ionised or chelated mineral mixture supplementation. Regarding intestinal microbiota counts there was a reduction of Escherichia coli counts in the small intestine in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In the large intestine, E. coli as well as Salmonella populations were reduced in ionised mineral supplemented birds. In conclusion, ionised or chelated minerals have partial positive effects in improving growth performance and reducing pathogenic bacteria load in the gastro-intestinal tract.

  9. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the sensitivity of dwarf tomato plants to low-LET ionising radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micco, Veronica; De Pascale, Stefania; Aronne, Giovanna; Paradiso, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Turano, Mimmo; Arena, Carmen

    Ionising radiation, acting alone or in interaction with microgravity and other environmental constraints, may affect plant at molecular, morpho-structural and physiological level. The intensity of the plant’s response depends on the properties of radiation and on the features of the plant itself. Indeed, different species are characterised by different susceptibility to radiation which may change during the life course. The aim of this research was to study the radiosensitivity to low-LET ionising radiation of plants of dwarf tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Microtom’) at two phenological phases (vegetative and reproductive), within the purpose of analysing plants for consideration as candidates for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) in Space. To pursue this objective, plants of the cultivar Microtom were irradiated with different doses of X-rays either at the stage of the second true leaf (VP - vegetative phase) or when at least one flower was blossomed (RP - reproductive phase). Plant’s response to ionising radiation was assessed through a multidisciplinary approach combining genetic analyses, ecophysiological measurements, morpho-anatomical characterisation of leaves and fruits, nutritional analyses of fruits. Growth, molecular and morpho-functional traits were measured during plant development up to fruiting in both VP and RP plant groups, and compared with non-irradiated control plants. Plant growth was monitored weekly recording parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, flowering and fruiting rate. Potential DNA alterations were explored through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by determining photosynthetic pigment composition, photochemistry and leaf gas exchanges. Leaf and fruit structure were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Leaf anatomical traits related to photosynthetic efficiency, and to structural radioprotection

  10. Non-ionising radiation human exposure assessment near telecommunication devices in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Simunić, Dina

    2006-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of the regulatory acts in non-ionising radiation in the world, with a special emphasis on basic guidelines issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). ICNIRP Guidelines are implemented in many countries worldwide. Croatia has also implemented them indirectly through the European Recommendation 1999/519/EC. The Croatian regulatory acts include the Non-lonising Radiation Protection Act, Ordinance on Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Protection, and the Ordinance on Basic Requirements for Devices which produce Optical Radiation and Measures for Optical Radiation Protection. Dosimetry and densitometry are compliant with relevant international and European standards. The paper presents an example of densitometric human exposure assessment in complex indoor exposure conditions. In spite of a high number of indoor and outdoor sources and the "worst-case exposure assessment", the results are within the limits defined by the Croatian EMF Ordinance.

  11. Ionisation chamber containing boron as a neutron detector in medical accelerator fields.

    PubMed

    Zielczynski, M; Gryzinski, M A; Golnik, N; Tulik, P

    2007-01-01

    A combination of the recombination principle of H(10) measurements with the use of the ionisation chambers containing boron has been presented, in order to increase the relative sensitivity of the chamber to neutrons by a factor close to the radiation quality factor of photoneutrons. Three types of the chambers were investigated. Two of them were filled with BF(3) and the third one contained electrodes covered with B(4)C. All the chambers were placed in paraffin moderators. The response of the chambers was investigated, depending on gas pressure and polarising voltage. The results showed that it was possible to obtain nearly the same response of the chamber to H(10) for photons and neutrons in a restricted energy range; however, further investigations are needed to make an optimum design.

  12. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed.

  13. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with surfaces. Using surface ionisation as a probe for surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlhoff, Mike W.

    2016-12-01

    The interface of neutral Rydberg atoms in the gas phase with a solid surface is of interest in many fields of modern research. This interface poses a particular challenge for any application in which Rydberg atoms are close to a substrate but also opens up the possibility of studying properties of the surface material itself through the atomic response. In this review the focus is on the process of electron tunneling from the excited state into the substrate that occurs when a Rydberg atom is located in front of a surface at a range of a few hundred nm and is demonstrated with a metallic surface. It is shown how variations in this ionisation mechanism can provide a powerful tool to probe image-charge effects, measure small superficial electric stray or patch fields and how charge transfer from the Rydberg atom can be in resonance with energetically discrete surface states.

  14. X-ray reflection from black-hole accretion discs with a radially stratified ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Domcek, V.; Dovčiak, M.; Guainazzi, M.; Marinucci, A.

    2015-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations have suggested a very high compactness of coronae in Active Galactic Nuclei as well as in X-ray Binaries. The compactness of the source implies that the black-hole accretion disc irradiation is a strong function of radius. We will show how the X-ray spectra are modified assuming the radially stratified ionisation according to the illumination by a point-like source on the black-hole rotational axis. We will discuss how this affects the measurements of the other model parameters, such as spin and radial emissivity. We will show the application of this model to the recent XMM-Newton/NUSTAR data of an active galaxy MCG-6-30-15.

  15. Determination of potato glycoalkaloids using high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Fumio; Morino, Keiko; Miyazawa, Haruna; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    A method for quantifying two toxic glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber tissue was developed using HPLC-electrospray ionisation (ESI)/MS. Potato samples were extracted with 5% aqueous acetic acid, and the extracts were subjected directly to HPLC-ESI/MS after filtration. By determining the intensities of the protonated molecules of alpha-solanine (m/z 868) and alpha-chaconine (m/z 852) using selected ion monitoring (positive ion mode), a sensitive assay was attained with detection limits of 38 and 14 ppb for the two glycoalkaloids, respectively. The high sensitivity and selectivity of MS detection effectively reduced the time of analysis thus enabling a high throughput assay of glycoalkaloids in potato tubers.

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of bacteriochlorophylls from Chlorobiaceae: characteristic fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Airs, Ruth L; Keely, Brendan J

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (APCI-LC/MS/MS) has been applied to the study of bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e of phototrophic prokaryotes. Cultures of Chlorobiaceae containing bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e were examined using a high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and APCI-LC/MS/MS employing post-column addition of formic acid. The results reveal complex distributions of bacteriochlorophyll homologues, with some closely eluting species giving isobaric protonated molecules. On-line LC/MS/MS studies reveal characteristic fragment ions for bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e. Fragmentations involving loss of the extended alkyl substituents that are unique to bacteriochlorophylls c, d and e and their derivatives have been rationalised by studying the phaeophorbides and the results applied to the direct study of the bacteriochlorophylls.

  17. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  18. Resonance ionisation mass spectrometry of krypton and its applications in planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strashnov, I.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    A new resonance ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for determining krypton isotope ratios in extraterrestrial samples is presented. Laser heating is used to extract gas from mg-size samples. A cryogenic sample concentrator is employed. Atoms continuously condense on a 75 K stainless steel substrate at the back plate of a Wiley-McLaren laser ion source from where they are desorbed by a pulsed 1064 nm laser and resonantly ionized in the plume. A three-colour (116.5 nm, 558.1 nm and 1064 nm) excitation scheme is used. Tuneable coherent Vacuum Ultraviolet (vuv) radiation near 116.5 nm is generated by four-wave sum frequency mixing of 252.5 nm and 1507 nm pulsed dye laser beams in a binary mixture of negatively and positively dispersive gases (Xe and Ar). Isotope effects have been observed that reduce the reproducibility of isotope ratio measurements between odd-mass, non-zero nuclear spin isotopes and even-mass, zero nuclear spin isotopes. This can be minimised and stabilised by controlling the laser fluences, experimental geometry, and the population of the magnetic sub-levels of the excited atomic states used in the ionisation process. Once stability is achieved, sample-standard bracketing (during which the known isotope ratios of a standard are determined before and after the measurements of the sample under the same conditions) allows precision and reproducibility of 1 % for the major isotope ratios to be achieved in samples krypton atoms. Detection limits of atoms/isotope have been demonstrated, ratios of Kr in meteorites have been made with 5-10 % precision. Applications of the instrument in various areas of planetary science are also discussed.

  19. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  20. A photo-ionised canopy for the shock-excited Criss-Cross nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporin, S.; Weinberger, R.; Stecklum, B.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study a new broad, well-defined arc of optical nebulosity close to the cloud-shock interacting Criss-Cross nebula, derive the basic physical properties of the nebulosity, and revise those of the nebula, and compare both objects to simulations of cloud-shock interactions from the literature. Methods: Deep optical, partly wide-field images were used to reveal the intricate morphology and overall extent of the nebulosities. Optical spectroscopy enabled us to uncover their nature. Results: The two nebulosities are obviously physically linked, but are of different types; the Criss-Cross nebula is, as was also shown in an earlier paper, excited via a slow shock from the expanding Orion-Eridanus bubble, but the broad arc is definitely photo-ionised. The source for ionising photons appears to be hot gas in this bubble. Some results of simulations of interactions of SNRs with interstellar clouds available from the literature bear a striking resemblance to our nebulae, which appear to represent an example - unrivalled in closeness and clarity - of an early-to-medium stage in the destruction of an isolated cloud over-run by a highly evolved SNR. Thereby the Criss-Cross nebula is, when seen from the SNR, the rear disrupted part of the original, small cloud, whereas the arc is probably its still rather intact front part. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  1. CF3(+) and CF2H(+): new reagents for n-alkane determination in chemical ionisation reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blake, Robert S; Ouheda, Saleh A; Evans, Corey J; Monks, Paul S

    2016-11-28

    Alkanes provide a particular analytical challenge to commonly used chemical ionisation methods such as proton-transfer from water owing to their basicity. It is demonstrated that the fluorocarbon ions CF3(+) and CF2H(+), generated from CF4, as reagents provide an effective means of detecting light n-alkanes in the range C2-C6 using direct chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. The present work assesses the applicability of the reagents in Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometric (CI-TOF-MS) environments with factors such as high moisture content, operating pressures of 1-10 Torr, accelerating electric fields (E/N) and long-lived intermediate complex formation. Of the commonly used chemical ionisation reagents, H3O(+) and NO(+) only react with hexane and higher while O2(+) reacts with all the target samples, but creates significant fragmentation. By contrast, CF3(+) and CF2H(+) acting together were found to produce little or no fragmentation. In dry conditions with E/N = 100 Td or higher the relative intensity of CF2H(+) to CF3(+) was mostly less than 1% but always less than 3%, making CF3(+) the main reagent ion. Using O2(+) in a parallel series of experiments, a substantially greater degree of fragmentation was observed. The detection sensitivities of the alkanes with CF3(+) and CF2H(+), while relatively low, were found to be better than those observed with O2(+). Experiments using alkane mixtures in the ppm range have shown the ionisation technique based on CF3(+) and CF2H(+) to be particularly useful for measurements of alkane/air mixtures found in polluted environments. As a demonstration of the technique's effectiveness in complex mixtures, the detection of n-alkanes in a smoker's breath is demonstrated.

  2. Analyse de l'intensité de fluorescence émise par une multicouche périodique sous rayonnement synchrotron. Application à l'étude de la répartition spatiale des éléments dans l'empilement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridou, F.; Cauchon, G.; Idir, M.

    2004-11-01

    L'analyse de l'intensité du rayonnement de fluorescence des multicouches périodiques en fonction des angles d'incidence ou d'émission, peut constituer une méthode de caractérisation non destructive capable de déterminer le profil de concentration en profondeur d'un élément donné, notamment au niveau des interfaces où ce profil influe considérablement sur les performances optiques dans le domaine X-UV. Le principe de la méthode consiste à exciter la fluorescence d'un des deux matériaux de l'empilement par une radiation d'énergie supérieure à celle du seuil d'absorption de l'élément considéré. Celui-ci va émettre son propre rayonnement à l'intérieur de la multicouche. La répartition d'intensité est modulée selon la distribution géométrique des sources de rayonnement (donc de l'élément excité) à l'intérieur de l'empilement. On présente ici les résultats qui ont pu êtres obtenus à partir du rayonnement d'une source synchrotron (SB3_LURE) pour étudier une multicouche Mo/Si de 50 périodes. On a pu ainsi exciter d'une part la fluorescence du silicium, puis celle du molybdène, et montrer que les informations obtenues sur la répartition des éléments dans la multicouche étaient complémentaires.

  3. The use of particle beam mass spectrometry for the measurement of impurities in a nabumetone drug substance, not easily amenable to atmospheric pressure ionisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J C; Hawtin, P N; Monté, S; Balogh, M; Jones, T

    2001-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/particle beam mass spectrometry (LC/PB-MS) was used for the structural elucidation of some impurities in nabumetone as this compound poorly ionises by atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) techniques. PB-MS was optimised for nabumetone and a sensitivity study was carried out. To obtain full scan electron ionisation spectra a minimum of 100 ng of compound on column was needed. By using 20 mg/mL solutions of nabumetone, impurities at levels of about 250 ppm mass fraction relative to nabumetone could be detected. Results were compared with LC/API-MS and previous GC/MS.

  4. Standardisation of (90)Y and determination of calibration factors for (90)Y microspheres (resin) for the NPL secondary ionisation chamber and a Capintec CRC-25R.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Kelley M; Fenwick, Andrew J; Arinc, Arzu; Johansson, Lena C

    2016-03-01

    The use of (90)Y resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres® microspheres) in Nuclear Medicine has dramatically increased in recent years due to its favourable outcome in the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases (Rajekar et al., 2011). The measurement of administered activity before and residual activity after treatment in radionuclide calibrators is required to determine total activity delivered to the patient. In comparison with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) where administered doses are often know to within ±5%, the actual administered activity in nuclear medicine procedures may only be known to within ±20% and subsequent dose calculations can result in even larger uncertainties (Fenwick et al., 2009). It is a well-recognised issue that ion chambers are instruments that are sensitive to the measurement geometry and matrix of a source, in particular for pure beta or low energy (<100keV) x-ray emitters (Gadd et al., 2006). This paper presents new calibration factors for NPL secondary standard ionisation chamber system (Vinten 671) and a Capintec CRC-25R radionuclide calibrator along with a discussion of the measurement problems associated with this radionuclide and matrix. Calibration of the NPL secondary standard system for this measurement matrix will enable NPL to provide standards for the Nuclear Medicine community and consequently increase the measurement capability.

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  6. Fast nucleotide identification through fingerprinting using gold nanoparticle-based surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Capelo, José L; Baptista, Pedro V

    2013-02-15

    We report a method centred on gold nanoparticle-based surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation for analysis of deoxynucleotides and alkylated nucleobases. Gold nanoparticles allow for enhanced analysis capability by eliminating undesired signature peaks; thus more elegant mass spectra can be attained that allow identification by nucleotide mass fingerprint. The resulting fingerprinting patterns on the spectra are compared and associated with the presence of different nucleotides in the sample. This method can be easily extended to modified nucleotides implicated in genome lesions due to exposure to environment chemicals, such as DNA adducts (e.g. guanine adducts). The use of gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation can be an useful tool to resolve common issues of background noise when analysing nucleic acids samples.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Evolution of tubular singular pulsed beams in a nonlinear dielectric medium upon ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, R. A.; Khasanov, O. Kh; Smirnova, T. V.

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of a high-power femtosecond tubular pulsed beam in a dielectric medium is numerically analysed upon optically induced ionisation. It is found that the balance between nonlinearities of opposite sign and different magnitude in the case of multiphoton ionisation favours the establishment of a quasi-soliton regime of radiation propagation over a distance exceeding several diffraction lengths. The use of these beams enables attaining high-density light fields and generate high-density plasmas.

  8. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm(2)-20  ×  20 cm(2) for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  9. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdell, S.; Tyler, M.; McNamara, J.; Sloan, K.; Ceylan, A.; Rinks, A.

    2016-12-01

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  10. Formation of 2-propanol in condensed molecular films of acetaldehyde following electron impact ionisation-induced proton transfer*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, Tobias; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies on thin condensed layers of acetaldehyde have previously revealed that electron exposure at an energy above the ionisation threshold leads to formation of 2-propanol. However, the mechanism of this reaction remained unclear. Therefore, a computational approach is used to explore the electron-induced reactions of acetaldehyde yielding 2-propanol. Starting from hydrogen-bonded dimers of acetaldehyde we show that the initial ionisation event triggers proton transfer between the two acetaldehyde moieties resulting in a hydrogen-bonded complex of a [OCCH3] radical and a protonated acetaldehyde cation. Given an excess energy of up to 0.75 eV and a favourable arrangement, a methyl radical released upon dissociation of the CC bond within the [OCCH3] radical can migrate to the carbonyl carbon of the protonated acetaldehyde cation. This produces a 2-propanol radical cation and CO. Neutral 2-propanol is then obtained by recombination with a second electron. A mechanism involving ionisation-driven proton transfer is thus proposed as pathway to the formation of 2-propanol during electron exposure of condensed layers of acetaldehyde.

  11. Investigation of the ionisation density dependence of the glow curve characteristics of LIF:MG,TI (TLD-100)

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Datz, H.; Margaliot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on ionisation density was investigated using irradiation with 90Sr/90Y beta rays, 60 and 250 kVp X rays, various heavy-charged particles and 0.2 and 14 MeV neutrons. Special attention is focused on the properties of high-temperature thermoluminescence; specifically, the behaviour of the high-temperature ratio (HTR) of Peaks 7 and 8 as a function of batch and annealing protocol. The correlation of Peaks 7 and 8 with average linear-energy-transfer (LET) is also investigated. The HTR of Peak 7 is found to be independent of LET for values of LET approximately >30 keV µm−1. The behaviour of the HTR of Peak 8 with LET is observed to be erratic, which suggests that applications using the HTR should separate the contributions of Peaks 7 and 8 using computerised glow curve deconvolution. The behaviour of the HTR following neutron irradiation is complex and not fully understood. The shape of composite Peak 5 is observed to be broader following high ionisation alpha particle irradiation, suggesting that the combined use of the HTR and the shape of Peak 5 could lead to improved ionisation density discrimination for particles of high LET. PMID:18667402

  12. Spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning selective: Elimination des corrections necessaires a la determination du rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, Sylvain

    Dans le but d'ameliorer la precision avec laquelle le rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene peut etre determine, un spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning a ete construit pour provoquer l'ionisation selective de l'hydrogene moleculaire et de l'hydrure de deuterium a partir d'un melange gazeux. L'utilisation d'atomes dans des etats d'excitation metastable s'est averee une solution adequate pour reponde a cette attente. L'emploi de l'helium, a l'interieur d'une source d'atomes metastables construit specifiquement pour ce travail, ne permet pas d'obtenir un spectre de masse compose uniquement des deux molecules d'interet. L'ionisation de ces dernieres provient de deux processus distincts, soient l'ionisation Penning et l'ionisation par bombardement electronique. Contrairement a l'helium, il a ete demontre que le neon metastable est un candidat ideal pour produire l'ionisation selective de type Penning. Le nombre d'ions produits est directement proportionnel au courant de la decharge electrique et de la pression d'operation de la source d'atomes metastables. Ces resultats demontrent le potentiel d'un tel spectrometre de masse pour ameliorer la precision a laquelle le rapport isotopique peut etre determine comparativement aux autres techniques existantes.

  13. On the divergences in assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation following the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Strand, P; Sundell-Bergman, S; Brown, J E; Dowdall, M

    2017-04-01

    The accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 11, 2011, led to significant contamination of the surrounding terrestrial and marine environments. Whilst impacts on human health remain the primary concern in the aftermath of such an accident, recent years have seen a significant body of work conducted on the assessment of the accident's impacts on both the terrestrial and marine environment. Such assessments have been undertaken at various levels of biological organisation, for different species, using different methodologies and coming, in many cases, to divergent conclusions as to the effects of the accident on the environment. This article provides an overview of the work conducted in relation to the environmental impacts of the Fukushima accident, critically comparing and contrasting methodologies and results with a view towards finding reasons for discrepancies, should they indeed exist. Based on the outcomes of studies conducted to date, it would appear that in order to avoid the fractured and disparate conclusions drawn in the aftermath of previous accidents, radioactive contaminants and their effects can no longer simply be viewed in isolation with respect to the ecosystems these effects may impact. A combination of laboratory based and field studies with a focus on ecosystem functioning and effects could offer the best opportunities for coherence in the interpretation of the results of studies into the environmental impacts of ionising radiation.

  14. Free energy for blue copper protein unfolding determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, V; Foti, S; La Rosa, C; Saletti, R; Canters, G W; Verbeet, M P

    2001-01-01

    An electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometric method for the determination of the free energy (DeltaG) of unfolding of proteins is described. The method was tested using three blue copper proteins: wild type azurin, Cys-3Ala/Cys-26Ala (C3A/C26A) azurin mutant and wild-type amicyanin. The time course of the denaturation process of the proteins dissolved in methanol/water (50:50, v/v, pH 3.5) was followed by recording ESI mass spectra at time intervals. The spectra showed two series of peaks, corresponding to the native holo-protein and the unfolded apo-protein. From the intensity ratio of these two series of peaks at increasing time and at equilibrium, the free energy for the unfolding process for the three proteins could be determined. To evaluate the reliability of the thermodynamic data obtained by the ESI mass spectrometric approach, the denaturation process was followed by UV-VIS spectroscopy. The two sets of data obtained by these independent methods were in good agreement indicating that the ESI-MS approach can be used to obtain reliable quantitative information about the protein unfolding process. In principle, this approach can be applied to other proteins and requires very low amounts of sample, due to the intrinsic sensitivity of mass spectrometry. This may prove particularly useful when the amount of sample available prevents the use of current methods.

  15. Ionising radiation exposure in patients with circular frame treatment of distal tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Bryant, H; Dearden, P M C; Harwood, P J; Wood, T J; Sharma, H K

    2015-08-01

    Total radiation exposure accumulated during circular frame treatment of distal tibial fractures was quantified in 47 patients treated by a single surgeon from February 2007 until Oct 2010. The radiation exposures for all relevant radiology procedures for the distal tibial injury were included to estimate the radiation risk to the patient. The median time of treatment in the frame was 169 days (range 105-368 days). Patients underwent a median of 13 sets of plain radiographs; at least one intra operative exposure and 16 patients underwent CT scanning. The median total effective dose per patient from time of injury to discharge was 0.025mSv (interquartile range 0.013-0.162 and minimum to maximum 0.01-0.53). The only variable shown to be an independent predictor of cumulative radiation dose on multivariate analysis was the use of CT scanning. This was associated with a 13-fold increase in overall exposure. Radiation exposure during treatment of distal tibial fractures with a circular frame in this group was well within accepted safe limits. The fact that use of CT was the only significant predictor of overall exposure serves as a reminder to individually assess the risk and utility of radiological investigations on an individual basis. This is consistent with the UK legal requirements for justification of all X-ray imaging, as set out in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 [1].

  16. Effect of penetrating ionising radiation on the mechanical properties of pericardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daar, Eman; Woods, E.; Keddie, J. L.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2010-07-01

    The pericardium is an anistropic composite material made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix mainly composed of proteoglycan and hyaluronan. The collagen fibres are arranged in layers, with different directions of alignment in each layer, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties of pericardium, including the ability to undergo large deformation during performance of regular physiological functions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue, being part of a study of the effect of cardiac doses received in breast radiotherapy and the possibility that this can give rise to cardiovascular complications. Irradiation doses in the range 5-80 Gy were used. To characterise the various mechanical properties [elastic modulus, stress relaxation, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture] a uniaxial tensile test method was applied. The preliminary results reflect the wide inter-sample variations that are expected in dealing with tissues, with only a weak indication of increase in the UTS of the pericardium tissue with increase in radiation dose. Such an effect has also been observed by others, with reduction in UTS at doses of 80 Gy.

  17. Xpg limits the expansion of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after ionising radiation

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Alush I.; Illing, Anett; Becker, Friedrich; Maerz, Lars D.; Morita, Yohei; Philipp, Melanie; Burkhalter, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced capacity of genome maintenance represents a problem for any organism, potentially causing premature death, carcinogenesis, or accelerated ageing. Strikingly though, loss of certain genome stability factors can be beneficial, especially for the maintenance of tissue stem cells of the intestine and the haematopoietic system. We therefore screened for genome stability factors negatively impacting maintenance of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the context of ionising radiation (IR). We found that in vivo knock down of Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group G (Xpg) causes elevation of HSC numbers after IR treatment, while numbers of haematopoietic progenitors are elevated to a lesser extent. IR rapidly induces Xpg both on mRNA and on protein level. Prevention of this induction does not influence activation of the checkpoint cascade, yet attenuates late checkpoint steps such as induction of p21 and Noxa. This causes a leaky cell cycle arrest and lower levels of apoptosis, both contributing to increased colony formation and transformation rates. Xpg thus helps to adequately induce DNA damage responses after IR, thereby keeping the expansion of damaged cells under control. This represents a new function of Xpg in the response to IR, in addition to its well-characterized role in nucleotide excision repair. PMID:27137888

  18. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two kinds of lymphocytes can attack and kill cancer cells: T-cells and B-cells. Immunotherapy aims to boost the ability of the T-cell and B-cell lymphocytes to kill cancer. This kind of therapy can also be used ...

  19. Screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency using electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P.; Doig, M.; Ghafari, S.; Meaney, C.; Taylor, C.; Leonard, J.; Morris, M.; Johnson, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To establish criteria for the diagnosis of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency in the UK population using a method in which carnitine species eluted from blood spots are butylated and analysed by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS).
DESIGN—Four groups were studied: (1) 35 children, aged 4 days to 16.2 years, with proven MCAD deficiency (mostly homozygous for the A985G mutation, none receiving carnitine supplements); (2) 2168control children; (3) 482 neonates; and (4) 15 MCAD heterozygotes.
RESULTS—All patients with MCAD deficiency had an octanoylcarnitine concentration ([C8-Cn]) > 0.38 µM and no accumulation of carnitine species > C10 or < C6. Among the patients with MCAD deficiency, the [C8-Cn] was significantly lower in children > 10 weeks old and in children with carnitine depletion (free carnitine < 20 µM). Neonatal blood spots from patients with MCAD deficiency had a [C8-Cn] > 1.5 µM, whereas in heterozygotes and other normal neonates the [C8-Cn] was < 1.0 µM. In contrast, the blood spot [C8-Cn] in eight of 27 patients with MCAD deficiency > 10 weeks old fell within the same range as five of 15 MCAD heterozygotes (0.38-1.0 µM). However, the free carnitine concentrations were reduced (< 20 µM) in the patients with MCAD deficiency but normal in the heterozygotes.
CONCLUSIONS—Criteria for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency using ESI-MS/MS must take account of age and carnitine depletion. If screening is undertaken at 7-10 days, the number of false positive and negative results should be negligible. Because there have been no instances of death or neurological damage following diagnosis of MCAD deficiency in our patient group, a strong case can be made for neonatal screening for MCAD deficiency in the UK.

 PMID:9797589

  20. Contribution to the Interpretation of Emission-line spectra in Ionised Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rola, C. S.

    1995-05-01

    The study of ionised nebulae from their emission-line intensities is the aim of this work. It concerns two complementary aspects. Firstly, we have studied the influence of the emission-line detection and measurement procedures in the values of the measured intensities. Secondly, we have developed diagnostic methods for the determination of the nature and physical properties of emission-line objects, using a minimum number of line intensities. Detailed simulations of the emission-line detection and intensity measurement procedures allowed us to estimate the errors committed in the intensity measurement of lines with low signal-to-noise ratio. Obtained results permitted us to show the existence of a bias in the measured intensities distribution and to determine a model for it. Furthermore, we determined analytically the probability distribution function of a intensity lines ratio. In this context, we have studied the effect of uncertainties in the intensity measures, and of temperature fluctuations in the determination of the C/O abundance ratio in planetary nebulae. With the purpose of determining the characteristics and the nature of emission-line objects having only a few line intensities available, we calculated the upper limits for photoionisation by OB stars in diagnostic diagrams. For this we build an extensive grid of photoionisation models covering a wide range of physical conditions in H II regions. The results obtained were used in the determination of the nature of the "Canada-France Redshift Survey" emission-line field galaxies, showing the importance of this type of diagnostic in deep redshift surveys.

  1. The Vertical Structure of Warm Ionised Gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Mao, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    We present a new joint analysis of pulsar dispersion measures and diffuse Hα emission in the Milky Way, which we use to derive the density, pressure and filling factor of the thick disk component of the warm ionised medium (WIM) as a function of height above the Galactic disk. By excluding sightlines at low Galactic latitude that are contaminated by Hii regions and spiral arms, we find that the exponential scale-height of free electrons in the diffuse WIM is 1830-250+120 pc, a factor of two larger than has been derived in previous studies. The corresponding inconsistent scale heights for dispersion measure and emission measure imply that the vertical profiles of mass and pressure in the WIM are decoupled, and that the filling factor of WIM clouds is a geometric response to the competing environmental influences of thermal and non-thermal processes. Extrapolating the properties of the thick-disk WIM to mid-plane, we infer a volume-averaged electron density 0.014 +/- 0.001 cm-3, produced by clouds of typical electron density 0.34 +/- 0.06 cm-3 with a volume filling factor 0.04 +/- 0.01. As one moves off the plane, the filling factor increases to a maximum of ~30% at a height of ~1-1.5 kpc, before then declining to accommodate the increasing presence of hot, coronal gas. Since models for the WIM with a ~1 kpc scale-height have been widely used to estimate distances to radio pulsars, our revised parameters suggest that the distances to many high-latitude pulsars have been substantially underestimated.

  2. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination.

  3. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weaken. Talk with family, friends, or a support group about your feelings. Work with your health care providers throughout your treatment. Helping yourself can make you feel more in control. Support Groups The diagnosis and treatment of cancer often causes ...

  5. Measurement of air kerma rates for 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field by ionisation chamber and build-up plate.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, Munehiko; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    The 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray calibration field by the (19)F(p, αγ)(16)O reaction is to be served at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. For the determination of air kerma rates using an ionisation chamber in the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field, the establishment of the charged particle equilibrium must be achieved during measurement. In addition to measurement of air kerma rates by the ionisation chamber with a thick build-up cap, measurement using the ionisation chamber and a build-up plate (BUP) was attempted, in order to directly determine air kerma rates under the condition of regular calibration for ordinary survey meters and personal dosemeters. Before measurements, Monte Carlo calculations were made to find the optimum arrangement of BUP in front of the ionisation chamber so that the charged particle equilibrium could be well established. Measured results imply that air kerma rates for the 6- to 7-MeV high-energy gamma-ray field could be directly determined under the appropriate condition using an ionisation chamber coupled with build-up materials.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry for the characterisation of degradation products in aged papers.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Seemann, Agathe; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2012-01-30

    A methodology for capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-MS) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of degradation products from paper among two families of compounds: low molar mass aliphatic organic acids, and aromatic (phenolic and furanic) compounds. The work comprises the optimisation of the CE separation and the ESI-MS parameters for improved sensitivity with model compounds using two successive designs of experiments. The method was applied to the analysis of lignocellulosic paper at different stages of accelerated hygrothermal ageing. The compounds of interest were identified. Most of them could be quantified and several additional analytes were separated.

  7. Evaluation of a pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector for the determination of neon concentrations by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J; Mochalski, P; Pusz, J

    2004-05-07

    A pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector, PDHID (Valco, PD-D2-I) with sample introduced to the discharge zone is shown to be applicable for reliable determinations of neon by gas chromatography. The detection level of 80 pg was obtained, but the dependence between detector response and neon mass was non-linear. However, for the discharge gas doped with 33 ppm of neon, a linear response to the neon mass up to 10(-5) g and the detection level of 0.5 ng were obtained. The method can be used for measuring neon concentrations in groundwater systems for hydrogeological purposes.

  8. Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jen; Chen, Sharon C A; Dwyer, Dominic E; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) into many clinical microbiology laboratories has revolutionised routine pathogen identification. MALDI-TOF MS complements and has good potential to replace existing phenotypic identification methods. Results are available in a more clinically relevant timeframe, particularly in bacteraemic septic shock. Novel applications include strain typing and the detection of antimicrobial resistance, but these are not widely used. This review discusses the technical aspects, current applications, and limitations of MALDI-TOF MS.

  9. Interpretation of ionospheric F-region structures in the vicinity of ionisation troughs observed by satellite radio tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladjev, G. A.; Evstafiev, O. V.; Mingalev, V. S.; Mingaleva, G. I.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Khudukon, B. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Tomographic images of the spatial distribution of electron density in the ionospheric F-region are presented from the Russian-American Tomography Experiment (RATE) in November 1993 as well as from campaigns carried out in northern Scandinavia in November 1995 and in Russia in April 1990. The reconstructions selected display the ionisation troughs above the tomographic chains of receivers during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed periods. Two mathematical models of the high-latitude ionosphere developed in the Polar Geophysical Institute have been applied for interpretation of the observed tomographic images.

  10. Development of a rest gas ionisation profile monitor for the CERN Proton Synchrotron based on a Timepix3 pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, S.; Dehning, B.; Gibson, S.; Sandberg, H.; Sapinski, M.; Sato, K.; Schneider, G.; Storey, J.

    2017-02-01

    A fast non-destructive transverse profile monitor, named PS Beam Gas Ionization monitor (PS- BGI), is under development at CERN for the Proton Synchrotron (PS). This monitor infers the beam profile from the transverse distribution of electrons created by the ionisation of rest gas molecules by the high energy beam particles. The distribution is measured by accelerating the electrons onto an imaging detector based on Timepix3 (TPX3). This detector consists of hybrid pixel detector assemblies mounted on a ceramic carrier board and flexible printed circuit cables which have been developed specifically for operation in an ultra high vacuum environment.

  11. The inverse-square gamma-irradiation anomaly of the Nuclear Enterprises 2575 large-volume ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Bielajew, Alex F; Tessier, Frédéric; El Gamal, Islam

    2015-12-01

    The Nuclear Enterprises (Model 2575) 600 cc ionisation chamber is examined to discover the cause of its anomalous behaviour in inverse-square stability measurements. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations are employed to isolate the cause of the discrepancy. It is found that most of the effect is due to the long photon attenuation pathlengths in the long side wall of the instrument. A phenomenological procedure, based on measurements, is proposed to correct for the anomaly. The procedure results in inverse-square stability to within 0.5 % over a range of 1-7 m.

  12. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  13. Determination of chlorinated paraffins in sediments from the Firth of Clyde by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry and carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection.

    PubMed

    Hussy, Ines; Webster, Lynda; Russell, Marie; Moffat, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of increasing concern, but are to date not widely investigated in the environment, largely due to the challenges involved in their quantification. Here, SCCPs were quantified in marine sediments from the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNIMS) and through carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID), and the analytical challenges encountered are discussed. Concentrations in the sediments ranged from 0.4 to 69 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-ECNIMS, and from 5.6 to 379 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-FID. For 8 out of 11 samples, analysis by GC-FID gave higher results than analysis by GC-ECNIMS. Unexpected aspects of the analysis, such as the presence of high concentrations of longer chain chlorinated paraffins in the samples, are also presented.

  14. Thermally annealed gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Di Franco, Cinzia; Palmisano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Metal nanomaterials have an emerging role in surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) providing a useful tool to overcome some limitations intrinsically related to the use of conventional organic matrices in matrix-assisted LDI-MS. In this contribution, the possibility to use a stainless-steel-supported gold nanoparticle (AuNP) film as a versatile platform for SALDI-MS was assessed. A sacrificial anode electrosynthetic route was chosen in order to obtain morphologically controlled core-shell AuNPs; the colloidal AuNPs were, thereafter, drop cast onto a stainless-steel sample plate and the resulting AuNP film was thermally annealed in order to improve its effectiveness as LDI-MS promoter. Spectroscopic characterization of the nanostructured film by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was crucial for understanding how annealing induced changes in the surface chemistry and influenced the performance of AuNPs as desorption/ionisation promoter. In particular, it was demonstrated that the post-deposition treatments were essential to enhance the AuNP core/analyte interaction, thus resulting in SALDI-MS spectra of significantly improved quality. The AuNP films were applied to the detection of three different classes of low molecular weight (LMW) analytes, i.e. amino acids, peptides and LMW polymers, in order to demonstrate the versatility of this nanostructured material.

  15. Induction of Hsp70 by desiccation, ionising radiation and heat-shock in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K Ingemar; Schill, Ralph O

    2007-04-01

    The physiology and biochemistry behind the extreme tolerance to desiccation shown by the so-called anhydrobiotic animals represents an exciting challenge to biology. The current knowledge suggests that both carbohydrates and proteins are often involved in protecting the dry cell from damage, or in the repair of induced damage. Tardigrades belong to the most desiccation-tolerant multicellular organisms, but very little research has been reported on the biochemistry behind desiccation tolerance in this group. We quantified the induction of the heat-shock protein Hsp70, a very wide-spread stress protein, in response to desiccation, ionising radiation, and heating, in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade Richtersius coronifer using an immuno-westernblot method. Elevated levels of Hsp70 were recorded after treatment of both heat and ionising radiation, and also in rehydrated tardigrades after a period of desiccation. In contrast, tardigrades in the desiccated (dry) state had reduced Hsp70 levels compared to the non-treated control group. Our results suggest that Hsp70 may be involved in the physiological and biochemical system underlying desiccation (and radiation) tolerance in tardigrades, and that its role may be connected to repair processes after desiccation rather than to biochemical stabilization in the dry state.

  16. Microsatellite analysis for determination of the mutagenicity of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and ionising radiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mairs, Robert J; Hughes, Kate; Fitzsimmons, Sara; Prise, Kevin M; Livingstone, Anne; Wilson, Lesley; Baig, Nazia; Clark, Anne Marie; Timpson, Alan; Patel, Gaurang; Folkard, M; Angerson, Wilson J; Boyd, Marie

    2007-01-10

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been reported to induce lesions in DNA and to enhance the mutagenicity of ionising radiation. However, the significance of these findings is uncertain because the determination of the carcinogenic potential of EMFs has largely been based on investigations of large chromosomal aberrations. Using a more sensitive method of detecting DNA damage involving microsatellite sequences, we observed that exposure of UVW human glioma cells to ELF-EMF alone at a field strength of 1 mT (50 Hz) for 12 h gave rise to 0.011 mutations/locus/cell. This was equivalent to a 3.75-fold increase in mutation induction compared with unexposed controls. Furthermore, ELF-EMF increased the mutagenic capacity of 0.3 and 3 Gy gamma-irradiation by factors of 2.6 and 2.75, respectively. These results suggest not only that ELF-EMF is mutagenic as a single agent but also that it can potentiate the mutagenicity of ionising radiation. Treatment with 0.3 Gy induced more than 10 times more mutations per unit dose than irradiation with 3 Gy, indicating hypermutability at low dose.

  17. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  18. Rapid screening method for determination of Ecstasy and amphetamines in urine samples using gas chromatography-chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Rosati, F; Pacifici, R; Zuccaro, R; Romolo, F S; Lopez, A

    2002-04-05

    The need for analytical screening tests more reliable and valid to detect amphetamine and related "designer drugs" in biological samples is becoming critical, due to the increasing diffusion of these drugs on the European illegal market. The most common screening procedures based on immunoassays suffer a number of limitations, including low sensitivity, lack of specificity and limited number of detectable substances. This paper describes a screening method based on gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) using positive chemical ionisation (PCI) detection. Methanol was used as reactant gas in the ionisation chamber. Molecular ions of different compounds were monitored, allowing a sensitivity of 5-10 ng/ml with high selectivity. The sensitivity of the method gives positive results in samples taken 48-72 h after intake of one dose of 50-100 mg. The method is simple and rapid. Sample preparation was limited to one liquid-liquid extraction, without any hydrolysis and derivatisation. Hydrolysis is critical to identify metabolites excreted as conjugates. Blank urine samples spiked with known amounts of amphetamine (AM), methylamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) and methylenedioxyphenyl-N-methyl-2-butanamine (MBDB) were analysed. The method was successfully tested on real samples of urine from people, whose use of amphetamine was suspected, and results were compared with results obtained with immunoassays.

  19. Leaf Anatomy and Photochemical Behaviour of Solanum lycopersicum L. Plants from Seeds Irradiated with Low-LET Ionising Radiation

    PubMed Central

    De Micco, V.; Paradiso, R.; Aronne, G.; De Pascale, S.; Quarto, M.; Arena, C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be exposed to ionising radiation not only in Space but also on Earth, due to specific technological applications or after nuclear disasters. The response of plants to ionising radiation depends on radiation quality/quantity and/or plant characteristics. In this paper, we analyse some growth traits, leaf anatomy, and ecophysiological features of plants of Solanum lycopersicum L. “Microtom” grown from seeds irradiated with increasing doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Gy). Both juvenile and compound leaves from plants developed from irradiated and control seeds were analysed through light and epifluorescence microscopy. Digital image analysis allowed quantifying anatomical parameters to detect the occurrence of signs of structural damage. Fluorescence parameters and total photosynthetic pigment content were analysed to evaluate the functioning of the photosynthetic machinery. Radiation did not affect percentage and rate of seed germination. Plants from irradiated seeds accomplished the crop cycle and showed a more compact habitus. Dose-depended tendencies of variations occurred in phenolic content, while other leaf anatomical parameters did not show distinct trends after irradiation. The sporadic perturbations of leaf structure, observed during the vegetative phase, after high levels of radiation were not so severe as to induce any significant alterations in photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:24883400

  20. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) Provides Accurate Direct from Culture Species Identification within the Genus Candida.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Bolt, Frances; Perdones-Montero, Alvaro; Rickards, Tony; Hardiman, Kate; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Burke, Adam; Bodai, Zsolt; Karancsi, Tamas; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Rebec, Monica; Balog, Julia; Takáts, Zoltan

    2016-11-14

    Members of the genus Candida, such as C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, are important human pathogens. Other members of this genus, previously believed to carry minimal disease risk, are increasingly recognised as important human pathogens, particularly because of variations in susceptibilities to widely used anti-fungal agents. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of clinical Candida isolates is fundamental in ensuring timely and effective treatments are delivered. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) has previously been shown to provide a high-throughput platform for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates. In comparison to commercially available matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF), REIMS based methods require no preparative steps nor time-consuming cell extractions. Here, we report on the ability of REIMS-based analysis to rapidly and accurately identify 153 clinical Candida isolates to species level. Both handheld bipolar REIMS and high-throughput REIMS platforms showed high levels of species classification accuracy, with 96% and 100% of isolates classified correctly to species level respectively. In addition, significantly different (FDR corrected P value < 0.05) lipids within the 600 to 1000 m/z mass range were identified, which could act as species-specific biomarkers in complex microbial communities.

  1. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) Provides Accurate Direct from Culture Species Identification within the Genus Candida

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Simon J. S.; Bolt, Frances; Perdones-Montero, Alvaro; Rickards, Tony; Hardiman, Kate; Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Burke, Adam; Bodai, Zsolt; Karancsi, Tamas; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Rebec, Monica; Balog, Julia; Takáts, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Candida, such as C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, are important human pathogens. Other members of this genus, previously believed to carry minimal disease risk, are increasingly recognised as important human pathogens, particularly because of variations in susceptibilities to widely used anti-fungal agents. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of clinical Candida isolates is fundamental in ensuring timely and effective treatments are delivered. Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) has previously been shown to provide a high-throughput platform for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates. In comparison to commercially available matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF), REIMS based methods require no preparative steps nor time-consuming cell extractions. Here, we report on the ability of REIMS-based analysis to rapidly and accurately identify 153 clinical Candida isolates to species level. Both handheld bipolar REIMS and high-throughput REIMS platforms showed high levels of species classification accuracy, with 96% and 100% of isolates classified correctly to species level respectively. In addition, significantly different (FDR corrected P value < 0.05) lipids within the 600 to 1000 m/z mass range were identified, which could act as species-specific biomarkers in complex microbial communities. PMID:27841356

  2. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber.

  3. X-ray line emission from highly ionised argon and sulphur in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnity, Paul

    Observations of H-like and He-like argon line emission and associated satellite spectra have been made on the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak by a Bragg rotorspectrometer and a double crystal monochromator. Similar He-like sulphur measurements have been made on the COMPASS-D (Compact Assembly) tokamak by a Johann curved crystal spectrometer. Recently calculated electron impact excitation rates for He-like ions were used in the derivation of the electron temperature sensitive line ratio G=(Ix+Iy+Iz)/Iw and the electron density sensitive ratio R=Iz/(Ix+Iy), where w, x, y and z are the He-like resonance line, intercombination lines and forbidden line respectively. For S XV the ratios Ik/Iw and Iq/Iw were also calculated, where k and q are Li-like dielectronic satellites to the w line formed by dielectronic recombination and inner shell excitation respectively. Both are electron temperature dependent, the latter also being sensitive to changes in the ionisation balance. The fine structure ratios Ix/Iy and /beta = Ly/alpha 2/Lyα1 were calculated for He-like S XV and H-like Ar XVIII respectively, where Ly/alpha/sb[1,2] are the fine structure components of the H-like Lyman alpha line. Transport modelling was carried out to account for non-coronal conditions in the JET plasma while a near-coronal equilibrium was assumed in the COMPASS-D plasma. Calculated ratios were compared with experimental measurements obtained from JET and COMPASS-D. For higher temperatures, such as during additional heating, the Ar XVII emission shell was found to move of axis, with a subsequent reduction in the G ratio. For S XV good agreement with calculations was found between the measured G and Iq/Iw ratios, indicating that the assumption of near-coronal equilibrium was valid. Lower than expected values of the S XV R ratio were found. After investigation of the atomic physics processes it was concluded that this was due to an unidentified instrumental effect of the Johann spectrometer. An

  4. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  5. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation.

  6. Test beam results of micro channel plates in 'ionisation mode' for the detection of single charged particle and electromagnetic showers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnyakov, A.; Barnyakov, M.; Brianza, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Pigazzini, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Trevisani, N.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pernie, L.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.

    2015-07-01

    IMCP is an R and D project aimed at the exploitation of secondary emission of electrons from the surface of microchannel plates (MCP) for fast timing of showers in high rate environments. The usage of MCPs in 'ionisation' mode has long been proposed and is used extensively in ion time-of-flight mass spectrometers. What has not been investigated in depth is their use to detect the ionizing component of showers. The fast time resolution of MCPs exceeds anything that has been previously used in calorimeters, and, if exploited effectively, could aid in the event reconstruction at high luminosities. Results from tests with electrons with energies up to 150 GeV of MCP devices with different characteristics will be presented, in particular detection efficiency and time resolution. (authors)

  7. Determination and imaging of metabolites from Vitis vinifera leaves by laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Gregory; Carré, Vincent; Poutaraud, Anne; Maunit, Benoît; Frache, Gilles; Merdinoglu, Didier; Muller, Jean-François

    2010-02-01

    Analysis of grapevine phytoalexins at the surface of Vitis vinifera leaves has been achieved by laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToFMS) without matrix deposition. This simple and rapid sampling method was successfully applied to map small organic compounds at the surface of grapevine leaves. It was also demonstrated that the laser wavelength is a highly critical parameter. Both 266 and 337 nm laser wavelengths were used but the 266 nm wavelength gave increased spatial resolution and better sensitivity for the detection of the targeted metabolites (resveratrol and linked stilbene compounds). Mass spectrometry imaging of grapevine Cabernet Sauvignon leaves revealed specific locations with respect to Plasmopara viticola pathogen infection or light illumination.

  8. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  9. The detection of piroxicam, tenoxicam and their metabolites in equine urine by electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Andrew R; Suann, Craig J; Stenhouse, Allen M

    2004-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted into the metabolism and urinary excretion of orally administered piroxicam and tenoxicam in the horse. The major component detected in urine after the administration of piroxicam was 5'-hydroxypiroxicam, which was detectable up to 24 h post-administration. Unchanged piroxicam was present only as a minor component. In contrast, unchanged tenoxicam was the major component observed after the administration of tenoxicam, being detectable for 72 h post-administration, while 5'-hydroxytenoxicam was a minor component. Phase II beta-glucuronide conjugation in each case was found to be negligible. The ion trap mass spectral characteristics of piroxicam, tenoxicam, 5'-hydroxypiroxicam and 5'-hydroxytenoxicam under electrospray ionisation conditions were examined in some detail.

  10. Thermoluminescent properties of Ni and Co doped synthetic, high pressure, high temperature diamonds: application to ionising radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Gheeraert, E; Kanda, H; Lapraz, D; Briand, D

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond crystals grown under diluted nickel or cobalt as solvent catalysts is reported. After a study of TL properties of 6 different samples, it is shown that a crystal grown with Ni+2%Ti and annealed at 2100 K presents an intense glow peak at around 490 K. This peak is characterised by a broad emission band centred at 530 nm (2.34 eV). This crystal presents a significant, reproducible and linear TL response relative to the absorbed dose up to an X ray air kerma of 10 Gy. All these features make this material suitable for ionising radiation dosimetry. A similar study is made on another crystal grown from pure Co, and a comparative review of the results does show that for dosimetry work, Ni-containing diamonds are more appropriate than those grown from Co catalyst.

  11. Rapid assignment of malting barley varieties by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - Time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Kořán, Michal; Jakešová, Michaela; Mikulíková, Renata; Boháč, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2016-09-01

    A method for discriminating malting barley varieties based on direct matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) fingerprinting of proteins was developed. Signals corresponding to hordeins were obtained by simple mixing of powdered barley grain with a MALDI matrix solution containing 12.5mgmL(-1) of ferulic acid in an acetonitrile:water:formic acid 50:33:17 v/v/v mixture. Compared to previous attempts at MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of barley proteins, the extraction and fractionation steps were practically omitted, resulting in a significant reduction in analytical time and costs. The discriminatory power was examined on twenty malting barley varieties and the practicability of the method was tested on sixty barley samples acquired from Pilsner Urquell Brewery. The method is proposed as a rapid tool for variety assignment and purity determination of malting barley that may replace gel electrophoresis currently used for this purpose.

  12. Application of thoron interference as a tool for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron with a pulse ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R M; Sumesh, C G; Vinod Kumar, A; Puranik, V D

    2013-07-01

    Pulse ionisation chamber (PIC)-based monitors measuring radioactive gas radon ((222)Rn) without energy discrimination will have interference due to thoron ((220)Rn) present in the atmosphere. A technique has been developed to use this property of interference for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron gas. These monitors work on the principle of counting of gross alphas emitted from radon and its progeny. A theoretical model has been developed for the variation of thoron sensitivity with respect to the flow rate of gas through the monitor. The thoron sensitivity of the monitor is found to vary with the flow rate of gas through the monitor. Using this sensitivity, the sampling procedure has been developed and verified for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron. The PIC-measured radon and thoron concentration using this procedure agrees well with those measured by using standard radon and thoron discriminating monitor.

  13. Determination of Cd and Zn by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using a sequential analysis procedure.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ahmed S; McGaw, Brian A; Midwood, Andrew J

    2002-05-16

    Isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) was used to examine the certified Cd and Zn content of 4 Certified Reference Materials (CRMs); 2 soils: GBW07401 and GBW07405, 1 plant CRM060 and an animal tissue SRM1566a. The CRMs were chosen to be of contrasting origin and Cd:Zn content. Three digestion procedures were compared: (i) an open tube aqua regia procedure (ii) microwave digestion using Teflon bombs and (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF) digestion using PTFE bombs. The Cd and Zn levels obtained using ID-TIMS all fell within the published certified range for the CRMs. This was the case regardless of the digestion procedure used, although HF digestion tended to yield marginally higher levels than the other procedures and in one instance, Cd in GBW07401, was significantly different (P<0.05) from the certified range. A filament loading procedure was developed, to allow sequential analysis of Cd and Zn on the same single filament during thermal ionisation mass spectrometry analysis. The sequential analysis technique was evaluated to ensure that Zn did not fractionate during Cd analysis and there was no inter-element interference. No marked difference in the precision and accuracy of the isotope ratio measurements were obtained from sequential element analyses on the same filament when compared to individual element analyses for a range of standard solutions or for sample digests. The most efficient procedure in terms of costs and productivity for future work of this kind would be a combination of microwave digestion and sequential analysis of Cd and Zn on the same filament.

  14. Follow-up of children exposed to ionising radiation from cardiac catheterisation: the Coccinelle study

    PubMed Central

    Baysson, H.; Nkoumazok, B.; Barnaoui, S.; Réhel, J. L.; Girodon, B.; Milani, G.; Boudjemline, Y.; Bonnet, D.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterisation has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of children with a wide variety of congenital and acquired forms of cardiovascular disease. Despite the clear clinical benefit to the patient, radiation exposure from paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures (CCPs) may be substantial. Given children's greater sensitivity to radiation and the longer life span during which radiation health effects can develop, an epidemiological cohort study, named Coccinelle or ‘Ladybird’ (French acronym for ‘Cohorte sur le risque de cancer après cardiologie interventionnelle pédiatrique’), is carried out in France to evaluate the risks of leukaemia and solid cancers in this population. A total number of 8000 included children are expected. Individual CCP-related doses will be assessed for each child included in the cohort. For each CCP performed, dosimetric parameters (dose–area product, fluoroscopy time and total number of cine frames) are retrieved retrospectively. Organ doses, especially to the lung, the oesophagus and the thyroid, are calculated with PCXMC software. The cohort will be followed up through linkage with French paediatric cancer registries. PMID:25833897

  15. Oligomeric carbon and siloxane series observed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry during the analysis of soot formed in fuel-rich flames.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Barbara; Ciajolo, Anna; Millan, Marcos; Galmes, Carolina; Herod, Alan A; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Oligomeric carbon and siloxane series have been observed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), during the analysis of the dichloromethane (DCM)-soluble fractions of condensable material recovered from fuel-rich flames. Laser desorption (LD) spectra showed a pattern of oligomeric dimethyl-siloxane structures with a spacing of 74 u. The siloxane series appears to have originated as contamination of samples by silicone oil used to lubricate connections of polymer tubing. This was confirmed by extracting silicone tubing and silicone grease with DCM followed by MALDI-MS analysis. A series of peaks with a mass spacing of 24 u was also observed, superimposed on the continuum of unresolved organic ions. This oligomeric series appears to correspond to polycyclic aromatics separated by (mainly) ethylene bridges. Thus LD-MS appears to have revealed a series of soot precursors, intermediate between polycyclic aromatics and particulate soot, which was not detected by MALDI-MS. More detailed work is necessary to define these species with precision.

  16. Analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex samples using solid-phase microextraction and isotope dilution quantification gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, S; Gustavsson, L; van Bavel, B

    2007-09-14

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-MS) and isotope dilution quantification for the analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex, water based samples has been optimised. For ionisation, ECNI was the most sensitive and selective method. SPME was compared to solid-phase extraction (SPE) and found to be more sensitive for these small volume samples. LODs were in the range 0.02-38ngL(-1) for SPME and 6-184ngL(-1) for SPE, respectively. The SPME method was applied on samples in the ngL(-1) level from artificial reed beds treated with sludge containing residues from explosives and pharmaceuticals.

  17. Identification of amino acids by material enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MELDI-MS) in positive- and negative-ion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Stecher, Guenther; Mayr, Stefan; Bonn, Guenther K.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, different silica gel modifications were evaluated for their application as target surface for material enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometric (MELDI-MS) investigation of amino acids. 4,4'-Azodianiline (ADA-silica) modified silica gel was successfully employed for the qualitative analysis of amino acids in positive- and in negative-ion mode. Further no derivatisation of amino acids was necessary, as the introduced system allowed the direct analysis of targets and delivered spectra with excellent signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio within a few minutes. The influence of surface chemistry, ionisation mode and the nature of analytes on signal intensity was studied and discussed. Detection limit of 2.10 pg (10 fmol) was achieved by employing ADA-silica in positive-ion mode. Finally, xylem saps from different types of trees were analysed. This proved the high performance and excellent behaviour of the introduced target surface material.

  18. Online antioxidant activity and ultra-performance LC-electrospray ionisation-quadrupole time-of-fight mass spectrometry for chemical fingerprinting of Indian polyherbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Pamita; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Shahid M; Bhutani, Kamlesh K

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC-DAD-DPPH method was developed for evaluating the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical scavenging activity of ethylacetate extracts of different polyherbal formulations (draksarista, draksava, lohasava and arvindasava) by using RP-18e column. The ethylacetate extract from polyherbal, 'draksarista' exhibited maximum free radical scavenging activity (99.9 ± 0.38%) followed by draksava (99.8 ± 0.34%), lohasava (98.5 ± 0.30%) and arvindasava (42.3 ± 0.34%) at 100 μg mL(-1). Simultaneously, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was used to study chemical composition of the ethylacetate extracts of formulations. The characteristic electrospray mass ionisation reveals the dominance of polyphenols and their glycosides in the four polyherbal formulations.

  19. Detection of phenolic oxidation products in cider apple juice by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bernillon, S; Guyot, S; Renard, C M G C

    2004-01-01

    Juice was prepared from cider apples of the cultivar "Kermerrien" under oxidative conditions. After isolation by solid-phase extraction, the phenolic fraction was subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. SIM scans were performed at m/z values obtained in model solutions. The oxidation products, resulting from coupling between a molecule of caffeoylquinic acid and caffeoylquinic acid, catechin or dimeric flavan-3-ol, were detected.

  20. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  1. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer's mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Neff, Frauke; Saran, Anna; Larsen, Martin R.; Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer's model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control of synaptic plasticity, calcium-dependent signalling and brain metabolism. An inhibition of CREB signalling was found at both dose rates whereas Rac1-Cofilin signalling was found activated only at the lower dose rate. Similarly, the reduction in the number of activated microglia in the molecular layer of hippocampus that paralleled with reduced levels of TNFα expression and lipid peroxidation was significant only at the lower dose rate. Adult neurogenesis, investigated by Ki67, GFAP and NeuN staining, and cell death (activated caspase-3) were not influenced at any dose or dose rate. This study shows that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer's pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27708245

  2. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Hooijerink, Dick; Sterk, Saskia S; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) was applied for the confirmation and three-dimensional profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MS(n) was demonstrated by scanning hormone esters and marker ink lines drawn at various distances on a microscopic slide at set distances, using an x-scanner with manual y and z adjustment. Tissue slices of bovine muscle injected with a hormone cocktail were analysed. All anabolic steroid esters could be directly detected in the sample and confirmed on the basis of identification points awarded for selected MS/MS transitions according to the performance criteria given in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Moreover, the injection site could be mapped by two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging MS, showing a horizontal and vertical distribution through the muscle tissue. This DESI approach offers potential for analysis of injection sites of steroid esters from illegally treated animals; moreover, direct analysis by ambient imaging DESI-MS still allows conventional extraction and analysis of the whole tissue for further confirmatory or contra-analysis afterwards.

  3. Thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using particle suspension matrices.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anna; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S; Parr, Vic

    2002-06-07

    Particle suspension matrices have been successfully utilized for the analysis of tetracycline antibiotics by thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS). Particles of different materials and sizes have been investigated (Co-UFP, TiN, TiO2, Graphite and Silicon) by applying particle suspensions to eluted TLC plates. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms have been recorded directly from the TLC plates. Strong cationization by sodium and potassium was obtained in the positive ion mode, with [M+Na-NH3]+ ions being the predominant signals. The TLC-MALDI mass spectra recorded from graphite suspensions showed the lowest background noise and the highest peak intensities from the range of suspension matrices studied. The mass accuracy from graphite films was improved by adding the peptide Phe-Phe to the graphite suspensions. This allowed internal recalibration of the TLC-MALDI mass spectra acquired during a run. One major potential advantage of TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS has been demonstrated in the analysis of chlortetracycline and tetracycline in a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and minocycline. Examination of the TLC plate prior to MALDI analysis showed only an unresolved spot for chlortetracycline and tetracycline. However by investigation of the MALDI mass spectra and plotting of single ion chromatograms separate peaks for chlortetracycline and tetracycline could be obtained.

  4. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry determination of zaleplon in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhang, Zunjian; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Fengguo; Chen, Yun

    2006-02-24

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the identification and quantification of zaleplon in human plasma using estazolam as an internal standard (IS). After the addition of estazolam and 2.0 M sodium hydroxide solution, plasma samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and then the organic layer was evaporated to dryness. The reconstituted solution of the residue was injected onto a prepacked Shim-pack VP-ODS C18 (250 mm x 2.0 mm i.d.) column and chromatographed with a mobile phase comprised of methanol:water (70:30) at a flow-rate of 0.2 ml/min. Detection was performed on a single quadrupole mass spectrometer by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode via atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. The mean standard curve was linear (r = 0.9991) over the concentration range of 0.2-100 ng/ml and had good back-calculated accuracy and precision. The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 10% relative standard deviation and accuracy ranged from 85% to 115%. The limit of detection was 0.1 ng/ml. The validated LC-APCI-MS method has been used successfully to study zaleplon pharmacokinetic, bioavailability and bioequivalence in 18 adult volunteers.

  5. Headspace analysis of new psychoactive substances using a Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Acton, W. Joe; Lanza, Matteo; Agarwal, Bishu; Jürschik, Simone; Sulzer, Philipp; Breiev, Kostiantyn; Jordan, Alfons; Hartungen, Eugen; Hanel, Gernot; Märk, Lukas; Mayhew, Chris A.; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion in the number and use of new psychoactive substances presents a significant analytical challenge because highly sensitive instrumentation capable of detecting a broad range of chemical compounds in real-time with a low rate of false positives is required. A Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SRI-ToF-MS) instrument is capable of meeting all of these requirements. With its high mass resolution (up to m/Δm of 8000), the application of variations in reduced electric field strength (E/N) and use of different reagent ions, the ambiguity of a nominal (monoisotopic) m/z is reduced and hence the identification of chemicals in a complex chemical environment with a high level of confidence is enabled. In this study we report the use of a SRI-ToF-MS instrument to investigate the reactions of H3O+, O2+, NO+ and Kr+ with 10 readily available (at the time of purchase) new psychoactive substances, namely 4-fluoroamphetamine, methiopropamine, ethcathinone, 4-methylethcathinone, N-ethylbuphedrone, ethylphenidate, 5-MeO-DALT, dimethocaine, 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran and nitracaine. In particular, the dependence of product ion branching ratios on the reduced electric field strength for all reagent ions was investigated and is reported here. The results reported represent a significant amount of new data which will be of use for the development of drug detection techniques suitable for real world scenarios. PMID:25844048

  6. Aqueous phototransformation of zinc pyrithione Degradation kinetics and byproduct identification by liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, V A; Shibata, K; Yamaguchi, Y; Sugasawa, S; Albanis, T

    2007-03-16

    The photochemical behavior of the antifouling agent zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) was studied in aqueous media of different composition under simulated solar irradiation using a xenon light source. The influence of important constituents of natural water (dissolved organic matter and nitrate) was also examined using a multivariate kinetic model. It was found that photodegradation proceeds via a pseudo first-order reaction. Kinetic experiments were monitored by LC-MS and photolytic half-lives ranging between 9.2 and 15.1 min have been observed. The increasing concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) accelerates the photolysis reaction, while the effect of nitrate ions was also positive since it increased the degradation rate, but to a lesser extent. Irradiation of the aqueous ZnPT solutions gave rise to several transformation products that were isolated by means of solid-phase extraction using poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) extraction disks. These byproducts were identified using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. Besides 2-pyridinesulfonic-acid, other degradation products formed included pyridine-N-oxide, 2-mercaptopyridine, 2,2'-dithiobis(pyridine-N-oxide), 2,2-dipyridyl disulfide and the pyridine/pyrithione mixed disulfide, 2,2'-dithiobispyridine mono-N-oxide (PPMD).

  7. Analysis of oilfield produced waters and production chemicals by electrospray ionisation multi-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn).

    PubMed

    McCormack, P; Jones, P; Hetheridge, M J; Rowland, S J

    2001-10-01

    Large quantities of diverse polar organic chemicals are routinely discharged from oil production platforms in so-called produced waters. The environmental fate of many of these is unknown since few methods exist for their characterisation. Preliminary investigations into the use of multistage electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) show its potential for the identification and quantification of compounds in specialty oilfield chemicals (corrosion inhibitors, scale inhibitors, biocides and demulsifiers) and produced waters. Multiple stage mass spectrometry (MSn) with both positive and negative ion detection allows high specificity detection and characterisation of a wide range of polar and charged molecules. For example, linear alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS), alkyldimethylbenzylammonium compounds, 2-alkyl-1-ethylamine-2-imidazolines, 2-alkyl-1-[N-ethylalkylamide]-2-imidazolines and a di-[alkyldimethylammonium-ethyl]ether were all identified and characterised in commercial formulations and/or North Sea oilfield produced waters. The technique should allow the marine environmental effects and fates of some of these polar compounds to be studied.

  8. Fragmentation of mycosporine-like amino acids by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Karina H M; Carvalho, Valdemir M; Pinto, Ernani; Colepicolo, Pio

    2006-01-01

    The determination and identification of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) from algae remain a major challenge due to the low concentration. Mass spectrometry (MS) can make an invaluable contribution in the search and identification of MAAs because of its high sensitivity, possibility of coupling with liquid chromatography, and the availability of powerful tandem mass spectrometric techniques. However, the unequivocal determination of the presence and location of important functional groups present on the basic skeleton of the MAAs is often elusive due to their inherent instability under MS conditions. In this study, the use of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) for characterisation of four MAAs (palythine, asterina, palythinol and shinorine) isolated from the macroalgae Gracilaria tenuistipitata Chang et Xia was investigated. The accurate-mass confirmation of the protonated molecules was performed on a Q-TOF instrument. We demonstrate that employing deuterium labelling in ESI-MS/MS analysis provides a convenient tool for the determination of new MAAs. Although the fragmentation patterns of MAAs were discussed earlier, to our knowledge, this is the first time that mechanisms are proposed.

  9. Rapid and sensitive method for the analysis of carbon monoxide in blood using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Anna-Maja; Larsson, Jan Erik

    2002-01-05

    In order to measure changes in physiological CO concentrations in blood with good accuracy, a method was developed using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (250 degrees C). A nickel catalyst system was fitted to convert CO to methane at 375 degrees C after separation with a molecular sieve column at 35 degrees C. Helium was used as carrier at 30 ml/min. Porcine or human blood (400 microl) was sampled in gastight tubes and treated with sulfuric acid and saponin (800 microl). Accuracy was 1.4% and 1.5% (RSD), respectively. Precision was 2.8% (porcine blood). Limit of detection was 0.01 nmol/ml gas and limit of quantification 12 nmol/ml blood. Calibration was made in the interval 12-514 nmol/ml blood (corresponding to 0.1-6% COHb). Samples were stable for at least a month at +4 degrees C. This paper describes a method with high sensitivity and good accuracy, suitable for analysis of low CO concentrations.

  10. Direct analysis of pharmaceutical tablet formulations using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Caroline J; Carolan, Vikki A; Richards, Don S; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-06-15

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) has been used to directly analyse a range of tablets in order to assess the homogeneity of the active drug compound throughout the excipients contained within the tablets studied. The information gained from the imaging experiments can be used to improve and gain a greater understanding of the manufacturing process; such knowledge will enable improvements in finished product quality to make safer and more efficacious tablet formulations. Commercially available and prescription tablet formulations have been analysed, including aspirin, paracetamol, sildenafil citrate (Viagra(R)) and a batch of tablets in development (tablet X: placebo; 1 mg; 3 mg and 6 mg). MALDI MSI provides semi-quantitative information that is related to ion abundance, therefore Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a multivariate analysis technique, has been used to differentiate between tablets containing different amounts of active drug ingredient. Aspects of sample preparation have also been investigated with regard to tablet shape and texture. The results obtained indicate that MALDI MSI can be used effectively to analyse the spatial distribution of the active pharmaceutical component (API) in pharmaceutical tablet formulations.

  11. Trace mycotoxin analysis in complex biological and food matrices by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Peter; Mayer-Helm, Bernhard

    2006-12-15

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi that are growing on agricultural commodities. Their frequent presence in food and their severe toxic, carcinogenic and estrogenic properties have been recognised as potential threat to human health. A reliable risk assessment of mycotoxin contamination for humans and animals relies basically on their unambiguous identification and accurate quantification in food and feedstuff. While most screening methods for mycotoxins are based on immunoassays, unambiguous analyte confirmation can be easily achieved with mass spectrometric methods, like gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Due to the introduction of atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) techniques in the late 80s, LC/MS has become a routine technique also in food analysis, overcoming the traditional drawbacks of GC/MS regarding volatility and thermal stability. During the last few years, this technical and instrumental progress had also an increasing impact on the expanding field of mycotoxin analysis. The aim of the present review is to give an overview on the application of LC-(API)MS in the analysis of frequently occurring and highly toxic mycotoxins, such as trichothecenes, ochratoxins, zearalenone, fumonisins, aflatoxins, enniatins, moniliformin and several other mycotoxins. This includes also the investigation of some of their metabolites and degradation products. Suitable sample pre-treatment procedures, their applicability for high sample through-put and their influence on matrix effects will be discussed. The review covers literature published until July 2006.

  12. Characterisation of a proposed internet synthesis of N,N-dimethyltryptamine using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cláudia P B; Freeman, Sally; Alder, John F; Brandt, Simon D

    2009-08-14

    The psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) are known to induce altered states of consciousness in humans. These properties attract great interest from clinical, neuroscientific, clandestine and forensic communities. The Breath of Hope Synthesis was reported on an internet website as a convenient two-step methodology for the preparation of DMT. The analytical characterisation of the first stage was the subject of previous publications by the authors and involved the thermal decarboxylation of tryptophan and the formation of tryptamine. The present study reports on the characterisation of the second step of this procedure which was based on the methylation of tryptamine. This employed methyl iodide and benzyltriethylammonium chloride/sodium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst. The reaction product was characterised by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Quantitative evaluation was carried out in positive multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM), which included synthesis of the identified reaction products. MRM screening of the product did not lead to the detection of DMT. Instead, 11.1% tryptamine starting material, 21.0% N,N,N-trimethyltryptammonium iodide (TMT) and 47.4% 1-N-methyl-TMT were detected. A 0.5% trace of the monomethylated N-methyltryptamine was also detected. This study demonstrated the impact on product purity of doubtful synthetic methodologies discussed on the internet.

  13. Effect of ionising radiation on polyphenolic content and antioxidant potential of parathion-treated sage (Salvia officinalis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Issam; Fekih, Sana; Sghaier, Haitham; Bousselmi, Mehrez; Saidi, Mouldi; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Fattouch, Sami

    2013-11-15

    The γ-irradiation effects on polyphenolic content and antioxidant capacity of parathion-pretreated leaves of Salvia officinalis plant were investigated. The analysis of phenolic extracts of sage without parathion showed that irradiation decreased polyphenolic content significantly (p<0.05) by 30% and 45% at 2 and 4kGy, respectively, compared to non-irradiated samples. The same trend was observed for the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), as assessed by the anionic DPPH and cationic ABTS radical-scavenging assays. The antioxidant potential decreased significantly (p<0.01) at 2 and 4kGy, by 11-20% and 40-44%, respectively. The results obtained with a pure chlorogenic acid solution confirmed the degradation of phenols; however, its TEAC was significantly (p<0.01) increased following irradiation. Degradation products of parathion formed by irradiation seem to protect against a decline of antioxidant capacity and reduce polyphenolic loss. Ionising radiation was found to be useful in breaking down pesticide residues without inducing significant losses in polyphenols.

  14. Comparison of ionisation chamber and semiconductor detector devices for measurement of the dose-width product for panoramic dental units.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S A; Martin, C J

    2013-06-01

    Doses for panoramic dental radiography are assessed in terms of the dose-width product (DWP) or dose-area product, which gives a measure of the radiation through a whole exposure. The DWP can be measured using a pencil ionisation chamber (IC) similar to that used for computed tomography dose assessment. However, ICs are sensitive to radiation incident from all directions and so backscatter from the image receptor may increase the recorded dose. This study compares measurements performed using four options: a pencil IC mounted straight on the image receptor, the IC mounted with a steel plate to the rear to standardise scatter conditions, the IC mounted with a steel plate and lead collimators in front to minimise the effect of extra-focal radiation, and a Quart Dido employing a one square centimetre semiconductor detector (SD) designed for panoramic measurements. The results indicate that modification of the current method by incorporating a steel plate reduced the measurement dose by 7% on average, but the reduction was greater for units with semiconductor imaging plates. The measurements with the SD agree more closely with the IC with the steel plate to the rear. An IC with a backing plate to standardise scatter or a suitable SD is recommended for measurement on panoramic dental units.

  15. Uncertainties in estimating health risks associated with exposure to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Preston, R Julian; Boice, John D; Brill, A Bertrand; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Conolly, Rory; Hoffman, F Owen; Hornung, Richard W; Kocher, David C; Land, Charles E; Shore, Roy E; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2013-09-01

    The information for the present discussion on the uncertainties associated with estimation of radiation risks and probability of disease causation was assembled for the recently published NCRP Report No. 171 on this topic. This memorandum provides a timely overview of the topic, given that quantitative uncertainty analysis is the state of the art in health risk assessment and given its potential importance to developments in radiation protection. Over the past decade the increasing volume of epidemiology data and the supporting radiobiology findings have aided in the reduction of uncertainty in the risk estimates derived. However, it is equally apparent that there remain significant uncertainties related to dose assessment, low dose and low dose-rate extrapolation approaches (e.g. the selection of an appropriate dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), the biological effectiveness where considerations of the health effects of high-LET and lower-energy low-LET radiations are required and the transfer of risks from a population for which health effects data are available to one for which such data are not available. The impact of radiation on human health has focused in recent years on cancer, although there has been a decided increase in the data for noncancer effects together with more reliable estimates of the risk following radiation exposure, even at relatively low doses (notably for cataracts and cardiovascular disease). New approaches for the estimation of hereditary risk have been developed with the use of human data whenever feasible, although the current estimates of heritable radiation effects still are based on mouse data because of an absence of effects in human studies. Uncertainties associated with estimation of these different types of health effects are discussed in a qualitative and semi-quantitative manner as appropriate. The way forward would seem to require additional epidemiological studies, especially studies of low dose and low dose

  16. Effect of NaCl and NaHCO3 on serum ionised calcium and blood gas status during sprinting.

    PubMed

    Beard, L A; Hinchcliff, K W

    2002-09-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is often administered to horses before racing in an attempt to delay fatigue and improve performance. We examined the effect of acid-base status on serum ionised calcium concentration (iCa) during high intensity exercise in 8 Standardbred mares. In a randomised, blinded, cross-over study, mares were administered each of 3 treatments, NaCl (0.7 g/kg bwt), NaHCO3 (1 g/kg bwt) in 3 l water, or 3 l of water only, 4 h before performing a standardised exercise test to fatigue on a treadmill. Mixed venous blood samples were collected as the horses ran for 5 min at 3 m/s, to fatigue at a predetermined speed (approximately 113% VO2max) and for 5 min at 3 m/s. There was no effect of treatment on time to fatigue (P = 0.744). NaHCO3 attenuated (P<0.05) the exercise-induced decrease in venous pH (mean +/- s.e. 6.97, 6.95 and 7.06 +/- 0.02 at end of sprint for water, NaCl and NaHCO3, respectively). Both serum total calcium concentration (tCa) and iCa increased (P<0.05) with running. NaHCO3 decreased iCa (P<0.05) compared to water; iCa of 1.58 and 1.44 +/- 0.04 mmol/l before exercise and 1.69 and 1.49 +/- 0.05 end sprint, for water and NaHCO3 treatments, respectively. These results demonstrate an effect of NaHCO3 on iCa during exercise. Further study is necessary to determine the effect of alterations in iCa on exercise performance.

  17. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in skin by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Josephine; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOFMS) has been used to detect and image the distribution of a xenobiotic substance in skin. Porcine epidermal tissue was treated with 'Nizoral', a medicated shampoo containing ketoconazole (+/-)-1-acetyl-4-[p-[[(2R,4S)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]piperazine) as active ingredient. Following incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C all excess formulation was washed from the surface. A cross-section of the drug-treated tissue was then blotted onto a cellulose membrane, precoated in matrix (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)), by airspray deposition. In separate experiments the tissue surface was treated with Nizoral within a triangular former, and subsequently blotted onto a matrix-coated membrane. Sample membranes were then mounted into the recess of specialised MALDI targets with adhesive tape. All samples were analysed by MALDI-TOFMS using an Applied Biosystem 'Q-star Pulsar i' hybrid Q-TOF mass spectrometer fitted with an orthagonal MALDI ion source and imaging software. Detection of the protonated molecule was readily achievable by this technique. Treatment of the tissue within a template gave rise to images depicting the expected distribution of the drug, demonstrating that this technique is capable of producing spatially useful data. Ion images demonstrating the permeation of the applied compound into the skin were achieved by imaging a cross-sectional imprint of treated tissue. A calibration graph for the determination of ketoconazole was prepared using the sodium adduct of the matrix ion as an internal standard. This enabled construction of a quantitative profile of drug in skin. Conventional haematoxylin and eosin staining and microscopy methods were employed to obtain a histological image of the porcine epidermal tissue. Superimposing the mass spectrometric and histological images appeared to indicate drug

  18. SU-E-T-150: Brachytherapy QA Employing a High Resolution Liquid Filled Ionisation Chamber Array: Initial Experience and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Gainey, M; Kollefrath, M; Bruggmoser, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying a complex 3D brachytherapy dose distribution by measurement is non-trivial. Ideally a photon detector array should be independent of energy and angle, have high spatial resolution and be robust for routine clinical use. Methods: An iridium-192 source was used. A PMMA jig was constructed comprising an outer slab and a central insert with eight milled channels for 1.33mm (outer diameter) steel needles, see figure. All calculations were performed using an empty CT study reconstructing eight virtual needles (QA-CT), using the v2 source model (Elekta AG, Sweden). A high resolution liquid filled ionisation chamber array SRS1000, together with Verisoft software v6.0 (PTW Freiburg, Germany), was used to perform measurements of plans of increasing complexity to evaluate its suitability for device- and patient-specific QA. The dimension of backscatter material was investigated. The patient plan dwell time distribution was entered manually into the QA-CT and the dose distribution was calculated. Results: Our measurements indicate that the array is independent of energy and angle. The resulting measured dose values are linearly interpolated to 2025 values. Shifts of 1mm of the entire needle are readily detectable. Individual dwell position shifts (2.5mm) are also readily measurable. Moreover a dwell time increase of 1 second both in the edge and central region are detectable. Conclusion: The high resolution SRS1000 array is a powerful instrument for brachytherapy QA enabling 977 simultaneous measurements to be performed. Our measurements suggest 60mm of RW3 backscatter material upstream and downstream are sufficient. Local percentage difference analysis is useful for device based QA, normalized relative percentage difference is arguably better for patient specific QA. Automated transfer of patient plan dwell time distribution to the QA plan is required to enable a comprehensive patient QA study to be performed. Moreover the described measurement technique

  19. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  20. Effect of ionising radiation treatment on the specific migration characteristics of packaging-food simulant combinations: effect of type and dose of radiation.

    PubMed

    Zygoura, P D; Paleologos, E K; Kontominas, M G

    2011-05-01

    Migration levels of acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) plasticiser from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film into the European Union specified aqueous food simulants (distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid and 10% v/v ethanol) were monitored as a function of time. Migration testing was carried out at 40°C for 10 days. Determination of the analyte was performed by applying an analytical methodology based on surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction prior to gas chromatographic-flame ionisation detection. PVC cling film used was subjected to ionising treatment with a [(60)Co] source, as well as to electron-beam irradiation at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25 kGy, with the aim to compare the effect of type and dose of radiation on the specific migration behaviour of PVC. Equilibrium concentrations of acetyl tributyl citrate into the aqueous solvents covered the ranges 173-422 µg l(-1) and 296-513 µg l(-1) for gamma- and electron-irradiated PVC, respectively. Hence, e-beam irradiation resulted in significantly higher ATBC migration compared with gamma treatment. The highest extraction efficiency of the 10% ethanol solution was common in both gamma and e-beam treatments; distilled water demonstrated the lowest migration. Gamma-irradiation at intermediate doses up to 5 kGy produced no statistically significant (p > 0.05) effect on ATBC migration into all three aqueous simulants; however, this does not apply for high-energy electrons. Both ionising treatments were similar in that they resulted in statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in plasticiser migrating amounts between non-irradiated and irradiated at doses of 15 and 25 kGy samples. Gamma-radiation did not affect the kinetics of plasticiser migration. On the contrary, electron-beam radiation produced shorter equilibration times for all food-simulating solvents tested at 40°C. The above values regarding ATBC migration into aqueous food simulants are far below the European Union restriction (1 mg kg(-1) body weight

  1. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  2. Characterisation of poly(alkyl methacrylate)s by means of electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Anthony T.; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.

    2004-11-01

    Electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) has been employed for the characterisation of two poly(alkyl methacrylate) polymers, namely poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA). Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed in a quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight (ToF) tandem mass spectrometer fitted with a nanospray source. Tandem mass spectra from singly, doubly and triply charged precursor ions (with alkali metals used for cationisation of the oligomers) are shown and the data are compared to those previously generated by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-collision-induced dissociation (MALDI-CID). These data indicate that cations with greater ionic radii may yield the most useful structural information as the mass-to-charge ratio of the precursor ion increases, whereas lithium or sodium ions are proposed to be ideal for obtaining spectra from lower molecular weight oligomers. Fragment ions at low mass-to-charge ratios dominate the spectra. Two series of peaks may be used to calculate the masses of the initiating and terminating end groups of the polymer. Ion peaks of greater mass-to-charge ratios form series that may be used to infer sequence information from the polymers.

  3. A miniaturised electron ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer that uses a unique helium ion removal pulsing technique specifically for gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jiang; Huang, Zhengxu; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Hui; Tan, Guobin; Gao, Wei; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2013-06-21

    A miniaturised reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with an electron ionisation ion source has been developed for the analysis of gases. An entirely new helium ion removal pulsing technique in this mass spectrometer is used to achieve an improved performance for the first time. The helium carrier gas, which enters into the source along with the gaseous sample, is simultaneously ionised and then orthogonally introduced into the time-of-fight mass analyser. Once the relatively light helium ions in the ion packet become extremely close to the reflectron plate (B-plate for short in this article), a modulated pulse is instantaneously applied on the B-plate and a negative reflectron voltage is set to the B-plate and lasts for a very short period, during which all the helium ions are directly bumped into the B-plate and subsequently removed. The helium ion removal pulsing technique can efficiently avoid saturation of the micro-channel plate caused by too many helium ions. A compact and durable instrument is designed, which has a mass resolving resolution greater than 400 FWHM for online gas analysis. The technology may also be further developed to remove other ions for TOF mass spectrometry.

  4. Determination of ionisation chamber collection efficiency in a swept electron beam by means of thermoluminescent detectors and the "two-voltage" method.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Rijnders, A; Ang, K K; Mellaerts, M; Grobet, P

    1985-06-01

    Two methods for determining the collection efficiency of a 0.6 cm3 thimble ionisation chamber exposed to the swept electron beam of a linear accelerator Therac 20 Saturne (CGR MeV) have been compared. In one method the chamber signal has been compared to that of simultaneously exposed thermoluminescent LiF dosemeters (TLD), in the other the "two-voltage" method of Boag, adapted for swept beams, has been used. By variation of the electron energy between 20 and 13 MeV, of the focus-skin-distance (FSD) between 200 and 100 cm and of the monitor rate between 400 monitor units (m.u.) and 100 m.u. per minute, different values could be produced for the peak charge density M. The collection efficiency of the chamber, operating at a standard voltage of 250 V, decreases from 0.99 to 0.84 for a charge density increasing from 0.3 X 10(-4) C/m3 to 7.5 X 10(-4) C/m3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed between the TLD and the "two-voltage" method adopted for similar M is never more than 2% and mostly smaller than 1%. It can be concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, the calculated ionisation chamber collection efficiency is confirmed by the experimental method using TL dosimetry.

  5. Novel characterisation of minor α-linolenic acid isomers in linseed oil by gas chromatography and covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Brenna, J T; Lawrence, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-06-01

    Discrimination between polyunsaturated fatty acid isomers with three double bonds is a great challenge, due to structural similarities and similar polarities. In this study, we report the identification of four minor geometrical isomers of α-linolenic acid (ALA) present in linseed oil samples: (9E,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12Z,15E)-, (9Z,12E,15Z)- and (9E,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoic acids, chromatographically resolved by gas chromatography (GC) using a new and highly polar ionic phase column (SLB-IL111). Gas chromatography-electron ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-EIMS) determined that the four unknown compounds were C18:3 n-3 isomers. The positional 9-12-15 C18:3 configuration was achieved by covalent adduct chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (CACI-MS/MS) while geometrical configuration was established with analytical standards based on relative retention. We hypothesised that these isomers are formed during linseed oil deodorisation and postulate preferred and unfavoured isomerisation pathways of ALA.

  6. Gas-phase dissociation of ionic liquid aggregates studied by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and energy-variable collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Coutinho, João A P; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2009-01-01

    Positive singly charged ionic liquid aggregates [(C(n)mim)(m+1)(BF(4))(m)](+) (mim = 3-methylimidazolium; n = 2, 4, 8 and 10) and [(C(4)mim)(m+1)(A)(m)](+) (A = Cl(-), BF(4) (-), PF(6) (-), CF(3)SO(3) (-) and (CF(3)SO(2))(2)N(-)) were investigated by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and energy-variable collision induced dissociation. The electrospray ionisation mass spectra (ESI-MS) showed the formation of an aggregate with extra stability for m = 4 for all the ionic liquids with the exception of [C(4)mim][CF(3)SO(3)]. ESI-MS-MS and breakdown curves of aggregate ions showed that their dissociation occurred by loss of neutral species ([C(n)mim][A])(a) with a >or= 1. Variable-energy collision induced dissociation of each aggregate from m = 1 to m = 8 for all the ionic liquids studied enabled the determination of E(cm, 1/2) values, whose variation with m showed that the monomers were always kinetically much more stable than the larger aggregates, independently of the nature of cation and anion. The centre-of-mass energy values correlate well with literature data on ionic volumes and interaction and hydrogen bond energies.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Change in the ionisation state of a near-surface laser-produced aluminium plasma in double-pulse ablation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, V. S.; Bokhonov, A. F.; Nedel'ko, M. I.; Tarasenko, N. V.

    2003-12-01

    The near-surface plasma produced upon irradiation of an aluminium target by two successive laser pulses with nonresonance and resonance wavelengths is studied by the spectroscopic and probe-assisted methods. The feasibility of increasing the ion fraction in the laser-produced plasma in double-pulse ablation modes is demonstrated. The conditions are determined under which processes on the surface as well as selective excitation and ionisation in the plasma have a determining effect on the formation of its ionisation state.

  8. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  9. The Insidious Nature of "Hard-Core" Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the Constructivist Research Programme of Patterns in High School Students' and Pre-Service Teachers' Thinking about Ionisation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners--senior high school students and pre-service teachers--in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is…

  10. Secondary ionisations in a wall-less ion-counting nanodosimeter: quantitative analysis and the effect on the comparison of measured and simulated track structure parameters in nanometric volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, Gerhard; Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    The object of investigation in nanodosimetry is the physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionising particle tracks, i.e. the sequence of the interaction types and interaction sites of a primary particle and all its secondaries, which reflects the stochastic nature of the radiation interaction. In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with protons and carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the ion track is of particular interest. Owing to limitations in current detector technology, the only way to determine the ionisation cluster size distribution in a DNA segment is to simulate the particle track structure in condensed matter. This is done using dedicated computer programs based on Monte Carlo procedures simulating the interaction of the primary ions with the target. Hence, there is a need to benchmark these computer codes using suitable experimental data. Ionisation cluster size distributions produced in the nanodosimeter's sensitive volume by monoenergetic protons and alpha particles (with energies between 0.1 MeV and 20 MeV) were measured at the PTB ion accelerator facilities. C3H8 and N2 were alternately used as the working gas. The measured data were compared with the simulation results obtained with the PTB Monte-Carlo code PTra [B. Grosswendt, Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 41, 103 (2002); M.U. Bug, E. Gargioni, H. Nettelbeck, W.Y. Baek, G. Hilgers, A.B. Rosenfeld, H. Rabus, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043308 (2013)]. Measured and simulated characteristics of the particle track structure are generally in good agreement for protons over the entire energy range investigated. For alpha particles with energies higher than the Bragg peak energy, a good agreement can also be seen, whereas for energies lower than the Bragg peak energy differences of as much as 25% occur. Significant deviations are only observed for large ionisation cluster sizes. These deviations can be explained by a background consisting of secondary ions. These ions are produced in the

  11. Importance of direct anthropogenic emissions of formic acid measured by a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Winter ClearfLo Campaign in London, January 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas J.; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Booth, A. Murray; Jones, Benjamin; Le Breton, Michael; Leather, Kimberley E.; Ghalaieny, Mohamed; Xiao, Ping; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Percival, Carl J.

    2014-02-01

    Formic acid, an ubiquitous trace gas in the atmosphere, was measured using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the winter ClearfLo campaign in London, 2012. Daily calibrations of formic acid gave sensitivities of 3 ion counts s-1 pptv-1 for the complete campaign and a limit of detection of 2 ppt. No correlation with nitric acid was observed, R2 of 0.137, indicating no significant secondary source of formic acid. However, a strong positive correlation with NOx, CO, and production in line with rush hour periods indicated a direct anthropogenic emission of formic acid from vehicle emissions. Peaks of 6.7 ppb of formic acid were observed with a mean of 610 ppt. Global models indicated that this emission source dominates in the northern hemisphere where global models underestimate formic acid most significantly, thus increasing the accuracy of modelling of global formic acid emissions.

  12. Analysis of trace amounts of carbon dioxide, oxygen and carbon monoxide in nitrogen using dual capillary columns and a pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Janse van Rensburg, M; Botha, A; Rohwer, E

    2007-10-05

    Gas mixtures of trace amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), dioxygen (O(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) in dinitrogen (N(2)) were separated and quantified using parallel dual capillary columns and pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection (PDHID). The detection limits (9 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO(2), 7 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for O(2) and 37 x 10(-9) mol mol(-1) for CO) were lower than those reported previously for similar methods. Uncertainties were calculated and results were validated by comparison of the CO and CO(2) results with those obtained using conventional methods. The method was also used to analyse nitrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in oxygen.

  13. A system for protecting the environment from ionising radiation: selecting reference fauna and flora, and the possible dose models and environmental geometries that could be applied to them.

    PubMed

    Pentreath, R J; Woodhead, D S

    2001-09-28

    In order to demonstrate, explicitly, that the environment can be protected with respect to controlled sources of ionising radiation, it is essential to have a systematic framework within which dosimetry models for fauna and flora can be used. And because of the practical limitations on what could reasonably be modelled and the amount of information that could reasonably be obtained, it is also necessary to limit the application of such models to a 'set' of fauna and flora within a reference' context. This paper, therefore, outlines the factors that will need to be considered to select such 'reference' fauna and flora, and describes some of the factors and constraints necessary to develop the associated dosimetry models. It also describes some of the most basic environmental geometrics within which the dose models could be set in order to make comparisons amongst different radiation sources.

  14. Identification of phenolic constituents in red chicory salads (Cichorium intybus) by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carazzone, Chiara; Mascherpa, Dora; Gazzani, Gabriella; Papetti, Adele

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic acids and flavonoids extracted from several types of Cichorium intybus var. silvestre salads ("Chioggia", "Treviso", "Treviso tardivo", and "Verona") were characterised by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry. Among the 64 compounds detected, several hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including 8 mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids, 3 tartaric acid derivatives, 31 flavonol and 2 flavone glycosides, as well as 10 anthocyanins were characterised based on UV spectra and MS(n) fragmentation patterns. Furthermore, several isomers of caffeic acid derivatives were distinguished for the first time by their specific mass spectral data. This is the first study reporting the glycosylation type and position of mono- and diglycosylated flavonoids in red salads.

  15. The fragmentation pathways of protonated Amiton in the gas phase: towards the structural characterisation of organophosphorus chemical warfare agents by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Steinborner, Simon; Ramachandran, Aravind; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Amiton (O,O-diethyl-S-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl] phosphorothiolate), otherwise known as VG, is listed in schedule 2 of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and has a structure closely related to VX (O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylamino)ethylmethylphosphonothiolate). Fragmentation of protonated VG in the gas phase was performed using electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-ITMS) and revealed several characteristic product ions. Quantum chemical calculations provide the most probable structures for these ions as well as the likely unimolecular mechanisms by which they are formed. The decomposition pathways predicted by computation are consistent with deuterium-labeling studies. The combination of experimental and theoretical data suggests that the fragmentation pathways of VG and analogous organophosphorus nerve agents, such as VX and Russian VX, are predictable and thus ESI tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for the verification of unknown compounds listed in the CWC.

  16. Sorption/desorption of non-hydrophobic and ionisable pharmaceutical and personal care products from reclaimed water onto/from a natural sediment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Meffe, Raffaella; Herrera, Sonia; Arranz, Elena; de Bustamante, Irene

    2014-02-15

    In the present work, the sorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) (acetaminophen, atenolol, carbamazepine, caffeine, naproxen and sulphamethoxazole) onto the natural organic matter (NOM) and the inorganic surfaces of a natural sandy loam sediment was quantified separately. The quantification was based on the PPCP charge, their degree of ionisation, their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (KOW) and the sediment organic carbon fraction (ƒOC). PPCP desorption from the sediment was examined under conditions of infiltrating water containing a high concentration of inorganic ions (mimicking infiltrating reclaimed water), and a low concentration (and smaller diversity) of inorganic ions (mimicking rainwater infiltration). Batch tests were performed using a sediment/water ratio of 1:4 and a PPCP initial concentration ranging from 1 to 100 μg L(-1). The results showed the type and degree of PPCP ionisation to strongly influence the sorption of these compounds onto the sediment. The sorption of cationic species onto the sediment was higher than that of anionic species and mostly reversible; the sorption of neutral species was negligible. The anionic species sorbed less onto the sediment, but also desorbed less easily. More than 70% of the total sorption was due to interaction with mineral surfaces. This holds especially true for cationic species (atenolol and caffeine) which sorption was enhanced by the negative surface charge of the sediment. The presence of inorganic ions had no impact on the desorption of the PPCPs from the sediment. According to the calculated percentages of removal, the mobility followed the order: carbamazepine>acetaminophen>naproxen>atenolol>sulfamethoxazole>caffeine.

  17. A comparison of overload behaviour for some sub 2 μm totally porous and sub 3 μm shell particle columns with ionised solutes.

    PubMed

    Fallas, Morgane M; Buckenmaier, Stephan M C; McCalley, David V

    2012-04-27

    The overloading performance of some 2.7 μm shell and sub 2 μm totally porous columns, including one pair manufactured from similar materials with similar bonding chemistries, was compared using strongly acidic and basic probe compounds. In general, the capacity of shell particles was not greatly reduced, despite containing a smaller porous volume. Nevertheless, at low pH, both types of column were overloaded by only small concentrations of ionised solute. Considerable improvement could be gained by increasing the buffer concentration, although sensitivity in mass spectrometric detection may be compromised. The capacity of columns of different internal diameter may not be directly compared merely by scaling the injection volumes, as it is possible that the sample is not homogeneously distributed across the column radius, especially in larger diameter columns, where the sample may travel preferentially through a central core of the packing. A totally porous charged surface hybrid phase gave much improved loading properties of the basic probe in low ionic strength mobile phases such as formic acid, often used in mass spectrometry. However, its relative advantage over conventional phases was reduced as the mobile phase ionic strength was increased. Furthermore, acidic compounds may give tailing on this phase. At pH 7, all columns tested showed evidence of interaction with ionised silanols; peak shapes improved as the buffer concentration was increased. Column efficiency first increased and then decreased as solute concentration was increased at constant buffer concentration, which can be attributed to the decreasing proportion of solute molecules retained by the ion exchange process.

  18. Predicted ionisation in mitochondria and observed acute changes in the mitochondrial transcriptome after gamma irradiation: a Monte Carlo simulation and quantitative PCR study.

    PubMed

    Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; McNamara, Aimee L; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin B; Kuncic, Zdenka; Banati, Richard B

    2013-11-01

    It is a widely accepted that the cell nucleus is the primary site of radiation damage while extra-nuclear radiation effects are not yet systematically included into models of radiation damage. We performed Monte Carlo simulations assuming a spherical cell (diameter 11.5 μm) modelled after JURKAT cells with the inclusion of realistic elemental composition data based on published literature. The cell model consists of cytoplasm (density 1g/cm(3)), nucleus (diameter 8.5 μm; 40% of cell volume) as well as cylindrical mitochondria (diameter 1 μm; volume 0.5 μm(3)) of three different densities (1, 2 and 10 g/cm(3)) and total mitochondrial volume relative to the cell volume (10, 20, 30%). Our simulation predicts that if mitochondria take up more than 20% of a cell's volume, ionisation events will be the preferentially located in mitochondria rather than in the cell nucleus. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we substantiate in JURKAT cells that human mitochondria respond to gamma radiation with early (within 30 min) differential changes in the expression levels of 18 mitochondrially encoded genes, whereby the number of regulated genes varies in a dose-dependent but non-linear pattern (10 Gy: 1 gene; 50 Gy: 5 genes; 100 Gy: 12 genes). The simulation data as well as the experimental observations suggest that current models of acute radiation effects, which largely focus on nuclear effects, might benefit from more systematic considerations of the early mitochondrial responses and how these may subsequently determine cell response to ionising radiation.

  19. Qualitative analysis of Copaifera oleoresin using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and gas chromatography with classical and cold electron ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Uekane, Thais M; Rezende, Claudia M; Bizzo, Humberto R; Marriott, Philip J

    2016-12-16

    Improved separation of both sesquiterpenes and diterpenic acids in Copaifera multijuga Hayne oleoresin, is demonstrated by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (accTOFMS). GC×GC separation employs polar phases (including ionic liquid phases) as the first dimension ((1)D) column, combined with a lower polarity (2)D phase. Elution temperatures (Te) of diterpenic acids (in methyl ester form, DAME) increased as the (1)D McReynolds' polarity value of the column phase decreased. Since Te of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons decreased with increased polarity, the very polar SLB-IL111 (1)D phase leads to excessive peak broadening in the (2)D apolar phase due to increased second dimension retention ((2)tR). The combination of SLB-IL59 with a nonpolar column phase was selected, providing reasonable separation and low Te for sesquiterpenes and DAME, compared to other tested column sets, without excessive (2)tR. Identities of DAME were aided by both soft (30eV) electron ionisation (EI) accurate mass TOFMS analysis and supersonic molecular beam ionisation (cold EI) TOFMS, both which providing less fragmentation and increased relative abundance of molecular ions. The inter-relation between EI energies, emission current, signal-to-noise and mass error for the accurate mass measurement of DAME are reported. These approaches can be used as a basis for conducting of GC×GC with soft EI accurate mass measurement of terpenes, particularly for unknown phytochemicals.

  20. pH-controlled dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the analysis of ionisable compounds in complex matrices: Case study of ochratoxin A in cereals.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Rastrelli, Luca

    2012-11-19

    A new sample preparation procedure, termed pH-controlled dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (pH-DLLME), has been developed for the analysis of ionisable compounds in highly complex matrices. This DLLME mode, intended to improve the selectivity and to expand the application range of DLLME, is based on two successive DLLMEs conducted at opposite pH values. pH-DLLME was applied to determination of ochratoxin A (OTA) in cereals. The hydrophobic matrix interferences in the raw methanol extract (disperser, 1mL) were removed by a first DLLME (I DLLME) performed at pH 8 to reduce the solubility of OTA in the extractant (CCl(4), 400μL). The pH of the aqueous phase was then adjusted to 2, and the analyte was extracted and concentrated by a second DLLME (extractant, 150μL C(2)H(4)Br(2)). The main factors influencing the efficiency of pH-DLLME including type and volume of I DLLME extractant, as well as the parameters affecting the OTA extraction by II DLLME, were studied in detail. Under optimum conditions, the method has detection and quantification limits of 0.019 and 0.062μg kg(-1), respectively, with OTA recoveries in the range of 81.2-90.1% (n=3). The accuracy of the analytical procedure, evaluated with a reference material (cereal naturally contaminated with OTA), is acceptable (accuracy of 85.6%±1.7, n=5). The applicability of pH-DLLME to the selective extraction of other ionisable compounds, such as acidic and basic pharmaceutical products was also demonstrated. The additional advantages of pH-DLLME are a higher selectivity and the extension of this microextraction technique to highly complex matrices.

  1. On-line coupling of a microelectrode array equipped poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip with an integrated graphite electrospray emitter for electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, Gustav; Dahlin, Andreas; Zettersten, Camilla; Bergquist, Jonas; Nyholm, Leif

    2005-10-01

    A novel method for the manufacturing of microchips for on-chip combinations of electrochemistry (EC) and sheathless electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is described. The technique, which does not require access to clean-room facilities, is based on the incorporation of an array of gold microcoil electrodes into a poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) microflow channel equipped with an integrated graphite based sheathless ESI emitter. Electrochemical measurements, which were employed to determine the electroactive area of the electrodes and to test the microchips, show that the manufacturing process was reproducible and that the important interelectrode distance in the electrochemical cell could to be adequately controlled. The EC-ESI-MS device was evaluated based on the ESI-MS detection of the oxidation products of dopamine. The results demonstrate that the present on-chip approach enables full potentiostatic control of the electrochemical cell and the attainment of very short transfer times between the electrochemical cell and the electrospray emitter. The transfer times were 0.6 and 1.2 s for flow rates of 1.0 and 0.5 microL min(-1), respectively, while the electrochemical conversion efficiency of the electrochemical cell was found to be 30% at a flow rate of 0.5 microL min(-1). To decouple the electrochemical cell from the ESI-MS high voltage and to increase the user-friendliness, the on-line electrochemistry-ESI-MS experiments were performed using a wireless Bluetooth battery-powered instrument with the chip floating at the potential induced by the ESI high voltage. The described on-chip EC-ESI-MS device can be used for fundamental electrochemical investigations as well as for applications based on the use of electrochemically controlled sample pretreatment, preconcentration and ionisation steps prior to ESI-MS.

  2. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is sometimes called oral cancer or oral cavity cancer. Mouth cancer is one of several types of cancer grouped in a category called head and neck cancers. Mouth cancer and other head and neck cancers are ...

  3. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is, how cancer is tracked, and the economic impact of cancer in the United States. Lifetime Risk ... Cancer? Cancer Surveillance Programs in the United States Economic Impact of Cancer Finding Cancer Information Learn how to ...

  4. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org Cancer.Net -- www.cancer.net/coping- ...

  5. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage-associated biomarkers of ionising radiation: current status and future relevance for radiology and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothkamm, K

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiation technology has developed dramatically in recent years, and its use has increased significantly, bringing clinical benefit. The use of diagnostic radiology has become widespread in modern society, particularly in paediatrics where the clinical benefit needs to be balanced with the risk of leukaemia and brain cancer increasing after exposure to low doses of radiation. With improving long-term survival rates of radiotherapy patients and the ever-increasing use of diagnostic and interventional radiology procedures, concern has risen over the long-term risks and side effects from such treatments. Biomarker development in radiology and radiotherapy has progressed significantly in recent years to investigate the effects of such use and optimise treatment. Recent biomarker development has focused on improving the limitations of established techniques by the use of automation, increasing sensitivity and developing novel biomarkers capable of quicker results. The effect of low-dose exposure (0–100 mGy) used in radiology, which is increasingly linked to cancer incidences, is being investigated, as some recent research challenges the linear-no-threshold model. Radiotherapy biomarkers are focused on identifying radiosensitive patients, determining the treatment-associated risk and allowing for a tailored and more successful treatment of cancer patients. For biomarkers in any of these areas to be successfully developed, stringent criteria must be applied in techniques and analysis of data to reduce variation among reports and allow data sets to be accurately compared. Newly developed biomarkers can then be used in combination with the established techniques to better understand and quantify the individual biological response to exposures associated with radiology tests and to personalise treatment plans for patients. PMID:23659923

  6. Childhood and adult cancers: contrasts and commonalities.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael F G; Bithell, John F; Stiller, Charles A; Kendall, Gerald M; O'Neill, Kate A

    2013-09-01

    Tumours occurring in children differ considerably from those occurring at older ages but exhibit common features. Those occurring in the teenage/young adult (TYA) years represent a transitional mixture of child and adult tumours and pose a considerable challenge for optimal clinical management and service provision. Nevertheless the fundamental processes of malignant change, arising from genetic/epigenetic interaction with environmental exposures, seem to operate across all ages and the entire tumour spectrum. We focus here on the ways in which genotype (and epigenetic modification), growth processes (particularly in utero), and exposure to ionising radiation (in conjunction with genetic susceptibility) affect cancer risk from childhood to adulthood, whether as a primary occurrence, or a second primary tumour following earlier primary occurrence and treatment.

  7. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the elemental and isotopic composition of solar system objects imposes critical constraints on models describing the origin of our solar system and can provide insight to chemical and physical processes taking place during the planetary evolution. So far, the investigation of chemical composition of planetary surfaces could be conducted almost exclusively by remotely controlled spectroscopic instruments from orbiting spacecraft, landers or rovers. With some exceptions, the sensitivity of these techniques is, however, limited and often only abundant elements can be investigated. Nevertheless, the spectroscopic techniques proved to be successful for global chemical mapping of entire planetary objects such as the Moon, Mars and asteroids. A combined afford of the measurements from orbit, landers and rovers can also yield the determination of local mineralogy. New instruments including Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), have been recently included for several landed missions. LIBS is thought to improve flexibility of the investigations and offers a well localised chemical probing from distances up to 10-13 m. Since LIMS is a mass spectrometric technique it allows for very sensitive measurements of elements and isotopes. We will demonstrate the results of the current performance tests obtained by application of a miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer, a LIMS instrument, developed in Bern for the chemical analysis of solids. So far, the only LIMS instrument on a spacecraft is the LAZMA instrument. This spectrometer was a part of the payload for PHOBOS-GRUNT mission and is also currently selected for LUNA-RESURCE and LUNA-GLOB missions to the lunar south poles (Managadze et al., 2011). Our LIMS instrument has the dimensions of 120 x Ø60 mm and with a weight of about 1.5 kg (all electronics included), it is the lightest mass analyser designed for in situ chemical

  8. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  9. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  10. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Eye Cancer > Eye Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Eye Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... trained to treat intraocular cancer. Parts of the eye The eye is the organ that collects light ...

  11. Ionised silica in the estuary of a river as supply to seawater: Identification and ionization efficiency of silica species by FAB-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Miho; Takahashi, Kazuya

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of the dissolution state of silicic acid is difficult. In river water, silica exists in particle form, but silica particles with a diameter of less than approximately 0.45 μm are considered as dissolved silica. In seawater, silica exists in two forms: ionic silica and particle silica. In this study, we focused on ionic silica. Using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS), the silica species in river water and seawater were detected as ionic forms. Ionic silica forms various chemical species in aquatic solutions, including the monomer ([Si]) and dimer ([Si]). The relative abundances of these species in aquatic solutions depend on the chemical and physical conditions. Silica species such as [Si(OH)2O2Na]- ([monomer-Na+]-), [Si2(OH)5O2]- ([dimer]-), [Si2(OH)4O3Na]-([dimer-Na+]-), [Si4(OH)7O5]- ([cyclic tetramer]-), [Si4(OH)6O6Na]- ([cyclic tetramer-Na+]-), [Si4(OH)9O4]- ([linear tetramer]-) and [Si4(OH)8O5Na]- ([linear tetramer-Na+]-) were directly observed by FAB-MS in river water and seawater. Some of these ionic silica species are expected to serve as "nutrients" for diatoms in seawater. Large silica particles are transported in river water, whereas in estuaries, a large amount of silica is precipitated and a small amount of silica is dissolved as ionic forms in sodium chloride solution. In river water, the concentration of silica was high, but the ionic silica species were hardly ionised by FAB-MS. In seawater, the concentration of silica was low, but the ionic silica species were well ionised. Thus, the ionization efficiency of silica species by FAB-MS indicates the type of silica species. The filtration process of silicic acid and the ionization of silicic acid to dissolve the silica species in seawater, which is an electrolyte (sodium chloride), occur in the estuary of a river. Thus, the estuary of a river plays an important role in the restructuring of silica from particle form to ionic form.

  12. A study of the analytical behaviour of selected synthetic and naturally occurring quinolines using electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography and gas chromatography and the construction of an appropriate database for quinoline characterisation.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, F; Ramachandran, V N; Smyth, W F; Hack, C J; Patton, E

    2006-07-14

    Mass spectral fragmentation of quinoline alkaloids of significance in plants has been investigated using electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) with a view to characterisation of molecules of unknown structure isolated from these natural sources. This investigation has led to the generation of an appropriate database incorporating data from ESI-MS(n) and also from gas liquid chromatography (GLC) and liquid chromatography (HPLC) for these low molecular mass quinolines. This has been put to practical application in the identification of quinoline alkaloids in a plant extract. Thus, an acid extraction of the leaves of Choisya ternata containing such tertiary alkaloids was analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) and the resulting behaviour of the quinolines was compared with that of the quinoline alkaloids in the database.

  13. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  14. A new approach to studying the effects of ionising radiation on single cells using FTIR synchrotron microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, E.; Birarda, G.; Kowalska, J.; Lekki, J.; Vaccari, L.; Wiecheć, A.; Wood, B. R.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on single cells using a proton source was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The prostate cancer cells (DU-145) were irradiated by a specific number (50, 200, 400, 2000 and 4000) of protons per cell. Next after fixing the cells with 70% ethanol micro-FTIR spectra were obtained using both: (a) the synchrotron radiation source with a Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) detector and (b) a globar source with a focal plane array (FPA) detector. FTIR spectra obtained from both instrumental configurations were analyzed independently to investigate the changes in the DNA phosphodiester region (1150-950 cm-1) of irradiated and control (untreated by ionizing radiation) cells. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) scores plot revealed distinct clusters for all groups of irradiated cells, even for those irradiated by the smallest dose of protons. The dose-dependent changes in the relative intensities of DNA peak at 970 cm-1 (ribose-phosphate skeletal motions), along with a shift of the O-P-O band corresponding to the symmetric phosphodiester stretching mode at 1090 cm-1 were observed. The results demonstrate that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool to investigate DNA damage in single cells and may become an important tool in assessing cell damage following radiotherapy.

  15. Visualisation of abscisic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds using desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sensu, Takuya; Sato, Kei; Sato, Futoshi; Paxton, Thanai; Yumoto, Emi; Miyamoto, Koji; Asahina, Masashi; Yokota, Takao; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2017-02-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the jasmonic acid related-compound 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) play crucial roles in seed development, dormancy, and germination. However, a lack of suitable techniques for visualising plant hormones has restricted the investigation of their biological mechanisms. In the present study, desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry (DESI-IMS), a powerful tool for visualising metabolites in biological tissues, was used to visualise ABA and OPDA in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed sections. The mass spectra, peak values and chemical formulae obtained from the analysis of seed sections were consistent with those determined for ABA and OPDA standards, as were the precursor and major fragment ions observed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging. Furthermore, the precursor and fragment ion images showed similar distribution patterns. In addition, the localisation of ABA and OPDA using DESI-IMS was confirmed using liquid chromatography-MS/MS (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated that ABA was mainly distributed in the radical and cotyledon of the embryo, whereas OPDA was distributed exclusively in external structures, such as the hilum and seed coat. The present study is the first to report the visualisation of plant hormones using IMS, and demonstrates that DESI-IMS is a promising technique for future plant hormone research.

  16. Rapid monitoring of carvacrol in plants and herbal medicines using matrix solid-phase dispersion and gas chromatography flame ionisation detector.

    PubMed

    Rashidipour, Marzieh; Heydari, Rouhollah; Feizbakhsh, Alireza; Hashemi, Payman

    2015-01-01

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) method coupled with gas chromatography flame ionisation detector as a quick and easy extraction technique has been developed to extract carvacrol from plants and herbal medicines. Influence of important parameters on the MSPD method efficiency, such as the sorbent material, the ratio of sample to sorbent material, elution solvent and volume of the elution solvent has been evaluated and optimised. Carvacrol was successfully extracted by diatomaceous earth as sorbent with 350 μL of dichloromethane as elution solvent. The calibration curve showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9965) and precision (RSD < 8.16%) in the concentration range of 0.5-100 μg mL(-1) for carvacrol. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.1 and 0.5 μg mL(-1), respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 74.4-80.5% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from 8.4% to 9.8%. The reported MSPD extraction method revealed to be simpler and faster than conventional methods used to quantify carvacrol from plants and herbal medicines.

  17. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time.

  18. Simultaneous determination of monomethylmercury, monobutyltin, dibutyltin and tributyltin in environmental samples by multi-elemental-species-specific isotope dilution analysis using electron ionisation GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Maria Jimenez; Pacheco-Arjona, Jaime; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Preud'Homme, Hugues; Amouroux, David; Donard, Olivier F X

    2006-11-01

    In this work, the simultaneous determination of four organometallic species (monomethylmercury, monobutyltin, dibutyltin and tributyltin) in environmental samples by using a GC-MS system with electron ionisation has been established. The measurement of isotope ratios in each species was accomplished by selecting the most adequate molecular cluster, and simple mathematical equations were applied to correct the contributions of 13C from the organic groups attached to the tin and mercury atoms. The influence of different parameters such as dwell time on the precision and accuracy of the measured isotope ratios in each target species has also been studied. The determination and the sample preparation procedures presented in this work were first individually validated by analysing several certified reference materials for butyltin compounds (mussel tissue CRM-477 and marine sediment SOPH-1) and for monomethylmercury (tuna fish CRM-464) using an innovative focused microwave technology for the extraction of the species from the solid samples. Additionally, the simultaneous determination of the four species was successfully validated by obtaining quantitative recoveries in spiked natural waters and by analysing the certified reference material BCR-710 (certified in tributyltin and monomethylmercury). The values obtained in such certified tissue were fully in agreement not only with the certified mass fractions but also with the proposed indicative values for mono- and dibutyltin.

  19. A preliminary investigation into a simple method for the determination of the mean ionisation energy of gas mixtures used in the NPL primary gas counting system.

    PubMed

    Phillips, H C; Sephton, J P; Johansson, L C; Dean, J C J

    2012-09-01

    The activity concentration of gaseous beta-emitting radionuclides such as (3)H, (85)Kr and, more recently, (11)C, is measured at NPL using a set of length-compensated proportional counters. The active gas is mixed with argon-methane (P-10) and passed to the counters. Adding gases to P-10 changes the mean ionisation energy, W, of the gas mixture. Estimation of the counting losses using the Monte Carlo model requires a knowledge of W. Unfortunately, only a limited amount of published data is available. This paper describes the initial experimental studies performed to enable the extension of the MC model based loss correction method to gases other than carbon dioxide in P-10. Preliminary measurements have been made to determine the W value for a gas mixture containing (85)Kr in nitrogen and P-10. The DC current through the counters is measured; the counters are also operated in the normal way with pulse amplifiers, discriminators and scalers. The value of W is derived from a knowledge of activity, counter current and mean beta energy.

  20. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust.

  1. Visualisation of abscisic acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds using desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirofumi; Sensu, Takuya; Sato, Kei; Sato, Futoshi; Paxton, Thanai; Yumoto, Emi; Miyamoto, Koji; Asahina, Masashi; Yokota, Takao; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the jasmonic acid related-compound 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) play crucial roles in seed development, dormancy, and germination. However, a lack of suitable techniques for visualising plant hormones has restricted the investigation of their biological mechanisms. In the present study, desorption electrospray ionisation-imaging mass spectrometry (DESI-IMS), a powerful tool for visualising metabolites in biological tissues, was used to visualise ABA and OPDA in immature Phaseolus vulgaris L. seed sections. The mass spectra, peak values and chemical formulae obtained from the analysis of seed sections were consistent with those determined for ABA and OPDA standards, as were the precursor and major fragment ions observed in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging. Furthermore, the precursor and fragment ion images showed similar distribution patterns. In addition, the localisation of ABA and OPDA using DESI-IMS was confirmed using liquid chromatography-MS/MS (LC-MS/MS). The results indicated that ABA was mainly distributed in the radical and cotyledon of the embryo, whereas OPDA was distributed exclusively in external structures, such as the hilum and seed coat. The present study is the first to report the visualisation of plant hormones using IMS, and demonstrates that DESI-IMS is a promising technique for future plant hormone research. PMID:28211480

  2. Examination of the translocation of sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Carolan, Vikki A; Crosland, Susan; Sharples, Kate R; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-11-30

    Pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control weeds, pests and diseases. Successful control is dependent on the compound reaching the target site within the organism after spray or soil application. Conventional methods for determining uptake and movement of herbicides and pesticides include autoradiography, liquid scintillation and chromatographic techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Autoradiography using radiolabelled compounds provides the best indication of a compound's movement within the plant system. Autoradiography is an established technique but it relies on the synthesis of radiolabelled compounds. The distribution of four sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants has been studied 24  h after foliar application. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) images of protonated molecules and fragment ions (resulting from fragmentation at the urea bond within the sulfonylurea herbicides) has provided evidence for translocation above and below the application point. The translocation of nicosulfuron and azoxystrobin within the same plant system has also been demonstrated following their application to the plant stem. This study provides evidence that MALDI-MSI has great potential as an analytical technique to detect and assess the foliar, root and stem uptake of agrochemicals, and to reveal their distribution through the plant once absorbed and translocated.

  3. Evolution of the Observed Ly-alpha Luminosity Function from z = 6.5 to z = 7.7: Evidence for the Epoch of Re-ionisation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, B.; Cuby, J.-G.; Courbin, F.; Fontana, A.; Freudling, W.; Fynbo, J.; Gallego, J.; Hibon, P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Moller, P.; Nilsson, K. K.; Pentericci, L.; Venemans, B.; Villar, V.; Willis, J.

    2011-12-01

    Probing the first billion years of the Universe is one of the last frontiers in cosmology. Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) are galaxies that can be detected out to very high redshifts during the epoch of re-ionisation. The evolution of their luminosity function with redshift is a direct probe of the Ly-alpha transmission of the intergalactic medium (IGM), related to the amount of neutral hydrogen. We report on the results of a search for LAEs at z = 7.7 using HAWK-I at the VLT with a narrowband filter centred at 1.06 μm. We did not find any LAE candidates, which allows us to infer robust constraints on the LAE luminosity function at z = 7.7. Depending on which luminosity functions at z = 6.5 are referred to, our results may reflect a significant quenching of the IGM Ly-alpha transmission, possibly from a strong increase in the neutral hydrogen fraction between these two redshifts.

  4. Influence of ionisation zone motion in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on angular ion flux and NbO x film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Robert; Clavero, César; Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2016-02-01

    The ion energies and fluxes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma from a Nb target were analysed angularly resolved along the tangential direction of the racetrack. A reactive oxygen-containing atmosphere was used as such discharge conditions are typically employed for the synthesis of thin films. Asymmetries in the flux distribution of the recorded ions as well as their energies and charge states were noticed when varying the angle between mass-energy analyser and target surface. More positively charged ions with higher count rates in the medium energy range of their distributions were detected in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction, thus confirming the notion that ionisation zones (also known as spokes or plasma bunches) are associated with moving potential humps. The motion of the recorded negatively charged high-energy oxygen ions was unaffected. Nb{{\\text{O}}x} thin films at different angles and positions were synthesised and analysed as to their structure and properties in order to correlate the observed plasma properties to the film growth conditions. The chemical composition and the film thickness varied with changing deposition angle, where the latter, similar to the ion fluxes, was higher in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction.

  5. Characterisation of chemical components for identifying historical Chinese textile dyes by ultra high performance liquid chromatography - photodiode array - electrospray ionisation mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wanrooij, Jantien; van Bommel, Maarten; Quye, Anita

    2017-01-06

    This research makes the first attempt to apply Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to both Photodiode Array detection (PDA) and Electrospray Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (ESI-MS) to the chemical characterisation of common textile dyes in ancient China. Three different extraction methods, respectively involving dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-oxalic acid, DMSO and hydrochloric acid, are unprecedentedly applied together to achieve an in-depth understanding of the chemical composition of these dyes. The first LC-PDA-MS database of the chemical composition of common dyes in ancient China has been established. The phenomena of esterification and isomerisation of the dye constituents of gallnut, gardenia and saffron, and the dye composition of acorn cup dyed silk are clarified for the first time. 6-Hydroxyrubiadin and its glycosides are first reported on a dyed sample with Rubia cordifolia from China. UHPLC-PDA-ESI-MS with a C18 BEH shield column shows significant advantages in the separation and identification of similar dye constituents, particularly in the cases of analysing pagoda bud and turmeric dyed sample extracts.

  6. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  8. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Precision Medicine Initiative® Cancer Moonshot℠ Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Snapshots Milestones in Cancer ... Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in ...

  9. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  12. Heat effects on DNA repair after ionising radiation: hyperthermia commonly increases the number of non-repaired double-strand breaks and structural rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, R. A.; Dikomey, E.; Dahm-Daphi, J.

    2001-01-01

    After ionising radiation double-strand breaks (dsb) are lethal if not repaired or misrepaired. Cell killing is greatly enhanced by hyperthermia and it is questioned here whether heat not only affects dsb repair capacity but also fidelity in a chromosomal context. dsb repair experiments were designed so as to mainly score non-homologous end joining, while homologous recombination was largely precluded. Human male G0 fibroblasts were either preheated (45°C, 20 min) or not before X-irradiation. dsb induction and repair were measured by conventional gel electrophoresis and an assay combining restriction digestion using a rare cutting enzyme (NotI) and Southern hybridisation, which detects large chromosomal rearrangements (>100 kb). dsb induction rate in an X-chromosomal NotI fragment was 4.8 × 10–3 dsb/Gy/Mb. Similar values were found for the genome overall and also when cells were preheated. After 50 Gy, fibroblasts were competent to largely restore the original restriction fragment size. Five per cent of dsb remained non-rejoined and 14% were misrejoined. Correct restitution of restriction fragments occurred preferably during the first hour but continued at a slow rate for 12–16 h. In addition, dsb appeared to misrejoin throughout the entire repair period. After hyperthermia the fractions of non-rejoined and misrejoined dsb were similarly increased to 13 and 51%, respectively. It is suggested that heat increases the probability of dsb being incorrectly rejoined but it is not likely to interfere with one dsb repair pathway in particular. PMID:11328880

  13. Rapid identification of additives in poly(vinyl chloride) lid gaskets by direct analysis in real time ionisation and single-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rothenbacher, Thorsten; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Gaskets for lids of glass jars usually consist of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) containing plasticisers and additional additives, which may migrate into packed foodstuffs. To conform to legal regulations, any such migration has to be determined analytically, which is a big challenge due to the huge chemical variety of additives in use. Therefore, a rapid screening method by means of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), using a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer, was developed. On introducing a plastisol sample into the DART interface, protonated molecules and ammonium adducts were obtained as the typical ionisation products of any additives present, and cleavages of ester bonds as typical fragmentation processes. Generally, additives present in the 1% range could be directly and easily identified if ion suppressive effects deriving from specific molecules did not occur. These effects could be avoided by analysing toluene extracts of plastisol samples, and this also improved the sensitivity. Using this method, it was possible to identify phthalates, fatty acid amides, tributyl O-acetylcitrate, dibutyl sebacate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, 1,2-diisononyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylate, and even more complex additives like acetylated mono- and diacylglycerides, epoxidised soybean oil, and polyadipates, with a limit of detection of < or = 1% in PVC plastisols. Only in the case of epoxidised linseed oil were levels of > or = 5% required for identification. The detection of azodicarbonamide, used as a foaming agent within the manufacturing process, was possible in principle, but was not highly reproducible due to the very low concentrations in plastisols.

  14. A dynamic system for the simulation of fasting luminal pH-gradients using hydrogen carbonate buffers for dissolution testing of ionisable compounds.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Grzegorz; Kołodziej, Bartosz; Koziolek, Mirko; Weitschies, Werner; Klein, Sandra

    2014-01-23

    The hydrogen carbonate buffer is considered as the most biorelevant buffer system for the simulation of intestinal conditions and covers the physiological pH range of the luminal fluids from pH 5.5 to about pH 8.4. The pH value of a hydrogen carbonate buffer is the result of a complex and dynamic interplay of the concentration of hydrogen carbonate ions, carbonic acid, the concentration of dissolved and solvated carbon dioxide and its partial pressure above the solution. The complex equilibrium between the different ions results in a thermodynamic instability of hydrogen carbonate solutions. In order to use hydrogen carbonate buffers with pH gradients in the physiological range and with the dynamics observed in vivo without changing the ionic strength of the solution, we developed a device (pHysio-grad®) that provides both acidification of the dissolution medium by microcomputer controlled carbon dioxide influx and alkalisation by degassing. This enables a continuous pH control and adjustment during dissolution of ionisable compounds. The results of the pH adjustment indicate that the system can compensate even rapid pH changes after addition of a basic or acidic moiety in amounts corresponding up to 90% of the overall buffer capacity. The results of the dissolution tests performed for a model formulation containing ionizable compounds (Nexium 20mg mups) indicate that both the simulated fasting intraluminal pH-profiles and the buffer species can significantly affect the dissolution process by changing the lag time prior to initial drug release and the release rate of the model compound. A prediction of the in vivo release behaviour of this formulation is thus most likely strongly related to the test conditions such as pH and buffer species.

  15. Feasibility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) networking in university hospitals in Brussels.

    PubMed

    Martiny, D; Cremagnani, P; Gaillard, A; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Mascart, G; Ebraert, A; Attalibi, S; Dediste, A; Vandenberg, O

    2014-05-01

    The mutualisation of analytical platforms might be used to address rising healthcare costs. Our study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of networking a unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system for common use in several university hospitals in Brussels, Belgium. During a one-month period, 1,055 successive bacterial isolates from the Brugmann University Hospital were identified on-site using conventional techniques; these same isolates were also identified using a MALDI-TOF MS system at the Porte de Hal Laboratory by sending target plates and identification projects via transportation and the INFECTIO_MALDI software (Infopartner, Nancy, France), respectively. The occurrence of transmission problems (<2 %) and human errors (<1 %) suggested that the system was sufficiently robust to be implemented in a network. With a median time-to-identification of 5 h and 11 min (78 min, min-max: 154-547), MALDI-TOF MS networking always provided a faster identification result than conventional techniques, except when chromogenic culture media and oxidase tests were used (p < 0.0001). However, the limited clinical benefits of the chromogenic culture media do not support their extra cost. Our financial analysis also suggested that MALDI-TOF MS networking could lead to substantial annual cost savings. MALDI-TOF MS networking presents many advantages, and few conventional techniques (optochin and oxidase tests) are required to ensure the same quality in patient care from the distant laboratory. Nevertheless, such networking should not be considered unless there is a reorganisation of workflow, efficient communication between teams, qualified technologists and a reliable IT department and helpdesk to manage potential connectivity problems.

  16. InterCardioRisk: a novel online tool for estimating doses of ionising radiation to occupationally-exposed medical staff and their associated health risks.

    PubMed

    Moriña, David; Grellier, James; Carnicer, Adela; Pernot, Eileen; Ryckx, Nick; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Those working in interventional cardiology and related medical procedures are potentially subject to considerable exposure to x-rays. Two types of tissue of particular concern that may receive considerable doses during such procedures are the lens of the eye and the brain. Ocular radiation exposure results in lens changes that, with time, may progress to partial or total lens opacification (cataracts). In the early stages, such opacities do not result in visual disability; the severity of such changes tends to increase progressively with dose and time until vision is impaired and cataract surgery is required. Scattered radiation doses to the eye lens of an interventional cardiologist in typical working conditions can exceed 34 μGy min(-1) in high-dose fluoroscopy modes and 3 μGy per image during image acquisition (instantaneous rate values) when radiation protection tools are not used. A causal relation between exposure to ionising radiation and increased risk of brain and central nervous system tumours has been shown in a number of studies. Although absorbed doses to the brain in interventional cardiology procedures are lower than those to the eye lens by a factor between 3.40 and 8.08 according to our simulations, doses to both tissues are among the highest occupational radiation doses documented for medical staff whose work involves exposures to x-rays. We present InterCardioRisk, a tool featuring an easy-to-use web interface that provides a general estimation of both cumulated absorbed doses experienced by medical staff exposed in the interventional cardiology setting and their estimated associated health risks. The tool is available at http://intercardiorisk.creal.cat.

  17. Introduction, audit and review of guidelines for delegated authorization of nuclear medicine investigations in compliance with the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000.

    PubMed

    Harris, A M; Greaves, C D; Taylor, C M; Taylor, C; Segasby, C A; Tindale, W B

    2003-08-01

    The introduction of the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 in Great Britain required every nuclear medicine investigation to be justified by a practitioner holding an appropriate Administration of Radioactive Substances Committee (ARSAC) certificate. The task of authorizing the radiation exposure may be performed by the practitioner (direct authorization) or delegated to an appropriately trained operator working to written guidelines approved by the practitioner (delegated authorization). In this study, we look at the process of implementation, audit and review of a set of Delegated Authorization Guidelines (DAG). The process of drafting the DAG is outlined. Following the introduction of the DAG, an audit of nuclear medicine referrals was performed at two sites for a period of 3 months. Each referral was compared with the DAG to determine whether it matched the criteria set out. If it did not match, it was further categorized as being due to: (1) insufficient referral information; or (2) clinical indication not included in the DAG. All non-matching requests were reviewed by the practitioner. Four hundred and thirty-seven of 632 (69%) referrals fitted the DAG, 12% (n=75) required clarification from the referrer before fitting with the criteria and 19% (n=120) were directly authorized by the practitioner. From those referrals that were directly authorized, some additional indications were identified and the DAG were subsequently revised. In conclusion, a delegated authorization procedure for nuclear medicine investigations can be implemented successfully. Regular audit is essential. This study identified the need to improve the format of the request card and to obtain additional referral information from the referrer.

  18. Direct Identification of Bacteria in Positive Blood Culture Bottles by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Background With long delays observed between sampling and availability of results, the usefulness of blood cultures in the context of emergency infectious diseases has recently been questioned. Among methods that allow quicker bacterial identification from growing colonies, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was demonstrated to accurately identify bacteria routinely isolated in a clinical biology laboratory. In order to speed up the identification process, in the present work we attempted bacterial identification directly from blood culture bottles detected positive by the automate. Methodology/Principal Findings We prospectively analysed routine MALDI-TOF identification of bacteria detected in blood culture by two different protocols involving successive centrifugations and then lysis by trifluoroacetic acid or formic acid. Of the 562 blood culture broths detected as positive by the automate and containing one bacterial species, 370 (66%) were correctly identified. Changing the protocol from trifluoroacetic acid to formic acid improved identification of Staphylococci, and overall correct identification increased from 59% to 76%. Lack of identification was observed mostly with viridans streptococci, and only one false positive was observed. In the 22 positive blood culture broths that contained two or more different species, only one of the species was identified in 18 samples, no species were identified in two samples and false species identifications were obtained in two cases. The positive predictive value of bacterial identification using this procedure was 99.2%. Conclusions/Significance MALDI-TOF MS is an efficient method for direct routine identification of bacterial isolates in blood culture, with the exception of polymicrobial samples and viridans streptococci. It may replace routine identification performed on colonies, provided improvement for the specificity of blood culture broths growing viridans

  19. On-line measurements of α-pinene ozonolysis products using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion-trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warscheid, Bettina; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    An on-line technique to investigate complex organic oxidation reactions in environmental chamber experiments is presented. The method is based on the direct introduction of the chamber air into an atmospheric pressure ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the analytical potential of the method (atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation/mass spectrometry, APCI/MS), the ozonolysis of α-pinene was investigated in a series of experiments performed in various sized reaction chambers at atmospheric pressure and 296 K in synthetic air. Investigations were focussed on the influence of the water vapour concentration on the formation of the predominant oxidation product, pinonaldehyde, derived from the α-pinene/ozone reaction. Quantification of pinonaldehyde was achieved by conducting a standard addition technique. The molar yield of pinonaldehyde was found to depend strongly on the actual water vapour concentration between <1 and 80% relative humidity. Starting with an average yield of 0.23±0.05 at dry conditions, pinonaldehyde formation was approximately doubled by reaching a yield of 0.53±0.05 at a relative humidity of around 60%. Furthermore, the formation mechanism of pinonaldehyde was investigated in greater detail using isotopically labelled water. Applying on-line APCI/MS, pinonaldehyde formation under incorporation of 18O was observed, strongly supporting the reaction of the stabilised Criegee radical with water in the gas phase as suggested by Alvarado et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research 103 (1998) 25541-25551). Furthermore, the mass spectra recorded on-line were used to perform a semi-quantitative estimation of the decomposition pathway of the primary ozonide, indicating a branching ratio of 0.35/0.65.

  20. General baseline toxicity QSAR for nonpolar, polar and ionisable chemicals and their mixtures in the bioluminescence inhibition assay with Aliivibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Baumer, Andreas; Bittermann, Kai; Henneberger, Luise; König, Maria; Kühnert, Christin; Klüver, Nils

    2017-03-22

    The Microtox assay, a bioluminescence inhibition assay with the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri, is one of the most popular bioassays for assessing the cytotoxicity of organic chemicals, mixtures and environmental samples. Most environmental chemicals act as baseline toxicants in this short-term screening assay, which is typically run with only 30 min of exposure duration. Numerous Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) exist for the Microtox assay for nonpolar and polar narcosis. However, typical water pollutants, which have highly diverse structures covering a wide range of hydrophobicity and speciation from neutral to anionic and cationic, are often outside the applicability domain of these QSARs. To include all types of environmentally relevant organic pollutants we developed a general baseline toxicity QSAR using liposome-water distribution ratios as descriptors. Previous limitations in availability of experimental liposome-water partition constants were overcome by reliable prediction models based on polyparameter linear free energy relationships for neutral chemicals and the COSMOmic model for charged chemicals. With this QSAR and targeted mixture experiments we could demonstrate that ionisable chemicals fall in the applicability domain. Most investigated water pollutants acted as baseline toxicants in this bioassay, with the few outliers identified as uncouplers or reactive toxicants. The main limitation of the Microtox assay is that chemicals with a high melting point and/or high hydrophobicity were outside of the applicability domain because of their low water solubility. We quantitatively derived a solubility cut-off but also demonstrated with mixture experiments that chemicals inactive on their own can contribute to mixture toxicity, which is highly relevant for complex environmental mixtures, where these chemicals may be present at concentrations below the solubility cut-off.

  1. NBS1 Heterozygosity and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    di Masi, Alessandra; Antoccia, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in the NBS1 gene are responsible for the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosome instability and hypersensitivity to ionising radiation (IR). Epidemiological data evidence that the NBS1 gene can be considered a susceptibility factor for cancer development, as demonstrated by the fact that almost 40% of NBS patients have developed a malignancy before the age of 21. Interestingly, also NBS1 heterozygotes, which are clinically asymptomatic, display an elevated risk to develop some types of malignant tumours, especially breast, prostate and colorectal cancers, lymphoblastic leukaemia, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). So far, nine mutations in the NBS1 gene have been found, at the heterozygous state, in cancer patients. Among them, the 657del5, the I171V and the R215W mutations are the most frequently described. The pathogenicity of these mutations is presumably connected with their occurrence in the highly conserved BRCT tandem domains of the NBS1 protein, which are present in a large superfamily of proteins, and are recognized as major mediators of processes related to cell-cycle checkpoint and DNA repair. This review will focus on the current state-of-knowledge regarding the correlation between carriers of NBS1 gene mutations and the proneness to the development of malignant tumours. PMID:19452044

  2. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  3. Efficacy of point-of-entry copper--silver ionisation system in eradicating Legionella pneumophila in a tropical tertiary care hospital: implications for hospitals contaminated with Legionella in both hot and cold water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y S; Lin, Y E; Liu, Y-C; Huang, W K; Shih, H Y; Wann, S R; Lee, S S; Tsai, H C; Li, C H; Chao, H L; Ke, C M; Lu, H H; Chang, C L

    2008-02-01

    A medical centre in Southern Taiwan experienced an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease, with the water distribution system thought to be the source of the infection. Even after two superheats and flush, the rate of Legionella positivity in distal sites in hospital wards and intensive care units (ICUs) was 14% and 66%, respectively. Copper-silver ionisation was therefore implemented in an attempt to control Legionella colonisation in both hot- and cold-water systems. Environmental cultures and ion concentration testing were performed to evaluate the efficacy of ionisation. When the system was activated, no significant change in rate of Legionella positivity in the hospital wards (20% vs baseline of 30%) and ICUs (28% vs baseline of 34%) of the test buildings over a three-month period was found, although all Legionella positivity rates were below 30%, an arbitrary target for Legionnaires' disease prevention. When ion concentrations were increased from month 4 to month 7, however, the rate of Legionella positivity decreased significantly to 5% (mean) in hospital wards (P=0.037) and 16% (mean) in ICUs (P=0.037). Legionella positivity was further reduced to 0% in hospital wards and 5% (mean) in ICUs while 50% sites were still positive for Legionella in a control building. Although Legionella was not completely eradicated during the study period, no culture- or urine-confirmed hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease was reported. Ionisation was effective in controlling Legionella for both hot and cold water, and may be an attractive alternative as a point-of-entry systematic disinfection solution for Legionella.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Polarisation of the third harmonic generated by the pump field caused by collisions of electrons and ions in a plasma produced upon ionisation of a gas of excited hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, Viktor P.; Silin, Pavel V.

    2005-06-01

    The polarisation properties of the third harmonic of the pump field are considered in a plasma produced upon ionisation of excited hydrogen-like atoms, taking into account l degeneration. These properties depend on the degree of circular polarisation and intensity of the pump field. The threshold nature of the total circular polarisation of the third harmonic appearing in the case of partial circular polarisation of the pump is established. This effect represents the bifurcation of the total circular polarisation. The conditions required to confirm experimentally the predicted polarisation properties of radiation are discussed.

  5. Is cancer risk of radiation workers larger than expected?

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, P; Rühm, W; Walsh, L; Blettner, M; Hammer, G; Zeeb, H

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures to ionising radiation mainly occur at low-dose rates and may accumulate effective doses of up to several hundred milligray. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the evidence of cancer risks from such low-dose-rate, moderate-dose (LDRMD) exposures. Our literature search for primary epidemiological studies on cancer incidence and mortality risks from LDRMD exposures included publications from 2002 to 2007, and an update of the UK National Registry for Radiation Workers study. For each (LDRMD) study we calculated the risk for the same types of cancer among the atomic bomb survivors with the same gender proportion and matched quantities for dose, mean age attained and mean age at exposure. A combined estimator of the ratio of the excess relative risk per dose from the LDRMD study to the corresponding value for the atomic bomb survivors was 1.21 (90% CI 0.51 to 1.90). The present analysis does not confirm that the cancer risk per dose for LDRMD exposures is lower than for the atomic bomb survivors. This result challenges the cancer risk values currently assumed for occupational exposures. PMID:19570756

  6. Multiscale approach predictions for biological outcomes in ion-beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’Yov, Andrey V.

    2016-06-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides advances in cancer treatment, offering the possibility of excellent dose localization and thus maximising cell-killing within the tumour. The full potential of such therapy can only be realised if the fundamental mechanisms leading to lethal cell damage under ion irradiation are well understood. The key question is whether it is possible to quantitatively predict macroscopic biological effects caused by ion radiation on the basis of physical and chemical effects related to the ion-medium interactions on a nanometre scale. We demonstrate that the phenomenon-based MultiScale Approach to the assessment of radiation damage with ions gives a positive answer to this question. We apply this approach to numerous experiments where survival curves were obtained for different cell lines and conditions. Contrary to other, in essence empirical methods for evaluation of macroscopic effects of ionising radiation, the MultiScale Approach predicts the biodamage based on the physical effects related to ionisation of the medium, transport of secondary particles, chemical interactions, thermo-mechanical pathways of biodamage, and heuristic biological criteria for cell survival. We anticipate this method to give great impetus to the practical improvement of ion-beam cancer therapy and the development of more efficient treatment protocols.

  7. Multiscale approach predictions for biological outcomes in ion-beam cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov’yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-beam therapy provides advances in cancer treatment, offering the possibility of excellent dose localization and thus maximising cell-killing within the tumour. The full potential of such therapy can only be realised if the fundamental mechanisms leading to lethal cell damage under ion irradiation are well understood. The key question is whether it is possible to quantitatively predict macroscopic biological effects caused by ion radiation on the basis of physical and chemical effects related to the ion-medium interactions on a nanometre scale. We demonstrate that the phenomenon-based MultiScale Approach to the assessment of radiation damage with ions gives a positive answer to this question. We apply this approach to numerous experiments where survival curves were obtained for different cell lines and conditions. Contrary to other, in essence empirical methods for evaluation of macroscopic effects of ionising radiation, the MultiScale Approach predicts the biodamage based on the physical effects related to ionisation of the medium, transport of secondary particles, chemical interactions, thermo-mechanical pathways of biodamage, and heuristic biological criteria for cell survival. We anticipate this method to give great impetus to the practical improvement of ion-beam cancer therapy and the development of more efficient treatment protocols. PMID:27297618

  8. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... Abnormal testicle development Exposure to certain chemicals ...

  9. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Signs & Symptoms? Should You Have an Oral Cancer Exam? U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and ...

  10. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  11. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a direct link between breast cancer and pesticides. Symptoms Early breast cancer often does not cause ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  12. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - anus; Squamous cell carcinoma - anal; HPV - anal cancer ... cancer and the human papillomavirus or HPV infection. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that has been linked to other cancers as well. Other major risk factors include: HIV ...

  13. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  14. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  16. PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy: two modes of attack on the cancer cell widening the clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Drew, Yvette; Plummer, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) represents an important novel target in cancer therapy. PARP-1 is essential to the repair of single strand DNA breaks via the base excision repair pathway. Inhibitors of PARP-1 have been shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of ionising radiation and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents such as the methylating agents and topoisomerase-I inhibitors. There are currently at least eight PARP inhibitors in clinical trial development. In vitro data, in vivo preclinical data and most recently early clinical trial data suggests that PARP inhibitors could be used not only as chemo/radiotherapy sensitizers but also as single agents to selectively kill cancers defective in DNA repair, specifically cancers with mutations in the breast cancer associated (BRCA)1 and BRCA2 genes. This theory of selectively exploiting cells defective in one DNA repair pathway by inhibiting another is a major breakthrough in the treatment of cancer. The current clinical data are discussed within this review with reference to the preclinical models which predicted activity and also future directions and the possible dangers/pitfalls of this clinical strategy are explored.

  17. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  18. Application of positive ion chemical ionisation and tandem mass spectrometry combined with gas chromatography to the trace level analysis of ethyl carbamate in bread.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Colin G; Jayaratne, Sanal M; Morrison, Carol

    2005-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and selective method has been developed and validated for the analysis of the contaminant ethyl carbamate (EC) in bread products at the part-per-billion level. The new procedure uses positive ion chemical ionisation (PICI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), combined with gas chromatography (GC), on a 'bench-top' triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Ammonia was the PICI reagent gas of choice because of its ability to produce abundant [M+H]+ and [M+NH4]+ ions from EC and deuterium-labelled EC (LEC) used as an internal standard. For identification and quantification, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) was used to follow the precursor-to-product ion transitions of m/z 107 --> 90, m/z 107 --> 62 and m/z 90 --> 62 for EC, as well as m/z 112 --> 63 for the LEC internal standard. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 1.2 microg kg(-1), respectively, and the recovery of the method was 101 +/- 10% at 10 microg kg(-1) and 98 +/- 5% at 100 microg kg(-1). The precision of the method, established under conditions of intermediate reproducibility, did not exceed a relative standard deviation of 7%. The quantitative performance of the new GC/PICI-SRM procedure compared favourably with that of a reference method based on GC/MS and selected ion monitoring (correlation coefficient, r = 0.997). However, the new method had the advantages of reduced sample preparation time, improved sensitivity and unambiguous identification of EC at all concentrations. Application of the new method to the analysis of 50 UK breads showed that levels of EC ranged from 0.6 to 2.3 microg kg(-1) in retail products and from 3.1 to 12.2 microg kg(-1) for breads prepared using domestic breadmaking machines (dry weight basis). Toasting bread in a domestic toaster led to increases of between two- and three-fold in mean EC concentrations.

  19. In situ formation and characterisation of singly ionised atomic europium in rare gas matrices—Luminescence spectroscopy and MP2 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Owen; Davis, Barry; McCaffrey, John G.

    2015-02-07

    , providing a temporary trap for the ionised electron in the matrices.

  20. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  1. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  4. Ionisation induced collapse of minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Trevor

    2013-08-01

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant side was the critical location. Furthermore, a parametric and sensitivity study of the Neu/Sehitoglu model parameters suggests that in addition to four previously reported parameters, the sensitivity of the phasing to oxidation damage would be critical to overall blade life..

  5. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  6. Real-time analysis of aromatics in combustion engine exhaust by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOF-MS): a robust tool for chassis dynamometer testing.

    PubMed

    Adam, T W; Clairotte, M; Streibel, T; Elsasser, M; Pommeres, A; Manfredi, U; Carriero, M; Martini, G; Sklorz, M; Krasenbrink, A; Astorga, C; Zimmermann, R

    2012-07-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOF-MS) is a robust method for real-time analysis of monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in complex emissions. A mobile system has been developed which enables direct analysis on site. In this paper, we utilize a multicomponent calibration scheme based on the analytes' photo-ionisation cross-sections relative to a calibrated species. This allows semi-quantification of a great number of components by only calibrating one compound of choice, here toluene. The cross-sections were determined by injecting nebulised solutions of aromatic compounds into the TOF-MS ion source with the help of a HPLC pump. Then, REMPI-TOF-MS was implemented at various chassis dynamometers and test cells and the exhaust of the following vehicles and engines investigated: a compression ignition light-duty (LD) passenger car, a compression ignition LD van, two spark ignition LD passenger cars, 2 two-stroke mopeds, and a two-stroke engine of a string gas trimmer. The quantitative time profiles of benzene are shown. The results indicate that two-stroke engines are a significant source for toxic and cancerogenic compounds. Air pollution and health effects caused by gardening equipment might still be underestimated.

  7. Determination and separation of bisphenol A, phthalate metabolites and structural isomers of parabens in human urine with conventional high-pressure liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Myridakis, Antonis; Balaska, Eirini; Gkaitatzi, Christina; Kouvarakis, Antonis; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2015-03-01

    Phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA) and parabens (PBs), organic chemicals widely used in everyday products, are considered to be endocrine disruptors. We propose a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of seven phthalate metabolites, six PBs and BPA in human urine. All three categories of the above endocrine disruptors were simultaneously extracted from 1 mL of human urine using solid phase extraction. In addition, with a conventional reversed phase LC column, we achieved for the first time the separation of three pairs of structural isomers, namely iso-/n-butyl paraben, propyl paraben and monobutyl phthalate. LC-MS/MS was operated and tested in both electrospray ionisation (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI). ESI was selected for the analysis due to its superior stability and repeatability. The method limit of detection (mLOD), achieved for a single set of high-performance LC conditions, ranged from 0.01 to 0.84 ng/mL for phthalate metabolites, from 0.06 to 0.24 ng/mL for PBs and was 2.01 ng/mL for BPA. Derivatisation of BPA with dansyl chloride lowered its mLOD to 0.007 ng/mL. Blank contamination was non-detectable. The present method was successfully applied for the analysis of the above-mentioned compounds in 80 male human urine samples.

  8. Investigating time patterns of variation in radiation cancer associations

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, D; Ashmore, J

    2005-01-01

    Aims: In occupational settings, carcinogenic exposures are often repeated or protracted over time. The time pattern of exposure accrual may influence subsequent temporal patterns of cancer risk. The authors present several simple models that may be used to evaluate the influence of time since exposure or age at exposure on cancer incidence or mortality in an occupational cohort. Methods: A cohort of 40 415 nuclear industry workers was identified via the Canadian National Dose Registry. Vital status and cause of death were ascertained through 1994. Associations between ionising radiation and mortality due to lung cancer, leukaemia, and cancers other than lung and leukaemia were quantified using conditional logistic regression models with risk sets constructed by incidence density sampling. A step function, a bilinear function, and a sigmoid function were used to evaluate temporal variation in exposure effects. Results: Step and sigmoid functions were used to explore latency and morbidity periods. For analyses of lung cancer, leukaemia, and other cancers the best fitting models were obtained when exposure assignment was lagged by 13, 0, and 5 years, respectively. A bilinear function was used to evaluate whether exposure effects diminished with time since exposure. In analyses of lung cancer and leukaemia, there was evidence that radiation effects attenuated with protracted time since exposure. In analyses of age at exposure, there was evidence of variation in radiation mortality associations for analyses of lung cancer and leukaemia; discounting radiation doses accrued at younger ages (for example, 15–35 years) led to significant improvements in model fit. Conclusions: This paper illustrates empirical approaches to evaluating temporal variation in the effect of a protracted exposure on disease risk. PMID:16046608

  9. Stages of Parathyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  10. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  11. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  12. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  13. Cancer Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  14. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  15. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, ... the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of uterine cancer include Abnormal vaginal ...

  16. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2007 : NCI Cancer Screening Tests Screening tests can find diseases and conditions early when ... active or are older than 21. Prostate Cancer Screening (Men): Get advice from your doctor if you ...

  17. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cancer in women in the United States and it is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer. Fallopian Tubes Ovaries Uterus Cervix Vagina Vulva www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ knowledge 800-CDC-INFO Inside Knowledge is an initiative ...

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  19. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... work with the chemical trichloroethylene. What Are the Kidneys? The body has two kidneys, one on each ...

  20. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  1. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  2. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  3. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a biopsy. Treatment varies, depending on your overall health and how advanced the cancer is. It might include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or biologic therapy. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  4. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  6. An improved dispersive solid-phase extraction clean-up method for the gas chromatography-negative chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometric determination of multiclass pesticide residues in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Deme, Pragney; Azmeera, Tirupathi; Prabhavathi Devi, B L A; Jonnalagadda, Padmaja R; Prasad, R B N; Vijaya Sarathi, U V R

    2014-01-01

    An improved sample preparation using dispersive solid-phase extraction clean-up was proposed for the trace level determination of 35 multiclass pesticide residues (organochlorine, organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroids) in edible oils. Quantification of the analytes was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionisation mode (GC-NCI-MS/MS). The limit of detection and limit of quantification of residues were in the range of 0.01-1ng/g and 0.05-2ng/g, respectively. The analytes showed recoveries between 62% and 110%, and the matrix effect was observed to be less than 25% for most of the pesticides. Crude edible oil samples showed endosulfan isomers, p,p'-DDD, α-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon residues in the range of 0.56-2.14ng/g. However, no pesticide residues in the detection range of the method were observed in refined oils.

  7. Testicular Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  8. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  9. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  10. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  11. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  12. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... they demand more and more of the body's nutrition. Cancer takes a person's strength, destroys organs and bones, and weakens the body's defenses against other illnesses. Cancer is uncommon in children, but can happen. The most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As ...

  13. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  14. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  15. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  16. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are ... Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  17. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  18. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  19. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  20. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  1. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis, High Risk Individuals, and Individuals With No History of Cancer (Control)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  2. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is found, the better the chance of recovery; however, esophageal cancer is often found at an ... has decreased, the tubes will be removed. Recovery Recovery As with any surgery or operation, there are ...

  3. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  4. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  5. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  6. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  7. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  8. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  9. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  10. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  11. Throat Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... that develop in your throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx) or tonsils. Your throat is a muscular tube ... cancer begins in the upper portion of the larynx and includes cancer that affects the epiglottis, which ...

  12. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the side effects will disappear. Radiation , or radiotherapy, is another method of treating cancer. A person ... specializes in using radiation to kill cancer cells. Radiotherapy machines deliver powerful X-rays or high-energy ...

  13. Eyelid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  14. Appendix Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  15. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  16. Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  17. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  19. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  20. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and getting enough rest can help combat the stress and fatigue of cancer. There's no sure way to prevent ovarian cancer. But certain factors are associated with lower risk: Use of oral contraceptives, especially for more than 10 years Previous ...

  1. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes Cancer of the penis is rare. Its ... penis; Glansectomy; Partial penectomy Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References Heinlen JE, Culkin DJ. Cancer of the ...

  2. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  3. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  5. Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  6. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  8. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  9. Obesity and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  10. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  12. Dictionary of Cancer Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  13. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  14. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  15. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  16. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  17. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  18. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  19. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  20. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  1. Cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjili, Masoud H.; Payne, Kyle K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers utilize multiple mechanisms to overcome immune responses. Emerging evidence suggest that immunotherapy of cancer should focus on inducing and re-programming cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems rather than focusing solely on T cells. Recently, we have shown that such a multifaceted approach can improve immunotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:22720242

  2. Cancer treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer. This helps your body get rid of cancer cells. Immunotherapy works by: Stopping or slowing the growth of ... to seek and attack certain parts of a cancer cell. Some have toxins or radioactive substances attached to them. Immunotherapy is given by a shot or IV. Hormonal ...

  3. Cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Houghton, A N

    1993-01-01

    In this review, we address current progress in various facets of the immune response to cancer, including 1) the molecular identification of tumor antigens implicated in immune recognition, 2) experimental studies of cytokine gene transfer into cancer cells, and 3) adoptive transfer of immune effector cells. These studies provide strategies for the future development of immunotherapy for cancer.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: On the bifurcation of the circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics generated in the plasma produced by the ionisation of a gas of excited hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, Viktor P.; Silin, Pavel V.

    2006-05-01

    Within the framework of the Bethe ionisation model we considered theoretically the dependences of the degree of circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics, which are generated due to bremsstrahlung, on the electric intensity of the pump field, the degree of its circular polarisation, and the principal quantum number of the excited states of hydrogen-like atoms of a gas ionised by the pump field. A bifurcation of the circular polarisation of these harmonics was discovered, which confirms our previous hypothesis that this effect is common for harmonics generated due to the bremsstrahlung in the pump field when the plasma electrons oscillate in this field. We determined how the relationships under consideration are scaled with VEn/VZ, the product of electron oscillation velocity and the principal quantum number of the excited electron divided by the Coulomb velocity.

  5. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of anesthetic — a medication that blocks the perception of pain. Your options for anesthesia will be ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/in-depth/cancer-surgery/ART-20044171 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal ...

  6. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing. PMID:27558808

  7. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing.

  8. Classification of protein binders in artist's paints by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry: an evaluation of principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA).

    PubMed

    Fremout, Wim; Kuckova, Stepanka; Crhova, Michaela; Sanyova, Jana; Saverwyns, Steven; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan; Vandenabeele, Peter; Moens, Luc

    2011-06-15

    Proteomics techniques are increasingly applied for the identification of protein binders in historical paints. The complex nature of paint samples, with different kinds of pigments mixed into, and degradation by long term exposure to light, humidity and temperature variations, requires solid analysis and interpretation methods. In this study matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of tryptic-digested paint replicas are subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) in order to distinguish proteinaceous binders based on animal glues, egg white, egg yolk and milk casein from each other. The most meaningful peptide peaks for a given protein class will be determined, and if possible, annotated with their corresponding amino acid sequence. The methodology was subsequently applied on egg temperas, as well as on animal glues from different species. In the latter small differences in the MALDI-TOF mass spectra can allow the determination of a mammal or sturgeon origin of the glue. Finally, paint samples from the 16(th) century altarpiece of St Margaret of Antioch (Mlynica, Slovakia) were analysed. Several expected peaks are either present in lower abundance or completely missing in these natural aged paints, due to degradation of the paints. In spite of this mammalian glue was identified in the St Margaret samples.

  9. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and diode array detection in the identification and quantification of the degradation products of calix[4]arene crown-6 under radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Lamouroux, C; Aychet, N; Lelièvre, A; Jankowski, C K; Moulin, C

    2004-01-01

    The extraction of 135Cs from high-activity liquid waste, arising from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, can be achieved by using calix[4]arene crown-6 compounds. The radiolytic degradation of di(n-octyloxy)calix[4]arene crown-6 (octMC6), in aliphatic or aromatic solvent in contact with 3 M nitric acid, was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography directly coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). More than 50 distinct degradation products were observed, and about 30 of these were identified. These compounds can be assigned to three categories, namely, products of reactions involving radical cleavage or addition, of oxidation reactions, or of aromatic substitution reactions. The major product, corresponding to substitution by an NO2 group, was quantified by external standard calibration using a purified synthetic sample. Despite the observation of all these degradation compounds, octMC6 appears to be remarkably stable under these drastic conditions, combining hydrolysis (HNO(3) 3 M) and an extreme exposure to radiolysis (10(6) Gy). Less than 35% degradation of octMC6 was observed in aromatic solvent under these conditions.

  10. Dissociation of biomolecules using a ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight/curved field reflectron tandem mass spectrometer equipped with a differential-pumped collision cell.

    PubMed

    Belgacem, Omar; Bowdler, Andrew; Brookhouse, Ian; Brancia, Francesco L; Raptakis, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    A commercial matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) instrument equipped with a curved field reflectron (CFR) was modified in order to perform collision-induced dissociation (CID) on a variety of biomolecules. The incorporation of a high-resolution ion gate together with a collision cell within the field-free region allowed tandem mass analysis (MS/MS), without the necessity to decelerate the precursor ions prior to activation. The simultaneous detection of all product ions remained possible by using the CFR. To test the MS/MS performances, ACTH (fragment 1-17), a complex high mannose carbohydrate (Man)(8)(GlcNac)(2) and a lysophosphatidylcholine lipid (18:1) were analysed on the modified instrument. Direct comparison with the low-energy product ion spectra, acquired on a MALDI quadrupole ion trap (QIT) two-stage reflectron time-of flight (ReToF) mass spectrometer, showed significant differences in the types of product ions observed. The additional ions detected were a clear indication of the high-energy fragmentation processes occurring in the collision cell.

  11. The Insidious Nature of 'Hard-Core' Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the constructivist research programme of patterns in high school students' and pre-service teachers' thinking about ionisation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners-senior high school students and pre-service teachers-in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is currently included in the curriculum for 16- to 19-year-old students studying chemistry in Singapore (and elsewhere). The comparison shows that: (1) although graduate pre-service teachers offered some types of incorrect responses less frequently than high school students; (2) they retained high levels of alternative conceptions commonly found among high school students; and (3) of particular note, certain alternative conceptions were found to be more common among the graduates. This suggests the intuitive appeal of certain alternative conceptions is such that they can readily be reproduced down 'generations' of learners. The findings are explored in terms of a range of conceptual resources that have been developed within the constructivist RP. The analysis suggests that the curriculum sets out inappropriate target knowledge for senior high school students, given the nature of the subject matter and the prior learning of the students. It is also suggested that it may be fruitful to consider conceptual learning in terms analogous to the RP found in science, and that from this perspective certain insidious alternative conceptions can be understood as derived from commitments that are taken for granted and protected from explicit challenge by a protective belt of refutable auxiliary conceptions.

  12. Characterisation of ship diesel primary particulate matter at the molecular level by means of ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled to laser desorption ionisation--comparison of feed fuel, filter extracts and direct particle measurements.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Schwemer, Theo; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    In this study, positive-mode laser desorption-ionisation ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LDI-FT-ICR-MS) was applied to study combustion aerosol samples obtained from a ship diesel engine as well as the feed fuel, used to operate the engine. Furthermore, particulate matter was sampled from the exhaust tube using an impactor and analysed directly from the impaction foil without sample treatment. From the high percentage of shared sum formula as well as similarities in the chemical spread of aerosol and heavy fuel oil, results indicate that the primary aerosol mainly consists of survived, unburned species from the feed fuel. The effect of pyrosynthesis could be observed and was slightly more pronounced for the CH-class compared to other compound classes, but in summary not dominant. Alkylation pattern as well as the aromaticity distribution, using the double bond equivalent, revealed a shift towards lower alkylation state for the aerosol. The alkylation pattern of the most dominant series revealed a higher correlation between different aerosol samples than between aerosol and feed samples. This was confirmed by cluster analysis. Overall, this study shows that LDI-FT-ICR-MS can be successfully applied for the analysis of combustion aerosol at the molecular level and that sum formula information can be used to identify chemical differences between aerosol and fuel as well as between different size fractions of the particulate matter.

  13. Improved method for the determination of zinc pyrithione in environmental water samples incorporating on-line extraction and preconcentration coupled with liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bones, Jonathan; Thomas, Kevin V; Paull, Brett

    2006-11-03

    A method has been developed for the determination of zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) in environmental water samples using monolithic reversed-phase silica columns for rapid on-line large volume solid phase extraction in tandem with on-line matrix removal using sacrificial strong anion exchange (SAX) columns. This is coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection. Limits of detection in spiked river water samples, using a 200 mL preconcentration volume, were determined as 18 ng L(-1), with a limit of quantitation of 62 ng L(-1). The percentage recovery from spiked river water was found to be 72+/-9 (n=3 extractions), whilst overall method precision, following 10 repeat complete analyses was found to be 27% RSD at 1 microg L(-1). Linearity was determined over the concentration range of 0.25-10 microg L(-1) and the calculated regression coefficient was R(2)=0.9802. The method was used to investigate the environmental fate of zinc pyrithione in waters and its partition coefficient between sediment and water phases.

  14. Characterisation by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry of phloroglucinol and 4-methylcatechol oxidation products to study the reactivity of epicatechin in an apple juice model system.

    PubMed

    Poupard, Pascal; Guyot, Sylvain; Bernillon, Stephane; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2008-02-01

    The reactivity of the (-)-epicatechin structure towards caffeoylquinic acid o-quinones was studied in an apple juice model solution. The approach consisted in considering separately the reactivities of the two phenolic moieties of an (-)-epicatechin molecule: phloroglucinol and 4-methylcatechol were chosen to represent A- and B-rings, respectively. The oxidation products were characterised by RP-HPLC coupled with electrospray ionisation Mass spectrometry (MS). The reactivities of the A- and B-rings were clearly different on the basis of the oxidation products formed. Both A- and B-rings could be involved in covalent bond formation, but electron transfers only occurred with the B-ring. Most of the (-)-epicatechin oxidation products were linked by A/B-ring linkage ("head-to-tail" intermolecular coupling). After this first dimerisation step, intramolecular reactions seemed to be favoured. Therefore, the complexity of oxidation products in apple juice does not only result from an extensive polymerisation of native phenolic compounds, but also from a multiplicity of small molecules in different oxidation states and isomeric forms.

  15. Identification of differentially expressed proteins of gamma-ray irradiated rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zhang; Yongping, Su; Fengchao, Wang; Guoping, Ai; Yongjiang, Wei

    2005-02-01

    To identify proteins involved in the processes of cellular and molecular response to radiation damage repair in intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteome of irradiated IEC-6 cells with that of normal cells. A series of methods were used, including two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (Z-DE), PDQuest software analysis of 2-DE gels, peptide mass fingerprinting based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and Swiss-Prot database searching, to separate and identify differentially expressed proteins. Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to validate the differentially expressed proteins. Image analysis revealed that averages of 608 +/- 39 and 595 +/- 31 protein spots were detected in normal and irradiated IEC-6 cells, respectively. Sixteen differential protein spots were isolated from gels, and measured with MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 14 spots yielded good spectra, and 11 spots matched with known proteins after database searching. These proteins were mainly involved in anti-oxidation, metabolism, and protein post-translational processes. Western blotting confirmed that stress-70 protein was down-regulated by gamma-irradiation. Up-regulation of ERP29 was confirmed by RT-PCR, indicating that it is involved in ionizing radiation. The clues provided by the comparative proteome strategy utilized here will shed light on molecular mechanisms of radiation damage repair in intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and on natural ambient air samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Albinet, A; Leoz-Garziandia, E; Budzinski, H; Viilenave, E

    2006-07-14

    This study deals with the development of a routine analytical method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation (GC/NICI-MS) for the determination of 17 nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) present at low concentrations in the atmosphere. This method includes a liquid chromatography purification procedure on solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Application of this analytical procedure has been performed on standard reference material (SRM 1649a: urban dust), giving results in good agreement with the few data available in the literature. The analytical method was also applied on ambient air samples (on both gas and particulate phases) from the French POVA program (POllution des Vallées Alpines). NPAHs concentrations observed for a rural site during the Winter period are about 0.2-100.0pgm(-3) in the particulate phase and about 0.0-20.0pgm(-3) in the gas phase. OPAHs present concentrations 10-100 times higher (0.1-2.0ngm(-3) and 0.0-1.4ngm(-3) for the particulate and the gas phases, respectively). These preliminary results show a good correlation between the characteristics of the sampling site and the compound origins (primary or secondary).

  17. Fast confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC/MS/MS using negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI).

    PubMed

    Weinmann, W; Goerner, M; Vogt, S; Goerke, R; Pollak, S

    2001-09-15

    A fast method using automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) and short-column liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) has been developed for the confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine samples. This highly specific method which combines chromatographic separation and MS/MS-analysis can be used for the confirmation of positive immunoassay results with a NIDA cut-off of 15ng/ml. The conjugates of THC-COOH were hydrolysed prior to SPE, and a standard SPE was performed using C18-SPE columns. No derivatisation of the extracts was needed as in GC/MS analysis, and the LC run-time was 6.5min by gradient elution with a retention time of 2.4min. Linearity of calibration was obtained in the range between 0 and 500ng/ml (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.998). Using linear regression (0-50ng/ml) the limit of detection (LOD) was 2.0ng/ml and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 5.1ng/ml; day-to-day reproducibility and precision were tested at 15 and 250ng/ml and were 13.4ng/ml+/-3.3% and 255.8ng/ml+/-4.5%, respectively.

  18. Mitigating the risk of radiation-induced cancers: limitations and paradigms in drug development.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Stephen S; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Kennedy, Ann R; Boice, John D; Shapiro, Alla; Hu, Tom C-C; Moyer, Brian R; Grace, Marcy B; Kelloff, Gary J; Fenech, Michael; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Coleman, C Norman

    2014-06-01

    The United States radiation medical countermeasures (MCM) programme for radiological and nuclear incidents has been focusing on developing mitigators for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE), and biodosimetry technologies to provide radiation dose assessments for guiding treatment. Because a nuclear accident or terrorist incident could potentially expose a large number of people to low to moderate doses of ionising radiation, and thus increase their excess lifetime cancer risk, there is an interest in developing mitigators for this purpose. This article discusses the current status, issues, and challenges regarding development of mitigators against radiation-induced cancers. The challenges of developing mitigators for ARS include: the long latency between exposure and cancer manifestation, limitations of animal models, potential side effects of the mitigator itself, potential need for long-term use, the complexity of human trials to demonstrate effectiveness, and statistical power constraints for measuring health risks (and reduction of health risks after mitigation) following relatively low radiation doses (<0.75 Gy). Nevertheless, progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms resulting in radiation injury, along with parallel progress in dose assessment technologies, make this an opportune, if not critical, time to invest in research strategies that result in the development of agents to lower the risk of radiation-induced cancers for populations that survive a significant radiation exposure incident.

  19. Can high dose rates used in cancer radiotherapy change therapeutic effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Konopacka, Maria; Sochanik, Aleksander; Ślosarek, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Current cancer radiotherapy relies on increasingly high dose rates of ionising radiation (100–2400 cGy/min). It is possible that changing dose rates is not paralleled by treatment effectiveness. Irradiating cancer cells is assumed to induce molecular alterations that ultimately lead to apoptotic death. Studies comparing the efficacy of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death in relation to varying dose rates do not provide unequivocal data. Whereas some have demonstrated higher dose rates (single dose) to effectively kill cancer cells, others claim the opposite. Recent gene expression studies in cells subject to variable dose rates stress alterations in molecular signalling, especially in the expression of genes linked to cell survival, immune response, and tumour progression. Novel irradiation techniques of modern cancer treatment do not rely anymore on maintaining absolute constancy of dose rates during radiation emission: instead, timing and exposure areas are regulated temporally and spatially by modulating the dose rate and beam shape. Such conditions may be reflected in tumour cells’ response to irradiation, and this is supported by the references provided. PMID:28239281

  20. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  1. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Parathyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  3. General Information about Parathyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  4. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) TOF analysis identifies serum angiotensin II concentrations as a strong predictor of all-cause and breast cancer (BCa)-specific mortality following breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, Francesco; Rubagotti, Alessandra; Nuzzo, Pier Vitale; Argellati, Francesca; Savarino, Grazia; Romano, Paolo; Damonte, Gianluca; Rocco, Mattia; Profumo, Aldo

    2015-11-15

    MALDI-TOF MS was used to recognise serum peptidome profiles predictive of mortality in women affected by early BCa. Mortality was analysed based on signal profiling, and appropriate statistics were used. The results indicate that four signals were increased in deceased patients compared with living patients. Three of the four signals were individually associated with all-cause mortality, but only one having mass/charge ratio (m/z) 1,046.49 was associated with BCa-specific mortality and was the only peak to maintain an independent prognostic role after multivariate analysis. Two groups exhibiting different mortality probabilities were identified after clustering patients based on the expression of the four peptides, but m/z 1,046.49 was exclusively expressed in the cluster exhibiting the worst mortality outcome, thus confirming the crucial value of this peptide. The specific role of this peak was confirmed by competing risk analysis. MS findings were validated by ELISA analysis after demonstrating that m/z 1,046.49 structurally corresponded to Angiotensin II (ATII). In fact, mortality results obtained after arbitrarily dividing patients according to an ATII serum value of 255 pg/ml (which corresponds to the 66(th) percentile value) were approximately comparable to those previously demonstrated when the same patients were analysed according to the expression of signal m/z 1,046.49. Similarly, ATII levels were specifically correlated with BCa-related deaths after competing risk analysis. In conclusion, ATII levels were increased in women who exhibited worse mortality outcomes, reinforcing the evidence that this peptide potentially significantly affects the natural history of early BCa. Our findings also confirm that MALDI-TOF MS is an efficient screening tool to identify novel tumour markers and that MS findings can be rapidly validated through less complex techniques, such as ELISA.

  6. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ...

  7. Cancer Staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ...

  8. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  9. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  10. Cancer in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposure. Learn if you can prevent childhood cancer. Finding Cancer in Children Cancers in children are often hard ... Major advances in treatment have made possible to cure many of these childhood cancers. Learn more on surviving childhood cancer. EASY READING ...

  11. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  12. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Cancer > Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma). Use the menu below to choose ...

  13. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Liver Cancer If you have some of the signs ... Health Care Team About Liver Cancer? More In Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  15. Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Dating and Intimacy Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men ... here Home > Navigating Cancer Care > Dating, Sex, and Reproduction > Cancer During Pregnancy Request Permissions Cancer During Pregnancy ...

  16. Ontario-wide Cancer TArgeted Nucleic Acid Evaluation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Breast Cancer; Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Melanoma; Gynecological Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Rare Cancer; Unknown Primary Cancer

  17. Assessment of hybrid, meta-hybrid-GGA, and long-range corrected density functionals for the estimation of enthalpies of formation, barrier heights, and ionisation potentials of selected C1-C5 oxygenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nahas, Ahmed M.; Simmie, John M.; Mangood, Ahmed H.; Hirao, Kimihiko; Song, Jong-Won; Watson, Mark A.; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-07-01

    The enthalpies of formation for some selected oxygenates have been calculated by the atomisation energy approach using B3LYP, BHandHLYP, MPW3LYP, MPW1K, MPWB1K, BB1K, MPW1B95, BMK, and long-range corrected (LC-ωPBE, LC-BOP, LCgau-BOP, LC-BOP12, LCgau-B97) density functionals, as well as the composite CBS-QB3 method. Compared with experiment, BMK, LC-ωPBE, LCgau-BOP, LC-BOP12, LCgau-B97, MPW195, MPW3LYP functionals and CBS-QB3 give root mean square errors (RMSE) in enthalpies of formation no greater than 4 kcal/mol, whilst MPW1K and BHandHLYP show much worse performance (RMSE of 20-40 kcal/mol). The B3LYP, MPWB1K, and BB1K results fall between the two extremes. Energy barriers for the dominant paths in the unimolecular decomposition of simple esters (HCO2CH3, C2H5CO2C2H5), C1-C3 acids, and 1-butanol are reproduced well by CBS-QB3, BMK, BB1K, LCgau-B97, and PW1B95 (RMSE = 1-2 kcal/mol), while other LC methods (LC-ωPBE, LC-BOP, LCgau-BOP, and LC-BOP12) show a deviation of up to 4 kcal/mol. For the ionisation potentials, calculated from Koopman's theorem, all of the investigated LC-methods give good results compared with other density functional theory functionals with a maximum deviation of 0.4 eV, except for LCgau-B97, which has an RMSE of 0.7 eV.

  18. Investigation, by single photon ionisation (SPI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS), of the effect of different cigarette-lighting devices on the chemical composition of the first cigarette puff.

    PubMed

    Adam, Thomas; Baker, Richard R; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Soft single-photon ionisation (SPI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) has been used to investigate the effect of different cigarette-lighting devices on the chemical composition of the mainstream smoke from the first cigarette puff. Lighting devices examined were a Borgwaldt electric lighter, a propane/butane gas lighter, a match, a candle, and the burning zone of another cigarette. To eliminate the effects of the different masses of tobacco burnt by use of the different lighting methods a normalisation procedure was performed which enabled investigation of changes in the chemical patterns of the resulting smoke. When another cigarette was used as the lighting device, elevated levels of ammonia and other nitrogen-containing substances were observed. These are high in the sidestream smoke of the cigarette used for lighting and would be drawn into the mainstream smoke of the cigarette being lit. In contrast, smoke from the cigarette lit by the electric lighter contained slightly higher normalised amounts of isoprene. Lighting the cigarette by use of a candle resulted in larger amounts of substances, e.g. benzene, which most probably originated from thermal decomposition of wax. The composition of the first puff of smoke obtained by use of the three lighting methods with open flames (gas lighter, match, and candle) was usually similar whereas the composition of the smoke produced by use of the electric lighter and the cigarette as the lighter were more unique. The chemical patterns generated by the different lighting devices could, however, be separated by principal-component analyses. Two additional test series were also studied. In the first the cigarette was lit with an electric lighter, then extinguished, the ash was cut off, and the cigarette was re-lit. In the second the cigarette was heated in an oven to 80 degrees C for 5 min before being lit. These treatments did not result in changes in the chemical composition compared with cigarettes lit in the

  19. Occupational cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.L.; Goldsmith, D.F.

    1986-09-01

    When cancer is possibly related to occupation, the family physician's task is to put the matter in perspective by educating the patient and carefully documenting the appearance of the tumor and the patient's work history. Occasionally, physicians are the first to recognize new associations between chemicals and cancer and can help to bring hazards under control.

  20. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors may increase a woman’s risk for ovarian cancer: • Being middle-aged or older. • Having close family members (such as ... than 40, with the greatest number of ovarian cancers occurring in women aged 60 years or older. Each year, approximately 21, ...

  1. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  2. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  3. Gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Kliček, Robert; Kolovrat, Marijan; Loncar, Bozo; Busic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer involving gastrointestinal tract, but it is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80-95% of biliary tract cancers. This tumor is a highly lethal disease with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5% and mean survival mere than 6 months. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis. The percentage of patients diagnosed to have gallbladder cancer after simple cholecystectomy for presumed gallbladder stone disease is 0.5-1.5%. Patients with preoperative suspicion of gallbladder cancer should not be treated by laparoscopy. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities—inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Improved imaging modalities and improved radical aggressive surgical approach in the last decade has improved outcomes and helped prolong survival in patients with gallbladder cancer. The overall 5-year survival for patients with gallbladder cancer who underwent R0 curative resection was from 21% to 69%. In the future, the development of potential diagnostic markers for disease will yield screening opportunities for those at risk either with ethnic susceptibility or known anatomic anomalies of the biliary tract. PMID:25392833

  4. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been a steady drop in lung cancer deaths among men, mainly because fewer men are smoking, and since the turn of the century, lung cancer deaths in women have been slowly declining. Cigarette smoking rates had been dropping steadily in the 1990s ...

  5. Metformin inhibits growth and enhances radiation response of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through ATM and AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Storozhuk, Y; Hopmans, S N; Sanli, T; Barron, C; Tsiani, E; Cutz, J-C; Pond, G; Wright, J; Singh, G; Tsakiridis, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: We examined the potential of metformin (MET) to enhance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) responses to ionising radiation (IR). Methods: Human NSCLC cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts from wild-type and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) α1/2-subunit−/− embryos (AMPKα1/2−/−-MEFs) and NSCLC tumours grafted into Balb/c-nude mice were treated with IR and MET and subjected to proliferation, clonogenic, immunoblotting, cell cycle and apoptosis assays and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: Metformin (2.5 μℳ–5 mℳ) inhibited proliferation and radio-sensitised NSCLC cells. Metformin (i) activated the ataxia telengiectasia-mutated (ATM)–AMPK–p53/p21cip1 and inhibited the Akt–mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)–eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) pathways, (ii) induced G1 cycle arrest and (iii) enhanced apoptosis. ATM inhibition blocked MET and IR activation of AMPK. Non-small cell lung cancer cells with inhibited AMPK and AMPKα1/2−/−-MEFs were resistant to the antiproliferative effects of MET and IR. Metformin or IR inhibited xenograft growth and combined treatment enhanced it further than each treatment alone. Ionising radiation and MET induced (i) sustained activation of ATM–AMPK–p53/p21cip1 and inhibition of Akt–mTOR–4EBP1 pathways in tumours, (ii) reduced expression of angiogenesis and (iii) enhanced expression of apoptosis markers. Conclusion: Clinically achievable MET doses inhibit NSCLC cell and tumour growth and sensitise them to IR. Metformin and IR mediate their action through an ATM–AMPK-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that MET can be a clinically useful adjunct to radiotherapy in NSCLC. PMID:23632475

  6. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  8. Induction of p53 protein by gamma radiation in lymphocyte lines from breast cancer and ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, G. W.; Ramsay, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of human cells to gamma-radiation causes levels of the tumour-suppressor nuclear protein p53 to increase in temporal association with the decrease in replicative DNA synthesis. Cells from patients with the radiosensitive and cancer-prone disease ataxia telangiectasia (AT) exhibit radioresistant DNA synthesis and show a reduced or delayed gamma-radiation-induced increase in p53 protein levels. We have used Western immunoblotting with semiquantitative densitometry to examine the gamma-radiation-induced levels of p53 protein in 57 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from patients with AT, carriers of the AT gene, breast cancer patients and normal donors. We confirm the previously reported reduced induction in AT homozygote LCLs (n = 8) compared with normal donor LCLs (n = 17, P = 0.01). We report that AT heterozygote LCLs (n = 5) also have a significantly reduced p53 induction when compared with LCLs from normal donors (n = 17, P = 0.02). The response of breast cancer patient cells was not significantly different from normal donor cells but 18% (5/27) had a p53 response in the AT heterozygote range (95% confidence interval) compared with only 6% (1/17) of the normal donor cells. We found no significant correlation between p53 induction and cellular radiosensitivity in LCLs from breast cancer patients. These methods may be useful in identifying individuals at greater risk of the DNA-damaging effects of ionising radiation. Images Figure 2 PMID:7577453

  9. Phenotypic consequences of somatic mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anika Maria; Drobnitzky, Neele; Devery, Aoife Maire; Bokobza, Sivan Mili; Adams, Richard A.; Maughan, Timothy S.; Ryan, Anderson Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are frequently found in human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of ATM function confers sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR) and topoisomerase inhibitors and may thus define a subset of cancer patients that could get increased benefit from these therapies. In this study, we evaluated the phenotypic consequences of ATM missense changes reported in seven NSCLC cell lines with regard to radiosensitivity and functionality of ATM signalling. Our data demonstrate that only 2/7 NSCLC cell lines (H1395 and H23) harbouring ATM missense mutations show a functional impairment of ATM signalling following IR-exposure. In these two cell lines, the missense mutations caused a significant reduction in ATM protein levels, impairment of ATM signalling and marked radiosensitivity. Of note, only cell lines with homozygous mutations in the ATM gene showed significant impairment of ATM function. Based on these observations, we developed an immunohistochemistry-based assay to identify patients with loss or reduction of ATM protein expression in a clinical setting. In a set of 137 NSCLC and 154 colorectal cancer specimens we identified tumoral loss of ATM protein expression in 9.5% and 3.9% of cases, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of this method. PMID:27602502

  10. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2010-05-01

    The veterinary oncology profession is uniquely able to contribute to the many advances that are imminent in immunotherapy. However, what works in a mouse will often not reflect the outcome in human patients with cancer. Therefore, comparative immunotherapy studies using veterinary patients may be better able to bridge murine and human studies. Many cancers in dogs and cats seem to be stronger models for their counterpart human tumors than presently available murine model systems. This author looks forward to the time when immunotherapy plays a significant role in the treatment and/or prevention of cancer in human and veterinary patients.

  11. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, cystic pancreatic neoplasms, and other nonendocrine pancreatic tumors. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ... by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ...

  12. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... workers, aluminum workers, leather workers, truck drivers, and pesticide applicators are at the highest risk. Chemotherapy: The ... Avoid exposure to chemicals linked to bladder cancer. Alternative Names Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial ...

  13. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... diagnosed, the tumor has often spread beyond the ovaries. See your doctor if you have the following ... the only treatment. Surgery may involve removing both ovaries and fallopian tubes, the uterus, or other structures ...

  14. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the circulatory system and the lymphatic system , two systems that are located throughout the body. This makes it hard to treat these cancers by operating on just one area. However, in children with ...

  15. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  16. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... and is best made in consultation with your health care team. What happens after treatment for endometrial cancer? ...

  17. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pap test results are not normal. • Get the HPV vaccine. It protects against the types of HPV that ... for cervical cancer. To learn more about the HPV vaccine visit www. cdc. gov/ hpv . • D on’t ...

  18. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for cervical cancer include: Not getting the HPV vaccine Being economically disadvantaged Having a mother who took ... be prevented by doing the following: Get the HPV vaccine . The vaccine prevents most types of HPV infection ...

  19. Parathyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to parathyroid cancer: A drug called gallium nitrate, which lowers the calcium level in the blood ... Hypercalcemia Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Parathyroid gland removal Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: Todd ...

  20. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  1. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  2. Oxaliplatin Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-24

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  3. Kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Linehan, W Marston; Rathmell, W Kimryn

    2012-01-01

    Over 65,000 Americans are diagnosed with kidney cancer each year and nearly 13,000 die of this disease. Kidney cancer is not a single disease, it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, each with a different histology, a different clinical course, responding differently to therapy and caused by a different gene. Study of the 13 genes that are known to cause kidney cancer has led to the understanding that kidney cancer is a metabolic disease. Recent discoveries of chromatin remodeling/histone modifying genes, such as PBRM1 and SETD2, have opened up new areas of intense interest in the study of the fundamental genetic basis of kidney cancer. New approaches to immunotherapy with agents such as the CTLA4 inhibitor, ipilumumab, have opened up promising new directions for clinical trials. A number of new agents targeting of VEGF receptor signaling and the mTOR pathways as well as novel approaches targeting HIF2 will hopefully provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for this disease.

  4. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  5. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  6. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  7. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  8. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  9. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures ...

  10. What Is Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer What Is Stomach Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... normal structure and function of the stomach. The stomach After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters ...

  11. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... amputation. This is called limb-salvage or limb-sparing surgery . In going over treatment options, it is ... 2016 Treating Bone Cancer Surgery for Bone Cancer Radiation Therapy for Bone Cancer Chemotherapy for Bone Cancer Targeted ...

  12. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  13. Gallbladder Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Gallbladder Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Gallbladder Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/ ... as it grows. Looking for More of an Overview? If you would like additional introductory information, explore ...

  14. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  15. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  16. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  18. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  19. What Is Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer What Is Liver Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... structure and function of the liver. About the liver The liver is the largest internal organ. It ...

  20. Basic Cancer Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  1. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  2. Your cancer care team

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 55. National Cancer Institute. Cancer genetics risk assessment and counseling. Updated July 28, 2016. Cancer.gov. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/genetics/risk-assessment-and-counseling/HealthProfessional/page1 . Accessed August 3, 2016. ...

  3. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  4. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be similar to widespread ovarian cancer. Fallopian tube cancer This is another rare cancer that is ... to epithelial ovarian cancer. It begins in the tube that carries an egg from the ovary to ...

  5. Ionisation of atomic hydrogen by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicher, Gottfried; Olsson, Bjorn; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther; Sperber, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    With the crossed beam apparatus the relative impact-ionization cross section of atomic hydrogen by positron impact was measured. A layout of the scattering region is given. The first measurements on the ionization of atomic hydrogen by positron impact are also given.

  6. Afatinib in Advanced Refractory Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Cancer

  7. How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed? Stomach cancers are usually found when ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  9. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  10. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  11. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  12. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  13. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  14. Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The patient shown is undergoing cancer radiation treatment in a hospital-like atmosphere but he is not in a hospital. The treatment room is at NASA's Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. It is a converted portion of the Center's cyclotron facility, originally designed for radiation studies related to nuclear propulsion for aircraft and spacecraft. Under an agreement between the Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the 50 million volt cyclotron is now being used to evaluate the effectiveness of "fast neutron" therapy in the treatment of cancerous tumors.

  15. Cancer immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Herberman, R.B. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Immunlogy of human T-cell leukemia/lymphonma (lymphotropic) viruses (the HTLV 'family'); Tumor specific antigens induced by mutagens and DNA hypomethylating agents: implications for the immunobiology of neoplasia; Destruction of tumor cells by macrophages: mechanisms of recognition and lysis and their regulation; Mechanisms of NK-cell mediated cytotoxicity; Role of natural killer (NK) cells in the control of tumor growth and metastatic spread; Monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer; preclinical models and investigations in humans; and Abnormalities in interleukin 2 production and response in cancer and possible therapeutic approaches.

  16. Penile Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter E.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Porter, Michael P.; Richie, Jerome P.; Sexton, Wade J.; Shipley, William U.; Small, Eric J.; Trump, Donald L.; Wile, Geoffrey; Wilson, Timothy G.; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this devastating disease based on evidence and expert consensus. PMID:23667209

  17. Protein disulphide isomerase as a target for nanoparticle-mediated sensitisation of cancer cells to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, L. E.; McMahon, S. J.; Butterworth, K. T.; Currell, F. J.; Schettino, G.; Prise, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation resistance and toxicity in normal tissues are limiting factors in the efficacy of radiotherapy. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to be effective at enhancing radiation-induced cell death, and were initially proposed to physically enhance the radiation dose deposited. However, biological responses of GNP radiosensitization based on physical assumptions alone are not predictive of radiosensitisation and therefore there is a fundamental research need to determine biological mechanisms of response to GNPs alone and in combination with ionising radiation. This study aimed to identify novel mechanisms of cancer cell radiosensitisation through the use of GNPs, focusing on their ability to induce cellular oxidative stress and disrupt mitochondrial function. Using N-acetyl-cysteine, we found mitochondrial oxidation to be a key event prior to radiation for the radiosensitisation of cancer cells and suggests the overall cellular effects of GNP radiosensitisation are a result of their interaction with protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). This investigation identifies PDI and mitochondrial oxidation as novel targets for radiosensitisation.

  18. Genome-wide gene expression profiling suggests distinct radiation susceptibilities in sporadic and post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Detours, V; Delys, L; Libert, F; Weiss Solís, D; Bogdanova, T; Dumont, J E; Franc, B; Thomas, G; Maenhaut, C

    2007-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) incidence dramatically increased in the vicinity of Chernobyl. The cancer-initiating role of radiation elsewhere is debated. Therefore, we searched for a signature distinguishing radio-induced from sporadic cancers. Using microarrays, we compared the expression profiles of PTCs from the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB, n=12) and from French patients with no history of exposure to ionising radiations (n=14). We also compared the transcriptional responses of human lymphocytes to the presumed aetiological agents initiating these tumours, γ-radiation and H2O2. On a global scale, the transcriptomes of CTB and French tumours are indistinguishable, and the transcriptional responses to γ-radiation and H2O2 are similar. On a finer scale, a 118 genes signature discriminated the γ-radiation and H2O2 responses. This signature could be used to classify the tumours as CTB or French with an error of 15–27%. Similar results were obtained with an independent signature of 13 genes involved in homologous recombination. Although sporadic and radio-induced PTCs represent the same disease, they are distinguishable with molecular signatures reflecting specific responses to γ-radiation and H2O2. These signatures in PTCs could reflect the susceptibility profiles of the patients, suggesting the feasibility of a radiation susceptibility test. PMID:17712314

  19. Cancer Biomarkers Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are synthetic versions of chemicals made in your body. Side effects of these drugs include chills, fever, nausea, vomiting and loss of ... cancer cells to grow and survive. Targeted therapy drugs can cause side ... areas of the body, such as the bones. No complementary and alternative ...

  1. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  2. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  3. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  4. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  5. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ..., Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic..., gastric cancer, kidney cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer and...

  6. Proteome profiling of human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line TOV-112D.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Gagné, Pierre; Hunter, Joanna M; Bonicalzi, Marie-Eve; Lemay, Jean-François; Kelly, Isabelle; Le Page, Cécile; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Droit, Amaud; Bourgais, David; Poirier, Guy G

    2005-07-01

    A proteome profiling of the epithelial ovarian cancer cell line TOV-112D was initiated as a protein expression reference in the study of ovarian cancer. Two complementary proteomic approaches were used in order to maximise protein identification: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) protein separation coupled to matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1DE) coupled to liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). One hundred and seventy-two proteins have been identified among 288 spots selected on two-dimensional gels and a total of 579 proteins were identified with the 1DE LC MS/MS approach. This proteome profiling covers a wide range of protein expression and identifies several proteins known for their oncogenic properties. Bioinformatics tools were used to mine databases in order to determine whether the identified proteins have previously been implicated in pathways associated with carcinogenesis or cell proliferation. Indeed, several of the proteins have been reported to be specific ovarian cancer markers while others are common to many tumorigenic tissues or proliferating cells. The diversity of proteins found and their association with known oncogenic pathways validate this proteomic approach. The proteome 2D map of the TOV-112D cell line will provide a valuable resource in studies on differential protein expression of human ovarian carcinomas while the 1DE LC MS/MS approach gives a picture of the actual protein profile of the TOV-112D cell line. This work represents one of the most complete ovarian protein expression analysis reports to date and the first comparative study of gene expression profiling and proteomic patterns in ovarian cancer.

  7. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  8. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  9. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The immune system is generally divided into 2 primary components: the innate immune response, and the highly specific but more slowly developing adaptive or acquired immune response. Immune responses can be further separated by whether they are induced by exposure to a foreign antigen (an "active" response) or whether they are transferred through serum or lymphocytes from an immunized individual (a "passive" response). The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells (ie, specificity), be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells (ie, sensitivity), and lastly be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor (ie, durability). Tumor immunology and immunotherapy is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields at present.

  10. How childhood cancers are different from adult cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000845.htm How childhood cancers are different from adult cancers To use the sharing features on this page, ... with cancer can be cured. Types of Childhood Cancers Cancer in children is rare, but some types ...

  11. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  12. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  13. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  14. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  15. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... your friends, your family, and the American Cancer Society help you take a step closer toward a ... DNA Offers Lung Cancer Clues An American Cancer Society grantee discovers a non-coding gene that may ...

  16. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Three-panel drawing of stage IA, IB, and IC; the first panel (stage IA) shows cancer inside ... cancer inside both ovaries. The third panel (stage IC) shows cancer inside both ovaries, and one ovary ...

  17. Living with Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Award Living With Kidney Cancer Living With Cancer Day to Day The impact of kidney cancer on your life ... least one half hour of exercise every other day. Vigorous walking, jogging, swimming, or other aerobic exercise ...

  18. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Today! Limited Edition T-Shirt Buy Today! The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national ... trustworthy health information: verify here. Social Networks The Oral Cancer Foundation 3419 Via Lido #205 Newport Beach Ca ...

  19. Living with Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute for Cancer Research website ( www.aicr.org ). Self-medication Many cancer patients medicate themselves with food and ... cancer. There is little research evidence that such self-medication can directly influence recurrence or cure. Patients should ...

  20. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... to give up. Jermyn Williams Colon Cancer Survivor Facebook Twitter Cancer A-Z Get expert information Get ... much stress. Eileen Fauteux & Her Mother Cancer Survivor Facebook Twitter Play Facebook Twitter determination A little goes ...

  1. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sexuality Life after Radical Cystectomy Women and Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy To watch the recordings and download the transcripts, click here! Look for more topics coming this spring! Bladder cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer in ...

  2. Cancer Prevention Overview (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  3. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www. cdc. ...

  4. SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  10. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  12. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  13. Stages of Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage II endometrial cancer. Cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix, but has not spread outside ... uterus. In stage II , cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix , but has not spread outside ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  15. Tobacco and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Category Cancer A-Z What Causes Cancer? Tobacco and Cancer Get information on cigarette, cigar, and ... affects different groups of people. Read more How Tobacco and Smoking Affects Your Health Carcinogens in Tobacco ...

  16. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  17. Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets the changes in cancer cells that help them grow, divide, and spread. Learn how targeted therapy works against cancer and about side effects that may occur.

  18. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancerous. As scientists have learned more about the molecular changes that lead to cancer, they have found ... cells of the original cancer usually have some molecular features in common, such as the presence of ...

  19. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Basal cell cancer is a malignant skin tumor involving cancerous changes of basal skin cells. Basal cell skin cancers ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and ...

  20. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or ...

  1. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  2. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal cancer is almost as common among women ... colorectal cancer. Myth: Colorectal cancer cannot be prevented. Truth: In many cases, colorectal cancer can be prevented. ...

  3. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  4. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  5. Types of Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  6. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Answers HPV and Cancer HPV Cancer Screening HPV Vaccines HPV Vaccine Safety For Clinicians Why is HPV Vaccine Important Clinician Factsheets Schedules & Recommendations Answering Parents Questions ...

  7. Global cancer statistics, 2012.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Bray, Freddie; Siegel, Rebecca L; Ferlay, Jacques; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-03-01

    Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly

  8. Life After Cancer | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  14. Breast Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  17. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  18. Breast Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Peckham, M

    1988-01-01

    Testicular cancer, which predominantly occurs in young men, has become increasingly common; it is presently the most common malignancy in men aged 20-34. Despite a lack of knowledge of aetiology, empirical advances, particularly in the management of patients with advanced disease, have been dramatic. Prior to the development of effective chemotherapy in the 1970s, less than 10% of men with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours were cured; nowadays approximately 90% of patients are potentially curable. The introduction of effective chemotherapy has led to a reappraisal of surgery and radiotherapy in the management of early stage disease and the introduction of a policy of surveillance in patients without evidence of metastases at the time of removal of the primary tumour. Following chemotherapy, surgery is required in approximately 25% of patients with advanced disease to excise residual masses, which in one-fifth of cases will show evidence of residual malignancy. In a proportion of patients, testicular cancer develops on a background of long-standing infertility, whereas in many men there is temporary oligospermia, despite a previous history of fertility. The majority of patients with prior evidence of spermatogenesis recover this function following chemotherapy and there is no evidence that children fathered by such patients have an increased risk of malformation. Despite physician optimism and excellent prospects for cure, significant psycho-social morbidity is associated with the diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer. Factors contributing to this are being identified and will lead, hopefully, to the minimisation of such problems by appropriate intervention.

  20. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.