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Sample records for reacting flow codes

  1. Nonlinear Krylov acceleration of reacting flow codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, R.; Smith, P.; Pernice, M.

    1996-12-31

    We are working on computational simulations of three-dimensional reactive flows in applications encompassing a broad range of chemical engineering problems. Examples of such processes are coal (pulverized and fluidized bed) and gas combustion, petroleum processing (cracking), and metallurgical operations such as smelting. These simulations involve an interplay of various physical and chemical factors such as fluid dynamics with turbulence, convective and radiative heat transfer, multiphase effects such as fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions, and chemical reaction. The governing equations resulting from modeling these processes are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled, thereby rendering their solution by traditional iterative methods (such as nonlinear line Gauss-Seidel methods) very difficult and sometimes impossible. Hence we are exploring the use of nonlinear Krylov techniques (such as CMRES and Bi-CGSTAB) to accelerate and stabilize the existing solver. This strategy allows us to take advantage of the problem-definition capabilities of the existing solver. The overall approach amounts to using the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) method and its variants as nonlinear preconditioners for the nonlinear Krylov method. We have also adapted a backtracking approach for inexact Newton methods to damp the Newton step in the nonlinear Krylov method. This will be a report on work in progress. Preliminary results with nonlinear GMRES have been very encouraging: in many cases the number of line Gauss-Seidel sweeps has been reduced by about a factor of 5, and increased robustness of the underlying solver has also been observed.

  2. Chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Sockol, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    Future aerospace propulsion concepts involve the combustion of liquid or gaseous fuels in a highly turbulent internal airstream. Accurate predictive computer codes which can simulate the fluid mechanics, chemistry, and turbulence-combustion interaction of these chemical reacting flows will be a new tool that is needed in the design of these future propulsion concepts. Experimental and code development research is being performed at LeRC to better understand chemical reacting flows with the long-term goal of establishing these reliable computer codes. Our approach to understand chemical reacting flows is to look at separate, more simple parts of this complex phenomenon as well as to study the full turbulent reacting flow process. As a result, we are engaged in research on the fluid mechanics associated with chemical reacting flows. We are also studying the chemistry of fuel-air combustion. Finally, we are investigating the phenomenon of turbulence-combustion interaction. Research, both experimental and analytical, is highlighted in each of these three major areas.

  3. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  4. SUPREM-DSMC: A New Scalable, Parallel, Reacting, Multidimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, David; Wysong, Ingrid; Kaplan, Carolyn; Mott, David; Wadsworth, Dean; VanGilder, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    An AFRL/NRL team has recently been selected to develop a scalable, parallel, reacting, multidimensional (SUPREM) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for the DoD user community under the High Performance Computing Modernization Office (HPCMO) Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). This paper will introduce the JANNAF Exhaust Plume community to this three-year development effort and present the overall goals, schedule, and current status of this new code.

  5. Supersonic Flow of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Mixtures. Volume 2: RAMP - A Computer Code for Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in conjunction with the numerical solution of the flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures was documented. The solution to the set of governing equations was obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form were shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The characteristic directions for the gas-particle system are found to be the conventional gas Mach lines, the gas streamlines and the particle streamlines. The basic mesh construction for the flow solution is along streamlines and normals to the streamlines for axisymmetric or two-dimensional flow. The analysis gives detailed information of the supersonic flow and provides for a continuous solution of the nozzle and exhaust plume flow fields. Boundary conditions for the flow solution are either the nozzle wall or the exhaust plume boundary.

  6. Two-Dimensional Integral Reacting Computer Code for Multiple Phase Flows

    1997-05-05

    ICRKFLO solves conservation equations for gaseous species, droplets, and solid particles of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by ellipitic-type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation for a three-phase reacting flow. Associated sub-models include integral combustion, two-parameter turbulence, particle melting and evaporation, droplet evaporation, and interfacial submodels. An evolving integral reaction submodel, originally designed for ICOMFLO2 to solve numerical stabilitymore » problems associated with Arrhenius type differential reaction submodels, was expanded and enhanced to handle petroleum cracking applications. A two-parameter turbulence submodel accounts for droplet and particle dispersion by gas phase turbulence with feedback effects on the gas phase. The evaporation submodel treats not only particle evaporation but the droplet size distribution shift caused by evaporation. Interfacial submodels correlate momentum and energy transfer between phases. Three major upgrades, adding new capabilities and improved physical modeling, were implemnted in IRCKFLO Version 2.0. They are :(1) particle-particle and particle wall interactions; (2) a two-step process for computing the reaction kinetics for a very large number of chemical reactions within a complex non-isothermal hydrodynamic flow field; and (3) a sectional coupling method combined with a triangular blocked cell technique for computing reacting multiphase flow systems of complex geometry while preserving the advantages of grid orthogonality.« less

  7. Supersonic reacting internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The national program to develop a trans-atmospheric vehicle has kindled a renewed interest in the modeling of supersonic reacting flows. A supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, has been proposed to provide the propulsion system for this vehicle. The development of computational techniques for modeling supersonic reacting flow fields, and the application of these techniques to an increasingly difficult set of combustion problems are studied. Since the scramjet problem has been largely responsible for motivating this computational work, a brief history is given of hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems. A discussion is also given of some early modeling efforts applied to high speed reacting flows. Current activities to develop accurate and efficient algorithms and improved physical models for modeling supersonic combustion is then discussed. Some new problems where computer codes based on these algorithms and models are being applied are described.

  8. Dual-Code Solution Strategy for Chemically-Reacting Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Eberhardt, Scott

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flow fields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three-dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a non-catalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the non-catalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated in both the radial and streamwise directions. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three-dimensional case in comparison to an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  9. Coherent structures in reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2013-11-01

    Our goal is to characterize the nature of reacting flows by identifying important ``coherent'' structures. We follow the recent work by Haller, Beron-Vera, and Farazmand which formalized the the notion of lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in fluid flows. In this theory, LCSs were derived from the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. We adapt this perspective to analogously define coherent structures in reacting flows. By this we mean a fluid flow with a reaction front propagating through it such that the propagation does not affect the underlying flow. A reaction front might be chemical (Belousov-Zhabotinsky, flame front, etc.) or some other type of front (electromagnetic, acoustic, etc.). While the recently developed theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) describes barriers to front propagation in time-periodic flows, this current work provides an important complement by extending to the aperiodic setting. The present work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under grants PHY- 0748828 and CMMI-1201236.

  10. Computation of Reacting Flows in Combustion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to develop an efficient three-dimensional computer code for chemically reacting flows. The main computer code developed is ALLSPD-3D. The ALLSPD-3D computer program is developed for the calculation of three-dimensional, chemically reacting flows with sprays. The ALL-SPD code employs a coupled, strongly implicit solution procedure for turbulent spray combustion flows. A stochastic droplet model and an efficient method for treatment of the spray source terms in the gas-phase equations are used to calculate the evaporating liquid sprays. The chemistry treatment in the code is general enough that an arbitrary number of reaction and species can be defined by the users. Also, it is written in generalized curvilinear coordinates with both multi-block and flexible internal blockage capabilities to handle complex geometries. In addition, for general industrial combustion applications, the code provides both dilution and transpiration cooling capabilities. The ALLSPD algorithm, which employs the preconditioning and eigenvalue rescaling techniques, is capable of providing efficient solution for flows with a wide range of Mach numbers. Although written for three-dimensional flows in general, the code can be used for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow computations as well. The code is written in such a way that it can be run in various computer platforms (supercomputers, workstations and parallel processors) and the GUI (Graphical User Interface) should provide a user-friendly tool in setting up and running the code.

  11. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  12. Advanced diagnostics for reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Baganoff, D.; Bowman, C. T.; Byer, R. L.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1983-11-01

    Progress is reported for the third year of an interdisciplinary program to innovate modern diagnostic techniques for application to reacting flows. Project areas are: (1) fiber optic absorption/fluorescence probes for species measurements employing tunable ultraviolet, visable and infrared laser sources; (2) wavelength modulation spectroscopy, using rapid-scanning ultraviolet, visible and infrared laser sources, for measurements of species, temperature and absorption lineshapes, (3) quantitative flow visualization, including temporally and spatially resolved species measurements in a plane, using laser-induced fluorescence; (4) multiple-point velocity visualization; (5) plasma diagnostics, utilizing planar laser-induced fluorescence and wavelength modulation techniques; (6) diagnostic techniques for thermionic converter plasmas; (7) application of advanced diagnostic techniques for studies of turbulent reacting flows; (8) development of measurement techniques and a novel facility for investigations of droplet evaporation in turbulent flows; (9) holographic display techniques for 3-D visualization of flowfield data; (10) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) for temperature and velocity measurements in a supersonic jet; and (11) computed absorption tomography system for species measurements in a plane.

  13. Comparison of mixing calculations for reacting and non-reacting flows in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oechsle, V. L.; Mongia, H. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    A production 3-D elliptic flow code has been used to calculate non-reacting and reacting flow fields in an experimental mixing section relevant to a rich burn/quick mix/lean burn (RQL) combustion system. A number of test cases have been run to assess the effects of the variation in the number of orifices, mass flow ratio, and rich-zone equivalence ratio on the flow field and mixing rates. The calculated normalized temperature profiles for the non-reacting flow field agree qualitatively well with the normalized conserved variable isopleths for the reacting flow field indicating that non-reacting mixing experiments are appropriate for screening and ranking potential rapid mixing concepts. For a given set of jet momentum-flux ratio, mass flow ratio, and density ratio (J, MR, and DR), the reacting flow calculations show a reduced level of mixing compared to the non-reacting cases. In addition, the rich-zone equivalence ratio has noticeable effect on the mixing flow characteristics for reacting flows.

  14. Numerical Prediction of Non-Reacting and Reacting Flow in a Model Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, reacting and non-reacting flow characteristics of a model gas turbine combustor operating on air/methane are simulated via an unstructured and massively parallel Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. This serves to demonstrate the capabilities of the code for design and analysis of real combustor engines. The effects of some design features of combustors are examined. In addition, the computed results are validated against experimental data.

  15. Comparing Spray Characteristics from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) National Combustion Code (NCC) Calculations Against Experimental Data for a Turbulent Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Moder, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Developing physics-based tools to aid in reducing harmful combustion emissions, like Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Unburnt Hydrocarbons (UHC s), and Sulfur Dioxides (SOx), is an important goal of aeronautics research at NASA. As part of that effort, NASA Glenn Research Center is performing a detailed assessment and validation of an in-house combustion CFD code known as the National Combustion Code (NCC) for turbulent reacting flows. To assess the current capabilities of NCC for simulating turbulent reacting flows with liquid jet fuel injection, a set of Single Swirler Lean Direct Injection (LDI) experiments performed at the University of Cincinnati was chosen as an initial validation data set. This Jet-A/air combustion experiment operates at a lean equivalence ratio of 0.75 at atmospheric pressure and has a 4 percent static pressure drop across the swirler. Detailed comparisons of NCC predictions for gas temperature and gaseous emissions (CO and NOx) against this experiment are considered in a previous work. The current paper is focused on detailed comparisons of the spray characteristics (radial profiles of drop size distribution and at several radial rakes) from NCC simulations against the experimental data. Comparisons against experimental data show that the use of the correlation for primary spray break-up implemented by Raju in the NCC produces most realistic results, but this result needs to be improved. Given the single or ten step chemical kinetics models, use of a spray size correlation gives similar, acceptable results

  16. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  17. Recent advances in PDF modeling of turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andrew D.; Dai, F.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation concludes that a Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solution successfully couples with an existing finite volume code; PDF solution method applied to turbulent reacting flows shows good agreement with data; and PDF methods must be run on parallel machines for practical use.

  18. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 3: Computer code user's and applications manual. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    A users manual for the RAMP2 computer code is provided. The RAMP2 code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. The general structure and operation of RAMP2 are discussed. A user input/output guide for the modified TRAN72 computer code and the RAMP2F code is given. The application and use of the BLIMPJ module are considered. Sample problems involving the space shuttle main engine and motor are included.

  19. Flow of chemically reacting carbon vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustrov, Yu A.; Poniaev, S. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a chemically reacting flow of an expanding gas flow consisting of carbon C and its clusters (C2 - C5) is presented. It is shown how the chemical composition of the mixture flow changes when it expands and its temperature decreases. The temperature range in which the nonequilibrium chemical model including separate direct and inverse cluster formation reactions should be used is determined. Variations in the effective adiabatic index in the C-C5 mixture and along the nozzle axis are given.

  20. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  1. Assessment of chemistry models for compressible reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Recent technological advances in propulsion and power devices and renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles have increased the need for detailed understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible reacting flows. In numerical simulations of such flows, accurate modeling of the fuel chemistry is a critical component of capturing the relevant physics. Various chemical models are currently being used in reacting flow simulations. However, the differences between these models and their impacts on the fluid dynamics in the context of compressible flows are not well understood. In the present work, a numerical code is developed to solve the fully coupled compressible conservation equations for reacting flows. The finite volume code is based on the theoretical and numerical framework developed by Oefelein (Prog. Aero. Sci. 42 (2006) 2-37) and employs an all-Mach-number formulation with dual time-stepping and preconditioning. The numerical approach is tested on turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz numbers. Different chemical models of varying complexity and computational cost are used and their effects are compared.

  2. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  3. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  4. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  5. AMR for low Mach number reacting flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.

    2004-01-16

    We present a summary of recent progress on the development and application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for low Mach number reacting flows. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations based on a general equation of state that discretely conserves both mass and energy. The discretization methodology is based on a robust projection formulation that accommodates large density contrasts. The algorithm supports modeling of multicomponent systems and incorporates an operator-split treatment of stiff reaction terms. The basic computational approach is embedded in an adaptive projection framework that uses structured hierarchical grids with subcycling in time that preserves the discrete conservation properties of the underlying single-grid algorithm. We present numerical examples illustrating the application of the methodology to turbulent premixed combustion and nuclear flames in type Ia supernovae.

  6. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) to extend the technique of direct numerical simulations to turbulent, chemically reacting flows, (2) to test the validity of the method by comparing computational results with laboratory data, and (3) to use the simulations to gain a better understanding of the effects of turbulence on chemical reactions. The effects of both the large scale structure and the smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are addressed. The relationship between infinite reaction rate and finite reaction rate chemistry is compared with some of the results of calculations with existing theories and laboratory data. The direct numerical simulation method involves the numerical solution of the detailed evolution of the complex turbulent velocity and concentration fields. Using very efficient numerical methods (e.g., pseudospectral methods), the fully nonlinear (possibly low pass filtered) equations of motion are solved and no closure assumptions or turbulence models are used. Statistical data are obtained by performing spatial, temporal, and/or ensemble averages over the computed flow fields.

  9. Uncertainty quantification in reacting flow modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Le MaÒitre, Olivier P.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Knio, Omar M.; Ghanem, Roger Georges; Najm, Habib N.

    2003-10-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in the computational modeling of physical systems is important for scientific investigation, engineering design, and model validation. In this work we develop techniques for UQ based on spectral and pseudo-spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, and we apply these constructions in computations of reacting flow. We develop and compare both intrusive and non-intrusive spectral PC techniques. In the intrusive construction, the deterministic model equations are reformulated using Galerkin projection into a set of equations for the time evolution of the field variable PC expansion mode strengths. The mode strengths relate specific parametric uncertainties to their effects on model outputs. The non-intrusive construction uses sampling of many realizations of the original deterministic model, and projects the resulting statistics onto the PC modes, arriving at the PC expansions of the model outputs. We investigate and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and identify their utility under different conditions. We also outline areas where ongoing and future research are needed to address challenges with both approaches.

  10. Numerical study of chemically reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian Shun; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1988-01-01

    A new computational fluid dynamic code has been developed for the study of mixing and chemical reactions in the flow fields of ramjets and scramjets. The code employs an implicit finite volume, lower-upper symmetric successive overrelaxation scheme for solving the complete two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and species transport equations in a fully-coupled and very efficient manner. The combustion processes are modeled by an 8-species, 14-step finite rate chemistry model whereas turbulence is simulated by a Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model. The validity of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical calculations with both experimental data and previous calculations of a cold flow helium injection into a straight channel and premixed hydrogen-air reacting flows in a ramped duct. The code is then used to calculate the mixing and chemical reactions of a hydrogen jet transversely injected into a supersonic airstream. Results are presented describing the flow field, the recirculation regions in front and behind the injector, and the chemical reactions.

  11. Development of a 3-D upwind PNS code for chemically reacting hypersonic flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Wadawadigi, G.

    1992-01-01

    Two new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) codes were developed to compute the three-dimensional, viscous, chemically reacting flow of air around hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The first code (TONIC) solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a fully coupled manner using an implicit, approximately-factored, central-difference algorithm. This code was upgraded to include shock fitting and the capability of computing the flow around complex body shapes. The revised TONIC code was validated by computing the chemically-reacting (M(sub infinity) = 25.3) flow around a 10 deg half-angle cone at various angles of attack and the Ames All-Body model at 0 deg angle of attack. The results of these calculations were in good agreement with the results from the UPS code. One of the major drawbacks of the TONIC code is that the central-differencing of fluxes across interior flowfield discontinuities tends to introduce errors into the solution in the form of local flow property oscillations. The second code (UPS), originally developed for a perfect gas, has been extended to permit either perfect gas, equilibrium air, or nonequilibrium air computations. The code solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that was modified to account for real gas effects. The dissipation term associated with this algorithm is sufficiently adaptive to flow conditions that, even when attempting to capture very strong shock waves, no additional smoothing is required. For nonequilibrium calculations, the code solves the fluid dynamic and species continuity equations in a loosely-coupled manner. This code was used to calculate the hypersonic, laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at various angles of attack. In addition, the flow around the McDonnel Douglas generic option blended-wing-body was computed and comparisons were made between the perfect gas, equilibrium air, and the

  12. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  13. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows.

  14. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  15. Investigation of chemically-reacting supersonic internal flows. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chitsomboon, T.; Tiwari, S.N.

    1985-09-01

    This report covers work done on the research project, Analysis and Computation of Internal Flow Field in a Scramjet Engine. The governing equations of two-dimensional chemically-reacting flows are presented together with the global two-step chemistry model. The finite-difference algorithm used is illustrated and the method of circumventing the stiffness is discussed. The computer program developed is used to solve two model problems of a premixed chemically-reacting flow. The results obtained are physically reasonable.

  16. Fast algorithm for calculating chemical kinetics in turbulent reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Pratt, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for a fast batch chemistry solver to perform the kinetics part of a split operator formulation of turbulent reacting flows, with special attention focused on the solution of the ordinary differential equations governing a homogeneous gas-phase chemical reaction. For this purpose, a two-part predictor-corrector algorithm which incorporates an exponentially fitted trapezoidal method was developed. The algorithm performs filtering of ill-posed initial conditions, automatic step-size selection, and automatic selection of Jacobi-Newton or Newton-Raphson iteration for convergence to achieve maximum computational efficiency while observing a prescribed error tolerance. The new algorithm, termed CREK1D (combustion reaction kinetics, one-dimensional), compared favorably with the code LSODE when tested on two representative problems drawn from combustion kinetics, and is faster than LSODE.

  17. Measurements of non-reacting and reacting flow fields of a liquid swirl flame burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Hochgreb, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The understanding of the liquid fuel spray and flow field characteristics inside a combustor is crucial for designing a fuel efficient and low emission device. Characterisation of the flow field of a model gas turbine liquid swirl burner is performed by using a 2-D particle imaging velocimetry(PIV) system. The flow field pattern of an axial flow burner with a fixed swirl intensity is compared under confined and unconfined conditions, i.e., with and without the combustor wall. The effect of temperature on the main swirling air flow is investigated under open and non-reacting conditions. The result shows that axial and radial velocities increase as a result of decreased flow density and increased flow volume. The flow field of the main swirling flow with liquid fuel spray injection is compared to non-spray swirling flow. Introduction of liquid fuel spray changes the swirl air flow field at the burner outlet, where the radial velocity components increase for both open and confined environment. Under reacting condition, the enclosure generates a corner recirculation zone that intensifies the strength of radial velocity. The reverse flow and corner recirculation zone assists in stabilizing the flame by preheating the reactants. The flow field data can be used as validation target for swirl combustion modelling.

  18. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  19. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the third year of Phase III of this research. This is the Final Report of our activities on this research sponsored by the NASA LaRC.

  20. Instantaneous planar visualization of reacting supersonic flows using silane seeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    A new visualization technique for reacting flows has been developed. This technique, which is suitable for supersonic combustion flows, has been demonstrated on a scramjet combustor model. In this application, gaseous silane (SiH4) was added to the primary hydrogen fuel. When the fuel reacted, so did the (SiH4), producing silica (SiO2) particles in situ. The particles were illuminated with a laser sheet formed from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) beam and the Mie scattering signal was imaged. These planar images of the silica Mie scattering provided instantaneous 'maps' of combustion progress within the turbulent reacting flowfield.

  1. The efficient calculation of chemically reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, D. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Drummond, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite volume formulation is used to study flows with chemical reactions. In this formulation the source terms resulting from the chemical reactions are treated implicitly and the resulting system of partial differential equations is solved using two time-stepping schemes. The first is based on the Runge-Kutta method while the second is based on an Adams predictor-corrector method. Results show that improvements in computational efficiency depend to a large extent on the manner in which the source term is treated. Further, analysis and computation indicate that the Runge-Kutta method is more efficient than the Adams methods. Finally, an adaptive time stepping scheme is developed to study problems involving shock ignition. Calculations for a hydrogen-air system agree well with other methods.

  2. Material point method of modelling and simulation of reacting flow of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Matthew; Chen, Kuan; Hu, Patrick G.

    2014-07-01

    Aerospace vehicles are continually being designed to sustain flight at higher speeds and higher altitudes than previously attainable. At hypersonic speeds, gases within a flow begin to chemically react and the fluid's physical properties are modified. It is desirable to model these effects within the Material Point Method (MPM). The MPM is a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian particle-based solver that calculates the physical properties of individual particles and uses a background grid for information storage and exchange. This study introduces chemically reacting flow modelling within the MPM numerical algorithm and illustrates a simple application using the AeroElastic Material Point Method (AEMPM) code. The governing equations of reacting flows are introduced and their direct application within an MPM code is discussed. A flow of 100% oxygen is illustrated and the results are compared with independently developed computational non-equilibrium algorithms. Observed trends agree well with results from an independently developed source.

  3. Numerical investigation of chemically reacting flows in ramjet dump combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Liu, Jong-Shang

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, including second-order turbulence model, are numerically integrated by using four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme to predict the steady-state supersonic flow structures in ramjet dump combustors. The formulation is derived for reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. In the present study, it is firstly attempted to assess the accuracy of existing high-order turbulence model in supersonic flows. The comparison shows reasonable agreement between calculated and measured data in terms of velocity distributions. It is indicated that a modified constant C-mu for calculating turbulent eddy viscosity is needed in the supersonic flow regime and the adaptive meshing is preferred to capture the recirculation zone. In the reacting flow calculation, the results from a test case of hydrogen and air combustion at premixed conditon show that the rearward facing step is able to increase flow residence time and stabilize the flame in supersonic flows.

  4. A three-dimensional upwind PNS code for chemically reacting scramjet flowfields. [Parabolized Navier Stokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wadawadigi, G.; Tannehill, J.C.; Buelow, P.E.; Lawrence, S.L. NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1992-07-01

    A new upwind, parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the three-dimensional (3D) chemically reacting flow in scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. The code is a modification of the 3D upwind PNS (UPS) airflow code which has been extended in the present study to permit internal flow calculations with hydrogen-air chemistry. With these additions, the new code has the capability of computing aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields simultaneously. The algorithm solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that has been modified to account for 'real gas' effects. The fluid medium is assumed to be a chemically reacting mixture of thermally perfect (but calorically imperfect) gases in thermal equilibrium. The new code has been applied to two test cases. These include the Burrows-Kurkov supersonic combustion experiment and a generic 3D scramjet flowfield. The computed results compare favorably with the available experimental data. 38 refs.

  5. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; James, S.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES) methods for computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the first year of Phase 3 of this research.

  6. Identification of Coherent Structures in Premixed Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, Eileen; Green, Melissa; Oran, Elaine; Syracuse University Team; University of Maryland Team

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the best ways to quantitatively characterize the turbulence-flame interaction in reacting flows. It has been observed that increased turbulence intensity both wrinkles and broadens the flame front throughout the preheat zone and reaction zone. A Lagrangian coherent structures analysis is used to identify the individual coherent turbulent structures as the maximizing ridges of the Finite-Time Lyapunov exponent scalar field (FTLE). This method provides different information than Eulerian criteria which have predominantly been used in previous reacting flow studies. Preliminary results show that LCS ridges exhibit a clear qualitative correlation to the contour of the fuel mass-fraction of the flame. A quantitative characterization of how the LCS results correlate to observed flame geometries will allow for a better understanding of how these structures affect the flame brush, and could lead to improved efficiency in particular engines.

  7. Density Weighted FDF Equations for Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we briefly revisit the formulation of density weighted filtered density function (DW-FDF) for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent reacting flows, which was proposed by Jaberi et al. (Jaberi, F.A., Colucci, P.J., James, S., Givi, P. and Pope, S.B., Filtered mass density function for Large-eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows, J. Fluid Mech., vol. 401, pp. 85-121, 1999). At first, we proceed the traditional derivation of the DW-FDF equations by using the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF), then we explore another way of constructing the DW-FDF equations by starting directly from the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We observe that the terms which are unclosed in the traditional DW-FDF equations are now closed in the newly constructed DW-FDF equations. This significant difference and its practical impact on the computational simulations may deserve further studies.

  8. Numerical simulation of low Mach number reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Aspden, Andrew J.; Day, Marcus S.; Lijewski,Michael J.

    2007-06-20

    Using examples from active research areas in combustion andastrophysics, we demonstrate a computationally efficient numericalapproach for simulating multiscale low Mach number reacting flows. Themethod enables simulations that incorporate an unprecedented range oftemporal and spatial scales, while at the same time, allows an extremelyhigh degree of reaction fidelity. Sample applications demonstrate theefficiency of the approach with respect to a traditional time-explicitintegration method, and the utility of the methodology for studying theinteraction of turbulence with terrestrial and astrophysical flamestructures.

  9. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  10. Turbulent reacting flow computations including turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model has been extended to be applicable for compressible reacting flows. A compressibility correction model based on modeling the dilatational terms in the Reynolds stress equations has been used. A turbulence-chemistry interaction model is outlined. In this model, the effects of temperature and species mass concentrations fluctuations on the species mass production rates are decoupled. The effect of temperature fluctuations is modeled via a moment model, and the effect of concentration fluctuations is included using an assumed beta-pdf model. Preliminary results obtained using this model are presented. A two-dimensional reacting mixing layer has been used as a test case. Computations are carried out using the Navier-Stokes solver SPARK using a finite rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion.

  11. Numerical and physical instabilities in massively parallel LES of reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    LES of reacting flows is rapidly becoming mature and providing levels of precision which can not be reached with any RANS (Reynolds Averaged) technique. In addition to the multiple subgrid scale models required for such LES and to the questions raised by the required numerical accurcay of LES solvers, various issues related the reliability, mesh independence and repetitivity of LES must still be addressed, especially when LES is used on massively parallel machines. This talk discusses some of these issues: (1) the existence of non physical waves (known as `wiggles' by most LES practitioners) in LES, (2) the effects of mesh size on LES of reacting flows, (3) the growth of rounding errors in LES on massively parallel machines and more generally (4) the ability to qualify a LES code as `bug free' and `accurate'. Examples range from academic cases (minimum non-reacting turbulent channel) to applied configurations (a sector of an helicopter combustion chamber).

  12. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  13. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    PubMed

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  14. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, C. A. Z.; Poludnenko, A. Y.; Urzay, J.; O'Brien, J.; Ihme, M.; Hamlington, P. E.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  15. Studies on nonequilibrium phenomena in supersonic chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, Rajnish

    1993-01-01

    This study deals with a systematic investigation of nonequilibrium processes in supersonic combustion. The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with nonequilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics, coupled with radiation, for hydrogen-air systems. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. For a basic understanding of the flow physics, premixed flows undergoing finite rate chemical reactions are investigated. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interactions vary substantially, depending on reactions involving HO2 and NO species, and that this can have a noticeable influence on the flowfield. The second part of this study deals with premixed reacting flows under thermal nonequilibrium conditions. Here, the critical problem is coupling of the vibrational relaxation process with the radiative heat transfer. The specific problem considered is a premixed expanding flow in a supersonic nozzle. Results indicate the presence of nonequilibrium conditions in the expansion region of the nozzle. This results in reduction of the radiative interactions in the flowfield. Next, the present study focuses on investigation of non-premixed flows under chemical nonequilibrium conditions. In this case, the main problem is the coupled turbulence-chemistry interaction. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic coflowing jets. Results indicate that the effect of heat release is to lower the turbulent shear stress and the mean density. The last part of this study proposes a new theoretical formulation for the coupled turbulence-radiation interactions. Results obtained for the coflowing jets experiment indicate that the effect of turbulence is to enhance the radiative interactions.

  16. Investigation of supersonic chemically reacting and radiating channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Mortaza; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    The 2-D time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows undergoing finite rate chemical reaction and radiation interaction for a hydrogen-air system. The explicit multistage finite volume technique of Jameson is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The multidimensional radiative transfer equations for a nongray model are provided for a general configuration and then reduced for a planar geometry. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The supersonic inviscid and viscous, nonreacting flows are solved by employing the finite volume technique of Jameson and the unsplit finite difference scheme of MacCormack. The specified problem considered is of the flow in a channel with a 10 deg compression-expansion ramp. The calculated results are compared with those of an upwind scheme. The problem of chemically reacting and radiating flows are solved for the flow of premixed hydrogen-air through a channel with parallel boundaries, and a channel with a compression corner. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the entire flow field.

  17. COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2004-03-01

    The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

  18. Coarse-Grid Simulation of Reacting and Non-Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Loezos, Peter N.; Srivastava, Anuj; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2001-11-06

    The principal goal of our project, funded under the DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) performance. Virtual demonstration of CFB performance requires modeling and simulation of the entire spectrum of gas-particle flow conditions ranging from dense phase flows in standpipes to dilute phase flow conditions of risers. We had proposed a virtual demonstration tool, which is based on the open-domain Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchange), originally developed at NETL (National Energy Technology Laboratory). MFIX is based on a model framework in which the gas and particle phases are treated as interpenetrating continua. The general structure of Eulerian equations of motion for each of the phases is well understood, although specific constitutive equations describing the rheological behavior of gas-particle suspensions are still being developed. MFIX includes the capability to carry out reactive flow simulations, so the tool that we have set out to develop will permit both cold flow and reactive flow simulations. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in MFIX sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. The volume fraction of particles in dense fluidized beds, standpipes and valves is usually sufficiently large that the particles make enduring contact with multiple neighbors. In such instances, stress transmission between particles, and between particles and bounding solid surfaces occurs predominantly through frictional interactions. In this regime of flow, when the strength of frictional interaction between particles becomes sufficiently weak, flow of gas-solid suspension becomes unstable and a bubbly suspension results. Once formed, these bubbles dictate the macroscale flow characteristics, and therefore detailed CFD simulation of suspensions in this regime should account

  19. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  20. Repartitioning Strategies for Massively Parallel Simulation of Reacting Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Zheng, Angen; Givi, Peyman; Labrinidis, Alexandros; Chrysanthis, Panos

    2015-11-01

    The majority of parallel CFD simulators partition the domain into equal regions and assign the calculations for a particular region to a unique processor. This type of domain decomposition is vital to the efficiency of the solver. However, as the simulation develops, the workload among the partitions often become uneven (e.g. by adaptive mesh refinement, or chemically reacting regions) and a new partition should be considered. The process of repartitioning adjusts the current partition to evenly distribute the load again. We compare two repartitioning tools: Zoltan, an architecture-agnostic graph repartitioner developed at the Sandia National Laboratories; and Paragon, an architecture-aware graph repartitioner developed at the University of Pittsburgh. The comparative assessment is conducted via simulation of the Taylor-Green vortex flow with chemical reaction.

  1. Numerical simulation of laminar reacting flows with complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    1999-12-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for low Mach number reacting flows with complex chemistry. Our approach uses a form of the low Mach number equations that discretely conserves both mass and energy. The discretization methodology is based on a robust projection formulation that accommodates large density contrasts. The algorithm uses an operator-split treatment of stiff reaction terms and includes effects of differential diffusion. The basic computational approach is embedded in an adaptive projection framework that uses structured hierarchical grids with subcycling in time that preserves the discrete conservation properties of the underlying single-grid algorithm. We present numerical examples illustrating the performance of the method on both premixed and non-premixed flames.

  2. Numerical simulation of high speed chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuricht, Scott Richard

    . The scramjet case demonstrates the usefulness of the method as a predictive tool for reacting flows. The rocket motor nozzle case demonstrates the capability of the method to handle mixed subsonic/transonic/supersonic flow environments. Five different chemical reaction mechanisms were studied illustrating the flexibility of the method.

  3. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  4. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-07-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  5. Numerical Computation of the Chemically Reacting Flow around the National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the research accomplished. The research performed during the grant period can be divided into the following major areas: (1) Computation of chemically reacting Supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) flowfields. (2) Application of a two-equation turbulence model to supersonic combustion flowfields. (3) Computation of the integrated aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields of a generic hypersonic space plane. (4) Computation of hypersonic flows with finite-catalytic walls. (5) Development of an upwind Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code for thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flows.

  6. Development of a three-phase reacting flow computer model for analysis of petroleum cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-07-01

    A general computational fluid dynamics computer code (ICRKFLO) has been developed for the simulation of the multi-phase reacting flow in a petroleum fluid catalytic cracker riser. ICRKFLO has several unique features. A new integral reaction submodel couples calculations of hydrodynamics and cracking kinetics by making the calculations more efficient in achieving stable convergence while still preserving the major physical effects of reaction processes. A new coke transport submodel handles the process of coke formation in gas phase reactions and the subsequent deposition on the surface of adjacent particles. The code was validated by comparing with experimental results of a pilot scale fluid cracker unit. The code can predict the flow characteristics of gas, liquid, and particulate solid phases, vaporization of the oil droplets, and subsequent cracking of the oil in a riser reactor, which may lead to a better understanding of the internal processes of the riser and the impact of riser geometry and operating parameters on the riser performance.

  7. CFD code evaluation for internal flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Research on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code evaluation with emphasis on supercomputing in reacting flows is discussed. Advantages of unstructured grids, multigrids, adaptive methods, improved flow solvers, vector processing, parallel processing, and reduction of memory requirements are discussed. As examples, researchers include applications of supercomputing to reacting flow Navier-Stokes equations including shock waves and turbulence and combustion instability problems associated with solid and liquid propellants. Evaluation of codes developed by other organizations are not included. Instead, the basic criteria for accuracy and efficiency have been established, and some applications on rocket combustion have been made. Research toward an ultimate goal, the most accurate and efficient CFD code, is in progress and will continue for years to come.

  8. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ton, V. T.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Osher, S. J.; Engquist, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) shock-capturing scheme for the solution of hyperbolic equations is extended to solve a system of coupled conservation equations governing two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible chemically reacting flow with full chemistry. The thermodynamic properties of the mixture are modeled accurately, and stiff kinetic terms are separated from the fluid motion by a fractional step algorithm. The methodology is used to study the concept of shock-induced mixing and combustion, a process by which the interaction of a shock wave with a jet of low-density hydrogen fuel enhances mixing through streamwise vorticity generation. Test cases with and without chemical reaction are explored here. Our results indicate that, in the temperature range examined, vorticity generation as well as the distribution of atomic species do not change significantly with the introduction of a chemical reaction and subsequent heat release. The actual diffusion of hydrogen is also relatively unaffected by the reaction process. This suggests that the fluid mechanics of this problem may be successfully decoupled from the combustion processes, and that computation of the mixing problem (without combustion chemistry) can elucidate much of the important physical features of the flow.

  9. Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ton, V. T.; Karagozin, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Osher, S. J.; Engquist, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Essentially NonOscillatory (ENO) shock-capturing scheme for the solution of hyperbolic equations is extended to solve a system of coupled conservation equations governing two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible chemically reacting flow with full chemistry. The thermodynamic properties of the mixture are modeled accurately, and stiff kinetic terms are separated from the fluid motion by a fractional step algorithm. The methodology is used to study the concept of shock-induced mixing and combustion, a process by which the interaction of a shock wave with a jet of low-density hydrogen fuel enhances mixing through streamwise vorticity generation. Test cases with and without chemical reaction are explored here. Our results indicate that, in the temperature range examined, vorticity generation as well as the distribution of atomic species do not change significantly with the introduction of a chemical reaction and subsequent heat release. The actual diffusion of hydrogen is also relatively unaffected by the reaction process. This suggests that the fluid mechanics of this problem may be successfully decoupled from the combustion processes, and that computation of the mixing problem (without combustion chemistry) can elucidate much of the important physical features of the flow.

  10. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  11. Domain decomposition methods for the parallel computation of reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Domain decomposition is a natural route to parallel computing for partial differential equation solvers. Subdomains of which the original domain of definition is comprised are assigned to independent processors at the price of periodic coordination between processors to compute global parameters and maintain the requisite degree of continuity of the solution at the subdomain interfaces. In the domain-decomposed solution of steady multidimensional systems of PDEs by finite difference methods using a pseudo-transient version of Newton iteration, the only portion of the computation which generally stands in the way of efficient parallelization is the solution of the large, sparse linear systems arising at each Newton step. For some Jacobian matrices drawn from an actual two-dimensional reacting flow problem, comparisons are made between relaxation-based linear solvers and also preconditioned iterative methods of Conjugate Gradient and Chebyshev type, focusing attention on both iteration count and global inner product count. The generalized minimum residual method with block-ILU preconditioning is judged the best serial method among those considered, and parallel numerical experiments on the Encore Multimax demonstrate for it approximately 10-fold speedup on 16 processors.

  12. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The technical tasks conducted to develop and demonstrate a new gas velocity measurement technique for high enthalpy reacting flows is described. The technique is based on Doppler-shifted Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical. The imaging approach permits, in principle, single-shot measurements of the 2-D distribution of a single velocity component in the measurement plane, and is thus a technique of choice for applications in high enthalpy transient flow facilities. In contrast to previous work in this area, the present program demonstrated an approach which modified the diagnostic technique to function under the constraints of practical flow conditions of engineering interest, rather than vice-versa. In order to accomplish the experimental demonstrations, the state-of-the-art in PLIF diagnostic techniques was advanced in several ways. Each of these tasks is described in detail and is intended to serve as a reference in supporting the transition of this new capability to the fielded PLIF instruments now installed at several national test facilities. Among the new results of general interest in LlF-based flow diagnostics, a detailed set of the first measurements of the collisional broadening and shifting behavior of OH (1,0) band transitions in H7-air combustion environments is included. Such measurements are critical in the design of a successful strategy for PLIF velocity imaging; they also relate to accurate concentration and temperature measurements, particularly in compressible flow regimes. Furthermore, the results shed new light on the fundamental relationship between broadening and energy transfer collisions in OH A(sup 2)Sigma(+)v(sup ') = 1. The first single-pulse, spectrally-resolved measurements of the output of common pulsed dye lasers were also produced during the course of this effort. As with the OH broadening measurements, these data are a significant aspect of a successful velocity imaging strategy, and also have

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin method for multicomponent chemically reacting flows and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for application to chemically reacting flows in subsonic and supersonic regimes under the consideration of variable thermo-viscous-diffusive transport properties, detailed and stiff reaction chemistry, and shock capturing. A hybrid-flux formulation is developed for treatment of the convective fluxes, combining a conservative Riemann-solver and an extended double-flux scheme. A computationally efficient splitting scheme is proposed, in which advection and diffusion operators are solved in the weak form, and the chemically stiff substep is advanced in the strong form using a time-implicit scheme. The discretization of the viscous-diffusive transport terms follows the second form of Bassi and Rebay, and the WENO-based limiter due to Zhong and Shu is extended to multicomponent systems. Boundary conditions are developed for subsonic and supersonic flow conditions, and the algorithm is coupled to thermochemical libraries to account for detailed reaction chemistry and complex transport. The resulting DG method is applied to a series of test cases of increasing physico-chemical complexity. Beginning with one- and two-dimensional multispecies advection and shock-fluid interaction problems, computational efficiency, convergence, and conservation properties are demonstrated. This study is followed by considering a series of detonation and supersonic combustion problems to investigate the convergence-rate and the shock-capturing capability in the presence of one- and multistep reaction chemistry. The DG algorithm is then applied to diffusion-controlled deflagration problems. By examining convergence properties for polynomial order and spatial resolution, and comparing these with second-order finite-volume solutions, it is shown that optimal convergence is achieved and that polynomial refinement provides advantages in better resolving the localized flame structure and complex flow-field features

  14. Three-dimensional calculation of supersonic reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Tsai, Y-L Peter; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1989-01-01

    A new three-dimensional numerical program incorporated with comprehensive real gas property models was developed to simulate supersonic reacting flows. The code employs an implicit finite volume, Lower-Upper (LU) time-marching method to solve the complete Navier-Stokes and species equations in a fully-coupled and very efficient manner. A chemistry model with nine species and eighteen reaction steps are adopted in the program to represent the chemical reaction of H2 and air. To demonstrate the capability of the program, flow fields of underexpanded hydrogen jets transversely injected into supersonic air stream inside the combustors of scramjets are calculated. Results clearly depict the flow characteristics, including the shock structure, separated flow regions around the injector, and the distribution of the combustion products.

  15. Three-dimensional calculation of supersonic reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Tsai, Y.-L. Peter (Editor); Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1989-01-01

    A new three-dimensional numerical program incorporated with comprehensive real gas property models has been developed to simulate supersonic reacting flows. The code employs an implicit finite volume, Lower-Upper (LU) time-marching method to solve the complete Navier-Stokes and species equations in a fully-coupled and very efficient manner. A chemistry model with nine species and eighteen reaction steps are adopted in the program to represent the chemical reaction of H2 and air. To demonstrate the capability of the program, flow fields of underexpanded hydrogen jets transversely injected into supersonic air stream inside the combustors of scramjets are calculated. Results clearly depict the flow characteristics, including the shock structure, separated flow regions around the injector, and the distribution of the combustion products.

  16. Three-dimensional calculations of supersonic reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Tsai, Y.-L. Peter; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1991-01-01

    A 3-D numerical program that incorporates comprehensive real gas property models was developed to simulate supersonic reacting flows. The code employs an implicit, finite volume, Lower-Upper (LU), time-marching method to solve the complete Navier-Stokes and species equations in a fully-coupled and efficient manner. A chemistry model with 9 species and 18 reaction steps is adopted in the program to represent the chemical reactions of H2 and air. To demonstrate the capability of the program, flow fields of underexpanded hydrogen jets transversely injected into the supersonic airstream inside the combustors of scramjets are calculated. Results clearly depict the flow characteristics, including the shock structure, the separated flow regions around the injector, and the distribution of the combustion products.

  17. Computations of non-reacting and reacting viscous blunt body flows, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs for calculating the flow distribution in the nose region of a blunt body at arbitrary speed and altitude are discussed. The programs differ from each other in their ability to consider either thin shock or thick shock conditions and in the use of either ideal, equilibrium air, or nonequilibrium air chemistry. The application of the programs to analyzing the flow distribution around the nose of the shuttle orbiter during reentry is reported.

  18. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  19. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The overall contractual effort and the theory and numerical solution for the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. Fundamental equations for steady flow of reacting gas-particle mixtures, method of characteristics, mesh point construction, and numerical integration of the conservation equations are considered herein.

  20. Analysis of non-premixed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of chemical reactions occurring in turbulent flows are important in the understanding of combustion and other applications. Current numerical methods are limited in their applications due to the numerical resolution required to completely capture all length scales, but, despite the fact that realistic combustion cannot be solved completely, numerical simulations can be used to give insight into the interaction between the processes of turbulence and chemical reaction. The objective was to investigate the effects of turbulent motion on the effects of chemical reaction to gain some insight on the interaction of turbulence, molecular diffusion, and chemical reaction to support modeling efforts. A direct turbulence simulation spectral code was modified to include the effects of chemical reaction and applied to an initial value problem of chemical reaction between non-premixed species. The influence of hydrodynamics on the instantaneous structure of the reaction was investigated. The local scalar dissipation rates and the local reaction rates were examined to determine the influence of vorticity or rate of strain on the reaction and the structure of the scalar field.

  1. Parallelization of Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss-Seidel Method for Chemically Reacting Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Jost, Gabriele; Chang, Sherry

    2005-01-01

    Development of technologies for exploration of the solar system has revived an interest in computational simulation of chemically reacting flows since planetary probe vehicles exhibit non-equilibrium phenomena during the atmospheric entry of a planet or a moon as well as the reentry to the Earth. Stability in combustion is essential for new propulsion systems. Numerical solution of real-gas flows often increases computational work by an order-of-magnitude compared to perfect gas flow partly because of the increased complexity of equations to solve. Recently, as part of Project Columbia, NASA has integrated a cluster of interconnected SGI Altix systems to provide a ten-fold increase in current supercomputing capacity that includes an SGI Origin system. Both the new and existing machines are based on cache coherent non-uniform memory access architecture. Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) relaxation method has been implemented into both perfect and real gas flow codes including Real-Gas Aerodynamic Simulator (RGAS). However, the vectorized RGAS code runs inefficiently on cache-based shared-memory machines such as SGI system. Parallelization of a Gauss-Seidel method is nontrivial due to its sequential nature. The LU-SGS method has been vectorized on an oblique plane in INS3D-LU code that has been one of the base codes for NAS Parallel benchmarks. The oblique plane has been called a hyperplane by computer scientists. It is straightforward to parallelize a Gauss-Seidel method by partitioning the hyperplanes once they are formed. Another way of parallelization is to schedule processors like a pipeline using software. Both hyperplane and pipeline methods have been implemented using openMP directives. The present paper reports the performance of the parallelized RGAS code on SGI Origin and Altix systems.

  2. Flow-distributed oscillations: Stationary chemical waves in a reacting flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kærn, Mads; Menzinger, Michael

    1999-10-01

    A recent prediction of stationary waves in open, reacting flows is experimentally verified. We show that stationary waves are generated by a mechanism whereby the flow carries a time-oscillating subelement, behaving like a batch reactor, through space while a fixed boundary condition at the inflow locks the phase of the oscillation. This mechanism can generate stationary patterns when all diffusion coefficients are equal. The experimental system is the ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a tubular reactor, fed by the outflow of a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Parameter conditions are such that the concentrations are constant in the CSTR while they oscillate in the flow tube.

  3. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  4. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H.

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  5. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Colucci, P. J.; Taulbee, D. B.; Givi, P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Aug. 1994 - 31 Jul. 1995, we have focused our efforts on two programs: (1) developments of explicit algebraic moment closures for statistical descriptions of compressible reacting flows and (2) development of Monte Carlo numerical methods for LES of chemically reacting flows.

  6. Fictitious domain method for fully resolved reacting gas-solid flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Liu, Kai; You, Changfu

    2015-10-01

    Fully resolved simulation (FRS) for gas-solid multiphase flow considers solid objects as finite sized regions in flow fields and their behaviours are predicted by solving equations in both fluid and solid regions directly. Fixed mesh numerical methods, such as fictitious domain method, are preferred in solving FRS problems and have been widely researched. However, for reacting gas-solid flows no suitable fictitious domain numerical method has been developed. This work presents a new fictitious domain finite element method for FRS of reacting particulate flows. Low Mach number reacting flow governing equations are solved sequentially on a regular background mesh. Particles are immersed in the mesh and driven by their surface forces and torques integrated on immersed interfaces. Additional treatments on energy and surface reactions are developed. Several numerical test cases validated the method and a burning carbon particles array falling simulation proved the capability for solving moving reacting particle cluster problems.

  7. Shock-turbulence interactions in a reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Ribner, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A specific reactive flow configuration, the interaction of a detonation wave with convected homogeneous isotropic weak turbulence (which can be constructed by a Fourier synthesis of small amplitude shear waves) is addressed. The effect of chemical heat release on the rms fluctuations downstream of the detonation is presented as a function of Mach number. In addition, for the particular case of the von Karman spectrum, the one dimensional power spectra of these flow quantities is given.

  8. Unstructured LES of Reacting Multiphase Flows in Realistic Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Frank; Apte, Sourabh; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Herrmann, Marcus; Constantinescu, George; Mahesh, Krishnan; Moin, Parviz

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program, an accurate and robust simulation tool is being developed to perform high-fidelity LES studies of multiphase, multiscale turbulent reacting flows in aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations using hybrid unstructured grids. In the combustor, pressurized gas from the upstream compressor is reacted with atomized liquid fuel to produce the combustion products that drive the downstream turbine. The Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach is used to simulate the combustor because of its demonstrated superiority over RANS in predicting turbulent mixing, which is central to combustion. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the combustor group over the past year, concentrating mainly on the two major milestones achieved this year: 1) Large scale simulation: A major rewrite and redesign of the flagship unstructured LES code has allowed the group to perform large eddy simulations of the complete combustor geometry (all 18 injectors) with over 100 million control volumes; 2) Multi-physics simulation in complex geometry: The first multi-physics simulations including fuel spray breakup, coalescence, evaporation, and combustion are now being performed in a single periodic sector (1/18th) of an actual Pratt & Whitney combustor geometry.

  9. Prediction of swirling reacting flow in ramjet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.; Samples, J. W.; Rhode, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations have been undertaken for a basic two-dimensional axisymmetric flowfield which is similar to that found in conventional gas turbine and ramjet combustors. A swirling flow enters a larger chamber via a sudden or gradual expansion. The calculation method involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation turbulence energy-turbulence dissipation rate turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. The results include recirculation zone characterization and predicted mean streamline patterns. Predictions with and without chemical reaction are obtained. An associated isothermal experimental flow study is providing a useful data base. Successful outcomes of the work can be incorporated into the more combustion- and hardware-oriented activities of industrial concerns.

  10. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the first phase of this research, conducted within the past six months, focus was in three directions: RANS of turbulent reacting flows by Probability Density Function (PDF) methods, RANS of non-reacting turbulent flows by advanced turbulence closures, and LES of mixing dominated reacting flows by a dynamics subgrid closure. A summary of our efforts within the past six months of this research is provided in this semi-annual progress report.

  11. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 2: Program manual for RAMP2. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    All of the elements used in the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described in detail. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields.

  12. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, Craig J.

    1990-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementation of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program to extend the present capabilities of this method was initiated for the treatment of chemically reacting flows. In the DNS efforts, the focus is on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and non-equilibrium kinetics modelings in high speed reacting flows. Emphasis was on the simulations of simple flows, namely homogeneous compressible flows, and temporally developing high speed mixing layers.

  13. Mixing and combustion enhancement in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Carpenter, Mark H.; Mukunda, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    Research has been conducted for a number of years at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) capable of propelling a vehicle at hypersonic speeds in the atmosphere or beyond. Recently, that research has been directed toward the optimization of the scramjet combustor, and in particular the efficiency of fuel-air mixing and reaction in the engine. This paper describes a study of fuel-air mixing and reaction in a supersonic flow field, and discusses several techniques that were applied for enhancing the mixing processes and overal combustion efficiency in the flow. Based on the results of the study, an alternate fuel injector configuration was computationally designed, and that configuration significantly increased the amount of fuel-air mixing and combustion over a given combustor length that was achieved.

  14. Radiative interactions in chemically reacting supersonic internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, R.

    1991-01-01

    The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with finite-rate chemistry and radiation for hydrogen-air systems. The chemistry source terms in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. The specific problem considered is the premixed flow in a channel with a ten-degree compression ramp. Three different chemistry models are used, accounting for increasing number of reactions and participating species. Two chemistry models assure nitrogen as inert, while the third model accounts for nitrogen reactions and NO(x) formation. The tangent slab approximation is used in the radiative flux formulation. A pseudo-gray model is used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interactions vary substantially, depending on reactions involving HO2 and NO species and that this can have a significant influence on the flowfield.

  15. A kinetic-theory approach to turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the mathematical and physical foundations for the kinetic theory of reactive turbulent flows, discussing the differences and relation between the kinetic and averaged equations, and comparing some solutions of the kinetic equations obtained by the Green's function method with those obtained by the approximate bimodal method. The kinetic method described consists essentially in constructing the probability density functions of the chemical species on the basis of solutions of the Langevin stochastic equation for the influence of eddies on the behavior of fluid elements. When the kinetic equations are solved for the structure of the diffusion flame established in a shear layer by the bimodal method, discontinuities in gradients of the mean concentrations at the two flame edges appear. This is a consequence of the bimodal approximation of all distribution functions by two dissimilar half-Maxwellian functions, which is a very crude approximation. These discontinuities do not appear when the solutions are constructed by the Green's function method described here.

  16. Seals Flow Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In recognition of a deficiency in the current modeling capability for seals, an effort was established by NASA to develop verified computational fluid dynamic concepts, codes, and analyses for seals. The objectives were to develop advanced concepts for the design and analysis of seals, to effectively disseminate the information to potential users by way of annual workshops, and to provide experimental verification for the models and codes under a wide range of operating conditions.

  17. Study of mass consistency LES/FDF techniques for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Cesar; Figueira da Silva, Luís Fernando

    2015-07-01

    A hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered density function (LES/FDF) approach is used for studying chemically reacting flows with detailed chemistry. In particular, techniques utilised for ensuring a mass consistent coupling between LES and FDF are discussed. The purpose of these techniques is to maintain a correct spatial distribution of the computational particles representing specified amounts of fluid. A particular mass consistency technique due to Y.Z. Zhang and D.C. Haworth (A general mass consistency algorithm for hybrid particle/finite-volume PDF methods, J. Comput. Phys. 194 (2004), pp. 156-193) and their associated algorithms are implemented in a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics code suitable for the simulation of variable density flows, representative of those encountered in actual combustion applications. To assess the effectiveness of the referenced technique for enforcing LES/FDF mass consistency, two- and three-dimensional simulations of a temporal mixing layer using detailed and reduced chemistry mechanisms are carried out. The parametric analysis performed focuses on determining the influence on the level of mass consistency errors of parameters such as the initial number of particles per cell and the initial density ratio of the mixing layers. Particular emphasis is put on the computational burden that represents the use of such a mass consistency technique. The results show the suitability of this type of technique for ensuring the mass consistency required when utilising hybrid LES/FDF approaches. The level of agreement of the computed results with experimental data is also illustrated.

  18. Finite volume method for the calculation of compressible chemically reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bussing, T.R.A.; Murman, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    Several efficient pseudo time techniques have been developed for calculating steady state chemically reacting flows. The techniques include the implicit treatment of the chemical source term, point implicit multiple grid accelerator and a constant CFL condition. It turns out that these methods can be viewed as ways of rescaling the equations in time such that all chemical and convective phenomena evolve at comparable pseudo time scales. Consequently the number of iterations needed to solve reacting problems is approximately the same as for non-reacting problems. The techniques are demonstrated for a simple dissociation model and a nontrivial H2 - Air combustion model.

  19. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Frankel, S. H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Sabini, G.; Madnia, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to extend current capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first two years of this research have been concentrated on a priori investigations of single-point Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing subgrid closures in reacting turbulent flows. In the efforts initiated in the third year, our primary focus has been on performing actual LES by means of PDF methods. The approach is based on assumed PDF methods and we have performed extensive analysis of turbulent reacting flows by means of LES. This includes simulations of both three-dimensional (3D) isotropic compressible flows and two-dimensional reacting planar mixing layers. In addition to these LES analyses, some work is in progress to assess the extent of validity of our assumed PDF methods. This assessment is done by making detailed companions with recent laboratory data in predicting the rate of reactant conversion in parallel reacting shear flows. This report provides a summary of our achievements for the first six months of the third year of this program.

  20. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-02-01

    Because of the possibility of using dissociating gases as coolants and working bodies of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to develop computational algorithms for calculating heat and mass transfer processes under conditions of nonequilibrium flow of chemically reacting gases not only in axisymmetric channels, but also in channels with a complex transverse cross section (including also in eccentric annular channels). An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas (N/sub 2/O/sub 4/).

  1. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.; Vidoni, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were concerned with developing reliable subgrid closures for modeling of the fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we focused our attention to further investigation of the effects of exothermicity in compressible turbulent flows. In our previous work, in the first year of this research, we have considered only 'simple' flows. Currently, we are in the process of extending our analyses for the purpose of modeling more practical flows of current interest at LaRC. A summary of our accomplishments during the third six months of the research is presented.

  2. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  3. A sectional coupling approach for the simulation of multi-phase reacting flow in a bent reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1996-04-01

    Multi-phase reacting flows of a bent fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactor have been simulated using the ICRKFLO code. A new sectional coupling approach has been developed to handle the complex geometry, which divides the bent reactor into two sections and computations are performed for the two sections successively. The computational results show that the ICRKFLO incorporated with the new sectional coupling approach can predict product yields very well compared with experimental data and can be used to identify critical processes and parameters which may be modified to improve the quality and quantity of the FCC products.

  4. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Taulbee, Dale B.; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Sabini, George J.; Shieh, Geoffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Sep. 1993 - 1 Sep. 1994, we have focused our efforts on two research problems: (1) developments of 'algebraic' moment closures for statistical descriptions of nonpremixed reacting systems, and (2) assessments of the Dirichlet frequency in presumed scalar probability density function (PDF) methods in stochastic description of turbulent reacting flows. This report provides a complete description of our efforts during this past year as supported by the NASA Langley Research Center under Grant NAG1-1122.

  5. Mixing and NOx Emission Calculations of Confined Reacting Jet Flows in Cylindrical and Annular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oechsle, Victor L.; Connor, Christopher H.; Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rapid mixing of cold lateral jets with hot cross-stream flows in confined configurations is of practical interest in gas turbine combustors as it strongly affects combustor exit temperature quality, and gaseous emissions in for example rich-lean combustion. It is therefore important to further improve our fundamental understanding of the important processes of dilution jet mixing especially when the injected jet mass flow rate exceeds that of the cross-stream. The results reported in this report describe some of the main flow characteristics which develop in the mixing process in a cylindrical duct. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been used to predict the mixing flow field characteristics and NOx emission in a quench section of a rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn (RQL) combustor. Sixty configurations have been analyzed in both circular and annular geometries in a fully reacting environment simulating the operating condition of an actual RQL gas turbine combustion liner. The evaluation matrix was constructed by varying the number of orifices per row and orifice shape. Other parameters such as J (momentum-flux ratio), MR (mass flowrate ratio), DR (density ratio), and mixer sector orifice ACd (effective orifice area) were maintained constant throughout the entire study. The results indicate that the mixing flow field can be correlated with the NOx production if they are referenced with the stoichiometric equivalence ratio value and not the equilibrium value. The mixing flowfields in both circular and annular mixers are different. The penetration of equal jets in both annular and circular geometries is vastly different which significantly affects the performance of the mixing section. In the computational results with the circular mixer, most of the NOx formation occurred behind the orifice starting at the orifice wake region. General trends have been observed in the NOx production as the number of orifices is changed and this appears to be

  6. A numerical method for DNS/LES of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Doom, Jeff; Hou, Yucheng; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2007-09-10

    A spatially non-dissipative, implicit numerical method to simulate turbulent reacting flows over a range of Mach numbers, is described. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are rescaled so that the zero Mach number equations are discretely recovered in the limit of zero Mach number. The dependent variables are co-located in space, and thermodynamic variables are staggered from velocity in time. The algorithm discretely conserves kinetic energy in the incompressible, inviscid, non-reacting limit. The chemical source terms are implicit in time to allow for stiff chemical mechanisms. The algorithm is readily extended to complex chemical mechanisms. Numerical examples using both simple and complex chemical mechanisms are presented.

  7. Seals Flow Code Development 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D. (Compiler); Hendricks, Robert C. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Seals Workshop of 1993 code releases include SPIRALI for spiral grooved cylindrical and face seal configurations; IFACE for face seals with pockets, steps, tapers, turbulence, and cavitation; GFACE for gas face seals with 'lift pad' configurations; and SCISEAL, a CFD code for research and design of seals of cylindrical configuration. GUI (graphical user interface) and code usage was discussed with hands on usage of the codes, discussions, comparisons, and industry feedback. Other highlights for the Seals Workshop-93 include environmental and customer driven seal requirements; 'what's coming'; and brush seal developments including flow visualization, numerical analysis, bench testing, T-700 engine testing, tribological pairing and ceramic configurations, and cryogenic and hot gas facility brush seal results. Also discussed are seals for hypersonic engines and dynamic results for spiral groove and smooth annular seals.

  8. An explicit Runge-Kutta method for turbulent reacting flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretti, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical method for the solution of the conservation equations governing steady, reacting, turbulent viscous flow in two-dimensional geometries, in both Cartesian and axisymmetric coordinates. These equations are written in Favre-averaged form and closed with a first order model. A two-equation K-epsilon model, where low Reynolds number and compressibility effects are included, and a modified eddy-break up model are used to simulate fluid mechanics turbulence, chemistry and turbulence-combustion interaction. The solution is obtained by using a pseudo-unsteady method with improved perturbation propagation properties. The equations are discretized in space by using a finite volume formulation. An explicit multi-stage dissipative Runge-Kutta algorithm is then used to advance the flow equations in the pseudo-time. The method is applied to the computation of both diffusion and premixed turbulent reacting flows. The computed temperature distributions compare favorably with experimental data.

  9. A method to determine the acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting duct liners in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustical properties of locally and nonlocally reacting acoustical liners in grazing flow are described. The effect of mean flow and shear flow are considered as well as the application to rigid and limp bulk reacting materials. The axial wavenumber of the least attenuated mode in a flow duct is measured. The acoustical properties of duct liners is then deduced from the measured axial wavenumber and known flow profile and boundary conditions. This method is a natural extension of impedance-like measurements.

  10. A computer program for two-dimensional and axisymmetric nonreacting perfect gas and equilibrium chemically reacting laminar, transitional and-or turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program is described in detail for laminar, transitional, and/or turbulent boundary-layer flows of non-reacting (perfect gas) and reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium. An implicit finite difference scheme was developed for both two dimensional and axisymmetric flows over bodies, and in rocket nozzles and hypervelocity wind tunnel nozzles. The program, program subroutines, variables, and input and output data are described. Also included is the output from a sample calculation of fully developed turbulent, perfect gas flow over a flat plate. Input data coding forms and a FORTRAN source listing of the program are included. A method is discussed for obtaining thermodynamic and transport property data which are required to perform boundary-layer calculations for reacting gases in chemical equilibrium.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  12. Computation of turbulent reacting flow in a solid-propellant ducted rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Chou, W.; Liu, S.

    1995-05-01

    A mathematical model for computation of turbulent reacting flows is developed under general curvilinear coordinate systems. An adaptive, streamline grid system is generated to deal with the complex flow structures in a multiple-inlet solid-propellant ducted rocket (SDR) combustor. General tensor representations of the k-epsilon and algebraic stress (ASM) turbulence models are derived in terms of contravariant velocity components, and modification caused by the effects of compressible turbulence is also included in the modeling. The clipped Gaussian probability density function is incorporated in the combustion model to account for fluctuations of properties. Validation of the above modeling is first examined by studying mixing and reacting characteristics in a confined coaxial-jet problem. This is followed by study of nonreacting and reacting SDR combustor flows. The results show that Gibson and Launder`s ASM incorporated with Sarkar`s modification for compressible turbulence effects based on the general curvilinear coordinate systems yields the most satisfactory prediction for this complicated SDR flowfield. 36 refs.

  13. Turbulent Chemically Reacting Flows According to a Kinetic Theory. Ph.D. Thesis; [statistical analysis/gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Z. C.

    1975-01-01

    A review of various methods of calculating turbulent chemically reacting flow such as the Green Function, Navier-Stokes equation, and others is presented. Nonequilibrium degrees of freedom were employed to study the mixing behavior of a multiscale turbulence field. Classical and modern theories are discussed.

  14. Three-dimensional calculations of supersonic reacting flows using an LU scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    An implicit finite volume lower-upper time-marching method which efficiently solves the complete Navier-Stokes and specied equations in a fully coupled fashion is the basis of the present 3D numerical program for simulating the supersonic reacting flows of H2 in air. The chemistry model incorporated has nine species and 18 reaction steps. Calculations are presented for flowfields of underexpanded hydrogen jets that are transversely injected into the supersonic airstream within scramjet combustors; the shock structure, separated flow regions around the injector, and combustion-product distributions are clearly represented.

  15. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  16. A pressure correction method for the calculation of compressible chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Chen, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed noniterative method for the solution of the transient fluid flow equations at all speed is extended to handle chemical reacting flows. The species conservation equations are loosely coupled into the predictor/multicorrector sequence of the solution procedure. A split-operator method separates the chemical kinetics terms from the fluid-dynamical terms, as well as an implicit differencing method enhance the numerical stability. The method was applied for turbulent diffusion flame calculations and for the analyses of high pressure, axisymmetric turbulent hypersonic nozzle flows. The diffusion flame results were compared with a similar pressure method for fast chemistry integration scheme without operator-splitting. Simulations of the nozzle flow indicated that the nonideal intermolecular effects must be included in the analysis and design of high pressure hypersonic nozzle.

  17. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties.

  18. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  19. Dynamical-systems analysis and unstable periodic orbits in reacting flows behind symmetric bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Gunaratne, Gemunu H; Kostka, Stanislav; Jiang, Naibo; Kiel, Barry V; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-09-01

    Dynamical systems analysis is performed for reacting flows stabilized behind four symmetric bluff bodies to determine the effects of shape on the nature of flame stability, acoustic coupling, and vortex shedding. The task requires separation of regular, repeatable aspects of the flow from experimental noise and highly irregular, nonrepeatable small-scale structures caused primarily by viscous-mediated energy cascading. The experimental systems are invariant under a reflection, and symmetric vortex shedding is observed throughout the parameter range. As the equivalence ratio-and, hence, acoustic coupling-is reduced, a symmetry-breaking transition to von Karman vortices is initiated. Combining principal-components analysis with a symmetry-based filtering, we construct bifurcation diagrams for the onset and growth of von Karman vortices. We also compute Lyapunov exponents for each flame holder to help quantify the transitions. Furthermore, we outline changes in the phase-space orbits that accompany the onset of von Karman vortex shedding and compute unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) embedded in the complex flows prior to and following the bifurcation. For each flame holder, we find a single UPO in flows without von Karman vortices and a pair of UPOs in flows with von Karman vortices. These periodic orbits organize the dynamics of the flow and can be used to reduce or control flow irregularities. By subtracting them from the overall flow, we are able to deduce the nature of irregular facets of the flows.

  20. Spatially-Resolved Velocity Measurements in Steady, High-Speed Reacting Flows Using Laser-Induced OH Fluorescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavuhn, Kurt G.

    The theoretical development and calibration of a nonintrusive, high-resolution, optical flowfield-diagnostic technique utilizing OH laser-induced fluorescence (OH LIF) for the measurement of velocity in steady, high-speed, reacting flows is reported. The particular high-speed, reacting flows of interest are those occurring in supersonic combustors for proposed hypersonic flight vehicles. The theory of the OH LIF strategy employed in this work is described, with emphasis on the optimization of the strategy for quantitative velocity measurements. A simplified model is derived for the calculation of expected signal levels from pulsed, narrow-linewidth, (1,0) band excitation of OH in flames when collecting filtered (1,1) and (0,0) band fluorescence with a gated detector. Several illumination techniques are presented for measuring the Doppler shift of the OH LIF while eliminating systematic errors. A unique reacting underexpanded jet was constructed for the calibration of the OH LIF velocity measurement technique over a wide range of flow conditions. A complete analysis of the distribution of flow properties in the jet flowfield is presented, including results from a full Navier-Stokes calculation with finite -rate chemistry. Comparisons of results from pointwise OH LIF velocity measurements along the centerline and planar OH LIF velocity measurements along the central plane of the reacting underexpanded jet with the numerical solution demonstrate the resolution, range, and accuracy of the technique. Measured and calculated velocities in the supersonic jet core agree on average to within +/-1.3% for the pointwise measurements and +/-2.2% for the planar measurements. The uncertainty (2 sigma) in the pointwise velocity measurements in the jet core was on average +/-6.0% for a single measurement and +/-3.5% for the average value of three scans. For the planar velocity measurements in the jet core, the uncertainty (2 sigma) was on average +/-4.9% for a single measurement

  1. Ensemble Averaged Probability Density Function (APDF) for Compressible Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a concept of the averaged probability density function (APDF) for studying compressible turbulent reacting flows. The APDF is defined as an ensemble average of the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF) with a mass density weighting. It can be used to exactly deduce the mass density weighted, ensemble averaged turbulent mean variables. The transport equation for APDF can be derived in two ways. One is the traditional way that starts from the transport equation of FG-PDF, in which the compressible Navier- Stokes equations are embedded. The resulting transport equation of APDF is then in a traditional form that contains conditional means of all terms from the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations except for the chemical reaction term. These conditional means are new unknown quantities that need to be modeled. Another way of deriving the transport equation of APDF is to start directly from the ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting transport equation of APDF derived from this approach appears in a closed form without any need for additional modeling. The methodology of ensemble averaging presented in this paper can be extended to other averaging procedures: for example, the Reynolds time averaging for statistically steady flow and the Reynolds spatial averaging for statistically homogeneous flow. It can also be extended to a time or spatial filtering procedure to construct the filtered density function (FDF) for the large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent reacting flows.

  2. MPSalsa Version 1.5: A Finite Element Computer Program for Reacting Flow Problems: Part 1 - Theoretical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Hennigan, G.L.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.; Salinger, A.G.; Schmidt, R.C.; Shadid, J.N.; Smith, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa Version 1.5, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar or turbulent low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow (with auxiliary turbulence equations), heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solve coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMK3N, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element database suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec. solver library.

  3. A time-accurate implicit method for chemically reacting flows at all Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, J. P.; Yang, V.; Shuen, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a unified solution algorithm capable of treating time-accurate chemically reacting flows at all Mach numbers, ranging from molecular diffusion velocities to supersonic speeds. A rescaled pressure term is used in the momentum equation to circumvent the singular behavior of pressure at low Mach numbers. A dual time-stepping integration procedure is established. The system eigenvalues become well behaved and have the same order of magnitude, even in the very low Mach number regime. The computational efficiency for moderate and high speed flow is competitive with the conventional density-based scheme. The capabilities of the algorithm are demonstrated by applying it to selected model problems including nozzle flows and flame dynamics.

  4. Large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to make use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first phase of this research conducted within the past three years have been directed in several issues pertaining to intricate physics of turbulent reacting flows. In our previous 5 semi-annual reports submitted to NASA LaRC, as well as several technical papers in archival journals, the results of our investigations have been fully described. In this progress report which is different in format as compared to our previous documents, we focus only on the issue of LES. The reason for doing so is that LES is the primary issue of interest to our Technical Monitor and that our other findings were needed to support the activities conducted under this prime issue. The outcomes of our related investigations, nevertheless, are included in the appendices accompanying this report. The relevance of the materials in these appendices are, therefore, discussed only briefly within the body of the report. Here, results are presented of a priori and a posterior analyses for validity assessments of assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) methods as potential subgrid scale (SGS) closures for LES of turbulent reacting flows. Simple non-premixed reacting systems involving an isothermal reaction of the type A + B yields Products under both chemical equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. A priori analyses are conducted of a homogeneous box flow, and a spatially developing planar mixing layer to investigate the performance of the Pearson Family of PDF's as SGS models. A posteriori analyses are conducted of the mixing layer using a hybrid one-equation Smagorinsky/PDF SGS closure. The Smagorinsky closure augmented by the solution of the subgrid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is employed to account for hydrodynamic fluctuations, and the PDF is employed for modeling the

  5. Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Blowout in a Reacting Turbulent Hydrogen Jet in Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, H.; Grout, R. W.; Gruber, A.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanisms contributing to flame stabilization and blowout in a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen transverse jet in a turbulent boundary layer cross-flow (JICF) are investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed chemistry. Non-reacting JICF DNS were performed to understand the relative magnitude and physical location of low velocity regions on the leeward side of the fuel jet where a flame can potentially anchor. As the injection angle is reduced from 90{sup o} to 70{sup o}, the low velocity region was found to diminish significantly, both in terms of physical extent and magnitude, and hence, its ability to provide favorable conditions for flame anchoring and stabilization are greatly reduced. In the reacting JICF DNS a stable flame is observed for 90{sup o} injection angle and, on average, the flame root is in the vicinity of low velocity magnitude and stoichiometric mixture. When the injection angle is smoothly transitioned to 75{sup o} a transient flame blowout is observed. Ensemble averaged quantities on the flame base reveal two phases of the blowout characterized by a kinematic imbalance between flame propagation speed and flow normal velocity. In the first phase dominant flow structures repeatedly draw the flame base closer to the jet centerline resulting in richer-than-stoichiometric mixtures and high velocity magnitudes. In the second phase, in spite of low velocity magnitudes and a return to stoichiometry, due to jet bending and flame alignment normal to the cross-flow, the flow velocity normal to the flame base increases dramatically perpetuating the blowout.

  6. Modeling study of rarefied gas effects on hypersonic reacting stagnation flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Bao, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Recent development of the near space hypersonic sharp leading vehicles has raised a necessity to fast and accurately predict the aeroheating in hypersonic rarefied flows, which challenges our understanding of the aerothermodynamics and aerothermochemistry. The present flow and heat transfer problem involves complex rarefied gas effects and nonequilibrium real gas effects which are beyond the scope of the traditional prediction theory based on the continuum hypothesis and equilibrium assumption. As a typical example, it has been found that the classical Fay-Riddell equation fails to predict the stagnation point heat flux, when the flow is either rarefied or chemical nonequilibrium. In order to design a more general theory covering the rarefied reacting flow cases, an intuitive model is proposed in this paper to describe the nonequilibrium dissociation-recombination flow along the stagnation streamline towards a slightly blunted nose in hypersonic rarefied flows. Some characteristic flow parameters are introduced, and based on these parameters, an explicitly analytical bridging function is established to correct the traditional theory to accurately predict the actual aeroheating performance. It is shown that for a small size nose in medium density flows, the flow at the outer edge of the stagnation point boundary layer could be highly nonequilibrium, and the aeroheating performance is distinguished from that of the big blunt body reentry flows at high altitudes. As a result, when the rarefied gas effects and the nonequilibrium real gas effects are both significant, the classical similarity law could be questionable, and it is inadequate to directly analogize results from the classical blunt body reentry problems to the present new generation sharp-leading vehicles. In addition, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method is also employed to validate the conclusion.

  7. Combined LAURA-UPS solution procedure for chemically-reacting flows. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flowfields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a noncatalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the noncatalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated and the nonequilibrium results are compared with a perfect gas solution, showing that while the surface pressure is relatively unchanged by the inclusion of reacting chemistry the nonequilibrium heating is 25 percent higher. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three dimensional case over an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  8. Effects of mesh resolution on large eddy simulation of reacting flows in complex geometry combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2008-10-15

    The power of current parallel computers is becoming sufficient to apply large eddy simulation (LES) tools to reacting flows not only in academic configurations but also in real gas turbine chambers. The most limiting factor in performing LES of real systems is the mesh size, which directly controls the overall cost of the simulation, so that the effects of mesh resolution on LES results become a key issue. In the present work, an unstructured compressible LES solver is used to compute the reacting flow in a domain corresponding to a sector of a realistic helicopter chamber. Three grids ranging from 1.2 to 44 million elements are used for LES and results are compared in terms of mean and fluctuating fields as well as of pressure spectra. Results show that the mean temperature, reaction rate, and velocity fields are almost insensitive to the grid size. The RMS field of the resolved velocity is also reasonably independent of the mesh, while the RMS fields of temperature exhibit more sensitivity to the grid, as expected from the fact that most of the combustion process proceeds at small scales. The acoustic field exhibits a limited sensitivity to the mesh, suggesting that LES is adapted to the computation of combustion instabilities in complex systems. (author)

  9. Deconvolution of reacting-flow dynamics using proper orthogonal and dynamic mode decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Hua, Jia-Chen; Barnhill, Will; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Gord, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and computational studies of reacting flows are extremely challenging due in part to nonlinearities of the underlying system of equations and long-range coupling mediated by heat and pressure fluctuations. However, many dynamical features of the flow can be inferred through low-order models if the flow constituents (e.g., eddies or vortices) and their symmetries, as well as the interactions among constituents, are established. Modal decompositions of high-frequency, high-resolution imaging, such as measurements of species-concentration fields through planar laser-induced florescence and of velocity fields through particle-image velocimetry, are the first step in the process. A methodology is introduced for deducing the flow constituents and their dynamics following modal decomposition. Proper orthogonal (POD) and dynamic mode (DMD) decompositions of two classes of problems are performed and their strengths compared. The first problem involves a cellular state generated in a flat circular flame front through symmetry breaking. The state contains two rings of cells that rotate clockwise at different rates. Both POD and DMD can be used to deconvolve the state into the two rings. In POD the contribution of each mode to the flow is quantified using the energy. Each DMD mode can be associated with an energy as well as a unique complex growth rate. Dynamic modes with the same spatial symmetry but different growth rates are found to be combined into a single POD mode. Thus, a flow can be approximated by a smaller number of POD modes. On the other hand, DMD provides a more detailed resolution of the dynamics. Two classes of reacting flows behind symmetric bluff bodies are also analyzed. In the first, symmetric pairs of vortices are released periodically from the two ends of the bluff body. The second flow contains von Karman vortices also, with a vortex being shed from one end of the bluff body followed by a second shedding from the opposite end. The way in which

  10. Methods for Prediction of High-Speed Reacting Flows in Aerospace Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Research to develop high-speed airbreathing aerospace propulsion systems was underway in the late 1950s. A major part of the effort involved the supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, engine. Work had also begun to develop computational techniques for solving the equations governing the flow through a scramjet engine. However, scramjet technology and the computational methods to assist in its evolution would remain apart for another decade. The principal barrier was that the computational methods needed for engine evolution lacked the computer technology required for solving the discrete equations resulting from the numerical methods. Even today, computer resources remain a major pacing item in overcoming this barrier. Significant advances have been made over the past 35 years, however, in modeling the supersonic chemically reacting flow in a scramjet combustor. To see how scramjet development and the required computational tools finally merged, we briefly trace the evolution of the technology in both areas.

  11. Application of a two-dimensional parabolic computer program to prediction of turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. S.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.; Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The capabilities of a computer program are explored, and computed results are compared with data. The comparisons are restricted to two-dimensional flows. Subsonic and supersonic flows, ducted and nonducted, reacting and nonreacting, are considered. An evaluation of models used for turbulence and chemical reaction was included. Constants in the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence model, which produces mixing in good agreement with data, are the same for all calculations. Experimental data are reported for coaxial injection at matched pressure (1 atm or 101.3 kPa) of a cold, Mach 2, hydrogen jet into a hot, Mach 2, vitiated airstream. Profiles of pitot pressure and gas composition obtained from water cooled probes are reported and compared with theoretical results.

  12. Reacting Multi-Species Gas Capability for USM3D Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Schuster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver contributed heavily to the NASA Constellation Project (CxP) as a highly productive computational tool for generating the aerodynamic databases for the Ares I and V launch vehicles and Orion launch abort vehicle (LAV). USM3D is currently limited to ideal-gas flows, which are not adequate for modeling the chemistry or temperature effects of hot-gas jet flows. This task was initiated to create an efficient implementation of multi-species gas and equilibrium chemistry into the USM3D code to improve its predictive capabilities for hot jet impingement effects. The goal of this NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment was to implement and validate a simulation capability to handle real-gas effects in the USM3D code. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  13. Comparison of PDF and Moment Closure Methods in the Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1994-01-01

    In modeling turbulent reactive flows, Probability Density Function (PDF) methods have an advantage over the more traditional moment closure schemes in that the PDF formulation treats the chemical reaction source terms exactly, while moment closure methods are required to model the mean reaction rate. The common model used is the laminar chemistry approximation, where the effects of turbulence on the reaction are assumed negligible. For flows with low turbulence levels and fast chemistry, the difference between the two methods can be expected to be small. However for flows with finite rate chemistry and high turbulence levels, significant errors can be expected in the moment closure method. In this paper, the ability of the PDF method and the moment closure scheme to accurately model a turbulent reacting flow is tested. To accomplish this, both schemes were used to model a CO/H2/N2- air piloted diffusion flame near extinction. Identical thermochemistry, turbulence models, initial conditions and boundary conditions are employed to ensure a consistent comparison can be made. The results of the two methods are compared to experimental data as well as to each other. The comparison reveals that the PDF method provides good agreement with the experimental data, while the moment closure scheme incorrectly shows a broad, laminar-like flame structure.

  14. Optimizing Simplified One-Step Chemical Models for High Speed Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgen, Alp; Houim, Ryan W.; Oran, Elaine S.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most important and difficult parts of constructing a multidimensional numerical simulation of a hydrocarbon reacting flow is finding a reliable and affordable model of the chemical and diffusive properties. Full detailed chemical models of these systems contain too many reactions and chemical species to be practical for realistic scenarios. The objective of our work is to create the simplest model possible that can reproduce the time-dependence of the energy input and the conversion from fuel to products. To that end, we are developing a procedure optimizing parameters in the most simplified ``one-step'' model. An important requirement of this model is that it reproduces known flame and detonation properties. Multidimensional numerical simulations using the new model are compared to deflagration-to-detonation experiments in channels containing ethylene and oxygen.

  15. A Novel Strategy for Numerical Simulation of High-speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikhi, M. R. H.; Drozda, T. G.; Givi, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to improve and implement the filtered mass density function (FDF) methodology for large eddy simulation (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed Year 1 of this research. This is the Final Report on our activities during the period: January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. 2002. In the efforts during the past year, LES is conducted of the Sandia Flame D, which is a turbulent piloted nonpremixed methane jet flame. The subgrid scale (SGS) closure is based on the scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology. The SFMDF is basically the mass weighted probability density function (PDF) of the SGS scalar quantities. For this flame (which exhibits little local extinction), a simple flamelet model is used to relate the instantaneous composition to the mixture fraction. The modelled SFMDF transport equation is solved by a hybrid finite-difference/Monte Carlo scheme.

  16. LES, DNS, and RANS for the Analysis of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colucci, P. J.; Jaberi, F. A.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    A filtered density function (FDF) method suitable for chemically reactive flows is developed in the context of large eddy simulation. The advantage of the FDF methodology is its inherent ability to resolve subgrid scales (SGS) scalar correlations that otherwise have to be modeled. Because of the lack of robust models to accurately predict these correlations in turbulent reactive flows, simulations involving turbulent combustion are often met with a degree of skepticism. The FDF methodology avoids the closure problem associated with these terms and treats the reaction in an exact manner. The scalar FDF approach is particularly attractive since it can be coupled with existing hydrodynamic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  17. Numerical mixing calculations of confined reacting jet flows in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oechsle, Victor L.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The results reported in this paper describe some of the main flow characteristics and NOx production results which develop in the mixing process in a constant cross-sectional cylindrical duct. A 3-dimensional numerical model has been used to predict the mixing flow field and NOx characteristics in a mixing section of an RQL combustor. Eighteen configurations have been analyzed in a circular geometry in a fully reacting environment simulating the operating condition of an actual RQL gas turbine combustion liner. The evaluation matrix was constructed by varying three parameter: (1) jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ration (J), (2) orifice shape or orifice aspect ratio, and (3) slot slant angle. The results indicate that the mixing flow field and NOx production significantly vary with the value of the jet penetration and subsequently, slanting elongated slots generally improve the NOx production at high J conditions. Round orifices produce low NOx at low J due to the strong jet penetration. The NOx production trends do not correlate with the mixing non-uniformity parameters described herein.

  18. Split Space-Marching Finite-Volume Method for Chemically Reacting Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Arthur W.; Bailey, Harry E.

    1976-01-01

    A space-marching finite-volume method employing a nonorthogonal coordinate system and using a split differencing scheme for calculating steady supersonic flow over aerodynamic shapes is presented. It is a second-order-accurate mixed explicit-implicit procedure that solves the inviscid adiabatic and nondiffusive equations for chemically reacting flow in integral conservation-law form. The relationship between the finite-volume and differential forms of the equations is examined and the relative merits of each discussed. The method admits initial Cauchy data situated on any arbitrary surface and integrates them forward along a general curvilinear coordinate, distorting and deforming the surface as it advances. The chemical kinetics term is split from the convective terms which are themselves dimensionally split, thereby freeing the fluid operators from the restricted step size imposed by the chemical reactions and increasing the computational efficiency. The accuracy of this splitting technique is analyzed, a sufficient stability criterion is established, a representative flow computation is discussed, and some comparisons are made with another method.

  19. Mixing and NO(x) Emission Calculations of Confined Reacting Jet Flows in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Oechsle, Victor L.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid mixing of cold lateral jets with hot cross-stream flows in confined configurations is of practical interest in gas turbine combustors as it strongly affects combustor exit temperature quality, and gaseous emissions in for example rich-lean combustion. It is therefore important to further improve our fundamental understanding of the important processes of dilution jet mixing especially when the injected jet mass flow rate exceeds that of the cross-stream. The results reported in this report describe some of the main flow characteristics which develop in the mixing process in a cylindrical duct. A 3-dimensional tool has been used to predict the mixing flow field characteristics and NOx emission in a quench section of an RQL combustor, Eighteen configurations have been analyzed in a circular geometry in a fully reacting environment simulating the operating condition of an actual RQL gas turbine combustion liner. The evaluation matrix was constructed by varying three parameters: 1) jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J), 2) orifice shape or orifice aspect ratio, and 3) slot slant angle. The results indicate that the mixing flow field significantly varies with the value of the jet penetration and subsequently, slanting elongated slots generally improve the mixing uniformity at high J conditions. Round orifices produce more uniform mixing and low NO(x) emissions at low J due to the strong and adequate jet penetration. No significant correlation was found between the NO(x) production rates and the mixing deviation parameters, however, strong correlation was found between NO(x) formation and jet penetration. In the computational results, most of the NO(x) formation occurred behind the orifice starting at the orifice wake region. Additional NO(x) is formed upstream of the orifice in certain configurations with high J conditions due to the upstream recirculation.

  20. Simulations of Spray Reacting Flows in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar PDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of the Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar probability density function (PDF) method. The flow field is calculated by using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS and URANS) with nonlinear turbulence models, and when the scalar PDF method is invoked, the energy and compositions or species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of an ensemble averaged density-weighted fine-grained probability density function that is referred to here as the averaged probability density function (APDF). A nonlinear model for closing the convection term of the scalar APDF equation is used in the presented simulations and will be briefly described. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar PDF method in both improving the simulation quality and reducing the computing cost are observed.

  1. Near field flow structure of isothermal swirling flows and reacting non-premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Olivani, Andrea; Solero, Giulio; Cozzi, Fabio; Coghe, Aldo

    2007-04-15

    Two confined lean non-premixed swirl-stabilized flame typologies were investigated in order to achieve detailed information on the thermal and aerodynamic field in the close vicinity of the burner throat and provide correlation with the exhaust emissions. Previous finding indicated the generation of a partially premixed flame with radial fuel injection and a purely diffusive flame with co-axial injection in a swirling co-flow. In the present work, the experimental study is reported which has been conducted on a straight exit laboratory burner with no quarl cone, fuelled by natural gas and air, and fired vertically upwards with the flame stabilized at the end of two concentric pipes with the annulus supplying swirled air and the central pipe delivering the fuel. Two fuel injection typologies, co-axial and radial (i.e., transverse), leading to different mixing mechanisms, have been characterized through different techniques: particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for a comprehensive analysis of the velocity field, still photography for the detection of flame front and main visible features, and thermocouples for the temperature distribution. Isothermal flow conditions have been included in the experimental investigation to provide a basic picture of the flow field and to comprehend the modifications induced by the combustion process. The results indicated that, although the global mixing process and the main flame structure are governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the two different fuel injection methodologies play an important role on mixture formation and flame stabilization in the primary mixing zone. Particularly, it has been found that, in case of axial injection, the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the backflow generated by the swirl can induce an intermittent fuel penetration in the recirculated hot products and the formation of a central sooting luminous plume, a phenomenon totally

  2. Hydrodynamic dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-06-01

    Analytical methods are employed to determine the axial dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in an incompressible electroosmotic flow. In contrast to previous approaches, the dispersion is obtained here by solving the time-dependent diffusion-advection equation in transformed spatial and temporal coordinates to obtain the two-dimensional late-time concentration field. The coefficient of dispersion arises as a separation eigenvalue, and its value is obtained as a necessary condition for satisfying all of the required boundary conditions. Solutions based on the Debye-Huckel approximation are presented for both a circular tube and a channel of infinite width. These results recover the well-known solutions for dispersion in pressure-driven flows when the Debye length is very large. In this limit, the axial dispersion is proportional to the square of the Peclet number based on the characteristic transverse dimension of the tube or channel. In the tilt of very small Debye lengths, the authors find that the dispersion varies as the square of the Peclet number based on the Debye length. Simple approximations to the coefficient of dispersion as a function of the Debye length and Peclet number are also presented.

  3. Effects of the reacting flowfield on combustion processes in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Priya

    The performance of dry, low NOx gas turbines, which employ lean premixed (or partially premixed) combustors, is often limited by static and dynamic combustor stability, and they require complicated mixing hardware. To overcome these issues, a novel design, referred to as a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor, has been recently demonstrated. The SPRF combustor has been shown to operate with ultra low NOx emissions in premixed and nonpremixed modes with gaseous and liquid fuels. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the interactions between the flowfield and combustion processes in this novel combustor for gas- and liquid-fueled operation. This is achieved with experimental measurements employing various optical diagnostic techniques, which include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), chemiluminescence imaging, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals and elastic laser scattering from liquid droplets. The velocity measurements obtained during gas-fueled operation show that both nonreacting and reacting flows exhibit a "stagnation" region with low mean velocity and high RMS fluctuations. In nonreacting flow, it has been shown that the decay rate of the jet can be modeled as a combination of a free jet and a jet in a uniform opposed flow. The high shear between the forward and reverse flows causes significant recirculation, resulting in enhanced entrainment and mixing of the returning hot product gases into the incoming reactant jet for the reacting flow cases, which enables stable operation of the combustor at very lean equivalence ratios. Nonpremixed operation produces a flowfield similar to that of the premixed case except in the near-field region. The coaxial injector design results in high turbulence intensities close to the injector exit leading to significant fuel-air premixing before combustion occurs. The operation of the SPRF combustor fueled with liquid Jet-A is also experimentally investigated. The results indicate that while

  4. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network. PMID:27217825

  5. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network.

  6. Modeling of gaseous reacting flow and thermal environment of liquid rocket injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozer, Emre

    Reacting flow and thermal fields around the injector critically affect the performance and life of liquid rocket engines. The performance gain by enhanced mixing is often countered by increased heat flux to the chamber wall, which can result in material failure. A CFD based design approach can aid in optimization of competing objectives by providing detailed flow field data and an ability to feasibly evaluate a large number of design configurations. To address issues related to the CFD analysis of such flows, various turbulence and combustion modeling aspects are assessed. Laminar finite-rate chemistry and steady laminar flamelet combustion models are adopted to facilitate individual assessments of turbulence-chemistry interactions (TCI) and chemical non-equilibrium. Besides the experimental wall heat transfer information, assessments are aided by evaluations of time scales, grid sensitivity, wall treatments and kinetic schemes. Several multi-element injector configurations are considered to study element-to-element interactions. Under the conditions considered, chemical non-equilibrium effect is found to be unimportant. TCI is found to noticeably alter the flow and thermal fields near the injector and the flame surface. In the multi-element injector case, due to proximity of the outer row injector elements to the wall, wall heat flux distribution is also significantly affected by TCI. The near wall treatment is found to critically affect wall heat flux predictions. A zonal treatment, blending the low-Reynolds number model and the law-of-the-wall approach is shown to improve the accuracy significantly. Porous materials such as Rigimesh are often used as the injector face plate of liquid rocket engines. A multi-scale model which eliminates the empirical dependence of conventional analysis methods, is developed. The resulting model is tested using experimental information showing excellent agreement. The model development and assessment presented for both injector

  7. Assessment of the constant non-unity Lewis number assumption in chemically-reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burali, Nicholas; Lapointe, Simon; Bobbitt, Brock; Blanquart, Guillaume; Xuan, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate computation of molecular diffusion coefficients in chemically reacting flows can be an expensive procedure, and the use of constant non-unity Lewis numbers has been adopted often as a cheaper alternative. The goal of the current work is to explore the validity and the limitations of the constant non-unity Lewis number approach in the description of molecular mixing in laminar and turbulent flames. To carry out this analysis, three test cases have been selected, including a lean, highly unstable, premixed hydrogen/air flame, a lean turbulent premixed n-heptane/air flame, and a laminar ethylene/air coflow diffusion flame. For the hydrogen flame, both a laminar and a turbulent configuration have been considered. The three flames are characterised by Lewis numbers which are less than unity, greater than unity, and close to unity, respectively. For each flame, mixture-averaged transport simulations are carried out and used as reference data. The current analysis suggests that, for numerous combustion configurations, the constant non-unity Lewis number approximation leads to small errors when the set of Lewis numbers is chosen properly. For the selected test cases and our numerical framework, the reduction of computational cost is found to be minimal.

  8. A numerical scheme for modelling reacting flow with detailed chemistry and transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Knio, Omar M.; Najm, Habib N.; Paul, Phillip H.

    2003-09-01

    An efficient projection scheme is developed for the simulation of reacting flow with detailed kinetics and transport. The scheme is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the compressible conservation equations for an ideal gas mixture. It is a modified version of the stiff operator-split scheme developed by Knio, Najm & Wyckoff (1999, J. Comput. Phys. 154, 428). Similar to its predecessor, the new scheme relies on Strang splitting of the discrete evolution equations, where diffusion is integrated in two half steps that are symmetrically distributed around a single stiff step for the reaction source terms. The diffusive half-step is integrated using an explicit single-step, multistage, Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method, which replaces the explicit, multi-step, fractional sub-step approach used in the previous formulation. This modification maintains the overall second-order convergence properties of the scheme and enhances the efficiency of the computations by taking advantage of the extended real-stability region of the RKC scheme. Two additional efficiency-enhancements are also explored, based on an extrapolation procedure for the transport coefficients and on the use of approximate Jacobian data evaluated on a coarse mesh. By including these enhancement schemes, performance tests using 2D computations with a detailed C{sub 1}C{sub 2} methane-air mechanism and a detailed mixture-averaged transport model indicate that speedup factors of about 15 are achieved over the previous split-stiff scheme.

  9. A New LES/PDF Method for Computational Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkeri, Hasret; Muradoglu, Metin; Pope, Stephen B.

    2013-11-01

    A new LES/PDF method is developed for computational modeling of turbulent reacting flows. The open source package, OpenFOAM, is adopted as the LES solver and combined with the particle-based Monte Carlo method to solve the LES/PDF model equations. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is employed to account for the subgrid-scale motions. The LES solver is first validated for the Sandia Flame D using a steady flamelet method in which the chemical compositions, density and temperature fields are parameterized by the mean mixture fraction and its variance. In this approach, the modeled transport equations for the mean mixture fraction and the square of the mixture fraction are solved and the variance is then computed from its definition. The results are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. Then the LES solver is combined with the particle-based Monte Carlo algorithm to form a complete solver for the LES/PDF model equations. The in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm is incorporated into the LES/PDF method for efficient implementation of detailed chemical kinetics. The LES/PDF method is also applied to the Sandia Flame D using the GRI-Mech 3.0 chemical mechanism and the results are compared with the experimental data and the earlier PDF simulations. The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Grant No. 111M067.

  10. A-priori testing of sub-grid models for chemically reacting nonpremixed turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.; Rogers, M. M.; Higuera, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The beta-assumed-pdf approximation of (Cook & Riley 1994) is tested as a subgrid model for the LES computation of nonpremixed turbulent reacting flows, in the limit of cold infinitely fast chemistry, for two plane turbulent mixing layers with different degrees of intermittency. Excellent results are obtained for the computation of integrals properties such as product mass fraction, and the model is applied to other quantities such as powers of the temperature and the pdf of the scalar itself. Even in these cases the errors are small enough to be useful in practical applications. The analysis is extended to slightly out of equilibrium problems such as the generation of radicals, and formulated in terms of the pdf of the scalar gradients. It is shown that the conditional gradient distribution is universal in a wide range of cases whose limits are established. Within those limits, engineering approximations to the radical concentration are also possible. It is argued that the experiments in this paper are essentially in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  11. Semi-implicit iterative methods for low Mach number turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macart, Jonathan F.; Mueller, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    A formally second-order accurate Strang splitting approach has been developed and applied to the solution of scalar transport/reaction equations for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows. The temporal discretization errors of this scheme are analyzed and compared with a formally first-order accurate Lie splitting approach and variations on a second-order accurate monolithic preconditioned scheme, utilizing two different preconditioners: the full Jacobian of the chemical source term and its diagonal approximation. The effect of chemical mechanism size on the relative performance of these schemes is assessed with a simple one-dimensional unsteady test case. The improved stability of the full Jacobian preconditioner is found to outpace its increased cost per time step compared to the diagonal approximation, and this advantage is found to increase with mechanism size. Likewise, the Strang splitting scheme is demonstrated to achieve better performance than the other approaches due to greater stability at larger time steps, despite greater cost per step. Finally, the schemes are evaluated with a three-dimensional unsteady turbulent planar jet flame, and similar conclusions are found as for the one-dimensional test case for relative performance.

  12. Numerical Simulations of a Reacting Sonic Jet in a Supersonic Cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    Interaction of a jet with a background cross-flow is a situation common to many engineering systems, including combustors in SCRAMJETS, gas turbines etc. Such an interaction enhances fuel-air mixing through the distortion of coherent structures into counter-rotating vortex pairs that are tilted, stretched and then sundered by the velocity gradient in the cross-flow, eventually leading to turbulent mixing. The ignition process and flame characteristics depend sensitively on the extent and efficiency of this turbulent mixing process. We describe results from detailed 3D numerical simulations of a sonic circular jet of diameter (D = 0.5 cm) issuing a mixture of H2 (Fuel) diluted with 50% N2 at 300 K into a turbulent, Mach 2 cross-flow of air at 1200 K. The simulations were performed in a computational domain of 20 × 16 × 16 jet diameters using the compressible flow code FLASH, with modifications to handle detailed (H2-O2) chemistry and temperature-dependent material properties. We discuss the role of shock driven mixing, ignition and flame anchoring on the combustion efficiency of the system.

  13. Modeling of High Speed Reacting Flows: Established Practices and Future Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has proven to be an invaluable tool for the design and analysis of high- speed propulsion devices. Massively parallel computing, together with the maturation of robust CFD codes, has made it possible to perform simulations of complete engine flowpaths. Steady-state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations are now routinely used in the scramjet engine development cycle to determine optimal fuel injector arrangements, investigate trends noted during testing, and extract various measures of engine efficiency. Unfortunately, the turbulence and combustion models used in these codes have not changed significantly over the past decade. Hence, the CFD practitioner must often rely heavily on existing measurements (at similar flow conditions) to calibrate model coefficients on a case- by-case basis. This paper provides an overview of the modeled equations typically employed by commercial- quality CFD codes for high-speed combustion applications. Careful attention is given to the approximations employed for each of the unclosed terms in the averaged equation set. The salient features (and shortcomings) of common models used to close these terms are covered in detail, and several academic efforts aimed at addressing these shortcomings are discussed.

  14. Radiative interactions in multi-dimensional chemically reacting flows using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiwen; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    chemically reacting compressible flows of premixed hydrogen and air in an expanding nozzle. The governing equations are based on the fully elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. Chemical reaction mechanisms were described by a finite rate chemistry model. The correlated Monte Carlo method developed earlier was employed to simulate multi-dimensional radiative heat transfer. Results obtained demonstrate that radiative effects on the flowfield are minimal but radiative effects on the wall heat transfer are significant. Extensive parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of equivalence ratio, wall temperature, inlet flow temperature, and nozzle size on the radiative and conductive wall fluxes.

  15. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent reacting flows in a chamber with gaseous ethylene injecting through the porous wall

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.M.; Lien, W.Y.; Hwang, P.W. . Dept of Power Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations were performed to study the turbulent reacting flows in a simulated solid-fuel combustion chamber. The time-dependent axisymmetric compressible conservation equations were solved directly without using subgrid-scale turbulence models. The combustion process considered was a one-step, irreversible, and infinitely fast chemical reaction and the pyrolizing solid fuel was simulated by gaseous ethylene injected through a porous wall for a practical range of fuel blowing velocity encountered in solid-fuel combustion chambers for the first time. The numerical code used the finite-volume technique which involved alternating in time the second-order, explicit MacCormack's and Godunov's methods. Characteristic-based boundary conditions were applied on inflow and outflow boundaries, which allow outlet boundary conditions to be nonzero gradients, and in turn, a practical length of computational domain to be realized. The effects of combustion on the large-scale unsteady flow structure and the mean flameholder recirculation zone were documented in terms of the density contours, vorticity dynamics, streamlines, mean-velocity vector fields, temperature profiles, flame position, and fuel blowing velocity. A comparison of the distributions of instantaneous and mean mass fractions of reactants shows that the present method appropriately reveals the effects of large-scale turbulent motions on combustion. Furthermore, the present large-eddy simulations have achieved a significant improvement in predicting the mean effective reattachment length over the previous calculations incorporating with turbulence models. The physical insight regarding the decrease of the mean effective reattachment length with combustion was also addressed.

  16. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. A summary of work accomplished during the last six months is presented.

  17. DUNE - a granular flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, D M; Cottom, T L; Bateson, W B

    2004-11-23

    DUNE was designed to accurately model the spectrum of granular. Granular flow encompasses the motions of discrete particles. The particles are macroscopic in that there is no Brownian motion. The flow can be thought of as a dispersed phase (the particles) interacting with a fluid phase (air or water). Validation of the physical models proceeds in tandem with simple experimental confirmation. The current development team is working toward the goal of building a flexible architecture where existing technologies can easily be integrated to further the capability of the simulation. We describe the DUNE architecture in some detail using physics models appropriate for an imploding liner experiment.

  18. Double Shock Experiments and Reactive Flow Modeling on LX-17 to Understand the Reacted Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin; Garcia, Frank; Fried, Laurence; Tarver, Craig

    2013-06-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method involving the use of two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on the projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. By measuring the parameters of the first and second shock waves, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as possible future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Double shock experiments and reactive flow modeling on LX-17 to understand the reacted equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Fried, Laurence E.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method involving the use of two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on the projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. By measuring the parameters of the first and second shock waves, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments.

  20. An application of a two-equation model of turbulence to three-dimensional chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical study of three dimensional chemically reacting and non-reacting flowfields is conducted using a two-equation model of turbulence. A generalized flow solver using an implicit Lower-Upper (LU) diagonal decomposition numerical technique and finite-rate chemistry has been coupled with a low-Reynolds number two-equation model of turbulence. This flow solver is then used to study chemically reacting turbulent supersonic flows inside combustors with synergetic fuel injectors. The reacting and non-reacting turbulent combustor solutions obtained are compared with zero-equation turbulence model solutions and with available experimental data. The hydrogen-air chemistry is modeled using a nine-species/eighteen reaction model. A low-Reynolds number k-epsilon model was used to model the effect of turbulence because, in general, the low-Reynolds number k-epsilon models are easier to implement numerically and are far more general than algebraic models. However, low-Reynolds number k-epsilon models require a much finer near-wall grid resolution than high-Reynolds number models to resolve accurately the near-wall physics. This is especially true in complex flowfields, where the stiff nature of the near-wall turbulence must be resolved. Therefore, the limitations imposed by the near-wall characteristics and compressible model corrections need to be evaluated further. The gradient-diffusion hypothesis is used to model the effects of turbulence on the mass diffusion process. The influence of this low-Reynolds number turbulence model on the reacting flowfield predictions was studied parametrically.

  1. Computational reacting gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of high speed flows at high altitudes, such as that encountered by re-entry spacecrafts, the interaction of chemical reactions and other non-equilibrium processes in the flow field with the gas dynamics is crucial. Generally speaking, problems of this level of complexity must resort to numerical methods for solutions, using sophisticated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The difficulties introduced by reacting gas dynamics can be classified into three distinct headings: (1) the usually inadequate knowledge of the reaction rate coefficients in the non-equilibrium reaction system; (2) the vastly larger number of unknowns involved in the computation and the expected stiffness of the equations; and (3) the interpretation of the detailed reacting CFD numerical results. The research performed accepts the premise that reacting flows of practical interest in the future will in general be too complex or 'untractable' for traditional analytical developments. The power of modern computers must be exploited. However, instead of focusing solely on the construction of numerical solutions of full-model equations, attention is also directed to the 'derivation' of the simplified model from the given full-model. In other words, the present research aims to utilize computations to do tasks which have traditionally been done by skilled theoreticians: to reduce an originally complex full-model system into an approximate but otherwise equivalent simplified model system. The tacit assumption is that once the appropriate simplified model is derived, the interpretation of the detailed numerical reacting CFD numerical results will become much easier. The approach of the research is called computational singular perturbation (CSP).

  2. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  3. Very Large Eddy Simulations of a Jet-A Spray Reacting Flow in a Single Element LDI Injector With and Without Invoking an Eulerian Scalar DWFDF Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the very large eddy simulations (VLES) of a Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single element lean direct injection (LDI) injector by using the National Combustion Code (NCC) with and without invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method, in which DWFDF is defined as the density weighted time filtered fine grained probability density function. The flow field is calculated by using the time filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations (TFNS) with nonlinear subscale turbulence models, and when the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method is invoked, the energy and species mass fractions are calculated by solving the equation of DWFDF. A nonlinear subscale model for closing the convection term of the Eulerian scalar DWFDF equation is used and will be briefly described in this paper. Detailed comparisons between the results and available experimental data are carried out. Some positive findings of invoking the Eulerian scalar DWFDF method in both improving the simulation quality and maintaining economic computing cost are observed.

  4. CURRENT - A Computer Code for Modeling Two-Dimensional, Chemically Reaccting, Low Mach Number Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.; Evans, G.H.; Moen, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    This report documents CURRENT, a computer code for modeling two- dimensional, chemically reacting, low Mach number flows including the effects of surface chemistry. CURRENT is a finite volume code based on the SIMPLER algorithm. Additional convergence acceleration for low Peclet number flows is provided using improved boundary condition coupling and preconditioned gradient methods. Gas-phase and surface chemistry is modeled using the CHEMKIN software libraries. The CURRENT user-interface has been designed to be compatible with the Sandia-developed mesh generator and post processor ANTIPASTO and the post processor TECPLOT. This report describes the theory behind the code and also serves as a user`s manual.

  5. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  6. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert, spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport, For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations

  7. Laminar or turbulent boundary-layer flows of perfect gases or reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer flows of non-reacting gases are predicted for both interal (nozzle) and external flows. Effects of favorable pressure gradients on two eddy viscosity models were studied in rocket and hypervelocity wind tunnel flows. Nozzle flows of equilibrium air with stagnation temperatures up to 10,000 K were computed. Predictions of equilibrium nitrogen flows through hypervelocity nozzles were compared with experimental data. A slender spherically blunted cone was studied at 70,000 ft altitude and 19,000 ft/sec. in the earth's atmosphere. Comparisons with available experimental data showed good agreement. A computer program was developed and fully documented during this investigation for use by interested individuals.

  8. LES and experimental studies of cold and reacting flow in a swirled partially premixed burner with and without fuel modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengissen, A.X.; Van Kampen, J.F.; Huls, R.A.; Stoffels, G.G.M.; Kok, J.B.W.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2007-07-15

    In devices where air and fuel are injected separately, combustion processes are influenced by oscillations of the air flow rate but may also be sensitive to fluctuations of the fuel flow rate entering the chamber. This paper describes a joint experimental and numerical study of the mechanisms controlling the response of a swirled complex-geometry combustor burning natural gas and air. The flow is first characterized without combustion and LDV results are compared to large eddy simulation (LES) data. The nonpulsated reacting regime is then studied and characterized in terms of the heat release field. Finally the fuel flow rate is pulsated at several amplitudes and the response of the chamber is analyzed using phase-locked averaging and acoustic analysis. Results show that LES and acoustic analysis predict the flame dynamics in this complex configuration with accuracy when heat losses (radiation and convection) are accounted for. (author)

  9. A second-order coupled immersed boundary-SAMR construction for chemically reacting flow over a heat-conducting Cartesian grid-conforming solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Kushal S.; Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Najm, Habib N.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a second-order numerical method for simulations of reacting flow around heat-conducting immersed solid objects. The method is coupled with a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) framework and a low-Mach number operator-split projection algorithm. A “buffer zone” methodology is introduced to impose the solid-fluid boundary conditions such that the solver uses symmetric derivatives and interpolation stencils throughout the interior of the numerical domain; irrespective of whether it describes fluid or solid cells. Solid cells are tracked using a binary marker function. The no-slip velocity boundary condition at the immersed wall is imposed using the staggered mesh. Near the immersed solid boundary, single-sided buffer zones (inside the solid) are created to resolve the species discontinuities, and dual buffer zones (inside and outside the solid) are created to capture the temperature gradient discontinuities. The development discussed in this paper is limited to a two-dimensional Cartesian grid-conforming solid. We validate the code using benchmark simulations documented in the literature. We also demonstrate the overall second-order convergence of our numerical method. To demonstrate its capability, a reacting flow simulation of a methane/air premixed flame stabilized on a channel-confined bluff-body using a detailed chemical kinetics model is discussed.

  10. An improved high-order scheme for DNS of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows based on stiff chemistry solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rixin; Yu, Jiangfei; Bai, Xue-Song

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved numerical scheme for numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport. The method is based on a semi-implicit operator-splitting scheme with a stiff solver for integration of the chemical kinetic rates, developed by Knio et al. [O.M. Knio, H.N. Najm, P.S. Wyckoff, A semi-implicit numerical scheme for reacting flow II. Stiff, operator-split formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 154 (2) (1999) 428-467]. Using the material derivative form of continuity equation, we enhance the scheme to allow for large density ratio in the flow field. The scheme is developed for direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flow by employing high-order discretization for the spatial terms. The accuracy of the scheme in space and time is verified by examining the grid/time-step dependency on one-dimensional benchmark cases: a freely propagating premixed flame in an open environment and in an enclosure related to spark-ignition engines. The scheme is then examined in simulations of a two-dimensional laminar flame/vortex-pair interaction. Furthermore, we apply the scheme to direct numerical simulation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) process in an enclosure studied previously in the literature. Satisfactory agreement is found in terms of the overall ignition behavior, local reaction zone structures and statistical quantities. Finally, the scheme is used to study the development of intrinsic flame instabilities in a lean H2/air premixed flame, where it is shown that the spatial and temporary accuracies of numerical schemes can have great impact on the prediction of the sensitive nonlinear evolution process of flame instability.

  11. Solution of two-phase reacting flow in liquid thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Anthony; Navaz, Homayun K.; Gross, Klaus W.

    1991-10-01

    A comprehensive Navier-Stokes code was developed for liquid rocket engine thrust chamber performance prediction. The code features multiple phases for liquid fuel and oxidizer droplets, group combustion effects, atomization models, full finite rate chemistry and the Chien low Reynolds number turbulence model. The multiple phase equations were cast in an Eulerian-Eulerian framework, which is essential for the treatment of dense spray. The discretization scheme is fully implicit and is based on the Lax-Friedrichs Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme, which is accurate, very efficient and capable of handling steep gradients and stiff chemistry. The efficiency of the numerical scheme is essential for this application since the set of governing equations can be quite large (typically about forty in number). Preliminary results were obtained for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and compared favorably with existing codes such as TDK and VIPER.

  12. Modification and improvement of software for modeling multidimensional reacting fuel flows. Final report, 1 November 1986-31 January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D.E.; Philbin, D.J.; Smooke, M.D.

    1989-07-01

    The flame type of most practical combustion devices is the diffusion flame. These flames are important in the interaction of heat and mass transfer with chemical reactions in ramjets, jet turbines and commercial burners. Three-dimensional models that couple the effects of fluid flow with detailed chemical reaction are as yet computationally infeasible. We focus our attention on axisymmetric laminar and turbulent diffusion flames in which a cylindrical fuel stream is surrounded by a coflowing oxidizer jet. In this configuration we can study the interaction of fluid flow with chemical reactions while obtaining a computationally feasible problem. The work centers on the development and application of accurate and efficient computational methods for the solution of the two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the reacting systems. In particular, our goals involve the generalization of our one-dimensional fluid-chemistry model to two dimensions. We also focus on the use of two-dimensional flame sheet models as starting estimates for the nonlinear equation solver. Both confined and free methane-air flames have been studied. The results of the research are applicable to problems in (1) turbulent reacting flows, (2) engine efficiency, (3) commercial power generation units and (4) pollutant formation.

  13. The use of direct numerical simulation in the study of turbulent, chemically-reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. J.; McMurtry, P. A.

    Full turbulence simulations are used here to study the effects of chemical heat release on the large-scale structures in turbulent mixing layers. In agreement with laboratory results, it is found that the heat release lowers the rate at which the mixing layer grows and reduces the rate at which chemical products are formed. The baroclinic torque and thermal expansion in the mixing layer produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to produce more diffuse vortices than in the constant density case, resulting in lower rotation rates of the large-scale structures. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layer are shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques. Calculations of the energy in the various wavenumbers shows that the heat release has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of individual modes. This methodology can be applied for Reynolds numbers less than several hundred and for Damkoehler numbers less than about ten.

  14. Concentration field in an ordered system of reacting plates situated along a flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polianin, A. D.; Sergeev, Iu. A.

    1981-02-01

    The plane problem of convective diffusion in an ordered semiinfinite system of plates situated along the flow of an ideal fluid is examined. Changes of the concentration field are determined primarily by the interaction of diffusion wakes and boundary layers of the plates, situated one after the other along the flow. Equations describing the concentration distribution on the outer boundary of the boundary layer of each plate are obtained and analyzed. It is shown that the concentration distribution in the core of the flow is described by a Volterra equation with an integrable singularity. The successive approximation method is used to determine the asymptotic properties of the concentration field some distance from the inlet to the system.

  15. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Foy, E.; Rowan, G.; Goldstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of probability theory to determine the effects of turbulent fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent combustion systems is briefly reviewed. Results are presented for the effect of species fluctuations in particular. It is found that turbulent fluctuations of species act to reduce the reaction rates, in contrast with the temperature fluctuations previously determined to increase Arrhenius reaction rate constants. For the temperature fluctuations, a criterion is set forth for determining if, in a given region of a turbulent flow field, the temperature can be expected to exhibit ramp like fluctuations. Using the above results, along with results previously obtained, a model is described for testing the effects of turbulent fluctuations of temperature and species on reaction rates in computer programs dealing with turbulent reacting flows. An alternative model which employs three variable probability density functions (temperature and two species) and is currently being formulated is discussed as well.

  16. User's manual for a TEACH computer program for the analysis of turbulent, swirling reacting flow in a research combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiappetta, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Described is a computer program for the analysis of the subsonic, swirling, reacting turbulent flow in an axisymmetric, bluff-body research combustor. The program features an improved finite-difference procedure designed to reduce the effects of numerical diffusion and a new algorithm for predicting the pressure distribution within the combustor. A research version of the computer program described in the report was supplied to United Technologies Research Center by Professor A. D. Gosman and his students, R. Benodeker and R. I. Issa, of Imperial College, London. The Imperial College staff also supplied much of the program documentation. Presented are a description of the mathematical model for flow within an axisymmetric bluff-body combustor, the development of the finite-difference procedure used to represent the system of equations, an outline of the algorithm for determining the static pressure distribution within the combustor, a description of the computer program including its input format, and the results for representative test cases.

  17. Spatio-temporal adaptation algorithm for two-dimensional reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervaiz, Mehtab M.; Baron, Judson R.

    1988-01-01

    A spatio-temporal adaptive algorithm for solving the unsteady Euler equations with chemical source terms is presented. Quadrilateral cells are used in two spatial dimensions which allow for embedded meshes tracking moving flow features with spatially varying time-steps which are multiples of global minimum time-steps. Blast wave interactions corresponding to a perfect gas (frozen) and a Lighthill dissociating gas (nonequilibrium) are considered for circular arc cascade and 90 degree bend duct geometries.

  18. Effects of precursor heating on radiative and chemically reacting viscous flow around a Jovian entry body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Szema, K. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of change in the precursor region flow properties on the entire shock layer flow phenomena around a Jovian entry body was investigated. The flow in the shock layer was assumed to be steady, axisymmetric, and viscous. Both the chemical equilibrium and the nonequilibrium composition of the shock layer gas were considered. The effects of transitional range behavior were included in the analysis of high altitude entry conditions. Realistic thermophysical and radiation models were used, and results were obtained by employing the implicit finite difference technique in the shock layer and an iterative procedure for the entire shock layer precursor zone. Results obtained for a 45 degree angle hyperboloid blunt body entering Jupiter's atmosphere at zero angle of attack indicates that preheating the gas significantly increases the static pressure and temperature ahead of the shock for entry velocities exceeding 36 km/sec. The nonequilibrium radiative heating rate to the body is found to be significantly higher than the corresponding equilibrium heating. The precursor heating generally increases the radiative and convective heating of a body. That increase is slightly higher for the nonequilibrium conditions.

  19. An iodine hypersonic wind tunnel for the study of nonequilibrium reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, G. C.; Muntz, E. P.; Weaver, D. P.; Dewitt, T. G.; Bradley, M. K.; Erwin, D. A.; Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot scale hypersonic wind tunnel operating on pure iodine vapor has been designed and tested. The wind tunnel operates intermittently with a run phase lasting approximately 20 minutes. Successful recirculation of the iodine used during the run phase has been achieved but can be improved. Relevant issues regarding the full scale facility's design and operation, and the use of iodine as a working gas are discussed. Continuous wave laser induced fluorescence was used to monitor number densities within the plume flowfield, while pulsed laser induced fluorescence was used in an initial attempt to measure vibrational energy state population distributions. Preliminary nozzle flow calculations based on finite rate chemistry are presented.

  20. Analysis of a parallelized nonlinear elliptic boundary value problem solver with application to reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, David E.; Smooke, Mitchell D.

    1987-01-01

    A parallelized finite difference code based on the Newton method for systems of nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems in two dimensions is analyzed in terms of computational complexity and parallel efficiency. An approximate cost function depending on 15 dimensionless parameters is derived for algorithms based on stripwise and boxwise decompositions of the domain and a one-to-one assignment of the strip or box subdomains to processors. The sensitivity of the cost functions to the parameters is explored in regions of parameter space corresponding to model small-order systems with inexpensive function evaluations and also a coupled system of nineteen equations with very expensive function evaluations. The algorithm was implemented on the Intel Hypercube, and some experimental results for the model problems with stripwise decompositions are presented and compared with the theory. In the context of computational combustion problems, multiprocessors of either message-passing or shared-memory type may be employed with stripwise decompositions to realize speedup of O(n), where n is mesh resolution in one direction, for reasonable n.

  1. Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows in an Opposed-Piston Two Stroke Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shalabh; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale model has been used for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in a generic single cylinder, opposed-piston, two-stroke engine configuration. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method in which the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme, and the spray and FMDF are implemented with stochastic Lagrangian methods. The reliability and consistency of the numerical methods are established for the engine configuration by comparing the Eulerian and Lagrangian components of the LES/FMDF. The effects of various operating conditions like boost pressure, heat transfer model, fuel spray temperature, nozzle diameter, injection pressure, and injector configuration on the flow field, heat loss and the evolution of spray and combustion are studied.

  2. Investigation of the aerothermodynamics of hypervelocity reacting flows in the ram accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.; Knowlen, C.

    1992-01-01

    New diagnostic techniques for measuring the high pressure flow fields associated with high velocity ram accelerator propulsive modes was experimentally investigated. Individual propulsive modes are distinguished by their operating Mach number range and the manner in which the combustion process is initiated and stabilized. Operation of the thermally choked ram accelerator mode begins by injecting the projectile into the accelerator tube at a prescribed entrance velocity by means of a conventional light gas gun. A specially designed obturator, which is used to seal the bore of the gun, plays a key role in the ignition of the propellant gases in the subsonic combustion mode of the ram accelerator. Once ignited, the combustion process travels with the projectile and releases enough heat to thermally choke the flow within several tube diameters behind it, thereby stabilizing a high pressure zone on the rear of the projectile. When the accelerating projectile approaches the Chapman-Jouguet detonation speed of the propellant mixture, the combustion region is observed to move up onto the afterbody of the projectile as the pressure field evolves to a distinctively different form that implies the presence of supersonic combustion processes. Eventually, a high enough Mach number is reached that the ram effect is sufficient to cause the combustion process to occur entirely on the body. Propulsive cycles utilizing on-body heat release can be established either by continuously accelerating the projectile in a single propellant mixture from low initial in-tube Mach numbers (M less than 4) or by injecting the projectile at a speed above the propellant's Chapman-Jouguet detonation speed. The results of experimental and theoretical explorations of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena and the effectiveness of the new diagnostic techniques are presented in this report.

  3. Mathematical Modelling on Chemically Reacting Boundary Type Flow under Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui Ying; Herviou, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to give a quantitative description of a heavily sooting, non-premixed laminar flame established in a shear boundary layer in microgravity. The competition between fuel pyrolysis rate, radiation loss due to soot formation and oxygen- side diffusion creates a number of unusual phenomena. A three-dimensional, laminar diffusion flame over plate in low-speed concurrent flow was formulated and solved. The model consists of full Navier-Stokes equations for mass, momentum, energy and species. Gas radiation associated with soot formation is included. The PAH inception model, which is based on the formation of two and three-ringed aromatic species, reproduces correctly the measured soot from a laminar ethylene diffusion flame. The flame standoff distance is beyond the boundary layer thickness, while soot resides always within the boundary layer. The fraction of the total energy released by the flame to the surface increases with a rise of pyrolysis rate due to increase in the flame volume. The zone of the high heat flux increases noticeably when the flame becomes most obviously dual on the cross-stream section due to development of the counter-rotating vortex.

  4. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, D.; Magnotti, F.; Chinitz, W.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction rates in turbulent, reacting flows are reviewed. Assumed probability density functions (pdf) modeling of reaction rates is being investigated in relation to a three variable pdf employing a 'most likely pdf' model. Chemical kinetic mechanisms treating hydrogen air combustion is studied. Perfectly stirred reactor modeling of flame stabilizing recirculation regions was used to investigate the stable flame regions for silane, hydrogen, methane, and propane, and for certain mixtures thereof. It is concluded that in general, silane can be counted upon to stabilize flames only when the overall fuel air ratio is close to or greater than unity. For lean flames, silane may tend to destabilize the flame. Other factors favoring stable flames are high initial reactant temperatures and system pressure.

  5. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foy, E.; Ronan, G.; Chinitz, W.

    1982-01-01

    A principal element to be derived from modeling turbulent reacting flows is an expression for the reaction rates of the various species involved in any particular combustion process under consideration. A temperature-derived most-likely probability density function (pdf) was used to describe the effects of temperature fluctuations on the Arrhenius reaction rate constant. A most-likely bivariate pdf described the effects of temperature and species concentrations fluctuations on the reaction rate. A criterion is developed for the use of an "appropriate" temperature pdf. The formulation of models to calculate the mean turbulent Arrhenius reaction rate constant and the mean turbulent reaction rate is considered and the results of calculations using these models are presented.

  6. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  7. How L2-Learners' Brains React to Code-Switches: An ERP Study with Russian Learners of German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruigendijk, Esther; Hentschel, Gerd; Zeller, Jan Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This Event Related Potentials (ERP) study investigates auditory processing of sentences with so-called code-switches in Russian learners of German. It has often been argued that switching between two languages results in extra processing cost, although it is not completely clear yet what exactly causes these costs. ERP presents a good method to…

  8. Computational studies of reacting flows with applications to zinc selenide nanoparticle synthesis and methane/hydrogen separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsona, Maria

    This work is a numerical study of the design and operation of two reacting flow systems, each with great potential in their fields. The design of reacting flow systems by computer simulations are successfully used in science and engineering to evaluate design geometries and operation, without resorting to experimental trial and error that is expensive, time consuming and, in some cases, dangerous. The models of the two systems described in this work are based on fundamental conservation equations for momentum and mass transfer coupled with chemical reaction kinetics and particle dynamics. The first part of this work is a study aiming to elucidate the transport phenomena and chemical reactions that control the size of ZnSe nanoparticles formed by a new vapor-phase synthesis route. The nanoparticles are synthesized by reacting vapors of (CH3)2Zn:N(C2H 5)3 adduct with H2Se gas (diluted in hydrogen) fed continuously from opposite sides into a counterflow jet reactor. The nuclei of the nanocrystals are formed by a direct condensation reaction near the stagnation point. The nuclei grow into nanoparticles by coalescence/coagulation and by surface growth reactions. A 2D model of an axially symmetric reactor was developed that includes descriptions of flow, mass transfer by convection and diffusion, chemical kinetics, particle nucleation, coagulation and surface growth. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of the model were solved using the Galerkin Finite Element Method. The model was used to study the relative importance of the underlying physical and chemical phenomena in controlling particle size and particle size distribution. Model predictions compared well with the limited experimental data available for this system. The model was also used for model-assisted design of the experimental counterflow jet reactor, where vapor-phase synthesis of ZnSe nanoparticles was demonstrated for the first time. The second part of this work involves the development of

  9. Numerical investigation of the nonreacting and reacting flow fields in a transverse gaseous injection channel with different species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Tian-tian; Li, Hao; Yan, Xiao-ting

    2014-12-01

    The mixing and combustion process has an important impact on the engineering realization of the scramjet engine. The nonreacting and reacting flow fields in a transverse injection channel have been investigated numerically, and the predicted results have been compared with the available experimental data in the open literature, the wall pressure distributions, the separation length, as well as the penetration height. Further, the influences of the molecular weight of the fuel and the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio on the wall pressure distribution have been studied. The obtained results show that the predicted results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data, and the variable trends of the penetration height and the separation distance are almost the same as those obtained in the experiment. The vapor pressure model is suitable to fit the relationship between the penetration height, the separation distance and the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio. The combustion process mainly occurs upstream of the injection port, and it makes a great difference to the wall pressure distribution upstream of the injection port, especially when the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio is large enough, namely 17.72 and 25.15 in the range considered in the current study. For hydrogen, the combustion downstream of the injection port occurs more intensively, and this may be induced by its smaller molecular weight.

  10. A computationally-efficient, semi-implicit, iterative method for the time-integration of reacting flows with stiff chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, B.; Xuan, Y.; Bobbitt, B.; Blanquart, G.

    2015-08-01

    A semi-implicit preconditioned iterative method is proposed for the time-integration of the stiff chemistry in simulations of unsteady reacting flows, such as turbulent flames, using detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on the simultaneous treatment of convection, diffusion, and chemistry, without using operator splitting techniques. The preconditioner corresponds to an approximation of the diagonal of the chemical Jacobian. Upon convergence of the sub-iterations, the fully-implicit, second-order time-accurate, Crank-Nicolson formulation is recovered. Performance of the proposed method is tested theoretically and numerically on one-dimensional laminar and three-dimensional high Karlovitz turbulent premixed n-heptane/air flames. The species lifetimes contained in the diagonal preconditioner are found to capture all critical small chemical timescales, such that the largest stable time step size for the simulation of the turbulent flame with the proposed method is limited by the convective CFL, rather than chemistry. The theoretical and numerical stability limits are in good agreement and are independent of the number of sub-iterations. The results indicate that the overall procedure is second-order accurate in time, free of lagging errors, and the cost per iteration is similar to that of an explicit time integration. The theoretical analysis is extended to a wide range of flames (premixed and non-premixed), unburnt conditions, fuels, and chemical mechanisms. In all cases, the proposed method is found (theoretically) to be stable and to provide good convergence rate for the sub-iterations up to a time step size larger than 1 μs. This makes the proposed method ideal for the simulation of turbulent flames.

  11. Operator-splitting errors in coupled reactive transport codes for flow and transport under atmospheric boundary conditions or layered soil profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One possible way of integrating subsurface flow and transport processes with (bio)geochemical reactions is to couple by means of an operator-splitting approach two completely separate codes, one for variably-saturated flow and solute transport and one for equilibrium and kinetic biogeochemical react...

  12. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  13. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    1995-03-17

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicabilitymore » of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.« less

  14. The 1992 Seals Flow Code Development Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Anita D.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    A two-day meeting was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center on August 5 and 6, 1992, to inform the technical community of the progress of NASA Contract NAS3-26544. This contract was established in 1990 to develop industrial and CFD codes for the design and analysis of seals. Codes were demonstrated and disseminated to the user community for evaluation. The peer review panel which was formed in 1991 provided recommendations on this effort. The technical community presented results of their activities in the area of seals, with particular emphasis on brush seal systems.

  15. Benchmarking NNWSI flow and transport codes: COVE 1 results

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, N.K.

    1985-06-01

    The code verification (COVE) activity of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is the first step in certification of flow and transport codes used for NNWSI performance assessments of a geologic repository for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes. The goals of the COVE activity are (1) to demonstrate and compare the numerical accuracy and sensitivity of certain codes, (2) to identify and resolve problems in running typical NNWSI performance assessment calculations, and (3) to evaluate computer requirements for running the codes. This report describes the work done for COVE 1, the first step in benchmarking some of the codes. Isothermal calculations for the COVE 1 benchmarking have been completed using the hydrologic flow codes SAGUARO, TRUST, and GWVIP; the radionuclide transport codes FEMTRAN and TRUMP; and the coupled flow and transport code TRACR3D. This report presents the results of three cases of the benchmarking problem solved for COVE 1, a comparison of the results, questions raised regarding sensitivities to modeling techniques, and conclusions drawn regarding the status and numerical sensitivities of the codes. 30 refs.

  16. Executable Code Recognition in Network Flows Using Instruction Transition Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ikkyun; Kang, Koohong; Choi, Yangseo; Kim, Daewon; Oh, Jintae; Jang, Jongsoo; Han, Kijun

    The ability to recognize quickly inside network flows to be executable is prerequisite for malware detection. For this purpose, we introduce an instruction transition probability matrix (ITPX) which is comprised of the IA-32 instruction sets and reveals the characteristics of executable code's instruction transition patterns. And then, we propose a simple algorithm to detect executable code inside network flows using a reference ITPX which is learned from the known Windows Portable Executable files. We have tested the algorithm with more than thousands of executable and non-executable codes. The results show that it is very promising enough to use in real world.

  17. Experimental Aspects of Code Validation in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanetz, Bruno; Délery, Jean

    2005-05-01

    In spite of the spectacular progress in CFD there is still a strong need to validate the computer codes by comparison with experiments. The first validation step is the assessment of the code numerical safety and the physical models accuracy. This validation step requires carefully made building block experiments. To be calculable, such experiments must satisfy conditions such as the precise definition of the test set-up geometry, the absence of uncontrolled parasitic effects, a complete information on the flow conditions and indication on the uncertainty margins. Under these conditions, the experiment can be put into a data bank which will be precious to help in the development of reliable and accurate codes. The paper provides an overview of modern measurement techniques for hypersonic flows analysis. The demonstration is illustrated by laminar experiments used to assess the numerical accuracy of codes run in high Mach number flows.

  18. Pollutant formation in fuel lean recirculating flows. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report; [in an Opposed Reacting Jet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schefer, R. W.; Sawyer, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    An opposed reacting jet combustor (ORJ) was tested at a pressure of 1 atmosphere. A premixed propane/air stream was stabilized by a counterflowing jet of the same reactants. The resulting intensely mixed zone of partially reacted combustion products produced stable combustion at equivalence ratios as low as 0.45. Measurements are presented for main stream velocities of 7.74 and 13.6 m/sec with an opposed jet velocity of 96 m/sec, inlet air temperatures from 300 to 600 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.45 to 0.625. Fuel lean premixed combustion was an effective method of achieving low NOx emissions and high combustion efficiencies simultaneously. Under conditions promoting lower flame temperature, NO2 constituted up to 100 percent of the total NOx. At higher temperatures this percentage decreased to a minimum of 50 percent.

  19. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the condensation of water vapor in a short tube. A numerical model of condensation heat transfer was incorporated in a flow network code. The flow network code that we have used in this paper is Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a finite volume based flow network code. Four different condensation models were presented in the paper. Soliman's correlation has been found to be the most stable in low flow rates which is of particular interest in this application. Another highlight of this investigation is conjugate or coupled heat transfer between solid or fluid. This work was done in support of NASA's International Space Station program.

  20. A compressible Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite volume code for solving two dimensional, compressible turbulent flows is described. Second order upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations is used to enhance stability and accuracy. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency. Several zero and two equation turbulence models are incorporated to study their impact on overall flow modeling accuracy. Applications to external and internal flows are discussed.

  1. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  2. Parallel computation of unsteady, three-dimensional, chemically reacting, nonequilibrium flow using a time-split finite-volume method on the Illiac IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of the split finite-volume method which is a viable numerical procedure for performing with the aid of a modern special purpose vector computer numerical simulation studies of complicated flow fields, including chemical reactions, about geometrically complex bodies. Such numerical studies are needed for the development of atmospheric entry vehicles such as the space shuttle. The equations which are approximated are quite general and can be used in studies of combustion, pollution, and other chemically reacting flow phenomena, where convective transport effects dominate the influence of radiative, viscous, and other transport mechanisms. The shock perturbed flow about a shuttle orbiter flying at a large angle of attack during atmospheric entry is illustrated. The method uses a time splitting of the convection differencing operator to achieve efficient data management.

  3. Progress of simulations for reacting shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1991-01-01

    An attempt was made to develop a high speed, chemically reactive shear layer test rig. The purpose of the experiment was to study the mixing of oxidizer and fuel streams in reacting shear layers for various density, velocity, and Mach number. The primary goal was to understand the effects of the compressibility upon mixing and combustion in a fundamental way. Therefore, a two-dimensional shear layer is highly desirable for its simplicity to quantify the compressibility effects. The RPLUS 2D code is used to calculate the flow fields of different sections of the test rig. The emphasis was on the supersonic nozzle design, the vitiation process for the hot air stream and the overall thermodynamic conditions of the test matrix. The k-epsilon turbulence model with wall function was successfully implemented in the RPLUS code. The k and epsilon equations are solved simultaneously and the LU scheme is used to make it compatible with the flow solver.

  4. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  5. Modelling of the process of fragmentation and vaporization of non-reacting liquid droplets in high-enthalpy gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefyev, K. Yu.; Voronetsky, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The intensification of the fragmentation and vaporization of liquid droplets in two-phase flows with the gas stagnation temperature Tg = 800-2500 K is an important scientific and technological problem. One should note that despite a high practical importance the mechanism of the vaporization of droplets with their preliminary gas-dynamic fragmentation in high-enthalpy flows has been studied insufficiently completely and requires additional research. The paper presents a mathematical model and the results of the computations of the fragmentation and vaporization of liquid droplets in subsonic and supersonic flows with a high stagnation temperature. A comparison of the obtained data with the experiments of other authors has been done. The extension of the regions of the gas-dynamic fragmentation and droplet vaporization in flow ducts with a variable distribution of parameters has been estimated. The found peculiarities may be used at the design of energy installations of the promising samples of the aerospace technology and gas-dynamic pipes.

  6. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1986-01-01

    A computationally-viable model describing the interaction between fluid-mechanical turbulence and finite-rate combustion reactions, principally in high-speed flows was developed. Chemical kinetic mechanisms, complete and global, were developed describing the finite rate reaction of fuels of interest to NASA. These fuels included principally hydrogen and silane, although a limited amount of work involved hydrocarbon fuels as well.

  7. Two-dimensional analysis of two-phase reacting flow in a firing direct-injection diesel engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. Lee

    1989-01-01

    The flow field, spray penetration, and combustion in two-stroke diesel engines are described. Fuel injection begins at 345 degrees after top dead center (ATDC) and n-dodecane is used as the liquid fuel. Arrhenius kinetics is used to calculate the reaction rate term in the quasi-global combustion model. When the temperature, fuel, and oxygen mass fraction are within suitable flammability limits, combustion begins spontaneously. No spark is necessary to ignite a localized high temperature region. Compression is sufficient to increase the gaseous phase temperature to a point where spontaneous chemical reactions occur. Results are described for a swirl angle of 22.5 degrees.

  8. Experimental investigation of water droplet-air flow interaction in a non-reacting PEM fuel cell channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Montello, Aaron D.; Guezennec, Yann G.; Pianese, Cesare

    It has been well documented that water production in PEM fuel cells occurs in discrete locations, resulting in the formation and growth of discrete droplets on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface within the gas flow channels (GFCs). This research uses a simulated fuel cell GFC with three transparent walls in conjunction with a high speed fluorescence photometry system to capture videos of dynamically deforming droplets. Such videos clearly show that the droplets undergo oscillatory deformation patterns. Although many authors have previously investigated the air flow induced droplet detachment, none of them have studied these oscillatory modes. The novelty of this work is to process and analyze the recorded videos to gather information on the droplets induced oscillation. Plots are formulated to indicate the dominant horizontal and vertical deformation frequency components over the range of sizes of droplets from formation to detachment. The system is also used to characterize droplet detachment size at a variety of channel air velocities. A simplified model to explain the droplet oscillation mechanism is provided as well.

  9. Prediction of strong and weak ignition regimes in turbulent reacting flows with temperature fluctuations: A direct numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Pinaki; Valorani, Mauro; Im, Hong; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    The present work investigates the auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations. An auto-ignition regime diagram is briefly discussed, that provides the framework for predicting the expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and flow/scalar field conditions. The regime diagram classifies the ignition regimes mainly into three categories: weak (deflagration dominant), reaction-controlled strong and mixing-controlled strong (volumetric ignition/spontaneous propagation dominant) regimes. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean thermally-stratified syngas/air turbulent mixture at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions are performed to assess the validity of the regime diagram. Various parametric cases are considered corresponding to different locations on the regime diagram, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers. Detailed analysis of the reaction front propagation and heat release indicates that the observed ignition behaviors agree very well with the corresponding predictions by the regime diagram. U.S. DOE NETL award number DE-FE0007465; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  10. An approximate viscous shock layer technique for calculating chemically reacting hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method was developed which can reliably calculate fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. The approach is applicable to perfect gas, equilibrium, and nonequilibrium flowfields. Since the method is fully viscous, the problems associated with a boundary layer solution with an inviscid layer solution are avoided. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) or VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Problems associated with a previously developed approximate VSL technique are addressed before extending the method to nonequilibrium calculations. Perfect gas (laminar and turbulent), equilibrium, and nonequilibrium solutions were generated for airflows over several analytic body shapes. Surface heat transfer, skin friction, and pressure predictions are comparable to VSL results. In addition, computed heating rates are in good agreement with experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher order procedures which require starting solutions.

  11. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; Gruber, Andrea; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization aremore » located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that hydrogen

  12. Effect of fuel composition and differential diffusion on flame stabilization in reacting syngas jets in turbulent cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Minamoto, Yuki; Kolla, Hemanth; Grout, Ray W.; Gruber, Andrea; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-24

    Here, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation results of a transverse syngas fuel jet in turbulent cross-flow of air are analyzed to study the influence of varying volume fractions of CO relative to H2 in the fuel composition on the near field flame stabilization. The mean flame stabilizes at a similar location for CO-lean and CO-rich cases despite the trend suggested by their laminar flame speed, which is higher for the CO-lean condition. To identify local mixtures having favorable mixture conditions for flame stabilization, explosive zones are defined using a chemical explosive mode timescale. The explosive zones related to flame stabilization are located in relatively low velocity regions. The explosive zones are characterized by excess hydrogen transported solely by differential diffusion, in the absence of intense turbulent mixing or scalar dissipation rate. The conditional averages show that differential diffusion is negatively correlated with turbulent mixing. Moreover, the local turbulent Reynolds number is insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the differential diffusion effect. Alternatively, the Karlovitz number provides a better indicator of the importance of differential diffusion. A comparison of the variations of differential diffusion, turbulent mixing, heat release rate and probability of encountering explosive zones demonstrates that differential diffusion predominantly plays an important role for mixture preparation and initiation of chemical reactions, closely followed by intense chemical reactions sustained by sufficient downstream turbulent mixing. The mechanism by which differential diffusion contributes to mixture preparation is investigated using the Takeno Flame Index. The mean Flame Index, based on the combined fuel species, shows that the overall extent of premixing is not intense in the upstream regions. However, the Flame Index computed based on individual contribution of H2 or CO species reveals that

  13. Tmvoc-React

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-02-12

    The TMVOC-REACT simulator was generated by replacing the fluid and heat flow part, TOUGH2, in TOUGHREACT with TMVOC. Both programs have been distributed to the public through the US Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center. TMVOC is a program for three-phase non-isothermal flows of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures in variably saturated heterogeneous media. TMVOC was initially designed for studying subsurface contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as hydrocarbon fuels and industrial solvents. It can model the one-, two-, or three-dimensional migration of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) through the unsaturated and saturated zones, the formation of an oil lens on the water table, the dissolution and subsequent transport of VOCs in groundwater, as well as the vaporization and migration of VOCs in the interstitial air of the unsaturated zone. TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive nonisothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes can be considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, pH and Eh. Intractions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, aid mine drainage remediation, and contaminant transport.

  14. Code System to Calculate Waste-Isolation Flow and Transport.

    2001-01-26

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to the United States Only. SWIFT2 (Sandia Waste Isolation Flow and Transport) is a fully transient, three-dimensional code that solves the coupled equations for transport in geologic media. The processes considered are fluid flow, heat transport, brine migration, and radionuclide-chain transport. Flow, heat and brine transport are coupled via fluid density, fluid viscosity, and porosity. Together they provide the velocity field on which the radionuclide transport depends. Both porous andmore » fractured media are considered. SWIFT2 was developed for use in the analysis of deep geologic nuclear waste-disposal facilities. However, it may be used in other areas such as waste injection into saline aquifers and heat storage in aquifers. Both dual-porosity and discrete-fracture conceptualizations may be considered for the fractured zones. A variable density is included throughout, and a variety of options are available to facilitate the various uses of the code.« less

  15. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.; Sieros, G.; Jost, E.; Lutz, T.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.; Barakos, G. N.; Colonia, S.; Baldacchino, D.; Baptista, C.; Ferreira, C.

    2016-09-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3 × 106 and 15 × 106. The necessary grid resolution, domain size, and iterative convergence criteria to have consistent results are discussed, and suggestions are given for best practice. For the fully turbulent results four out of seven codes provide consistent results. For the laminar-turbulent transitional results only three out of seven provided results, and the agreement is generally lower than for the fully turbulent case.

  16. Assessment of the IVA3 code for multifield flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, H. B.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of the IVA3 computer code for multifield flow simulation, as applied to the premixing phase of a hypothetical steam explosion in a water-cooled power reactor. The first section of this report reviews the derivation of the basic partial differential equations of multifield modeling, with reference to standard practices in the multiphase flow literature. Basic underlying assumptions and approximations are highlighted, and comparison is made between IVA3 and other codes in current use. Although Kolev's derivation of these equations is outside the mainstream of the multiphase literature, the basic partial differential equations are in fact nearly equivalent to those in other codes. In the second section, the assumptions and approximations required to pass from generic differential equations to a specific working form are detailed. Some modest improvements to the IVA3 model are suggested. In Section 3, the finite difference approximations to the differential equations are described. The discretization strategy is discussed with reference to numerical stability, accuracy, and the role of various physical phenomena - material convection, sonic propagation, viscous stress, and interfacial exchanges - in the choice of discrete approximations. There is also cause for concern about the approximations of time evolution in some heat transfer terms, which might be adversely affecting numerical accuracy. The fourth section documents the numerical solution method used in IVA3. An explanation for erratic behavior sometimes observed in the first outer iteration is suggested, along with possible remedies. Finally, six recommendations for future assessment and improvement of the IVA3 model and code are made.

  17. User's manual for airfoil flow field computer code SRAIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A two dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes calculation procedure with specific application to the isolated airfoil problem is presented. The procedure solves the full, ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence represented by a mixing length model. The equations are solved in a general nonorthogonal coordinate system which is obtained via an external source. Specific Cartesian locations of grid points are required as input for this code. The method of solution is based upon the Briley-McDonald LBI procedure. The manual discusses the analysis, flow of the program, control steam, input and output.

  18. Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

  19. Tmvoc-React

    2008-02-12

    The TMVOC-REACT simulator was generated by replacing the fluid and heat flow part, TOUGH2, in TOUGHREACT with TMVOC. Both programs have been distributed to the public through the US Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center. TMVOC is a program for three-phase non-isothermal flows of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures in variably saturated heterogeneous media. TMVOC was initially designed for studying subsurface contamination by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as hydrocarbon fuels and industrial solvents.more » It can model the one-, two-, or three-dimensional migration of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) through the unsaturated and saturated zones, the formation of an oil lens on the water table, the dissolution and subsequent transport of VOCs in groundwater, as well as the vaporization and migration of VOCs in the interstitial air of the unsaturated zone. TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive nonisothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes can be considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, pH and Eh. Intractions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, aid mine drainage remediation, and contaminant transport.« less

  20. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence. PMID:27239189

  1. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  2. Comparison of Orbiter PRCS Plume Flow Fields Using CFD and Modified Source Flow Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Stuart, Phillip C.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter will use Reaction Control System (RCS) jets for docking with the planned International Space Station (ISS). During approach and backout maneuvers, plumes from these jets could cause high pressure, heating, and thermal loads on ISS components. The object of this paper is to present comparisons of RCS plume flow fields used to calculate these ISS environments. Because of the complexities of 3-D plumes with variable scarf-angle and multi-jet combinations, NASA/JSC developed a plume flow-field methodology for all of these Orbiter jets. The RCS Plume Model (RPM), which includes effects of scarfed nozzles and dual jets, was developed as a modified source-flow engineering tool to rapidly generate plume properties and impingement environments on ISS components. This paper presents flow-field properties from four PRCS jets: F3U low scarf-angle single jet, F3F high scarf-angle single jet, DTU zero scarf-angle dual jet, and F1F/F2F high scarf-angle dual jet. The RPM results compared well with plume flow fields using four CFD programs: General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), Cartesian (CART), Unified Solution Algorithm (USA), and Reacting and Multi-phase Program (RAMP). Good comparisons of predicted pressures are shown with STS 64 Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) data.

  3. Combined Influence of Hall Current and Soret Effect on Chemically Reacting Magnetomicropolar Fluid Flow from Radiative Rotating Vertical Surface with Variable Suction in Slip-Flow Regime

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    An analysis study is presented to study the effects of Hall current and Soret effect on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection of a micropolar fluid in a rotating frame of reference with slip-flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface which absorbs the micropolar fluid with variable suction velocity. The effects of heat absorption, chemical reaction, and thermal radiation are discussed and for this Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in energy equation. The entire system rotates with uniform angular velocity Ω about an axis normal to the plate. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are solved by perturbation techniques. In order to get physical insight, the numerical results of translational velocity, microrotation, fluid temperature, and species concentration for different physical parameters entering into the analysis are discussed and explained graphically. Also, the results of the skin-friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are discussed with the help of figures for various values of flow pertinent flow parameters. PMID:27350957

  4. Flow Duct Data for Validation of Acoustic Liner Codes for Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Munro, Scott; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to acquire acoustic and flow data with hard and lined duct wall duct sections for validation of a liner prediction code being developed at NASA LaRC. Both the mean flowfield and acoustic flowfields were determined in a cross-plane of the rectangular duct. A flow duct facility with acoustic drivers connected to a rectangular (4.7 x 2.0 inch) source section and a linear acoustic liner mounted downstream of the source section was used in this study. The liner section was designed to allow liner materials to be placed on all 4 walls of the duct. The test liner was of the locally-reacting type and was made from a ceramic material. The material, consisting of a tubular structure, was provided by NASA LaRC. The liner was approximately 8.89 cm (3.5 inches) thick. For the current study, only the two "short" sides of the duct were lined with liner material. The other two sides were hard walls. Two especially built instrumentation sections were attached on either sides of the liner section to allow acoustic and flow measurements to be made upstream and downstream of the liner. The two instrumentation duct sections were built to allow measurement of acoustic and flow properties at planes perpendicular to flow upstream and downstream of the liner section. The instrumentation section was also designed to provide a streamwise gradient in acoustic (complex) pressure from which the acoustic particle velocity, needed for the model validation, can be computed. Flow measurements included pressure, temperature, and velocity profiles upstream of the liner section. The in-flow sound pressure levels and phases were obtained with a microphone probe equipped with a nose cone in two cross planes upstream of the liner and two cross plane downstream of the liner. In addition to the acoustic measurements at the cross planes. axial centerline acoustic data was acquired using an axially traversing microphone probe which was traversed from a location

  5. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  6. Surface pressure measurements for CFD code validation in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. The bluntness ratio of the geometry is 10% and the slice begins at 70% of the length of the vehicle. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from {minus}10 to + 18{degrees}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. A new and innovative uncertainty analysis was devised to estimate the contributors to surface pressure measurement uncertainty. Quantitative estimates were computed for the uncertainty contributions due to the complete instrumentation system, nonuniformity of flow in the test section of the wind tunnel, and variations in the wind tunnel model. This extensive set of high-quality surface pressure measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for hypersonic flow conditions.

  7. UNSAT-H, an unsaturated soil water flow code for use at the Hanford site: code documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1985-10-01

    The unsaturated soil moisture flow code, UNSAT-H, which was developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for assessing water movement at waste sites on the Hanford site, is documented in this report. This code is used in simulating the water dynamics of arid sites under consideration for waste disposal. The results of an example simulation of constant infiltration show excellent agreement with an analytical solution and another numerical solution, thus providing some verification of the UNSAT-H code. Areas of the code are identified for future work and include runoff, snowmelt, long-term climate and plant models, and parameter measurement. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A generalized one-dimensional computer code for turbomachinery cooling passage flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Roelke, Richard J.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized one-dimensional computer code for analyzing the flow and heat transfer in the turbomachinery cooling passages was developed. This code is capable of handling rotating cooling passages with turbulators, 180 degree turns, pin fins, finned passages, by-pass flows, tip cap impingement flows, and flow branching. The code is an extension of a one-dimensional code developed by P. Meitner. In the subject code, correlations for both heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss computations were developed to model each of the above mentioned type of coolant passages. The code has the capability of independently computing the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient on each side of a rectangular passage. Either the mass flow at the inlet to the channel or the exit plane pressure can be specified. For a specified inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure, and exit static pressure, the code computers the flow rates through the main branch and the subbranches, flow through tip cap for impingement cooling, in addition to computing the coolant pressure, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient distribution in each coolant flow branch. Predictions from the subject code for both nonrotating and rotating passages agree well with experimental data. The code was used to analyze the cooling passage of a research cooled radial rotor.

  9. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes, and flow in heated porous media.

  10. F2D users manual: A two-dimensional compressible gas flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    The F2D computer code is a general purpose, two-dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-corrector solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  11. ACFAC: a cash flow analysis code for estimating product price from an industrial operation

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.

    1980-04-01

    A computer code is presented which uses a discountted cash flow methodology to obtain an average product price for an industtrial process. The general discounted cash flow method is discussed. Special code options include multiple treatments of interest during construction and other preoperational costs, investment tax credits, and different methods for tax depreciation of capital assets. Two options for allocating the cost of plant decommissioning are available. The FORTRAN code listing and the computer output for a sample problem are included.

  12. Validation of the NPARC code for nozzle afterbody flows at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Smith, Crawford F.

    1995-01-01

    The NPARC code, a Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes code, was validated for nozzle afterbody (boatail) flow fields at transonic speeds. The flow fields about three geometries were studied: an axisymmetric nozzle with attached flow; an axisymmetric nozzle with separated flow: and a two-dimensional (rectangular) nozzle with separated flow. Three turbulence models, Baldwin-Lomax, Baldwin-Barth, and Chien k-epsilon, were used to determine the effect of turbulence model selection on the flow field solution. Static pressure distributions on the nozzle surfaces and pitot pressure measurements in the exhaust plume were examined. Results from the NPARC code compared very well with experimental data for all cases. For attached flow fields, the effect of the turbulence models showed no discernable differences. The Baldwin-Barth model yielded better results than either the Chien k-epsilon or the Baldwin-Lomax model for separated flow fields.

  13. Meanline Analysis of Turbines with Choked Flow in the Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is a new meanline/streamline turbomachinery modeling tool being developed at NASA GRC. During the development process, a limitation of the code was discovered in relation to the analysis of choked flow in axial turbines. This paper describes the relevant physics for choked flow as well as the changes made to OTAC to enable analysis in this flow regime.

  14. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  15. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-05-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  16. Combustion chamber analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  17. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  18. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel. [CONDOR code

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction.

  19. A Validation Summary of the NCC Turbulent Reacting/non-reacting Spray Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Liu, N.-S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This pper provides a validation summary of the spray computations performed as a part of the NCC (National Combustion Code) development activity. NCC is being developed with the aim of advancing the current prediction tools used in the design of advanced technology combustors based on the multidimensional computational methods. The solution procedure combines the novelty of the application of the scalar Monte Carlo PDF (Probability Density Function) method to the modeling of turbulent spray flames with the ability to perform the computations on unstructured grids with parallel computing. The calculation procedure was applied to predict the flow properties of three different spray cases. One is a nonswirling unconfined reacting spray, the second is a nonswirling unconfined nonreacting spray, and the third is a confined swirl-stabilized spray flame. The comparisons involving both gas-phase and droplet velocities, droplet size distributions, and gas-phase temperatures show reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The comparisons involve both the results obtained from the use of the Monte Carlo PDF method as well as those obtained from the conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution. Detailed comparisons in the case of a reacting nonswirling spray clearly highlight the importance of chemistry/turbulence interactions in the modeling of reacting sprays. The results from the PDF and non-PDF methods were found to be markedly different and the PDF solution is closer to the reported experimental data. The PDF computations predict that most of the combustion occurs in a predominantly diffusion-flame environment. However, the non-PDF solution predicts incorrectly that the combustion occurs in a predominantly vaporization-controlled regime. The Monte Carlo temperature distribution shows that the functional form of the PDF for the temperature fluctuations varies substantially from point to point. The results also bring to the fore some of the

  20. F2D. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-08-01

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicability of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.

  1. Imaging flow cytometer using computation and spatially coded filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry analyzes multiple physical characteristics of a large population of single cells as cells flow in a fluid stream through an excitation light beam. Flow cytometers measure fluorescence and light scattering from which information about the biological and physical properties of individual cells are obtained. Although flow cytometers have massive statistical power due to their single cell resolution and high throughput, they produce no information about cell morphology or spatial resolution offered by microscopy, which is a much wanted feature missing in almost all flow cytometers. In this paper, we invent a method of spatial-temporal transformation to provide flow cytometers with cell imaging capabilities. The method uses mathematical algorithms and a specially designed spatial filter as the only hardware needed to give flow cytometers imaging capabilities. Instead of CCDs or any megapixel cameras found in any imaging systems, we obtain high quality image of fast moving cells in a flow cytometer using photomultiplier tube (PMT) detectors, thus obtaining high throughput in manners fully compatible with existing cytometers. In fact our approach can be applied to retrofit traditional flow cytometers to become imaging flow cytometers at a minimum cost. To prove the concept, we demonstrate cell imaging for cells travelling at a velocity of 0.2 m/s in a microfluidic channel, corresponding to a throughput of approximately 1,000 cells per second.

  2. Code System to Calculate Waste-Isolation Flow and Transport.

    1999-10-18

    Version 00 SWIFT solves the coupled or individual equations governing fluid flow, heat transport, brine displacement, and radionuclide displacement in geologic media. Fluid flow may be transient or steady state. One, two, or three dimensions are available, and transport of radionuclides chains is possible.

  3. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2. 1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  4. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2.1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  5. A supersonic three-dimensional code for flow over blunt bodies: Program documentation and test cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, D. S.; Mcmillan, O. J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a computer code for the calculation of steady, supersonic, three dimensional, inviscid flow over blunt bodies is illustrated. Input and output are given and explained for two cases: a pointed code of 20 deg half angle at 15 deg angle of attack in a free stream with M sub infinite = 7, and a cone-ogive-cylinder at 10 deg angle of attack with M sub infinite = 2.86. A source listing of the computer code is provided.

  6. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  7. PEBBLES: A COMPUTER CODE FOR MODELING PACKING, FLOW AND RECIRCULATIONOF PEBBLES IN A PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive, high fidelity model for pebble flow has been developed and embodied in the PEBBLES computer code. In this paper, a description of the physical artifacts included in the model is presented and some results from using the computer code for predicting the features of pebble flow and packing in a realistic pebble bed reactor design are shown. The sensitivity of models to various physical parameters is also discussed.

  8. A FORTRAN computer code for calculating flows in multiple-blade-element cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution technique has been developed for solving the multiple-blade-element, surface-of-revolution, blade-to-blade flow problem in turbomachinery. The calculation solves approximate flow equations which include the effects of compressibility, radius change, blade-row rotation, and variable stream sheet thickness. An integral equation solution (i.e., panel method) is used to solve the equations. A description of the computer code and computer code input is given in this report.

  9. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  10. Two-Phase Flow in Geothermal Wells: Development and Uses of a Good Computer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Ramirez, Jaime

    1983-06-01

    A computer code is developed for vertical two-phase flow in geothermal wellbores. The two-phase correlations used were developed by Orkiszewski (1967) and others and are widely applicable in the oil and gas industry. The computer code is compared to the flowing survey measurements from wells in the East Mesa, Cerro Prieto, and Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal fields with success. Well data from the Svartsengi field in Iceland are also used. Several applications of the computer code are considered. They range from reservoir analysis to wellbore deposition studies. It is considered that accurate and workable wellbore simulators have an important role to play in geothermal reservoir engineering.

  11. TVENT1: a computer code for analyzing tornado-induced flow in ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-07-01

    TVENT1 is a new version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1 is essentially the same code but has added features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features also have been added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate the code's applications.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LEST and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23, 1997 and December August 31, 2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Sparlart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in Turbine Cascades Using LESTool and UNCLE Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.

    2004-01-01

    During the period December 23,1997 and December August 31,2004, we accomplished the development of 2 CFD codes for DNS/LES/RANS simulation of turbine cascade flows, namely LESTool and UNCLE. LESTool is a structured code making use of 5th order upwind differencing scheme and UNCLE is a second-order-accuracy unstructured code. LESTool has both Dynamic SGS and Spalart's DES models and UNCLE makes use of URANS and DES models. The current report provides a description of methodologies used in the codes.

  14. Comparison of strongly heat-driven flow codes for unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Updegraff, C.D.

    1989-08-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in unsaturated welded tuff. As part of this effort, SNL evaluated existing strongly heat-driven flow computer codes for simulating ground-water flow in unsaturated media. The three codes tested, NORIA, PETROS, and TOUGH, were compared against a suite of problems for which analytical and numerical solutions or experimental results exist. The problems were selected to test the abilities of the codes to simulate situations ranging from simple, uncoupled processes, such as two-phase flow or heat transfer, to fully coupled processes, such as vaporization caused by high temperatures. In general, all three codes were found to be difficult to use because of (1) built-in time stepping criteria, (2) the treatment of boundary conditions, and (3) handling of evaporation/condensation problems. A drawback of the study was that adequate problems related to expected repository conditions were not available in the literature. Nevertheless, the results of this study suggest the need for thorough investigations of the impact of heat on the flow field in the vicinity of an unsaturated HLW repository. Recommendations are to develop a new flow code combining the best features of these three codes and eliminating the worst ones. 19 refs., 49 figs.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  16. A supersonic, three-dimensional code for flow over blunt bodies: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, D. S.; Mcmillan, O. J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer code is described which may be used to calculate the steady, supersonic, three-dimensional, inviscid flow over blunt bodies. The theoretical and numerical formulation of the problem is given (shock-capturing, downstream marching), including exposition of the boundary and initial conditions. The overall flow logic of the program, its usage, accuracy, and limitations are discussed.

  17. Greenland Flow Dynamics: (De)coding Process Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.; Parizek, B. R.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Applegate, P. J.; Christianson, K. A.; Dixon, T. H.; Holland, D. M.; Holschuh, N.; Keller, K.; Koellner, S. J.; Lampkin, D. J.; Muto, A.; Nicholas, R.; Stevens, N. T.; Voytenko, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive modeling informed by the growing body of observational data yields important insights to the controlling processes operating across a range of spatiotemporal scales that have influenced the dynamic variability of the Greenland ice sheet. Pressurized basal lubrication enhances ice flow. This lubricating water is largely produced by basal and/or surface melt. For the North East Greenland Ice Stream, elevated geothermal heat flux (GHF) near its onset helps initiate the streaming flow. We suggest that the elevated GHF is likely caused by melt production and migration due to cyclical loading of the lithosphere over glacial timescales. On sub-seasonal timescales, surface meltwater production and transmission to the subglacial environment can enhance flow for pressurized, distributed hydraulic systems and diminish regional sliding for lower-pressure, channelized systems. However, in a warming climate, this lubricating source occurs across an expanding ablation zone, possibly softening shear margins and triggering basal sliding over previously frozen areas. Yet, the existence of active englacial conduits can lead to a plumbing network that helps preserve ice tongues and limit the loss of important buttressing of outlet glacier flow. Ocean forcing has been implicated in the variability of outlet glacier speeds around the periphery of Greenland. The extent and timescale over which those marginal changes influence inland flow depends on the basal rheology that, on a local scale, also influences the concentration of englacial stresses. Detailed observations of a calving event on Helheim Glacier have helped constrain diagnostic simulations of the pre- and post-calving stress states conducted in hopes of informing improved calving relationships. Furthermore, warm-water-mass variability within Irminger/Atlantic Waters off Greenland may play an important role in the monthly modulation of outlet glacier flow speeds, as has been observed for an ice stream draining into

  18. Hyperbolic/parabolic development for the GIM-STAR code. [flow fields in supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.; Stalnaker, J. F.; Ratliff, A. W.

    1980-01-01

    Flow fields in supersonic inlet configurations were computed using the eliptic GIM code on the STAR computer. Spillage flow under the lower cowl was calculated to be 33% of the incoming stream. The shock/boundary layer interaction on the upper propulsive surface was computed including separation. All shocks produced by the flow system were captured. Linearized block implicit (LBI) schemes were examined to determine their application to the GIM code. Pure explicit methods have stability limitations and fully implicit schemes are inherently inefficient; however, LBI schemes show promise as an effective compromise. A quasiparabolic version of the GIM code was developed using elastical parabolized Navier-Stokes methods combined with quasitime relaxation. This scheme is referred to as quasiparabolic although it applies equally well to hyperbolic supersonic inviscid flows. Second order windward differences are used in the marching coordinate and either explicit or linear block implicit time relaxation can be incorporated.

  19. Alternative conceptual models and codes for unsaturated flow in fractured tuff: Preliminary assessments for GWTT-95

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-09-01

    Groundwater travel time (GWTT) calculations will play an important role in addressing site-suitability criteria for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain,Nevada. In support of these calculations, Preliminary assessments of the candidate codes and models are presented in this report. A series of benchmark studies have been designed to address important aspects of modeling flow through fractured media representative of flow at Yucca Mountain. Three codes (DUAL, FEHMN, and TOUGH 2) are compared in these benchmark studies. DUAL is a single-phase, isothermal, two-dimensional flow simulator based on the dual mixed finite element method. FEHMN is a nonisothermal, multiphase, multidimensional simulator based primarily on the finite element method. TOUGH2 is anon isothermal, multiphase, multidimensional simulator based on the integral finite difference method. Alternative conceptual models of fracture flow consisting of the equivalent continuum model (ECM) and the dual permeability (DK) model are used in the different codes.

  20. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  1. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation systemmore » components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.« less

  2. Code System to Calculate Transient 2-Dimensional 2-Phase Flow.

    1999-10-18

    Version: 00 SOLA-DF is a numerical solution algorithm for gas-liquid mixture dynamics in two space dimensions and time. The two-phase system is described by a set of mixture equations plus a relation describing the relative flow of one phase with respect to the other. The algorithm contains models to represent the interphase exchange rates of mass, momentum, and energy for water-steam mixtures.

  3. A Nonlinear Dynamic Subscale Model for Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS)/Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) of Internal Non-Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    A brief introduction of the temporal filter based partially resolved numerical simulation/very large eddy simulation approach (PRNS/VLES) and its distinct features are presented. A nonlinear dynamic subscale model and its advantages over the linear subscale eddy viscosity model are described. In addition, a guideline for conducting a PRNS/VLES simulation is provided. Results are presented for three turbulent internal flows. The first one is the turbulent pipe flow at low and high Reynolds numbers to illustrate the basic features of PRNS/VLES; the second one is the swirling turbulent flow in a LM6000 single injector to further demonstrate the differences in the calculated flow fields resulting from the nonlinear model versus the pure eddy viscosity model; the third one is a more complex turbulent flow generated in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor, the calculated result has demonstrated that the current PRNS/VLES approach is capable of capturing the dynamically important, unsteady turbulent structures while using a relatively coarse grid.

  4. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok

    2002-01-01

    Pure water is distilled from waste water in the International Space Station. The distillation assembly consists of an evaporator, a compressor and a condenser. Vapor is periodically purged from the condenser to avoid vapor accumulation. Purged vapor is condensed in a tube by coolant water prior to entering the purge pump. The paper presents a condensation model of purged vapor in a tube. This model is based on the Finite Volume Method. In the Finite Volume Method, the flow domain is discretized into multiple control volumes and a simultaneous analysis is performed.

  5. Description of a computer program to calculate reacting supersonic internal flow fields with shock waves using viscous characteristics: Program manual and sample calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, R. J.; Agnone, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for calculating internal supersonic flow fields with chemical reactions and shock waves typical of supersonic combustion chambers with either wall or mid-stream injectors is described. The usefulness and limitations of the program are indicated. The program manual and listing are presented along with a sample calculation.

  6. User's guide for NASCRIN: A vectorized code for calculating two-dimensional supersonic internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program NASCRIN has been developed for analyzing two-dimensional flow fields in high-speed inlets. It solves the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form by an explicit, two-step finite-difference method. An explicit-implicit method can also be used at the user's discretion for viscous flow calculations. For turbulent flow, an algebraic, two-layer eddy-viscosity model is used. The code is operational on the CDC CYBER 203 computer system and is highly vectorized to take full advantage of the vector-processing capability of the system. It is highly user oriented and is structured in such a way that for most supersonic flow problems, the user has to make only a few changes. Although the code is primarily written for supersonic internal flow, it can be used with suitable changes in the boundary conditions for a variety of other problems.

  7. Potential flow theory and operation guide for the panel code PMARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.; Dudley, Michael R.; Iguchi, Steve K.; Browne, Lindsey; Katz, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis for PMARC, a low-order potential-flow panel code for modeling complex three-dimensional geometries, is outlined. Several of the advanced features currently included in the code, such as internal flow modeling, a simple jet model, and a time-stepping wake model, are discussed in some detail. The code is written using adjustable size arrays so that it can be easily redimensioned for the size problem being solved and the computer hardware being used. An overview of the program input is presented, with a detailed description of the input available in the appendices. Finally, PMARC results for a generic wing/body configuration are compared with experimental data to demonstrate the accuracy of the code. The input file for this test case is given in the appendices.

  8. Development of a multigrid transonic potential flow code for cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, John

    1992-01-01

    Finite-volume methods for discretizing transonic potential flow equations have proven to be very flexible and accurate for both two and three dimensional problems. Since they only use local properties of the mapping, they allow decoupling of the grid generation from the rest of the problem. A very effective method for solving the discretized equations and converging to a solution is the multigrid-ADI technique. It has been successfully applied to airfoil problems where O type, C type and slit mappings have been used. Convergence rates for these cases are more than an order of magnitude faster than with relaxation techniques. In this report, we describe a method to extend the above methods, with the C type mappings, to airfoil cascade problems.

  9. Code validation for the simulation of supersonic viscous flow about the F-16XL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jolen; Tu, Eugene; King, Lyndell

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion on code validation for the simulation of supersonic viscous flow about the F-16XL are provided. Because of the large potential gains related to laminar flow on the swept wings of supersonic aircraft, interest in the applications of laminar flow control (LFC) techniques in the supersonic regime has increased. A supersonic laminar flow control (SLFC) technology program is currently underway within NASA. The objective of this program is to develop the data base and design methods that are critical to the development of laminar flow control technology for application to supersonic transport aircraft design. Towards this end, the program integrates computational investigations underway at NASA Ames-Moffett and NASA Langley with flight-test investigations being conducted on the F-16XL at the NASA Ames-Dryden Research Facility in cooperation with Rockwell International. The computational goal at NASA Ames-Moffett is to integrate a thin-layer Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver with a stability analysis code. The flow solver would provide boundary layer profiles to the stability analysis code which in turn would predict transition on the F-16XL wing. To utilize the stability analysis codes, reliable boundary layer data is necessary at off-design cases. Previously, much of the prediction of boundary layer transition has been accomplished through the coupling of boundary layer codes with stability theory. However, boundary layer codes may have difficulties at high Reynolds numbers, of the order of 100 million, and with the current complex geometry in question. Therefore, a reliable code which solves the thin-layer Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations is needed. Two objectives are discussed, the first in greater depth. The first objective is method verification, via comparisons of computations with experiment, of the reliability and robustness of the code. To successfully implement LFC techniques to the F-16XL wing, the flow about

  10. Enhanced capabilities and modified users manual for axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Modifications made to the axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN are documented in this report. Endwall blockage and stall margin predictions were added. The loss-coefficient model was upgraded. Default correlations for rotor and stator solidity and aspect-ratio inputs and for stator-exit tangential velocity inputs were included in the code along with defaults for aerodynamic design limits. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  11. TOPAZ - the transient one-dimensional pipe flow analyzer: code validation and sample problems

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    TOPAZ is a ''user friendly'' computer code for modeling the one-dimensional-transient physics of multi-species gas transfer in arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, vessels, and flow branches. This document presents a series of sample problems designed to aid potential users in creating TOPAZ input files. To the extent possible, sample problems were selected for which analytical solutions currently exist. TOPAZ comparisons with such solutions are intended to provide a measure of code validation.

  12. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  13. Calculation of Turbulent Subsonic Diffuser Flows Using the NPARC Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudek, J. C.; Georgiadis, N. J.; Yoder, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Axisymmetric subsonic diffuser flows were calculated with the NPARC Navier-Stokes code in order to determine the effects various code features have on the flow solutions. The code features examined in this work were turbulence models and boundary conditions. Four turbulence models available in NPARC were used: the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model, and the Chien kappa-epsilon and Wilcox kappa-omega two-equation models. The three boundary conditions examined were the free boundary, the mass flux boundary and the subsonic outflow with variable static pressure. In addition to boundary condition type, the geometry downstream of the diffuser was varied to see if upstream influences were present. The NPARC results are compared with experimental data and recommendations are given for using NPARC to compute similar flows.

  14. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and non-reacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  15. Users manual for updated computer code for axial-flow compressor conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    An existing computer code that determines the flow path for an axial-flow compressor either for a given number of stages or for a given overall pressure ratio was modified for use in air-breathing engine conceptual design studies. This code uses a rapid approximate design methodology that is based on isentropic simple radial equilibrium. Calculations are performed at constant-span-fraction locations from tip to hub. Energy addition per stage is controlled by specifying the maximum allowable values for several aerodynamic design parameters. New modeling was introduced to the code to overcome perceived limitations. Specific changes included variable rather than constant tip radius, flow path inclination added to the continuity equation, input of mass flow rate directly rather than indirectly as inlet axial velocity, solution for the exact value of overall pressure ratio rather than for any value that met or exceeded it, and internal computation of efficiency rather than the use of input values. The modified code was shown to be capable of computing efficiencies that are compatible with those of five multistage compressors and one fan that were tested experimentally. This report serves as a users manual for the revised code, Compressor Spanline Analysis (CSPAN). The modeling modifications, including two internal loss correlations, are presented. Program input and output are described. A sample case for a multistage compressor is included.

  16. Some Examples of the Application and Validation of the NUFT Subsurface Flow and Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J J

    2001-08-01

    This report was written as partial fulfillment of a subcontract from DOD/DOE Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) as part of a project directed by the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. The report documents examples of field validation of the Non-isothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) code for environmental remediation, with emphasis on soil vapor extraction, and describes some of the modifications needed to integrate the code into the DOD Groundwater Modeling System (GMS, 2000). Note that this report highlights only a subset of the full capabilities of the NUFT code.

  17. Modeling Improvements and Users Manual for Axial-flow Turbine Off-design Computer Code AXOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    An axial-flow turbine off-design performance computer code used for preliminary studies of gas turbine systems was modified and calibrated based on the experimental performance of large aircraft-type turbines. The flow- and loss-model modifications and calibrations are presented in this report. Comparisons are made between computed performances and experimental data for seven turbines over wide ranges of speed and pressure ratio. This report also serves as the users manual for the revised code, which is named AXOD.

  18. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 2: Development of the computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a numerical scheme for solving the time dependent viscous compressible three dimensional flow equations to aid in the design of helicopter rotors. The development of a computer code to solve a three dimensional unsteady approximate form of the Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block emplicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is described. Results of calculations of several Cartesian test cases are presented. The computer code can be applied to more complex flow fields such as these encountered on rotating airfoils.

  19. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  20. CRESLAF (Version 4. 0): A Fortran program for modeling laminar, chemically reacting, boundary-layer flow in cylindrical or planar channels

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Moffat, H.K. ); Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M. )

    1993-04-01

    CRESLAF is a Fortran program that predicts the velocity, temperature, and species profiles in two-dimensional (planar or axisymmetric) channels. The program accounts for finite-rate gas-phase and surface chemical kinetics and molecular transport. The model employs the boundary-layer approximations for the fluid-flow equations, coupled to gas-phase and surface species continuity equations. The program runs in conjunction with the Chemkin preprocessors for the gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms and the transport properties. This report presents the equations defining the model, the method of solution, the input parameters to the program, and a sample problem illustrating its use. Applications of CRESLAF include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors, heterogeneous catalysis on reactor walls, and corrosion processes.

  1. CRESLAF. Version 4.0: A Fortran program for modeling laminar, chemically reacting, boundary-layer flow in cylindrical or planar channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltrin, M. E.; Moffat, H. K.; Kee, R. J.; Rupley, F. M.

    1993-04-01

    CRESLAF is a Fortran program that predicts the velocity, temperature, and species profiles in two-dimensional (planar or axisymmetric) channels. The program accounts for finite-rate gas-phase and surface chemical kinetics and molecular transport. The model employs the boundary-layer approximations for the fluid-flow equations, coupled to gas-phase and surface species continuity equations. The program runs in conjunction with the Chemkin preprocessors for the gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms and the transport properties. This report presents the equations defining the model, the method of solution, the input parameters to the program, and a sample problem illustrating its use. Applications of CRESLAF include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors, heterogeneous catalysis on reactor walls, and corrosion processes.

  2. CRESLAF (Version 4.0): A Fortran program for modeling laminar, chemically reacting, boundary-layer flow in cylindrical or planar channels

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.

    1993-04-01

    CRESLAF is a Fortran program that predicts the velocity, temperature, and species profiles in two-dimensional (planar or axisymmetric) channels. The program accounts for finite-rate gas-phase and surface chemical kinetics and molecular transport. The model employs the boundary-layer approximations for the fluid-flow equations, coupled to gas-phase and surface species continuity equations. The program runs in conjunction with the Chemkin preprocessors for the gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms and the transport properties. This report presents the equations defining the model, the method of solution, the input parameters to the program, and a sample problem illustrating its use. Applications of CRESLAF include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors, heterogeneous catalysis on reactor walls, and corrosion processes.

  3. Preface: Recent Advances in Modeling Multiphase Flow and Transportwith the TOUGH Family of Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2007-11-15

    A symposium on research carried out using the TOUGH family of numerical codes was held from May 15 to 17, 2006, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This special issue of the 'Vadose Zone Journal' contains revised and expanded versions of a selected set of papers presented at this symposium (TOUGH Symposium 2006; http://esd.lbl.gov/TOUGHsymposium), all of which focus on multiphase flow, including flow in the vadose zone.

  4. Current Status on the use of Parallel Computing in Turbulent Reacting Flow Computations Involving Sprays, Monte Carlo PDF and Unstructured Grids. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in multidimensional combustor modeling as evidenced by the level of sophistication employed in terms of modeling and numerical accuracy considerations, is also dictated by the available computer memory and turnaround times afforded by present-day computers. With the aim of advancing the current multi-dimensional computational tools used in the design of advanced technology combustors, a solution procedure is developed that combines the novelty of the coupled CFD/spray/scalar Monte Carlo PDF (Probability Density Function) computations on unstructured grids with the ability to run on parallel architectures. In this approach, the mean gas-phase velocity and turbulence fields are determined from a standard turbulence model, the joint composition of species and enthalpy from the solution of a modeled PDF transport equation, and a Lagrangian-based dilute spray model is used for the liquid-phase representation. The gas-turbine combustor flows are often characterized by a complex interaction between various physical processes associated with the interaction between the liquid and gas phases, droplet vaporization, turbulent mixing, heat release associated with chemical kinetics, radiative heat transfer associated with highly absorbing and radiating species, among others. The rate controlling processes often interact with each other at various disparate time 1 and length scales. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and liquid phase evaporation in many practical combustion devices.

  5. Implementation of Finite Volume based Navier Stokes Algorithm Within General Purpose Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Majumdar, Alok

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a finite volume based numerical algorithm that allows multi-dimensional computation of fluid flow within a system level network flow analysis. There are several thermo-fluid engineering problems where higher fidelity solutions are needed that are not within the capacity of system level codes. The proposed algorithm will allow NASA's Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) to perform multi-dimensional flow calculation within the framework of GFSSP s typical system level flow network consisting of fluid nodes and branches. The paper presents several classical two-dimensional fluid dynamics problems that have been solved by GFSSP's multi-dimensional flow solver. The numerical solutions are compared with the analytical and benchmark solution of Poiseulle, Couette and flow in a driven cavity.

  6. Groundwater flow code verification ``benchmarking`` activity (COVE-2A): Analysis of participants` work

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Barnard, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The Nuclear Waste Repository Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is investigating the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for underground burial of nuclear wastes. One element of the investigations is to assess the potential long-term effects of groundwater flow on the integrity of a potential repository. A number of computer codes are being used to model groundwater flow through geologic media in which the potential repository would be located. These codes compute numerical solutions for problems that are usually analytically intractable. Consequently, independent confirmation of the correctness of the solution is often not possible. Code verification is a process that permits the determination of the numerical accuracy of codes by comparing the results of several numerical solutions for the same problem. The international nuclear waste research community uses benchmarking for intercomparisons that partially satisfy the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) definition of code verification. This report presents the results from the COVE-2A (Code Verification) project, which is a subset of the COVE project.

  7. Coded excitation using periodic and unipolar M-sequences for photoacoustic imaging and flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haichong K; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-11

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging imaging technology combining optical imaging with ultrasound. Imaging of the optical absorption coefficient and flow measurement provides additional functional information compared to ultrasound. The issue with photoacoustic imaging is its low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to scattering or attenuation; this is especially problematic when high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) lasers are used. In previous research, coded excitation utilizing several pseudorandom sequences has been considered as a solution for the problem. However, previously proposed temporal coding procedures using Golay codes or M-sequences are so complex that it was necessary to send a sequence twice to realize a bipolar sequence. Here, we propose a periodic and unipolar sequence (PUM), which is a periodic sequence derived from an m-sequence. The PUM can enhance signals without causing coding artifacts for single wavelength excitation. In addition, it is possible to increase the temporal resolution since the decoding start point can be set to any code in periodic irradiation, while only the first code of a sequence was available for conventional aperiodic irradiation. The SNR improvement and the increase in temporal resolution were experimentally validated through imaging evaluation and flow measurement. PMID:26832234

  8. Method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT heat-flow code

    SciTech Connect

    Butkovich, T.R.; Montan, D.N.

    1980-04-01

    One objective of the spent fuel test in Climax Stock granite (SFTC) is to correctly model the thermal transport, and the changes in the stress field and accompanying displacements from the application of the thermal loads. We have chosen the ADINA and ADINAT finite element codes to do these calculations. ADINAT is a heat transfer code compatible to the ADINA displacement and stress analysis code. The heat flow problem encountered at SFTC requires a code with conduction, radiation, and ventilation capabilities, which the present version of ADINAT does not have. We have devised a method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT code. This method effectively reproduces the results from the TRUMP multi-dimensional finite difference code, which correctly models radiative heat transport between drift surfaces, conductive and convective thermal transport to and through air in the drifts, and mass flow of air in the drifts. The temperature histories for each node in the finite element mesh calculated with ADINAT using this method can be used directly in the ADINA thermal-mechanical calculation.

  9. The impact of time step definition on code convergence and robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, S.; Weiss, J. M.; Merkle, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implemented preconditioning for multi-species reacting flows in two independent codes, an implicit (ADI) code developed in-house and the RPLUS code (developed at LeRC). The RPLUS code was modified to work on a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. The performance of both the codes was tested, and it was shown that preconditioning can improve convergence by a factor of two to a hundred depending on the problem. Our efforts are currently focused on evaluating the effect of chemical sources and on assessing how preconditioning may be applied to improve convergence and robustness in the calculation of reacting flows.

  10. A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND, JAMES H.; HOMICZ, GREGORY F.; PORTER, VICKI L.; GOSSLER, ALBERT A.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.

  11. Open-Source Development of the Petascale Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, G. E.; Andre, B.; Bisht, G.; Johnson, T.; Karra, S.; Lichtner, P. C.; Mills, R. T.

    2013-12-01

    Open-source software development has become increasingly popular in recent years. Open-source encourages collaborative and transparent software development and promotes unlimited free redistribution of source code to the public. Open-source development is good for science as it reveals implementation details that are critical to scientific reproducibility, but generally excluded from journal publications. In addition, research funds that would have been spent on licensing fees can be redirected to code development that benefits more scientists. In 2006, the developers of PFLOTRAN open-sourced their code under the U.S. Department of Energy SciDAC-II program. Since that time, the code has gained popularity among code developers and users from around the world seeking to employ PFLOTRAN to simulate thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and biogeochemical processes in the Earth's surface/subsurface environment. PFLOTRAN is a massively-parallel subsurface reactive multiphase flow and transport simulator designed from the ground up to run efficiently on computing platforms ranging from the laptop to leadership-class supercomputers, all from a single code base. The code employs domain decomposition for parallelism and is founded upon the well-established and open-source parallel PETSc and HDF5 frameworks. PFLOTRAN leverages modern Fortran (i.e. Fortran 2003-2008) in its extensible object-oriented design. The use of this progressive, yet domain-friendly programming language has greatly facilitated collaboration in the code's software development. Over the past year, PFLOTRAN's top-level data structures were refactored as Fortran classes (i.e. extendible derived types) to improve the flexibility of the code, ease the addition of new process models, and enable coupling to external simulators. For instance, PFLOTRAN has been coupled to the parallel electrical resistivity tomography code E4D to enable hydrogeophysical inversion while the same code base can be used as a third

  12. A Computer Code for Swirling Turbulent Axisymmetric Recirculating Flows in Practical Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.; Rhode, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A primitive pressure-velocity variable finite difference computer code was developed to predict swirling recirculating inert turbulent flows in axisymmetric combustors in general, and for application to a specific idealized combustion chamber with sudden or gradual expansion. The technique involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. A user's manual, dealing with the computational problem, showing how the mathematical basis and computational scheme may be translated into a computer program is presented. A flow chart, FORTRAN IV listing, notes about various subroutines and a user's guide are supplied as an aid to prospective users of the code.

  13. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.; Marek, C. John; Myrabo, Leik N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing, and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Research Center Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and nonreacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  14. Investigation of aerodynamic characteristics of wings having vortex flow using different numerical codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of highly sweptback wings having separation-induced vortex flow were investigated by employing different numerical codes with a view to determining some of the capabilities and limitations of these codes. Flat wings of various configurations-strake wing models, cropped, diamond, arrow and double delta wings, were studied. Cambered and cranked planforms have also been tested. The theoretical results predicted by the codes were compared with the experimental data, wherever possible, and found to agree favorably for most of the configurations investigated. However, large cambered wings could not be successfully modeled by the codes. It appears that the final solution in the free vortex sheet method is affected by the selection of the initial solution. Accumulated span loadings estimated for delta and diamond wings were found to be unusual in comparison with attached flow results in that the slopes of these load curves near the leading edge do not tend to infinity as they do in the case of attached flow.

  15. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents the results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers. The work consists of two parts: (1) the development and testing of a spectral numerical computer code that treats the diffusion reaction equations; and (2) the simulation of a series of cases of chemical reactions occurring on mixing layers. The reaction considered is a binary, irreversible reaction with no heat release. The reacting species are nonpremixed. The results of the numerical tests indicate that the high accuracy of the spectral methods observed for rigid body rotation are also obtained when diffusion, reaction, and more complex flows are considered. In the simulations, the effects of vortex rollup and smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are investigated. The simulation results are found to be in approximate agreement with similarity theory. Comparisons of simulation results with certain modeling hypotheses indicate limitations in these hypotheses. The nondimensional product thickness computed from the simulations is compared with laboratory values and is found to be in reasonable agreement, especially since there are no adjustable constants in the method.

  16. A vortex code for flow over rigid or flexible bluff bodies*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, James; Porter, Vicki; Homicz, Greg; Gossler, Albert

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we discuss version 1.0 of the computer code (CURL) that we have developed to simulate unsteady, 3D, incompressible flows around rigid and flexible bluff bodies whose geometries are made up from thin membrane or ribbon elements. The motivation for this work comes from Sandia National Laboratories' need to perform complete numerical simulations of parachute deployment, inflation, and steady descent. First-generation serial and parallel versions of the uncoupled fluids code have been developed. In addition, a fluid-structure coupling scheme has been developed. Preliminary results for both a rigid and a flexible cross parachute are presented herein.

  17. National Combustion Code Validated Against Lean Direct Injection Flow Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    Most combustion processes have, in some way or another, a recirculating flow field. This recirculation stabilizes the reaction zone, or flame, but an unnecessarily large recirculation zone can result in high nitrogen oxide (NOx) values for combustion systems. The size of this recirculation zone is crucial to the performance of state-of-the-art, low-emissions hardware. If this is a large-scale combustion process, the flow field will probably be turbulent and, therefore, three-dimensional. This research dealt primarily with flow fields resulting from lean direct injection (LDI) concepts, as described in Research & Technology 2001. LDI is a concept that depends heavily on the design of the swirler. The LDI concept has the potential to reduce NOx values from 50 to 70 percent of current values, with good flame stability characteristics. It is cost effective and (hopefully) beneficial to do most of the design work for an LDI swirler using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are CAE tools that can calculate three-dimensional flows in complex geometries. However, CFD codes are only beginning to correctly calculate the flow fields for complex devices, and the related combustion models usually remove a large portion of the flow physics.

  18. An investigation of design optimization using a 2-D viscous flow code with multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have advanced to the point where they are effective analytical tools for solving flow fields around complex geometries. There is also a need for their use as a design tool to find optimum aerodynamic shapes. In the area of design, however, a difficulty arises due to the large amount of computer resources required by these codes. It is desired to streamline the design process so that a large number of design options and constraints can be investigated without overloading the system. There are several techniques which have been proposed to help streamline the design process. The feasibility of one of these techniques is investigated. The technique under consideration is the interaction of the geometry change with the flow calculation. The problem of finding the value of camber which maximizes the ratio of lift over drag for a particular airfoil is considered. In order to test out this technique, a particular optimization problem was tried. A NACA 0012 airfoil was considered at free stream Mach number of 0.5 with a zero angle of attack. Camber was added to the mean line of the airfoil. The goal was to find the value of camber for which the ratio of lift over drag is a maximum. The flow code used was FLOMGE which is a two dimensional viscous flow solver which uses multigrid to speed up convergence. A hyperbolic grid generation program was used to construct the grid for each value of camber.

  19. Simulation of a Synthetic Jet in Quiescent Air Using TLNS3D Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Although the actuator geometry is highly three-dimensional, the outer flowfield is nominally two-dimensional because of the high aspect ratio of the rectangular slot. For the present study, this configuration is modeled as a two-dimensional problem. A multi-block structured grid available at the CFDVAL2004 website is used as a baseline grid. The periodic motion of the diaphragm is simulated by specifying a sinusoidal velocity at the diaphragm surface with a frequency of 450 Hz, corresponding to the experimental setup. The amplitude is chosen so that the maximum Mach number at the jet exit is approximately 0.1, to replicate the experimental conditions. At the solid walls zero slip, zero injection, adiabatic temperature and zero pressure gradient conditions are imposed. In the external region, symmetry conditions are imposed on the side (vertical) boundaries and far-field conditions are imposed on the top boundary. A nominal free-stream Mach number of 0.001 is imposed in the free stream to simulate incompressible flow conditions in the TLNS3D code, which solves compressible flow equations. The code was run in unsteady (URANS) mode until the periodicity was established. The time-mean quantities were obtained by running the code for at least another 15 periods and averaging the flow quantities over these periods. The phase-locked average of flow quantities were assumed to be coincident with their values during the last full time period.

  20. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D.

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  1. Closure models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, A.; Tarbell, J.M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, a simple procedure based on fast and slow reaction asymptotics has been employed to drive first-order closure models for the nonlinear reaction terms in turbulent mass balances from mechanistic models of turbulent mixing and reaction. The coalescence-redispersion (CRD) model, the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the three-environment (3E) model, and the four-environment (4E) model have been used to develop closure equations. The closure models have been tested extensively against experimental data for both single and multiple reactions. The closures based on slow asymptotics for the CRD, 3E and 4E models provide very good predictions of all of the experimental data, while other models available either in the literature or derived here are not adequate. The simple new closure equations developed in this paper may be useful in modeling systems involving turbulent mixing and complex chemical reactions.

  2. A 3D-PNS computer code for the calculation of supersonic combusting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, Tawit; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    A computer code has been developed based on the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations which govern the supersonic combusting flow of the hydrogen-air system. The finite difference algorithm employed was a hybrid of the Schiff-Steger algorithm and the Vigneron, et al., algorithm which is fully implicit and fully coupled. The combustion of hydrogen and air was modeled by the finite-rate two-step combustion model of Rogers-Chinitz. A new dependent variable vector was introduced to simplify the numerical algorithm. Robustness of the algorithm was considerably enhanced by introducing an adjustable parameter. The computer code was used to solve a premixed shock-induced combustion problem and the results were compared with those of a full Navier-Stokes code. Reasonably good agreement was obtained at a fraction of the cost of the full Navier-Stokes procedure.

  3. Validation of CFD Codes for Parawing Geometries in Subsonic to Supersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz-Ayoroa, Juan G.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Melton, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic studies of a rigid parawing at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 4.65 were carried out using three established inviscid, viscous and independent panel method codes. Pressure distributions along four chordwise sections of the wing were compared to experimental wind tunnel data gathered from NASA technical reports. Results show good prediction of the overall trends and magnitudes of the pressure distributions for the inviscid and viscous solvers. Pressure results for the panel method code diverge from test data at large angles of attack due to shock interaction phenomena. Trends in the flow behavior and their effect on the integrated force and moments on this type of wing are examined in detail using the inviscid CFD code results.

  4. A computer code for three-dimensional incompressible flows using nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1986-03-01

    In this report, a numerical method for solving the equations of motion of three-dimensional incompressible flows in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate (BFC) systems has been developed. The equations of motion are transformed to a generalized curvilinear coordinate system from which the transformed equations are discretized using finite difference approximations in the transformed domain. The hybrid scheme is used to approximate the convection terms in the governing equations. Solutions of the finite difference equations are obtained iteratively by using a pressure-velocity correction algorithm (SIMPLE-C). Numerical examples of two- and three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent flow problems are employed to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the present computer code. The user's guide and computer program listing of the present code are also included.

  5. A computer code for three-dimensional incompressible flows using nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    In this report, a numerical method for solving the equations of motion of three-dimensional incompressible flows in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate (BFC) systems has been developed. The equations of motion are transformed to a generalized curvilinear coordinate system from which the transformed equations are discretized using finite difference approximations in the transformed domain. The hybrid scheme is used to approximate the convection terms in the governing equations. Solutions of the finite difference equations are obtained iteratively by using a pressure-velocity correction algorithm (SIMPLE-C). Numerical examples of two- and three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent flow problems are employed to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the present computer code. The user's guide and computer program listing of the present code are also included.

  6. Flow and Containment Transport Code for Modeling Variably Saturated Porous Media

    1998-05-14

    FACT is a finite element based code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport. It was designed to perform transient three-dimensional calculations that simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogenous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problemsmore » are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates. FACT writes out both ascii and graphical binary files that are TECPLOT-ready. Special features are also available within FACT for handling the typical groundwater modeling needs for remediation efforts at the Savannah River Site.« less

  7. Evaluation of reaction rates in streambed sediments with seepage flow: a novel code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, Fulvio; De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai

    2015-04-01

    Streambed interfaces represent hotspots for nutrient transformations because they host different microbial species which perform many heterotrophic and autotrophic reactions. The evaluation of these reaction rates is crucial to assess the fate of nutrients in riverine environments, and it is often performed through the analysis of concentrations from water samples collected along vertical profiles. The most commonly employed evaluation tool is the Profile code developed by Berg et al. (1998), which determines reaction rates by fitting observed concentrations to a diffusion-reaction equation that neglects the presence of water flow within sediments. However, hyporheic flow is extremely common in streambeds, where solute transport is often controlled by advection rather than diffusion. There is hence a pressing need to develop new methods that can be applied even to advection-dominated sediments. This contribution fills this gap by presenting a novel approach that extends the method proposed by Berg et al. (1998). This new approach includes the influence of vertical solute transport by upwelling or downwelling water, and it is this suited to the typical flow conditions of stream sediments. The code is applied to vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen from a laboratory flume designed to mimic the complex flow conditions of real streams. The results show that it is fundamental to consider water flow to obtain reliable estimates of reaction rates in streambeds. Berg, P., N. Risgaard-Petersen, and S. Rysgaard, 1998, Interpretation of measured concentration profiles in the sediment porewater, Limnology and Oceanography, 43:1500-1510.

  8. Enhanced capabilities and updated users manual for axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN. Turbine cooling has been added to the analysis. New alternative input options allow direct specification of stage reaction, stage work factor, and stage work split. The Reynolds number loss dependency was modified and an internal calculation of air viscosity was added. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  9. Potential Flow Theory and Operation Guide for the Panel Code PMARC. Version 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical basis for PMARC, a low-order panel code for modeling complex three-dimensional bodies, in potential flow, is outlined. PMARC can be run on a wide variety of computer platforms, including desktop machines, workstations, and supercomputers. Execution times for PMARC vary tremendously depending on the computer resources used, but typically range from several minutes for simple or moderately complex cases to several hours for very large complex cases. Several of the advanced features currently included in the code, such as internal flow modeling, boundary layer analysis, and time-dependent flow analysis, including problems involving relative motion, are discussed in some detail. The code is written in Fortran77, using adjustable-size arrays so that it can be easily redimensioned to match problem requirements and computer hardware constraints. An overview of the program input is presented. A detailed description of the input parameters is provided in the appendices. PMARC results for several test cases are presented along with analytic or experimental data, where available. The input files for these test cases are given in the appendices. PMARC currently supports plotfile output formats for several commercially available graphics packages. The supported graphics packages are Plot3D, Tecplot, and PmarcViewer.

  10. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  11. UNSAT-H Version 1. 0: unsaturated flow code documentation and applications for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.; Jones, T.L.

    1986-08-01

    Waste mangement practices at the Hanford Site have relied havily on near-surface burial. Predicting the future performance of any burial site in terms of the migration of buried contaminants requires a model capable of simulating water flow in the unsaturated soils above the buried waste. The model currently being developed to meet this need is UNSAT-H, which was developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for assessing the water dynamics of near-surface waste-disposal sites at the Hanfrod Site. The code will primarily be used to predict deep drainage (i.e., recharge) as a function of environmental conditions such as climate, soil type, and vegetation. UNSAT-H will also simulate various waste-management practices such as placing surface barriers over waste sites. UNSAT-H is a one-dimensional model that simulates the dynamics processes of infiltration, drainage, redistribution, surface evaporation, and uptake of water from soil by plants. UNSAT-H is designed to utilize two auxiliary codes. These codes are DATAINH, which is used to process the input data, and DATAOUT, which is used to process the UNSAT-H output. Operation of the code requires three separate steps. First, the problem to be simulated must be conceptualized in terms of boundary conditions, available data, and soil properties. Next, the data must be correctly formatted for input. Finally, the unput data must be processed, UNSAT-H run, and the output data processed for analysis. This report includes three examples of code use. In the first example, a benchmark test case is run in which the results of UNSAT-H simulations of infiltration are compared with an analytical solution and a numerical solution. The comparisons show excellent agreement for the specific test case, and this agreement provides vertification of the infiltration portion of the UNSAT-H code. The other two examples of code use are a simulation of a layered soil and one of plant transpiration.

  12. Development of an Unstructured Mesh Code for Flows About Complete Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Gupta, K. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, under NASA Research Grant NAG4-157. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of flow simulations about complete vehicle configurations. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms, flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. The FELISA system is also a component of the STARS aeroservoelastic system developed at NASA Dryden. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. We show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although this initial results were encouraging it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. In this grant we set out to investigate some novel methodologies that could lead to the

  13. Coded illumination for motion-blur free imaging of cells on cell-phone based imaging flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Manish; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2014-10-01

    Cell-phone based imaging flow cytometry can be realized by flowing cells through the microfluidic devices, and capturing their images with an optically enhanced camera of the cell-phone. Throughput in flow cytometers is usually enhanced by increasing the flow rate of cells. However, maximum frame rate of camera system limits the achievable flow rate. Beyond this, the images become highly blurred due to motion-smear. We propose to address this issue with coded illumination, which enables recovery of high-fidelity images of cells far beyond their motion-blur limit. This paper presents simulation results of deblurring the synthetically generated cell/bead images under such coded illumination.

  14. An implicit finite-difference code for a two-equation turbulence model for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.

    1985-01-01

    An implicit finite difference code was developed which solves the transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate in generalized coordinates in three dimensions. The finite difference equations are solved using the Beam-Warming algorithm. The kinetic energy-dissipation code, KEM, provides the closure; i.e., the turbulent viscosity for calculation of either compressible or incompressible flows. Turbulent internal flow over a backward-facing step has been calculated using the present code in conjunction with the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Code, INS3D. The results are in good agreement with experiments and two dimensional computations of other researchers.

  15. Relative efficiency and accuracy of two Navier-Stokes codes for simulating attached transonic flow over wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Wornom, Stephen F.

    1991-01-01

    Two codes which solve the 3-D Thin Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations are used to compute the steady state flow for two test cases representing typical finite wings at transonic conditions. Several grids of C-O topology and varying point densities are used to determine the effects of grid refinement. After a description of each code and test case, standards for determining code efficiency and accuracy are defined and applied to determine the relative performance of the two codes in predicting turbulent transonic wing flows. Comparisons of computed surface pressure distributions with experimental data are made.

  16. Relative efficiency and accuracy of two Navier-Stokes codes for simulating attached transonic flow over wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Wornom, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, two codes which solve the three-dimensional Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations are used to compute the steady-state flow for two test cases representing typical finite wings at transonic conditions. Several grids of C-O topology and varying point densities are used. After a description of each code and test case, standards for determining code efficiency and accuracy are defined and applied to determine the relative performance of the two codes in predicting turbulent transonic wing flows. Comparisons of computed surface pressure distributions with experimental data are made.

  17. Code System to Calculate Three-Dimensional Extension Two-Phase Flow Dynamics.

    1999-04-28

    Version 00 This package consists of two programs K-FIX(3D) and K-FIX(3D, FLX) which extend the transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid program K-FIX to perform three-dimensional calculations. The transient dynamics of three-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. The application is to flow in the annulus between two cylinders where the inner cylinder moves periodically perpendicular to its axis. K-FIX(3D)more » is easily adaptable to a variety of two phase flow problems while K-FIX (3D,FLX) combines KFIX(3D), the three-dimensional version of the KFIX code, with the three-dimensional, elastic shell code FLX for application to a very specific class of problems. KFIX(3D,FLX) was developed specifically to calculate the coupled fluid-structure dynamics of a light water reactor core support barrel under accident conditions. Motion may be induced by blowdown, prescribed displacement, or seismic action. This package was released by NESC in 1982 then transferred to ESTSC and then to RSICC in January 1999. Files were not retrievable from the media, but the NEA Data Bank in France graciously submitted their package which was obtained from NESC. Hence, the files in this package are from the NEADB NESC-0877/01 package.« less

  18. A depth-averaged, two-phase flow code for hazard mapping that satisfies both hydraulic and granular flow extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoba, G. A.; Sheridan, M. F.; Pitman, B.

    2009-12-01

    Ground-hugging particle-laden flows constitute some of the most dangerous natural phenomena on Earth. Such currents, in the form of snow avalanches, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, lahars, and landslides, are among the most destructive processes in nature. Humans tend to settle in areas near rich soils, volcanoes, or watercourses, all of which could be strongly affected by these dangerous flows. In order to improve risk preparedness and site management in potentially affected zones, an appropriate knowledge of these natural hazardous phenomena is required. Their evolution in time, flow dynamics and run out distance are key aspects that help in the planning for hazardous events, development of hazardous regions and design of management policy to prepare in advance of potential natural disasters. This paper describes a depth-averaged model for two-phase flow that is currently under development at the University at Buffalo. It is being implemented within the TITAN2D framework that presently simulates dry geophysical mass flows over natural-scale terrains. The initial TITAN2D code was created to simulate granular flow. But because the presence of an interstitial fluid strongly modifies the dynamics of the flow, a new, more general, two-phase model is needed to account for the broad range in volume fraction of solids that occurs in nature. The mathematical model depth-integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for each phase, solid and fluid. The solid phase is modeled assuming a Coulomb constitutive behavior at the theoretical limit of pure solids. In contrast, the fluid phase conforms to a typical hydraulic approach at the limit of pure fluid and uses the Darcy-Weisbach approach to account for bed friction. The linkage for compositions between the pure end-member single phases is accommodated by the inclusion of a phenomenological-based drag coefficient. The model is capable of simulating the whole range of particle volumetric fractions, from pure fluid flows to pure

  19. Evaluation of turbulence models in the PARC code for transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, N. J.; Drummond, J. E.; Leonard, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    Flows through a transonic diffuser were investigated with the PARC code using five turbulence models to determine the effects of turbulence model selection on flow prediction. Three of the turbulence models were algebraic models: Thomas (the standard algebraic turbulence model in PARC), Baldwin-Lomax, and Modified Mixing Length-Thomas (MMLT). The other two models were the low Reynolds number k-epsilon models of Chien and Speziale. Three diffuser flows, referred to as the no-shock, weak-shock, and strong-shock cases, were calculated with each model to conduct the evaluation. Pressure distributions, velocity profiles, locations of shocks, and maximum Mach numbers in the duct were the flow quantities compared. Overall, the Chien k-epsilon model was the most accurate of the five models when considering results obtained for all three cases. However, the MMLT model provided solutions as accurate as the Chien model for the no-shock and the weak-shock cases, at a substantially lower computational cost (measured in CPU time required to obtain converged solutions). The strong shock flow, which included a region of shock-induced flow separation, was only predicted well by the two k-epsilon models.

  20. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  1. Meanline Analysis of Turbines with Choked Flow in the Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of turbomachinery performance characteristics is an important part of the conceptual aircraft engine design process. During this phase, the designer must examine the effects of a large number of turbomachinery design parameters to determine their impact on overall engine performance and weight. The lack of detailed design information available in this phase necessitates the use of simpler meanline and streamline methods to determine the turbomachinery geometry characteristics and provide performance estimates prior to more detailed CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analyses. While a number of analysis codes have been developed for this purpose, most are written in outdated software languages and may be difficult or impossible to apply to new, unconventional designs. The Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is currently being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a flexible meanline and streamline analysis capability in a modern object-oriented language. During the development and validation of OTAC, a limitation was identified in the code's ability to analyze and converge turbines as the flow approached choking. This paper describes a series of changes which can be made to typical OTAC turbine meanline models to enable the assessment of choked flow up to limit load conditions. Results produced with this revised model setup are provided in the form of turbine performance maps and are compared to published maps.

  2. National Combustion Code: Parallel Implementation and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quealy, A.; Ryder, R.; Norris, A.; Liu, N.-S.

    2000-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) is being developed by an industry-government team for the design and analysis of combustion systems. CORSAIR-CCD is the current baseline reacting flow solver for NCC. This is a parallel, unstructured grid code which uses a distributed memory, message passing model for its parallel implementation. The focus of the present effort has been to improve the performance of the NCC flow solver to meet combustor designer requirements for model accuracy and analysis turnaround time. Improving the performance of this code contributes significantly to the overall reduction in time and cost of the combustor design cycle. This paper describes the parallel implementation of the NCC flow solver and summarizes its current parallel performance on an SGI Origin 2000. Earlier parallel performance results on an IBM SP-2 are also included. The performance improvements which have enabled a turnaround of less than 15 hours for a 1.3 million element fully reacting combustion simulation are described.

  3. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  4. National Combustion Code Parallel Performance Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quealy, Angela; Benyo, Theresa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) is being developed by an industry-government team for the design and analysis of combustion systems. The unstructured grid, reacting flow code uses a distributed memory, message passing model for its parallel implementation. The focus of the present effort has been to improve the performance of the NCC code to meet combustor designer requirements for model accuracy and analysis turnaround time. Improving the performance of this code contributes significantly to the overall reduction in time and cost of the combustor design cycle. This report describes recent parallel processing modifications to NCC that have improved the parallel scalability of the code, enabling a two hour turnaround for a 1.3 million element fully reacting combustion simulation on an SGI Origin 2000.

  5. Maximum mixing times of methane and air under non-reacting and reacting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brasoveanu, D.; Gupta, A.K.

    1998-07-01

    Mixing times between methane and air under non-reacting or reacting conditions in the presence of rates of temperature and pressure and velocity gradients are examined using a mixing model based on the ideal gas law and the equation of continuity. The model is valid for low pressure combustors under non-reacting conditions. The model is also valid under reacting conditions for the fresh mixture which contains only trace amounts of combustion products. The effects of initial pressure, temperature and fluid composition on mixing time are also analyzed. In general, the exact mixing time has to be determined numerically. Nevertheless maximum values of mixing times can be determined analytically for a broad range of operational conditions. Results show that under both reacting and non-reacting conditions, the maximum mixing time is directly proportional to the initial pressure and temperature of mixture and inversely proportional to rates of pressure and temperature, and to velocity divergence. Mixing through fuel dispersion into the surrounding air is shown to be faster than via air penetration into the fuel flow. Rates of pressure of less than 1 atm/s acting along provide a mixing time in excess of one second which is unacceptably long for many applications, in particular gas turbine combustion. Rates of temperature produced by flame may provide mixing times shorter than 0.1 s. Mixing times of the order of a few milliseconds for efficient combustion and low emission, require high velocity gradients at the fuel-air boundary. Results show that enhanced mixing is achieved by combining temperature and velocity gradients. This analysis of mixing time is intended to provide important design guidelines for the development of high intensity, high efficiency and low emission combustors.

  6. TOPP: A post-processor for TOPAZ, the one dimensional pipe flow analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.W.

    1987-07-01

    TOPP is a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) post-processor for producing graphical results from the one dimensional pipe flow analysis code, TOPAZ. TOPAZ was written by W. S. Winters of Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore (SNLL) and is available on the CRAY computers at LLNL. The SNLL version of TOPAZ produces a very limited set of variables that can be used as input to a post-processor. The version at LLNL has been modified to output every time-dependent variable to an absolute binary file at the user specified minor edit frequency. TOPP reads this absolute binary file and produces a variety of graphical results. 2 refs.

  7. Nonequilibrium, Drift-Flux Code System for Two-Phase Flow Network Analysis

    2000-08-01

    Version: 00 SOLA-LOOP is designed for the solution of transient two-phase flow in networks composed of one-dimensional components. The fluid dynamics is described by a nonequilibrium, drift-flux formulation of the fluid conservation laws. Although developed for nuclear reactor safety analysis, SOLA-LOOP may be used as the basis for other types of special-purpose network codes. The program can accommodate almost any set of constitutive relations, property tables, or other special features required for different applications.

  8. An improved supersonic, three-dimensional, external, inviscid flow field code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Koch, F.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow fields about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. This report deals only with modifications to these procedures in four specific areas: inlet mass ingestion, subsonic axial Mach number, improved conformal mappings, and vehicles flying at yaw. In each area both the modifications to the computational procedures and computer code are discussed.

  9. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  10. The implementation of an aeronautical CFD flow code onto distributed memory parallel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ierotheou, C. S.; Forsey, C. R.; Leatham, M.

    2000-04-01

    The parallelization of an industrially important in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for calculating the airflow over complex aircraft configurations using the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The code discussed is the flow solver module of the SAUNA CFD suite. This suite uses a novel grid system that may include block-structured hexahedral or pyramidal grids, unstructured tetrahedral grids or a hybrid combination of both. To assist in the rapid convergence to a solution, a number of convergence acceleration techniques are employed including implicit residual smoothing and a multigrid full approximation storage scheme (FAS). Key features of the parallelization approach are the use of domain decomposition and encapsulated message passing to enable the execution in parallel using a single programme multiple data (SPMD) paradigm. In the case where a hybrid grid is used, a unified grid partitioning scheme is employed to define the decomposition of the mesh. The parallel code has been tested using both structured and hybrid grids on a number of different distributed memory parallel systems and is now routinely used to perform industrial scale aeronautical simulations. Copyright

  11. Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Code for Supersonic Axisymmetric Base Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently calculate the flow structure in the base region of bodies of revolution in supersonic flight is a significant step in CFD code validation for applications ranging from base heating for rockets to drag for protectives. The FDNS code is used to compute such a flow and the results are compared to benchmark quality experimental data. Flowfield calculations are presented for a cylindrical afterbody at M = 2.46 and angle of attack a = O. Grid independent solutions are compared to mean velocity profiles in the separated wake area and downstream of the reattachment point. Additionally, quantities such as turbulent kinetic energy and shear layer growth rates are compared to the data. Finally, the computed base pressures are compared to the measured values. An effort is made to elucidate the role of turbulence models in the flowfield predictions. The level of turbulent eddy viscosity, and its origin, are used to contrast the various turbulence models and compare the results to the experimental data.

  12. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in the simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.

  13. Assessment of a hybrid finite element and finite volume code for turbulent incompressible flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Yidong; Wang, Chuanjin; Luo, Hong; Christon, Mark; Bakosi, Jozsef

    2015-12-15

    Hydra-TH is a hybrid finite-element/finite-volume incompressible/low-Mach flow simulation code based on the Hydra multiphysics toolkit being developed and used for thermal-hydraulics applications. In the present work, a suite of verification and validation (V&V) test problems for Hydra-TH was defined to meet the design requirements of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The intent for this test problem suite is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the Hydra-TH solution methods. The simulation problems vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. A set of RANS and LES turbulence models were used in themore » simulation of four classical test problems. Numerical results obtained by Hydra-TH agreed well with either the available analytical solution or experimental data, indicating the verified and validated implementation of these turbulence models in Hydra-TH. Where possible, we have attempted some form of solution verification to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and to suggest best practices when using the Hydra-TH code.« less

  14. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  15. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  16. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  17. Method of Verification of the Numerical Codes for Modeling of Flows in Gas Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    A simple semi-analytical solution is proposed for the verification of numerical codes for modeling of unsteady gas flows in strong centrifugal fields. The gas flow is driven by a source/sink of energy and by an external force (deceleration/acceleration of the gas rotation) acting on the gas at a given frequency. In the semi-analytical solution, the rotor is infinite, while the given forces vary harmonically with a given wave-length along the axial coordinate. As a result, the unsteady flow problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, which can be quickly solved to any prescribed accuracy. A similar unsteady problem is solved numerically with the rotor length equal to the wavelength of the external force along the axis of rotation. The periodicity of the solution is prescribed at the end faces of the rotor. As an example, the semi-analytical solution is compared with the numerical ones obtained with different boundary conditions and mesh resolution in radial direction. The comparison confirms that the problem formulations are equivalent in both cases. The semi-analytical solution allows us to determine optimal mesh resolution and accuracy of the calculations.

  18. Mesh Dependency of Turbulent Reacting Large-Eddy Simulations of a Gas Turbine Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, Guillaume; Staffelbach, Gabriel; Gicquel, Laurent Y. M.; Poinsot, Thierry J.

    Convergence of reacting LES predictions for an aeronautical gas turbine combustion chamber is analysed in terms of mesh resolution. To do so three fully unstructured meshes containing respectively 1.2, 10.6 and 43.9 million tetrahedra are used to compute this fully turbulent reacting flow. Resolution criteria obtained from the mean velocity and reacting fields depict different convergence behaviors. Reacting fields and more specifically combustion regimes are seen to be slightly grid dependent while maintaining mean global combustion quantities.

  19. Code and Solution Verification of 3D Numerical Modeling of Flow in the Gust Erosion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion microcosms are devices commonly used to investigate the erosion and transport characteristics of sediments at the bed of rivers, lakes, or estuaries. In order to understand the results these devices provide, the bed shear stress and flow field need to be accurately described. In this research, the UMCES Gust Erosion Microcosm System (U-GEMS) is numerically modeled using Finite Volume Method. The primary aims are to simulate the bed shear stress distribution at the surface of the sediment core/bottom of the microcosm, and to validate the U-GEMS produces uniform bed shear stress at the bottom of the microcosm. The mathematical model equations are solved by on a Cartesian non-uniform grid. Multiple numerical runs were developed with different input conditions and configurations. Prior to developing the U-GEMS model, the General Moving Objects (GMO) model and different momentum algorithms in the code were verified. Code verification of these solvers was done via simulating the flow inside the top wall driven square cavity on different mesh sizes to obtain order of convergence. The GMO model was used to simulate the top wall in the top wall driven square cavity as well as the rotating disk in the U-GEMS. Components simulated with the GMO model were rigid bodies that could have any type of motion. In addition cross-verification was conducted as results were compared with numerical results by Ghia et al. (1982), and good agreement was found. Next, CFD results were validated by simulating the flow within the conventional microcosm system without suction and injection. Good agreement was found when the experimental results by Khalili et al. (2008) were compared. After the ability of the CFD solver was proved through the above code verification steps. The model was utilized to simulate the U-GEMS. The solution was verified via classic mesh convergence study on four consecutive mesh sizes, in addition to that Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was calculated and based on

  20. A 3D-CFD code for accurate prediction of fluid flows and fluid forces in seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Current and future turbomachinery requires advanced seal configurations to control leakage, inhibit mixing of incompatible fluids and to control the rotodynamic response. In recognition of a deficiency in the existing predictive methodology for seals, a seven year effort was established in 1990 by NASA's Office of Aeronautics Exploration and Technology, under the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion program, to develop validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts, codes and analyses for seals. The effort will provide NASA and the U.S. Aerospace Industry with advanced CFD scientific codes and industrial codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals. An advanced 3D CFD cylindrical seal code has been developed, incorporating state-of-the-art computational methodology for flow analysis in straight, tapered and stepped seals. Relevant computational features of the code include: stationary/rotating coordinates, cylindrical and general Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC) systems, high order differencing schemes, colocated variable arrangement, advanced turbulence models, incompressible/compressible flows, and moving grids. This paper presents the current status of code development, code demonstration for predicting rotordynamic coefficients, numerical parametric study of entrance loss coefficients for generic annular seals, and plans for code extensions to labyrinth, damping, and other seal configurations.

  1. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  2. An assessment of the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral grid, Euler Flow Solver Code FELISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Erickson, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution-adaptive Euler flow solver for unstructured tetrahedral meshes is assessed, and the accuracy and efficiency of the method for predicting sonic boom pressure signatures about simple generic models are demonstrated. Comparison of computational and wind tunnel data and enhancement of numerical solutions by means of grid adaptivity are discussed. The mesh generation is based on the advancing front technique. The FELISA code consists of two solvers, the Taylor-Galerkin and the Runge-Kutta-Galerkin schemes, both of which are spacially discretized by the usual Galerkin weighted residual finite-element methods but with different explicit time-marching schemes to steady state. The solution-adaptive grid procedure is based on either remeshing or mesh refinement techniques. An alternative geometry adaptive procedure is also incorporated.

  3. Laser-based volumetric flow visualization by digital color imaging of a spectrally coded volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, T. J.; Spence, D. J.; Coutts, D. W.

    2008-01-01

    We present the framework for volumetric laser-based flow visualization instrumentation using a spectrally coded volume to achieve three-component three-dimensional particle velocimetry. By delivering light from a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with an optical fiber, we exploit stimulated Raman scattering within the fiber to generate a continuum spanning the visible spectrum from 500to850nm. We shape and disperse the continuum light to illuminate a measurement volume of 20×10×4mm3, in which light sheets of differing spectral properties overlap to form an unambiguous color variation along the depth direction. Using a digital color camera we obtain images of particle fields in this volume. We extract the full spatial distribution of particles with depth inferred from particle color. This paper provides a proof of principle of this instrument, examining the spatial distribution of a static field and a spray field of water droplets ejected by the nozzle of an airbrush.

  4. Laser-based volumetric flow visualization by digital color imaging of a spectrally coded volume.

    PubMed

    McGregor, T J; Spence, D J; Coutts, D W

    2008-01-01

    We present the framework for volumetric laser-based flow visualization instrumentation using a spectrally coded volume to achieve three-component three-dimensional particle velocimetry. By delivering light from a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with an optical fiber, we exploit stimulated Raman scattering within the fiber to generate a continuum spanning the visible spectrum from 500 to 850 nm. We shape and disperse the continuum light to illuminate a measurement volume of 20 x 10 x 4 mm(3), in which light sheets of differing spectral properties overlap to form an unambiguous color variation along the depth direction. Using a digital color camera we obtain images of particle fields in this volume. We extract the full spatial distribution of particles with depth inferred from particle color. This paper provides a proof of principle of this instrument, examining the spatial distribution of a static field and a spray field of water droplets ejected by the nozzle of an airbrush.

  5. Octopaminergic Modulation of Temporal Frequency Coding in an Identified Optic Flow-Processing Interneuron

    PubMed Central

    Longden, Kit D.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2010-01-01

    Flying generates predictably different patterns of optic flow compared with other locomotor states. A sensorimotor system tuned to rapid responses and a high bandwidth of optic flow would help the animal to avoid wasting energy through imprecise motor action. However, neural processing that covers a higher input bandwidth itself comes at higher energetic costs which would be a poor investment when the animal was not flying. How does the blowfly adjust the dynamic range of its optic flow-processing neurons to the locomotor state? Octopamine (OA) is a biogenic amine central to the initiation and maintenance of flight in insects. We used an OA agonist chlordimeform (CDM) to simulate the widespread OA release during flight and recorded the effects on the temporal frequency coding of the H2 cell. This cell is a visual interneuron known to be involved in flight stabilization reflexes. The application of CDM resulted in (i) an increase in the cell's spontaneous activity, expanding the inhibitory signaling range (ii) an initial response gain to moving gratings (20–60 ms post-stimulus) that depended on the temporal frequency of the grating and (iii) a reduction in the rate and magnitude of motion adaptation that was also temporal frequency-dependent. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that the application of a neuromodulator can induce velocity-dependent alterations in the gain of a wide-field optic flow-processing neuron. The observed changes in the cell's response properties resulted in a 33% increase of the cell's information rate when encoding random changes in temporal frequency of the stimulus. The increased signaling range and more rapid, longer lasting responses employed more spikes to encode each bit, and so consumed a greater amount of energy. It appears that for the fly investing more energy in sensory processing during flight is more efficient than wasting energy on under-performing motor control. PMID:21152339

  6. GCKP84-general chemical kinetics code for gas-phase flow and batch processes including heat transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics code is described for complex, homogeneous ideal gas reactions in any chemical system. The main features of the GCKP84 code are flexibility, convenience, and speed of computation for many different reaction conditions. The code, which replaces the GCKP code published previously, solves numerically the differential equations for complex reaction in a batch system or one dimensional inviscid flow. It also solves numerically the nonlinear algebraic equations describing the well stirred reactor. A new state of the art numerical integration method is used for greatly increased speed in handling systems of stiff differential equations. The theory and the computer program, including details of input preparation and a guide to using the code are given.

  7. Verification of software codes for simulation of unsteady flows in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. A.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.; Yupatov, S. V.

    2013-06-01

    A simple semi-analytical solution is proposed for the problem of an unsteady gas flow in a gas centrifuge. The circulation in the centrifuge is driven by a source/sink of energy and by an external force (deceleration/acceleration of the gas rotation) acting on the gas at a given frequency. In the semi-analytical solution, the rotor is infinite, while the given forces vary harmonically with a given wave-length along the axial coordinate. As a result, the unsteady flow problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, which can be quickly solved to any prescribed accuracy. This problem is proposed for verifying numerical codes designed for the simulation of unsteady processes in gas centrifuges. A similar unsteady problem is solved numerically, in which case the cylinder is finite with the rotor length equal to the wavelength of the external force along the axis of rotation. The periodicity of the solution is set at end faces of the cylinder. As an example, the semi-analytical solution is compared with the numerical one obtained with these boundary conditions. The comparison confirms that the problem formulations are equivalent in both cases.

  8. Computation of three-dimensional nozzle-exhaust flow fields with the GIM code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.; Anderson, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology is introduced for constructing numerical analogs of the partial differential equations of continuum mechanics. A general formulation is provided which permits classical finite element and many of the finite difference methods to be derived directly. The approach, termed the General Interpolants Method (GIM), can combined the best features of finite element and finite difference methods. A quasi-variational procedure is used to formulate the element equations, to introduce boundary conditions into the method and to provide a natural assembly sequence. A derivation is given in terms of general interpolation functions from this procedure. Example computations for transonic and supersonic flows in two and three dimensions are given to illustrate the utility of GIM. A three-dimensional nozzle-exhaust flow field is solved including interaction with the freestream and a coupled treatment of the shear layer. Potential applications of the GIM code to a variety of computational fluid dynamics problems is then discussed in terms of existing capability or by extension of the methodology.

  9. Predicting radiative heat transfer in thermochemical nonequilibrium flow fields. Theory and user's manual for the LORAN code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin Hartung

    1994-01-01

    The theory for radiation emission, absorption, and transfer in a thermochemical nonequilibrium flow is presented. The expressions developed reduce correctly to the limit at equilibrium. To implement the theory in a practical computer code, some approximations are used, particularly the smearing of molecular radiation. Details of these approximations are presented and helpful information is included concerning the use of the computer code. This user's manual should benefit both occasional users of the Langley Optimized Radiative Nonequilibrium (LORAN) code and those who wish to use it to experiment with improved models or properties.

  10. TVENT1P user's manual, a computer code for analyzing tornado-induced gas-dynamic transients in flow networks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1984-09-01

    TVENT1P is a revised version of the TVENT computer code, which was designed to predict the flows and pressures in a ventilation system subjected to a tornado. TVENT1P is essentially the same code, but we have added a material transport algorithm and features for turning blowers off and on, changing blower speeds, and changing the resistance of dampers and filters. These features make it possible to depict a sequence of events during a single run. Other features have been added to make the code more versatile. Example problems are included to demonstrate applications for TVENT1P.

  11. A computer code for multiphase all-speed transient flows in complex geometries. MAST version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Jiang, Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of the MAST code, which computes transient solutions to the multiphase flow equations applicable to all-speed flows, is described. Two-phase flows are formulated based on the Eulerian-Lagrange scheme in which the continuous phase is described by the Navier-Stokes equation (or Reynolds equations for turbulent flows). Dispersed phase is formulated by a Lagrangian tracking scheme. The numerical solution algorithms utilized for fluid flows is a newly developed pressure-implicit algorithm based on the operator-splitting technique in generalized nonorthogonal coordinates. This operator split allows separate operation on each of the variable fields to handle pressure-velocity coupling. The obtained pressure correction equation has the hyperbolic nature and is effective for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic flow regimes. The present code adopts a nonstaggered grid arrangement; thus, the velocity components and other dependent variables are collocated at the same grid. A sequence of benchmark-quality problems, including incompressible, subsonic, transonic, supersonic, gas-droplet two-phase flows, as well as spray-combustion problems, were performed to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the present code.

  12. The November 2002 Pyroclastic Flows at El Reventador, Ecuador: Computer Simulations Using the TITAN Thin-layer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, B.; Sheridan, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    On November 3, 2002, El Reventador volcano, located on the eastern flank of the Ecuadorian Andes, produced a sudden, violent eruption culminating in a 17km high column containing mostly steam and ash. Explosions in the initial phase created a summit crater while generating four lithic-rich andesitic pyroclastic flows. The longest of these flows traveled ESE out of the breached caldera, obliquely overriding the 200-400m southern caldera wall, reaching the Quijos River 8km distant. This flow crossed the major oil pipelines of Ecuador, displacing a pressurized crude oil pipeline more than 100m. The flows contained mostly lithic fragments with only minor juvenile pumice. The accompanying ash-cloud surge deposited a thin layer on top of the PF deposit, indicating an abundance of gas within the flow. The eruption came with practically no warning and yet had a large socio- economic impact for Ecuador. While the flows themselves resulted in no loss of life, the lack of significant precursor activity underscores the necessity for detailed pre-eruption knowledge of the potential hazards and risk zones around a particular volcano so as to be prepared in the event of such "surprise" eruptions. In conjunction with field mapping, computer models of volcanogenic flows can be used not only to identify risk zones but to understand the evolution of these flows. A new set of computer simulations using the TITAN (www.gmfg.buffalo.edu) thin-layer code allows a more complete exploration of important flow properties associated with this type of eruption. Realizations of this code simulate the path, extent, flow thickness, velocity, and momentum of the flows given the set of initial conditions (volume, starting location, flux hydrograph, internal friction, and basal friction). The TITAN code was used to simulate the four lithic-rich pyroclastic flows generated at the beginning of the 2002 eruption. Using field estimated volumes and starting positions of the PFs, simulations of the two

  13. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction.

  14. Gas and drop behavior in reacting and non-reacting air-blast atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of the two-phase flow produced by a gas-turbine air-blast atomizer is performed with the goal of identifying the interaction between the two phases for both nonreacting and reacting conditions. A two-component phase Doppler interferometry is utilized to characterize three flowfields produced by the atomizer: (1) the single-phase flow, (2) the two-phase nonreacting spray, and (3) the two-phase reacting spray. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating axial and azimuthal velocities for each phase are obtained. In addition, the droplet size distribution, volume flux, and concentration are measured. The results reveal the strong influence of the dispersed phase on the gas, and the influence of reaction on both the gas and the droplet field. The presence of the spray significantly alters the inlet condition of the atomizer. With this alteration quantified, it is possible to deduce that the inertia associated with the dispersed phase damps the fluctuating velocities of the gas. Reaction reduces the volume flux of the droplets, broadens the local volume distribution of the droplets in the region of the reaction zone, increases the axial velocities and radial spread of the gas, and increases the anisotropy in the region of the reaction zone.

  15. SIMULATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL FLOW WITH CONSTRAINED TRANSPORT AND ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: ALGORITHMS AND TESTS OF THE AstroBEAR CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-06-15

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh-refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high-resolution shock-capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite-volume sense. Divergence-free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of magnetic field topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across collocated grids of different resolutions. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  16. Computer code for analysing three-dimensional viscous flows in impeller passages and other duct geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatchell, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A code, CATHY3/M, was prepared and demonstrated by application to a sample case. The preparation is reviewed, a summary of the capabilities and main features of the code is given, and the sample case results are discussed. Recommendations for future use and development of the code are provided.

  17. An efficient code for the simulation of nonhydrostatic stratified flow over obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pihos, G. G.; Wurtele, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    The physical model and computational procedure of the code is described in detail. The code is validated in tests against a variety of known analytical solutions from the literature and is also compared against actual mountain wave observations. The code will receive as initial input either mathematically idealized or discrete observational data. The form of the obstacle or mountain is arbitrary.

  18. Use of a Viscous Flow Simulation Code for Static Aeroelastic Analysis of a Wing at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a static aeroelastic analysis of a wind tunnel test model of a wing in high-lift configuration using a viscous flow simulation code. The model wing was tailored to deform during the tests by amounts similar to a composite airliner wing in highlift conditions. This required use of a viscous flow analysis to predict the lift coefficient of the deformed wing accurately. We thus utilized an existing static aeroelastic analysis framework that involves an inviscid flow code (Cart3d) to predict the deformed shape of the wing, then utilized a viscous flow code (Overflow) to compute the aerodynamic loads on the deformed wing. This way, we reduced the cost of flow simulations needed for this analysis while still being able to predict the aerodynamic forces with reasonable accuracy. Our results suggest that the lift of the deformed wing may be higher or lower than that of the non-deformed wing, and the washout deformation of the wing is the key factor that changes the lift of the deformed wing in two distinct ways: while it decreases the lift at low to moderate angles of attack simply by lowering local angles of attack along the span, it increases the lift at high angles of attack by alleviating separation.

  19. User's guide for the computer code COLTS for calculating the coupled laminar and turbulent flow over a Jovian entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graeves, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide for a computer code 'COLTS' (Coupled Laminar and Turbulent Solutions) is provided which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows with radiation and coupled ablation injection past a Jovian entry probe. Time-dependent viscous-shock-layer equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time-asymptotic finite-difference method. Eddy viscosity in the turbulent flow is approximated by a two-layer model. In all, 19 chemical species are used to describe the injection of carbon-phenolic ablator in the hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The equilibrium composition of the mixture is determined by a free-energy minimization technique. A detailed frequency dependence of the absorption coefficient for various species is considered to obtain the radiative flux. The code is written for a CDC-CYBER-203 computer and is capable of providing solutions for ablated probe shapes also.

  20. Performance of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code on CYBER 205 for high-speed juncture flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmanan, B.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A vectorized 3D Navier-Stokes code has been implemented on CYBER 205 for solving the supersonic laminar flow over a swept fin/flat plate junction. The code extends MacCormack's predictor-corrector finite volume scheme to a generalized coordinate system in a locally one dimensional time split fashion. A systematic parametric study is conducted to examine the effect of fin sweep on the computed flow field. Calculated results for the pressure distribution on the flat plate and fin leading edge are compared with the experimental measurements of a right angle blunt fin/flat plate junction. The decrease in the extent of the separated flow region and peak pressure on the fin leading edge, and weakening of the two reversed supersonic zones with increase in fin sweep have been clearly observed in the numerical simulation.

  1. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  2. NUCLEAR FISSION CHAIN REACTING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.; Brown, H.S.

    1961-06-27

    The patent describes a reactor consisting of a plurality of tubes passing through a body of heavy water or graphite, a heat exchanger, means for flowing UF/sub 6/ through the tubes and the heat exchangar, and means for bleeding off some of the UF/sub 6/ and separating plutonium therefrom. A specific suggestion contained is that the amount of the UF/sub 6/ outside the reaction unit be a multiple of that within it.

  3. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  4. Development and application of the GIM code for the Cyber 203 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainaker, J. F.; Robinson, M. A.; Rawlinson, E. G.; Anderson, P. G.; Mayne, A. W.; Spradley, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The GIM computer code for fluid dynamics research was developed. Enhancement of the computer code, implicit algorithm development, turbulence model implementation, chemistry model development, interactive input module coding and wing/body flowfield computation are described. The GIM quasi-parabolic code development was completed, and the code used to compute a number of example cases. Turbulence models, algebraic and differential equations, were added to the basic viscous code. An equilibrium reacting chemistry model and implicit finite difference scheme were also added. Development was completed on the interactive module for generating the input data for GIM. Solutions for inviscid hypersonic flow over a wing/body configuration are also presented.

  5. Investigation into the flow field around a maneuvering submarine using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Bong

    The accurate and efficient prediction of hydrodynamic forces and moments on a maneuvering submarine has been achieved by investigating the flow physics involving the interaction of the vortical flow shed from the sail and the cross-flow boundary layer of the hull. In this investigation, a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computer code is used to simulate the most important physical effects related to maneuvering. It is applied to a generic axisymmetric body with the relatively simple case of the flow around an unappended hull at an angle of attack. After the code is validated for this simple case, it is validated for the case of a submarine with various appendages attached to the hull moving at an angle of drift. All six components of predicted forces and moments for various drift angles are compared with experimental data. Calculated pressure coefficients along the azimuthal angle are compared with experimental data and discussed to show the effect of the sail and the stern appendages. To understand the main flow features for a submarine in a straight flight, the RANS code is applied to simulate SUBOFF axisymmetric body at zero angle of attack in a straight-line basin. Pressure coefficient, skin friction coefficient, mean velocity components and the Reynolds shear stresses are compared with experimental data and discussed. The physical aspects of the interaction between the vortical flow shed by the sail and the cross-flow boundary layer on the hull are explained in greater detail. The understanding of this interaction is very important to characterize accurately the hydrodynamic behavior of a maneuvering submarine.

  6. TOPAZ: The transient one-dimensional pipe flow analyzer: An update on code improvements and increased capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1987-09-01

    TOPAZ is a ''user-friendly'' computer code for modeling the one-dimensional, transient physics of multi-species gas transfer in arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, vessels, and flow branches. This report, the fourth in a series of reports documenting TOPAZ, discusses coding improvements and the addition of new capabilities. These improvements make the current version of TOPAZ considerably more versatile than the original version which was distributed last year. For example, the new version does not restrict the user to modeling only hydrogen and helium isotope flows. Users now have the capability of modeling arbitrary gas mixture flows. In addition users may define time-dependent functions for mass generation, energy deposition, flow area, and maximum integration time step. Parallel flow paths and flows through channels having noncircular cross-sections may now be simulated. Improvements in TOPAZ mesh generation have been made which permit users to add additional ''plumbing'' to existing models without renumbering the mesh. 7 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Benchmark Data for Evaluation of Aeroacoustic Propagation Codes With Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2005-01-01

    Increased understanding of the effects of acoustic treatment on the propagation of sound through commercial aircraft engine nacelles is a requirement for more efficient liner design. To this end, one of NASA s goals is to further the development of duct propagation and impedance reduction codes. A number of these codes have been developed over the last three decades. These codes are typically divided into two categories: (1) codes that use the measured complex acoustic pressure field to reduce the acoustic impedance of treatment that is positioned along the wall of the duct, and (2) codes that use the acoustic impedance of the treatment as input and compute the sound field throughout the duct. Clearly, the value of these codes is dependent upon the quality of the data used for their validation. Over the past two decades, data acquired in the NASA Langley Research Center Grazing Incidence Tube have been used by a number of researchers for comparison with their propagation codes. Many of these comparisons have been based upon Grazing Incidence Tube tests that were conducted to study specific liner technology components, and were incomplete for general propagation code validation. Thus, the objective of the current investigation is to provide a quality data set that can be used as a benchmark for evaluation of duct propagation and impedance reduction codes. In order to achieve this objective, two parallel efforts have been undertaken. The first of these is the development of an enhanced impedance eduction code that uses data acquired in the Grazing Incidence Tube. This enhancement is intended to place the benchmark data on as firm a foundation as possible. The second key effort is the acquisition of a comprehensive set of data selected to allow propagation code evaluations over a range of test conditions.

  8. DCM3D: A dual-continuum, three-dimensional, ground-water flow code for unsaturated, fractured, porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Updegraff, C.D. ); Lee, C.E. ); Gallegos, D.P. )

    1991-02-01

    This report constitutes the user's manual for DCM3D. DCM3D is a computer code for solving three-dimensional, ground-water flow problems in variably saturated, fractured porous media. The code is based on a dual-continuum model with porous media comprising one continuum and fractures comprising the other. The continua are connected by a transfer term that depends on the unsaturated permeability of the porous medium. An integrated finite-difference scheme is used to discretize the governing equations in space. The time-dependent term is allowed to remain continuous. The resulting set of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) is solved with a general ODE solver, LSODES. The code is capable of handling transient, spatially dependent source terms and boundary conditions. The boundary conditions can either prescribed head or prescribed flux. 24 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Documentation of a numerical code for the simulation of variable density ground-water flow in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuiper, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical code is documented for the simulation of variable density time dependent groundwater flow in three dimensions. The groundwater density, although variable with distance, is assumed to be constant in time. The Integrated Finite Difference grid elements in the code follow the geologic strata in the modeled area. If appropriate, the determination of hydraulic head in confining beds can be deleted to decrease computation time. The strongly implicit procedure (SIP), successive over-relaxation (SOR), and eight different preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) methods are used to solve the approximating equations. The use of the computer program that performs the calculations in the numerical code is emphasized. Detailed instructions are given for using the computer program, including input data formats. An example simulation and the Fortran listing of the program are included. (USGS)

  10. The COSIMA experiments and their verification, a data base for the validation of two phase flow computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Class, G.; Meyder, R.; Stratmanns, E.

    1985-12-01

    The large data base for validation and development of computer codes for two-phase flow, generated at the COSIMA facility, is reviewed. The aim of COSIMA is to simulate the hydraulic, thermal, and mechanical conditions in the subchannel and the cladding of fuel rods in pressurized water reactors during the blowout phase of a loss of coolant accident. In terms of fuel rod behavior, it is found that during blowout under realistic conditions only small strains are reached. For cladding rupture extremely high rod internal pressures are necessary. The behavior of fuel rod simulators and the effect of thermocouples attached to the cladding outer surface are clarified. Calculations performed with the codes RELAP and DRUFAN show satisfactory agreement with experiments. This can be improved by updating the phase separation models in the codes.

  11. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  12. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  13. SSDA code to apply data assimilation in soil water flow modeling: Documentation and user manual

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Data assimilation (DA) with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) corrects modeling results based on measured s...

  14. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-03-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  15. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  16. Development of a locally mass flux conservative computer code for calculating 3-D viscous flow in turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.

    1982-01-01

    The VANS successive approximation numerical method was extended to the computation of three dimensional, viscous, transonic flows in turbomachines. A cross-sectional computer code, which conserves mass flux at each point of the cross-sectional surface of computation was developed. In the VANS numerical method, the cross-sectional computation follows a blade-to-blade calculation. Numerical calculations were made for an axial annular turbine cascade and a transonic, centrifugal impeller with splitter vanes. The subsonic turbine cascade computation was generated in blade-to-blade surface to evaluate the accuracy of the blade-to-blade mode of marching. Calculated blade pressures at the hub, mid, and tip radii of the cascade agreed with corresponding measurements. The transonic impeller computation was conducted to test the newly developed locally mass flux conservative cross-sectional computer code. Both blade-to-blade and cross sectional modes of calculation were implemented for this problem. A triplet point shock structure was computed in the inducer region of the impeller. In addition, time-averaged shroud static pressures generally agreed with measured shroud pressures. It is concluded that the blade-to-blade computation produces a useful engineering flow field in regions of subsonic relative flow; and cross-sectional computation, with a locally mass flux conservative continuity equation, is required to compute the shock waves in regions of supersonic relative flow.

  17. Vorticity Dynamics in Single and Multiple Swirling Reacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Travis; Aguilar, Michael; Emerson, Benjamin; Noble, David; Lieuwen, Tim

    2015-11-01

    This presentation describes an analysis of the unsteady flow structures in two multinozzle swirling jet configurations. This work is motivated by the problem of combustion instabilities in premixed flames, a major concern in the development of modern low NOx combustors. The objective is to compare the unsteady flow structures in these two configurations for two separate geometries and determine how certain parameters, primarily distance between jets, influence the flow dynamics. The analysis aims to differentiate between the flow dynamics of single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. This study looks at how the vorticity in the shear layers of one reacting swirling jet can affect the dynamics of a nearby similar jet. The distance between the swirling jets is found to have an effect on the flow field in determining where swirling jets merge and on the dynamics upstream of the merging location. Graduate Student, School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

  18. Use of an Accurate DNS Particulate Flow Method to Supply and Validate Boundary Conditions for the MFIX Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Gang Feng

    2012-05-31

    The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of two-fluid models, where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of the two-fluid models in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. Typically, the gas or liquid fluid boundary condition at a solid wall is the so called no-slip condition, which has been widely accepted to be valid for single-phase fluid dynamics provided that the Knudsen number is low. However, the boundary condition for the solid phase is not well understood. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. Experimental or numerical simulation data are needed in order to determinate the slip boundary condition that is applicable to a two-fluid model. The goal of this project is to improve the performance and accuracy of the boundary conditions used in two-fluid models such as the MFIX code, which is frequently used in multiphase flow simulations. The specific objectives of the project are to use first principles embedded in a validated Direct Numerical Simulation particulate flow numerical program, which uses the Immersed Boundary method (DNS-IB) and the Direct Forcing scheme in order to establish, modify and validate needed energy and momentum boundary conditions for the MFIX code. To achieve these objectives, we have developed a highly efficient DNS code and conducted numerical simulations to investigate the particle-wall and particle-particle interactions in particulate flows. Most of our research findings have been reported in major conferences and archived journals, which are listed in Section 7 of this report. In this report, we will present a

  19. BIGFLOW: A numerical code for simulating flow in variably saturated, heterogeneous geologic media. Theory and user`s manaual, Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.; Bagtzoglou, A.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents BIGFLOW 1.1, a numerical code for simulating flow in variably saturated heterogeneous geologic media. It contains the underlying mathematical and numerical models, test problems, benchmarks, and applications of the BIGFLOW code. The BIGFLOW software package is composed of a simulation and an interactive data processing code (DATAFLOW). The simulation code solves linear and nonlinear porous media flow equations based on Darcy`s law, appropriately generalized to account for 3D, deterministic, or random heterogeneity. A modified Picard Scheme is used for linearizing unsaturated flow equations, and preconditioned iterative methods are used for solving the resulting matrix systems. The data processor (DATAFLOW) allows interactive data entry, manipulation, and analysis of 3D datasets. The report contains analyses of computational performance carried out using Cray-2 and Cray-Y/MP8 supercomputers. Benchmark tests include comparisons with other independently developed codes, such as PORFLOW and CMVSFS, and with analytical or semi-analytical solutions.

  20. Code System to Calculate Transient 2-Dimensional 2-Fluid Flow Dynamics.

    1999-07-19

    Version 00 The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange.

  1. Flow and transport simulations using T2CG1, a package of conjugate gradient solvers for the TOUGH2 family of codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1995-04-01

    This report discusses the details of modifications made to the TOUGH2 family of codes to complement its direct solver which significantly increases the size of problems solved by the TOUGH2 code. With this modification, the TOUGH2 system is being tested in multiphase, multicomponent fluid and heat flow problems related to vadose zone hydrology, nuclear waste disposal, and environmental remediation.

  2. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W.

    1995-10-01

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  3. Exit of a blast wave from a conical nozzle. [flow field calculations by Eulerian computer code DORF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Johnson, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Eulerian computer code DORF was used in the analysis of a two-dimensional, unsteady flow field resulting from semi-confined explosions for propulsive applications. Initially, the ambient gas inside the conical shaped nozzle is set into motion due to the expansion of the explosion product gas, forming a shock wave. When this shock front exits the nozzle, it takes almost a spherical form while a complex interaction between the nozzle and compression and rarefaction waves takes place behind the shock. The results show an excellent agreement with experimental data.

  4. A vectorized code for calculating laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies at zero and small angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide is provided for a computer code which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies, such as spherically blunted cones, hyperboloids, etc., at zero and small angles of attack. The code is written in STAR FORTRAN language for the CDC-STAR-100 computer. Time-dependent, viscous-shock-layer-type equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time asymptotic, finite-difference method. For the turbulent flow, a two-layer, eddy-viscosity model is used. The code provides complete flow-field properties including shock location, surface pressure distribution, surface heating rates, and skin-friction coefficients. This report contains descriptions of the input and output, the listing of the program, and a sample flow-field solution.

  5. Calculation of wall effects of flow on a perforated wall with a code of surface singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piat, J. F.

    1994-07-01

    Simplifying assumptions are inherent in the analytic method previously used for the determination of wall interferences on a model in a wind tunnel. To eliminate these assumptions, a new code based on the vortex lattice method was developed. It is suitable for processing any shape of test sections with limited areas of porous wall, the characteristic of which can be nonlinear. Calculation of wall effects in S3MA wind tunnel, whose test section is rectangular 0.78 m x 0.56 m, and fitted with two or four perforated walls, have been performed. Wall porosity factors have been adjusted to obtain the best fit between measured and computed pressure distributions on the test section walls. The code was checked by measuring nearly equal drag coefficients for a model tested in S3MA wind tunnel (after wall corrections) and in S2MA wind tunnel whose test section is seven times larger (negligible wall corrections).

  6. Validations of CFD Code for Density-Gradient Driven Air Ingress Stratified Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti

    2010-05-01

    Air ingress into a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an important phenomena to consider because the air oxidizes the reactor core and lower plenum where the graphite structure supports the core region in the gas turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) design, thus jeopardizing the reactor’s safety. Validating the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code used to analyze the air ingress phenomena is therefore an essential part of the safety analysis and the ultimate computation required for licensing

  7. Massively parallel multiple interacting continua formulation for modeling flow in fractured porous media using the subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fracture dominated flows occur in numerous subsurface geochemical processes and at many different scales in rock pore structures, micro-fractures, fracture networks and faults. Fractured porous media can be modeled as multiple interacting continua which are connected to each other through transfer terms that capture the flow of mass and energy in response to pressure, temperature and concentration gradients. However, the analysis of large-scale transient problems using the multiple interacting continuum approach presents an algorithmic and computational challenge for problems with very large numbers of degrees of freedom. A generalized dual porosity model based on the Dual Continuum Disconnected Matrix approach has been implemented within a massively parallel multiphysics-multicomponent-multiphase subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN. Developed as part of the Department of Energy's SciDAC-2 program, PFLOTRAN provides subsurface simulation capabilities that can scale from laptops to ultrascale supercomputers, and utilizes the PETSc framework to solve the large, sparse algebraic systems that arises in complex subsurface reactive flow and transport problems. It has been successfully applied to the solution of problems composed of more than two billions degrees of freedom, utilizing up to 131,072 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is the world’s fastest supercomputer. Building upon the capabilities and computational efficiency of PFLOTRAN, we will present an implementation of the multiple interacting continua formulation for fractured porous media along with an application case study.

  8. A fast algorithm for non-Newtonian flow. An enhanced particle-tracking finite element code for solving boundary-valve problems in viscoelastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkus, David S.

    1989-01-01

    This project concerned the development of a new fast finite element algorithm to solve flow problems of non-Newtonian fluids such as solutions or melts of polymers. Many constitutive theories for such materials involve single integrals over the deformation history of the particle at the stress evaluation point; examples are the Doi-Edwards and Curtiss-Bird molecular theories and the BKZ family derived from continuum arguments. These theories are believed to be among the most accurate in describing non-Newtonian effects important to polymer process design, effects such as stress relaxation, shear thinning, and normal stress effects. This research developed an optimized version of the algorithm which would run a factor of two faster than the pilot algorithm on scalar machines and would be able to take full advantage of vectorization on machines. Significant progress was made in code vectorization; code enhancement and streamlining; adaptive memory quadrature; model problems for the High Weissenberg Number Problem; exactly incompressible projection; development of multimesh extrapolation procedures; and solution of problems of physical interest. A portable version of the code is in the final stages of benchmarking and testing. It interfaces with the widely used FIDAP fluid dynamics package.

  9. Development of code evaluation criteria for assessing predictive capability and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shyi-Jang; Barson, S. L.; Sindir, M. M.; Prueger, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), because of its unique ability to predict complex three-dimensional flows, is being applied with increasing frequency in the aerospace industry. Currently, no consistent code validation procedure is applied within the industry. Such a procedure is needed to increase confidence in CFD and reduce risk in the use of these codes as a design and analysis tool. This final contract report defines classifications for three levels of code validation, directly relating the use of CFD codes to the engineering design cycle. Evaluation criteria by which codes are measured and classified are recommended and discussed. Criteria for selecting experimental data against which CFD results can be compared are outlined. A four phase CFD code validation procedure is described in detail. Finally, the code validation procedure is demonstrated through application of the REACT CFD code to a series of cases culminating in a code to data comparison on the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Impeller.

  10. FECWATER: user's manual of a Finite-Element Code for simulating WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Strand, R.H.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents the user's manual of FECWATER, a Finite-Element code for simulating WATER flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media. The code is designed for generic application. For each site-specific application, 14 cards are required to specify the size of arrays and 6 cards are used to assign the control numbers in the main program. In addition, user's supply functions must be given to specify the soil property relationships between moisture content, water capacity, and hydraulic conductivity and pressure head, if they are not given in tabular form. Input data to the code includes the program control indices, properties of the porous media, the geometry in the form of elements and nodes, boundary and initial conditions, and rainfall information. Principal output includes the spatial distribution of pressure head, total head, moisture-content, and Darcy's velocity components at any desired time. Fluxes through various types of boundaries are output. In addition, diagnostic variables, such as the number of non-convergent nodes, residuals, and rainfall-seepage nodes, may be printed, if required. This user's manual should be used in conjunction with references listed in the bibliography.

  11. Spatiotemporal coding in the cortex: information flow-based learning in spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Deco, G; Schürmann, B

    1999-05-15

    We introduce a learning paradigm for networks of integrate-and-fire spiking neurons that is based on an information-theoretic criterion. This criterion can be viewed as a first principle that demonstrates the experimentally observed fact that cortical neurons display synchronous firing for some stimuli and not for others. The principle can be regarded as the postulation of a nonparametric reconstruction method as optimization criteria for learning the required functional connectivity that justifies and explains synchronous firing for binding of features as a mechanism for spatiotemporal coding. This can be expressed in an information-theoretic way by maximizing the discrimination ability between different sensory inputs in minimal time. PMID:10226189

  12. Application of Chimera Navier-Stokes Code for High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud

    1997-01-01

    The primary task for this year was performed in support of the "Trailblazer" project. The purpose of the task was to perform an extensive CFD study of the shock boundary-layer interaction between the engine-diverters and the primary body surfaces of the Trailblazer vehicle. Information gathered from this study would be used to determine the effectiveness of the diverters in preventing the boundary-layer coming off of the vehicle forebody from entering the main engines. The PEGSUS code was used to define the "holes" and "boundaries" for each grid. Two sets of CFD calculations were performed.Extensive post-processing of the results was performed.

  13. Coupled Monte Carlo Probability Density Function/ SPRAY/CFD Code Developed for Modeling Gas-Turbine Combustor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    approach was extended in our previous work to the study of compressible reacting flows. The application of this method to several supersonic diffusion flames associated with scramjet combustor flow fields provided favorable comparisons with the available experimental data. A further extension of this approach to spray flames, three-dimensional computations, and parallel computing was reported in a recent paper. The recently developed PDF/SPRAY/computational fluid dynamics (CFD) module combines the novelty of the joint composition PDF approach with the ability to run on parallel architectures. This algorithm was implemented on the NASA Lewis Research Center's Cray T3D, a massively parallel computer with an aggregate of 64 processor elements. The calculation procedure was applied to predict the flow properties of both open and confined swirl-stabilized spray flames.

  14. Color-coded three-dimensional micro particle tracking velocimetry and application to micro backward-facing step flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin; Dabiri, Dana; Hove, Jay R.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the authors proposed a microscopic particle tracking system based on the previous work (Tien et al. in Exp Fluids 44(6):1015-1026, 2008). A three-pinhole plate, color-coded by color filters of different wavelengths, is utilized to create a triple exposure pattern on the image sensor plane for each particle, and each color channel of the color camera acts as an independent image sensor. This modification increases the particle image density of the original monochrome system by three times and eliminates the ambiguities caused by overlap of the triangle exposure patterns. A novel lighting method and a color separation algorithm are proposed to overcome the measurement errors due to crosstalk between color filters. A complete post-processing procedure, including a cascade correlation peak-finding algorithm to resolve overlap particles, a calibration-based method to calculate the depth location based on epipolar line search method, and a vision-based particle tracking algorithm is developed to identify, locate and track the Lagrangian motions of the tracer particles and reconstruct the flow field. A 10X infinity-corrected microscope and back-lighted by three individual high power color LEDs aligning to each of the pinhole is used to image the flow. The volume of imaging is 600 × 600 × 600 μm3. The experimental uncertainties of the system verified with experiments show that the location uncertainties are less than 0.10 and 0.08 μm for the in-plane and less than 0.82 μm for the out-of-plane components, respectively. The displacement uncertainties are 0.62 and 0.63 μm for the in-plane and 0.77 μm for the out-of-plane components, respectively. This technique is applied to measure a flow over a backward-facing micro-channel flow. The channel/step height is 600/250 μm. A steady flow with low particle density and an accelerating flow with high particle density are measured and compared to validate the flow field resolved from a two-frame tracking method

  15. GRUMFOIL: A computer code for the viscous transonic flow over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, H. R.; Melnik, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A user's manual which describes the operation of the computer program, GRUMFOIL is presented. The program computes the viscous transonic flow over two dimensional airfoils using a boundary layer type viscid-inviscid interaction approach. The inviscid solution is obtained by a multigrid method for the full potential equation. The boundary layer solution is based on integral entrainment methods.

  16. Spray and High-Pressure Flow Computations in the National Combustion Code (NCC) Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    2002-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in materials processing. A liquid spray is a two-phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase in the form of droplets or ligaments. The interactions between the two phases--which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy--can occur in different ways at disparate time and length scales involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the ratecontrolling processes associated with turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates of the spray, among many other factors. With the aim of developing an efficient solution procedure for use in multidimensional combustor modeling, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  17. Simulating the lava flow formed during the 2014-2015 Holuhraun eruption (Bardarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) by using the new F-L probabilistic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Jensen, Esther H.; Barsotti, Sara; Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Coppola, Diego

    2015-04-01

    The 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun started when a new code (named F-L) was being developed. The availability of several digital Elevation Models of the area inundated by the lava and the availability of continuously updated maps of the flow (collected in the field and through remote sensing imagery) provided an excellent opportunity for testing and calibrating the new code against an evolving flow field. Remote sensing data also provided a constrain on the effusion rate. Existing numerical codes for the simulation of lava flow emplacement are based either on the solution of some simplification of the physical governing equations of this phenomenon (the so-called "deterministic codes" - e.g. Hidaka et al. 2005; Crisci et al. 2010), or, instead, on the evidence that lava flows tend to follow the steepest descent path from the vent downhill (the so-called "probabilistic codes" - e.g. Favalli et al. 2005). F-L is a new code for the simulation of lava flows, which rests on an approach similar to the one introduced by Glaze and Baloga (2013), and can be ascribed to the "probabilistic family" of lava flow simulation codes. Nevertheless, in contrast with other probabilistic codes (e.g. Favalli et al. 2005), this code explicitly tackles not only the direction of expansion of the growing flow and the area covered, but also the volume of the emplaced lava over time, and hence the supply rate. As a result, this approach bridges the stochastic point of view of a plain probabilistic code with one of the most critical among the input parameters considered by deterministic codes, which is the effusion rate during the course of an eruption. As such, a similar code, in principle, can tackle several aspects which were previously not addressed within the probabilistic approach, which are: (i) the 3D morphology of the flow field (i.e. thickness), (ii) the implications of the effusion rate in the growth of the flow field, and (iii) the evolution of the lava coverage over time

  18. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-01

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  19. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-22

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  20. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  1. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-07-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  2. Three-dimensional computations of cross-flow injection and combustion in a supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    A low-storage version of the SPARK3D code which is based on the temporally second-order accurate MacCormack (1969) explicit scheme is used to solve the governing equations for three-dimensional chemically reacting flows with finite-rate chemistry. The code includes a fourth-order compact spatial scheme capable of providing higher order spatial accuracy, and it is used to study two-dimensional linear advection, two-dimensional Euler flow, and three-dimensional viscous flow. Also considered are the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen in a supersonic cross stream.

  3. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting turbulent mixing layer by a pseudospectral-spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the implementation of the spectral-element technique for simulating a chemically reacting, spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. Attention is given to experimental and numerical studies that have investigated the development, evolution, and mixing characteristics of shear flows. A mathematical formulation is presented of the physical configuration of the spatially developing reacting mixing layer, in conjunction with a detailed representation of the spectral-element method's application to the numerical simulation of mixing layers. Results from 2D and 3D calculations of chemically reacting mixing layers are given.

  4. Methane and air mixing times under nonreacting and reacting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brasoveanu, D.; Gupta, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    Mixing times of methane and air under nonreacting or reacting conditions in the presence of a constant rate of temperature or pressure are examined using a mixing model based on the ideal gas law and the equation of continuity. The model is valid for low pressure ratios combustors under nonreacting conditions. The model is also valid under reacting conditions for the fresh mixture which contains only trace amounts of combustion products. The effects of initial pressure, temperature, velocity divergence and initial fluid composition on mixing time are also analyzed. Results show that under both reacting and nonreacting conditions, the mixing time is directly proportional to the initial pressure and temperature of mixture and inversely proportional to rates of pressure and temperature and to the velocity divergence. The mixing time is shorter for the case of fuel dispersing into the surrounding air, than for the case of air penetrating into the fuel flow. The rates of pressure of less than 1 atm/s alone can provide a mixing time in excess of one second which is unacceptably long for many applications, in particular gas turbine combustion. Rates of temperature produced by flame may provide mixing times of less than 0.1 s. To assure mixing times of a few milliseconds for efficient combustion, coupled with low pollutants emission, high velocity gradients between the fuel and air flows are required. The results show that a combination of several effects must be used in parallel for achieving this goal. This analysis of mixing time is intended to provide important design guidelines for the development of high intensity and high efficiency combustors having low pollutants emission.

  5. On the Partially Reacted Boundary Layer in Rate Sticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-06-01

    Using our reactive flow model TDRR to simulate detonation in a rate stick, we observe that a partially reacted layer (PRL) is formed near the boundary. We are not aware that such a PRL has been observed in tests, and this is why we regarded it in the past as a numerical artifact. Assuming that such an artifact may be caused by the finite rise time of the detonation shock, we showed in how it can be eliminated by delaying the outward boundary motion for a length of time comparable with the shock rise time. Here we revisit the PRL problem. First we show that it is not a numerical artifact but a real phenomenon. We do this by repeating the reactive flow run with a finer resolution. By looking at the PRL structure, we see doubling the resolution affects the PRL only slightly. We then conjecture that the PRL formation has to do with the finite duration of the reaction process (or the finite extent of the reaction zone). By the time the boundary rarefaction reaches a cell near the boundary, it is only partially reacted, and its reaction is cut off. To strengthen our conjecture we also show how the PRL structure changes with the reaction duration.

  6. On the partially reacted boundary layer in rate sticks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Using our temperature dependent reactive flow model (TDRR) to simulate detonation in a rate stick, we observe that a partially reacted layer (PRL) is formed near the boundary. We are not aware that such a PRL has been observed in tests, and this is why we regarded it in the past as a numerical artifact. Assuming that such an artefact may be caused by the finite rise time of the detonation shock, we showed in [1] how it can be eliminated by delaying the outward boundary motion for a length of time comparable with the shock rise time. Here we revisit the PRL problem. We first show that it is not a numerical artifact but a real phenomenon. We do this by repeating the reactive flow run with a finer mesh. By looking at the PRL structure, we see that doubling the resolution affects the PRL only slightly. We then conjecture that the PRL formation has to do with the finite duration of the reaction process (or the finite extent of the reaction zone). By the time the boundary rarefaction reaches a cell near the boundary, it may be only partially reacted, and its reaction may therefore be cut off. To establish our conjecture we show how the PRL structure changes with the reaction duration.

  7. Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, E.

    2011-06-09

    fuel element burnout is due to a form of flow instability. Whittle and Forgan provide a formula that predicts when this flow instability will occur. This formula is included in the PLTEMP/ANL code.Error! Reference source not found. Olson has shown that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the powers at which flow instability occurs in the Whittle and Forgan experiments. He also considered the electrically heated tests performed in the ANS Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop at ORNL and report by M. Siman-Tov et al. The purpose of this memorandum is to demonstrate that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the Croft and the Waters tests. This demonstration should provide sufficient confidence that the PLTEMP/ANL code can adequately predict the onset of flow instability for the converted MURR. The MURR core uses light water as a coolant, has a 24-inch active fuel length, downward flow in the core, and an average core velocity of about 7 m/s. The inlet temperature is about 50 C and the peak outlet is about 20 C higher than the inlet for reactor operation at 10 MW. The core pressures range from about 4 to about 5 bar. The peak heat flux is about 110 W/cm{sup 2}. Section 2 describes the mechanism that causes flow instability. Section 3 describes the Whittle and Forgan formula for flow instability. Section 4 briefly describes both the Croft and the Waters experiments. Section 5 describes the PLTEMP/ANL models. Section 6 compares the PLTEMP/ANL predictions based on the Whittle and Forgan formula with the Croft measurements. Section 7 does the same for the Waters measurements. Section 8 provides the range of parameters for the Whittle and Forgan tests. Section 9 discusses the results and provides conclusions. In conclusion, although there is no single test that by itself closely matches the limiting conditions in the MURR, the preponderance of measured data and the ability of the Whittle and Forgan correlation, as implemented in PLTEMP/ANL, to predict the onset of flow

  8. Laser induced fluorescence applied to turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The saturated fluorescence method makes use of the great simplifications which occur when under conditions of intense radiation the excitation process becomes saturated. A description is presented of the saturated fluorescence method, taking into account rate equations and saturation, radiative transfer, the two-level system, a multilevel system, and measurements under saturation conditions. The detectability limits of the method are investigated. Fluorescence trapping is found to place an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss. Turbulence places time and spatial constraints on the measurements, but otherwise poses no difficulties. Saturated laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be a most promising method for measuring species concentrations in flames.

  9. Navier-Stokes Solvers and Generalizations for Reacting Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Elman, Howard C

    2013-01-27

    This is an overview of our accomplishments during the final term of this grant (1 September 2008 -- 30 June 2012). These fall mainly into three categories: fast algorithms for linear eigenvalue problems; solution algorithms and modeling methods for partial differential equations with uncertain coefficients; and preconditioning methods and solvers for models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of reacting stagnation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergthorson, Jeff; Dimotakis, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Planar laminar premixed flames are stabilized in the stagnation flowfield of an impinging jet. These flames are studied experimentally through measurements of the axial velocity and CH radical profiles, the equivalence ratio, plate temperature, and the static (Bernoulli) pressure drop across the nozzle. The velocity measurements are performed using Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV), a technique valuable in flame measurements due to the low particle-mass loading, high accuracy and short run times possible. The CH radical profile is measured using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which provides a very accurate marker for the reaction zone location. The experimental results are compared to predictions by a one-dimensional simulation which incorporates full chemistry. Difficulties in performing detailed comparisons between one-dimensional simulations and finite-nozzle-diameter experiments are discussed in the context of validating chemical kinetics models. To further investigate the validity of these chemical kinetics models, global flame properties such as extinction strain-rates are also investigated.

  11. Time integration of reacting flows with CSP tabulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Frenklach, Michael; Marzouk, Youssef M.; Valorani, Mauro; Goussis, Dimitris A.; Najm, Habib N.; Debusschere, Bert J.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents recent progress on the use of Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) techniques for time integration of stiff chemical systems. The CSP integration approach removes fast time scales from the reaction system, thereby enabling integration with explicit time stepping algorithms. For further efficiency improvements, a tabulation strategy was developed to allow reuse of the relevant CSP quantities. This paper outlines the method and demonstrates its use on the simulation of hydrogen-air ignition.

  12. A 3-dimensional Navier-Stokes-Euler code for blunt-body flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    The shock-layer flowfield is obtained with or without viscous and heat-conducting dissipations from the conservative laws of fluid dynamics equations using a shock-fitting implicity finite-difference technique. The governing equations are cast in curvilinear-orthogonal coordinates and transformed to the domain between the shock and the body. Another set of equations is used for the singular coordinate axis, which, together with a cone generator away from the stagnation point, encloses the computation domain. A time-dependent alternating direction implicit factorization technique is applied to integrate the equations with local-time increment until a steady solution is reached. The shock location is updated after the flowfield computation, but the wall conditions are implemented into the implicit procedure. Innovative procedures are introduced to define the initial flowfield, to treat both perfect and equilibrium gases, to advance the solution on a coarse-to-fine grid sequence, and to start viscous flow computations from their corresponding inviscid solutions. The results are obtained from a grid no greater than 28 by 18 by 7 and converged within 300 integration steps. They are of sufficient accuracy to start parabolized Navier-Stokes or Euler calculations beyond the nose region, to compare with flight and wind-tunnel data, and to evaluate conceptual designs of reentry spacecraft.

  13. The Softmounted Inertially Reacting Pointing System (SIRPNT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.; Laskin, Robert A.

    A softmounted inertially reacting pointing system differs from traditional gimbal-based pointing system architecture in that: (1) the primary pointing control actuator does not need to apply torques on the basebody, and hence will not interact in a destabilizing way with basebody flexibility, and (2) the connection of the payload with the basebody is via a soft, low frequency structure, which acts as a two-way low pass filter for disturbances. Planar, linear analysis of a preliminary design of such a pointing system using the piezoelectric polymer material PVF2 as an active element in the softmount is presented demonstrating the potential performance in disturbance rich environments such as Space Station.

  14. REAC/TS handles hot topics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    William R. Bibb, MD is the director of research and waste management at a unique facility that deals exclusively in radiation accidents-the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site(REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tenn. REAC/TS is housed in the 400-bed Oak Ridge Methodist Medical Center. It was instituted seven years ago to provide emergency care for more than 16,000 workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratories in the event of a nuclear accident. It has a medical staff of eight on call 24 hours a day. They are still waiting for their first accident patient. Nonetheless, the REAC/TS staff manages to keep occupied. The facility, which is operated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities for the Department of Energy, has become something of a teaching hospital, and the staff conducts classes on treating radiation-exposure accidents. The week-long courses are free and accommodate 30 health professionals at a time. In seven years of operation, the facility has graduated thousands of physicians, nurses, and paramedics.

  15. Simulation of bubble growth and coalescence in reacting polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchisio, Daniele; Karimi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns with the simulation of reacting polymer foams with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In these systems upon mixing of different ingredients polymerization starts and some gaseous compounds are produced, resulting in the formation of bubbles that growth and coalesce. As the foam expands, the polymerization proceeds resulting in an increase of the apparent viscosity. The evolution of the collective behavior of the bubbles within the polymer foam is tracked by solving a master kinetic equation, formulated in terms of the bubble size distribution. The rate with which individual bubbles grow is instead calculated by resolving the momentum and concentration boundary layers around the bubbles. Moreover, since it is useful to track the evolution of the interface between the foam and the surrounding air, a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model is adopted. The final computational model is implemented in the open-source CFD code openFOAM by making use of the compressibleInterFoam solver. The master kinetic equation is solved with a quadrature-based moment method (QBMM) directly implemented in openFOAM, whereas the bubble growth model is solved independently and ''called'' from the CFD code by using an unstructured database. Model predictions are validated against experimental data. This work was funded by the European Commission under the grant agreement number 604271 (Project acronym: MoDeNa; call identifier: FP7-NMP-2013-SMALL-7).

  16. Addition of equilibrium air to an upwind Navier-Stokes code and other first steps toward a more generalized flow solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Bruce S.

    1991-01-01

    An upwind three-dimensional volume Navier-Stokes code is modified to facilitate modeling of complex geometries and flow fields represented by proposed National Aerospace Plane concepts. Code enhancements include an equilibrium air model, a generalized equilibrium gas model and several schemes to simplify treatment of complex geometric configurations. The code is also restructured for inclusion of an arbitrary number of independent and dependent variables. This latter capability is intended for eventual use to incorporate nonequilibrium/chemistry gas models, more sophisticated turbulence and transition models, or other physical phenomena which will require inclusion of additional variables and/or governing equations. Comparisons of computed results with experimental data and results obtained using other methods are presented for code validation purposes. Good correlation is obtained for all of the test cases considered, indicating the success of the current effort.

  17. Equilibrium properties of chemically reacting gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, and the equation of state of the gas are all derived for chemically reacting gas mixtures in terms of the compressibility, the mol fractions, the thermodynamic properties of the pure gas components, and the change in zero point energy due to reaction. Results are illustrated for a simple diatomic dissociation reaction and nitrogen is used as an example. Next, a gas mixture resulting from combined diatomic dissociation and atomic ionization reactions is treated and, again, nitrogen is used as an example. A short discussion is given of the additional complexities involved when precise solutions for high-temperature air are desired, including effects caused by NO produced in shuffle reactions and by other trace species formed from CO2, H2O and Ar found in normal air.

  18. Validation of a Node-Centered Wall Function Model for the Unstructured Flow Code FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee; Vasta, Veer N.; White, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of two wall function models in the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational uid dynamics (CFD) code FUN3D is described. FUN3D is a node centered method for solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational grids. The first wall function model, based on the work of Knopp et al., is used in conjunction with the one-equation turbulence model of Spalart-Allmaras. The second wall function model, also based on the work of Knopp, is used in conjunction with the two-equation k-! turbulence model of Menter. The wall function models compute the wall momentum and energy flux, which are used to weakly enforce the wall velocity and pressure flux boundary conditions in the mean flow momentum and energy equations. These wall conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the contribution of the wall function model to the Jacobian are also included. The boundary conditions of the turbulence transport equations are enforced explicitly (strongly) on all solid boundaries. The use of the wall function models is demonstrated on four test cases: a at plate boundary layer, a subsonic di user, a 2D airfoil, and a 3D semi-span wing. Where possible, different near-wall viscous spacing tactics are examined. Iterative residual convergence was obtained in most cases. Solution results are compared with theoretical and experimental data for several variations of grid spacing. In general, very good comparisons with data were achieved.

  19. Quick-Mixing Studies Under Reacting Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, May Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The low-NO(x) emitting potential of rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn )RQL) combustion makes it an attractive option for engines of future stratospheric aircraft. Because NO(x) formation is exponentially dependent on temperature, the success of the RQL combustor depends on minimizing high temperature stoichiometric pocket formation in the quick-mixing section. An experiment was designed and built, and tests were performed to characterize reaction and mixing properties of jets issuing from round orifices into a hot, fuel-rich crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct. The reactor operates on propane and presents a uniform, non-swirling mixture to the mixing modules. Modules consisting of round orifice configurations of 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 18 holes were evaluated at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and jet-to-mainstream mass-flaw ratio of 2.5. Temperatures and concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, HC, and NO(x) were obtained upstream, down-stream, and within the orifice plane to determine jet penetration as well as reaction processes. Jet penetration was a function of the number of orifices and affected the mixing in the reacting system. Of the six configurations tested, the 14-hole module produced jet penetration close to the module half-radius and yielded the best mixing and most complete combustion at a plane one duct diameter from the orifice leading edge. The results reveal that substantial reaction and heat release occur in the jet mixing zone when the entering effluent is hot and rich, and that the experiment as designed will serve to explore satisfactorily jet mixing behavior under realistic reacting conditions in future studies.

  20. Development of Comprehensive Reduced Kinetic Models for Supersonic Reacting Shear Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zambon, A. C.; Chelliah, H. K.; Drummond, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of multi-dimensional unsteady turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport can be computationally extremely intensive even on distributed computing architectures. With the development of suitable reduced chemical kinetic models, the number of scalar variables to be integrated can be decreased, leading to a significant reduction in the computational time required for the simulation with limited loss of accuracy in the results. A general MATLAB-based automated mechanism reduction procedure is presented to reduce any complex starting mechanism (detailed or skeletal) with minimal human intervention. Based on the application of the quasi steady-state (QSS) approximation for certain chemical species and on the elimination of the fast reaction rates in the mechanism, several comprehensive reduced models, capable of handling different fuels such as C2H4, CH4 and H2, have been developed and thoroughly tested for several combustion problems (ignition, propagation and extinction) and physical conditions (reactant compositions, temperatures, and pressures). A key feature of the present reduction procedure is the explicit solution of the concentrations of the QSS species, needed for the evaluation of the elementary reaction rates. In contrast, previous approaches relied on an implicit solution due to the strong coupling between QSS species, requiring computationally expensive inner iterations. A novel algorithm, based on the definition of a QSS species coupling matrix, is presented to (i) introduce appropriate truncations to the QSS algebraic relations and (ii) identify the optimal sequence for the explicit solution of the concentration of the QSS species. With the automatic generation of the relevant source code, the resulting reduced models can be readily implemented into numerical codes.

  1. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  2. Simulation of steady-state and transient sodium boiling experiments in a seven-pin bundle under flow rundown conditions by using BODYFIT-1FE code

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Sha, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    A seven-pin rod bundle under flow rundown conditions was simulated by using the computer code BODYFIT-1FE (BOunDarY-FITted Coordinate System - 1 phase, Fully-Elliptic). In this code, the complicated rod bundle configuration is first transformed into rectangular geometry with uniform meshes. The transformed governing equations for all the thermal-hydraulic variables are then solved. The results of the simulation are presented here. All the predicted values agree favorably with the measured data. 7 refs., 20 figs.

  3. CNSFV code development, virtual zone Navier-Stokes computations of oscillating control surfaces and computational support of the laminar flow supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, Goetz H.

    1993-01-01

    The work performed during the past year on this cooperative agreement covered two major areas and two lesser ones. The two major items included further development and validation of the Compressible Navier-Stokes Finite Volume (CNSFV) code and providing computational support for the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT). The two lesser items involve a Navier-Stokes simulation of an oscillating control surface at transonic speeds and improving the basic algorithm used in the CNSFV code for faster convergence rates and more robustness. The work done in all four areas is in support of the High Speed Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center.

  4. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  5. An interactive code (NETPATH) for modeling NET geochemical reactions along a flow PATH, version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Niel; Prestemon, Eric C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    1994-01-01

    NETPATH is an interactive Fortran 77 computer program used to interpret net geochemical mass-balance reactions between an initial and final water along a hydrologic flow path. Alternatively, NETPATH computes the mixing proportions of two to five initial waters and net geochemical reactions that can account for the observed composition of a final water. The program utilizes previously defined chemical and isotopic data for waters from a hydrochemical system. For a set of mineral and (or) gas phases hypothesized to be the reactive phases in the system, NETPATH calculates the mass transfers in every possible combination of the selected phases that accounts for the observed changes in the selected chemical and (or) isotopic compositions observed along the flow path. The calculations are of use in interpreting geochemical reactions, mixing proportions, evaporation and (or) dilution of waters, and mineral mass transfer in the chemical and isotopic evolution of natural and environmental waters. Rayleigh distillation calculations are applied to each mass-balance model that satisfies the constraints to predict carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and strontium isotopic compositions at the end point, including radiocarbon dating. DB is an interactive Fortran 77 computer program used to enter analytical data into NETPATH, and calculate the distribution of species in aqueous solution. This report describes the types of problems that can be solved, the methods used to solve problems, and the features available in the program to facilitate these solutions. Examples are presented to demonstrate most of the applications and features of NETPATH. The codes DB and NETPATH can be executed in the UNIX or DOS1 environment. This report replaces U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 91-4078, by Plummer and others, which described the original release of NETPATH, version 1.0 (dated December, 1991), and documents revisions and enhancements that are included in version 2.0. 1 The

  6. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  7. An efficient, explicit finite-rate algorithm to compute flows in chemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    An explicit finite-rate code was developed to compute hypersonic viscous chemically reacting flows about three-dimensional bodies. Equations describing the finite-rate chemical reactions were fully coupled to the gas dynamic equations using a new coupling technique. The new technique maintains stability in the explicit finite-rate formulation while permitting relatively large global time steps.

  8. Conversion of the Twin Cities metropolitan area numerical ground-water-flow model from the Trescott-Larson computer code to the McDonald-Harbaugh computer code

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in calculated flow rates for the McDonald-Harbaugh and Trescott-Larson Twin Cities models were less than 0.3 cubic feet per second for recharge and the head-dependent source-sink functions. Differences in calculated flow in and flow out of constant-head cells for each model layer for the two models ranged from about 2 cubic feet per second for the Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer model layer to about 45 cubic feet per second for the Prairie du ChienJordan aquifer model layer. The differences between the net flow rates at constant-head cells calculated by the two models for each model layer were much smaller, ranging from 0.01 cubic feet per second for the Ironton-Galesville and Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer model layers to 8.39 cubic feet per second for the St. Peter aquifer model layer. Differences in the calculated ground-water budgets for the two models were 5.3 percent for the total sources and 4.4 percent for the total sinks.

  9. Planarians require an intact brain to behaviorally react to cocaine, but not to react to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Pagán, O R; Deats, S; Baker, D; Montgomery, E; Wilk, G; Tenaglia, M; Semon, J

    2013-08-29

    Planarians possess a rudimentary brain with many features in common with vertebrate brains. They also display a remarkable capacity for tissue regeneration including the complete regeneration of the nervous system. Using the induction of planarian seizure-like movements (pSLMs) as a behavioral endpoint, we demonstrate that an intact nervous system is necessary for this organism to react to cocaine exposure, but not necessary to react to nicotine administration. Decapitated planarians (Girardia tigrina) display pSLMs indistinguishable from intact worms when exposed to nicotine, but cocaine-induced pSLMs are reduced by about 95% upon decapitation. Decapitated worms recover their normal sensitivity to cocaine within 5 days after head amputation. In worms where half of the brain was removed or partially dissected, the expression of cocaine-induced pSLMs was reduced by approximately 75%. Similar amputations at the level of the tail did not show a significant decrease to cocaine exposure. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first report that explores how regenerating planarians react to the exposure of cocaine.

  10. Planarians require an intact brain to behaviorally react to cocaine, but not to react to nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Oné R.; Deats, Sean; Baker, Debra; Montgomery, Erica; Wilk, Galia; Tenaglia, Matthew; Semon, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Planarians possess a rudimentary brain with many features in common with vertebrate brains. They also display a remarkable capacity for tissue regeneration including the complete regeneration of the nervous system. Using the induction of planarian seizure-like movements (pSLMs) as a behavioral endpoint, we demonstrate that an intact nervous system is necessary for this organism to react to cocaine exposure, but not necessary to react to nicotine administration. Decapitated planarians (Girardia tigrina) display pSLMs indistinguishable from intact worms when exposed to nicotine, but cocaine-induced pSLMs are reduced by about 95% upon decapitation. Decapitated worms recover their normal sensitivity to cocaine within five days after head amputation. In worms where half of the brain was removed or partially dissected, the expression of cocaine-induced pSLMs was reduced by approximately 75 %. Similar amputations at the level of the tail did not show a significant decrease to cocaine exposure. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first report that explores how regenerating planarians react to the exposure of cocaine. PMID:23684614

  11. Planarians require an intact brain to behaviorally react to cocaine, but not to react to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Pagán, O R; Deats, S; Baker, D; Montgomery, E; Wilk, G; Tenaglia, M; Semon, J

    2013-08-29

    Planarians possess a rudimentary brain with many features in common with vertebrate brains. They also display a remarkable capacity for tissue regeneration including the complete regeneration of the nervous system. Using the induction of planarian seizure-like movements (pSLMs) as a behavioral endpoint, we demonstrate that an intact nervous system is necessary for this organism to react to cocaine exposure, but not necessary to react to nicotine administration. Decapitated planarians (Girardia tigrina) display pSLMs indistinguishable from intact worms when exposed to nicotine, but cocaine-induced pSLMs are reduced by about 95% upon decapitation. Decapitated worms recover their normal sensitivity to cocaine within 5 days after head amputation. In worms where half of the brain was removed or partially dissected, the expression of cocaine-induced pSLMs was reduced by approximately 75%. Similar amputations at the level of the tail did not show a significant decrease to cocaine exposure. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first report that explores how regenerating planarians react to the exposure of cocaine. PMID:23684614

  12. Re-Shock Experiments in LX-17 to Investigate Reacted Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Forbes, Jerry W.; Tarver, Craig M.; Urtiew, Paul A.; Garcia, Frank

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed utilizing a 101 mm gun to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a re-shock method. This method involves backing the energetic material with thin plates (of a known equation of state) that reflect a shock back into the detonated material. Thus, by measuring the parameters of this reflected wave information on the reacted state can be obtained. The experiments were driven by a projectile to near the CJ state ensuring a quick transition to detonation near the front of the sample. Embedded electromagnetic particle velocity (EMV) gauges were used to measure the particle velocity profiles at different Lagrange positions during the event. Calibration of this technique was accomplished by using an elastic material as the target where the known state could be measured and evaluated. A discussion of this work will include the experimental setup, particle velocity profiles, data interpretation, and future experiments. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  13. A multi-grid code for 3-D transonic potential flow about axisymmetric inlets at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, D. R.; Reyhner, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present work, an existing transonic potential code is adapted to utilize the Multiple Level Adaptive technique proposed by A. Brandt. It is shown that order of magnitude improvements in speed and greatly improved accuracy over the unmodified code are achieved. Consideration is given to the difficulties of multi-grid programming, and possible future applications are surveyed.

  14. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 2: Code description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  15. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  16. TWO-PHASE FLOW STUDIES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PRIMARY CIRCUITS USING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.

    SciTech Connect

    KOHURT, P. , KALINICHENKO, S.D.; KROSHILIN, A.E.; KROSHILIN, V.E.; SMIRNOV, A.V.

    2006-06-04

    In this paper we present recent results of the application of the thermal-hydraulic code BAGIRA to the analysis of complex two-phase flows in nuclear power plants primary loops. In particular, we performed benchmark numerical simulation of an integral LOCA experiment performed on a test facility modeling the primary circuit of VVER-1000. In addition, we have also analyzed the flow patterns in the VVER-1000 steam generator vessel for stationary and transient operation regimes. For both of these experiments we have compared the numerical results with measured data. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of BAGIRA by modeling a hypothetical severe accident for a VVER-1000 type nuclear reactor. The numerical analysis, which modeled all stages of the hypothetical severe accident up to the complete ablation of the reactor cavity bottom, shows the importance of multi-dimensional flow effects.

  17. Operator-splitting errors in coupled reactive transport codes for transient variably saturated flow and contaminant transport in layered soil profiles.

    PubMed

    Jacques, D; Simůnek, J; Mallants, D; van Genuchten, M Th

    2006-12-15

    One possible way of integrating subsurface flow and transport processes with (bio)geochemical reactions is to couple by means of an operator-splitting approach two completely separate codes, one for variably-saturated flow and solute transport and one for equilibrium and kinetic biogeochemical reactions. This paper evaluates the accuracy of the operator-splitting approach for multicomponent systems for typical soil environmental problems involving transient atmospheric boundary conditions (precipitation, evapotranspiration) and layered soil profiles. The recently developed HP1 code was used to solve the coupled transport and chemical equations. For steady-state flow conditions, the accuracy was found to be mainly a function of the adopted spatial discretization and to a lesser extent of the temporal discretization. For transient flow situations, the accuracy depended in a complex manner on grid discretization, time stepping and the main flow conditions (infiltration versus evaporation). Whereas a finer grid size reduced the numerical errors during steady-state flow or the main infiltration periods, the errors sometimes slightly increased (generally less than 50%) when a finer grid size was used during periods with a high evapotranspiration demand (leading to high pressure head gradients near the soil surface). This indicates that operator-splitting errors are most significant during periods with high evaporative boundary conditions. The operator-splitting errors could be decreased by constraining the time step using the performance index (the product of the grid Peclet and Courant numbers) during infiltration, or the maximum time step during evapotranspiration. Several test problems were used to provide guidance for optimal spatial and temporal discretization. PMID:16919364

  18. iTOUGH2-IFC: An Integrated Flow Code in Support of Nagra's Probabilistic Safety Assessment:--User's Guide and Model Description

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan A.

    2009-01-02

    This document describes the development and use of the Integrated Flow Code (IFC), a numerical code and related model to be used for the simulation of time-dependent, two-phase flow in the near field and geosphere of a gas-generating nuclear waste repository system located in an initially fully water-saturated claystone (Opalinus Clay) in Switzerland. The development of the code and model was supported by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen, Switzerland. Gas generation (mainly H{sub 2}, but also CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) may affect repository performance by (1) compromising the engineered barriers through excessive pressure build-up, (2) displacing potentially contaminated pore water, (3) releasing radioactive gases (e.g., those containing {sup 14}C and {sup 3}H), (4) changing hydrogeologic properties of the engineered barrier system and the host rock, and (5) altering the groundwater flow field and thus radionuclide migration paths. The IFC aims at providing water and gas flow fields as the basis for the subsequent radionuclide transport simulations, which are performed by the radionuclide transport code (RTC). The IFC, RTC and a waste-dissolution and near-field transport model (STMAN) are part of the Integrated Radionuclide Release Code (IRRC), which integrates all safety-relevant features, events, and processes (FEPs). The IRRC is embedded into a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) computational tool that (1) evaluates alternative conceptual models, scenarios, and disruptive events, and (2) performs Monte-Carlo sampling to account for parametric uncertainties. The preliminary probabilistic safety assessment concept and the role of the IFC are visualized in Figure 1. The IFC was developed based on Nagra's PSA concept. Specifically, as many phenomena as possible are to be directly simulated using a (simplified) process model, which is at the core of the IRRC model. Uncertainty evaluation (scenario uncertainty

  19. Development of an efficient computer code to solve the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. [for predicting viscous flow fields about lifting bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. L., Jr.; Oatway, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    A research effort was conducted with the goal of reducing computer time of a Navier Stokes Computer Code for prediction of viscous flow fields about lifting bodies. A two-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar, transonic computer code (STOKES) was modified to incorporate a non-uniform timestep procedure. The non-uniform time-step requires updating of a zone only as often as required by its own stability criteria or that of its immediate neighbors. In the uniform timestep scheme each zone is updated as often as required by the least stable zone of the finite difference mesh. Because of less frequent update of program variables it was expected that the nonuniform timestep would result in a reduction of execution time by a factor of five to ten. Available funding was exhausted prior to successful demonstration of the benefits to be derived from the non-uniform time-step method.

  20. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  1. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  2. An experimental study of combustion: The turbulent structure of a reacting shear layer formed at a rearward-facing step. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A premixed propane-air flame is stabilized in a turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward-facing step. The mean and rms averages of the turbulent velocity flow field were determined by LDV for both reacting and non-reacting flows. The reaching flow was visualized by high speed schlieren photography. Large scale structures dominate the reacting shear layer. The growth of the large scale structures is tied to the propagation of the flame. The linear growth rate of the reacting shear layer defined by the mean velocity profiles is unchanged by combustion but the virtual origin is shifted downstream. The reacting shear layer based on the mean velocity profiles is shifted toward the recirculation zone and the reattachments lengths are shortened by 30%.

  3. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  4. Stereoscopic PIV on multiple color-coded light sheets and its application to axial flow in flapping robotic insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, Simon; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2009-12-01

    Non-scanning volume flow measurement techniques such as 3D-PTV, holographic and tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) permit reconstructions of all three components (3C) of velocity and vorticity vectors in a fluid volume (3D). In this study, we present a novel 3D3C technique termed Multiple-Color-Plane Stereo Particle-Image-Velocimetry (color PIV), which allows instantaneous measurements of 3C velocity vectors in six parallel, colored light sheets. We generated the light sheets by passing white light of two strobes through dichroic color filters and imaged the slices by two 3CCD color cameras in Stereo-PIV configuration. The stereo-color images were processed by custom software routines that sorted each colored fluid particle into one of six gray-scale images according to its hue, saturation, and luminance. We used conventional Stereo PIV cross-correlation algorithms to compute a 3D planar vector field for each light sheet and subsequently interpolated a volume flow map from the six vector fields. As a first application, we quantified the wake and axial flow in the vortical structures of a robotic insect (fruit fly) model wing. In contrast to previous findings, the measured data indicate strong axial flow components on the upper wing surface, including axial flow in the leading-edge vortex core. Collectively, color PIV is robust against mechanical misalignments, avoids laser safety issues, and computes instantaneous 3D vector fields in a fraction of the time typical for other 3D systems. Color PIV might thus be of value for volume measurements of highly unsteady flows.

  5. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  6. Evaluation of the scale dependent dynamic SGS model in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Martin; Usera, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    The Scale Dependent Dynamic Model (SDDM) has been widely validated in large-eddy simulations using pseudo-spectral codes [1][2][3]. The scale dependency, particularly the potential law, has been proved also in a priori studies [4][5]. To the authors' knowledge there have been only few attempts to use the SDDM in finite difference (FD) and finite volume (FV) codes [6][7], finding some improvements with the dynamic procedures (scale independent or scale dependent approach), but not showing the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter when using the SDDM. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the SDDM in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi, an updated version of the code presented in [8]. caffa3d.MBRi is a FV code, second-order accurate, parallelized with MPI, in which the domain is divided in unstructured blocks of structured grids. To accomplish this, 2 cases are considered: flow between flat plates and flow over a rough surface with the presence of a model wind turbine, taking for this case the experimental data presented in [9]. In both cases the standard Smagorinsky Model (SM), the Scale Independent Dynamic Model (SIDM) and the SDDM are tested. As presented in [6][7] slight improvements are obtained with the SDDM. Nevertheless, the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter supports the generalization of the dynamic procedure proposed in the SDDM, particularly taking into account that no explicit filter is used (the implicit filter is unknown). [1] F. Porté-Agel, C. Meneveau, M.B. Parlange. "A scale-dependent dynamic model for large-eddy simulation: application to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer". Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2000, 415, 261-284. [2] E. Bou-Zeid, C. Meneveau, M. Parlante. "A scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flows". Physics of Fluids, 2005, 17, 025105 (18p). [3] R. Stoll, F. Porté-Agel. "Dynamic subgrid-scale models for momentum and scalar fluxes in large-eddy simulations of

  7. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  8. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  9. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  10. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. K.; Srivastava, R.

    1979-01-01

    Two computer codes were developed for describing flow reactors in which high purity, solar grade silicon is produced via reduction of gaseous silicon halides. The first is the CHEMPART code, an axisymmetric, marching code which treats two phase flows with models describing detailed gas-phase chemical kinetics, particle formation, and particle growth. It can be used to described flow reactors in which reactants, mix, react, and form a particulate phase. Detailed radial gas-phase composition, temperature, velocity, and particle size distribution profiles are computed. Also, deposition of heat, momentum, and mass (either particulate or vapor) on reactor walls is described. The second code is a modified version of the GENMIX boundary layer code which is used to compute rates of heat, momentum, and mass transfer to the reactor walls. This code lacks the detailed chemical kinetics and particle handling features of the CHEMPART code but has the virtue of running much more rapidly than CHEMPART, while treating the phenomena occurring in the boundary layer in more detail.

  11. Parallelization of GeoClaw code for modeling geophysical flows with adaptive mesh refinement on many-core systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Yuen, D.A.; Zhu, A.; Song, S.; George, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    We parallelized the GeoClaw code on one-level grid using OpenMP in March, 2011 to meet the urgent need of simulating tsunami waves at near-shore from Tohoku 2011 and achieved over 75% of the potential speed-up on an eight core Dell Precision T7500 workstation [1]. After submitting that work to SC11 - the International Conference for High Performance Computing, we obtained an unreleased OpenMP version of GeoClaw from David George, who developed the GeoClaw code as part of his PH.D thesis. In this paper, we will show the complementary characteristics of the two approaches used in parallelizing GeoClaw and the speed-up obtained by combining the advantage of each of the two individual approaches with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), demonstrating the capabilities of running GeoClaw efficiently on many-core systems. We will also show a novel simulation of the Tohoku 2011 Tsunami waves inundating the Sendai airport and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, over which the finest grid distance of 20 meters is achieved through a 4-level AMR. This simulation yields quite good predictions about the wave-heights and travel time of the tsunami waves. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  12. Computer code of two-phase flow in geothermal wells producing water and/or water-carbon dioxide mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tanka, Shouichi; Nishi, Kosuke

    1988-01-01

    Mathematical well models are developed for pure water and for water-carbon dioxide mixtures. For the slug flow regime, three correlations (Orkiszewski’s, Nicklin’s and modified Nicklin’s) are compared. An equation-of-state package for water-carbon dioxide mixtures is proposed as a function of pressure and temperature. The predicted values are compared with sixteen field cases, in which the maximum carbon dioxide content is 2.8 %.

  13. NASA-Ames three-dimensional potential flow analysis system (POTFAN) equation solver code (SOLN) version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Bonnett, W. S.; Medan, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program known as SOLN was developed as an independent segment of the NASA-Ames three-dimensional potential flow analysis systems of linear algebraic equations. Methods used include: LU decomposition, Householder's method, a partitioning scheme, and a block successive relaxation method. Due to the independent modular nature of the program, it may be used by itself and not necessarily in conjunction with other segments of the POTFAN system.

  14. Parametric Study of Flow Control Over a Hump Model Using an Unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Greenblatt, David

    2007-01-01

    This is an expanded version of a limited-length paper that appeared at the 5th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena by the same authors. A computational study was performed for steady and oscillatory flow control over a hump model with flow separation to assess how well the steady and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations predict trends due to Reynolds number, control magnitude, and control frequency. As demonstrated in earlier studies, the hump model case is useful because it clearly demonstrates a failing in all known turbulence models: they under-predict the turbulent shear stress in the separated region and consequently reattachment occurs too far downstream. In spite of this known failing, three different turbulence models were employed to determine if trends can be captured even though absolute levels are not. Overall the three turbulence models showed very similar trends as experiment for steady suction, but only agreed qualitatively with some of the trends for oscillatory control.

  15. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  16. An assessment of viscous effects in computational simulation of benign and burst vortex flows on generic fighter wind-tunnel models using TEAM code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Tim A.; Harris, Brenda W.; Raj, Pradeep

    1995-01-01

    Vortex flows on a twin-tail and a single-tail modular transonic vortex interaction (MTVI) model, representative of a generic fighter configuration, are computationally simulated in this study using the Three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Method (TEAM). The primary objective is to provide an assessment of viscous effects on benign (10 deg angle of attack) and burst (35 deg angle of attack) vortex flow solutions. This study was conducted in support of a NASA project aimed at assessing the viability of using Euler technology to predict aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft configurations at moderate-to-high angles of attack in a preliminary design environment. The TEAM code solves the Euler and Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes equations on patched multiblock structured grids. Its algorithm is based on a cell-centered finite-volume formulation with multistage time-stepping scheme. Viscous effects are assessed by comparing the computed inviscid and viscous solutions with each other and experimental data. Also, results of Euler solution sensitivity to grid density and numerical dissipation are presented for the twin-tail model. The results show that proper accounting of viscous effects is necessary for detailed design and optimization but Euler solutions can provide meaningful guidelines for preliminary design of flight vehicles which exhibit vortex flows in parts of their flight envelope.

  17. On the stability of a convective motion generated by a chemically reacting fluid in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koliskina, V.; Kolyshkin, A.; Volodko, I.; Kalis, H.

    2016-06-01

    Linear stability analysis of a chemically reacting fluid motion in a pipe is performed in the present paper. The reaction rate has an Arrhenius form. The base flow and temperature distribution is obtained from the nonlinear heat equation coupled with the equations of motion. The stability of the flow with respect to asymmetric (spiral) perturbations is investigated numerically. The critical Grasshof number of the flow depends on two dimensionless parameters: the Prandtl number and the Frank-Kamenetsky parameter. The increase of both parameters has a destabilizing influence on the flow. It is shown that the second branch of a marginal stability curve corresponding to smaller critical Grasshof numbers appears as the Prandtl number increases.

  18. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  19. A 1D model for the description of mixing-controlled reacting diesel sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Desantesa, J.M.; Pastor, J.V.; Garcia-Oliver, J.M.; Pastor, J.M.

    2009-01-15

    The paper reports an investigation on the transient evolution of diesel flames in terms of fuel-air mixing, spray penetration and combustion rate. A one-dimensional (1D) spray model, which was previously validated for inert diesel sprays, is extended to reacting conditions. The main assumptions of the model are the mixing-controlled hypothesis and the validity of self-similarity for conservative properties. Validation is achieved by comparing model predictions with both CFD gas jet simulations and experimental diesel spray measurements. The 1D model provides valuable insight into the evolution of the flow within the spray (momentum and mass fluxes, tip penetration, etc.) when shifting from inert to reacting conditions. Results show that the transient diesel flame evolution is mainly governed by two combustion-induced effects, namely the reduction in local density and the increase in flame radial width. (author)

  20. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  1. Development of an upwind, finite-volume code with finite-rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvik, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    Under this grant, two numerical algorithms were developed to predict the flow of viscous, hypersonic, chemically reacting gases over three-dimensional bodies. Both algorithms take advantage of the benefits of upwind differencing, total variation diminishing techniques, and a finite-volume framework, but obtain their solution in two separate manners. The first algorithm is a zonal, time-marching scheme, and is generally used to obtain solutions in the subsonic portions of the flow field. The second algorithm is a much less expensive, space-marching scheme and can be used for the computation of the larger, supersonic portion of the flow field. Both codes compute their interface fluxes with a temporal Riemann solver and the resulting schemes are made fully implicit including the chemical source terms and boundary conditions. Strong coupling is used between the fluid dynamic, chemical, and turbulence equations. These codes have been validated on numerous hypersonic test cases and have provided excellent comparison with existing data.

  2. Development of Three-Dimensional Flow Code Package to Predict Performance and Stability of Aircraft with Leading Edge Ice Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strash, D. J.; Summa, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    In the work reported herein, a simplified, uncoupled, zonal procedure is utilized to assess the capability of numerically simulating icing effects on a Boeing 727-200 aircraft. The computational approach combines potential flow plus boundary layer simulations by VSAERO for the un-iced aircraft forces and moments with Navier-Stokes simulations by NPARC for the incremental forces and moments due to iced components. These are compared with wind tunnel force and moment data, supplied by the Boeing Company, examining longitudinal flight characteristics. Grid refinement improved the local flow features over previously reported work with no appreciable difference in the incremental ice effect. The computed lift curve slope with and without empennage ice matches the experimental value to within 1%, and the zero lift angle agrees to within 0.2 of a degree. The computed slope of the un-iced and iced aircraft longitudinal stability curve is within about 2% of the test data. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a zonal method for the icing analysis of complete aircraft or isolated components within the linear angle of attack range. In fact, this zonal technique has allowed for the viscous analysis of a complete aircraft with ice which is currently not otherwise considered tractable.

  3. A biomimetic mass-flow transducer utilizing all-optofluidic generation of self-digitized, pulse code-modulated optical pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Paek, Jungwook; Kim, Jaeyoun

    2012-10-01

    We present a new mass-flow transducer producing responses in the form of optical pulse trains that are encoded with information on the strength and position of the stimulus. We implemented the self-digitization and encoding capabilities all-optofluidically, without involving external electronics, by integrating one optical fiber cantilever with multiple polymer optical waveguides on a microfluidic platform. The transducer can also be configured to respond only to transitional stimuli. These features closely mimic the rate-coding, action potential labeling, and rapid adaptation processes observed in biological mechanoreceptors and allow multiple transducers to transmit signals over a single, shared channel. We fabricated the transducer using polymer-based soft-lithography techniques. Its characterization confirmed the stimulus strength-dependent generation of optical pulses and the feasibility of multiplexing 2(n-1) to 2(n) transducers using n waveguides. PMID:22858863

  4. Some recent applications of XTRAN3S. [time marching finite difference code for solution of three-dimensional transonic small perturbation flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, D. A.; Bennett, R. M.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    A time-marching finite difference code, XTRAN3S, that solves the three-dimensional transonic small perturbation equation for flow over isolated wings has recently been developed. During initial applications of the program, problems were encountered in the prediction of unsteady forces. The use of a revised grid and force calculation scheme improved those predictions. Comparisons are made between predicted and experimental pressure data for a rectangular supercritical wing. Comparisons of steady and unsteady data at freestream Mach number = 0.700 show good agreement between calculated and experimental values. A comparison of steady data at freestream Mach number = 0.825 shows poor agreement between calculations and experiment. Program difficulties have been encountered with swept and tapered configurations.

  5. REACT: Resettable Hold Down and Release Actuator for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Nestor; Collado, Marcelo; Cabás, Ramiro

    2014-07-01

    A new HDRA based on SMA technology, called REACT, has been designed for development of loads and appendixes in space applications. This design involves a rod supported by spheres that block its axial movement during a preload application. The rod shape allows misalignment and blocks the rotation around axial axis for a proper installation of the device. Because of the high preload requirements for this type of actuators, finite element analysis (FEA) has been developed in order to check the structure resistance. The results of the FEA have constrained the REACT design, in terms of dimensions, materials, and shape of the mechanical parts. A complete test campaign for qualification of REACT is proposed. Several qualification models are intended to be built for testing in parallel. Therefore, it is a way to demonstrate margins which allows getting some statistics.

  6. Method for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant

    DOEpatents

    Lumpkin, Robert E.; Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy

    1979-03-27

    This invention relates to a new and novel method and apparatus for reacting nongaseous material with a gaseous reactant comprising introducing a first stream containing a nongaseous material into a reaction zone; simultaneously introducing a second stream containing a gaseous reactant into the reaction zone such that the gaseous reactant immediately contacts and reacts with the first stream thereby producing a gaseous product; forming a spiralling vortex within the reaction zone to cause substantial separation of gases, including the gaseous product, from the nongaseous material; forming and removing a third stream from the reaction zone containing the gaseous product which is substantially free of the nongaseous material before a major portion of the gaseous product can react with the nongaseous material; and forming and removing a fourth stream containing the nongaseous material from the reaction zone.

  7. Calculation of Propulsive Nozzle Flowfields in Multidiffusing Chemically Reacting Environments. Ph.D. Thesis - Purdue Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth John

    1994-01-01

    An advanced engineering model has been developed to aid in the analysis and design of hydrogen/oxygen chemical rocket engines. The complete multispecies, chemically reacting and multidiffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, including the Soret thermal diffusion and the Dufour energy transfer terms. In addition to the spectrum of multispecies aspects developed, the model developed in this study is also conservative in axisymmetric flow for both inviscid and viscous flow environments and the boundary conditions employ a viscous, chemically reacting, reference plane characteristics method. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film cooled nozzle, and a transpiration cooled plug and spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 and the 25 lbf film cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements when all of the chemical reaction and diffusion terms are considered. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. The Soret thermal diffusion term is demonstrated to have a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle in both the laminar flow 1030:1 nozzle and the turbulent flow plug and spool nozzle analysis cases performed. Further, the Soret term was shown to represent an important fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in a transpiration cooled rocket engine.

  8. Multinuclear MAS NMR investigation of zeolites reacted with chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Kónya, Z.; Lentz, P.; Nagy, J. B.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    Multinuclear ( 23Na, 27Al, 29Si, 13C) MAS NMR techniques were used for investigation of surface reaction of Y-type zeolites with CFCs (CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2, CClF 3, CF 4) and HCFC (CHClF 2). The hydrogen containing derivative reacts slowly. Those possessing more than 2 F atoms can be regarded as stable unreactive materials. CCl 4, CCl 3F, CCl 2F 2 react strongly with the zeolites. The reaction of HCFC with zeolites has a different mechanism to the other CFCs tested. On the basis of multinuclear NMR results a mechanism is given for the decomposition of HCFC.

  9. Images constructed from computed flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from ideal- and real-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flow fields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. The constructed images are compared to experimental images for several types of flow, including a ramp, a blunt-body, a nozzle, and a reacting flow. The constructed images simulate the features observed in the experimental images. They are sensitive to errors in the flow-field solutions and can be used to identify solution errors. In addition, techniques for obtaining phase shifts from experimental finite-fringe interferograms and for removing experimentally induced phase-shift errors are discussed. Both the constructed images and calculated phase shifts can be used for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  10. TranAir: A full-potential, solution-adaptive, rectangular grid code for predicting subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows about arbitrary configurations. Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Samant, S. S.; Bieterman, M. B.; Melvin, R. G.; Young, D. P.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Hilmes, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program, called TranAir, for analyzing complex configurations in transonic flow (with subsonic or supersonic freestream) was developed. This program provides accurate and efficient simulations of nonlinear aerodynamic flows about arbitrary geometries with the ease and flexibility of a typical panel method program. The numerical method implemented in TranAir is described. The method solves the full potential equation subject to a set of general boundary conditions and can handle regions with differing total pressure and temperature. The boundary value problem is discretized using the finite element method on a locally refined rectangular grid. The grid is automatically constructed by the code and is superimposed on the boundary described by networks of panels; thus no surface fitted grid generation is required. The nonlinear discrete system arising from the finite element method is solved using a preconditioned Krylov subspace method embedded in an inexact Newton method. The solution is obtained on a sequence of successively refined grids which are either constructed adaptively based on estimated solution errors or are predetermined based on user inputs. Many results obtained by using TranAir to analyze aerodynamic configurations are presented.

  11. [Transient UV absorption spectra of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Jun; Ping, Li; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Qi-Ming; Xue, Jun-Peng; Wu, Da-Cheng; Li, Rui-Xia

    2009-03-01

    UV absorption spectrum of artemisinin and transient absorption spectra of various concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide were measured by using an intensified spectroscopic detector ICCD. The exposure time of each spectrum was 0.1 ms. Results indicate that artemisinin has an obvious UV absorption band centered at 212.52 nm and can react with sodium hydroxide easily. All absorption spectra of different concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide have the similar changes, but the moment at which the changes happened is different. After adding sodium hydroxide into artemisinin in ethanol solution, there was a new absorption band centered at 288 nm appearing firstly. As reaction went on, the intensity of another absorption band centered at 260 nm increased gradually. At the end of the reaction, a continuous absorption band from 200 to 350 nm with the peak at 245 nm formed finally. No other transient absorption spectral data are available on the reaction of artemisinin with sodium hydroxide currently. The new spectral information obtained in this experiment provides very important experimental basis for understanding the properties of artemisinin reacting with alkaline medium and is useful for correctly using of artemisinin as a potential anticancer drug.

  12. Development of a Three-Dimensional PSE Code for Compressible Flows: Stability of Three-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Jeyasingham, Samarasingham

    1999-01-01

    A program is developed to investigate the linear stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layer flows over bodies of revolutions. The problem is formulated as a two dimensional (2D) eigenvalue problem incorporating the meanflow variations in the normal and azimuthal directions. Normal mode solutions are sought in the whole plane rather than in a line normal to the wall as is done in the classical one dimensional (1D) stability theory. The stability characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer over a sharp cone with 50 half-angle at 2 degrees angle of attack is investigated. The 1D eigenvalue computations showed that the most amplified disturbances occur around x(sub 2) = 90 degrees and the azimuthal mode number for the most amplified disturbances range between m = -30 to -40. The frequencies of the most amplified waves are smaller in the middle region where the crossflow dominates the instability than the most amplified frequencies near the windward and leeward planes. The 2D eigenvalue computations showed that due to the variations in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the most amplified disturbances are shifted to 120 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the parallel theory. It is also observed that the nonparallel amplification rates are smaller than that is obtained from the parallel theory.

  13. On conditions and parameters important to model sensitivity for unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuff; Results of analyses for HYDROCOIN [Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Project] Level 3 Case 2: Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Prindle, R.W.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Project (HYDROCOIN) was formed to evaluate hydrogeologic models and computer codes and their use in performance assessment for high-level radioactive-waste repositories. This report describes the results of a study for HYDROCOIN of model sensitivity for isothermal, unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuffs. We investigated both the types of flow behavior that dominate the performance measures and the conditions and model parameters that control flow behavior. We also examined the effect of different conceptual models and modeling approaches on our understanding of system behavior. The analyses included single- and multiple-parameter variations about base cases in one-dimensional steady and transient flow and in two-dimensional steady flow. The flow behavior is complex even for the highly simplified and constrained system modeled here. The response of the performance measures is both nonlinear and nonmonotonic. System behavior is dominated by abrupt transitions from matrix to fracture flow and by lateral diversion of flow. The observed behaviors are strongly influenced by the imposed boundary conditions and model constraints. Applied flux plays a critical role in determining the flow type but interacts strongly with the composite-conductivity curves of individual hydrologic units and with the stratigraphy. One-dimensional modeling yields conservative estimates of distributions of groundwater travel time only under very limited conditions. This study demonstrates that it is wrong to equate the shortest possible water-travel path with the fastest path from the repository to the water table. 20 refs., 234 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Heat Treatment Optimizations for Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Racetrack Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G. L.

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is developing Wind-and-React (W&R) Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) accelerator magnet technology for insert coils, to surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb-based magnets, and eventually develop hybrid systems that can approach 20 T dipole fields. The Bi-2212 technology is being developed in close collaboration with industry, and has been partly supported by the US Very High Field Superconducting Magnet Collaboration (VHFSMC). Steady improvements were made over the last several years, with coil HTS-SC08 reaching 2636 A, or about 85% of its witness sample critical current (Ic). Though this is still a factor 3 to 4 too low to be competitive with Nb-based materials, it is expected that the required Ic can be achieved through further conductor optimizations. Recent developments include the commissioning of infrastructure for the reaction of coils at LBNL. Earlier coils were fabricated and tested at LBNL, but were reacted at the wire manufacturer. We describe in detail the furnace calibrations and heat treatment optimizations that enable coil reactions at temperatures approaching 890°C with a homogeneity of ±1°C in a pure oxygen flow. We reacted two new coils at LBNL, and tested the performance of coil HTS-SC10 at 4.2 K in self-field using a superconducting transformer system. We find that its performance is consistent with witness samples, and comparable to coil HTS-SC08, which is an identical coil that was reacted at Oxford Instruments Superconductor Technology (OST), thereby validating the in-house reaction process

  15. The STATFLUX code: a statistical method for calculation of flow and set of parameters, based on the Multiple-Compartment Biokinetical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, F.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Helene, O.; Vanin, V.; Milian, F.; Deppman, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Rodriguez, O.

    2007-03-01

    The code STATFLUX, implementing a new and simple statistical procedure for the calculation of transfer coefficients in radionuclide transport to animals and plants, is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. Flow parameters were estimated by employing two different least-squares procedures: Derivative and Gauss-Marquardt methods, with the available experimental data of radionuclide concentrations as the input functions of time. The solution of the inverse problem, which relates a given set of flow parameter with the time evolution of concentration functions, is achieved via a Monte Carlo simulation procedure. Program summaryTitle of program:STATFLUX Catalogue identifier:ADYS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYS_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Micro-computer with Intel Pentium III, 3.0 GHz Installation:Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, Department of Experimental Physics, University of São Paulo, Brazil Operating system:Windows 2000 and Windows XP Programming language used:Fortran-77 as implemented in Microsoft Fortran 4.0. NOTE: Microsoft Fortran includes non-standard features which are used in this program. Standard Fortran compilers such as, g77, f77, ifort and NAG95, are not able to compile the code and therefore it has not been possible for the CPC Program Library to test the program. Memory required to execute with typical data:8 Mbytes of RAM memory and 100 MB of Hard disk memory No. of bits in a word:16 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:6912 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:229 541 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:The investigation of transport mechanisms for

  16. Computer user's guide for a chemically reacting viscous shock-layer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the computer code for predicting viscous shock-layer flows over nonanalytic blunt bodies (Program VISLNABB) for hypersonic, low Reynolds number flows. Four specific and one general body geometries are considered. In addition to sphere-cones, cylinder wedges and geometries defined in tabular form, options for hyperboloids and paraboloids are included. Details of the theory and results are included in a separate engineering report. The program, subroutines, variables in common, and input and output data are described. Listings of the program code, output data for a sample case, and the input data for this sample case are included.

  17. A preliminary investigation of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the flow around a cylinder at ReD = 3900 using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-02-14

    Engineering fluid mechanics simulations at high Reynolds numbers have traditionally been performed using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations and a turbulence model. The RANS methodology has well-documented shortcomings in the modeling of separated or bluff body wake flows that are characterized by unsteady vortex shedding. The resulting turbulence statistics are strongly influenced by the detailed structure and dynamics of the large eddies, which are poorly captured using RANS models (Rodi 1997; Krishnan et al. 2004). The Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methodology offers the potential to more accurately simulate these flows as it resolves the large-scale unsteady motions and entails modeling of only the smallest-scale turbulence structures. Commercial computational fluid dynamics products are beginning to offer LES capability, allowing practicing engineers an opportunity to apply this turbulence modeling technique to much wider array of problems than in dedicated research codes. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the LES capability in the commercial CFD solver StarCD by simulating the flow around a cylinder at a Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter, D, of 3900 using the constant coefficient Smagorinsky LES model. The results are compared to both the experimental and computational results provided in Kravchenko & Moin (2000). We find that StarCD provides predictions of lift and drag coefficients that are within 15% of the experimental values. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the time-averaged velocity statistics and the published data. The differences in these metrics may be due to the use of a truncated domain in the spanwise direction and the short time-averaging period used for the statistics presented here. The instantaneous flow field visualizations show a coarser, larger-scale structure than the study of Kravchenko & Moin (2000), which may be a product of the LES implementation or of the domain and resolution used

  18. A dynamic flow simulation code benchmark study addressing the highly heterogeneous properties of the Stuttgart formation at the Ketzin pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Class, Holger; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Norden, Ben; Kolditz, Olaf; Kühn, Michael; Walter, Lena; Wang, Wenqing; Zehner, Björn

    2013-04-01

    CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site located in Eastern Germany (Brandenburg) about 25 km west of Berlin is undertaken since June 2008 with a scheduled total amount of about 70,000 t CO2 to be injected into the saline aquifer represented by the Stuttgart Formation at a depth of 630 m to 650 m until the end of August 2013. The Stuttgart Formation is of fluvial origin determined by high-permeablity sandstone channels embedded in a floodplain facies of low permeability indicating a highly heterogeneous distribution of reservoir properties as facies distribution, porosity and permeability relevant for dynamic flow simulations. Following the dynamic modelling activities discussed by Kempka et al. (2010), a revised geological model allowed us to history match CO2 arrival times in the observation wells and reservoir pressure with a good agreement (Martens et al., 2012). Consequently, the validated reservoir model of the Stuttgart Formation at the Ketzin pilot site enabled us to predict the development of reservoir pressure and the CO2 plume migration in the storage formation by dynamic flow simulations. A benchmark study of industrial (ECLIPSE 100 as well as ECLIPSE 300 CO2STORE and GASWAT) and scientific dynamic flow simulations codes (TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N, OpenGeoSys and DuMuX) was initiated to address and compare the simulator capabilities considering a highly complex reservoir model. Hence, our dynamic flow simulations take into account different properties of the geological model such as significant variation of porosity and permeability in the Stuttgart Formation as well as structural geological features implemented in the geological model such as seven major faults located at the top of the Ketzin anticline. Integration of the geological model into reservoir models suitable for the different dynamic flow simulators applied demonstrated that a direct conversion of reservoir model discretization between Finite Volume and Finite Element flow simulators is not feasible

  19. Beta Testing of CFD Code for the Analysis of Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Emma; Wey, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary version of OpenNCC was tested to assess its accuracy in generating steady-state temperature fields for combustion systems at atmospheric conditions using three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. Meshes were generated from a CAD model of a single-element lean-direct injection combustor, and the latest version of OpenNCC was used to calculate combustor temperature fields. OpenNCC was shown to be capable of generating sustainable reacting flames using a tetrahedral mesh, and the subsequent results were compared to experimental results. While nonreacting flow results closely matched experimental results, a significant discrepancy was present between the code's reacting flow results and experimental results. When wide air circulation regions with high velocities were present in the model, this appeared to create inaccurately high temperature fields. Conversely, low recirculation velocities caused low temperature profiles. These observations will aid in future modification of OpenNCC reacting flow input parameters to improve the accuracy of calculated temperature fields.

  20. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.; VanderWal, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with an iterative method called ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS and the method used to compute the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes but different ring circulations. The concentrations of methane, water, and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  1. Navier-Stokes simulation of 3-D hypersonic equilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, N.; Lombard, C. K.; Bardina, J.

    1988-01-01

    A computationally efficient three-dimensional conservative supracharacteristic Navier-Stokes method has been extended to simulate complex external chemically reacting flows of hypersonic reentry vehicles at angle-of-attack. Numerical simulation results of the flow around a sphere-cone-cone-flare reentry vehicle at 10 deg angle-of-attack are presented, in addition to the results of a well-validated two-dimensional code with which the 0-deg axisymmetric flow has been computed. A method for obtaining compositions of species in equilibrium ionized air is proposed.

  2. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  3. Experimental investigation of a reacting transverse jet in a high pressure oscillating vitiated crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugger, Christopher A.

    Staged combustion is one design approach in a gas turbine engine to reduce pollutant emission levels. In axially staged combustion, portions of the air and fuel are injected downstream of a lean premixed low NOx primary combustion zone. The gas residence time at elevated temperatures is decreased resulting in lower thermal NOx, and the reduced oxygen and high temperature vitiated primary zone flow further help to reduce pollutant emissions and quickly complete combustion. One implementation of axially staged combustion is transverse fuel jet injection. An important consideration for staged combustion systems, though, is how the primary and secondary combustion zones can couple through the acoustic resonances of the chamber. These couplings can lead to additional source terms that pump energy into the resonant acoustic field and help sustain the high-amplitude combustor pressure oscillations. An understanding of these couplings is important so that it may be possible to design a secondary combustion system that provides inherent damping to the combustor system. To systematically characterize the coupling of a reacting jet in unsteady crossflow in detail, the effects of an an unsteady pressure flowfield and an unsteady velocity flowfield are separately investigated. An optically accessible resonant combustion chamber was designed and built as part of this work to generate a standing wave unsteady vitiated crossflow at a chamber pressure of 0.9 MPa. The location of transverse jet injection corresponds to one of two locations, where one location is the pressure node and the other location the pressure anti-node of the resonant chamber acoustic mode. The injection location is optically accessible, and the dynamic interactions between the transverse jet flow and the 1st and 2nd axial combustor modes are measured using 10 kHz OH-PLIF and 2D PIV. This document analyzes five test cases: two non-reacting jets and three reacting jets. All cases correspond to jet injection

  4. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models were developed which allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H2 or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction.

  5. Thermal chemical-mechanical reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, A L., III; Tarver, C M

    1998-08-26

    The three dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic computer code ALE3D with fully coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical material models provides the framework for the development of a physically realistic model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives. The processes of hot spot formation during shock compression, subsequent ignition of reaction or failure to react, growth of reaction in individual hot spots, and coalescence of reacting hot spots during the transition to detonation can now be modeled using Arrhenius chemical kinetic rate laws and heat transfer to propagate the reactive flow. This paper discusses the growth rates of reacting hot spots in HMX and TATB and their coalescence during shock to detonation transition. Hot spot deflagration rates are found to be fast enough to consume explosive particles less than 10 mm in diameter during typical shock duration times, but larger particles must fragment and create more reactive surface area in order to be rapidly consumed.

  6. Preliminary Assessment of Turbomachinery Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, Quamrul H.

    2007-01-01

    This report assesses different CFD codes developed and currently being used at Glenn Research Center to predict turbomachinery fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. This report will consider the following codes: APNASA, TURBO, GlennHT, H3D, and SWIFT. Each code will be described separately in the following section with their current modeling capabilities, level of validation, pre/post processing, and future development and validation requirements. This report addresses only previously published and validations of the codes. However, the codes have been further developed to extend the capabilities of the codes.

  7. An asymptotic analysis of supersonic reacting mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an asymptotic analysis of the laminar mixing of the simultaneous chemical reaction between parallel supersonic streams of two reacting species. The study is based on a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction and on large activation energy asymptotics. Essentially it extends the work of Linan and Crespo to include the effect of free shear and Mach number on the ignition regime, the deflagration regime and the diffusion flame regime. It is found that the effective parameter is the product of the characteristic Mach number and a shear parameter.

  8. Computation of reacting flowfield with radiation interaction in chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, V.; Persselin, S.F.; Yang, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to provide a rapid and stable solution of the reacting and radiating flowfield in chemical laser cavities. A marching technique, implicit in both fluid mechanics and chemistry, is employed in solving the two-dimensional mixing layer equations. The aerokinetics and radiation interaction is calculated iteratively by solving the aerokinetic equations for the gain distribution and the propagation equations for the radiation field. In the iterative solution, a linearization method which leads to enhanced numerical efficiency is employed.

  9. ReACT Methodology Proof of Concept Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) funded INL Researchers to evaluate a novel process for assessing and mitigating cyber security risks. The proof of concept level of the method was tested in an industry environment. This case study, plus additional case studies will support the further development of the method into a tool to assist industry in securing their critical networks. This report provides an understanding of the process developed in the Response Analysis and Characterization Tool (ReACT) project. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these tools for use by industry.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics and thermal structure of nonpremixed reacting swirling wakes at low Reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rong F.; Yen, Shun C.

    2008-12-15

    The aerodynamic characteristics and thermal structure of uncontrolled and controlled swirling double-concentric jet flames at low Reynolds numbers are experimentally studied. The swirl and Reynolds numbers are lower than 0.6 and 2000, respectively. The flow characteristics are diagnosed by the laser-light-sheet-assisted Mie scattering flow visualization method and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The thermal structure is measured by a fine-wire thermocouple. The flame shapes, combined images of flame and flow, velocity vector maps, streamline patterns, velocity and turbulence distributions, flame lengths, and temperature distributions are discussed. The flow patterns of the no-control case exhibit an open-top, single-ring vortex sitting on the blockage disc with a jetlike swirling flow evolving from the central disc face toward the downstream area. The rotation direction and size of the near-disc vortex, as well as the flow properties, change in different ranges of annulus swirl number and therefore induce three characteristic flame modes: weak swirling flame, lifted flame, and turbulent reattached flame. Because the near-disc vortex is open-top, the radial dispersion of the fuel-jet fluids is not significantly enhanced by the annulus swirling flow. The flows of the reacting swirling double-concentric jets at such low swirl and Reynolds numbers therefore present characteristics of diffusion jet flames. In the controlled case, the axial momentum of the central fuel jet is deflected radially by a control disc placed above the blockage disc. This arrangement can induce a large near-disc recirculation bubble and high turbulence intensities. The enhanced mixing hence tremendously shortens the flame length and enlarges the flame width. (author)

  11. GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Sensitivity Program): A computer code to perform post-SWENT (simulator for water, energy, and nuclide transport) adjoint sensitivity analysis of steady-state ground-water flow: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.L.; RamaRao, B.S.; McNeish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Senstivity Program) computes measures of the behavior of a ground-water system and the system's performance for waste isolation, and estimates the sensitivities of these measures to system parameters. The computed measures are referred to as ''performance measures'' and include weighted squared deviations of computed and observed pressures or heads, local Darcy velocity components and magnitudes, boundary fluxes, and travel distance and time along travel paths. The sensitivities are computed by the adjoint method and are exact derivatives of the performance measures with respect to the parameters for the modeled system, taken about the assumed parameter values. GRASP presumes steady-state, saturated grondwater flow, and post-processes the results of a multidimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) finite-difference flow code. This document describes the mathematical basis for the model, the algorithms and solution techniques used, and the computer code design. The implementation of GRASP is verified with simple one- and two-dimensional flow problems, for which analytical expressions of performance measures and sensitivities are derived. The linkage between GRASP and multidimensional finite-difference flow codes is described. This document also contains a detailed user's manual. The use of GRASP to evaluate nuclear waste disposal issues has been emphasized throughout the report. The performance measures and their sensitivities can be employed to assist in directing data collection programs, expedite model calibration, and objectively determine the sensitivity of projected system performance to parameters.

  12. Evaluation of multi-phase heat transfer and droplet evaporation in petroleum cracking flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C.Q.

    1996-04-01

    A computer code ICRKFLO was used to simulate the multiphase reacting flow of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors. The simulation provided a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics and heat transfer processes in an FCC riser reactor, critical to the development of a new high performance unit. The code was able to make predictions that are in good agreement with available pilot-scale test data. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet evaporation processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact could become even greater on scale-up units.

  13. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Liikkanen, Lassi A; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies.

  14. Sticky Tunes: How Do People React to Involuntary Musical Imagery?

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Victoria J.; Liikkanen, Lassi A.; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or ‘earworms’; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  15. Microgravity Diode Laser Spectroscopy Measurements in a Reacting Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2001-01-01

    The technique of Diode Laser Spectroscopy (DLS) with wavelength modulation is utilized to measure the concentration of methane in reacting vortex rings under microgravity conditions. From the measured concentration of methane, other major species such as water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen can be easily computed under the assumption of equilibrium chemistry with the method of Interactive Temperature with Assumed Chemistry (ITAC). The conserved scalar approach in modelling the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion is utilized to represent the unknown variables in terms of the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate in conjunction with ITAC. Post-processing of the DLS measurements and the method of ITAC used in computing the species concentration are discussed. From the flame luminosity results, the increase in ring circulation appears to increase the fuel consumption rate inside the reacting vortex ring and the flame height for cases with similar fuel volumes. Preliminary results and application of ITAC show some potential capabilities of ITAC in DLS. The measured concentration of methane, and computed concentrations of water and carbon dioxide agree well with available results from numerical simulations.

  16. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Liikkanen, Lassi A; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  17. The NATA code; theory and analysis. Volume 3: Programmer's manual. [for calculating flow in arc-heated wind tunnels and conditions on models tested in reentry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bade, W. L.; Yos, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The present, third volume of the final report is a programmer's manual for the code. It provides a listing of the FORTRAN 4 source program; a complete glossary of FORTRAN symbols; a discussion of the purpose and method of operation of each subroutine (including mathematical analyses of special algorithms); and a discussion of the operation of the code on IBM/360 and UNIVAC 1108 systems, including required control cards and the overlay structure used to accommodate the code to the limited core size of the 1108. In addition, similar information is provided to document the programming of the NOZFIT code, which is employed to set up nozzle profile curvefits for use in NATA.

  18. The RealGas and RealGasH2O Options of the TOUGH+ Code for the Simulation of Coupled Fluid and Heat Flow in Tight/Shale Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George; Freeman, Craig

    2013-09-30

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas . The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include: coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  19. The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, George J.; Freeman, Craig M.

    2014-04-01

    We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) reservoirs. The gas mixture is treated as either a single-pseudo-component having a fixed composition, or as a multicomponent system composed of up to 9 individual real gases. The RealGas option has the same general capabilities, but does not include water, thus describing a single-phase, dry-gas system. In addition to the standard capabilities of all members of the TOUGH+ family of codes (fully-implicit, compositional simulators using both structured and unstructured grids), the capabilities of the two codes include coupled flow and thermal effects in porous and/or fractured media, real gas behavior, inertial (Klinkenberg) effects, full micro-flow treatment, Darcy and non-Darcy flow through the matrix and fractures of fractured media, single- and multi-component gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media following several isotherm options, discrete and fracture representation, complex matrix-fracture relationships, and porosity-permeability dependence on pressure changes. The two options allow the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in problems of geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, and of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CH4) and non-condensable gas mixtures. The codes are verified against available analytical and semi-analytical solutions. Their capabilities are demonstrated in a series of problems of increasing complexity, ranging from isothermal flow in simpler 1D and 2D conventional gas reservoirs, to non-isothermal gas flow in 3D fractured shale gas reservoirs involving 4 types of fractures, micro-flow, non-Darcy flow and gas

  20. CFD code development for performance evaluation of a pilot-scale FCC riser reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Zhou, C.Q.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1997-09-01

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) is an important conversion process for the refining industry. The improvement of FCC technology could have a great impact on the public in general by lowering the cost of transportation fuel. A recent review of the FCC technology development by Bienstock et al. of Exxon indicated that the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation can be very effective in the advancement of the technology. Theologos and Markatos used a commercial CFD code to model an FCC riser reactor. National Laboratories of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have accumulated immense CFD expertise over the years for various engineering applications. A recent DOE survey showed that National Laboratories are using their CFD expertise to help the refinery industry improve the FCC technology under DOE`s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). Among them are Los Alamos National Laboratory with Exxon and Amoco and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with Chevron and UOP. This abstract briefly describes the current status of ANL`s work. The objectives of the ANL CRADA work are (1) to use a CFD code to simulate FCC riser reactor flow and (2) to evaluate the impacts of operating conditions and design parameters on the product yields. The CFD code used in this work was originally developed for spray combustion simulation in early 1980 at Argonne. It has been successfully applied to diagnosing a number of multi-phase reacting flow problems in a magneto-hydrodynamic power train. A new version of the CFD code developed for the simulation of the FCC riser flow is called Integral CRacKing FLOw (ICRKFLO). The CFD code solves conservation equations of general flow properties for three phases: gaseous species, liquid droplets, and solid particles. General conservation laws are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, and species for a multi-phase flow with gas species, liquid droplets, and solid particles.