Science.gov

Sample records for reaction centers formed

  1. Characterization of a Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center mutant that enhances the distinction between spectral forms of the initial electron donor.

    PubMed

    Eastman, J E; Taguchi, A K; Lin, S; Jackson, J A; Woodbury, N W

    2000-12-05

    A large scale mutation of the Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center M-subunit gene, sym2-1, has been constructed in which amino acid residues M205-M210 have been changed to the corresponding L subunit amino acids. Two interconvertable spectral forms of the initial electron donor are observed in isolated reaction centers from this mutant. Which conformation dominates depends on ionic strength, the nature of the detergent used, and the temperature. Reaction centers from this mutant have a ground-state absorbance spectrum that is very similar to wild-type when measured immediately after purification in the presence of high salt. However, upon subsequent dialysis against a low ionic strength buffer or the addition of positively charged detergents, the near-infrared spectral band of P (the initial electron donor) in sym2-1 reaction centers is shifted by over 30 nm to the blue, from 852 to 820 nm. Systematically varying either the ionic strength or the amount of charged detergent reveals an isobestic point in the absorbance spectrum at 845 nm. The wild-type spectrum also shifts with ionic strength or detergent with an isobestic point at 860 nm. The large spectral separation between the two dominant conformational forms of the sym2-1 reaction center makes detailed measurements of each state possible. Both of the spectral forms of P bleach in the presence of light. Electrochemical measurements of the P/P+ midpoint potential of sym2-1 reaction centers show an increase of about 30 mV upon conversion from the long-wavelength form to the short-wavelength form of the mutant. The rate constant of initial electron transfer in both forms of the mutant reaction centers is essentially the same, suggesting that the spectral characteristics of P are not critical for charge separation. The short-wavelength form of P in this mutant also converts to the long-wavelength form as a function of temperature between room temperature and 130 K, again giving rise to an isobestic point, in this

  2. Characterization of Iron Dinitrosyl Species Formed in the Reaction of Nitric Oxide with a Biological Rieske Center

    PubMed Central

    Tinberg, Christine E.; Tonzetich, Zachary J.; Wang, Hongxin; Do, Loi H.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Reactions of nitric oxide with cysteine-ligated iron-sulfur cluster proteins typically result in disassembly of the iron-sulfur core and formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs). Here we report the first evidence that DNICs also form in the reaction of NO with Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] clusters. Upon treatment of a Rieske protein, component C of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMOC) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1, with a slight excess of NO (g) or NO-generators S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-pencillamine (SNAP) and diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), the absorbance bands of the [2Fe-2S] cluster are epxtinguished and replaced by a new feature that slowly grows in at 367 nm. Analysis of the reaction products by EPR, Mössbauer, and NRVS spectroscopy reveals that the primary product of the reaction is a thiolate-bridged diiron tetranitrosyl species, [Fe2(μ-SCys)2(NO)4] having a Roussin's red ester (RRE) formula, and that mononuclear DNICs account for only a minor fraction of nitrosylated iron. Reduction of this RRE reaction product with sodium dithionite produces the one-electron reduced Roussin's red ester (rRRE) having absorbtions at 640 and 960 nm. These results demonstrate that NO reacts readily with Rieske centers in protein and suggest that dinuclear RRE species, not mononuclear DNICs, may be the primary iron dinitrosyl species responsible for the pathological and physiological effects of nitric oxide in such systems in biology. PMID:21133361

  3. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  4. New tetragonal form of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the involvement of a manganese ion at a crystal contact point

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, G.; Cámara-Artigas, A.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Crystals have been obtained of wild-type reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides using manganese chloride as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4222, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 207.8, c = 107.5 Å. The crystal structure has been determined to a resolution limit of 4.6 Å using a previously determined structure of the reaction center as a molecular-replacement model. The calculated electron-density maps show the presence of a manganese ion at one of the crystal contact points bridging two symmetry-related histidine residues, suggesting that the metal plays a key role in facilitating the crystallization of the protein in this form. PMID:16511142

  5. New tetragonal form of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the involvement of a manganese ion at a crystal contact point.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, G; Cámara-Artigas, A; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2005-08-01

    Crystals have been obtained of wild-type reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides using manganese chloride as a precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4(2)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 207.8, c = 107.5 A. The crystal structure has been determined to a resolution limit of 4.6 A using a previously determined structure of the reaction center as a molecular-replacement model. The calculated electron-density maps show the presence of a manganese ion at one of the crystal contact points bridging two symmetry-related histidine residues, suggesting that the metal plays a key role in facilitating the crystallization of the protein in this form.

  6. Trimeric forms of the photosystem I reaction center complex pre-exist in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Shubin, V V; Tsuprun, V L; Bezsmertnaya, I N; Karapetyan, N V

    1993-11-08

    Oligomeric and monomeric forms of chlorophyll-protein complexes of photosystem I (PSI) have been isolated from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Spirulina [(1992) FEBS Lett. 309, 340-342]. Electron microscopic analysis of the complexes showed that the oligomeric form is a trimer of the shape and dimensions similar to those of the trimer from thermophilic cyanobacteria. The chlorophyl ratio in the isolated trimer and monomer was found to be 7:3. The trimeric form of PSI complex in contrast to the monomeric one contains the chlorophyll emitting at 760 nm (77K), which is also found in Spirulina membranes and therefore could be used as an intrinsic probe for the trimeric complex. The 77K circular dichroism spectrum of the trimeric form is much more similar to that of Spirulina membranes than the spectrum of the monomer. Thus, the trimeric PSI complexes exist and dominate in the Spirulina membranes.

  7. Structural and preliminary molecular dynamics studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and its mutant form L(M196)H + H(M202)L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyashtorny, V. G.; Fufina, T. Yu.; Vasilieva, L. G.; Shuvalov, V. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.

    2014-07-01

    Pigment-protein interactions are responsible for the high efficiency of the light-energy transfer and conversion in photosynthesis. The reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is the most convenient model for studying the mechanisms of primary processes of photosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis can be used to study the effect of the protein environment of electron-transfer cofactors on the optical properties, stability, pigment composition, and functional activity of RC. The preliminary analysis of RC was performed by computer simulation of the amino acid substitutions L(M196)H + H(M202)L at the pigment-protein interface and by estimating the stability of the threedimensional structure of the mutant RC by the molecular dynamics method. The doubly mutated reaction center was overexpressed, purified, and crystallized. The three-dimensional structure of this mutant was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the molecular dynamics model.

  8. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  9. Functional reconstitution of photosynthetic reaction centers in planar lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, M.; Montal, M.; Feher, G.

    1979-01-01

    Planar lipid bilayers containing reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26 were formed by apposing two reaction center—lipid monolayers formed from a reaction center—lipid complex in hexane. Secondary donors (cytochrome c) and acceptors (ubiquinone-0) were added on opposite sides of the membrane. Upon illumination, this system generated transient and steady-state voltages and currents. The wavelength dependence of the photoresponse matched the absorption spectrum of reaction centers. A simple model based on the transfer of charges across the membrane that explains the salient features of the photoresponse is presented. PMID:16592737

  10. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  11. Origin and evolution of photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John M.; Pierson, Beverly K.

    1987-09-01

    The prototype reaction center may have used protoporphyrin-IX associated with small peptides to transfer electrons or protons across the primitive cell membrane. The precursor of all contemporary reaction centers contained chlorophylla molecules as both primary electron donor and initial electron acceptor and an Fe-S center as secondary acceptor (RC-1 type). The biosynthetic pathway for chlorophylla evolved along with the evolution of a better organized reaction center associated with cytochromes and quinones in a primitive cyclic electron transport system. This reaction center probably functioned initially in photoassimilation, but was easily adapted to CO2 fixation using H2 and H2S as reductants. During this phase bacteriochlorophyllg may have evolved from chlorophylla in response to competition for light, and thereby initiated the gram-positive line of eubacteria. A second reaction center (RC-2) evolved from RC-1 between 3.5 and 2.5 Ga ago in response to the competition for reductants for CO2 fixation. The new organism containing RC-2 in series with RC-1 would have been able to use poor reducing agents such as the abundant aqueous ferrous ion in place of H2 and H2S. This new organism is proposed to be the common ancestor of all phototrophic eubacteria except those related to the gram-positive bacteria. All organisms containing bacteriochlorophylla lost either RC-1 or RC-2, while those organisms containing chlorophylla (ancestors of cyanobacteria) added a water-splitting enzyme to RC-2 between 3.0 and 2.5 Ga ago in order to use H2O in place of hydrated ferrous ion as electron donor for autotrophic photosynthesis.

  12. [Intermediate states formed during discharge separation in the reaction centers of Rhodospirillum rubrum in the presence of a low-redox potential].

    PubMed

    Godik, V I; Samuilov, V D; Borisov, A Iu

    1978-01-01

    The intermediate short-lived states arising in reaction centre preparations (RC) of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum are investigated under the conditions of low redox potential. Excitation by 353 and 530 nm laser pulses produced two states characterized by optical absorption changes in the range of 350--650 nm and lifetimes: 10--30 ns for the first state and 2.5 +/- 0.5 microseconds for the second one. The first state is similar to the state PF, described previously by Parson et al. for RC from Rps. sphaeroides. Carotenoid extraction with isooctane resulted in changing the spectrum with tau = 2.5 microseconds and in the appearance of new absorption changes similar to those for the R state observed before in carotenoidless bacterial strains within microsecond time range. The comparison of the microsecond spectra with difference spectra (continuous light minus dark) of RC from R. rubrum in the range of 350--650 nm made it possible to identify the states with tau = 2.5 microseconds as carotenoid triplet states. The ratio of quantum yields of PR and carotenoid triplet states production was determined as being 1 : 1. The conclusion was made that triplet-triplet energy transfer from state PR to carotenoid is responsible for the production of carotenoid triplet states.

  13. Photo-CIDNP of Photosyntheitc Reaction Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Ann. E. McDermott

    2005-10-22

    Studies of Photochemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers: Wavelength and Time Dependence Solid-state NMR spectra of quinone-reduced photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and chromatophores exhibit certain strongly enhanced lines under illumination, a result of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP). This technique offers a new method to investigate photosynthetic electronic transactions while retaining the NMR advantages of narrow linewidths and site-specific resolution. Pulsed laser illumination at 532 nm was used as the basis for time resolved photo-CIDNP experiments, a technique not previously published for solid-state photosynthetic systems. These measurements offer insight about the origin of the polarization effects.

  14. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. |; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G.; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M.

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  15. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. . Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  16. PTERIDINES AND THE FUNCTION OF THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC REACTION CENTER*

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, R. C.; Nugent, N. A.

    1969-01-01

    The photoreduction and interaction with the photosynthetic “reaction center” of 2-amino,4-hydroxy-6-substituted pteridine indicates that these low-potential (∼ -0.7 v), naturally occurring compounds play a primary role in photosynthetic electron transport. These unconjugated pteridines, which occur in association with the photosynthetic apparatus of green plants and photosynthetic bacteria, can be reduced by light in the presence of a bacterial chromatophore fraction from the dihydro form to the tetrahydro form. 6,7-Dimethyl-tetrahydropteridine readily reduces spinach ferredoxin. This compound also specifically interacts with reaction-center chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll and produces spectral shifts similar to those produced by light. It is proposed that the electron produced by excited-state chlorophyll is captured and separated by a pteridine at -0.67 v at the photosynthetic reaction center. PMID:5260934

  17. Reaction of silicate minerals to form tetramethoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Larry N; Schattenmann, Florian J; Jordan, Tracey M; Carnahan, James C; Flanagan, William P; Wroczynski, Ronald J; Lemmon, John P; Anostario, Joseph M; Othon, Michelle A

    2002-05-06

    Several silicon dioxide sources were used as reagents in the base-mediated reaction with dimethyl carbonate (DMC) to make tetramethoxysilane (Q'). Several commercially available diatomaceous earth materials were investigated. High throughput screening was employed to explore over 200 silicate rocks and minerals as alternative silicon dioxide sources for formation of Q' from DMC and base. Amorphous silicon dioxide materials are effective reagents for the Q' forming reaction. Effective silicon dioxide sources in addition to the diatomaceous earth materials include opal and various synthetic silicates (Li, Co, and Ca).

  18. Conformationally Constrained Macrocyclic Diporphyrin-Fullerene Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vikas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Hambourger, Michael; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Gust, Devens

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert excitation energy from absorbed sunlight into chemical potential energy in the form of a charge-separated state. The rates of the electron transfer reactions necessary to achieve long-lived, high-energy charge-separated states with high quantum yields are determined in part by precise control of the electronic coupling among the chromophores, donors and acceptors, and of the reaction energetics. Successful artificial photosynthetic reaction centers for solar energy conversion have similar requirements. Control of electronic coupling in particular necessitates chemical linkages between active component moieties that both mediate coupling and restrict conformational mobility so that only spatial arrangements that promote favorable coupling are populated. Toward this end, we report the synthesis, structure and photochemical properties of an artificial reaction center containing two porphyrin electron donor moieties and a fullerene electron acceptor in a macrocyclic arrangement involving a ring of 42 atoms. The two porphyrins are closely spaced, in an arrangement reminiscent of that of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers. The molecule is produced by an unusual cyclization reaction that yields mainly a product with C2 symmetry and trans-2 disubstitution at the fullerene. The macrocycle maintains a rigid, highly-constrained structure that was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy, NMR, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling at the semi-empirical PM6 and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G**) levels. Transient absorption results for the macrocycle in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran reveal photoinduced electron transfer from the porphyrin first excited singlet state to the fullerene to form a P•+-C60•−-P charge separated state with a time constant of 1.1 ps. Photoinduced electron transfer to the fullerene excited singlet state to form the same charge-separated state has a time constant of 15 ps. The charge-separated state is formed with a

  19. Biodiesel forming reactions using heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yijun

    Biodiesel synthesis from biomass provides a means for utilizing effectively renewable resources, a way to convert waste vegetable oils and animal fats to a useful product, a way to recycle carbon dioxide for a combustion fuel, and production of a fuel that is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has a lower emission profile than petroleum-diesel. Free fatty acid (FFA) esterification and triglyceride (TG) transesterification with low molecular weight alcohols constitute the synthetic routes to prepare biodiesel from lipid feedstocks. This project was aimed at developing a better understanding of important fundamental issues involved in heterogeneous catalyzed biodiesel forming reactions using mainly model compounds, representing part of on-going efforts to build up a rational base for assay, design, and performance optimization of solid acids/bases in biodiesel synthesis. As FFA esterification proceeds, water is continuously formed as a byproduct and affects reaction rates in a negative manner. Using sulfuric acid (as a catalyst) and acetic acid (as a model compound for FFA), the impact of increasing concentrations of water on acid catalysis was investigated. The order of the water effect on reaction rate was determined to be -0.83. Sulfuric acid lost up to 90% activity as the amount of water present increased. The nature of the negative effect of water on esterification was found to go beyond the scope of reverse hydrolysis and was associated with the diminished acid strength of sulfuric acid as a result of the preferential solvation by water molecules of its catalytic protons. The results indicate that as esterification progresses and byproduct water is produced, deactivation of a Bronsted acid catalyst like H2SO4 occurs. Using a solid composite acid (SAC-13) as an example of heterogeneous catalysts and sulfuric acid as a homogeneous reference, similar reaction inhibition by water was demonstrated for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This similarity together with

  20. Photosynthetic reaction centers/ITO hybrid nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Tibor; Bencsik, Gábor; Magyar, Melinda; Visy, Csaba; Gingl, Zoltán; Nagy, Krisztina; Váró, György; Hajdu, Kata; Kozák, Gábor; Nagy, László

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthetic reaction center proteins purified from Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacterium were deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive oxide, and the photochemical/-physical properties of the composite were investigated. The kinetics of the light induced absorption change indicated that the RC was active in the composite and there was an interaction between the protein cofactors and the ITO. The electrochromic response of the bacteriopheophytine absorption at 771 nm showed an increased electric field perturbation around this chromophore on the surface of ITO compared to the one measured in solution. This absorption change is associated with the charge-compensating relaxation events inside the protein. Similar life time, but smaller magnitude of this absorption change was measured on the surface of borosilicate glass. The light induced change in the conductivity of the composite as a function of the concentration showed the typical sigmoid saturation characteristics unlike if the photochemically inactive chlorophyll was layered on the ITO. In this later case the light induced change in the conductivity was oppositely proportional to the chlorophyll concentration due to the thermal dissipation of the excitation energy. The sensitivity of the measurement is very high; few picomole RC can change the light induced resistance of the composite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm.

  2. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  3. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-14

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  4. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-01

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  5. Dynamic response of a plane-symmetrical exothermic reaction center.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. W.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1972-01-01

    ?sger,An analysis of the dynamic behavior of an idealized, plane-symmetrical exothermic reaction center is presented. The conservation equations for the reaction center are combined and yield a single integral equation expressing a nonlinear transfer function of the system for which the input is provided by a given time profile of the heat released per unit mass while the output gives the pressure pulse it generates under the restriction of plane-symmetrical motion. The solution is governed by a Daumk]hler number. For a given form of the exothermic power pulse profile, the dynamic behavior of the system is completely specified in terms of only this Daumk]hler number and the heat of reaction per unit mass of the combustible medium. Specific solutions are worked out for a set of typical elementary power pulse profiles, and the practical significance of the results is illustrated by their application to the problem of transition to detonation in an explosive gas.

  6. Evolution of a reaction center in an explosive material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Kapila, A. K.; Stewart, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the spatial structure and temporal evolution of a reaction center for a model involving Arrhenius kinetics. The center, which is characterized by peaks in pressure and temperature with little diminution in local density, is found to have one of two possible self-similar structures. The analysis uses a combination of asymptotics and numerics and terminates when pressure and temperature in the reaction center have peaked.

  7. CB Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The registration deadline for the Cancer Biotechnology (CB) class is 1/27/2016. The first 50 registrants for each class offered (Jan. 29 or Feb. 9) will be accepted. Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form. Questions?

  8. Design of dinuclear manganese cofactors for bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Olson, Tien L; Espiritu, Eduardo; Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Simmons, Chad R; Williams, JoAnn C; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Allen, James P

    2016-05-01

    A compelling target for the design of electron transfer proteins with novel cofactors is to create a model for the oxygen-evolving complex, a Mn4Ca cluster, of photosystem II. A mononuclear Mn cofactor can be added to the bacterial reaction center, but the addition of multiple metal centers is constrained by the native protein architecture. Alternatively, metal centers can be incorporated into artificial proteins. Designs for the addition of dinuclear metal centers to four-helix bundles resulted in three artificial proteins with ligands for one, two, or three dinuclear metal centers able to bind Mn. The three-dimensional structure determined by X-ray crystallography of one of the Mn-proteins confirmed the design features and revealed details concerning coordination of the Mn center. Electron transfer between these artificial Mn-proteins and bacterial reaction centers was investigated using optical spectroscopy. After formation of a light-induced, charge-separated state, the experiments showed that the Mn-proteins can donate an electron to the oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers, with the Mn-proteins having additional metal centers being more effective at this electron transfer reaction. Modeling of the structure of the Mn-protein docked to the reaction center showed that the artificial protein likely binds on the periplasmic surface similarly to cytochrome c2, the natural secondary donor. Combining reaction centers with exogenous artificial proteins provides the opportunity to create ligands and investigate the influence of inhomogeneous protein environments on multinuclear redox-active metal centers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  9. The Photosynthetic Reaction Center from the Purple Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deisenhofer, Johann; Michel, Hartmut

    1989-09-01

    The history and methods of membrane protein crystallization are described. The solution of the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis is described, and the structure of this membrane protein complex is correlated with its function as a light-driven electron pump across the photosynthetic membrane. Conclusions about the structure of the photosystem II reaction center from plants are drawn, and aspects of membrane protein structure are discussed.

  10. Sources and interrelations of oxidants (peroxides and {sup {center_dot}}OH), iron(II), and organic acids formed from aqueous-phase photochemical reactions in clouds, fogs, and aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, B.C.; Arakaki, T.; Shu P.G.

    1995-12-31

    Based on studies of cloud waters from Whiteface Mountain, New York, the aqueous photoformation of OH is attributed to two different mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the direct photolysis of nitrate, and the other mechanism involves an HOOH-Fe(II) photo-Fenton reaction. Separate studies of well-defined aqueous solutions (pH=3.7) of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes, for dicarboxylates commonly found in atmospheric waters (oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate), reveals that these complexes rapidly form Fe(II) and HOOH with 313-nm illumination. Finally, studies of the aqueous (pH=3.7) photolysis of biacetyl, which is commonly found in fogs and clouds, produces acetic acid, peroxyacetic acid, HOOH, CH{sub 3}OOH, and pyruvic acid. The peroxylacetyl radical is proposed as a key intermediate; it is the most strongly oxidizing organic peroxyl radical known to date.

  11. An Analysis of UCNS Certified Headache Center Patient Intake Forms.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Roni; Rayhill, Melissa; Viknevich, Joseph; Charleston, Larry; Mathew, Paul G

    2016-03-01

    Compare the similarities and differences among headache intake forms from headache centers with United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS) accredited headache medicine fellowships in the United States. Patient intake forms establish a first communication with patients. There have been no studies evaluating them at headache centers. Analysis of these forms can provide insight into their content and potential for improvement. This observational study involved collection and analysis of intake forms from 25 UCNS fellowship accredited headache centers from July 2014 to October 2014. Forms were compared and contrasted in terms of data fields included, response format, and use of validated assessment tools. Forms shared many common elements, yet were highly variable in content, style, scales, and methods of analysis. Twenty percent (5/20) of centers did not have a formal intake form. Forms ranged from 1 to 28 pages. Seventy percent (12/17) utilized a check box format, 23% (4/17) utilized an open ended/fill in the blank format, and 6% (1/17) utilized a circle the response(s) format. Family history was inquired about in 82% (14/17) of forms and past medical history (PMH) in 58% (10/17) of forms. Gender questions were asked 82% (14/17) of the time for women, 29% (5/17) for men. Eighty-eight percent (15/17) of forms had questions concerning any type of previous medication tried. Patient intake forms are useful for clinical purposes, but vary markedly between UCNS headache centers. Ultimately, a universal intake form could be generated, providing a research-based alternative to the form currently used at each center. Use of a standardized intake form by UCNS centers would streamline data collection, a good first step in the eventual generation of a headache registry. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  12. Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sarthak; Carey, Anne-Marie; Locsin, Joshua; Gao, Bing-Rong; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2017-07-13

    In purple bacterial reaction centers, triplet excitation energy transfer occurs from the primary donor P, a bacteriochlorophyll dimer, to a neighboring carotenoid to prevent photodamage from the generation of reactive oxygen species. The BB bacteriochlorophyll molecule that lies between P and the carotenoid on the inactive electron transfer branch is involved in triplet energy transfer between P and the carotenoid. To expand the high-resolution spectral and kinetic information available for describing the mechanism, we investigated the triplet excited state formation and energy transfer pathways in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy over a broad spectral region on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale at both room temperature and at 77 K. Wild-type reaction centers were compared with a reaction center mutant (M182HL) in which BB is replaced by a bacteriopheophytin (Φ), as well as to reaction centers that lack the carotenoid. In wild-type reaction centers, the triplet energy transfer efficiency from P to the carotenoid was essentially unity at room temperature and at 77 K. However, in the M182HL mutant reaction centers, both the rate and efficiency of triplet energy transfer were decreased at room temperature, and at 77 K, no triplet energy transfer was observed, attributable to a higher triplet state energy of the bacteriopheophytin that replaces bacteriochlorophyll in this mutant. Finally, detailed time-resolved spectral analysis of P, carotenoid, and BB (Φ in the M182HL mutant) reveals that the triplet state of the carotenoid is coupled fairly strongly to the bridging intermediate BB in wild-type and Φ in the M182HL mutant, a fact that is probably responsible for the lack of any obvious intermediate (3)BB/(3)Φ transient formation during triplet energy transfer.

  13. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  14. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  15. Stochastic discrete event simulation of germinal center reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figge, Marc Thilo

    2005-05-01

    We introduce a generic reaction-diffusion model for germinal center reactions and perform numerical simulations within a stochastic discrete event approach. In contrast to the frequently used deterministic continuum approach, each single reaction event is monitored in space and time in order to simulate the correct time evolution of this complex biological system. Germinal centers play an important role in the immune system by performing a reaction that aims at improving the affinity between antibodies and antigens. Our model captures experimentally observed features of this reaction, such as the development of the remarkable germinal center morphology and the maturation of antibody-antigen affinity in the course of time. We model affinity maturation within a simple affinity class picture and study it as a function of the distance between the initial antibody-antigen affinity and the highest possible affinity. The model reveals that this mutation distance may be responsible for the experimentally observed all-or-none behavior of germinal centers; i.e., they generate either mainly output cells of high affinity or no high-affinity output cells at all. Furthermore, the exact simulation of the system dynamics allows us to study the hypothesis of cell recycling in germinal centers as a mechanism for affinity optimization. A comparison of three possible recycling pathways indicates that affinity maturation is optimized by a recycling pathway that has previously not been taken into account in deterministic continuum models.

  16. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu.; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  17. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  18. Bio-Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Incorporating Reaction Center and Reaction Center Plus Light Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoubi, Houman

    Harvesting solar energy can potentially be a promising solution to the energy crisis now and in the future. However, material and processing costs continue to be the most important limitations for the commercial devices. A key solution to these problems might lie within the development of bio-hybrid solar cells that seeks to mimic photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and to take advantage of the low material costs, negative carbon footprint, and material abundance. The bio-photoelectrochemical cell technologies exploit biomimetic means of energy conversion by utilizing plant-derived photosystems which can be inexpensive and ultimately the most sustainable alternative. Plants and photosynthetic bacteria harvest light, through special proteins called reaction centers (RCs), with high efficiency and convert it into electrochemical energy. In theory, photosynthetic RCs can be used in a device to harvest solar energy and generate 1.1 V open circuit voltage and ~1 mA cm-2 short circuit photocurrent. Considering the nearly perfect quantum yield of photo-induced charge separation, efficiency of a protein-based solar cell might exceed 20%. In practice, the efficiency of fabricated devices has been limited mainly due to the challenges in the electron transfer between the protein complex and the device electrodes as well as limited light absorption. The overarching goal of this work is to increase the power conversion efficiency in protein-based solar cells by addressing those issues (i.e. electron transfer and light absorption). This work presents several approaches to increase the charge transfer rate between the photosynthetic RC and underlying electrode as well as increasing the light absorption to eventually enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of bio-hybrid solar cells. The first approach is to decrease the electron transfer distance between one of the redox active sites in the RC and the underlying electrode by direct attachment of the of protein complex

  19. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S.; Govindjee; O`Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 {plus_minus} 0.6 ps at 4{degree}C and 1.4{plus_minus} 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680{sup +}-Pheo{sup {minus}} state. Recent results of Hastings et al. obtained at high data acquisition rates and low flash intensities, suggest that the Pheo{sup {minus}} state may form more slowly. In light of this work, we have carried out additional time domain studies of both electron transport and energy transfer phenomena in stabilized DM PSII RCs at room temperature. We used a 1-kHz repetition rate femtosecond transient absorption spectrometer with a 200 fs instrumental time resolution and compared the results with those obtained by others using frequency domain hole-burning techniques.

  20. Photocurrent generation in diamond electrodes modified with reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Roberta; Csiki, Réka; Lyuleeva, Alina; Pfisterer, Jonas; Wiesinger, Markus; Janssens, Stoffel D; Haenen, Ken; Cattani-Scholz, Anna; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose A

    2015-04-22

    Photoactive reaction centers (RCs) are protein complexes in bacteria able to convert sunlight into other forms of energy with a high quantum yield. The photostimulation of immobilized RCs on inorganic electrodes result in the generation of photocurrent that is of interest for biosolar cell applications. This paper reports on the use of novel electrodes based on functional conductive nanocrystalline diamond onto which bacterial RCs are immobilized. A three-dimensional conductive polymer scaffold grafted to the diamond electrodes enables efficient entrapment of photoreactive proteins. The electron transfer in these functional diamond electrodes is optimized through the use of a ferrocene-based electron mediator, which provides significant advantages such as a rapid electron transfer as well as high generated photocurrent. A detailed discussion of the generated photocurrent as a function of time, bias voltage, and mediators in solution unveils the mechanisms limiting the electron transfer in these functional electrodes. This work featuring diamond-based electrodes in biophotovoltaics offers general guidelines that can serve to improve the performance of similar devices based on different materials and geometries.

  1. Role of Carotenoids in Photosystem II (PSII) Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braslavsky, Silvia E.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2012-11-01

    A photoprotection mechanism operative in closed reaction centers (RCs) is proposed, where-as a consequence of the negative charge on the quinone QA-triplet 3Chl is formed by the radical pair mechanism on the accessory Chl of the normally inactive D2 branch where it can be subsequently quenched by the spatially close β-carotene in the D2 branch. Whereas β-carotene in the D1 branch is more than 17 Å away from the accessory D1-chlorophyll ({Chl_accD_1)} and, therefore, cannot quench the Chl triplet, the D2-carotene is only 13.2 Å away from {Chl_accD_2} . We propose that the D2 branch becomes active in electron transfer and thus plays a photoprotective role when the intact RCs are closed under high photon fluence conditions. This interpretation allows combining many seemingly inconsistent observations in the literature and reveals the so far "elusive" RC triplet quenching mechanism in PSII. Based on laser-induced optoacoustic studies, an important structural role is assigned to the β-carotene in the D1 branch, i.e., this carotene ensures a rigid structure.

  2. Severe Cutaneous Drug Reactions: Do Overlapping Forms Exist?

    PubMed

    Horcajada-Reales, C; Pulido-Pérez, A; Suárez-Fernández, R

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms are all severe hypersensitivity reactions to medications. While each of these reactions is a well-established entity with specific diagnostic criteria, clinicians see cases that fulfill criteria for more than one form, prompting discussion on the possibility of combined forms. Such overlapping clinical pictures meeting the criteria for 2 conditions have thus become a topic of debate in dermatology in recent years. We describe 2 patients with cutaneous drug reactions having the characteristics of both acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome -toxic epidermal necrolysis. We also review previously published cases and current thinking on such overlapping conditions.

  3. Cu-free 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition click reactions to form isoxazole linkers in chelating ligands for fac-[M(I)(CO)3]+ centers (M = Re, 99mTc).

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Shalina C; Kasten, Benjamin B; Stojakovic, Jelena; Moore, Adam L; MacGillivray, Leonard R; Benny, Paul D

    2014-02-17

    Isoxazole ring formation was examined as a potential Cu-free alternative click reaction to Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne/azide cycloaddition. The isoxazole reaction was explored at macroscopic and radiotracer concentrations with the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) core for use as a noncoordinating linker strategy between covalently linked molecules. Two click assembly methods (click, then chelate and chelate, then click) were examined to determine the feasibility of isoxazole ring formation with either alkyne-functionalized tridentate chelates or their respective fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) complexes with a model nitrile oxide generator. Macroscale experiments, alkyne-functionalized chelates, or Re complexes indicate facile formation of the isoxazole ring. (99m)Tc experiments demonstrate efficient radiolabeling with click, then chelate; however, the chelate, then click approach led to faster product formation, but lower yields compared to the Re analogues.

  4. OH radical reactions with phenylalanine in free and peptide forms.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Cruz-Torres, Armando

    2008-02-21

    Density functional theory has been used to model the reaction of OH with l-phenylalanine, as a free molecule and in the Gly-Phe-Gly peptide. The influence of the environment has been investigated using water and benzene as models for polar and non-polar surroundings, in addition to gas phase calculations. Different paths of reaction have been considered, involving H abstractions and addition reactions, with global contributions to the overall reaction around 10% and 90% respectively when Phe is in its free form. The ortho-adducts (o-tyrosine) were found to be the major products of the Phe+OH reaction, for all the modeled environments and especially in water solutions. The reactivity of phenylalanine towards OH radical attacks is predicted to be higher in its peptidic form, compared to the free molecule. The peptidic environment also changes the sites' reactivity, and for the Gly-Phe-Gly+OH reaction H abstraction becomes the major path of reaction. The good agreement found between the calculated and the available experimental data supports the methodology used in this work, as well as the data reported here for the first time.

  5. A Problem-Centered Approach to Canonical Matrix Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a problem-centered approach to the topic of canonical matrix forms in a second linear algebra course. In this approach, abstract theory, including such topics as eigenvalues, generalized eigenspaces, invariant subspaces, independent subspaces, nilpotency, and cyclic spaces, is developed in response to the patterns discovered…

  6. A Problem-Centered Approach to Canonical Matrix Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a problem-centered approach to the topic of canonical matrix forms in a second linear algebra course. In this approach, abstract theory, including such topics as eigenvalues, generalized eigenspaces, invariant subspaces, independent subspaces, nilpotency, and cyclic spaces, is developed in response to the patterns discovered…

  7. Reaction Rate Measurements at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Bounds, J. A.; Brooks, G. H., Jr.; Favorite, J. A.; Goda, J. M.; Hayes, D. K.; Jackman, K. R.; Little, R. C.; Macinnes, M. R.; Myers, W. L.; Oldham, W. J.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sanchez, R. G.; Schake, A. R.; White, M. C.; Wilkerson, C. W., Jr.

    2014-09-01

    With the resumption of regular operations of the Los Alamos Critical Assemblies at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC), located at the Nevada National Security Site, we have embarked upon a series of campaigns to restore the capability to perform integral reaction rate and fission product yield measurements using historical radiochemical methods. This talk will present an overview of the current and future experimental plans, including results from our experimental campaigns on the Comet/Zeus and Flattop assemblies.

  8. Native FMO-reaction center supercomplex in green sulfur bacteria: an electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bína, David; Gardian, Zdenko; Vácha, František; Litvín, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Chlorobaculum tepidum is a representative of green sulfur bacteria, a group of anoxygenic photoautotrophs that employ chlorosomes as the main light-harvesting structures. Chlorosomes are coupled to a ferredoxin-reducing reaction center by means of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein. While the biochemical properties and physical functioning of all the individual components of this photosynthetic machinery are quite well understood, the native architecture of the photosynthetic supercomplexes is not. Here we report observations of membrane-bound FMO and the analysis of the respective FMO-reaction center complex. We propose the existence of a supercomplex formed by two reaction centers and four FMO trimers based on the single-particle analysis of the complexes attached to native membrane. Moreover, the structure of the photosynthetic unit comprising the chlorosome with the associated pool of RC-FMO supercomplexes is proposed.

  9. Femtosecond photodichroism studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Wiederrecht, G P; Seibert, M; Govindjee; Wasielewski, M R

    1994-09-13

    Photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical potential begins in reaction center protein complexes, where rapid charge separation occurs with nearly unit quantum efficiency. Primary charge separation was studied in isolated photosystem II reaction centers from spinach containing 6 chlorophyll a, 2 pheophytin a (Pheo), 1 cytochrome b559, and 2 beta-carotene molecules. Time-resolved pump-probe kinetic spectroscopy was carried out with 105-fs time resolution and with the pump laser polarized parallel, perpendicular, and at the magic angle (54.7 degrees) relative to the polarized probe beam. The time evolution of the transient absorption changes due to the formation of the oxidized primary electron donor P680+ and the reduced primary electron acceptor Pheo- were measured at 820 nm and 545 nm, respectively. In addition, kinetics were obtained at 680 nm, the wavelength ascribed to the Qy transition of the primary electron donor P680 in the reaction center. At each measured probe wavelength the kinetics of the transient absorption changes can be fit to two major kinetic components. The relative amplitudes of these components are strongly dependent on the polarization of the pump beam relative to that of the probe. At the magic angle, where no photoselection occurs, the amplitude of the 3-ps component, which is indicative of the charge separation, dominates. When the primary electron acceptor Pheo is reduced prior to P680 excitation, the 3-ps component is eliminated.

  10. Femtosecond photodischroism studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.; Siebert, M.; Govindjee

    1994-09-13

    Photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical potential begins in reaction center protein complexes, where rapid charge separation occurs with nearly unit quantum efficiency. Primary charge separation was studied in isolated photosystem II reaction centers from spinach containing 6 chlorophyll a, 2 pheophytin a (Pheo), 1 cytochrome b{sub 559}, and 2 {beta}-carotene molecules. Time-resolved pump-probe kinetic spectroscopy was carried out with 105-fs time resolution and with the pump laser polarized parallel, perpendicular, and at the magic angle (54.7{degrees}) relative to the polarized probe beam. The time evolution of the oxidized primary electron donor P680{sup +} and the reduced primary electron acceptor Pheo{sup {minus}} were measured at 820 nm and 545 nm, respectively. In addition, kinetics were obtained at 680 nm, the wavelength ascribed to the Q{sub y} transition of the primary electron donor P680 in the reaction center. At each measured probe wavelength the kinetics of the transient absorption changes can be fit to two major kinetic components. The relative amplitudes of these components are strongly dependent on the polarization of the pump beam relative to that of the probe. At the magic angle, where no photoselection occurs, the amplitude of the 3-ps component, which is indicative of the charge separation, dominates. When the primary electron acceptor Pheo is reduced prior to P680 excitation, the 3-ps component is eliminated. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants of Charge Recombination Reactions in Bacterial Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy, T. T.; Yen, V. T. H.; Thao, T. T.; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    The bacterial reaction center couples light-induced electron transfer via a tightly bound ubiquinone (QA) to a mobile ubiquinone (QB). Based on the electron transfer theory by Marcus, we have investigated the rate of charge recombination reactions from Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, by mean of finding an approximation formula. The results obtained are verified for not only at high and low temperature as the previous works but also at the medium temperature range.

  12. Analysis of quasifission competition in fusion reactions forming heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Kalee; Kohley, Zachary; Morrissey, Dave; Wakhle, Aditya; Stiefel, Krystin; Hinde, David; Dasgupta, Mahananda; Williams, Elizabeth; Simenel, Cedric; Carter, Ian; Cook, Kaitlin; Jeung, Dongyun; Luong, Duc Huy; McNeil, Steven; Palshetkar, Chandani; Rafferty, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions have provided a mechanism for the production of superheavy elements allowing for the extension of both the periodic table and chart of the nuclides. However, fusion of the projectile and target, forming a compound nucleus, is hindered by orders of magnitude by the quasifission process in heavy systems. In order to fully understand this mechanism, and make accurate predictions for superheavy element production cross sections, a clear description of the interplay between the fusion-fission and quasifission reaction channels is necessary. The mass-angle distributions of fragments formed in 8 different Cr + W reactions were measured at the Australia National University in order to explore the N/Z dependence of the quasifission process. Two sets of data were measured: one at a constant energy relative to the fusion barrier and one at a constant compound nucleus excitation energy. The results of this analysis will provide insight into the effect of using more neutron-rich beams in superheavy element production reactions.

  13. Probing active electron transfer branch in photosystem I reaction center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Martinsson, Peter; Chitnis, Parag

    2003-03-01

    Complimentary point mutations were introduced at the primary electron acceptor sites in A and B branches of the photosystem I (PS I) reaction center (RC) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and their effect on the kinetics of the electron transfer process was studied by means of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The results indicate that in these species the electron transfer occurs primarily along the A-branch. Previous optical experiments on PS I complexes from Chlorella sorokiniana demonstrated that both branches of RC are equally active. That suggests that the directionality of electron transfer in PS I is species dependent.

  14. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  15. Pigment exchange of photosystem II reaction center by chlorophyll d.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tatsuya; Hirano, Emi; Nagata, Junko; Nakazato, Katsuyoshi

    2005-06-01

    Pigment exchanges among photosystem reaction centers (RCs) are useful for the identification and functional analysis of chromophores in photosynthetic organisms. Pigment replacement within the spinach Photosystem II RC was performed with Chl d derived from the oxygenic alga Acaryochloris marina, using a protocol similar to that reported previously [Gall et al. (1998) FEBS Lett 434: 88-92] based on the incubation of reaction centers with an excess of other pigments. In this study, we analyzed Chl d-modified monomeric RC which was separated from Chl d-modified dimeric RC by size-exclusion chromatography. Based on the assumption of a constant ratio of two Pheo a molecules per RC, the number of Chl a molecules in Chl d-modified monomeric RCs was found to decrease from six to four. The absorption spectrum of the Chl d-modified monomeric RC at room temperature showed a large peak at 699.5 nm originating from Chl d and a small peak at 672.5 nm orignating from Chl a. Photoaccumulation of the Pheo a- in Chl d-modified monomeric RC, in the presence of sodium dithionate and methyl viologen, did not differ significantly from that in control RC, showing that the Chl d-modified monomeric RC retains its charge separation activity and photochemically active Pheo a.

  16. Photosynthetic reaction center as a quantum heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Voronine, Dmitri V; Mukamel, Shaul; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-02-19

    Two seemingly unrelated effects attributed to quantum coherence have been reported recently in natural and artificial light-harvesting systems. First, an enhanced solar cell efficiency was predicted and second, population oscillations were measured in photosynthetic antennae excited by sequences of coherent ultrashort laser pulses. Because both systems operate as quantum heat engines (QHEs) that convert the solar photon energy to useful work (electric currents or chemical energy, respectively), the question arises whether coherence could also enhance the photosynthetic yield. Here, we show that both effects arise from the same population-coherence coupling term which is induced by noise, does not require coherent light, and will therefore work for incoherent excitation under natural conditions of solar excitation. Charge separation in light-harvesting complexes occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls (the special pair) at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. We show the analogy between the energy level schemes of the special pair and of the laser/photocell QHEs, and that both population oscillations and enhanced yield have a common origin and are expected to coexist for typical parameters. We predict an enhanced yield of 27% in a QHE motivated by the reaction center. This suggests nature-mimicking architectures for artificial solar energy devices.

  17. Electrostatic Interactions in Proteins: Application to the Photosynthetic Reaction Center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroza, Paul

    This is a computational study of electrostatic interactions in the reaction center from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The reaction center is a protein/pigment complex that initiates the conversion of light energy into chemical energy. One of the important reactions in this process is the transfer of an electron from the primary electron acceptor (Q_ A , a ubiquinone-10 molecule) to the secondary electron acceptor (Q_ B, also a ubiquinone -10). In this work, I apply a continuum electrostatic model to calculate the energetics of the electron transfer between the quinones. The protein is treated as a continuum of low dielectric embedded in a high-dielectric continuum (the solvent). The atomic coordinates of the protein, determined by X-ray crystallography, provide the atomic detail necessary to define the dielectric interface and the location of charges in the protein. The electrostatic energy for a charge distribution in the protein is determined from a finite -difference solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The free energy of electron transfer is coupled to the solution pH by electrostatic interactions with titrating amino acids in the reaction center. The effect of these interactions is approximated by a Monte Carlo sampling of the protonation states of the protein. The calculations show that the major difference between the electrostatic environments of the quinones is the large number of titrating residues near Q _{rm B}. Although there are large desolvation energies for charges near Q _{rm B}, compensating interactions, particularly from the dipoles in the polypeptide backbone of the protein, favor the ionization of acidic residues nearby. The calculated pH dependence of the free energy of electron transfer agrees well with experiment, but there is a systematic error in the absolute free energy. Glu L212, an acidic residue near Q_{rm B}, is calculated to dominate the proton uptake resulting from electron transfer, in

  18. Reaction of sodium calcium borate glasses to form hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Day, Delbert E

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the transformation of two sodium calcium borate glasses to hydroxyapatite (HA). The chemical reaction was between either 1CaO . 2Na(2)O . 6B(2)O(3) or 2CaO . 2Na(2)O . 6B(2)O(3) glass and a 0.25 M phosphate (K(2)HPO(4)) solution at 37, 75 and 200 degrees C. Glass samples in the form of irregular particles (125-180 microm) and microspheres (45-90 and 125-180 microm) were used in order to understand the reaction mechanism. The effect of glass composition (calcium content) on the weight loss rate and reaction temperature on crystal size, crystallinity and grain shape of the reaction products were studied. Carbonated HA was made by dissolving an appropriate amount of carbonate (K(2)CO(3)) in the 0.25 M phosphate solution. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the reaction products. The results show that sodium calcium borate glasses can be transformed to HA by reacting with a phosphate solution. It is essentially a process of dissolution of glass and precipitation of HA. The transformation begins from an amorphous state to calcium-deficient HA without changing the size and shape of the original glass sample. Glass with a lower calcium content (1CaO . 2Na(2)O . 6B(2)O(3)), or reacted at an elevated temperature (75 degrees C), has a higher reaction rate. The HA crystal size increases and grain shape changes from spheroidal to cylindrical as temperature increases from 37 to 200 degrees C. Increase in carbonate concentration can also decrease the crystal size and yield a more needle-like grain shape.

  19. Immobilization of photosynthetic reaction centers on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, T.M.; Chumanov, G.; Gual, D.

    1993-12-31

    Membrane-bound proteins are ideal candidates for immobilization on surfaces because of their distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. Their interaction with a particular surface should depend upon its hydrophilicity. Variation of the surface properties is expected to result in changes in the orientation of an absorbed protein. In this study, two methods for immobilization of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroids on metal surfaces have been compared, including self-assembly or spontaneous adsorption and Langmuir-Blodgett transfer of monolayers from an air/water interface. The effect of the immobilization procedure on the structure of the protein complex has been determined from photochemical activity and optical measurements. The experimental variables which are critical for maintaining the structure and function of the protein in the adsorbed state will be discussed.

  20. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S. ); Govindjee ); O'Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. )

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 [plus minus] 0.6 ps at 4[degree]C and 1.4[plus minus] 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680[sup +]-Pheo[sup [minus

  1. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  2. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reaction-Formed Joints in Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    1998-01-01

    A reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RB-SiC) ceramic material (Carborundum's Cerastar RB-SIC) has been joined using a reaction forming approach. Microstructure and mechanical properties of three types of reaction-formed joints (350 micron, 50-55 micron, and 20-25 micron thick) have been evaluated. Thick (approximately 350 micron) joints consist mainly of silicon with a small amount of silicon carbide. The flexural strength of thick joints is about 44 plus or minus 2 MPa, and fracture always occurs at the joints. The microscopic examination of fracture surfaces of specimens with thick joints tested at room temperature revealed the failure mode to be typically brittle. Thin joints (<50-55 micron) consist of silicon carbide and silicon phases. The room and high temperature flexural strengths of thin (<50-55 micron) reaction-formed joints have been found to be at least equal to that of the bulk Cerastar RB-SIC materials because the flexure bars fracture away from the joint regions. In this case, the fracture origins appear to be inhomogeneities inside the parent material. This was always found to be the case for thin joints tested at temperatures up to 1350C in air. This observation suggests that the strength of Cerastar RB-SIC material containing a thin joint is not limited by the joint strength but by the strength of the bulk (parent) materials.

  4. Spectroscopic properties of photosystem II reaction center revisited.

    PubMed

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Abramavicius, Darius; Ogilvie, Jennifer P; Valkunas, Leonas

    2017-09-21

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only biological system capable of splitting water to molecular oxygen. Its reaction center (RC) is responsible for the primary charge separation that drives the water oxidation reaction. In this work, we revisit the spectroscopic properties of the PSII RC using the complex time-dependent Redfield (ctR) theory for optical lineshapes [A. Gelzinis et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154107 (2015)]. We obtain the PSII RC model parameters (site energies, disorder, and reorganization energies) from the fits of several spectra and then further validate the model by calculating additional independent spectra. We obtain good to excellent agreement between theory and calculations. We find that overall our model is similar to some of the previous asymmetric exciton models of the PSII RC. On the other hand, our model displays differences from previous work based on the modified Redfield theory. We extend the ctR theory to describe the Stark spectrum and use its fit to obtain the parameters of a single charge transfer state included in our model. Our results suggest that ChlD1(+)PheoD1(-) is most likely the primary charge transfer state, but that the Stark spectrum of the PSII RC is probably also influenced by other states.

  5. Transcriptional analysis of the B cell germinal center reaction

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Keller, Jeffrey L.; Haddad, Joseph; Miljkovic, Vladan; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    The germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial for T cell-dependent immune responses and is targeted by B cell lymphomagenesis. Here we analyzed the transcriptional changes that occur in B cells during GC transit (naïve B cells → centroblasts → centrocytes → memory B cells) by gene expression profiling. Naïve B cells, characterized by the expression of cell cycle-inhibitory and antiapoptotic genes, become centroblasts by inducing an atypical proliferation program lacking c-Myc expression, switching to a proapoptotic program, and down-regulating cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion receptors. The transition from GC to memory cells is characterized by a return to a phenotype similar to that of naïve cells except for an apoptotic program primed for both death and survival and for changes in the expression of cell surface receptors including IL-2 receptor β. These results provide insights into the dynamics of the GC reaction and represent the basis for the analysis of B cell malignancies. PMID:12604779

  6. Spectroscopic properties of photosystem II reaction center revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Abramavicius, Darius; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Valkunas, Leonas

    2017-09-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only biological system capable of splitting water to molecular oxygen. Its reaction center (RC) is responsible for the primary charge separation that drives the water oxidation reaction. In this work, we revisit the spectroscopic properties of the PSII RC using the complex time-dependent Redfield (ctR) theory for optical lineshapes [A. Gelzinis et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154107 (2015)]. We obtain the PSII RC model parameters (site energies, disorder, and reorganization energies) from the fits of several spectra and then further validate the model by calculating additional independent spectra. We obtain good to excellent agreement between theory and calculations. We find that overall our model is similar to some of the previous asymmetric exciton models of the PSII RC. On the other hand, our model displays differences from previous work based on the modified Redfield theory. We extend the ctR theory to describe the Stark spectrum and use its fit to obtain the parameters of a single charge transfer state included in our model. Our results suggest that C h lD1 +P h e oD1 - is most likely the primary charge transfer state, but that the Stark spectrum of the PSII RC is probably also influenced by other states.

  7. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. [Generation of the differences of the electric potentials by Rhodospirillum rubrum reaction center complexes devoid of the heavy subunit].

    PubMed

    Barskiĭ, E L; Kondrashin, A A; Samuilov, V D

    1982-10-01

    The electrogenic activity of Rhodospirillum rubrum P870 reaction center complexes devoid of the heavy (H) subunit and retaining the light (L) and medium (M) subunits, was studied. The proteoliposomes containing such reaction center complexes were formed by a self-assembly procedure, using soya bean phospholipids. In the presence of Ca2+ the reaction center proteoliposomes were incorporated into a phospholipid-impregnated Teflon filter separating two solutions of identical composition. After addition of N,N,N',N'-tetra-methyl-p-phenylenediamine (or cytochrome c) and qinone (menadione), illumination caused generation of an electric potential difference between the two filter-separated compartments, the proteoliposome-free compartment being negatively charged. The illuminated proteoliposomes took up penetrating tetraphenylphosphonium cations and, in a lesser degree, tetraphenylborate anions. The data obtained suggest that the reaction center complexes containing only L- and M-subunits possess the electrogenic activity. The H-subunit is not directly involved in membrane potential generation.

  9. Comparative evaluation of adverse drug reaction reporting forms for introduction of a spontaneous generic ADR form

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshi; Bhatt, Parloop

    2012-01-01

    Despite comprehensive and stringent phases of clinical trials and surveillance efforts, unexpected and serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) repeatedly occur after the drug is marketed. ADR reporting is an important aspect of an efficient and effective pharmacovigilance program. Although Medwatch, Yellow Card, CDSCO form, etc. are the protocol forms of ADR collection and reports, a number of countries design and use their respective ADR forms. This review compares similarities and dissimilarities of 13 ADR forms of countries representing their geographical location. This study extracted 73 data elements mentioned in 13 different ADR forms. Only 13 elements were common. An ADR form of Malaysia and Canada covers the highest number of data 43, while Brazil falls to the opposite end with a number of 17 data elements in lieu with the Generic ADR Form. The result of this review highlights 58 data elements of the proposed generic ADR form which ensures that requisite reporting information essential for correct causality assessment of ADRs are included. The proposed “Generic ADR form” could be adopted worldwide mandatorily for reporting any/all ADRs associated with marketed drugs. PMID:23129957

  10. How to harvest solar energy with the photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaeff, Alexander; Reyes, Justin

    Photosynthetic reaction center (PRC) is a protein complex that performs a key step in photosynthesis: the electron-hole separation driven by photon absorbtion. The PRC has a great promise for applications in solar energy harvesting and photosensing. Such applications, however, are hampered by the difficulty in extracting the photogenerated electric charge from the PRC. To that end, it was proposed to attach the PRC to a molecular wire through which the charge could be collected. In order to find the attachment point for the wire that would maximize the rate of charge outflow from the PRC, we performed a computational study of the PRC from the R. virdis bacterium. An ensemble of PRC structures generated by a molecular dynamics simulation was used to calculate the rate of charge transport from the site of initial charge separation to several trial sites on the protein surface. The Pathways model was used to calculate the charge transfer rate in each step of the network of heme co-factors through which the charge transport was presumed to proceed. A simple kinetic model was then used to determine the overall rate of the multistep charge transport. The calculations revealed several candidate sites for the molecular wire attachment, recommended for experimental verification.

  11. Electron transfer in native and mutated photosystem I reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Xu, Wu; Chitnis, Parag; Struve, Walter

    2002-03-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved absorption difference studies were performed on photosystem I complexes from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The overal electron transfer from the special pair P700 to the secondary acceptor A1 has been shown to be 10 ps, twice shorter than the previously estimated value. Similar studies were performed on more than 10 genetically engineered species, where protein structure was altered in the visinity of the reaction center (RC). The functioning of the PS I complex was found to be extremelly sensitive to the protein sequence in the immediate proximity of the RC: less than half of the studied mutations resulted in photosynthetically active complexes, and all of the latter had electron transfer dynamics indistinguishable from that of the wild type. Most of the mutations in the other areas of the PS I, including antenna, did not affect the photosynthetic function of this complex radically. These results confirm the extreme importance of the precise RC structure and demonstrate why millions of years of evolution resulted in only two types of topologically similar RC's shared by all photosynthetic organisms.

  12. Electrostatic dominoes: long distance propagation of mutational effects in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Sebban, P; Maróti, P; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K

    1995-07-04

    Two point mutants from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, both modified in the M protein of the photosynthetic reaction center, have been studied by flash-induced absorbance spectroscopy. These strains carry either the M231Arg --> Leu or M43ASN --> Asp mutations, which are located 9 and 15 A, respectively, from the terminal electron acceptor QB. In the wild-type Rb. sphaeroides structure, M231Arg is involved in a conserved salt bridge with H125Glu and H232Glu and M43Asn is located among several polar residues that form or surround the QB binding site. These substitutions were originally uncovered in phenotypic revertants isolated from the photosynthetically incompetent L212Glu-L213Asp --> Ala-Ala site-specific double mutant. As second-site suppressor mutations, they have been shown to restore the proton transfer function that is interrupted in the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant. The electrostatic effects that are induced in reaction centers by the M231Arg --> Leu and M43Asn --> Asp substitutions are roughly the same in either the double-mutant or wild-type backgrounds. In a reaction center that is otherwise wild type in sequence, they decrease the free energy gap between the QA- and QB- states by 24 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 5 meV, respectively. The pH dependences of K2, the QA-QB <--> QAQB- equilibrium constant, are altered in reaction centers that carry either of these substitutions, revealing differences in the pKas of titratable groups compared to the wild type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, George D.; Cotton, Therese M.; Zhou, Chengli; Gaul, Dale; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael

    1993-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra were obtained for the reaction center complexes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RC) and from photosystem II (PSII) of spinach, adsorbed on Ag and Au surfaces. These preliminary results demonstrate the considerable potential of this technique for selectively exciting resonance Raman scattering from reaction center components within their distinct absorption bands. Because of the high sensitivity afforded by SERRS, spectra could be measured from a single monolayer of reaction centers adsorbed on a metal surface. The surface-sensitivity provides new information indicating the topology of the PSII reaction center 47 kD light-harvesting protein complex. The activity of the PSII reaction center complex adsorbed on metal surfaces was monitored by photochemical reduction of cyt b-559. Measurement of fluorescence emission was shown to be a new and sensitive method for monitoring the structural and functional integrity of the PSII reaction center complex on the metal surface.

  14. [Characteristics of leprosy reactions in paucibacillary and multibacillary individuals attended at two reference centers in Recife, Pernambuco].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; Silveira, Vera Magalhães da; França, Emmanuel Rodrigues de

    2010-01-01

    Significant reactions frequently occur among leprosy cases, and thus a significant proportion of leprosy patients present disabilities and undergo leprosy retreatment. Clinical-epidemiological characterization of reaction patterns is essential for managing such patients. Objective to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of leprosy reactions among paucibacillary and multibacillary individuals. In this cross-sectional study, 201 patients with histories of reactions who were attended at two reference centers for leprosy treatment were evaluated. Variables such as initial bacilloscopy, sex, age, skin phototype, origin, clinical presentation, type of treatment, type of reaction, final bacilloscopy index and time of reaction onset in relation to the treatment were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using simple frequencies. To calculate risk factors for multibacillary forms, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Male sex, age between 30 and 44 years, phototype V, borderline clinical form, regular treatment, type I reaction, neuritis, presence of 10 to 20 nodules and onset of the leprosy reaction during the treatment were the most frequent findings. Male patients predominated and were associated with greater risk of developing the multibacillary forms. Leprosy reactions occurred most frequently during the treatment. Multibacillary patients were more likely to need leprosy retreatment, and those with type I and type II reactions presented greater frequency of neuritis, lymphadenopathy, arthritis and iritis than did those with isolated reactions.

  15. Modification of photosystem I reaction center by the extraction and exchange of chlorophylls and quinones.

    PubMed

    Itoh, S; Iwaki, M; Ikegami, I

    2001-10-30

    The photosystem (PS) I photosynthetic reaction center was modified thorough the selective extraction and exchange of chlorophylls and quinones. Extraction of lyophilized photosystem I complex with diethyl ether depleted more than 90% chlorophyll (Chl) molecules bound to the complex, preserving the photochemical electron transfer activity from the primary electron donor P700 to the acceptor chlorophyll A(0). The treatment extracted all the carotenoids and the secondary acceptor phylloquinone (A(1)), and produced a PS I reaction center that contains nine molecules of Chls including P700 and A(0), and three Fe-S clusters (F(X), F(A) and F(B)). The ether-extracted PS I complex showed fast electron transfer from P700 to A(0) as it is, and to FeS clusters if phylloquinone or an appropriate artificial quinone was reconstituted as A(1). The ether-extracted PS I enabled accurate detection of the primary photoreactions with little disturbance from the absorbance changes of the bulk pigments. The quinone reconstitution created the new reactions between the artificial cofactors and the intrinsic components with altered energy gaps. We review the studies done in the ether-extracted PS I complex including chlorophyll forms of the core moiety of PS I, fluorescence of P700, reaction rate between A(0) and reconstituted A(1), and the fast electron transfer from P700 to A(0). Natural exchange of chlorophyll a to 710-740 nm absorbing chlorophyll d in PS I of the newly found cyanobacteria-like organism Acaryochloris marina was also reviewed. Based on the results of exchange studies in different systems, designs of photosynthetic reaction centers are discussed.

  16. Nuclear Reaction Data Center Network; International and Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Otuka, Naohiko

    2009-03-31

    The activities of the Nuclear Reaction Data Centre at Hokkaido University and International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centre (NRDC) are explained. Finally, collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries are proposed.

  17. Light saturation response of inactive photosystem II reaction centers in spinach.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Whitmarsh, J

    1990-07-01

    The effective absorption cross section of inactive photosystem II (PS II) centers, which is the product of the effective antenna size and the quantum yield for photochemistry, was investigated by comparing the light saturation curves of inactive PS II and active reaction centers in intact chloroplasts and thylakoid membranes of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Inactive PS II centers are defined as the impaired PS II reaction centers that require greater than 50 ms for the reoxidation of QA (-) subsequent to a single turnover flash. Active reaction centers are defined as the rapidly turning over PS II centers (recovery time less than 50 ms) and all of the PS I centers. The electrochromic shift, measured by the flash-induced absorbance increase at 518 nm, was used to probe the activity of the reaction centers. Light saturation curves were generated for inactive PS II centers and active reaction centers by measuring the extent of the absorbance increase at 518 nm induced by red actinic flashes of variable energy. The light saturation curves show that inactive PS II centers required over twice as many photons as active reaction centers to achieve the same yield. The ratio of the flash energy required for 50% saturation for active reaction centers (PS II active + PS I) compared to inactive PS II centers was 0.45±0.04 in intact chloroplasts, and 0.54±0.11 in thylakoid membranes. Analysis of the light saturation curves using a Poisson statistical model in which the ratio of the antenna size of active PS II centers to that of PS I is considered to range from 1 to 1.5, indicates that the effective absorption cross section of inactive PS II centers was 0.54-0.37 times that of active PS II centers. If the quantum yield for photochemistry is assumed to be one, we estimate that the antenna system serving the inactive PS II centers contains approx. 110 chlorophyll molecules.

  18. Compensation for L212GLU in bacterial reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Deng, Y.L.; Schiffer, M.; Sebban, P.

    1995-12-31

    In wild-type bacterial reaction centers (RC), residue L212Glu, which is located about 5 {Angstrom} away from Q{sub B}, is involved in the delivery of the second proton to Q{sub B{sup 2}{minus}} [1-4]. We previously constructed the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala double mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus, and it is incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS{sup {minus}}) due to interruption of the proton transfer pathway to Q{sub B}[3,4]. We have isolated several photocompetent (PS{sup +}) phenotypic revertants of this L212-L213AA double mutant [3-7]. The compensatory mutations that restore function in these strains are diverse and show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is absolutely required for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer. Genotypic revertant and second-site mutations, located within the Q{sub B} binding picket or at more distant sites, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213 to restore photocompetence. One of the phenotypic revertants of the L212Ala-L213Ala double mutant carries a genotypic reversion of L213Ala to Asp; the Ala substitution at L212 remains. We were intrigued that this L212Glu {yields} Ala mutant R. capsulatus is photocompetent, while the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant of R. sphaeroides is not, particularly since the sequence identity in the Q{sub B} site of these two strains is 90{percent} [8]. To this end, we constructed the L212Glu {yields} Gln mutant in R. capsulatus, and it is also PS{sup {minus}}. To determine the function that is lost in the L212Gln mutant but restored by Ala at that site, we selected four PS{sup +} revertants from the L212Gln strain.

  19. Porous silicon/photosynthetic reaction center hybrid nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Kata; Gergely, Csilla; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Zimányi, László; Tenger, Katalin; Khoroshyy, Petro; Palestino, Gabriela; Agarwal, Vivechana; Hernádi, Klára; Németh, Zoltán; Nagy, László

    2012-08-14

    The purified photosynthetic reaction center protein (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 purple bacteria was bound to porous silicon microcavities (PSiMc) either through silane-glutaraldehyde (GTA) chemistry or via a noncovalent peptide cross-linker. The characteristic resonance mode in the microcavity reflectivity spectrum red shifted by several nanometers upon RC binding, indicating the protein infiltration into the porous silicon (PSi) photonic structure. Flash photolysis experiments confirmed the photochemical activity of RC after its binding to the solid substrate. The kinetic components of the intraprotein charge recombination were considerably faster (τ(fast) = 14 (±9) ms, τ(slow) = 230 (±28) ms with the RC bound through the GTA cross-linker and only τ(fast) = 27 (±3) ms through peptide coating) than in solution (τ(fast) = 120 (±3) ms, τ(slow) = 1387 (±2) ms), indicating the effect of the PSi surface on the light-induced electron transfer in the protein. The PSi/RC complex was found to oxidize the externally added electron donor, mammalian cytochrome c, and the cytochrome oxidation was blocked by the competitive RC inhibitor, terbutryne. This fact indicates that the specific surface binding sites on the PSi-bound RC are still accessible to external cofactors and an electronic interaction with redox components in the aqueous environment is possible. This new type of biophotonic material is considered to be an excellent model for new generation applications at the interface of silicon-based electronics and biological redox systems designed by nature.

  20. Procedure for rapid isolation of photosynthetic reaction centers using cytochrome c affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Brudvig, G.W.; Worland, S.T.; Sauer, K.

    1983-02-01

    Horse heart cytochrome c linked to Sepharose 4B is used to purify reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. This procedure allows for an initial recovery of 80-90% of the bacterial reaction centers present in chromatophore membranes. High purity reaction centers (A/sub 280//A/sub 802/ < 1.30) can be obtained with a 30% recovery. Reaction centers from wild-type Rps. sphaeroides and Rps. capsulata also bind to a cytochrome c column. Cytochrome c affinity chromatography can also be used to isolate photosystem I complexes from spinach chloroplasts.

  1. Phenomenological description of a three-center insertion reaction: an information-theoretic study.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Flores-Gallegos, Nelson; Dehesa, Jesús S; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Antolín, Juan; López-Rosa, Sheila; Sen, K D

    2010-02-04

    Information-theoretic measures are employed to describe the course of a three-center chemical reaction in terms of detecting the transition state and the stationary points unfolding the bond-forming and bond-breaking regions which are not revealed in the energy profile. The information entropy profiles for the selected reactions are generated by following the intrinsic-reaction-coordinate (IRC) path calculated at the MP2 level of theory from which Shannon entropies in position and momentum spaces at the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p) level are determined. Several complementary reactivity descriptors are also determined, such as the dipole moment, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through a multipole expansion (DMA), the atomic charges and electric potentials fitted to the MEP, the hardness and softness DFT descriptors, and several geometrical parameters which support the information-theoretic analysis. New density-based structures related to the bond-forming and bond-breaking regions are proposed. Our results support the concept of a continuum of transient of Zewail and Polanyi for the transition state rather than a single state, which is also in agreement with reaction-force analyses.

  2. From photons to protons in the photocycle of bacterial reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Maroti, P., Osvath, S., Tapai, C., Hanson, D.K. , Sebban, P.

    1995-12-31

    The detailed knowledge of the atomic coordinates of the bacterial reaction center (RC) has permitted a close scrutiny of structure/function relationships not only of the quinones but of the protein itself with its internal water structure. Protonatable groups were identified as intrinsic part of the redox reactions, providing charge compensation and forming channels for the movement of hydrogen ions to QB2-. The nature and position of these groups give rise to electrostatic profiles that determine the kinetics and energetics of proton transport. Fine tuning or dramatic variations of protein delivery pathways can adapt the photocycle to changes in bulk phase pH value, buffering capacities and primary structure of the RC.

  3. Face-centered-cubic lithium crystals formed in mesopores of carbon nanofiber electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-Sun; Seo, Jong-Hyun; Son, Seoung-Bum; Kim, Seul Cham; Choi, In-Suk; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Se-Hee; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2013-07-23

    In the foreseeable future, there will be a sharp increase in the demand for flexible Li-ion batteries. One of the most important components of such batteries will be a freestanding electrode, because the traditional electrodes are easily damaged by repeated deformations. The mechanical sustainability of carbon-based freestanding electrodes subjected to repeated electrochemical reactions with Li ions is investigated via nanotensile tests of individual hollow carbon nanofibers (HCNFs). Surprisingly, the mechanical properties of such electrodes are improved by repeated electrochemical reactions with Li ions, which is contrary to the conventional wisdom that the mechanical sustainability of carbon-based electrodes should be degraded by repeated electrochemical reactions. Microscopic studies reveal a reinforcing mechanism behind this improvement, namely, that inserted Li ions form irreversible face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals within HCNF cavities, which can reinforce the carbonaceous matrix as strong second-phase particles. These FCC Li crystals formed within the carbon matrix create tremendous potential for HCNFs as freestanding electrodes for flexible batteries, but they also contribute to the irreversible (and thus low) capacity of HCNFs.

  4. The Friedel-Crafts Reaction - A Sixth Form Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodson, D.

    1973-01-01

    Suggests that the Friedel-Crafts reaction, used for synthesizing a wide range of aromatic compounds, is an ideal vehicle for extended senior high school project work in chemistry. Provides a theoretical discussion of the reaction, suggests a number of suitable investigations, and outlines the experimental details. (JR)

  5. Organic Reaction Mechanisms in the Sixth Form Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Presents the mechanistic ideas underlying reactions between nucleophiles and carbonyl compounds as well as some popular misconceptions. Relates reactions of carboxylic acid derivatives to those of aldehydes and ketones. Discusses leaving group ability and the ability of carbonyl oxygen to accept a negative charge. (Author/MVL)

  6. Organic Reaction Mechanisms in the Sixth Form Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Presents the mechanistic ideas underlying reactions between nucleophiles and carbonyl compounds as well as some popular misconceptions. Relates reactions of carboxylic acid derivatives to those of aldehydes and ketones. Discusses leaving group ability and the ability of carbonyl oxygen to accept a negative charge. (Author/MVL)

  7. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  8. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  9. Aerosols formed from the chemical reaction of monoterpenes and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ambe, Y.

    Chamber experiments were conducted to study the aerosol products from the ozonolysis of the major atmospheric monoterpenes; α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene. It was found that the α-pinene-O 3 reaction produced mainly 2', 2'-dimethyl-3'-acetyl cyclobutyl ethanal (pinonaldehyde), the β-pinene-O 3 reaction, mainly 6,6-dimethyl-bicyclo [3.1.1] heptan-2-one and the limonene-O 3 reaction, several unidentified products. These products were sought in forest aerosols and pinonaldehyde was detected in the atmosphere.

  10. Aerosols formed from the chemical reaction of monoterpenes and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ambe, Y.

    Chamber experiments were conducted to study the aerosol products from the ozonolysis of the major atmospheric monoterpenes; α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene. It was found that the α-pinend-O 3 reaction produced mainly 2'. 2'-dimethyl-3'-acetyl cyclobutyl ethanal (pinonaldehyde), the β-pinene-O 3 reaction, mainly 6,6-dimethyl-bicyclo [3.1.1] heptan-2-one and the limonene-O 3 reaction, several unidentified products. These products were sought in forest aerosols and pinonaldehyde was detected in the atmosphere.

  11. SMT Course Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Scientific Management Training Registration Form For NCI Fellows and Staff May 19, 2017 9:00 am - 12:00 noon (Frederick) 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm (Bethesda) Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form. Questions?

  12. The Effects of Process-Centered and Form-Centered Instruction on the Coherence of College Freshman Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Wesley K.

    This comparative study evaluated the writing growth of 97 college freshman before and after instruction to determine if a process-centered mode of teaching had a more significant impact than a traditional form-centered mode of instruction on discourse coherence in composition. The study used a pretest/posttest, quasi-experimental design with both…

  13. A fresh look at the evolution and diversification of photochemical reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Tanai

    2015-10-01

    In this review, I reexamine the origin and diversification of photochemical reaction centers based on the known phylogenetic relations of the core subunits, and with the aid of sequence and structural alignments. I show, for example, that the protein folds at the C-terminus of the D1 and D2 subunits of Photosystem II, which are essential for the coordination of the water-oxidizing complex, were already in place in the most ancestral Type II reaction center subunit. I then evaluate the evolution of reaction centers in the context of the rise and expansion of the different groups of bacteria based on recent large-scale phylogenetic analyses. I find that the Heliobacteriaceae family of Firmicutes appears to be the earliest branching of the known groups of phototrophic bacteria; however, the origin of photochemical reaction centers and chlorophyll synthesis cannot be placed in this group. Moreover, it becomes evident that the Acidobacteria and the Proteobacteria shared a more recent common phototrophic ancestor, and this is also likely for the Chloroflexi and the Cyanobacteria. Finally, I argue that the discrepancies among the phylogenies of the reaction center proteins, chlorophyll synthesis enzymes, and the species tree of bacteria are best explained if both types of photochemical reaction centers evolved before the diversification of the known phyla of phototrophic bacteria. The primordial phototrophic ancestor must have had both Type I and Type II reaction centers.

  14. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Makinaga, Ayano; Togashi, Tomoaki; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-06-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  15. Nuclear Reaction Data File for Astrophysics (NRDF/A) in Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katō, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Masaaki; Furutachi, Naoya; Togashi, Tomoaki; Makinaga, Ayano; Otuka, Naohiko

    2010-06-01

    The activities of the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre is explained. The main task of the centre is data compilation of Japanese nuclear reaction data in collaboration of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres. As one of recent activities, preparation of a new database (NRDF/A) and evaluation of astronuclear reaction data are reported. Collaboration in the nuclear data activities among Asian countries is proposed.

  16. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  17. Kinetic analysis of the thermal stability of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Arwel V; Rees, Paul; Heathcote, Peter; Jones, Michael R

    2006-06-01

    The temperature-induced denaturation of the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been studied through the changes that occur in the absorption spectrum of the bound chromophores on heating. At elevated temperatures, the characteristic absorbance bands of the bacteriochlorins bound to the polypeptides within the reaction center are lost, and are replaced by features typical of unbound bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin. The kinetics of the spectral changes cannot be explained by a direct conversion from the functional to the denatured form of the protein, and require the presence of at least one intermediate. Possible mechanisms for the transformation via an intermediate are examined using a global analysis of the kinetic data, and the most likely mechanism is shown to involve a reversible transformation between the native state and an off-pathway intermediate, coupled to an irreversible transformation to the denatured state. The activation energies for the transformations between the three components are calculated from the effect of temperature on the individual rate constants, and the likely structural changes of the protein during the temperature-induced transformation are discussed.

  18. SARD Course Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form. Questions? E-mail Dr. Terry Moody or contact him by phone at (240) 276-7785.

  19. TRACO Course Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    TRACO Translational Research in Clinical Oncology September 5 - December 4, 2017 For NIH Postdoctoral and Clinical Fellows Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form.

  20. Effects of Nuclear Spin Polarization on Reaction Dynamics in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Richard A.; Boxer, Steven G.

    1987-01-01

    Singlet-triplet mixing in the initial radical-pair state, P[unk]I[unk], of photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers is due to the hyperfine mechanism at low magnetic fields and both the hyperfine and Δg mechanisms at high magnetic fields (>1 kG). Since the hyperfine field felt by the electron spins in P[unk]I[unk] is dependent upon the nuclear spin state in each radical, the relative probabilities of charge recombination to the triplet state of the primary electron donor, 3PI, or the ground state, PI, will depend on the nuclear spin configuration. As a result these recombination products will have non-equilibrium distributions of nuclear spin states (nuclear spin polarization). This polarization will persist until the 3PI state decays. In addition, due to unequal nuclear spin relaxation rates in the diamagnetic PI and paramagnetic 3PI states, net polarization of the nuclear spins can result, especially in experiments that involve recycling of the system through the radical-pair state. This net polarization can persist for very long times, especially at low temperatures. Nuclear spin polarization can have consequences on any subsequent process that involves re-formation of the radical-pair state. Numerical calculations of the nuclear polarization caused by both of these mechanics are presented, including the effect of such polarization on subsequent yields of 3PI, 3PI decay rates, the decay rate of the radical pair, and saturation behavior. The effect of this polarization under certain circumstances can be very dramatic and can explain previously noted discrepancies between experiments and theories that do not include nuclear spin polarization effects. Our analysis suggests new classes of experiments and indicates the need to reinterpret some past experimental results. PMID:19431700

  1. Effects of nuclear spin polarization on reaction dynamics in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R A; Boxer, S G

    1987-06-01

    Singlet-triplet mixing in the initial radical-pair state, P[unk]I[unk], of photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers is due to the hyperfine mechanism at low magnetic fields and both the hyperfine and Deltag mechanisms at high magnetic fields (>1 kG). Since the hyperfine field felt by the electron spins in P[unk]I[unk] is dependent upon the nuclear spin state in each radical, the relative probabilities of charge recombination to the triplet state of the primary electron donor, (3)PI, or the ground state, PI, will depend on the nuclear spin configuration. As a result these recombination products will have non-equilibrium distributions of nuclear spin states (nuclear spin polarization). This polarization will persist until the (3)PI state decays. In addition, due to unequal nuclear spin relaxation rates in the diamagnetic PI and paramagnetic (3)PI states, net polarization of the nuclear spins can result, especially in experiments that involve recycling of the system through the radical-pair state. This net polarization can persist for very long times, especially at low temperatures. Nuclear spin polarization can have consequences on any subsequent process that involves re-formation of the radical-pair state.Numerical calculations of the nuclear polarization caused by both of these mechanics are presented, including the effect of such polarization on subsequent yields of (3)PI, (3)PI decay rates, the decay rate of the radical pair, and saturation behavior. The effect of this polarization under certain circumstances can be very dramatic and can explain previously noted discrepancies between experiments and theories that do not include nuclear spin polarization effects. Our analysis suggests new classes of experiments and indicates the need to reinterpret some past experimental results.

  2. Redox Biology Course Evaluation Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    To improve the Redox Biology (RB) course in future years, we would appreciate your feedback by completing this course evaluation. Please score the course elements as poor, fair, average, good or excellent. Please type any comments that you have in response to the questions at the bottom of the form. Remember to include your name as you wish it to appear on the certificate. Thank you for your feedback.

  3. ST Course Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Statistical Tutorial course is intended primarily for NIH Clinical and Postdoctoral Fellows. Registration will be open: May 3, 2017 to May 19, 2017 This course's Date and location is: May 23, 9am - 12 Noon Building 49, Rooms 1A51-1A59 (Bethesda) Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form. Questions?

  4. Proton displacements coupled to primary electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center.

    PubMed

    Eisenmayer, Thomas J; Lasave, Jorge A; Monti, Adriano; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2013-09-26

    Using first-principles molecular dynamics (AIMD) and constrained density functional theory (CDFT) we identify the pathway of primary electron transfer in the R. Sphaeroides reaction center from the special pair excited state (P*) to the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (BA). Previous AIMD simulations on the special pair (PLPM) predicted a charge-transfer intermediate formation through the excited-state relaxation along a reaction coordinate characterized by the rotation of an axial histidine (HisM202). To account for the full electron transfer we extend the model to include the primary acceptor BA. In this extended model, the LUMO is primarily localized on the acceptor BA and extends over an interstitial water (water A) that is known to influence the rate of electron transfer (Potter et al. Biochemistry 2005 280, 27155-27164). A vibrational analysis of the dynamical trajectories gives a frequency of 30-35 cm(-1) for a molecular motion involving the hydrogen-bond network around water A, in good agreement with experimental findings (Yakovlev et al. Biochemistry, 2003, 68, 603-610). In its binding pocket water A can act as a switch by breaking and forming hydrogen bonds. With CDFT we calculate the energy required to the formation of the charge-separated state and find it to decrease along the predicted anisotropic reaction coordinate. Furthermore, we observe an increased coupling between the ground and charge-separated state. Water A adapts its hydrogen-bonding network along this reaction coordinate and weakens the hydrogen bond with HisM202. We also present AIMD simulations on the radical cation (P(•+)) showing a weakening of the hydrogen bond between HisL168 and the 3(1)-acetyl of PL. This work demonstrates how proton displacements are crucially coupled to the primary electron transfer and characterizes the reaction coordinate of the initial photoproduct formation.

  5. [High-order derivative spectroscopy of infrared absorption spectra of the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of reduced and chemically oxidized reaction center preparations from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated by means of high-order derivative spectroscopy. The model Gaussian band with a maximum at 810 nm and a half-band of 15 nm found in the absorption spectrum of the reduced reaction center preparation is eliminated after the oxidation of photoactive bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P). This band was related to the absorption of the P(+)y excitonic band of P. On the basis of experimental results, it was concluded that the bleaching of the P(+)y absorption band at 810 nm in the oxidized reaction center preparations gives the main contribution to the blue shift of the 800 nm absorption band of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers.

  6. Purification and spectroscopic characterization of photosystem II reaction center complexes isolated with or without Triton X-100.

    PubMed

    Eijckelhoff, C; van Roon, H; Groot, M L; van Grondelle, R; Dekker, J P

    1996-10-01

    The pigment composition of the isolated photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form currently is a matter of considerable debate. In this contribution, we present a new method based on a combination of gel filtration chromatography and diode array detection to analyze the composition of photosystem II reaction center preparations. We show that the method is very sensitive for the detection of contaminants such as the core antenna protein CP47, pigment-free and denatured reaction center proteins, and unbound chlorophyll and pheophytin molecules. We also present a method by which the photosystem II reaction center complex is highly purified without using Triton X-100, and we show that in this preparation the contamination with CP47 is less than 0.1%. The results strongly indicate that the photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form binds six chlorophyll a, two pheophytin a, and two beta-carotene molecules and that the main effect of Triton X-100 is the extraction of beta-carotene from the complex. Analysis of 4 K absorption and emission spectra indicates that the spectroscopic properties of this preparation are similar to those obtained by a short Triton X-100 treatment. In contrast, preparations obtained by long Triton X-100 treatment show decreased absorption of the shoulder at 684 nm in the 4 K absorption spectrum and an increased number of pigments that trap excitation energy at very low temperatures. We conclude that the 684 nm shoulder in the 4 K absorption spectrum should at least in part be attributed to the primary electron donor of photosystem II.

  7. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  8. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  9. Light-driven oxygen production from superoxide by Mn-binding bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Allen, James P; Olson, Tien L; Oyala, Paul; Lee, Wei-Jen; Tufts, Aaron A; Williams, JoAnn C

    2012-02-14

    One of the outstanding questions concerning the early Earth is how ancient phototrophs made the evolutionary transition from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis, which resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. We have previously demonstrated that reaction centers from anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria can be modified to bind a redox-active Mn cofactor, thus gaining a key functional feature of photosystem II, which contains the site for water oxidation in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants [Thielges M, et al. (2005) Biochemistry 44:7389-7394]. In this paper, the Mn-binding reaction centers are shown to have a light-driven enzymatic function; namely, the ability to convert superoxide into molecular oxygen. This activity has a relatively high efficiency with a k(cat) of approximately 1 s(-1) that is significantly larger than typically observed for designed enzymes, and a K(m) of 35-40 μM that is comparable to the value of 50 μM for Mn-superoxide dismutase, which catalyzes a similar reaction. Unlike wild-type reaction centers, the highly oxidizing reaction centers are not stable in the light unless they have a bound Mn. The stability and enzymatic ability of this type of Mn-binding reaction centers would have provided primitive phototrophs with an environmental advantage before the evolution of organisms with a more complex Mn(4)Ca cluster needed to perform the multielectron reactions required to oxidize water.

  10. Light-driven oxygen production from superoxide by Mn-binding bacterial reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, James P.; Olson, Tien L.; Oyala, Paul; Lee, Wei-Jen; Tufts, Aaron A.; Williams, JoAnn C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the outstanding questions concerning the early Earth is how ancient phototrophs made the evolutionary transition from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis, which resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. We have previously demonstrated that reaction centers from anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria can be modified to bind a redox-active Mn cofactor, thus gaining a key functional feature of photosystem II, which contains the site for water oxidation in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants [Thielges M, et al. (2005) Biochemistry 44:7389–7394]. In this paper, the Mn-binding reaction centers are shown to have a light-driven enzymatic function; namely, the ability to convert superoxide into molecular oxygen. This activity has a relatively high efficiency with a kcat of approximately 1 s-1 that is significantly larger than typically observed for designed enzymes, and a Km of 35–40 μM that is comparable to the value of 50 μM for Mn-superoxide dismutase, which catalyzes a similar reaction. Unlike wild-type reaction centers, the highly oxidizing reaction centers are not stable in the light unless they have a bound Mn. The stability and enzymatic ability of this type of Mn-binding reaction centers would have provided primitive phototrophs with an environmental advantage before the evolution of organisms with a more complex Mn4Ca cluster needed to perform the multielectron reactions required to oxidize water. PMID:22308385

  11. High throughput engineering to revitalize a vestigial electron transfer pathway in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Faries, Kaitlyn M; Kressel, Lucas L; Wander, Marc J; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Hanson, Deborah K

    2012-03-09

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert light energy into chemical energy in a series of transmembrane electron transfer reactions, each with near 100% yield. The structures of reaction centers reveal two symmetry-related branches of cofactors (denoted A and B) that are functionally asymmetric; purple bacterial reaction centers use the A pathway exclusively. Previously, site-specific mutagenesis has yielded reaction centers capable of transmembrane charge separation solely via the B branch cofactors, but the best overall electron transfer yields are still low. In an attempt to better realize the architectural and energetic factors that underlie the directionality and yields of electron transfer, sites within the protein-cofactor complex were targeted in a directed molecular evolution strategy that implements streamlined mutagenesis and high throughput spectroscopic screening. The polycistronic approach enables efficient construction and expression of a large number of variants of a heteroligomeric complex that has two intimately regulated subunits with high sequence similarity, common features of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic transmembrane protein assemblies. The strategy has succeeded in the discovery of several mutant reaction centers with increased efficiency of the B pathway; they carry multiple substitutions that have not been explored or linked using traditional approaches. This work expands our understanding of the structure-function relationships that dictate the efficiency of biological energy-conversion reactions, concepts that will aid the design of bio-inspired assemblies capable of both efficient charge separation and charge stabilization.

  12. Coke forming reaction kinetic study on petroleum based feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Shigley, J.K.; Fu, Ta-Wei

    1988-08-01

    The carbonization of hydrocarbons is a very complex process. The pyrolysis reactions are predominantly free radical in nature and can be summarized as a polymerization process. The phase transitions from a 199% isotropic phase to an anisotropic mesophase during the carbonization of many feeds is an important and much studied phenomena. This phenomena is capitalized on in industry to produce needle or graphite coke. The kinetics of pitch polymerization and coke formation have historically been studied by measuring the solubility of the heat treated material in various solvents. The concentration of free radicals in the carbonized samples have also been used to investigate the mechanistic and kinetic aspects of the process. A very extensive study was conducted by Greinke using GPC techniques to measure the changes in narrow molecular weight ranges and the overall molecular weight distribution of a pitch during carbonization. This study focuses on the use of product volatile matter as the measure of extent of carbonization of two different feedstocks. It is ideally suited for use in commercial coking operations as a control or quality parameter of green coke.

  13. Light saturation curves show competence of the water splitting complex in inactive Photosystem II reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Nedbal, L; Gibas, C; Whitmarsh, J

    1991-12-01

    Photosystem II complexes of higher plants are structurally and functionally heterogeneous. While the only clearly defined structural difference is that Photosystem II reaction centers are served by two distinct antenna sizes, several types of functional heterogeneity have been demonstrated. Among these is the observation that in dark-adapted leaves of spinach and pea, over 30% of the Photosystem II reaction centers are unable to reduce plastoquinone to plastoquinol at physiologically meaningful rates. Several lines of evidence show that the impaired reaction centers are effectively inactive, because the rate of oxidation of the primary quinone acceptor, QA, is 1000 times slower than in normally active reaction centers. However, there are conflicting opinions and data over whether inactive Photosystem II complexes are capable of oxidizing water in the presence of certain artificial electron acceptors. In the present study we investigated whether inactive Photosystem II complexes have a functional water oxidizing system in spinach thylakoid membranes by measuring the flash yield of water oxidation products as a function of flash intensity. At low flash energies (less that 10% saturation), selected to minimize double turnovers of reaction centers, we found that in the presence of the artificial quinone acceptor, dichlorobenzoquinone (DCBQ), the yield of proton release was enhanced 20±2% over that observed in the presence of dimethylbenzoquinone (DMBQ). We argue that the extra proton release is from the normally inactive Photosystem II reaction centers that have been activated in the presence of DCBQ, demonstrating their capacity to oxidize water in repetitive flashes, as concluded by Graan and Ort (Biochim Biophys Acta (1986) 852: 320-330). The light saturation curves indicate that the effective antenna size of inactive reaction centers is 55±12% the size of active Photosystem II centers. Comparison of the light saturation dependence of steady state oxygen evolution

  14. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  15. Quality check of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting forms of different countries.

    PubMed

    Bandekar, M S; Anwikar, S R; Kshirsagar, N A

    2010-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are considered as one of the leading causes of death among hospitalized patients. Thus reporting of adverse drug reactions become an important phenomenon. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting form is an essential component and a major tool of the pharmacovigilance system of any country. This form is a tool to collect information of ADRs which helps in establishing the causal relationship between the suspected drug and the reaction. As different countries have different forms, our aim was to study, analyze the suspected adverse drug reaction reporting form of different countries, and assess if these forms can capture all the data regarding the adverse drug reaction. For this analysis we identified 18 points which are essential to make a good adverse drug reaction report, enabling proper causality assessment of adverse reaction to generate a safety signal. Adverse drug reaction reporting forms of 10 different countries were collected from the internet and compared for 18 points like patient information, information about dechallenge-rechallenge, adequacy of space and columns to capture necessary information required for its causality assessment, etc. Of the ADR forms that we analyzed, Malaysia was the highest scorer with 16 out of 18 points. This study reveals that there is a need to harmonize the ADR reporting forms of all the countries because there is a lot of discrepancy in data captured by the existing ADR reporting forms as the design of these forms is different for different countries. These incomplete data obtained result in inappropriate causality assessment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Tang, Kai; Kálmán, László

    2011-10-12

    Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site near the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was probed in the reaction centers of carotenoid-less mutant, R-26 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recently, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was reported in wild type that was attributed to structural changes that ultimately lengthened the lifetime of the charge-separated state by 3 orders of magnitude (Deshmukh, S. S.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.; Kalman, L. Biochemistry 2011, 50, 340). Here in the R-26 reaction centers, the combination of light-induced structural changes and lipid binding resulted in a 5 orders of magnitude increase in the lifetime of the charge-separated state involving the oxidized dimer and the reduced primary quinone in proteoliposomes. Only saturated phospholipids with fatty acid chains of 12 and 14 carbon atoms long were bound successfully at 8 °C by cooling the reaction center protein slowly from room temperature. In addition to reporting a dramatic increase of the lifetime of the charge-separated state at physiologically relevant temperatures, this study reveals a novel lipid binding site in photosynthetic reaction center. These results shed light on a new potential application of the reaction center in energy storage as a light-driven biocapacitor since the charges separated by ∼30 Å in a low-dielectric medium can be prevented from recombination for hours.

  17. Is there a conserved interaction between cardiolipin and the type II bacterial reaction center?

    PubMed Central

    Wakeham, M C; Sessions, R B; Jones, M R; Fyfe, P K

    2001-01-01

    In a recent publication, the structural details of an interaction between the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center and the anionic phospholipid diphosphatidyl glycerol (cardiolipin) were described (K. E. McAuley, P. K. Fyfe, J. P. Ridge, N. W. Isaacs, R. J. Cogdell, and M. R. Jones, 1999, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96:14706-14711). This was the first crystallographic description of an interaction between this biologically important lipid and an integral membrane protein and was also the first piece of evidence that the reaction center has a specific interaction with cardiolipin. We have examined the extent to which the residues that interact with the cardiolipin are conserved in other species of photosynthetic bacteria with this type of reaction center and discuss the possibility that this cardiolipin binding site is a conserved feature of these reaction centers. We look at how sequence variations that would affect the shape of the cardiolipin binding site might affect the protein-cardiolipin interaction, by modeling the binding of cardiolipin to the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis. PMID:11222300

  18. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  19. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  20. Cytochrome b559 content in isolated photosystem II reaction center preparations.

    PubMed

    Yruela, Inmaculada; Miota, Francisca; Torrado, Elena; Seibert, Michael; Picorel, Rafael

    2003-05-01

    The cytochrome b559 content was examined in five types of isolated photosystem II D1-D2-cytochrome b559 reaction center preparations containing either five or six chlorophylls per reaction center. The reaction center complexes were obtained following isolation procedures that differed in chromatographic column material, washing buffer composition and detergent concentration. Two different types of cytochrome b559 assays were performed. The absolute heme content in each preparation was obtained using the oxidized-minus-reduced difference extinction coefficient of cytochrome b559 at 559 nm. The relative amount of D1 and cytochrome b559alpha-subunit polypeptide was also calculated for each preparation from immunoblots obtained using antibodies raised against the two polypeptides. The results indicate that the cytochrome b559 heme content in photosystem II reaction center complexes can vary with the isolation procedure, but the variation of the cytochrome b559alpha-subunit/D1 polypeptide ratio was even greater. This variation was not found in the PSII-enriched membrane fragments used as the RC-isolation starting material, as different batches of membranes obtained from spinach harvested at different seasons of the year or those from sugar beets grown in a chamber under controlled environmental conditions lack variation in their alpha-subunit/D1 polypeptide ratio. A precise determination of the ratio using an RC1-control sample calibration curve gave a ratio of 1.25 cytochrome b559alpha-subunit per 1.0 D1 polypeptide in photosystem II membranes. We conclude that the variations found in the reaction center preparations were due to the different procedures used to isolate and purify the different reaction center complexes.

  1. Using synthetic model systems to understand charge separation and spin dynamics in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M. R.

    1998-08-27

    Our current work in modeling reaction center dynamics has resulted in the observation of each major spin-dependent photochemical pathway that is observed in reaction centers. The development of new, simpler model systems has permitted us to probe deeply into the mechanistic issues that drive these dynamics. Based on these results we have returned to biomimetic chlorophyll-based electron donors to mimic these dynamics. Future studies will focus on the details of electronic structure and energetic of both the donor-acceptor molecules and their surrounding environment that dictate the mechanistic pathways and result in efficient photosynthetic charge separation.

  2. Reactions to Discrimination, Stigmatization, Ostracism, and Other Forms of Interpersonal Rejection: A Multimotive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laura Smart; Leary, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of…

  3. Reactions to Discrimination, Stigmatization, Ostracism, and Other Forms of Interpersonal Rejection: A Multimotive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laura Smart; Leary, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of…

  4. Method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, John A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of densifying an article formed of reaction bonded silicon nitride is disclosed. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article is packed in a packing mixture consisting of silicon nitride powder and a densification aid. The reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are sujected to a positive, low pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause any open porosity originally found in the reaction bonded silicon nitride article to be substantially closed. Thereafter, the reaction bonded silicon nitride article and packing powder are subjected to a positive high pressure nitrogen gas treatment while being heated to a treatment temperature and for a treatment time to cause a sintering of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article whereby the strength of the reaction bonded silicon nitride article is increased.

  5. Substrate activation for O2 reactions by oxidized metal centers in biology.

    PubMed

    Pau, Monita Y M; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-11-20

    The uncatalyzed reactions of O(2) (S = 1) with organic substrates (S = 0) are thermodynamically favorable but kinetically slow because they are spin-forbidden and the one-electron reduction potential of O(2) is unfavorable. In nature, many of these important O(2) reactions are catalyzed by metalloenzymes. In the case of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes, either Fe(II) or Fe(III) can play the catalytic role in these spin-forbidden reactions. Whereas the ferrous enzymes activate O(2) directly for reaction, the ferric enzymes activate the substrate for O(2) attack. The enzyme-substrate complex of the ferric intradiol dioxygenases exhibits a low-energy catecholate to Fe(III) charge transfer transition that provides a mechanism by which both the Fe center and the catecholic substrate are activated for the reaction with O(2). In this Perspective, we evaluate how the coupling between this experimentally observed charge transfer and the change in geometry and ligand field of the oxidized metal center along the reaction coordinate can overcome the spin-forbidden nature of the O(2) reaction.

  6. A new photosystem II reaction center component (4.8 kDa protein) encoded by chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, M; Inoue, Y

    1988-12-05

    The photosystem II reaction center complex, so-called D1-D2-cytochrome b-559 complex, isolated from higher plants contains a new component of about 4.8 kDa [(1988) Plant Cell Physiol. 29, 1233-1239]. The partial amino acid sequence of this component from spinach was determined after release of N-terminal blockage. The determined sequence matched an open reading frame (ORF36) of the chloroplast genome from tobacco and liverwort, which is located downstream from the psbK gene and forms an operon with psbK. The predicted product consists of 36 amino acid residues and has a single membrane-spanning segment. High homology between the tobacco and liverwort genes, and its presence in the reaction center complex suggest an important role for this component in the photosystem II complex. Since this gene corresponds to a part of the formerly designated psbI gene, we propose to revise the definition of psbI as the gene encoding the 4.8 kDa reaction center component.

  7. Genetic probes of structure/function relationships in the Q{sub B} binding site of the photosynthetic reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Tiede, D.M.; Nance, S.L.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Schiffer, M.

    1991-06-25

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, a quinone molecule, Q{sub B}, is the terminal acceptor in light-induced electron transfer. The crystal structure of the reaction center implicates the protonatable amiho acid residues L212Glu and L213Asp in the binding of Q{sub B} to the reaction center and in proton transfer to the anionic forms of Q{sub B} generated by electron transfer from Q{sub A}. Here we report the construction of the double mutant L212Ala-L213Ala by site-specific mutagenesis, and the isolation and preliminary biophysical characterization of revertant and suppressor strains that have regained the ability to grow under photosynthetic conditions. Our results show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is essential for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus and that second-site mutations, located within the QB binding pocket or at a more distant site, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213. Acquisition of a single negatively charged residue (at position L213, or on the other side of the binding pocket at position L225) or loss of a positively charged residue (at position M231) is sufficient to restore activity to the complex.

  8. Incidence and predictors of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in a North Carolina academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nicole L; Chandiramani, Divya V; Morse, Michael A; Wei, David; Hedrick, Nancy E; Hansen, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    Previous research has indicated a high incidence of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in the southern US. This study documents the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions in North Carolina, and explores whether factors such as patient demographics, allergy history, premedications, and cancer type are potential predictors for cetuximab reactions. This retrospective chart review consisted of 72 consecutively treated patients from Duke University's Morris Oncology treatment center between September 2005 and August 2007. Data regarding stage of malignancy, premedications, and hypersensitivity reactions were collected from electronic databases. The number and type of reactions were characterized. Patients with and without hypersensitivity reactions were compared using bivariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Of the 72 patients, 21 (29%) experienced hypersensitivity reactions. The majority of reactions (62%) were grades III or IV. Of the 21 patients having a reaction, 9 (43%) were sent to the emergency room and 5 (24%) had an overnight hospitalization. Three hospitalized patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Both male gender (p = 0.039) and head/neck cancer (p = 0.014) were related to an increased likelihood of hypersensitivity reaction in bivariate analyses. In multivariate analyses, controlling for demographics, allergy history, premedications, and cancer type/stage, only type of cancer was predictive of hypersensitivity reaction (colon vs head/neck OR = 0.177; 95% CI 0.036-0.858). This study confirms a high rate of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in a southern region of the US. Patients with head/neck cancers were significantly more likely to have hypersensitivity reactions than patients with colon cancers.

  9. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    DOE PAGES

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; ...

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized themore » interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.« less

  10. The protein's role in triplet energy transfer in bacterial reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Laible, P. D.

    1998-08-14

    When photosynthetic organisms are subjected to high-light conditions in nature, electron transfer becomes blocked as the rate of conversion of light into charge-separated states in the reaction center (RC) exceeds the capacity of the soluble carriers involved in cyclic electron transfer. In that event, a well-characterized T{sub 0}-polarized triplet state {sup T}P, is formed on the primary donor, P, from the P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} state (reviewed in [1]). In an aerobic or semi-aerobic environment, the major role of the carotenoid (C), also bound by the RC, is to quench {sup T}P prior to its sensitization of the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} singlet state of oxygen--a potentially damaging biological oxidant. The carotenoid performs this function efficiently in most bacterial RCs by rapidly accepting the triplet state from P and dissipating this excited-state energy into heat through internal conversion. The lowest-lying triplet states of P and the carotenoid are sufficiently different that {sup T}P can promote oxygen to its excited singlet state whereas {sup T}C can quench the {sup T}P state (reviewed in [2]).

  11. On the nature of excited states of photosynthetic reaction centers: An ultrafast infrared study

    SciTech Connect

    Haran, G.; Wynne, K.; Reid, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) contain eight chromophores forming a well-defined supramolecular structure within a protein framework. Theoretical studies suggest that the excited states of these chromophores are delocalized and contain important contributions from charge-transfer and resonance states. There is no clear-cut experimental evidence pertaining to the degree of localization of excited states. We have used ultrafast near and mid-infrared spectroscopic methods to investigate the character of some of the excited states. Exciting the 800 nm, absorption band, we followed the fate of the excitation energy using either the stimulated emission of the special pair at 920 nm or a transient absorption at 1.2 {mu}m. For a completely localized system, Forster theory-based calculations are expected to accurately predict the kinetics of energy transfer. It was found, however, that calculated rates arc much faster than measured rates. This corroborates a delocalized picture, with internal conversion rather than energy transfer between states. We have also measured the transient absorption spectrum of the RC in the infrared spectral region, detecting several new low-lying electronic states. Assignments for these states, and implications for the localization problem will be discussed.

  12. A Study of Client Reactions: Lifelong Learning Center, the Free Library of Philadelphia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William

    A study was conducted to assess client reaction to key activities of the Lifelong Learning Center (LLC) of the Free Library of Philadelphia and to identify particular patterns of client interest. A survey was developed to determine (1) clients' satisfaction with accessibility of services, quality of interaction with staff, and information…

  13. Observation of multiple radical pair states in photosystem 2 reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Booth, P J; Crystall, B; Ahmad, I; Barber, J; Porter, G; Klug, D R

    1991-07-30

    Charge recombination of the primary radical pair in D1/D2 reaction centers from photosystem 2 has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The kinetics of the primary radical pair are multiexponential and exhibit at least two lifetimes of 20 and 52 ns. In addition, a third lifetime of approximately 500 ps also appears to be present. These multiexponential charge-recombination kinetics reflect either different conformational states of D1/D2 reaction centers, with the different conformers exhibiting different radical pair lifetimes, or relaxations in the free energy of the radical pair state. Whichever model is invoked, the free energies of formation of the different radical pair states exhibit a linear temperature dependence from 100 to 220 K, indicating that they are dominated by entropy with negligible enthalpy contributions. These results are in agreement with previous determinations of the thermodynamics that govern primary charge separation in both D1/D2 reaction centers [Booth, P.J., Crystall, B., Giorgi, L. B., Barber, J., Klug, D.R., & Porter, G. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1016, 141-152] and reaction centers of purple bacteria [Woodbury, N.W.T., & Parson, W.W. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 767, 345-361]. It is possible that these observations reflect structural changes that accompanying primary charge separation and assist in stabilization of the radical pair state thus optimizing the efficiency of primary electron transfer.

  14. Mimicry of the radical pair and triplet states in photosynthetic reaction centers with a synthetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Greenfield, S.R.; Svec, W.A.

    1997-08-01

    Results are presented on a photosynthetic model system that closely mimics the spin dynamics of triplet state formation found in photosynthetic reaction centers. This research will make it possible to design new models to probe the mechanism of the primary events of photosynthesis.

  15. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  16. Tropospheric reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from hydroxyl radical reaction with a series of alternative fluorocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Roger

    1990-01-01

    In the present assessment, the hydrogen containing halocarbons being considered as alternatives to the the presently used chlorofluorocarbons are the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 123 (CF3CHCl2), 141b (CFCl2CH3), 142b (CF2ClCH3), 22 (CHF2Cl) and 124 (CF3CHFCl) and the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 134a (CF3CH2F), 152a (CHF2CH3) and 125 (CF3CHF2). All of these HCFCs and HFCs will react with the hydroxyl (OH) radical in the troposphere, giving rise to haloalkyl radicals which then undergo a complex series of reactions in the troposphere. These reactions of the haloalkyl radicals formed from the initial OH radical reactions with the HCFCs and HFCs under tropospheric conditions are the focus here.

  17. Reaction schemes visualized in network form: the syntheses of strychnine as an example.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, John R

    2013-05-24

    Representation of synthesis sequences in a network form provides an effective method for the comparison of multiple reaction schemes and an opportunity to emphasize features such as reaction scale that are often relegated to experimental sections. An example of data formatting that allows construction of network maps in Cytoscape is presented, along with maps that illustrate the comparison of multiple reaction sequences, comparison of scaffold changes within sequences, and consolidation to highlight common key intermediates used across sequences. The 17 different synthetic routes reported for strychnine are used as an example basis set. The reaction maps presented required a significant data extraction and curation, and a standardized tabular format for reporting reaction information, if applied in a consistent way, could allow the automated combination of reaction information across different sources.

  18. The new anti-actin agent dihydrohalichondramide reveals fenestrae-forming centers in hepatic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Braet, Filip; Spector, Ilan; Shochet, Nava; Crews, Phillip; Higa, Tatsuo; Menu, Eline; de Zanger, Ronald; Wisse, Eddie

    2002-01-01

    Background Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) react to different anti-actin agents by increasing their number of fenestrae. A new structure related to fenestrae formation could be observed when LSECs were treated with misakinolide. In this study, we investigated the effects of two new actin-binding agents on fenestrae dynamics. High-resolution microscopy, including immunocytochemistry and a combination of fluorescence- and scanning electron microscopy was applied. Results Halichondramide and dihydrohalichondramide disrupt microfilaments within 10 minutes and double the number of fenestrae in 30 minutes. Dihydrohalichondramide induces fenestrae-forming centers, whereas halichondramide only revealed fenestrae-forming centers without attached rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter. Correlative microscopy showed the absence of actin filaments (F-actin) in sieve plates and fenestrae-forming centers. Comparable experiments on umbilical vein endothelial cells and bone marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells revealed cell contraction without the appearance of fenestrae or fenestrae-forming centers. Conclusion (I) A comparison of all anti-actin agents tested so far, revealed that the only activity that misakinolide and dihydrohalichondramide have in common is their barbed end capping activity; (II) this activity seems to slow down the process of fenestrae formation to such extent that it becomes possible to resolve fenestrae-forming centers; (III) fenestrae formation resulting from microfilament disruption is probably unique to LSECs. PMID:11914125

  19. B-side electron transfer promoted by absorbance of multiple photons in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Jackson, J.A.; Taguchi, A.K.W.; Woodbury, N.W.

    1999-06-03

    Femtosecond transient absorbance spectra of quinone-depleted Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers in the Q{sub X} transition region have been measured at 15 K under various excitation conditions. This study focuses on the excitation wavelength dependence and excitation intensity dependence of the formation of charge-separated states on the A- and B-side of the reaction center, judging from the bleaching of the 533 nm (B-side) and 544 nm (A-side) ground-state transitions of the reaction center bacteriopheophytins (H{sub A} and H{sub B}). Upon low-intensity selective excitation directly into the bacteriopheophytin Q{sub Y} transitions (near 760 nm), bleaching of both ground-state bacteriopheophytin Q{sub X} transitions appeared immediately, showing that initially either the A- or B-side bacteriopheophytin could be excited. However, both excited states ultimately resulted in P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} formation under these conditions. Low-intensity excitation at any of the various wavelengths showed no difference in the kinetics of the A-side charge separation forming P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} and no substantial formation of the B-side charge-separated state, P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}}. In contrast, high-intensity 595 nm excitation resulted in substantial long-lived bleaching of the B-side bacteriopheophytin ground-state transition at 533 nm. This 533 nm bleaching was formed with essentially the same time constant as the bleaching at 544 nm due to A-side charge separation. Both bleaching bands persisted at the longest times measured in quinone-removed reaction centers. The long-lived bleaching at 533 nm using high-intensity excitation most likely represents the formation of P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}} with a relative yield of nearly 40%. One possible mechanism for B-side electron transfer is that two-photon excitation of the reaction center resulting in the state P{sup *}B{sub B}{sup *} makes P{sup +}B{sub B}{sup {minus}} thermodynamically

  20. Light-induced structural changes in a photosynthetic reaction center caught by Laue diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wöhri, Annemarie B; Katona, Gergely; Johansson, Linda C; Fritz, Emelie; Malmerberg, Erik; Andersson, Magnus; Vincent, Jonathan; Eklund, Mattias; Cammarata, Marco; Wulff, Michael; Davidsson, Jan; Groenhof, Gerrit; Neutze, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert the energy content of light into a transmembrane potential difference and so provide the major pathway for energy input into the biosphere. We applied time-resolved Laue diffraction to study light-induced conformational changes in the photosynthetic reaction center complex of Blastochloris viridis. The side chain of TyrL162, which lies adjacent to the special pair of bacteriochlorophyll molecules that are photooxidized in the primary light conversion event of photosynthesis, was observed to move 1.3 angstroms closer to the special pair after photoactivation. Free energy calculations suggest that this movement results from the deprotonation of this conserved tyrosine residue and provides a mechanism for stabilizing the primary charge separation reactions of photosynthesis.

  1. Structure-function studies of the photosynthetic reaction center using herbicides that compete for the quinone binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Bylina, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Certain classes of herbicides act as competitive inhibitors of the photosynthetic reaction center. Genetic engineering techniques can be used to generate photosynthetic reaction centers which contain altered quinone binding sites. A genetic system for rapidly screening herbicides developed in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been used to examine the effect of different s-triazine herbicides on the growth of bacteria containing reaction centers with altered quinone binding sites. Structural insights into herbicide binding have been obtained by determining the level of resistance or sensitivity to structurally related herbicides in these modified reaction centers.

  2. Fusion and quasifission studies in reactions forming Rn via evaporation residue measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamlath, A.; Prasad, E.; Madhavan, N.; Laveen, P. V.; Gehlot, J.; Nasirov, A. K.; Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nath, S.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Shareef, M.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Kumar, Dvgrks; Devi, P. Sandya; Khushboo, Jisha, P.; Kumar, Neeraj; Hosamani, M. M.; Kailas, S.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Formation of the compound nucleus (CN) is highly suppressed by quasifission in heavy-ion collisions involving massive nuclei. Though considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fusion-fission and quasifission, the exact dependence of fusion probability on various entrance channel variables is not completely clear, which is very important for the synthesis of new heavy and superheavy elements. Purpose: To study the interplay between fusion and quasifission in reactions forming CN in the boundary region where the fusion probability starts to deviate from unity. Methods: Fusion evaporation residue cross sections were measured for the Si,3028+180Hf reactions using the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyser at IUAC, New Delhi. Experimental data were compared with data from other reactions forming the same CN or isotopes of the CN. Theoretical calculations were performed using the dinuclear system and statistical models. Results: Reduced evaporation residue cross sections were observed for the reactions studied compared with the asymmetric reaction forming the same CN, indicating fusion suppression in more symmetric systems. The observations are consistent with fission fragment measurements performed in the same or similar systems. Larger ER cross sections are observed with increase in mass in the isotopic chain of the CN. Conclusions: Fusion probability varies significantly with the entrance channels in reactions forming the same CN. While complete fusion occurs for the 16O+194Pt reaction, the fusion probability drops to approximately 60 -70 % for the 30Si+180Hf and less than 20 % for the 50Ti+160Gd reactions, respectively, forming the same CN at similar excitation energies.

  3. Activation Strain Analysis of SN2 Reactions at C, N, O, and F Centers.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2017-02-02

    Fundamental principles that determine chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms are the very foundation of chemistry and many related fields of science. Bimolecular nucleophilic substitutions (SN2) are among the most common and therefore most important reaction types. In this report, we examine the trends in the SN2 reactions with respect to increasing electronegativity of the reaction center by comparing the well-studied backside SN2 Cl(-) + CH3Cl with similar Cl(-) substitutions on the isoelectronic series with the second period elements N, O, and F in place of C. Relativistic (ZORA) DFT calculations are used to construct the gas phase reaction potential energy surfaces (PES), and activation strain analysis, which allows decomposition of the PES into the geometrical strain and interaction energy, is employed to analyze the observed trends. We find that SN2@N and SN2@O have similar PES to the prototypical SN2@C, with the well-defined reaction complex (RC) local minima and a central barrier, but all stationary points are, respectively, increasingly stable in energy. The SN2@F, by contrast, exhibits only a single-well PES with no barrier. Using the activation strain model, we show that the trends are due to the interaction energy and originate mainly from the decreasing energy of the empty acceptor orbital (σ*A-Cl) on the reaction center A in the order of C, N, O, and F. The decreasing steric congestion around the central atom is also a likely contributor to this trend. Additional decomposition of the interaction energy using Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory provides further support for this explanation, as well as suggesting electrostatic energy as the primary reason for the distinct single-well PES profile for the FCl reaction.

  4. Activation Strain Analysis of SN2 Reactions at C, N, O, and F Centers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental principles that determine chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms are the very foundation of chemistry and many related fields of science. Bimolecular nucleophilic substitutions (SN2) are among the most common and therefore most important reaction types. In this report, we examine the trends in the SN2 reactions with respect to increasing electronegativity of the reaction center by comparing the well-studied backside SN2 Cl– + CH3Cl with similar Cl– substitutions on the isoelectronic series with the second period elements N, O, and F in place of C. Relativistic (ZORA) DFT calculations are used to construct the gas phase reaction potential energy surfaces (PES), and activation strain analysis, which allows decomposition of the PES into the geometrical strain and interaction energy, is employed to analyze the observed trends. We find that SN2@N and SN2@O have similar PES to the prototypical SN2@C, with the well-defined reaction complex (RC) local minima and a central barrier, but all stationary points are, respectively, increasingly stable in energy. The SN2@F, by contrast, exhibits only a single-well PES with no barrier. Using the activation strain model, we show that the trends are due to the interaction energy and originate mainly from the decreasing energy of the empty acceptor orbital (σ*A–Cl) on the reaction center A in the order of C, N, O, and F. The decreasing steric congestion around the central atom is also a likely contributor to this trend. Additional decomposition of the interaction energy using Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory provides further support for this explanation, as well as suggesting electrostatic energy as the primary reason for the distinct single-well PES profile for the FCl reaction. PMID:28045531

  5. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  6. Characterization of SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using NASA's reaction forming process. Silicon-2 at a percent of niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bi-modal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon and silicon. Fiber push-out tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approx. 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approx. 60 MPa. A typical four point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pull out.

  7. Characterization of SiC Fiber (SCS-6) Reinforced-Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) reinforced-reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using a reaction-forming process. Silicon-2 at.% niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bimodal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon, and silicon. Fiber pushout tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approximately 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approximately 60 MPa. A typical four-point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pullout.

  8. Millimeter and Submillimeter Studies of O(^1D) Insertion Reactions to Form Molecules of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Brian; Wehres, Nadine; Deprince, Bridget Alligood; Roy, Althea A. M.; Laas, Jacob; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2015-06-01

    While both the number of detected interstellar molecules and their chemical complexity continue to increase, understanding of the processes leading to their formation is lacking. Our research group combines laboratory spectroscopy, observational astronomy, and astrochemical modeling for an interdisciplinary examination of the chemistry of star and planet formation. This talk will focus on our laboratory studies of O(^1D) insertion reactions with organic molecules to produce molecules of astrophysical interest. By employing these reactions in a supersonic expansion, we are able to produce interstellar organic reaction intermediates that are unstable under terrestrial conditions; we then probe the products using millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy. We benchmarked this setup using the well-studied O(^1D) + methane reaction to form methanol. After optimizing methanol production, we moved on to study the O(^1D) + ethylene reaction to form vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH), and the O(^1D) + methyl amine reaction to form aminomethanol (NH_2CH_2OH). Vinyl alcohol measurements have now been extended up to 450 GHz, and the associated spectral analysis is complete. A possible detection of aminomethanol has also been made, and continued spectral studies and analysis are underway. We will present the results from these experiments and discuss future applications of these molecular and spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Mixed lateral preference and peritraumatic reactions to the World Trade Center attacks.

    PubMed

    Chemtob, Claude M; Wang, Yanping; Dugan, Kelly L; Abramovitz, Robert; Marmar, Charles

    2006-11-01

    There is evidence that mixed lateral preference is a risk factor for developing more intense posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. However, no research has examined whether mixed-handed persons experience greater threat of loss of life and physical injury and more intense emotional reactions (terror, helplessness, horror) during peritraumatic exposure. This study compared the intensity of ratings of perceived threat to life and physical injury and emotional reactions among mixed-handed and fully right-handed mothers directly exposed to the World Trade Center attacks. Controlling for exposure, mixed-handed mothers reported more intense ratings, indicating that mixed lateral preference may be associated with greater peritraumatic emotional distress.

  10. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Laboratory-Scale Carbon–Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vaneet; Stokes, Benjamin J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene, the simplest alkene, is the most abundantly synthesized organic molecule by volume. It is readily incorporated into transitionmetal–catalyzed carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions through migratory insertions into alkylmetal intermediates. Because of its D2h symmetry, only one insertion outcome is possible. This limits byproduct formation and greatly simplifies analysis. As described within this Minireview, many carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions incorporate a molecule (or more) of ethylene at ambient pressure and temperature. In many cases, a useful substituted alkene is incorporated into the product. PMID:24105881

  11. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  12. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to document the physical characteristics of the day care center and identify and inventory possible sources of pollutants.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the large...

  13. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  14. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 03:HOUSE/BUILDING CHARACTERISTICS OBSERVATION SURVEY FOR THE DAY CARE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to document the physical characteristics of the day care center and identify and inventory possible sources of pollutants.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the large...

  15. Evolution of reaction center mimics to systems capable of generating solar fuel.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Benjamin D; Vaughn, Michael D; Bergkamp, Jesse J; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Capturing and converting solar energy via artificial photosynthesis offers an ideal way to limit society's dependence on fossil fuel and its myriad consequences. The development and study of molecular artificial photosynthetic reactions centers and antenna complexes and the combination of these constructs with catalysts to drive the photochemical production of a fuel helps to build the understanding needed for development of future scalable technologies. This review focuses on the study of molecular complexes, design of which is inspired by the components of natural photosynthesis, and covers research from early triad reaction centers developed by the group of Gust, Moore, and Moore to recent photoelectrochemical systems capable of using light to convert water to oxygen and hydrogen.

  16. [On the electron stabilization within the quinone acceptor part of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers].

    PubMed

    Noks, P P; Krasil'nikov, P M; Mamonov, P A; Seĭfullina, N Kh; Uchoa, A F; Baptista, M S

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of the photoinduced differential absorption spectrum of isolated Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centers was investigated. The measurements were carried out in the spectral region of 400-500 nm on the time scale of up to 200 microseconds. The spectral changes observed can be interpreted in terms of the effects of proton shift along hydrogen bonds between the primary quinone acceptor and the protein. A theoretical analysis of the spectrum time evolution was performed, which is based on the consideration of the kinetics of proton tunneling along the hydrogen bond. It was shown that the stabilization of the primary quinone electronic state occurs within the first several tens of microseconds after quinone reduction. It slows down upon the deuteration of reaction centers as well as after adding 90% of glycerol; on the other hand, it accelerates as temperature rises up to 40 degrees C.

  17. Quantum coherence as a witness of vibronically hot energy transfer in bacterial reaction center.

    PubMed

    Paleček, David; Edlund, Petra; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2017-09-01

    Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. On the basis of spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion depends critically on the assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. We demonstrate that, for a bacterial reaction center protein, long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited-state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores. We show that the appearance of these coherences arises from a release of electronic energy during energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction center, and they call for a reexamination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis.

  18. Quantum coherence as a witness of vibronically hot energy transfer in bacterial reaction center

    PubMed Central

    Paleček, David; Edlund, Petra; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins have evolved over billions of years so as to undergo optimal energy transfer to the sites of charge separation. On the basis of spectroscopically detected quantum coherences, it has been suggested that this energy transfer is partially wavelike. This conclusion depends critically on the assignment of the coherences to the evolution of excitonic superpositions. We demonstrate that, for a bacterial reaction center protein, long-lived coherent spectroscopic oscillations, which bear canonical signatures of excitonic superpositions, are essentially vibrational excited-state coherences shifted to the ground state of the chromophores. We show that the appearance of these coherences arises from a release of electronic energy during energy transfer. Our results establish how energy migrates on vibrationally hot chromophores in the reaction center, and they call for a reexamination of claims of quantum energy transfer in photosynthesis. PMID:28913419

  19. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C2-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What's more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  20. Primary charge separation and energy transfer in the photosystem I reaction center of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    White, N.T.H.; Beddard, G.S.; Thorne J.R.G.; Feehan, T.M.; Keyes, T.E.; Heathcote, P.

    1996-07-18

    Using low intensity femtosecond duration laser pulses at 708 nm, we have observed absorption transients associated with electron transfer through the primary electron acceptor A{sub 0} in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center from spinach under nonreducing conditions. At this wavelength the electron donor P{sub 700} is excited directly, although some antenna chlorophylls are also excited. Using a nanosecond duration preflash of 690 nm to oxidize P{sub 700}, and then measuring the absorption transients from the antenna alone, it is possible by subtraction to isolate the absorption transients arising from electron transfer. We discuss this method critically. Th spectrum of A{sub 0}{sup -}-A{sub 0} does not appear promptly but takes nearly 3 ps to reach maximum intensity and resembles those spectra previously obtained from higher plants, with a maximum bleaching at 685{+-}2 nm and a shoulder in the region 670-675 nm. The decay time of the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} is calculated as 20 ps. Analysis of absorption transients indicates that the intrinsic rate constant forming the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} cannot be measured directly because energy migration in the antenna is fast and quenching is approaching `trap limited` behavior. With use of a detailed model of the antenna energy migration based on the X-ray structure, the intrinsic rate constant for electron transfer is estimated as k{sub 1} nearly equals 0.7 ps{sup -1}. 81 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Optimizing multi-step B-side charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Kressel, Lucas L.; Dylla, Nicholas P.; Wander, Marc J.; Hanson, Deborah K.; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D.; Kirmaier, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Using high-throughput methods for mutagenesis, protein isolation and charge-separation functionality, we have assayed 40 Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction center (RC) mutants for their P+ QB- yield (P is a dimer of bacteriochlorophylls and Q is a ubiquinone) as produced using the normally inactive B-side cofactors BB and HB (where B is a bacteriochlorophyll and H is a bacteriopheophytin). Two sets of mutants explore all possible residues at M131 (M polypeptide, native residue Val near HB) in tandem with either a fixed His or a fixed Asn at L181 (L polypeptide, native residue Phe near BB). A third set of mutants explores all possible residues at L181 with a fixed Glu at M131 that can form a hydrogen bond to HB. For each set of mutants, the results of a rapid millisecond screening assay that probes the yield of P+ QB- are compared among that set and to the other mutants reported here or previously. For a subset of eight mutants, the rate constants and yields of the individual B-side electron transfer processes are determined via transient absorption measurements spanning 100 fs to 50 μs. The resulting ranking of mutants for their yield of P+ QB- from ultrafast experiments is in good agreement with that obtained from the millisecond screening assay, further validating the efficient, high-throughput screen for B-side transmembrane charge separation. Results from mutants that individually show progress toward optimization of P+ HB- → P+ QB- electron transfer or initial P* → P+ HB- conversion highlight unmet challenges of optimizing both processes simultaneously.

  2. Isolation and characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Worland, S.T.

    1984-09-01

    Reaction centers were isolated by affinity chromatography on equine cytochrome C. Peripheral proteins were removed with 0.05% LDAO. Absorption and EPR spectra and bleaching assays indicate that the reaction centers retained their electron donors and acceptors in the native environment. Three reaction center polypeptides were isolated and submitted for amino-terminal sequence determination. By comparing these sequences to those deduced from DNA, it was established that the M and L subunits are post-translationally modified to remove the aminoterminal Met, whereas the H subunit is not. Inhibition of O/sub 2/ evolution in photosystem II particles from spinach by naphthoquinone derivatives show O/sub 2/ inhibition by bromomethyl and acetoxymethyl derivatives but not with hydroxymethyl derivatives. Inhibition by acetoxymethyl derivatives in irreversible and dependent on illumination suggesting that reduction of the quinone is necessary. Therefore acetoxymethyl derivatives may be useful as suicide reagents for labelling quinone binding sites. Procedures were developed to extract one or both of the quinones present in reaction centers and preserve the integrity of the co-factor binding sites. The H and M subunits were cleaned using furmic acid. Both fragments were isolated from the H subunit, while the larger fragment was isolated from the M subunit. Electrophoretic mobilities of the isolated fragments agrees well with the expected molecular weights. The L subunit was digested with Staphylococcus areus vs protease. The pattern obtained was consistant with the potential sites of cleavage, but it was not possible to assign cleavage sites unambiguously. 112 references, 37 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Dynamical theory of primary processes of charge separation in the photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, Victor D

    2005-05-01

    A dynamical theory has been developed for primary separation of charges in the course of photosynthesis. The theory deals with both hopping and superexchange transfer mechanisms. Dynamics of electron transfer from dimeric bacteriochlorophyll to quinone has been calculated. The results obtained agree with experimental data and provide a unified explanation of both the hierarchy of the transfer time in the photosynthetic reaction center and the phenomenon of coherent oscillations accompanying the transfer process.

  4. Reaction synthesis of dynamically densified titanium-based intermetallic and ceramic-forming powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namjoshi, Shantanu Ashok

    The mechanism(s) and kinetics of the reaction synthesis of dynamically-densified Ti-based intermetallic and ceramic forming powder mixtures were investigated in this study. Dynamic densification employing shock-compression produces a dense-packed and highly-activated state of powder mixture constituents resulting in significantly increased mass transport rates and enhanced chemical reactivity. Green density compacts (˜85--95% TMD) of Ti-Si, Ti-B, and Ti-Al powder mixtures, obtained using shock-densification under different loading conditions, were heat treated in an inert atmosphere, at their respective eutectic temperatures. Microstructural observation showed evidence of reaction initiating in the solid state, but eventually being taken over by a self sustained combustion type reaction mechanism. Activation energies determined using differential thermal analysis were used to correlate the reaction behavior in Ti-Si (as the model system), based on Carter's kinetic model for solid-state reactions and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetics for the combustion-type reaction, with experimental measurements of fraction of Ti5Si3 formed as a function of time and temperature. It was confirmed that in Ti-Si dynamically-densified powder compacts the reaction occurs in the solid-state up to temperatures <1000°C, but with further increase in temperature the reaction is taken over by a combustion-type reaction. The Ti-Si compacts thus produced are 92--95% dense and show a fully reacted Ti5Si3 microstructure, with ~6 mum grain size and ˜800 kg/mm2 microhardness. A predictive model was developed, incorporating a balance between rate of heat generation (due to reaction) and heat dissipation, to determine optimum synthesis conditions under which the reaction occurs in the solid state without being taken over by the combustion mode. The model considered synthesis temperature, compact porosity, and activation energy as the variables, to determine the fraction reacted as a function of

  5. Photoelectric currents across planar bilayer membranes containing bacterial reaction centers. Response under conditions of single electron turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Packham, N K; Dutton, P L; Mueller, P

    1982-01-01

    Light-induced electric current and potential responses have been measured across planar phospholipid membranes containing reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Under conditions in which the reaction centers are restricted to a single electron turnover, the responses can be correlated with the light-induced electron transfer reactions associated with the reaction center. The results indicate that electron transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll dimer to the primary ubiquinone molecule, and from ferrocytochrome c to the oxidized dimer occur in series across the planar membrane. Electron transfer from the primary to secondary ubiquinone molecule is not electrogenic. PMID:6277403

  6. The Role of Grain Surface Reactions in the Chemistry of Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Roberge, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of reactions at the surfaces of dust grains has long been recognized to be one of the two main chemical processes that form molecules in cold, dark interstellar clouds where simple, saturated (fully-hydrogenated) molecules such as H2 water, methanol, H2CO, H2S, ammonia and CH4 are present in quantities far too high to be consistent with their extremely low gas phase formation rates. In cold dark regions of interstellar space, dust grains provide a substrate onto which gas-phase species can accrete and react. Grains provide a "third body" or a sink for the energy released in the exothermic reactions that form chemical bonds. In essence, the surfaces of dust grains open up alternative reaction pathways to form observed molecules whose abundances cannot be explained with gas-phase chemistry alone. This concept is taken one step further in this work: instead of merely acting as a substrate onto which radicals and molecules may physically adsorb, some grains may actively participate in the reaction itself, forming chemical bonds with the accreting species. Until recently, surface chemical reactions had not been thought to be important in warm circumstellar media because adspecies rapidly desorb from grains at very low temperatures; thus, the residence times of molecules and radicals on the surface of grains at all but the lowest temperatures are far too short to allow these reactions to occur. However, if the adspecies could adsorb more strongly, via a true chemical bond with surfaces of some dust grains, then grain surface reactions will play an important role in warm circumstellar regions as well. In this work, the surface-catalyzed reaction CO + 3 H2 yields CH4 + H2O is studied in the context that it may be very effective at converting the inorganic molecule CO into the simplest organic compound, methane. H2 and CO are the most abundant molecules in space, and the reaction converting them to methane, while kinetically inhibited in the gas phase under

  7. Control of Transcriptional Fidelity by Active Center Tuning as Derived from RNA Polymerase Endonuclease Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3′-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg2+ ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg2+ is present. This Mg2+ is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg2+ to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg2+ thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg2+ and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000–4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity. PMID:23283976

  8. A Teflon microreactor with integrated piezoelectric actuator to handle solid forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Simon; Noël, Timothy; Gu, Lei; Heider, Patrick L; Jensen, Klavs F

    2011-08-07

    We present a general inexpensive method for realizing a Teflon stack microreactor with an integrated piezoelectric actuator for conducting chemical synthesis with solid products. The microreactors are demonstrated with palladium-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions, which are prone to clogging microchannels by forming insoluble salts as by-products. Investigations of the ultrasonic waveform applied by the piezoelectric actuator reveal an optimal value of 50 kHz at a load power of 30 W. Operating the system at these conditions, the newly developed Teflon microreactor handles the insoluble solids formed and no clogging is observed. The investigated reactions reach full conversion in very short reaction times and high isolated yields are obtained (>95% yield).

  9. One-pot lipase-catalyzed aldol reaction combination of in situ formed acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Long-Hua; Deng, Qing-Feng; Xie, Zong-Bo; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2013-12-01

    A facile tandem route to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes was developed by combining the two catalytic activities of the same enzyme in a one-pot strategy for the aldol reaction and in situ generation of acetaldehyde. Lipase from Mucor miehei was found to have conventional and promiscuous catalytic activities for the hydrolysis of vinyl acetate and aldol condensation with in situ formed acetaldehyde. The first reaction continuously provided material for the second reaction, which effectively reduced the volatilization loss, oxidation, and polymerization of acetaldehyde, as well as avoided a negative effect on the enzyme of excessive amounts of acetaldehyde. After optimizing the process, several substrates participated in the reaction and provided the target products in moderate to high yields using this single lipase-catalyzed one-pot biotransformation.

  10. Reactions to Discrimination, Stigmatization, Ostracism, and Other Forms of Interpersonal Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Laura Smart; Leary, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people’s reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People’s immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of rejection in terms of negative affect and lowered self-esteem. However, following these immediate responses, people’s reactions are influenced by construals of the rejection experience that predict 3 distinct motives for prosocial, antisocial, and socially avoidant behavioral responses. The authors describe the relational, contextual, and dispositional factors that affect which motives determine people’s reactions to a rejection experience and the ways in which these 3 motives may work at cross-purposes. The multimotive model accounts for the myriad ways in which responses to rejection unfold over time and offers a basis for the next generation of research on interpersonal rejection. PMID:19348546

  11. Reactions to discrimination, stigmatization, ostracism, and other forms of interpersonal rejection: a multimotive model.

    PubMed

    Smart Richman, Laura; Leary, Mark R

    2009-04-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of rejection in terms of negative affect and lowered self-esteem. However, following these immediate responses, people's reactions are influenced by construals of the rejection experience that predict 3 distinct motives for prosocial, antisocial, and socially avoidant behavioral responses. The authors describe the relational, contextual, and dispositional factors that affect which motives determine people's reactions to a rejection experience and the ways in which these 3 motives may work at cross-purposes. The multimotive model accounts for the myriad ways in which responses to rejection unfold over time and offers a basis for the next generation of research on interpersonal rejection.

  12. Strong evidence for quasifission in asymmetric reactions forming {sup 202}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiei, R.; Thomas, R. G.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Morton, C. R.; Gasques, L. R.; Brown, M. L.; Rodriguez, M. D.

    2008-02-15

    Fission fragment mass-angle correlations and mass ratio distributions have been measured for the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 186}Os, {sup 24}Mg+{sup 178}Hf, {sup 34}S+{sup 168}Er, and {sup 48}Ti+{sup 154}Sm, forming the {sup 202}Po composite nucleus, at near barrier energies. Systematic analysis based on the expected dependence of the variance of the mass distribution on the angular momentum and temperature of the compound nucleus indicate that the two lighter systems evolve through true compound nucleus fission. Evidence of quasifission was observed for the two most mass-symmetric reactions, through strong mass-angle correlations for the {sup 48}Ti+{sup 154}Sm reaction and a broadened mass ratio distribution for the {sup 34}S+{sup 168}Er reaction. Furthermore, the increase in mass width at near barrier energies shows the influence of the alignment of statically deformed target nuclei.

  13. The aluminium and iodine pentoxide reaction for the destruction of spore forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Clark, Billy R; Pantoya, Michelle L

    2010-10-21

    The threat of biological weapons is a major concern in the present day and has led to studying methods to neutralize spore forming bacteria. A new technique involves the use of a thermite reaction that exhibits biocidal properties to limit bacterial growth. The objective was to examine the influence on bacteria growth upon spore exposure to thermite reactions with and without biocidal properties. Three thermites are considered: two that have biocidal properties (aluminium (Al) combined with iodine pentoxide (I(2)O(5)) and Al combined with silver oxide (Ag(2)O)); and, one that produces a highly exothermic reaction but has no biocidal properties (Al combined with iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3))). Results show that Al + I(2)O(5) is extremely effective at neutralizing spores after only one hour of exposure. The temperature generated by the reaction was not determined to be an influential factor affecting spore growth kinetics. Further analysis of the thermite reactions revealed that the Al + I(2)O(5) reaction produces iodine gas that effectively interacts with the spores and neutralizes bacteria growth, while the Al + Ag(2)O reaction temperature does not vaporize silver. In the condensed phase silver does not interact with the spores enough to neutralize bacteria growth. This study gives evidence that a thermite can be used as a stable transportation and delivery system for biocidal gas.

  14. Morphology of melt-rich channels formed during reaction infiltration experiments on partially molten mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical, geophysical and geological observations suggest that melt extraction from the partially molten mantle occurs by some sort of channelized flow. Melt-solid reactions can lead to melt channelization due to a positive feedback between melt flow and reaction. If a melt-solid reaction increases local permeability, subsequent flow is increased as well and promotes further reaction. This process can lead to the development of high-permeability channels which emerge from background flow. In nature, anastomozing tabular dunite bodies within peridotitic massifs are thought to represent fossilized channels that formed by reactive flow. The conditions under which such channels can emerge are treated by the reaction infiltration instability (RII) theory (e.g. Szymczak and Ladd 2014). In this contribution, we report the results of a series of Darcy type experiments designed to study the development of channels due to RII in mantle lithologies (Pec et al. 2015). We sandwiched a partially molten rock between a melt source and a porous sink and annealed it at high-pressures (P = 300 MPa) and high-temperatures (T = 1200° or 1250° C) under a controlled pressure gradient (∇P = 0-100 MPa/mm) for up to 5 hours. The partially molten rock is formed by 50:50 mixtures of San Carlos olivine (Ol, Fo ˜ 88) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) with either 4, 10 or 20 vol% of alkali basalt added. The source and sink are disks of alkali basalt and porous alumina, respectively. During the experiments, silica undersaturated melt from the melt source dissolves Cpx and precipitates an iron rich Ol (Fo ˜ 82) thereby forming a Cpx-free reaction layer at the melt source - partially molten rock interface. The melt fraction in the reaction layer increases significantly (40% melt) compared to the protolith, confirming that the reaction increases the permeability of the partially molten rock. In experiments annealed under a low pressure gradient (and hence slow melt flow velocity) the reaction layer is

  15. Reaction profile in patch testing with allergens formed during vulcanization of rubber.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Christer; Pontén, Ann; Svedman, Cecilia; Bergendorff, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Vulcanization of rubber changes its allergen pattern. To estimate the contact allergic reactivity profile of users of finished rubber products. Twenty-four patients with known contact allergy to rubber accelerators were patch tested with 21 compounds found in chemical analyses of vulcanized rubber products. No diphenylguanidine, p-phenylenediamine antioxidants or thioureas were included in the study. Thiuram monosulfides formed during vulcanization showed generally stronger test reactions than the corresponding thiuram disulfides. We also obtained more positive thiuram reactions to the monosulfides than to the disulfides. A positive reaction to a dithiocarbamate was accompanied by a positive reaction to the corresponding thiuram, except for 1 patient. The nitrogen substituents showed only minor differences between the methyl, ethyl and pentamethylene groups, but the butyl derivatives gave, in most cases, a negative response. Dialkylthiocarbamyl benzothiazole sulfides, formed between thiurams and mercaptobenzothiazoles during vulcanization, showed strong test reactions in almost all patients who were sensitive to dithiocarbamates, thiurams, or mercaptobenzothiazoles. We found thiuram monosulfides to be better markers of thiuram sensitivity than the corresponding disulfides or dithiocarbamates. Surprisingly, the dialkylthiocarbamyl benzothiazole sulfides were good markers of both thiuram and mercaptobenzothiazole sensitivity. This is an unexpected finding that needs to be confirmed in a larger study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Contributions of organic peroxides to secondary aerosol formed from reactions of monoterpenes with O3.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Wu, Wilbur; Lim, Yong Bin; Ziemann, Paul J

    2005-06-01

    The role of organic peroxides in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactions of monoterpenes with O3 was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments. Reactions were performed with endocyclic (alpha-pinene and delta3-carene) and exocyclic (beta-pinene and sabinene) alkenes in dry and humid air and in the presence of the OH radical scavengers: cyclohexane, 1-propanol, and formaldehyde. A thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer was used to probe the identity and volatility of SOA components, and an iodometric-spectrophotometric method was used to quantify organic peroxides. Thermal desorption profiles and mass spectra showed that the most volatile SOA components had vapor pressures similar to pinic acid and that much of the SOA consisted of less volatile species that were probably oligomeric compounds. Peroxide analyses indicated that the SOA was predominantly organic peroxides, providing evidence that the oligomers were mostly peroxyhemiacetals formed by heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides and aldehydes. For example, it was estimated that organic peroxides contributed approximately 47 and approximately 85% of the SOA mass formed in the alpha- and beta-pinene reactions, respectively. Reactions performed with different OH radical scavengers indicated that most of the hydroperoxides were formed through the hydroperoxide channel rather than by reactions of stabilized Criegee intermediates. The effect of the OH radical scavenger on the SOA yield was also investigated, and the results were consistent with results of recent experiments and model simulations that support a mechanism based on changes in the [HO2]/[RO2] ratios. These are the first measurements of organic peroxides in monoterpene SOA, and the results have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of SOA formation and the potential effects of atmospheric aerosol particles on the environment and human health.

  17. Externally controlled anisotropy in pattern-forming reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escala, Dario M.; Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of centrifugal forces is analyzed in a pattern-forming reaction-diffusion system. Numerical simulations conducted on the appropriate extension of the Oregonator model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction show a great variety of dynamical behaviors in such a system. In general, the system exhibits an anisotropy that results in new types of patterns or in a global displacement of the previous one. We consider the effect of both constant and periodically modulated centrifugal forces on the different types of patterns that the system may exhibit. A detailed analysis of the patterns and behaviors observed for the different parameter values considered is presented here.

  18. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene, Ethylene, and Diborane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with a mixture of acetylene and ethylene was found to be 20,440 +/- 150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net-heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,850 +/- 150 Btu per pound.

  19. Investigation of photochemical reaction products of glucose formed during direct UV detection in CE.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas; Himmelsbach, Markus; Buchberger, Wolfgang W

    2016-04-01

    In CE, saccharides are accessible to direct UV detection due to a photochemical reaction in the detection window of the separation capillary resulting in the formation of UV absorbing substances. Employing a CE method that allows long in-capillary irradiation with subsequent UV and MS detection, the present study could identify several reaction products of glucose. Among these were UV absorbing substances so far unknown to be formed during direct UV detection with the chemical formulas C4 H6 O2 , C5 H6 O4 , C5 H8 O3, and C6 H8 O5 . Investigations of the impact of the irradiation time revealed differences between these reaction products suggesting differing reaction mechanisms especially for the smallest products. More detailed information could be obtained by experiments with isotope-labeled substrates performed to determine the parts of glucose that are converted to the particular reaction products. In addition, structural formulas for the reaction products were suggested based on HPLC-MS/MS measurements of off-line irradiated glucose solutions which revealed the existence of functional groups such as carboxylic acid or aldehyde groups.

  20. Materials Characterization Center meeting on impact testing of waste forms. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Atteridge, D.; Dudder, G.

    1981-10-01

    A meeting was held on March 25-26, 1981 to discuss impact test methods for waste form materials to be used in nuclear waste repositories. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) in preparing the MCC-10 Impact Test Method to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The meeting focused on two essential aspects of the test method, namely the mechanical process, or impact, used to effect rapid fracture of a waste form and the analysis technique(s) used to characterize particulates generated by the impact.

  1. An audit of request forms submitted in a multidisciplinary diagnostic center in Lagos.

    PubMed

    Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Ogbenna, Abiola Ann; Iwuala, Sandra Omozehio

    2015-01-01

    Request forms are important means of communication between physicians and diagnostic service providers. Pre-analytical errors account for over two thirds of errors encountered in diagnostic service provision. The importance of adequate completion of request forms is usually underestimated by physicians which may result in medical errors or delay in instituting appropriate treatment. The aim of this study was to audit the level of completion of request forms presented at a multidisciplinary diagnostic center. A review of all requests forms for investigations which included radiologic, laboratory and cardiac investigations received between July and December 2011 was performed to assess their level of completeness. The data was entered into a spreadsheet and analyzed. Only 1.3% of the 7,841 request forms reviewed were fully completed. Patient's names, the referring physician's name and gender were the most completed information on the forms evaluated with 99.0%, 99.0% and 90.3% completion respectively. Patient's age was provided in 68.0%, request date in 88.2%, and clinical notes/ diagnosis in 65.9% of the requests. Patient's full address was provided in only 5.6% of requests evaluated. This study shows that investigation request forms are inadequately filled by physicians in our environment. Continuous medical education of physicians on the need for adequate completion of request forms is needed.

  2. An audit of request forms submitted in a multidisciplinary diagnostic center in Lagos

    PubMed Central

    Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Ogbenna, Abiola Ann; Iwuala, Sandra Omozehio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Request forms are important means of communication between physicians and diagnostic service providers. Pre-analytical errors account for over two thirds of errors encountered in diagnostic service provision. The importance of adequate completion of request forms is usually underestimated by physicians which may result in medical errors or delay in instituting appropriate treatment. The aim of this study was to audit the level of completion of request forms presented at a multidisciplinary diagnostic center. Methods A review of all requests forms for investigations which included radiologic, laboratory and cardiac investigations received between July and December 2011 was performed to assess their level of completeness. The data was entered into a spreadsheet and analyzed. Results Only 1.3% of the 7,841 request forms reviewed were fully completed. Patient's names, the referring physician's name and gender were the most completed information on the forms evaluated with 99.0%, 99.0% and 90.3% completion respectively. Patient's age was provided in 68.0%, request date in 88.2%, and clinical notes/ diagnosis in 65.9% of the requests. Patient's full address was provided in only 5.6% of requests evaluated. Conclusion This study shows that investigation request forms are inadequately filled by physicians in our environment. Continuous medical education of physicians on the need for adequate completion of request forms is needed. PMID:26309456

  3. A generalized garnet-forming reaction for metaigneous rocks in the Adirondacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized reaction is presented to account for garnet formation in a variety of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. This reaction, which is the sum of five partial reactions written in aluminum-fixed frames of reference, is given by: 4(y+1+w)Anorthite+4 k(y+1+2 w)Olivine +4(1-k)(y+1+2 w)Fe-oxide+(8(y+1) -4 k(y+1+2 w))Orthopyroxene = 2(y+1)Garnet +2(y+1+2 w)Clinopyroxene+4 wSpinel where y is a function of plagioclase composition, k refers to the relative amounts of olivine and Fe-oxide participating in the reaction, and w is a measure of silicon mobility. When mass balanced for Mg and Fe, this reaction is found to be consistent with analyzed mineral compositions in a wide range of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. The reaction applies equally well whether the garnets were formed directly from the rectants given above or went through an intermadiate stage involving the formation of spinel, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene. The actual reactions which have produced garnet in both undersaturated and quartz-bearing rocks are special cases of the above general reaction. The most important special cases appear to be those in which the reactants include either olivine alone (k=1) or Fe-oxide alone (k=0). Silicon is relatively immobile (w =2) in olivine bearing, magnesium-rich rocks (k???1), and this correlates with the increased intensity in spinel clouding of plagioclase in these rocks. Silicon mobility apparently increases in the more iron-rich rocks, which also tend to contain clear or lightly clouded plagioclase. In all the rocks studied the most common composition of metamorphic plagioclase is close to An33 (i.e., y=1). Plagioclase of lower anorthite content may be too sodic to participate in garnet formation at the P-T conditions involved. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Coupling of collective motions of the protein matrix to vibrations of the non-heme iron in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Orzechowska, A; Lipińska, M; Fiedor, J; Chumakov, A; Zajac, M; Slezak, T; Matlak, K; Strzałka, K; Korecki, J; Fiedor, L; Burda, K

    2010-10-01

    Non-heme iron is a conservative component of type II photosynthetic reaction centers of unknown function. We found that in the reaction center from Rba. sphaeroides it exists in two forms, high and low spin ferrous states, whereas in Rsp. rubrum mostly in a low spin state, in line with our earlier finding of its low spin state in the algal photosystem II reaction center (Burda et al., 2003). The temperature dependence of the non-heme iron displacement studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the surrounding of the high spin iron is more flexible (Debye temperature ~165K) than that of the low spin atom (~207K). Nuclear inelastic scattering measurements of the collective motions in the Rba. sphaeroides reaction center show that the density of vibrational states, originating from non-heme iron, has well-separated modes between lower (4-17meV) and higher (17-25meV) energies while in the one from Rsp. rubrum its distribution is more uniform with only little contribution of low energy (~6meV) vibrations. It is the first experimental evidence that the fluctuations of the protein matrix in type II reaction center are correlated to the spin state of non-heme iron. We propose a simple mechanism in which the spin state of non-heme iron directly determines the strength of coupling between the two quinone acceptors (Q(A) and Q(B)) and fast collective motions of protein matrix that play a crucial role in activation and regulation of the electron and proton transfer between these two quinones. We suggest that hydrogen bond network on the acceptor side of reaction center is responsible for stabilization of non-heme iron in different spin states. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On the mechanism of ubiquinone mediated photocurrent generation by a reaction center based photocathode.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Vincent M; Swainsbury, David J K; Fyfe, Paul K; van der Heijden, Wessel; Jones, Michael R; Frese, Raoul N

    2016-12-01

    Upon photoexcitation, the reaction center (RC) pigment-proteins that facilitate natural photosynthesis achieve a metastable separation of electrical charge among the embedded cofactors. Because of the high quantum efficiency of this process, there is a growing interest in their incorporation into biohybrid materials for solar energy conversion, bioelectronics and biosensing. Multiple bioelectrochemical studies have shown that reaction centers from various photosynthetic organisms can be interfaced with diverse electrode materials for the generation of photocurrents, but many mechanistic aspects of native protein functionality in a non-native environment is unknown. In vivo, RC's catalyse ubiquinone-10 reduction, protonation and exchange with other lipid phase ubiquinone-10s via protein-controlled spatial orientation and protein rearrangement. In contrast, the mechanism of ubiquinone-0 reduction, used to facilitate fast RC turnover in an aqueous photoelectrochemical cell (PEC), may not proceed via the same pathway as the native cofactor. In this report we show truncation of the native isoprene tail results in larger RC turnover rates in a PEC despite the removal of the tail's purported role of ubiquinone headgroup orientation and binding. Through the use of reaction centers with single or double mutations, we also show the extent to which two-electron/two-proton ubiquinone chemistry that operates in vivo also underpins the ubiquinone-0 reduction by surface-adsorbed RCs in a PEC. This reveals that only the ubiquinone headgroup is critical to the fast turnover of the RC in a PEC and provides insight into design principles for the development of new biophotovoltaic cells and biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural analysis of the homodimeric reaction center complex from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    He, Guannan; Zhang, Hao; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E

    2014-08-05

    The reaction center (RC) complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is composed of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein (FMO) and the reaction center core (RCC) complex. The RCC complex has four subunits: PscA, PscB, PscC, and PscD. We studied the FMO/RCC complex by chemically cross-linking the purified sample followed by biochemical and spectroscopic analysis. Blue-native gels showed that there were two types of FMO/RCC complexes, which are consistent with complexes with one copy of FMO per RCC and two copies of FMO per RCC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the samples after cross-linking showed that all five subunits of the RC can be linked by three different cross-linkers: bissulfosuccinimidyl suberate, disuccinimidyl suberate, and 3,3-dithiobis-sulfosuccinimidyl propionate. The interaction sites of the cross-linked complex were also studied using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The results indicated that FMO, PscB, PscD, and part of PscA are exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. PscD helps stabilize FMO to the reaction center and may facilitate transfer of the electron from the RC to ferredoxin. The soluble domain of the heme-containing cytochrome subunit PscC and part of the core subunit PscA are located on the periplasmic side of the membrane. There is a close relationship between the periplasmic portions of PscA and PscC, which is needed for the efficient transfer of the electron between PscC and P840.

  7. Influence of hydroxylamine conformation on stereocontrol in Pd-catalyzed isoxazolidine-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Lemen, Georgia S; Giampietro, Natalie C; Hay, Michael B; Wolfe, John P

    2009-03-20

    Palladium-catalyzed carboamination reactions between N-Boc-O-(but-3-enyl)hydroxylamine derivatives and aryl or alkenyl bromides afford cis-3,5- and trans-4,5-disubstituted isoxazolidines in good yield with up to >20:1 dr. The diastereoselectivity observed in the formation of cis-3,5-disubstituted isoxazolidines is superior to selectivities typically obtained in other transformations, such as 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, that provide these products. In addition, the stereocontrol in the C-N bond-forming Pd-catalyzed carboamination reactions of N-Boc-O-(but-3-enyl)hydroxylamines is significantly higher than that of related C-O bond-forming carboetherification reactions of N-benzyl-N-(but-3-enyl)hydroxylamine derivatives. This is likely due to a stereoelectronic preference for cyclization via transition states in which the Boc group is placed in a perpendicular orientation relative to the plane of the developing ring, which derives from the conformational equilibria of substituted hydroxylamines.

  8. Weak temperature dependence of P (+) H A (-) recombination in mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Białek, Rafał; Pajzderska, Maria; Karolczak, Jerzy; Burdziński, Gotard; Jones, Michael R; Brettel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In contrast with findings on the wild-type Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, biexponential P (+) H A (-)  → PH A charge recombination is shown to be weakly dependent on temperature between 78 and 298 K in three variants with single amino acids exchanged in the vicinity of primary electron acceptors. These mutated reaction centers have diverse overall kinetics of charge recombination, spanning an average lifetime from ~2 to ~20 ns. Despite these differences a protein relaxation model applied previously to wild-type reaction centers was successfully used to relate the observed kinetics to the temporal evolution of the free energy level of the state P (+) H A (-) relative to P (+) B A (-) . We conclude that the observed variety in the kinetics of charge recombination, together with their weak temperature dependence, is caused by a combination of factors that are each affected to a different extent by the point mutations in a particular mutant complex. These are as follows: (1) the initial free energy gap between the states P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) , (2) the intrinsic rate of P (+) B A (-)  → PB A charge recombination, and (3) the rate of protein relaxation in response to the appearance of the charge separated states. In the case of a mutant which displays rapid P (+) H A (-) recombination (ELL), most of this recombination occurs in an unrelaxed protein in which P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) are almost isoenergetic. In contrast, in a mutant in which P (+) H A (-) recombination is relatively slow (GML), most of the recombination occurs in a relaxed protein in which P (+) H A (-) is much lower in energy than P (+) H A (-) . The weak temperature dependence in the ELL reaction center and a YLH mutant was modeled in two ways: (1) by assuming that the initial P (+) B A (-) and P (+) H A (-) states in an unrelaxed protein are isoenergetic, whereas the final free energy gap between these states following the protein relaxation is large (~250 meV or

  9. Species differences in unlocking B-side electron transfer in bacterial reaction centers

    DOE PAGES

    Dylla, Nicholas P.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Wyllie, Ryan M.; ...

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) reveals symmetry-related electron transfer (ET) pathways, but only one path is used in native RCs. Analogous mutations have been made in two Rhodobacter (R.) species. A glutamic acid at position 133 in the M subunit increases transmembrane charge separation via the naturally inactive (B-side) path through impacts on primary ET in mutant R. sphaeroidesRCs. Prior work showed that the analogous substitution in the R. capsulatusRC also increases B-side activity, but mainly affects secondary ET. Finally, the overall yields of transmembrane ET are similar, but enabled in fundamentally different ways.

  10. Chapter 3: Isolation of Photosystem II Reaction Center Complexes from Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Picorel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Methods to isolate and purify 6- and 5-Chl D1/D2/Cyt b559 photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) complexes from plants are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of each procedure are discussed. One of the simpler 6-Chl procedures and a procedure for isolating 5-Chl complexes are described in detail. Furthermore, a rapid procedure that produces relatively large amounts of less pure 6-Chl material (i.e., more nonpigmented protein) is also described. Criteria to assess the purity of PSII RC preparations are presented, and problems associated with each of the isolation procedures are discussed.

  11. The Biological Methane-Forming Reaction: Mechanism Confirmed Through Spectroscopic Characterization of a Key Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Shima, Seigo

    2016-10-24

    Find your path: Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR, turquoise) reversibly catalyzes the reduction of methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-S-CoM) with coenzyme B (CoB-SH) to form methane and the heterodisulfide. Recently, spectroscopic methods were used to detect trapped intermediates in a stopped-flow system, and CoM-S-Ni(II) was identified after half a turnover of the MCR reaction (F430 =nickel porphinoid). This finding supports a methyl-radical catalytic mechanism.

  12. Identification, isolation, and sequence of the reaction center protein genes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Reaction centers in photosynthetic membranes are the centers to which electronic excitation due to light absorption is transferred. This excitation brings about a charge separation between a bacteriochlorophyll molecule and two quinone molecules which ultimately leads to the formation of a hydroquinone. The reduced hydroquinone is then utilized to produce a proton gradient across the membrane and ultimately to produce ATP. We have focused our interest on the structure of the reaction center in the photosynthetic purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, with the intention of establishing a detailed understanding of these first chemical steps in the natural fixation of sunlight. The methods used to identify and isolate the genes for the three reaction center subunits, L, M, and H, in Rps. capsulata are outlined. These genes have then been sequenced, and the sequences analyzed in detail for their similarity with sequences of comparable proteins from more advanced photosynthetic bacteria such as Anabena, from algae such as Euglena and Chlamydomonas, and from higher plants such as amaranthus, soybean, tobacco and spinach. Homology was found which has been tentatively interpreted to be in the region of quinone binding in all of these reaction centers. There is growing optimism that there will be substantial structural similarity between the reaction centers of the purple bacteria and those of photosystem II in higher plants. This conclusion is important because the x-ray crystal structures of several of the purple bacteria reaction center complexes are presently being worked on and will ultimately be solved.

  13. Dynamics of energy conversion in reaction center core complexes of the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Neerken, S; Schmidt, K A; Aartsma, T J; Amesz, J

    1999-10-05

    Excited-state and electron-transfer dynamics at cryogenic temperature in reaction center core (RCC) complexes of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii were studied by means of time-resolved absorption spectroscopy, using selective excitaton of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and of chlorophyll (Chl) a 670. The results indicate that the BChls a of the RCC complex form an excitonically coupled system. Relaxation of the excitation energy within the ensemble of BChl a molecules occurred within 2 ps. A time constant of about 25 ps was ascribed to charge separation. Absorption changes in the 670 nm region, where Chl a 670 absorbs, were fairly complicated. They showed various time constants and were dependent on the wavelength of excitation and they did not lead to a simple picture of the electron acceptor reaction. Energy transfer from Chl a 670 to BChl a occurred with a time constant of 1.5 ps. However, upon excitation of Chl a 670 the amount of oxidized primary electron donor, P840(+), formed relative to that of excited BChl a was considerably larger than upon direct excitation of BChl a. This indicates the existence of an alternative pathway for charge separation which does not involve excited BChl a.

  14. Nickel-Catalyzed Carbon–Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Unactivated Tertiary Alkyl Halides: Suzuki Arylations

    PubMed Central

    Zultanski, Susan L.; Fu, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    The first Suzuki cross-couplings of unactivated tertiary alkyl electrophiles are described, employing a readily accessible catalyst (NiBr2·-diglyme/4,4′-di-t-butyl-2,2′-bipyridine, both commercially available); this also represents the initial example of the use of a Group 10 catalyst to cross-couple unactivated tertiary electrophiles to form carbon–carbon bonds. This approach to the synthesis of all-carbon quaternary carbon centers does not suffer from isomerization of the alkyl group, in contrast with the umpolung strategy for this bond construction (cross-coupling a tertiary alkylmetal with an aryl electrophile). Preliminary mechanistic studies are consistent with the generation of a radical intermediate along the reaction pathway. PMID:23281960

  15. A caudal proliferating growth center contributes to both poles of the forming heart tube.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Gert; Abu-Issa, Radwan; de Boer, Bouke A; Hutson, Mary R; de Boer, Piet A J; Soufan, Alexandre T; Ruijter, Jan M; Kirby, Margaret L; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2009-01-30

    Recent studies have shown that the primary heart tube continues to grow by addition of cells from the coelomic wall. This growth occurs concomitantly with embryonic folding and formation of the coelomic cavity, making early heart formation morphologically complex. A scarcity of data on localized growth parameters further hampers the understanding of cardiac growth. Therefore, we investigated local proliferation during early heart formation. Firstly, we determined the cell cycle length of primary myocardium of the early heart tube to be 5.5 days, showing that this myocardium is nonproliferating and implying that initial heart formation occurs solely by addition of cells. In line with this, we show that the heart tube rapidly lengthens at its inflow by differentiation of recently divided precursor cells. To track the origin of these cells, we made quantitative 3D reconstructions of proliferation in the forming heart tube and the mesoderm of its flanking coelomic walls. These reconstructions show a single, albeit bilateral, center of rapid proliferation in the caudomedial pericardial back wall. This center expresses Islet1. Cell tracing showed that cells from this caudal growth center, besides feeding into the venous pole of the heart, also move cranially via the dorsal pericardial mesoderm and differentiate into myocardium at the arterial pole. Inhibition of caudal proliferation impairs the formation of both the atria and the right ventricle. These data show how a proliferating growth center in the caudal coelomic wall elongates the heart tube at both its venous and arterial pole, providing a morphological mechanism for early heart formation.

  16. Mutations to R. sphaeroides Reaction Center Perturb Energy Levels and Vibronic Coupling but Not Observed Energy Transfer Rates.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Moira L; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Rolczynski, Brian S; Massey, Sara C; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-03-10

    The bacterial reaction center is capable of both efficiently collecting and quickly transferring energy within the complex; therefore, the reaction center serves as a convenient model for both energy transfer and charge separation. To spectroscopically probe the interactions between the electronic excited states on the chromophores and their intricate relationship with vibrational motions in their environment, we examine coherences between the excited states. Here, we investigate this question by introducing a series of point mutations within 12 Å of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center. Using two-dimensional spectroscopy, we find that the time scales of energy transfer dynamics remain unperturbed by these mutations. However, within these spectra, we detect changes in the mixed vibrational-electronic coherences in these reaction centers. Our results indicate that resonance between bacteriochlorophyll vibrational modes and excitonic energy gaps promote electronic coherences and support current vibronic models of photosynthetic energy transfer.

  17. Formation of new Tm3+ tetragonal symmetry optical centers in CaF2 hot-formed laser ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, M. E.; Alimov, O. K.; Papashvili, A. G.; Martynova, K. A.; Konyushkin, V. A.; Nakladov, A. N.; Osiko, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    By means of time-resolved site-selective spectroscopy the formation of new Tm3+ optical centers with modified local environment and presumably tetragonal local symmetry in CaF2 hot-formed laser quality ceramics is observed. The spectroscopic properties of these new Tm3+ optical centers are investigated and shown to differ strongly from that for regular tetragonal optical centers.

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for the reaction of semiquinone radicals to form superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Buettner, Garry R

    2010-09-15

    The quinone/semiquinone/hydroquinone triad (Q/SQ(*-)/H(2)Q) represents a class of compounds that has great importance in a wide range of biological processes. The half-cell reduction potentials of these redox couples in aqueous solutions at neutral pH, E degrees ', provide a window to understanding the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this triad and their associated chemistry and biochemistry in vivo. Substituents on the quinone ring can significantly influence the electron density "on the ring" and thus modify E degrees' dramatically. E degrees' of the quinone governs the reaction of semiquinone with dioxygen to form superoxide. At near-neutral pH the pK(a)'s of the hydroquinone are outstanding indicators of the electron density in the aromatic ring of the members of these triads (electrophilicity) and thus are excellent tools to predict half-cell reduction potentials for both the one-electron and two-electron couples, which in turn allow estimates of rate constants for the reactions of these triads. For example, the higher the pK(a)'s of H(2)Q, the lower the reduction potentials and the higher the rate constants for the reaction of SQ(*-) with dioxygen to form superoxide. However, hydroquinone autoxidation is controlled by the concentration of di-ionized hydroquinone; thus, the lower the pK(a)'s the less stable H(2)Q to autoxidation. Catalysts, e.g., metals and quinone, can accelerate oxidation processes; by removing superoxide and increasing the rate of formation of quinone, superoxide dismutase can accelerate oxidation of hydroquinones and thereby increase the flux of hydrogen peroxide. The principal reactions of quinones are with nucleophiles via Michael addition, for example, with thiols and amines. The rate constants for these addition reactions are also related to E degrees'. Thus, pK(a)'s of a hydroquinone and E degrees ' are central to the chemistry of these triads. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional type 2 photosynthetic reaction centers found in the rare bacterial phylum Gemmatimonadetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yonghui; Feng, Fuying; Medová, Hana; Dean, Jason; Koblížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria emerged on Earth more than 3 Gyr ago. To date, despite a long evolutionary history, species containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based reaction centers have been reported in only 6 out of more than 30 formally described bacterial phyla: Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Acidobacteria. Here we describe a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing isolate AP64 that belongs to the poorly characterized phylum Gemmatimonadetes. This red-pigmented semiaerobic strain was isolated from a freshwater lake in the western Gobi Desert. It contains fully functional type 2 (pheophytin-quinone) photosynthetic reaction centers but does not assimilate inorganic carbon, suggesting that it performs a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Full genome sequencing revealed the presence of a 42.3-kb–long photosynthesis gene cluster (PGC) in its genome. The organization and phylogeny of its photosynthesis genes suggests an ancient acquisition of PGC via horizontal transfer from purple phototrophic bacteria. The data presented here document that Gemmatimonadetes is the seventh bacterial phylum containing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophic species. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy can be transferred between distant bacterial phyla, providing new insights into the evolution of bacterial photosynthesis. PMID:24821787

  20. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  1. Modeling light-driven proton pumps in artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2009-07-21

    We study a model of a light-induced proton pump in artificial reaction centers. The model contains a molecular triad with four electron states (i.e., one donor state, two photosensitive group states, and one acceptor state) as well as a molecular shuttle having one electron and one proton-binding sites. The shuttle diffuses between the sides of the membrane and translocates protons energetically uphill: from the negative side to the positive side of the membrane, harnessing for this purpose the energy of the electron-charge separation produced by light. Using the methods of quantum transport theory we calculate the range of light intensity and transmembrane potentials that maximize both the light-induced proton current and the energy transduction efficiency. We also study the effect of temperature on proton pumping. The light-induced proton pump in our model gives a quantum yield of proton translocation of about 55%. Thus, our results explain previous experiments on these artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.

  2. Electron transfer between exogenous electron donors and reaction center of photosystem 2.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, M D; Kurashov, V N; Petrova, I O; Zaspa, A A; Semenov, A Yu

    2010-05-01

    Transfer of electrons between artificial electron donors diphenylcarbazide (DPC) and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and reaction center of manganese-depleted photosystem 2 (PS2) complexes was studied using the direct electrometrical method. For the first time it was shown that reduction of redox-active amino acid tyrosine Y(Z)(.) by DPC is coupled with generation of transmembrane electric potential difference (DeltaPsi). The amplitude of this phase comprised ~17% of that of the DeltaPsi phase due to electron transfer between Y(Z) and the primary quinone acceptor Q(A). This phase is associated with vectorial intraprotein electron transfer between the DPC binding site on the protein-water interface and the tyrosine Y(Z)(.). The slowing of DeltaPsi decay in the presence of NH2OH indicates effective electron transfer between the artificial electron donor and reaction center of PS2. It is suggested that NH2OH is able to diffuse through channels with diameter of 2.0-3.0 A visible in PS2 structure and leading from the protein-water interface to the Mn(4)Ca cluster binding site with the concomitant electron donation to Y(Z)(.). Because the dielectrically-weighted distance between the NH2OH binding site and Y(Z)(.) is not determined, the transfer of electrons from NH2OH to Y(Z)(.) could be either electrically silent or contribute negligibly to the observed electrogenicity in comparison with hydrophobic donors.

  3. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Eliza, Sazia A.; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Islam, Syed K; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, Milton Nance

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  4. Model for primary electron transfer and coupling of electronic states at reaction centers of purple bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    A detailed derivation is presented for relations making it possible to describe the effect of temperature on the halfwidth of the P960 and P870 absorption bands and also on the electron transfer (ET) rate at reaction centers (RCs) of the purple bacteria Rps. viridis and Rb. sphaeroides. Primary electron transfer is considered as a resonant nonradiative transition between P* and P+B L - states (where P is a special pair, BL is an additional bacteriochlorophyll in the L branch of the reaction center). It has been shown that the vibrational hα mode with frequency 130 150 cm-1 controls primary electron transfer. It has been found that the matrix element of the electronic transition between the states P* and P+B L - is equal to 12.7 ± 0.9 and 12.0 ± 1.2 cm-1 for Rps. viridis and Rb. sphaeroides respectively. The mechanism is discussed for electron transport from P* and BL and then to bacteriopheophytin HL.

  5. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2013-04-02

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  6. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D [Madison, WI; Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI

    2012-04-10

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  7. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D [Madison, WI; Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  8. [Delayed bacteriochlorophyll luminescence and the primary stages of electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers of purple bacteria].

    PubMed

    Borisov, A Iu; Kotova, E A; Samuilov, V D

    1984-01-01

    The results of studies of charge separation in photosynthetic reaction centers of purple bacteria are summarized. The findings concerning the sequence of initial steps of the electron transfer and properties of the electron carriers obtained by direct methods of differential optical absorption and ESR spectroscopy are compared with the data on the bacteriochlorophyll delayed fluorescence resulting from reversal of charge separation. The data analysis gives an integrated description of the reaction center operation which is not avoid of discrepancies.

  9. Rotational effects in complex-forming bimolecular substitution reactions: A quantum-mechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Carsten; Schmatz, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The quantum dynamics of the complex-forming SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Br→ClCH3+Br- is studied with emphasis on rotational effects. The pseudotriatomic system Cl-Me-Br is treated with a corresponding three-dimensional (3D) potential energy surface as a function of the two scattering coordinates and the enclosed angle where the geometry of the methyl group Me is optimized at each point. The 3D space is divided into three different parts, the interaction region, an intermediate region, and the asymptotic region. In line with simple classical-mechanical arguments and previous classical trajectory calculations, initial rotational motion of CH3Br seemingly decreases the reaction probability. However, the dynamical inclusion of the rotational degree of freedom and the presence of the many rovibrational product states overall lead to a large increase in reactivity compared to our previous collinear study on this reaction. If the reactant is rotationally excited, the higher vibrational product states are depleted in favor of lower-lying levels. Starting the reaction with rotationless reactants may end up in significant rotational excitation in the product molecules (translation-to-rotation energy transfer). On the other hand, initial rotational energy in rotationally highly excited reactants is to a large amount converted into translational and vibrational energy. The average amount of rotational energy in the products shows a twofold vibrational excitation-independent saturation (i.e., memorylessness), with respect to both initial rotational excitation and translational energy. Since only about one-half of all reactant states end in rotationless products, the reaction probability should be increased by a factor of 2; the actually larger reactivity points to other dynamical effects that play an important role in the reaction.

  10. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Disulfide and Sulfenic Acid to Form the Strongly Nucleophilic Persulfide.

    PubMed

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Lange, Mike; Bonanata, Jenner; Coitiño, E Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Filipovic, Milos R; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2015-11-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increasingly recognized to modulate physiological processes in mammals through mechanisms that are currently under scrutiny. H2S is not able to react with reduced thiols (RSH). However, H2S, more precisely HS(-), is able to react with oxidized thiol derivatives. We performed a systematic study of the reactivity of HS(-) toward symmetric low molecular weight disulfides (RSSR) and mixed albumin (HSA) disulfides. Correlations with thiol acidity and computational modeling showed that the reaction occurs through a concerted mechanism. Comparison with analogous reactions of thiolates indicated that the intrinsic reactivity of HS(-) is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of thiolates. In addition, H2S is able to react with sulfenic acids (RSOH). The rate constant of the reaction of H2S with the sulfenic acid formed in HSA was determined. Both reactions of H2S with disulfides and sulfenic acids yield persulfides (RSSH), recently identified post-translational modifications. The formation of this derivative in HSA was determined, and the rate constants of its reactions with a reporter disulfide and with peroxynitrite revealed that persulfides are better nucleophiles than thiols, which is consistent with the α effect. Experiments with cells in culture showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide enhanced the formation of persulfides. Biological implications are discussed. Our results give light on the mechanisms of persulfide formation and provide quantitative evidence for the high nucleophilicity of these novel derivatives, setting the stage for understanding the contribution of the reactions of H2S with oxidized thiol derivatives to H2S effector processes.

  11. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tabbutt, S.

    1987-09-01

    The focus of this thesis is excitation transfer and primary photochemistry in spinach chloroplasts and sub-chloroplast particles. The fluorescence kinetics are measured with a synchronously pumped, mode-locked dye laser excitation source and a reverse single photon-counting timing detection system. Very little has been reported on the fluorescence properties of photosystem I (PS I) due to its relatively weak emission compared to photosystem II (PS II). Using a PS I complex isolated from spinach, two emission bands, 690 nm and 722 nm were observed. The 690 nm fluorescence kinetics has an instrument limited (25 ps) rise and is best fit to three exponential decay components: slow, 2.2 to 2.5 ns; middle, 250 to 300 ps; and fast, 40 to 100 ps. Both the yield and kinetics are temperature independent (77 to 295K). The 722 nm emission is dramatically temperature dependent. At 295K the fluorescence lifetimes at 720 nm are identical to those at 690 nm. Upon lowering the temperature the lifetimes of all three decay components increase, a measurable risetime (>25 ps) grows in at temperatures below 265K, and the fluorescence intensity at 722 nm increases about 20-fold from 295K to 77K. These studies provide excitation transfer rates and activation energies within the PS I centers. The PS I emission data can be explained by two Chl a species: an antenna pool emitting at 690 nm and the reaction center emitting at 722 nm. The PSI reaction center complex (CP1) fluorescence intensity under continuous actinic illumination (690 nm) decreased by about 20% with the same kinetics as the optical bleaching at 699 nm. The kinetics and magnitudes of the fluorescence decrease and photobleaching depend upon excitation intensity, ascorbate concentration, ferri/ferrocyanide redox titration and phenasinemethosulfate concentration. 168 refs., 38 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon–carbon bond forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki–Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon–carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki–Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  14. Sequence Analysis of Trimer Isomers Formed by Montmorillonite Catalysis in the Reaction of Binary Monomer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Gözen; Hazen, Robert M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2007-10-01

    Oligonucleotides are structurally similar to short RNA strands. Therefore, their formation via non-enzymatic reactions is highly relevant to Gilbert's RNA world scenario (1986) and the origin of life. In laboratory synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers, it is necessary to remove the water molecules from the reaction medium to shift the equilibrium in favor of oligonucleotide formation, which would have been impossible for reactions that took place in dilute solutions on the early Earth. Model studies designed to address this problem demonstrate that montmorillonite, a phyllosilicate common on Earth and identified on Mars, efficiently catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between activated mononucleotides in dilute solutions and produces RNA-like oligomers. The purpose of this study was to examine the sequences and regiospecificity of trimer isomers formed in the reaction of 5'-phosphorimidazolides of adenosine and uridine. Results demonstrated that regiospecificity and sequence specificity observed in the dimer fractions are conserved in their elongation products. With regard to regiospecificity, 61% of the linkages were found to be RNA-like 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds. With regard to sequence specificity, we found that 88% of the linear trimers were hetero-isomers with 61% A-monomer and 39% U-monomer incorporation. These results lend support to Bernal's hypothesis that minerals may have played a significant role in the chemical processes that led to the origin of life by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds in RNA-like oligomers.

  15. Sequence analysis of trimer isomers formed by montmorillonite catalysis in the reaction of binary monomer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ertem, Gözen; Hazen, Robert M; Dworkin, Jason P

    2007-10-01

    Oligonucleotides are structurally similar to short RNA strands. Therefore, their formation via non-enzymatic reactions is highly relevant to Gilbert's RNA world scenario (1986) and the origin of life. In laboratory synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers, it is necessary to remove the water molecules from the reaction medium to shift the equilibrium in favor of oligonucleotide formation, which would have been impossible for reactions that took place in dilute solutions on the early Earth. Model studies designed to address this problem demonstrate that montmorillonite, a phyllosilicate common on Earth and identified on Mars, efficiently catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between activated mononucleotides in dilute solutions and produces RNA-like oligomers. The purpose of this study was to examine the sequences and regiospecificity of trimer isomers formed in the reaction of 5'-phosphorimidazolides of adenosine and uridine. Results demonstrated that regiospecificity and sequence specificity observed in the dimer fractions are conserved in their elongation products. With regard to regiospecificity, 61% of the linkages were found to be RNA-like 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds. With regard to sequence specificity, we found that 88% of the linear trimers were hetero-isomers with 61% A-monomer and 39% U-monomer incorporation. These results lend support to Bernal's hypothesis that minerals may have played a significant role in the chemical processes that led to the origin of life by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds in RNA-like oligomers.

  16. Looking at research consent forms through a participant-centered lens: the PRISM readability toolkit.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Jessica R; Wiese, Cheryl J; Greene, Sarah M

    2009-01-01

    Communicating in lay language is an underdeveloped skill among many researchers-a limitation that contributes to low readability among research consent forms and may hinder participant understanding of study procedures and risks. We present the Project to Review and Improve Study Materials (PRISM) and its centerpiece, the PRISM Readability Toolkit. The toolkit provides strategies for creating study materials that are readable and participant centered, focusing on consent forms but also addressing other participant materials. Based on plain language principles, this free resource includes a flexible menu of tools, such as an editing checklist, before and after examples, easy-to-read template language, and a list of alternative words. Among PRISM's ongoing goals is to test the toolkit with populations groups.

  17. Monomeric metal aqua complexes in the interlayer space of montmorillonites as strong Lewis acid catalysts for heterogeneous carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Tomonori; Kato, Masaki; Mizugaki, Tomoo; Ebitani, Kohki; Kaneda, Kiyotomi

    2004-12-17

    Montmorillonite-enwrapped copper and scandium catalysts (Cu(2+)- and Sc(3+)-monts) were easily prepared by treating Na(+)-mont with the aqueous solution of the copper nitrate and scandium triflate, respectively. The resulting Cu(2+)- and Sc(3+)-monts showed outstanding catalytic activities for a variety of carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as the Michael reaction, the Sakurai-Hosomi allylation, and the Diels-Alder reaction, under solvent-free or aqueous conditions. The remarkable activity of the mont catalysts is attributable to the negatively charged silicate layers that are capable of stabilizing metal cations. Furthermore, these catalysts were reusable without any appreciable loss in activity and selectivity. The Cu(2+)-mont-catalyzed Michael reaction proceeds via a ternary complex in which both the 1,3-dicarbonyl compound and the enone are coordinated to a Lewis acid Cu(2+) center.

  18. Characteristics of HgS nanoparticles formed in hair by a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarche, G.; Walter, P.; Van Elslande, E.; Ayache, J.; Castaing, J.

    2013-01-01

    A chemical reaction, derived from an ancient recipe for hair dyeing, is used to precipitate nanoparticles of mercury sulphide in hair by the simple process of immersion in a water solution of Ca(OH)2 and HgO. After several days, HgS nanoparticles appear throughout the hair and are particularly numerous in the various interfaces. The formation of these nanoparticles has been studied by analytical and atomic resolution electron microscopy. High resolution quantitative analysis allowed the determination of two varieties of HgS precipitate crystal structures formed: a hexagonal cinnabar and a cubic metacinnabar structure. This very simple process of a chemical reaction in hair is a particularly inexpensive way to fabricate semiconductor sulphide nanoparticles with specific properties.

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics fabricated by silicon infiltration of porous carbon preforms are discussed. The morphological characterization of the carbon preforms indicates a very narrow pore size distribution. Measurements of the preform density by physical methods and by mercury porosimetry agree very well and indicate that virtually all of the porosity in the preforms is open to infiltrating liquids. The average room temperature flexural strength of the RFSC material with approximately 8 at.% free silicon is 369 +/- 28 MPa (53.5 +/- 4 ksi). The Weibull strength distribution data give a characteristic strength value of 381 MPa (55 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 14.3. The residual silicon content is lower and the strengths are superior to those of most commercially available reaction-bonded silicon carbide materials.

  20. Emergent Properties of Giant Vesicles Formed by a Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (PISA) Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Anders N.; Szymański, Jan K.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Giant micrometer sized vesicles are of obvious interest to the natural sciences as well as engineering, having potential application in fields ranging from drug delivery to synthetic biology. Their formation often requires elaborate experimental techniques and attempts to obtain giant vesicles from chemical media in a one-pot fashion have so far led to much smaller nanoscale structures. Here we show that a tailored medium undergoing controlled radical polymerization is capable of forming giant polymer vesicles. Using a protocol which allows for an aqueous reaction under mild conditions, we observe the macroscale consequences of amphiphilic polymer synthesis and the resulting molecular self-assembly using fluorescence microscopy. The polymerization process is photoinitiated by blue light granting complete control of the reaction, including on the microscope stage. The self-assembly process leads to giant vesicles with radii larger than 10 microns, exhibiting several emergent properties, including periodic growth and collapse as well as phototaxis. PMID:28128307

  1. Emergent Properties of Giant Vesicles Formed by a Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (PISA) Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsen, Anders N.; Szymański, Jan K.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Giant micrometer sized vesicles are of obvious interest to the natural sciences as well as engineering, having potential application in fields ranging from drug delivery to synthetic biology. Their formation often requires elaborate experimental techniques and attempts to obtain giant vesicles from chemical media in a one-pot fashion have so far led to much smaller nanoscale structures. Here we show that a tailored medium undergoing controlled radical polymerization is capable of forming giant polymer vesicles. Using a protocol which allows for an aqueous reaction under mild conditions, we observe the macroscale consequences of amphiphilic polymer synthesis and the resulting molecular self-assembly using fluorescence microscopy. The polymerization process is photoinitiated by blue light granting complete control of the reaction, including on the microscope stage. The self-assembly process leads to giant vesicles with radii larger than 10 microns, exhibiting several emergent properties, including periodic growth and collapse as well as phototaxis.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics fabricated by silicon infiltration of porous carbon preforms are discussed. The morphological characterization of the carbon preforms indicates a very narrow pore size distribution. Measurements of the preform density by physical methods and by mercury porosimetry agree very well and indicate that virtually all of the porosity in the preforms is open to infiltrating liquids. The average room temperature flexural strength of the RFSC material with approximately 8 at.% free silicon is 369 +/- 28 MPa (53.5 +/- 4 ksi). The Weibull strength distribution data give a characteristic strength value of 381 MPa (55 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 14.3. The residual silicon content is lower and the strengths are superior to those of most commercially available reaction-bonded silicon carbide materials.

  3. An experimental and computational study of the ions formed by the reaction of cyclopentanone with O-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenigman, Rebecca L.; Kato, Shuji; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2005-03-01

    The structures and reactivities of the ions formed by the reaction of cyclopentanone with O- have been studied using flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) experiments in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Three C5H6O- isomers were found to be generated - cyclopentanone-2,5-diyl radical anion (4-), 2-carbenacyclopentanone radical anion (5-), and cyclopentanone-2,4-diyl radical anion (6-). The large amount of signal loss observed in this reaction is attributed to formation of 2-cyclopentenone radical anion (10-), in which the electron is predicted to be unbound. DFT calculations predict 4- to be the most stable of the bound C5H6O- ions, and FA-SIFT experiments confirm 4- is the major ion formed in this reaction. Bracketing experiments found the proton affinity (PA) of 4- to be 362 +/- 5 kcal/mol and the electron binding energy (EBE) to be ca. 0.5 eV. Although the PA of this species predicted by DFT calculations (363.2 kcal/mol) is consistent with the experimental value, both DFT and ab initio calculations predict an EBE of ca. 1.6 eV for this radical anion. The apparent conflict between the calculated and experimental EBE is resolved by proposing that, in the gas phase bracketing experiments, the electron transfer process leads adiabatically, not to cyclopentanone-2,5-diyl (4), but, by a retro-Nazarov reaction, to the more stable 1,4-pentadien-3-one (18). DFT calculations show that the difference between the computed and measured EBEs of 4- can be accounted for by the calculated difference between the energies of 18 and 4.

  4. USING CENTER HOLE HEAT TRANSFER TO REDUCE FORMATION TIMES FOR CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FROM PYROPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth J. Bateman; Charles W. Solbrig

    2006-07-01

    The waste produced from processing spent fuel from the EBR II reactor must be processed into a waste form suitable for long term storage in Yucca Mountain. The method chosen produces zeolite granules mixed with glass frit, which must then be converted into a solid. This is accomplished by loading it into a can and heating to 900 C in a furnace regulated at 915 C. During heatup to 900 C, the zeolite and glass frit react and consolidate to produce a sodalite monolith. The resultant ceramic waste form (CWF) is then cooled. The waste is 52 cm in diameter and initially 300 cm long but consolidates to 150 cm long during the heating process. After cooling it is then inserted in a 5-DHLW/DOE SNF Long Canister. Without intervention, the waste takes 82 hours to heat up to 900 C in a furnace designed to geometrically fit the cylindrical waste form. This paper investigates the reduction in heating times possible with four different methods of additional heating through a center hole. The hole size is kept small to maximize the amount of CWF that is processed in a single run. A hole radius of 1.82 cm was selected which removes only 1% of the CWF. A reference computation was done with a specified inner hole surface temperature of 915 C to provide a benchmark for the amount of improvement which can be made. It showed that the heatup time can potentially be reduced to 43 hours with center hole heating. The first method, simply pouring high temperature liquid aluminum into the hole, did not produce any noticeable effect on reducing heat up times. The second method, flowing liquid aluminum through the hole, works well as long as the velocity is high enough (2.5 cm/sec) to prevent solidification of the aluminum during the initial front movement of the aluminum into the center hole. The velocity can be reduced to 1 cm/sec after the initial front has traversed the ceramic. This procedure reduces the formation time to near that of the reference case. The third method, flowing a gas

  5. Light-mediated heterogeneous cross dehydrogenative coupling reactions: metal oxides as efficient, recyclable, photoredox catalysts in C-C bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Rueping, Magnus; Zoller, Jochen; Fabry, David C; Poscharny, Konstantin; Koenigs, René M; Weirich, Thomas E; Mayer, Joachim

    2012-03-19

    Let there be light: A heterogeneous photocatalytic system based on easily recyclable TiO(2) or ZnO allows cross dehydrogenative coupling reactions of tertiary amines. The newly developed protocols have successfully been applied to various C-C and C-P bond-forming reactions to provide nitro amines as well as amino ketones, nitriles and phosphonates.

  6. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Photosystem II D1D2-cyt.b559 Reaction Center Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Jeffrey Allen

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a powerful new technique for examining the electronic and vibronic couplings and dynamics of chemical, semiconductor, and biological samples. We present several technical innovations in the implementation of 2DES. We have performed two-color 2DES experiments, extending the technique's ability to study energy transfer to states at frequencies far from the initial absorption. We have demonstrated 2DES in the pump-probe geometry using a pulse-shaper. This method eliminates many technical challenges inherent to previous implementations of 2DES, making it a more widely accessible technique. To broaden the available frequency information, we have demonstrated 2DES with a continuum probe pulse. We have utilized this method to observe vibrational wavepacket dynamics in a laser dye, demonstrating that these dynamics modulate 2D lineshapes and must be accounted for in modelling 2DES data. We perform 2DES studies on the Qy band of the D1D2-cyt.b559 reaction center of plant photosystem II. This reaction center is the core oxygen-evolving complex in plant photosynthesis, taking in light energy and forming a charge separated state capable of splitting water. Understanding the relationship between the structure and function has both fundamental importance and applications to improving artificial light-harvesting. Traditional spectroscopy methods have been unable to completely resolve the time-ordering of energy and charge transfer events or the degree of electronic coupling between chromophores due to severe spectral congestion in the Q y band. 2DES extends previous methods by frequency-resolving an additional dimension to reveal the degree of static disorder and electronic coupling, as well as a detailed picture of energy and charge transfer dynamics that will allow tests of excitonic models of the reaction center. Our data show direct evidence of electronic coupling and rapid sub-ps energy transfer between "blue" and "red

  7. Co-No Catalytic Surface Reaction on Body-Centered Cubic Structure:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, M.; Qaisrani, A. U.; Khan, M. K.

    A Monte Carlo Simulation study of the monomer dimer (CO-NO) heterogeneous catalytic reaction on body-centered cubic structure (BCC) is presented. The effect of Eley-Rideal (ER), diffusion of nitrogen and carbon monoxide on the phase diagram is investigated. The steady reactive state is observed while using Langmuir-Hinsehelwood (LH) mechanism. Whenever the ER mechanism is included in our simulation, the production of CO2 starts as soon as yCO departs from zero, which is consistent with the experimental results. The ER mechanism does not affect the production of N2. The effect of diffusion of CO and N are found very little on the steady state reactive region where the concentration of CO is very high.

  8. Light-harvesting bio-nanomaterial using porous silicon and photosynthetic reaction center

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon microcavity (PSiMc) structures were used to immobilize the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) purified from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26. Two different binding methods were compared by specular reflectance measurements. Structural characterization of PSiMc was performed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The activity of the immobilized RC was checked by measuring the visible absorption spectra of the externally added electron donor, mammalian cytochrome c. PSi/RC complex was found to oxidize the cytochrome c after every saturating Xe flash, indicating the accessibility of specific surface binding sites on the immobilized RC, for the external electron donor. This new type of bio-nanomaterial is considered as an excellent model for new generation applications of silicon-based electronics and biological redox systems. PMID:22804837

  9. Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides between 1000 and 1800 cm-1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, P; Zurek, M; Mäntele, W; Meyer, M; Scheer, H; Zinth, W

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe experiments of reaction centers of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R26) in the mid-IR region between 1000 and 1800 cm-1 are recorded with a time resolution of 300-400 fs. The difference spectra of the states P*, P+HA-, and P+QA- with respect to the ground state P predominantly reflect changes of the special pair. They show positive and negative bands due to changes of distinct vibrational modes superimposed on a broad background of enhanced absorption. A number of certain bands can be assigned to the special pair P, to the bacteriopheophytin HA, and to the quinone QA. The temporal evolution of the IR absorbance changes is well described by the time constants known from femtosecond spectroscopy of the electronic states. Differences occur only at very early times, which are indicative of fast vibrational relaxation with a time constant of a few hundred femtoseconds. PMID:7892185

  10. Alumina plate containing photosystem I reaction center complex oriented inside plate-penetrating silica nanopores.

    PubMed

    Kamidaki, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Noji, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tetsuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-08-22

    The photosynthetic photosystem I reaction center complex (PSI-RC), which has a molecular diameter of 21 nm with 100 pigments, was incorporated into silica nanopores with a 100-nm diameter that penetrates an alumina plate of 60-μm thickness to make up an inorganic-biological hybrid photocell. PSI-RCs, purified from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, were stable inside the nanopores and rapidly photoreduced a mediator dye methyl viologen. The reduced dye was more stable inside nanopores suggesting the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The analysis by a cryogenic electron spin paramagnetic resonance indicated the oriented arrangement of RCs inside the 100-nm nanopores, with their surface parallel to the silica wall and perpendicular to the plane of the alumina plate. PSI RC complex in the semicrystalline orientation inside silica nanopores can be a new type of light energy conversion unit to supply strong reducing power selectively to other molecules inside or outside nanopores.

  11. Mimicry of the radical pair and triplet states in photosynthetic reaction centers with a synthetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Hasharoni, K.; Levanon, H.; Greenfield, S.R.; Gosztola, D.J.; Svec, W.A.; Wasiclewski, M.R. |

    1995-08-02

    Supramolecular systems synthesized to model the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) are designed to mimic several key properties of the RC protein. Thus far, most RC models fulfill only a subset of these criteria, with very few reports employing time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (TREPR). We now report TREPR results on a photosynthetic model system (1) in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) that does not contain the natural pigments, yet closely mimics the spin dynamics of triplet state formation found only in photosynthetic RCs. The design of supermolecule 1 follows criteria established for promoting high quantum yield charge separation in glassy media. The observation of this triplet state in 1 by TREPR demonstrates that most of the electronic states found in the primary photochemistry of photosynthetic RCs can be mimicked successfully in synthetic models interacting with LCs. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. [Adverse drug reactions in elderly people : First data from the Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE)].

    PubMed

    Treudler, R; Walther, F; Ahnert, P; Simon, J-C

    2017-01-01

    Few data exist on adverse drug reactions (ADR) in elderly people. In this group, pharmacotherapy represents a challenge with regard to comorbidities, drug interactions and compliance. The aim of this article is to highlight the characteristics of ADR in elderly patients. In addition to a literature review we present the first data from the Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE). Between 2011 and 2015 a total of 9537 subjects aged 40-79 years were randomly included in this population-based, age and sex standardized investigation in the inhabitants of Leipzig, Germany and special emphasis was placed on allergies including questions with regard to ADR. Of the 9537 subjects, data on allergies were available from 8979 subjects. Female gender, comorbidities and the use of multiple drugs were significantly associated with an increased risk of ADR. Women also reported ADR significantly more frequently than men. Of the subjects 22% reported suffering from some form of ADR as a result of medications, while in 2.3% this reaction had occurred within the previous 12 months. Less than 15% of LIFE patients with ADR were in possession of a document giving details of the ADR. The occurrence of ADR significantly contributes to morbidity in elderly patients. For prevention of ADR knowledge of patient-related factors, underlying diseases, drug characteristics and drug interactions are necessary.

  13. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: a modified form of the equation of motion.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  14. Radiation reaction on a classical charged particle: A modified form of the equation of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaine, Guillermo García; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2013-09-01

    We present and numerically solve a modified form of the equation of motion for a charged particle under the influence of an external force, taking into account the radiation reaction. This covariant equation is integro-differential, as Dirac-Röhrlich's, but has several technical improvements. First, the equation has the form of Newton's second law, with acceleration isolated on the left hand side and the force depending only on positions and velocities: Thus, the equation is linear in the highest derivative. Second, the total four-force is by construction perpendicular to the four-velocity. Third, if the external force vanishes for all future times, the total force and the acceleration automatically vanish at the present time. We show the advantages of this equation by solving it numerically for several examples of external force.

  15. Dextran-based hydrogel formed by thiol-Michael addition reaction for 3D cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Qi; Wei, Zhao; Zhu, Xv Long; Huang, Guo You; Xu, Feng; Yang, Jian Hai; Osada, Yoshihito; Zrínyi, Miklós; Li, Jian Hui; Chen, Yong Mei

    2015-04-01

    Cell encapsulation in three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels can mimic native cell microenvironment and plays a major role in cell-based transplantation therapies. In this contribution, a novel in situ-forming hydrogel, Dex-l-DTT hydrogel ("l" means "linked-by"), by cross-linking glycidyl methacrylate derivatized dextran (Dex-GMA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) under physiological conditions, has been developed using thiol-Michael addition reaction. The mechanical properties, gelation process and degree of swelling of the hydrogel can be easily adjusted by changing the pH of phosphate buffer saline. The 3D cell encapsulation ability is demonstrated by encapsulating rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts into the in situ-forming hydrogel with maintained high viability. The BMSCs also maintain their differentiation potential after encapsulation. These results demonstrate that the Dex-l-DTT hydrogel holds great potential for biomedical field.

  16. Reaction-Forming Method for Producing Near Net-Shape Refractory Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Palmisiano, Marc N.; Jakubenas, Kevin J.; Baranwal, Rita

    2004-07-20

    A method for reaction forming refractory metal carbides. The method involves the fabrication of a glassy carbon preform by casting an organic, resin-based liquid mixture into a mold and subsequently heat treating it in two steps, which cures and pyrolizes the resin resulting in a porous carbon preform. By varying the amounts of the constituents in the organic, resin-based liquid mixture, control over the density of the carbon preform is obtained. Control of the density and microstructure of the carbon preform allows for determination of the microstructure and properties of the refractory metal carbide material produced. The glassy carbon preform is placed on a bed of refractory metal or refractory metal--silicon alloy. The pieces are heated above the melting point of the metal or alloy. The molten metal wicks inside the porous carbon preform and reacts, forming the refractory metal carbide or refractory metal carbide plus a minor secondary phase.

  17. Hydrogen bonds between nitrogen donors and the semiquinone in the Q(B) site of bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2010-08-25

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have identical ubiquinone-10 molecules functioning as primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors. X-band 2D pulsed EPR spectroscopy, called HYSCORE, was applied to study the interaction of the Q(B) site semiquinone with nitrogens from the local protein environment in natural and (15)N uniformly labeled reactions centers. (14)N and (15)N HYSCORE spectra of the Q(B) semiquinone show the interaction with two nitrogens carrying transferred unpaired spin density. Quadrupole coupling constants estimated from (14)N HYSCORE spectra indicate them to be a protonated nitrogen of an imidazole residue and amide nitrogen of a peptide group. (15)N HYSCORE spectra allowed estimation of the isotropic and anisotropic couplings with these nitrogens. From these data, we calculated the unpaired spin density transferred onto 2s and 2p orbitals of nitrogen and analyzed the contribution of different factors to the anisotropic hyperfine tensors. The hyperfine coupling of other protein nitrogens with the semiquinone is weak (<0.1 MHz). These results clearly indicate that the Q(B) semiquinone forms hydrogen bonds with two nitrogens and provide quantitative characteristics of the hyperfine couplings with these nitrogens, which can be used in theoretical modeling of the Q(B) site. On the basis of the quadrupole coupling constant, one nitrogen can only be assigned to N(delta) of His-L190, consistent with all existing structures. However, we cannot specify between two candidates the residue corresponding to the second nitrogen. Further work employing multifrequency spectroscopic approaches or selective isotope labeling would be desirable for unambiguous assignment of this nitrogen.

  18. Fractional Viscosity Dependence of Reaction Kinetics in Glass-Forming Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seulki; Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion of molecules in complex systems such as glasses and cell cytoplasm is slow, heterogeneous, and sometimes nonergodic. The effects of such intriguing diffusion on the kinetics of chemical and biological reactions remain elusive. In this Letter, we report that the kinetics of the polymer loop formation reaction in a Kob-Andersen (KA) glass forming liquid is influenced significantly by the dynamic heterogeneity. The diffusion coefficient D of a KA liquid deviates from the Stokes-Einstein relation at low temperatures and D shows a fractional dependence on the solvent viscosity ηs, i.e., D ˜ηs-ξD with ξD=0.85 . The dynamic heterogeneity of a KA liquid affects the rate constant krxn of the loop formation and leads to the identical fractional dependence of krxn on ηs with krxn˜ηs-ξ and ξ =ξD, contrary to reactions in dynamically homogeneous solutions where krxn˜ηs-1.

  19. Materials Characterization Center. Second workshop on irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this second workshop on irradiations effects was to continue the discussions initiated at the first workshop and to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in developing test methods. The following major conclusions were reached: Ion or neutron irradiations are not substitutes for the actinide-doping technique, as described by the MCC-6 Method for Preparation and Characterization of Actinide-Doped Waste Forms, in the final evaluation of any waste form with respect to the radiation effects from actinide decay. Ion or neutron irradiations may be useful for screening tests or more fundamental studies. The use of these simulation techniques as screening tests for actinide decay requires that a correlation between ion or neutron irradiations and actinide decay be established. Such a correlation has not yet been established and experimental programs in this area are highly recommended. There is a need for more fundamental studies on dose-rate effects, temperature dependence, and the nature and importance of alpha-particle effects relative to the recoil nucleus in actinide decay. There are insufficient data presently available to evaluate the potential for damage from ionizing radiation in nuclear waste forms. No additional test methods were recommended for using ion or neutron irradiations to simulate actinide decay or for testing ionization damage in nuclear waste forms. It was recognized that additional test methods may be required and developed as more data become available. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Task Group on the Simulation of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms (E 10.08.03) was organized to act as a continuing vehicle for discussions and development of procedures, particularly with regard to ion irradiations.

  20. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-03-01

    Interquinone QA‑ → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions.

  1. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  2. Ex vivo engineered immune organoids for controlled germinal center reactions.

    PubMed

    Purwada, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish K; Ahn, Haelee; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Cerchietti, Leandro; Singh, Ankur

    2015-09-01

    Ex vivo engineered three-dimensional organotypic cultures have enabled the real-time study and control of biological functioning of mammalian tissues. Organs of broad interest where its architectural, cellular, and molecular complexity has prevented progress in ex vivo engineering are the secondary immune organs. Ex vivo immune organs can enable mechanistic understanding of the immune system and more importantly, accelerate the translation of immunotherapies as well as a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that lead to their malignant transformation into a variety of B and T cell malignancies. However, till date, no modular ex vivo immune organ has been developed with an ability to control the rate of immune reaction through tunable design parameter. Here we describe a B cell follicle organoid made of nanocomposite biomaterials, which recapitulates the anatomical microenvironment of a lymphoid tissue that provides the basis to induce an accelerated germinal center (GC) reaction by continuously providing extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell signals to naïve B cells. Compared to existing co-cultures, immune organoids provide a control over primary B cell proliferation with ∼100-fold higher and rapid differentiation to the GC phenotype with robust antibody class switching.

  3. Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center Exhibiting Acid-Responsive Regulation of Photoinduced Charge Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Pahk, Ian; Kodis, Gerdenis; Fleming, Graham R.; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2016-09-16

    Charge separation (CS) is the primary light-driven reaction in photosynthesis whereas onphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is a photoprotective regulatory mechanism employed by many photosynthetic organisms to dynamically modulate energy flow within the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuating light conditions. Activated by decreases in lumen pH produced during periods of high photon flux, NPQ induces rapid thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy. As a result, the rate of CS decreases, thereby limiting the accumulation of potentially deleterious reactive intermediates and byproducts. In this article, a molecular triad that functionally mimics the effects of NPQ associated with an artificial photosynthetic reaction center is described. Steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies have been used to demonstrate a 1 order of magnitude reduction in the CS quantum yield via reversible protonation of an excited-state-quenching molecular switch moiety. As in the natural system, the populations of unquenched and quenched states and therefore the overall yields of CS were found to be dependent on acid concentration.

  4. Photophysics of photosynthesis. Structure and spectroscopy of reaction centers of purple bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, A. J.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1997-08-01

    The fundamental photochemical reaction of photosynthetic energy conversion, which transforms the photon energy of light in chemical free energy, takes places in a membrane-bound, pigmented reaction center protein (RC). We examine here the structure-function relationships of this uniquely efficient process. First, the RC is discussed in relation to the overall photosynthetic apparatus. Second, we highlight the X-ray diffraction analysis of two bacterial RCs, discussing the problems associated with the analysis of a non-water-soluble protein of molecular weight over 120 kDa. The structure of the polypeptide chains in the RC-protein, and the configuration of the cofactors non-covalently bound to the polypeptide scaffolding, is reviewed in detail. Third, we present a detailed account of investigations on the functioning of the RC with a number of optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques, with emphasis on the relation between structure and function. The results for RCs of purple bacteria, green bacteria and the two plant photosystems are compared, and discussed in the framework of current theories of photosynthetic electron transport.

  5. Two novel pyrrolooxazole pigments formed by the Maillard reaction between glucose and threonine or serine.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kyoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2017-02-01

    Pyrrolothiazolate formed by the Maillard reaction between l-cysteine and d-glucose has a pyrrolothiazole skeleton as a chromophore. We searched for a Maillard pigment having a pyrrolooxazole skeleton formed from l-threonine or l-serine instead of l-cysteine in the presence of d-glucose. As a result, two novel yellow pigments, named pyrrolooxazolates A and B, were isolated from model solutions of the Maillard reaction containing l-threonine and d-glucose, and l-serine and d-glucose, respectively, and identified as (2R,3S,7aS)-2,3,7,7a-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-2,5,7a-trimethyl-7-oxo-pyrrolo[2,1-b]oxazole-3-calboxylic acid and (3S,7aS)-2,3,7,7a-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-5,7a-dimethyl-7-oxo-pyrrolo[2,1-b]oxazole-3-calboxylic acid by instrumental analyses. These compounds were pyrrolooxazole derivatives carrying a carboxy group, and showed the absorption maxima at 300-360 nm under acidic and neutral conditions and at 320-390 nm under alkaline conditions.

  6. Photoprotection of reaction centers: thermal dissipation of absorbed light energy vs charge separation in lichens.

    PubMed

    Heber, Ulrich; Soni, Vineet; Strasser, Reto J

    2011-05-01

    During desiccation, fluorescence emission and stable light-dependent charge separation in the reaction centers (RCs) of photosystem II (PSII) declined strongly in three different lichens: in Parmelia sulcata with an alga as the photobiont, in Peltigera neckeri with a cyanobacterium and in the tripartite lichen Lobaria pulmonaria. Most of the decline of fluorescence was caused by a decrease in the quantum efficiency of fluorescence emission. It indicated the activation of photoprotective thermal energy dissipation. Photochemical activity of the RCs was retained even after complete desiccation. It led to light-dependent absorption changes and found expression in reversible increases in fluorescence or in fluorescence quenching. Lowering the temperature changed the direction of fluorescence responses in P. sulcata. The observations are interpreted to show that reversible light-induced increases in fluorescence emission in desiccated lichens indicate the functionality of the RCs of PSII. Photoprotection is achieved by the drainage of light energy to dissipating centers outside the RCs before stable charge separation can take place. Reversible quenching of fluorescence by strong illumination is suggested to indicate the conversion of the RCs from energy conserving to energy dissipating units. This permits them to avoid photoinactivation. On hydration, re-conversion occurs to energy-conserving RCs. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  7. Detection of photosynthetic energy storage in a photosystem I reaction center preparation by photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Owens, T G; Carpentier, R; Leblanc, R M

    1990-06-01

    Thermal emission and photochemical energy storage were examined in photosystem I reaction center/core antenna complexes (about 40 Chl a/P700) using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Satisfactory signals could only be obtained from samples bound to hydroxyapatite and all samples had a low signal-to-noise ratio compared to either PS I or PS II in thylakoid membranes. The energy storage signal was saturated at low intensity (half saturation at 1.5 W m(-2)) and predicted a photochemical quantum yield of >90%. Exogenous donors and acceptors had no effect on the signal amplitudes indicating that energy storage is the result of charge separation between endogenous components. Fe(CN)6 (-3) oxidation of P700 and dithionite-induced reduction of acceptors FA-FB inhibited energy storage. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that energy storage in PS I arises from charge separation between P700 and Fe-S centers FA-FB that is stable on the time scale of the photoacoustic modulation. High intensity background light (160 W m(-2)) caused an irreversible loss of energy storage and correlated with a decrease in oxidizable P700; both are probably the result of high light-induced photoinhibition. By analogy to the low fluorescence yield of PS I, the low signal-to-noise ratio in these preparations is attributed to the short lifetime of Chl singlet excited states in PS I-40 and its indirect effect on the yield of thermal emission.

  8. Designing a national combined reporting form for adverse drug reactions and medication errors.

    PubMed

    Tanti, A; Serracino-Inglott, A; Borg, J J

    2015-06-09

    The Maltese Medicines Authority was tasked with developing a reporting form that captures high-quality case information on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors in order to fulfil its public-health obligations set by the European Union (EU) legislation on pharmacovigilance. This paper describes the process of introducing the first combined ADR/medication error reporting form in the EU for health-care professionals, the analysis of reports generated by it and the promotion of the system. A review of existing ADR forms was carried out and recommendations from the European Medicines Agency and World Health Organization audits integrated. A new, combined ADR/medication error reporting form was developed and pilot tested based on case studies. The Authority's quality system (ISO 9001 certified) was redesigned and a promotion strategy was deployed. The process used in Malta can be useful for countries that need to develop systems relative to ADR/medication error reporting and to improve the quality of data capture within their systems.

  9. Study of quark flow in exclusive reactions at 90 degrees in the center of mass (AGS E838)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, R.; White, C.; Courant, H.; Fang, G.; Heller, K. J.; Johns, K.; Marshak, M. L.; Shupe, M.; Barton, D. S.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A. S.; Gushue, S.; Kmit, M.; Lowenstein, D. I.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Heppelmann, S.; Ma, X.; Russell, J. J.

    1995-07-01

    We report a study of quark flow in 20 exclusive reactions measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS with a beam momentum of 5.9 GeV/c at 90° in the center of mass. This experiment confirms the strong quark flow reaction mechanism dependence of two-body hadron scattering at large angles seen at 9.9 GeV/c. Large differences in cross sections for different reactions are consistent with the dominance of quark interchange in these 90° reactions, and indicate that pure gluon exchange and quark/antiquark annihilation diagrams are less important.

  10. Magnetic circular dichroism investigation on chromophores in reaction centers of photosystem I and II of green plant photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Tsunenori; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Itoh, Shigeru; Iwaki, Masayo; Mimuro, Mamoru; Satoh, Kimiyuki

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of chlorophylls (Chl) in P700-enriched (12 Chl/P700) photosystem (PS) I particles and D1-D2-cyt b559 (PSII reaction center) particles isolated from spinach are measured in the wavelength region between 450 and 750 nm. The relative magnitude of MCD to absorption intensity ([MCD]/[Abs]) is found to be a good measure to estimate the interaction of chromophores (dimer or monomer). The difference spectrum between reduced and oxidized state for the 12 Chl/P700 particles can be interpreted to be composed of a positive MCD from P700 and a negative MCD for P700 +. MCD signals for the primary acceptor Chl a monomer (A 0) and the reduced cytochrome f are also observed. The MCD signal from pheophytin a in the PSII reaction center is remarkably in the Qx, region as strong as the signal from the reaction center chlorophylls (P680 and accessory) and other attached chlorophylls. Based on the data, the MCD bands, as well as the absorption bands in the Qy region, are deconvoluted into the contribution from reaction center chlorophylls and the other chlorophylls. The [MCD]/[Abs] ratio of P680 or P700 is small and similar to that of special pair bacteriochlorophylls in the reaction center of purple bacteria, indicating the specific feature of MCD signals that originate from a dimer-type interaction.

  11. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  12. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  13. Photocurrent Generation by Photosynthetic Purple Bacterial Reaction Centers Interfaced with a Porous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide (ATO) Electrode.

    PubMed

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Zhang, HaoJie; Mieritz, Daniel; Volosin, Alex; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Yan, Hao; Seo, Dong-Kyun; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2016-09-28

    The ability to exchange energy and information between biological and electronic materials is critical in the development of hybrid electronic systems in biomedicine, environmental sensing, and energy applications. While sensor technology has been extensively developed to collect detailed molecular information, less work has been done on systems that can specifically modulate the chemistry of the environment with temporal and spatial control. The bacterial photosynthetic reaction center represents an ideal photonic component of such a system in that it is capable of modifying local chemistry via light-driven redox reactions with quantitative control over reaction rates and has inherent spectroscopic probes for monitoring function. Here a well-characterized model system is presented, consisting of a transparent, porous electrode (antimony-doped tin oxide) which is electrochemically coupled to the reaction center via a cytochrome c molecule. Upon illumination, the reaction center performs the 2-step, 2-electron reduction of a ubiquinone derivative which exchanges with oxidized quinone in solution. Electrons from the electrode then move through the cytochrome to reoxidize the reaction center electron donor. The result is a facile platform for performing redox chemistry that can be optically and electronically controlled in time and space.

  14. Materials characterization center workshop on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, F.P.; Turcotte, R.P.; Weber, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Workshop on Irradiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms sponsored by the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) brought together experts in radiation damage in materials and waste-management technology to review the problems associated with irradiation effects on waste-form integrity and to evaluate standard methods for generating data to be included in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The workshop reached the following conclusions: the concept of Standard Test for the Effects of Alpha-Decay in Nuclear Waste Solids, (MCC-6) for evaluating the effects of alpha decay is valid and useful, and as a result of the workshop, modifications to the proposed procedure will be incorpoated in a revised version of MCC-6; the MCC-6 test is not applicable to the evaluation of radiation damage in spent fuel; plutonium-238 is recommended as the dopant for transuranic and defense high-level waste forms, and when high doses are required, as in the case of commercial high-level waste forms, /sup 244/Cm can be used; among the important property changes caused by irradiation are those that lead to greater leachability, and additionally, radiolysis of the leachant may increase leach rates; research is needed in this area; ionization-induced changes in physical properties can be as important as displacement damage in some materials, and a synergism is also likely to exist from the combined effects of ionization and displacement damage; and the effect of changing the temperature and dose rates on property changes induced by radiation damage needs to be determined.

  15. Isotopic and internal CX{sub 3} (X=D,H) rotational motion effects in the Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCX{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CX{sub 3} intracluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, C. A.; Gasmi, K.; Skowronek, S.; Gonzalez Urena, A.

    2006-06-28

    Photodepletion and action spectra of the laser-induced Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3} fragmentation have been measured over the 16 075-16 380 cm{sup -1} range. The observed band and peak structures allowed us to estimate the vibrational and rotational structures of the excited complex at the transition state configuration. The relative reaction probability P{sub R}(E) for the intracluster Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCD{sub 3}+h{nu}{yields}BaF+CD{sub 3} reaction has been determined over the cited energy range. P{sub R}(E) shows a peak structure with an energy spacing of 8.9 cm{sup -1} which was attributed to an internal rotation of the CD{sub 3} group in the intermediate state. A comparison with previous Ba{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}FCH{sub 3} photofragmentation spectra reveals the dynamical role of the internal CX{sub 3} (X=H,D) motion which is manifested by the presence of rotational resonances in the laser-induced intracluster reaction.

  16. Reaction efficiencies and rate constants for the goethite-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction of NAPL-form aromatic hydrocarbons and chloroethylenes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, C Kuei-Jyum; Hsu, Chi-Yu; Chiu, Chuen-Huey; Huang, Kuo-Lin

    2008-03-01

    The contaminants present as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources for groundwater pollution. Fenton-like reaction catalyzed by natural iron oxides such as goethite in soils is one of the feasible in situ chemical reactions used to remediate contaminated sites. This research evaluated the Fenton-like reaction of five chlorinated ethylenes and three aromatic hydrocarbons using goethite as the catalyst. The reaction efficiencies and rate constants of these compounds in NAPL and dissolved forms were compared. The content of goethite used in batch experiments was in the range similar to those found in subsurfaces. Low H2O2 concentrations (0.05 and 0.1%) were tested in order to represent the low oxidant concentration in the outer region of treatment zone. The results showed that at the tested goethite and H2O2 ranges, the majority of contaminants were removed in the first 120 s. When aromatics and chloroethylenes were present as NAPLs, their removal efficiencies and reaction constants decreased. The removal efficiencies of 0.02 mmol NAPL contaminants were 26-70% less than those of the dissolved. The measured rate constants were in the order of 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for dissolved chlorinated ethylenes and aromatic hydrocarbons, but were 25-60% less for their NAPL forms. The initial dosage of H2O2 and NAPL surface areas (18.4-38.2 mm2) did not significantly affect reaction efficiencies and rate constants of chlorinated NAPLs. Instead, they were related to the octanol-water partition coefficient of compounds. For both dissolved and NAPL forms, aromatic hydrocarbons were more reactive than chlorinated ethylenes in Fenton-like reaction. These results indicated that the decrease in reaction efficiencies and rate constants of NAPL-form contaminants would pose more negative impacts on the less reactive compounds such as benzene and cis 1,2-DCE during goethite-catalyzed Fenton-like reaction.

  17. Electrically active centers formed in silicon during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Poloskin, D. S.; Shek, E. I.

    2013-02-15

    The parameters of electrically active centers formed during the high-temperature diffusion of boron and aluminum into silicon in various media are studied by the Hall method and capacitance spectroscopy. It is found that the variation in the resistivity of the n base of the structures with p-n junctions fabricated in the study is controlled by the formation of three donor levels Q1, E4, and Q3 with the energies E{sub c} - 0.31, E{sub c} - 0.27, and E{sub c} - 0.16 eV. Diffusion in a chlorine-containing atmosphere introduces only a single level E4, but its concentration is 2.5 times lower, compared with diffusion in air. The values of the ionization energy of the Q3 level, measured under equilibrium (Hall effect) and nonequilibrium (capacitance spectroscopy) conditions, almost coincide. The deepest level E1 with an energy of E{sub c} - 0.54 eV, formed upon diffusion in both media, has no effect on the resistivity in the n base of the structures.

  18. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  19. Air oxidation of hydrazine. 1. Reaction kinetics on natural kaolinites, halloysites, and model substituent layers with varying iron and titanium oxide and O- center contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L.; Mariner, R.; Rice, A.

    1991-01-01

    Air oxidation of hydrazine was studied by using a group of kaolinites, halloysites, and substituent oxides as models for the tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. The rate was found to be linear with oxygen. The stoichiometry showed that oxygen was the primary oxidant and that dinitrogen was the only important nitrogen-containing product. The rates on kaolinites were strongly inhibited by water. Those on three-dimensional silica and gibbsite appeared not to be. That on a supposedly layered silica formed from a natural kaolinite by acid leaching showed transitional behavior--slowed relative to that expected from a second-order reaction relative to that on the gibbsite and silica but faster than those on the kaolinites. The most striking result of the reaction was the marked increase in the rate of reaction of a constant amount of hydrazine as the amount of clay was increased. The increase was apparent (in spite of the water inhibition at high conversions) over a 2 order of magnitude variation of the clay weight. The weight dependence was taken to indicate that the role of the clay is very important, that the number of reactive centers is very small, or that they may be deactivated over the course of the reaction. In contrast to the strong dependence on overall amount of clay, the variation of amounts of putative oxidizing centers, such as structural Fe(III), admixed TiO2 or Fe2O3, or O- centers, did not result in alteration of the rate commensurate with the degree of variation of the entity in question. Surface iron does play some role, however, as samples that were pretreated with a reducing agent were less active as catalysts than the parent material. These results were taken to indicate either that the various centers interact to such a degree that they cannot be considered independently or that the reaction might proceed by way of surface complexation, rather than single electron transfers.

  20. Air oxidation of hydrazine. 1. Reaction kinetics on natural kaolinites, halloysites, and model substituent layers with varying iron and titanium oxide and O- center contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L.; Mariner, R.; Rice, A.

    1991-01-01

    Air oxidation of hydrazine was studied by using a group of kaolinites, halloysites, and substituent oxides as models for the tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. The rate was found to be linear with oxygen. The stoichiometry showed that oxygen was the primary oxidant and that dinitrogen was the only important nitrogen-containing product. The rates on kaolinites were strongly inhibited by water. Those on three-dimensional silica and gibbsite appeared not to be. That on a supposedly layered silica formed from a natural kaolinite by acid leaching showed transitional behavior--slowed relative to that expected from a second-order reaction relative to that on the gibbsite and silica but faster than those on the kaolinites. The most striking result of the reaction was the marked increase in the rate of reaction of a constant amount of hydrazine as the amount of clay was increased. The increase was apparent (in spite of the water inhibition at high conversions) over a 2 order of magnitude variation of the clay weight. The weight dependence was taken to indicate that the role of the clay is very important, that the number of reactive centers is very small, or that they may be deactivated over the course of the reaction. In contrast to the strong dependence on overall amount of clay, the variation of amounts of putative oxidizing centers, such as structural Fe(III), admixed TiO2 or Fe2O3, or O- centers, did not result in alteration of the rate commensurate with the degree of variation of the entity in question. Surface iron does play some role, however, as samples that were pretreated with a reducing agent were less active as catalysts than the parent material. These results were taken to indicate either that the various centers interact to such a degree that they cannot be considered independently or that the reaction might proceed by way of surface complexation, rather than single electron transfers.

  1. Reaction of primary and secondary amines to form carbamic acid glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H

    2006-12-01

    Glucuronidation is an important mechanism used by mammalian systems to clear and eliminate both endogenous and foreign chemicals. Many functional groups are susceptible to conjugation with glucuronic acid, including hydroxyls, phenols, carboxyls, activated carbons, thiols, amines, and selenium. Primary and secondary amines can also react with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) via a reversible reaction to form a carbamic acid. The carbamic acid is also a substrate for glucuronidation and results in a stable carbamate glucuronide metabolite. The detection and characterization of these products has been facilitated greatly by the advent of soft ionization mass spectrometry techniques and high field NMR instrumentation. The formation of carbamate glucuronide metabolites has been described for numerous pharmaceuticals and they have been identified in all of the species commonly used in drug metabolism studies (rat, dog, mouse, rabbit, guinea pig, and human). There has been no obvious species specificity for their formation and no preference for 1 degrees or 2 degrees amines. Many biological reactions have also been described in the literature that involve the reaction of CO(2) with amino groups of biomolecules. For example, CO(2) generated from cellular respiration is expired in part through the reversible formation of a carbamate between CO(2) and the alpha-amino groups of the alpha- and beta-chains of hemoglobin. Also, carbamic acid products of several amines, such as beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), ethylenediamine, and L-cysteine have been implicated in toxicity. Studies suggested that a significant portion of amino-compounds in biological samples (that naturally contain CO(2)/bicarbonate) can be present as a carbamic acid.

  2. Specific adducts formed through a radical reaction between peptides and contact allergenic hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Redeby, Theres; Nilsson, Ulrika; Altamore, Timothy M; Ilag, Leopold; Ambrosi, Annalisa; Broo, Kerstin; Börje, Anna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2010-01-01

    The first step in the development of contact allergy (allergic contact dermatitis) includes the penetration of an allergy-causing chemical (hapten) into the skin, where it binds to macromolecules such as proteins. The protein-hapten adduct is then recognized by the immune system as foreign to the body. For hydroperoxides, no relevant hapten target proteins or protein-hapten adducts have so far been identified. In this work, bovine insulin and human angiotensin I were used as model peptides to investigate the haptenation mechanism of three hydroperoxide haptens: (5R)-5-isopropenyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexene-1-hydroperoxide (Lim-2-OOH), cumene hydroperoxide (CumOOH), and 1-(1-hydroperoxy-1-methylethyl) cyclohexene (CycHexOOH). These hydroperoxides are expected to react via a radical mechanism, for which 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride (Fe(III)TPPCl) was used as a radical initiator. The reactions were carried out in 1:1 ethanol/10 mM ammonium acetate buffer pH 7.4, for 3 h at 37 degrees C, and the reaction products were either enzymatically digested or analyzed directly by MALDI/TOF-MS, HPLC/MS/MS, and 2D gel electrophoresis. Both hydroperoxide-specific and unspecific reaction products were detected, but only in the presence of the iron catalyst. In the absence of catalyst, the hydroperoxides remained unreacted. This suggests that the hydroperoxides can enter into the skin and remain inert until activated. Through the detection of a Lim-2-OOH adduct bound at the first histidine (of two) of angiotensin I, it was confirmed that hydroperoxides have the potential to form specific antigens in contact allergy.

  3. Contributions of parent molecule fixed and excess energies to product energy partitioning in four-center elimination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, R. M.; Santamaría, J.

    1989-03-01

    In four-center elimination reactions such as hydrogen halide elimination from halogenated hydrocarbons the energy barrier is higher than the difference in enthalpy of formation between the parent molecule and its fragments (HX and olefin). This determines that the energy available to products has two origins: the reverse reaction barrier (fixed energy), and the excess energy (energy above the barrier). Both types of energy are partitioned among products following different laws: more or less statistical for excess energy and non-statistical for fixed energy. In a study of CF 3-CH 3 decomposition, we describe a practical method, based on the variation of product energy partitioning with excess energy, to determine the partitioning of the fixed energy among different types of product energy, thus defining the exact nature of the reverse reaction energy barrier. We applied this model to other types of reactions, such as three-center molecular eliminations.

  4. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  5. Complete magnesiothermic reduction reaction of vertically aligned mesoporous silica channels to form pure silicon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Dong Jin; Cho, Kyeong Min; Kim, Seon Joon; Park, Jung-Ki; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its simplicity and low temperature conditions, magnesiothermic reduction of silica is one of the most powerful methods for producing silicon nanostructures. However, incomplete reduction takes place in this process leaving unconverted silica under the silicon layer. This phenomenon limits the use of this method for the rational design of silicon structures. In this effort, a technique that enables complete magnesiothermic reduction of silica to form silicon has been developed. The procedure involves magnesium promoted reduction of vertically oriented mesoporous silica channels on reduced graphene oxides (rGO) sheets. The mesopores play a significant role in effectively enabling magnesium gas to interact with silica through a large number of reaction sites. Utilizing this approach, highly uniform, ca. 10 nm sized silicon nanoparticles are generated without contamination by unreacted silica. The new method for complete magnesiothermic reduction of mesoporous silica approach provides a foundation for the rational design of silicon structures. PMID:25757800

  6. Complete magnesiothermic reduction reaction of vertically aligned mesoporous silica channels to form pure silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Lee, Dong Jin; Cho, Kyeong Min; Kim, Seon Joon; Park, Jung-Ki; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-03-11

    Owing to its simplicity and low temperature conditions, magnesiothermic reduction of silica is one of the most powerful methods for producing silicon nanostructures. However, incomplete reduction takes place in this process leaving unconverted silica under the silicon layer. This phenomenon limits the use of this method for the rational design of silicon structures. In this effort, a technique that enables complete magnesiothermic reduction of silica to form silicon has been developed. The procedure involves magnesium promoted reduction of vertically oriented mesoporous silica channels on reduced graphene oxides (rGO) sheets. The mesopores play a significant role in effectively enabling magnesium gas to interact with silica through a large number of reaction sites. Utilizing this approach, highly uniform, ca. 10 nm sized silicon nanoparticles are generated without contamination by unreacted silica. The new method for complete magnesiothermic reduction of mesoporous silica approach provides a foundation for the rational design of silicon structures.

  7. Microstructural Characterization of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Ceramics. Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructural characterization of two reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics has been carried out by interference layering, plasma etching, and microscopy. These specimens contained free silicon and niobium disilicide as minor phases with silicon carbide as the major phase. In conventionally prepared samples, the niobium disilicide cannot be distinguished from silicon in optical micrographs. After interference layering, all phases are clearly distinguishable. Back scattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the results obtained by interference layering. Plasma etching with CF4 plus 4% O2 selectively attacks silicon in these specimens. It is demonstrated that interference layering and plasma etching are very useful techniques in the phase identification and microstructural characterization of multiphase ceramic materials.

  8. On the key factors of angular correlations in complex-forming elementary reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, L.; Rayez, J. C.

    2006-04-01

    In the mid-seventies, Case and Herschbach argued that for complex-forming three-atom reactions governed by long-range forces and performed in supersonic molecular beam experiments, vectorial properties are determined by a single parameter Λ' = , L' and j' being respectively the moduli of the orbital and rotational angular momenta of the products. A simple mathematical relation between vectorial properties and Λ' was then proposed. However, Λ' must be determined beforehand by phase space theory calculations. Besides, we have recently shown that scalar properties are mainly controled by two factors ρ'1 and ρ'2 respectively called angular excitation and diatomic inertial contribution. We show here that these factors control also vectorial properties. Moreover, the way they control them is summarized in a set of four figures. The advantage of our method is that ρ'1 and ρ'2 are related to the mechanical parameters of the reaction by very simple formulas, contrary to Λ'. Last by not least, our parameters appear to be mostly independent, so that vectorial properties cannot be said to strictly depend on Λ'. Nevertheless, it turns out that the rule proposed by Case and Herschbach is reasonable in many realistic situations.

  9. Materials Characterization Center workshop on leaching of radioactive waste forms. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Strachan, D.M.; Turcotte, R.P.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    At the first Materials Characterization Center (MCC) workshop, on the leaching of radioactive waste forms, there was general agreement that, after certain revisions, the proposed leach test plan set forth by the MCC can be expected to meet most of the nuclear waste community's waste form durability data requirements. The revisions give a clearer definition of the purposes of each test and the end uses of the data. As a result of the workshop, the format of the test program has been recast to clarify the purposes, limitations, and interrelationships of the individual tests. There was also a recognition that the leach test program must be based on an understanding of the mechanistic principles of leaching, and that further study is needed to ensure that the approved data from the MCC leach tests will be compatible with mechanistic research needs. It was agreed that another meeting of the participants in Working Groups 3 and 4, and perhaps some other experts, should be held as soon as possible to focus just on the definition of leach test requirements for mechanistic research. The MCC plans to hold this meeting in April 1980. Many of the tests that will lead to increased understanding of mechanisms will of necessity be long-term tests, sometimes lasting for several years. But the MCC also faces pressing needs to produce approved data that can be used for the comparison of waste forms in the relative near-term, i.e., in the next 1 to 3 yr. Therefore, it was decided to initiate a round-robin test of the MCC short-term static leach procedure as soon as practicable. The MCC has tentative plans for organization of the round robin in May 1980.

  10. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  11. Modeling of reversible charge separation in reaction centers of photosynthesis: an incoherent approach.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, A G; Shuvalov, V A

    2014-02-21

    Primary charge separation in reaction centers (RCs) of bacterial photosynthesis is modeled in this work. An incoherent population dynamics of RCs states is formulated by kinetic equations. It is assumed that charge separation is accompanied by regular motion of the system along additional coordinates. This motion modulates an energetics of the reactions, and this modulation causes femtosecond oscillations in the population of the states. The best qualitative and quantitative accordance with experimental data on native, modified and mutant RCs of Rba. sphaeroides is achieved in the five states model that includes two excited states P(*)905BAHA and P(*)940BAHA and three charge separated states I, P(+)BA(-)HA and P(+)BAHA(-) (P is a primary electron donor, bacteriochlorophyll dimer, BA and HA are electron acceptors, monomeric bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in active A-branch respectively). The excited states emit at 905 and 940 nm and have approximately the same energy and high interaction rate. The intermediate state I is populated earlier than the P(+)BA(-)HA state and has energy close to the energy of the excited states, a high rate of population and depopulation and spectral identity to the BA(-). A sum of the I and P(+)BA(-)HA populations fits the experimental kinetics of the BA(-) absorption band at 1020 nm. The model explains an oscillatory phenomenon in the kinetics of the P(*) stimulated emission and of the BA(-) absorption. In the schemes without the I state, accordance with the experiment is achieved at unreal parameter values or is not achieved at all. A qualitative agreement of the model with the experiment can be achieved at a wide range of parameter values. The nature of the states I and P(*)940BAHA is discussed in terms of partial charge separation between P and BA and inside P respectively.

  12. Dual-face nucleoside scaffold featuring a stereogenic all-carbon quaternary center. Intramolecular silicon tethered group-transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Tambutet, Guillaume; Becerril-Jiménez, Fabiola; Dostie, Starr; Simard, Ryan; Prévost, Michel; Mochirian, Philippe; Guindon, Yvan

    2014-11-07

    The design of a novel nucleoside scaffold that exhibits an all-carbon quaternary center is reported. This allows for both α- and β-anomers of a given 2'-deoxy-2',2'-difluoro nucleoside analog (NA) to have potential biological activity. Using an intramolecular atom-transfer reaction, an all-carbon quaternary center was obtained without the use of heavy metals and/or harsh conditions. The chemistry developed is efficient, easily scalable and leads to novel libraries of molecules.

  13. An unusual form of reaction wood in Koromiko [Hebe salicifolia G. Forst. (Pennell)], a southern hemisphere angiosperm.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Miho; Becker, Verena K; Altaner, Clemens M

    2012-02-01

    Koromiko [Hebe salicifolia G. Forst. (Pennell)] is a woody angiosperm native to New Zealand and Chile. Hebe spp. belong to the otherwise herbaceous family Plantaginaceae in the order Lamiales. Reaction wood exerting expansional forces was found on the lower side of leaning H. salicifolia stems. Such reaction wood is atypical for angiosperms, which commonly form contracting reaction wood on the upper side of leaning stems. Reaction wood typical for angiosperms is formed by species in other families in the order Lamiales. This suggests that the form of reaction wood is specific to the family level. Functionally the reaction wood of H. salicifolia is similar to that found in gymnosperms, which both act by pushing. However, their chemical, anatomical and physical characteristics are different. Typical features of reaction wood present in gymnosperms such as high density, thick-walled rounded cells and the presence of (1 → 4)-β-galactan in the secondary cell wall layer are absent in H. salicifolia reaction wood. Reaction wood of H. salicifolia varies from normal wood in having a higher microfibril angle, which is likely to determine the direction of generated maturation stresses.

  14. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1.

    PubMed

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-14

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  15. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  16. Temporal and spectral characterization of the photosynthetic reaction center from Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Adrien; Sarrou, Josephine; Lin, Su; Romberger, Steven P; Golbeck, John H; Savikhin, Sergei; Redding, Kevin E

    2013-09-01

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study of the isolated photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Heliobacterium modesticaldum reveals that thermal equilibration of light excitation among the antenna pigments followed by trapping of excitation and the formation of the charge-separated state P800 (+)A0 (-) occurs within ~25 ps. This time scale is similar to that reported for plant and cyanobacterial photosystem I (PS I) complexes. Subsequent electron transfer from the primary electron acceptor A0 occurs with a lifetime of ~600 ps, suggesting that the RC of H. modesticaldum is functionally similar to that of Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium chlorum. The (A0 (-) - A0) and (P800 (+) - P800) absorption difference spectra imply that an 8(1)-OH-Chl a F molecule serves as the primary electron acceptor and occupies the position analogous to ec3 (A0) in PS I, while a monomeric BChl g pigment occupies the position analogous to ec2 (accessory Chl). The presence of an intense photobleaching band at 790 nm in the (A0 (-) - A0) spectrum suggests that the excitonic coupling between the monomeric accessory BChl g and the 8(1)-OH-Chl a F in the heliobacterial RC is significantly stronger than the excitonic coupling between the equivalent pigments in PS I.

  17. Microaerophilic growth and induction of the photosynthetic reaction center in Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, F.S.; Oesterhelt, D.

    1989-05-01

    Rhodopseudomonas viridis was grown in liquid culture at 30 degrees C anaerobically in light (generation time, 13 h) and under microaerophilic growth conditions in the dark (generation time, 24 h). The bacterium could be cloned at the same temperature anaerobically in light (1 week) and aerobically in the dark (3 to 4 weeks) if oxygen was limited to 0.1%. Oxygen could not be replaced by dimethyl sulfoxide, potassium nitrate, or sodium nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. No growth was observed anaerobically in darkness or in the light when air was present. A variety of additional carbon sources were used to supplement the standard succinate medium, but enhanced stationary-phase cell density was observed only with glucose. Conditions for induction of the photosynthetic reaction center upon the change from microaerophilic to phototrophic growth conditions were investigated and optimized for a mutant functionally defective in phototrophic growth. R. viridis consumed about 20-fold its cell volume of oxygen per hour during respiration. The MICs of ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, and terbutryn were determined.

  18. Double Mutation in Photosystem II Reaction Centers and Elevated CO2 Grant Thermotolerance to Mesophilic Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Jorge; Shlyk-Kerner, Oksana; Kaftan, David; Goldberg, Eran; Dulebo, Alexander; Gidekel, Manuel; Gutierrez, Ana; Scherz, Avigdor

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic biomass production rapidly declines in mesophilic cyanobacteria grown above their physiological temperatures largely due to the imbalance between degradation and repair of the D1 protein subunit of the heat susceptible Photosystem II reaction centers (PSIIRC). Here we show that simultaneous replacement of two conserved residues in the D1 protein of the mesophilic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, by the analogue residues present in the thermophilic Thermosynechococcus elongatus, enables photosynthetic growth, extensive biomass production and markedly enhanced stability and repair rate of PSIIRC for seven days even at 43°C but only at elevated CO2 (1%). Under the same conditions, the Synechocystis control strain initially presented very slow growth followed by a decline after 3 days. Change in the thylakoid membrane lipids, namely the saturation of the fatty acids is observed upon incubation for the different strains, but only the double mutant shows a concomitant major change of the enthalpy and entropy for the light activated QA−→QB electron transfer, rendering them similar to those of the thermophilic strain. Following these findings, computational chemistry and protein dynamics simulations we propose that the D1 double mutation increases the folding stability of the PSIIRC at elevated temperatures. This, together with the decreased impairment of D1 protein repair under increased CO2 concentrations result in the observed photothermal tolerance of the photosynthetic machinery in the double mutant PMID:22216094

  19. Cofactor-specific photochemical function resolved by ultrafast spectroscopy in photosynthetic reaction center crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Libai; Ponomarenko, Nina; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Tiede, David M

    2012-03-27

    High-resolution mapping of cofactor-specific photochemistry in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was achieved by polarization selective ultrafast spectroscopy in single crystals at cryogenic temperature. By exploiting the fixed orientation of cofactors within crystals, we isolated a single transition within the multicofactor manifold, and elucidated the site-specific photochemical functions of the cofactors associated with the symmetry-related active A and inactive B branches. Transient spectra associated with the initial excited states were found to involve a set of cofactors that differ depending upon whether the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls, BChl(A), BChl(B), or the special pair bacteriochlorophyll dimer, P, was chosen for excitation. Proceeding from these initial excited states, characteristic photochemical functions were resolved. Specifically, our measurements provide direct evidence for an alternative charge separation pathway initiated by excitation of BChl(A) that does not involve P*. Conversely, the initial excited state produced by excitation of BChl(B) was found to decay by energy transfer to P. A clear sequential kinetic resolution of BChl(A) and the A-side bacteriopheophytin, BPh(A), in the electron transfer proceeding from P* was achieved. These experiments demonstrate the opportunity to resolve photochemical function of individual cofactors within the multicofactor RC complexes using single crystal spectroscopy.

  20. Orientated binding of photosynthetic reaction centers on gold using Ni-NTA self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Scott A; Wang, Leyu; Zullo, Joseph M; Shashidhar, Ranganathan; Lebedev, Nikolai

    2004-07-15

    Coupling of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) with inorganic surfaces is attractive for the identification of the mechanisms of interprotein electron transfer (ET) and for possible applications in construction of photo- and chemosensors. Here we show that RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides can be immobilized on gold surfaces with the RC primary donor looking towards the substrate by using a genetically engineered poly-histidine tag (His(7)) at the C-terminal end of the M-subunit and a Ni-NTA terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM). In the presence of an electron acceptor, ubiquinone-10, illumination of this RC electrode generates a cathodic photocurrent. The action spectrum of the photocurrent coincides with the absorption spectrum of RC and the photocurrent decreases in response to the herbicide, atrazine, confirming that the RC is the primary source of the photoresponse. Disruption of the Ni-NTA-RC bond by imidazole leads to about 80% reduction of the photocurrent indicating that most of the photoactive protein is specifically bound to the electrode through the linker.

  1. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  2. Light induced transmembrane proton gradient in artificial lipid vesicles reconstituted with photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Milano, Francesco; Trotta, Massimo; Dorogi, Márta; Fischer, Béla; Giotta, Livia; Agostiano, Angela; Maróti, Péter; Kálmán, László; Nagy, László

    2012-06-01

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC) is the minimal nanoscopic photoconverter in the photosynthetic membrane that catalyzes the conversion of solar light to energy readily usable for the metabolism of the living organisms. After electronic excitation the energy of light is converted into chemical potential by the generation of a charge separated state accompanied by intraprotein and ultimately transmembrane proton movements. We designed a system which fulfills the minimum structural and functional requirements to investigate the physico/chemical conditions of the processes: RCs were reconstituted in closed lipid vesicles made of selected lipids entrapping a pH sensitive indicator, and electron donors (cytochrome c₂ and K₄[Fe(CN)₆]) and acceptors (decylubiquinone) were added to sustain the photocycle. Thanks to the low proton permeability of our preparations, we could show the formation of a transmembrane proton gradient under illumination and low buffering conditions directly by measuring proton-related signals simultaneously inside and outside the vesicles. The effect of selected ionophores such as gramicidin, nigericin and valinomycin was used to gain more information on the transmembrane proton gradient driven by the RC photochemistry.

  3. Protein modifications affecting triplet energy transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed Central

    Laible, P D; Chynwat, V; Thurnauer, M C; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K; Frank, H A

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency of triplet energy transfer from the special pair (P) to the carotenoid (C) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from a large family of mutant strains has been investigated. The mutants carry substitutions at positions L181 and/or M208 near chlorophyll-based cofactors on the inactive and active sides of the complex, respectively. Light-modulated electron paramagnetic resonance at 10 K, where triplet energy transfer is thermally prohibited, reveals that the mutations do not perturb the electronic distribution of P. At temperatures > or = 70 K, we observe reduced signals from the carotenoid in most of the RCs with L181 substitutions. In particular, triplet transfer efficiency is reduced in all RCs in which a lysine at L181 donates a sixth ligand to the monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(B). Replacement of the native Tyr at M208 on the active side of the complex with several polar residues increased transfer efficiency. The difference in the efficiencies of transfer in the RCs demonstrates the ability of the protein environment to influence the electronic overlap of the chromophores and thus the thermal barrier for triplet energy transfer. PMID:9591686

  4. Spectral, photophysical, and stability properties of isolated photosystem II reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Picorel, R.; Rubin, A.B.; Connolly, J.S. )

    1988-06-01

    Photosystem II reaction center (RC) preparations isolated from spinach (Spinacea oleracea) by the Nanba-Satoh procedure are quite labile, even at 4{degree}C in the dark. Simple spectroscopic criteria were developed to characterize the native state of the material. Degradation of the RC results in (a) blue-shifting of the red-most absorption maximum, (b) a shift of the 77 K fluorescence maximum from {approximately}682 nm to {approximately}670 nm, and (c) a shift of fluorescence lifetime components from 1.3-4 nanoseconds and >25 nanoseconds to {approximately}6-7 nanoseconds. Fluorescence properties at 77 K seem to be a more sensitive spectral indicator of the integrity of the material. The >25 nanosecond lifetime component is assigned to P680{sup +} Phenophytin{sup -}recombination luminescence, which suggest a correlation between the observed spectral shifts and the photochemical competence of the preparation. Substitution of lauryl maltoside for Triton X-100 immediately after RC isolation stabilizes the RCs and suggests that Triton may be responsible for the instability.

  5. Solid base-catalyzed reaction of nitriles with methanol to form. alpha. ,. beta. -unsaturated nitriles 2. Surface base property and reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Hideki; Kato, Tatsuro; Kuwabra, Tetsu; Ueda, Wataru; Morikawa, Yutaka; Moro-Oka, Yoshihiko; Ikawa, Tsuneo )

    1990-11-01

    Solid acid and base properties of magnesium oxides activated by transition metal ions, M-MgO, which are effective catalysts for the reaction of nitriles with methanol to form corresponding {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated nitriles, were studied by temperature-programmed desorption of CO{sub 2} and the reaction of isopropyl alcohol, and the reaction mechanism was studied by isotopic tracer methods. The surface base property of magnesium oxide was modified by the addition of a metal ion; the addition of a metal ion with larger ionic radius than that of Mg{sup 2+} induces surface acid sites without any appreciable changes in the amount of surface base site. Active catalysts were formed in the latter case but not in the former case. It was thought that a surface acid property as well as a surface base property played an important role in the course of the reaction. Reaction of deuterium-substituted acetonitrile and methanol revealed that the exchange reaction between hydroxyl hydrogen of methanol and methyl hydrogen of acetonitrile took place readily under the conditions of acrylonitrile synthesis and the isotopic distribution in acetonitrile after the reaction was very close to that of isotopic equilibrium. No exchange reaction between methyl hydrogen of methanol and that of acetonitrile was observed. It was found, on the other hand, that the isotopic exchange reaction between methyl hydrogen of deuterated methanol and light methanol can occur under the same conditions. The reaction mechanism appears to be dehydrogenation of methanol to adsorbed formaldehyde which then reacts with the acetonitrile anion and, after dehydration, yields acrylonitrile.

  6. Readability of informed consent forms in clinical trials conducted in a skin research center

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Aniseh; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining informed consents is one of the most fundamental principles in conducting a clinical trial. In order for the consent to be informed, the patient must receive and comprehend the information appropriately. Complexity of the consent form is a common problem that has been shown to be a major barrier to comprehension for many patients. The objective of this study was to assess the readability of different templates of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in clinical trials in the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL), Tehran, Iran. This study was conducted on ICFs of 45 clinical trials of the CRTSDL affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. ICFs were tested for reading difficulty, using the readability assessments formula adjusted for the Persian language including the Flesch–Kincaid reading ease score, Flesch–Kincaid grade level, and Gunning fog index. Mean readability score of the whole text of ICFs as well as their 7 main information parts were calculated. The mean ± SD Flesch Reading Ease score for all ICFs was 31.96 ± 5.62 that is in the difficult range. The mean ± SD grade level was calculated as 10.71 ± 1.8 (8.23–14.09) using the Flesch–Kincaid formula and 14.64 ± 1.22 (12.67–18.27) using the Gunning fog index. These results indicate that the text is expected to be understandable for an average student in the 11th grade, while the ethics committee recommend grade level 8 as the standard readability level for ICFs. The results showed that the readability scores of ICFs assessed in our study were not in the acceptable range. This means they were too complex to be understood by the general population. Ethics committees must examine the simplicity and readability of ICFs used in clinical trials. PMID:27471590

  7. Readability of informed consent forms in clinical trials conducted in a skin research center.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Aniseh; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining informed consents is one of the most fundamental principles in conducting a clinical trial. In order for the consent to be informed, the patient must receive and comprehend the information appropriately. Complexity of the consent form is a common problem that has been shown to be a major barrier to comprehension for many patients. The objective of this study was to assess the readability of different templates of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in clinical trials in the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL), Tehran, Iran. This study was conducted on ICFs of 45 clinical trials of the CRTSDL affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. ICFs were tested for reading difficulty, using the readability assessments formula adjusted for the Persian language including the Flesch-Kincaid reading ease score, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Gunning fog index. Mean readability score of the whole text of ICFs as well as their 7 main information parts were calculated. The mean ± SD Flesch Reading Ease score for all ICFs was 31.96 ± 5.62 that is in the difficult range. The mean ± SD grade level was calculated as 10.71 ± 1.8 (8.23-14.09) using the Flesch-Kincaid formula and 14.64 ± 1.22 (12.67-18.27) using the Gunning fog index. These results indicate that the text is expected to be understandable for an average student in the 11(th) grade, while the ethics committee recommend grade level 8 as the standard readability level for ICFs. The results showed that the readability scores of ICFs assessed in our study were not in the acceptable range. This means they were too complex to be understood by the general population. Ethics committees must examine the simplicity and readability of ICFs used in clinical trials.

  8. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  9. Facilitating donor compliance with strategies to prevent vasovagal reactions: comparison of web-based and in-center approaches.

    PubMed

    Thijsen, Amanda; Fisher, Jenny; Gemelli, Carley N; Bell, Barbara; Davison, Tanya E; Masser, Barbara M

    2017-10-01

    Research has documented beneficial effects of water loading (WL) and applied muscle tension (AMT) on reducing self-reported vasovagal reactions (VVRs) in whole blood (WB) donors. However, the optimal approach to reducing VVRs using these strategies in routine blood collection practice is not known. This study evaluated the effectiveness of embedding newly developed web-based and on-site donor education materials to increase the use of these two prevention techniques during blood collection. Two studies were conducted with WB donors. In Study 1, donors (n = 375) were randomly allocated to evaluate one of three forms of educational materials (video, webpage, card) in an online questionnaire. In Study 2, donors (n = 598) were randomly assigned to view either off-site web-based or in-center educational materials and were surveyed after donation to assess compliance to the VVR prevention procedure and to self-report VVR. In Study 1, donors rated the video as having the highest message appeal and indicated greater likelihood to use AMT compared to the webpage and card. No differences were found in likelihood to use WL. In contrast, in Study 2, greater adherence to VVR prevention strategies was observed in donors who received the in-center instruction card in comparison to those who received the web-based materials. Examination of viewing data indicated that only a small number of donors had seen the web-based materials. No significant effects of the techniques were found on self-reported VVRs. Providing on-site instructions is the most effective method to increase donor compliance to VVR prevention techniques. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Wraight, Colin A.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.

  11. Fundamental study of ammonia-sulfur dioxide reactions to form solid particles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.; Bai, H.

    1994-01-18

    The effects of reaction residence time, presence of inert particles and moisture content on the SO{sub 2} removal and the product particle size distributions have been determined. Results indicated that both gas phase and particle phase reach equilibria in a very short time. The presence of inert particles increases the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency slightly, with a greater increase in removal efficiency at higher surface areas. Moisture content is the most important parameter affecting SO{sub 2} removal. Increasing the moisture content from 1.6% to 6.4% by volume results in a 30% increase of the SO{sub 2} removal at a reaction temperature of 51{degree}C. The products at near anhydrous conditions were concluded to be NH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}, (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the products at humid conditions could be either the 1:1 sulfites, NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 5}, or the 2:1 sulfites, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 3} {minus}H{sub 2}O, or a mixture of the 1:1 and 2:1 sulfite. Those sulfite particles could subsequently oxidize to form the more stable sulfate particles. A gas-to-particle formation model has been developed to simulate the NH{sub 3}-SO{sub 2} system in the presence and absence of seed aerosols at trace water conditions. This model accounts for simultaneous nucleation, coagulation, condensation and chemical reaction. The applicability of utilizing ammonia injection to a flue gas system has been discussed in terms of two possible removal schemes. One utilizes ammonia injection alone and the other is in conjunction with the injection of Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry in a spray dryer system. Both schemes have the potential of achieving over 90% SO{sub 2} removal from power plants burning high-sulfur coals.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of Deoxygenation Reactions over Proton-Form and Molybdenum-Modified Zeolite Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, Jeremy William

    The depletion of fossil fuel resources and the environmental consequences of their use have dictated the development of new sources of energy that are both sustainable and economical. Biomass has emerged as a renewable carbon feedstock that can be used to produce chemicals and fuels traditionally obtained from petroleum. The oxygen content of biomass prohibits its use without modification because oxygenated hydrocarbons are non-volatile and have lower energy content. Chemical processes that eliminate oxygen and keep the carbon backbone intact are required for the development of biomass as a viable chemical feedstock. This dissertation reports on the kinetic and mechanistic studies conducted on high and low temperature catalytic processes for deoxygenation of biomass precursors to produce high-value chemicals and fuels. Low temperature, steady state reaction studies of acetic acid and ethanol were used to identify co-adsorbed acetic acid/ethanol dimers as surface intermediates within specific elementary steps involved in the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol on zeolites. A reaction mechanism involving two dominating surface species, an inactive ethanol dimeric species adsorbed on Bronsted sites inhibiting ester formation and a co-adsorbed complex of acetic acid and ethanol on the active site reacting to produce ethyl acetate, is shown to describe the reaction rate as a function of temperature (323 -- 383 K), acetic acid (0.5 -- 6.0 kPa), and ethanol (5.0 -- 13.0 kPa) partial pressure on proton-form BEA, FER, MFI, and MOR zeolites. Measured differences in rates as a function of zeolite structure and the rigorous interpretation of these differences in terms of esterification rate and equilibrium constants is presented to show that the intrinsic rate constant for the activation of the co-adsorbed complex increases in the order FER < MOR < MFI < BEA. High temperature co-processing of acetic acid, formic acid, or carbon dioxide with methane (CH3COOH/CH4 = 0

  13. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  14. B-branch electron transfer in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides assessed with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-01-01

    Mutants of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are described which were designed to study electron transfer along the so-called B-branch of reaction center (RC) cofactors. Combining the mutation L(M214)H, which results in the incorporation of a bacteriochlorophyll, beta, for H(A) [Kirmaier et al. (1991) Science 251: 922-927] with two mutations, G(M203)D and Y(M210)W, near B(A), we have created a double and a triple mutant with long lifetimes of the excited state P(*) of the primary donor P, viz. 80 and 160 ps at room temperature, respectively. The yield of P(+)Q(A) (-) formation in these mutants is reduced to 50 and 30%, respectively, of that in wildtype RCs. For both mutants, the quantum yield of P(+)H(B) (-) formation was less than 10%, in contrast to the 15% B-branch electron transfer demonstrated in RCs of a similar mutant of Rba. capsulatus with a P(*) lifetime of 15 ps [Heller et al. (1995) Science 269: 940-945]. We conclude that the lifetime of P(*) is not a governing factor in switching to B-branch electron transfer. The direct photoreduction of the secondary quinone, Q(B), was studied with a triple mutant combining the G(M203)D, L(M214)H and A(M260)W mutations. In this triple mutant Q(A) does not bind to the reaction center [Ridge et al. (1999) Photosynth Res 59: 9-26]. It is shown that B-branch electron transfer leading to P(+)Q(B) (-) formation occurs to a minor extent at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures (about 3% following a saturating laser flash at 20 K). In contrast, in wildtype RCs P(+)Q(B) (-) formation involves the A-branch and does not occur at all at cryogenic temperatures. Attempts to accumulate the P(+)Q(B) (-) state under continuous illumination were not successful. Charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) formed by B-branch electron transfer in the new mutant is much faster (seconds) than has been previously reported for charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) trapped in wildtype RCs (10(5) s) [Kleinfeld et al. (1984b) Biochemistry 23

  15. Structural and mechanical characterization of detonation coatings formed by reaction products of titanium with components of the spraying atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianitsky, Vladimir Yu.; Dudina, Dina V.; Panin, Sergey V.; Vlasov, Ilya V.; Batraev, Igor S.; Bokhonov, Boris B.

    2016-11-01

    Structural characterization of detonation deposits formed by reaction products of titanium with the components of the spraying atmosphere showed that ceramic-based coatings of unique microstructures—consisting of alternating layers of different compositions—can be formed. For the first time, mechanical characteristics of the coatings formed by reaction-accompanied detonation spraying of titanium were evaluated. It was found that high-yield transformation of titanium into oxides and nitrides during spraying can result in the formation of coatings with high fracture resistance and interface fracture toughness. The hardness of the coatings measured along the cross-section of the specimens was higher than that on the surface of the coatings, which indicated mechanical anisotropy of the deposited material. In terms of mechanical properties, coatings formed by the reaction products appear to be more attractive than those specially treated to preserve metallic titanium.

  16. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  17. Structural and spectroscopic consequences of hexacoordination of a bacteriochlorophyll cofactor in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center .

    PubMed

    Frolov, Dmitrij; Marsh, May; Crouch, Lucy I; Fyfe, Paul K; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hadfield, Andrea; Jones, Michael R

    2010-03-09

    The structural and functional consequences of changing the coordination state of one of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) cofactors in the purple bacterial reaction center have been explored. A combination of steady state spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography was used to demonstrate that mutagenesis of residue 181 of the L-polypeptide from Phe to Arg (FL181R) causes the BChl at the accessory (B(B)) position on the so-called inactive cofactor branch to become hexacoordinated, with no significant changes to the structure of the surrounding protein. This change was accompanied by the appearance of a distinctive absorbance band at 631 nm in the room-temperature absorbance spectrum. The ligand donor was not the Arg side chain but rather an intervening water molecule, and contrary to expectations, the Mg of B(B) did not adopt a more in-plane geometry in response to hexacoordination. The mutation caused a disturbance to the detailed conformation of the BChl macrocycle that manifested in a number of subtle changes to the resonance Raman spectrum. Hexacoordination of B(B) produced a small increase in the lifetime of the excited electronic state of the primary donor bacteriochlorophylls (P*), indicating some disturbance to light-driven energy and/or electron transfer events on the time scale of a few picoseconds after light excitation. The B(B) bacteriochlorophyll returned to a pentacoordinated state in a double mutant where the FL181R mutation was combined with removal of the native axial ligand through mutation of His M182 to Leu. Experimental evidence of hexacoordinated bacteriochlorophylls in the literature on antenna proteins is considered, and possible reasons why hexacoordinated bacteriochlorophylls and chlorophylls appear to be avoided in photosynthetic proteins are discussed.

  18. Pathways of energy transformation in antenna reaction center complexes of Heliobacillus mobilis.

    PubMed

    Neerken, S; Aartsma, T J; Amesz, J

    2000-03-28

    The conversion of excitation energy in the antenna reaction center complex of Heliobacillus mobilis was investigated at 10 K as well as at 275 K by means of time-resolved absorbance difference spectroscopy of isolated membranes in the (sub)picosecond time range. Selective excitation of the primary electron acceptor, chlorophyll (Chl) a 670, and of the different spectral pools of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g (BChl g 778, BChl g 793, and BChl g 808) was applied. At 10 K, excitation at 770 or 793 nm resulted on the one hand in rapid energy transfer to BChl g 808 and on the other hand in fast charge separation from excited BChl g 793 ( approximately 1 ps). Once the excitations were on BChl g 808, the bleaching band shifted gradually to the red, from 806 to 813 nm, and charge separation from excited BChl g 808 occurred by a very slow process ( approximately 500 ps). The main purpose of our experiments was to answer the question whether an "alternative" pathway for charge separation exists upon excitation of Chl a 670. Our measurements showed that the amount of oxidized primary donor (P798(+)) relative to that of excited BChl g produced by excitation of Chl a 670 was considerably larger than upon direct excitation of BChl g. This indicates the existence of an alternative pathway for charge separation that does not involve excited antenna BChl g. This effect occurred at 10 K as well as at 275 K. The mechanism for this process is discussed in relation to different trapping models; it is concluded that charge separation occurs directly from excited Chl a 670.

  19. Cumulant analysis of charge recombination kinetics in bacterial reaction centers reconstituted into lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, G; Mallardi, A; Giustini, M; Berti, D; Venturoli, G

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge recombination between the primary photoxidized donor (P(+)) and the secondary reduced quinone acceptor (Q(B)(-)) have been studied in reaction centers (RCs) from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporated into lecithin vesicles containing large ubiquinone pools over the temperature range 275 K = (50 +/- 15) nm). Following these premises, we describe the kinetics of P(+)Q(B)(-) recombination with a truncated cumulant expansion and relate it to P(Q) and to the free energy changes for Q(A)(-)Q(B) --> Q(A)Q(B)(-) electron transfer (DeltaG(AB)(o)) and for quinone binding (DeltaG(bind)(o)) at Q(B). The model accounts well for the temperature and quinone dependence of the charge recombination kinetics, yielding DeltaG(AB)(o) = -7.67 +/- 0.05 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaG(bind)(o) = -14.6 +/- 0.6 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K. PMID:10968981

  20. Structural and spectropotentiometric analysis of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Li, Liang; Marino, Antony R.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ostafin, Agnes; Popova, Julia A.; Bylina, Edward J.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Norris, Jr., James R.

    2010-07-22

    Heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs) of Blastochloris viridis were crystallized using microfluidic technology. In this mutant, a leucine residue replaced the histidine residue which had acted as a fifth ligand to the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) of the primary electron donor dimer M site (HisM200). With the loss of the histidine-coordinated Mg, one bacteriochlorophyll of the special pair was converted into a bacteriopheophytin (BPhe), and the primary donor became a heterodimer supermolecule. The crystals had dimensions 400 x 100 x 100 {micro}m, belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, and were isomorphous to the ones reported earlier for the wild type (WT) strain. The structure was solved to a 2.5 {angstrom} resolution limit. Electron-density maps confirmed the replacement of the histidine residue and the absence of Mg. Structural changes in the heterodimer mutant RC relative to the WT included the absence of the water molecule that is typically positioned between the M side of the primary donor and the accessory BChl, a slight shift in the position of amino acids surrounding the site of the mutation, and the rotation of the M194 phenylalanine. The cytochrome subunit was anchored similarly as in the WT and had no detectable changes in its overall position. The highly conserved tyrosine L162, located between the primary donor and the highest potential heme C{sub 380}, revealed only a minor deviation of its hydroxyl group. Concomitantly to modification of the BChl molecule, the redox potential of the heterodimer primary donor increased relative to that of the WT organism (772 mV vs. 517 mV). The availability of this heterodimer mutant and its crystal structure provides opportunities for investigating changes in light-induced electron transfer that reflect differences in redox cascades.

  1. FTIR spectroscopy of the reaction center of Chloroflexus aurantiacus: photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, Alexej A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2011-09-01

    Mid-infrared spectral changes associated with the photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor H(A) in reaction centers (RCs) of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus (Cfl.) aurantiacus are examined by light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The light-induced H(A)(-)/H(A) FTIR (1800-1200cm(-1)) difference spectrum of Cfl. aurantiacus RCs is compared to that of the previously well characterized purple bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides RCs. The most notable feature is that the large negative IR band at 1674cm(-1) in Rba. sphaeroides R-26, attributable to the loss of the absorption of the 13(1)-keto carbonyl of H(A) upon the radical anion H(A)(-) formation, exhibits only a very minor upshift to 1675cm(-1) in Cfl. aurantiacus. In contrast, the absorption band of the 13¹-keto C=O of H(A)(-) is strongly upshifted in the spectrum of Cfl. aurantiacus compared to that of Rba. sphaeroides (from 1588 to 1623cm(-1)). The data are discussed in terms of: (i) replacing the glutamic acid at L104 in Rba. sphaeroides R-26 RCs by a weaker hydrogen bond donor, a glutamine, at the equivalent position L143 in Cfl. aurantiacus RCs; (ii) a strengthening of the hydrogen-bonding interaction of the 13¹-keto C=O of H(A) with Glu L104 and Gln L143 upon H(A)(-) formation and (iii) a possible influence of the protein dielectric environment on the 13¹-keto C=O stretching frequency of neutral H(A). A conformational heterogeneity of the 13³-ester C=O group of H(A) is detected for Cfl. aurantiacus RCs similar to what has been previously described for purple bacterial RCs.

  2. Germinal Center Reaction Following Cutaneous Dengue Virus Infection in Immune-Competent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; García-Cordero, Julio; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has four serotypes, which can cause from asymptomatic disease to severe dengue. Heterologous secondary infections have been associated to a greater risk of potentially fatal dengue due to non-neutralizing memory antibodies (Abs), which facilitate the infection, such as anti-precursor membrane (prM) Abs, among other mechanisms. Usually, class-switched memory Abs are generated mainly through germinal centers (GCs). However, the cellular events underlying these Ab responses to DENV, especially during repeated/secondary infections, have been poorly studied. We wanted to know whether there is involvement of GC reactions during cutaneous DENV infection and whether there is any sort of preferential Ab responses to defined viral proteins. Intradermal DENV inoculation at a relatively low dose efficiently infects immune-competent BALB/c mice, inducing higher quantities of DENV-specific GC B cells and larger GCs than the control conditions. Interestingly, GCs exhibited as much prM as envelope (E) and non-structural 3 viral proteins in situ. Intriguingly, despite the much larger abundance of E protein than of prM protein in the virions, infected animals showed similar amounts of circulating Abs and Ag-specific GC B cells both for prM and for E proteins, even significantly higher for prM. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of the GC responses during DENV infection. This relatively stronger anti-prM response could be triggered by DENV to preferentially promote Abs against certain viral proteins, which might favor infections by facilitating DENV invasion of host cells. It is thus conceivably that DENV might have evolved to induce this kind of Ab responses. PMID:25964784

  3. Adverse drug reactions reported to the drug and poison information center of Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Saheb Sharif-Askari, Fatemeh; Saheb Sharif-Askari, Narjes; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2017-01-01

    Burden of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in home-environment and domestic settings, is unknown. To discuss the epidemiology of reported ADRs to 13-Aban drug and poison information center (DPIC) and to discuss the burden of hospitalization caused by these ADRs from commonly implicated therapeutic groups. A retrospective analysis of the yellow card schemes of suspected ADRs reported to the 13-Aban DPIC was conducted from 21 March 2013 to 21 November 2016 inclusive. Characteristics of the ADRs, such as the sex and age of the patient, the therapeutic group involved, and the medical outcome of the exposure, were examined. ADR Hospitalization (ADRH) index was calculated for each drug group by dividing the number of ADR-related hospitalizations with total number of reported ADR cases (n = 748), and then multiplying by 100. ADRs were reported for 748 patients representing 5 cases per 1000 enquiries to the 13-Aban DPIC over almost 4-years of the study period. Public were responsible for reporting every 4 out of 5 ADR cases (n = 651, 87%) and the remaining 1 out of 5 ADR cases was reported by the health care professionals (n = 97, 13%). Most of the ADRs had a medical outcome documented as having a minor effect or were minimally bothersome to the patients (n = 509, 68%), and less than 4.9% (n = 37) were documented as having a major effect or were life-threatening. Overall, 7.4% (n = 55) of ADRs were resulted in hospitalization. Antibacterials for systemic use represented the therapeutic group with the highest hospitalization index (1.7%). The study concluded that ADRs to antibiotics are common and some of them resulted in hospitalization.

  4. Interactions between Cytochrome c2 and the Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides : The Cation-pi Interaction†

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, M. L.; Weber, K. H.; Chang, C.; Okamura, M. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The cation-pi interaction between positively charged and aromatic groups is a common feature of many proteins and protein complexes. The structure of the complex between cytochrome c2 (cyt c2) and photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides exhibits a cation-pi complex formed between Arg-C32 on cyt c2 and Tyr-M295 on the RC (Axelrod et. al (2002) J. Mol. Biol. 319, 501–515). The importance of the cation-pi interaction for binding and electron transfer was studied by mutating Tyr-M295 and Arg-C32. The first and second order rates for electron transfer were not affected by mutating Tyr-M295 to Ala indicating that the cation-pi complex does not greatly affect the association process or structure of the state active in electron transfer. The dissociation constant KD showed a greater increase when Try-M295 was replaced by non-aromatic Ala (3-fold) than by aromatic Phe (1.2-fold) characteristic of a cation-pi interaction. Replacement of Arg-C32 by Ala increased KD (80-fold) largely due to removal of electrostatic interactions with negatively charged residues on the RC. Replacement by Lys, increased KD (6-fold) indicating that Lys does not form a cation-pi complex. This specificity for Arg may be due to a solvation effect. Double mutant analysis indicates interaction energy between Tyr-M295 and Arg-C32 of about −24 meV (−0.6 kcal/mole). This energy is surprisingly small considering the widespread occurrence of cation-pi complexes and may be due to the trade-off between the favorable cation-pi binding energy and the unfavorable desolvation energy needed to bury Arg-C32 in the short-range contact region between the two proteins. PMID:16008347

  5. Reaction Kinetics of Primary Rock-forming Minerals under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    Mineral dissolution kinetics influence such phenomena as development of soil fertility, amelioration of the effects of acid rain, formation of karst, acid mine drainage, transport and sequestration of contaminants, sequestration of carbon dioxide at depth in the earth, ore deposition, and metamorphism. On a global basis, mineral weathering kinetics are also involved in the long-term sink for CO2 in the atmosphere:CaSiO3+CO2=CaCO3+SiO2(1)MgSiO3+CO2=MgCO3+SiO2(2)These reactions (Urey, 1952) describe the processes that balance the volcanic and metamorphic CO2 production to maintain relatively constant levels of atmospheric CO2 over 105-106 yr timescales. In these equations, Ca- and MgSiO3 represent all calcium- and magnesium-containing silicates. Calcium- and magnesium-silicates at the Earth's surface are predominantly plagioclase feldspars, Ca-Mg-pyroxenes, amphiboles, and phyllosilicates, Ca-Mg orthosilicates. Although dissolution of the other main rock-forming mineral class, carbonate minerals, does not draw down CO2 from the atmosphere over geologic timescales, carbonate dissolution is globally important in controlling river and ground water chemistry.Despite the importance of mineral dissolution, field weathering rates are generally observed to be up to five orders of magnitude slower than laboratory dissolution rates (White, 1995), and the reason for this discrepancy remains a puzzle. For example, mean lifetimes of 1 mm spheres of rock-forming minerals calculated from measured rate data following Lasaga (1984) are much smaller than the mean half-life of sedimentary rocks (600 My, Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). As pointed out by others ( Velbel, 1993a), the order of stability of minerals calculated from measured dissolution kinetics ( Table 1) generally follow weathering trends observed in the field (e.g., Goldich, 1938) with some exceptions. Some have suggested that quantitative prediction of field rates will be near-impossible, although such rate trends may be

  6. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  7. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

  8. CTEPP NC DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions related to t...

  9. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  10. Application of micro X-ray diffraction to investigate the reaction products formed by the alkali silica reaction in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dähn, R.; Arakcheeva, A.; Schaub, Ph.; Pattison, P.; Chapuis, G.; Grolimund, D.; Wieland, E.; Leemann, A.

    2015-12-21

    Alkali–silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most important deterioration mechanisms in concrete leading to substantial damages of structures worldwide. Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) was employed to characterize the mineral phases formed in micro-cracks of concrete aggregates as a consequence of ASR. This particular high spatial resolution technique enables to directly gain structural information on ASR products formed in a 40-year old motorway bridge damaged due to ASR. Micro-X-ray-fluorescence was applied on thin sections to locate the reaction products formed in veins within concrete aggregates. Micro-XRD pattern were collected at selected points of interest along a vein by rotating the sample. Rietveld refinement determined the structure of the ASR product consisting of a new layered framework similar to mountainite and rhodesite. Furthermore, it is conceivable that understanding the structure of the ASR product may help developing new technical treatments inhibiting ASR.

  11. [3 + 2] Cycloaddition Reaction of in Situ Formed Azaoxyallyl Cations with Aldehydes: An Approach to Oxazolidin-4-ones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaifan; Yang, Chi; Yao, Hequan; Lin, Aijun

    2016-09-16

    A novel [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between in situ formed azaoxyallyl cations and aldehydes has been developed. This concise method allows the rapid formation of a number of oxazolidin-4-ones in high yields with good functional group tolerance at room temperature. Further transformation and late-stage modifications of drug molecules could also be achieved in good yields, highlighting the potential utility of the reaction.

  12. Reactions of the alkoxy radicals formed following OH-addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. C-C bond scission reactions.

    PubMed

    Dibble, T S

    2001-05-09

    The atmospheric degradation pathways of the atmospherically important terpenes alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are studied using density functional theory. We employ the correlation functional of Lee, Yang, and Parr and the three-parameter HF exchange functional of Becke (B3LYP) together with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The C-C bond scission reactions of the beta-hydroxyalkoxy radicals that are formed after OH addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are investigated. Both of the alkoxy radicals formed from the alpha-pinene-OH adduct possess a single favored C-C scission pathway with an extremely low barrier (approximately 3 kcal/mol) leading to the formation of pinonaldehyde. Neither of these pathways produces formaldehyde, and preliminary computational results offer some support for suggestions that 1,5 or 1,6 H-shift (isomerization) reactions of alkoxy radicals contribute to formaldehyde production. In the case of the alkoxy radical formed following OH addition to the methylene group of beta-pinene, there exists two C-C scission reactions with nearly identical barrier heights (approximately 7.5 kcal/mol); one leads to known products (nopinone and formaldehyde) but the ultimate products of the competing reaction are unknown. The single C-C scission pathway of the other alkoxy radical from beta-pinene possesses a very low (approximately 4 kcal/mol) barrier. The kinetically favored C-C scission reactions of all four alkoxy radicals appear to be far faster than expected rates of reaction with O2. The rearrangement of the alpha-pinene-OH adduct, a key step in the proposed mechanism of formation of acetone from alpha-pinene, is determined to possess a barrier of 11.6 kcal/mol. This value is consistent with another computational result and is broadly consistent with the modest acetone yields observed in product yield studies.

  13. Origin of Nanobubbles Electrochemically Formed in a Magnetic Field: Ionic Vacancy Production in Electrode Reaction.

    PubMed

    Aogaki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Miura, Miki; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Mogi, Iwao; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-07-05

    As a process complementing conventional electrode reactions, ionic vacancy production in electrode reaction was theoretically examined; whether reaction is anodic or cathodic, based on the momentum conservation by Newton's second law of motion, electron transfer necessarily leads to the emission of original embryo vacancies, and dielectric polarization endows to them the same electric charge as trans- ferred in the reaction. Then, the emitted embryo vacancies immediately receive the thermal relaxation of solution particles to develop steady-state vacancies. After the vacancy production, nanobubbles are created by the collision of the vacancies in a vertical magnetic field.

  14. Origin of Nanobubbles Electrochemically Formed in a Magnetic Field: Ionic Vacancy Production in Electrode Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Aogaki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Miura, Miki; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Mogi, Iwao; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    As a process complementing conventional electrode reactions, ionic vacancy production in electrode reaction was theoretically examined; whether reaction is anodic or cathodic, based on the momentum conservation by Newton’s second law of motion, electron transfer necessarily leads to the emission of original embryo vacancies, and dielectric polarization endows to them the same electric charge as trans- ferred in the reaction. Then, the emitted embryo vacancies immediately receive the thermal relaxation of solution particles to develop steady-state vacancies. After the vacancy production, nanobubbles are created by the collision of the vacancies in a vertical magnetic field. PMID:27377532

  15. Origin of Nanobubbles Electrochemically Formed in a Magnetic Field: Ionic Vacancy Production in Electrode Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aogaki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Miura, Makoto; Oshikiri, Yoshinobu; Miura, Miki; Morimoto, Ryoichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Mogi, Iwao; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    As a process complementing conventional electrode reactions, ionic vacancy production in electrode reaction was theoretically examined; whether reaction is anodic or cathodic, based on the momentum conservation by Newton’s second law of motion, electron transfer necessarily leads to the emission of original embryo vacancies, and dielectric polarization endows to them the same electric charge as trans- ferred in the reaction. Then, the emitted embryo vacancies immediately receive the thermal relaxation of solution particles to develop steady-state vacancies. After the vacancy production, nanobubbles are created by the collision of the vacancies in a vertical magnetic field.

  16. Vibrational coherence in bacterial reaction centers with genetically modified B-branch pigment composition.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Andrei G; Shkuropatova, Tatiana A; Vasilieva, Luidmila G; Shkuropatov, Anatoli Ya; Gast, Peter; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond absorption difference spectroscopy was applied to study the time and spectral evolution of low-temperature (90 K) absorbance changes in isolated reaction centers (RCs) of the HM182L mutant of Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides. In this mutant, the composition of the B-branch RC cofactors is modified with respect to that of wild-type RCs by replacing the photochemically inactive BB accessory bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) by a photoreducible bacteriopheophytin molecule (referred to as PhiB). We have examined vibrational coherence within the first 400 fs after excitation of the primary electron donor P with 20-fs pulses at 870 nm by studying the kinetics of absorbance changes at 785 nm (PhiB absorption band), 940 nm (P*-stimulated emission), and 1020 nm (BA- absorption band). The results of the femtosecond measurements are compared with those recently reported for native Rb. sphaeroides R-26 RCs containing an intact BB BChl. At delay times longer than approximately 50 fs (maximum at 120 fs), the mutant RCs exhibit a pronounced BChl radical anion (BA-) absorption band at 1020 nm, which is similar to that observed for Rb. sphaeroides R-26 RCs and represents the formation of the intermediate charge-separated state P+ BA-. Femtosecond oscillations are revealed in the kinetics of the absorption development at 1020 nm and of decay of the P*-stimulated emission at 940 nm, with the oscillatory components of both kinetics displaying a generally synchronous behavior. These data are interpreted in terms of coupling of wave packet-like nuclear motions on the potential energy surface of the P* excited state to the primary electron-transfer reaction P*-->P+ BA- in the A-branch of the RC cofactors. At very early delay times (up to 80 fs), the mutant RCs exhibit a weak absorption decrease around 785 nm that is not observed for Rb. sphaeroides R-26 RCs and can be assigned to a transient bleaching of the Qy ground-state absorption band of the PhiB molecule. In the range of 740

  17. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  18. Stigmatellin Probes the Electrostatic Potential in the QB Site of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K.; Wraight, Colin A.; Sebban, Pierre; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp→Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu→Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (ΔpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (ΔpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AA+M44Asn→AA+M44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay. PMID:25606686

  19. Wave packet motions coupled to electron transfer in reaction centers of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Andrei G; Shkuropatova, Tatiana A; Vasilieva, Lyudmila G; Shkuropatov, Anatoli Ya; Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2008-08-01

    Transient absorption difference spectroscopy with approximately 20 femtosecond (fs) resolution was applied to study the time and spectral evolution of low-temperature (90 K) absorbance changes in isolated reaction centers (RCs) of Chloroflexus (C.) aurantiacus. In RCs, the composition of the B-branch chromophores is different with respect to that of purple bacterial RCs by occupying the B(B) binding site of accessory bacteriochlorophyll by bacteriopheophytin molecule (Phi(B)). It was found that the nuclear wave packet motion induced on the potential energy surface of the excited state of the primary electron donor P* by approximately 20 fs excitation leads to a coherent formation of the states P+Phi(B)(-) and P+B(A)(-) (B(A) is a bacteriochlorophyll monomer in the A-branch of cofactors). The processes were studied by measuring coherent oscillations in kinetics of the absorbance changes at 900 nm and 940 nm (P* stimulated emission), at 750 nm and 785 nm (Phi(B) absorption bands), and at 1,020-1028 nm (B(A)(-) absorption band). In RCs, the immediate bleaching of the P band at 880 nm and the appearance of the stimulated wave packet emission at 900 nm were accompanied (with a small delay of 10-20 fs) by electron transfer from P* to the B-branch with bleaching of the Phi(B) absorption band at 785 nm due to Phi(B)(-) formation. These data are consistent with recent measurements for the mutant HM182L Rb. sphaeroides RCs (Yakovlev et al., Biochim Biophys Acta 1757:369-379, 2006). Only at a delay of 120 fs was the electron transfer from P* to the A-branch observed with a development of the B(A)(-) absorption band at 1028 nm. This development was in phase with the appearance of the P* stimulated emission at 940 nm. The data on the A-branch electron transfer in C. aurantiacus RCs are consistent with those observed in native RCs of Rb. sphaeroides. The mechanism of charge separation in RCs with the modified B-branch pigment composition is discussed in terms of coupling between

  20. Stigmatellin Probes the Electrostatic Potential in the Q(B) Site of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K.; Wraight, Colin A.; Sebban, P; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-20

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp/Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu/Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (DpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (DpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AAþM44Asn/AAþM44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay.

  1. Stigmatellin probes the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K; Wraight, Colin A; Sebban, Pierre; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-20

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp → Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu → Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (ΔpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (ΔpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AA+M44Asn → AA+M44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay.

  2. Properties of a photonic crystal formed in a solution featuring the Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Rytik, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that a solution featuring the Briggs-Rauscher (BR) oscillating chemical reaction can exhibit the properties of a photonic crystal with alternating bandgap width. Thicknesses and dielectric permittivities of structural elements in the BR reaction solution have been determined by measuring the reflection and transmission spectra of microwave radiation in the range of 5-8 GHz.

  3. Aerosol-Forming Reactions of Glyoxal, Methylglyoxal and Amino Acids in Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haan, D. O.; Smith, K. W.; Stroik, D. R.; Corrigan, A. L.; Lee, F. E.; Phan, J. T.; Conley, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are two common aldehydes present in fog and cloud water. Amino acids are present in clouds at similar concentrations. Here we present bulk and aerosol mass spectroscopic data demonstrating that irreversible reactions between glyoxal and amino acids, triggered by droplet evaporation, produce N-derivatized imidazole compounds along with deeply colored Maillard reaction products. These reactions can occur in the dark and in the absence of oxidants. Reactions between methylglyoxal and amino acids produce analogous methylated products plus oligomers with masses up to m/z = 1000. These reactions, which go to completion on the 10-min-timescale of cloud processing, could be significant sources of secondary organic aerosol and humic-like substances (HULIS or brown carbon).

  4. The decay of hot nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A=45 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, B.

    1993-01-01

    The decay of hot nuclei formed in the reactions [sup 139]La + [sup 27]Al, [sup 51]V, [sup nat]Cu, and [sup 139]La were studied by the coincident detection of up to four complex fragments (Z > 3) emitted in these reactions. Fragments were characterized as to their atomic number, energy and in- and out-of-plane angles. The probability of the decay by an event of a given complex fragment multiplicity as a function of excitation energy per nucleon of the source is nearly independent of the system studied. Additionally, there is no large increase in the proportion of multiple fragment events as the excitation energy of the source increases past 5 MeV/nucleon. This is at odds with many prompt multifragmentation models of nuclear decay. The reactions [sup 139]La + [sup 27]Al, [sup 51]V, [sup nat]Cu were also studied by combining a dynamical model calculation that simulates the early stages of nuclear reactions with a statistical model calculation for the latter stages of the reactions. For the reaction [sup 139]La + [sup 27]Al, these calculations reproduced many of the experimental features, but other features were not reproduced. For the reaction [sup 139]La + [sup 51]V, the calculation failed to reproduce somewhat more of the experimental features. The calculation failed to reproduce any of the experimental features of the reaction [sup 139]La + [sup nat]Cu, with the exception of the source velocity distributions.

  5. DACS (Data and Analysis Center for Software) Conversion Data Collection Forms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Identify by block number) This product consists of three data collection forms to be used to describe con- version projects. The first form, the...Software System Overview Form is designed to capture data which describes the general nature of the conversion effort. The second form, the Detailed Resource...lower than a CPCG. It does not constitute an executable package . Software at this level is an individual subprogram which calls lower level subprograms

  6. Axially assembled photosynthetic reaction center mimics composed of tetrathiafulvalene, aluminum(iii) porphyrin and fullerene entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddutoori, Prashanth K.; Lim, Gary N.; Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Karr, Paul A.; Ito, Osamu; D'Souza, Francis; Pilkington, Melanie; van der Est, Art

    2015-07-01

    The distance dependence of sequential electron transfer has been studied in six, vertical, linear supramolecular triads, (TTF-Phn-py --> AlPor-Phm-C60, n = 0, 1 and m = 1, 2, 3), constructed using tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), aluminum(iii) porphyrin (AlPor) and fullerene (C60) entities. The C60 and TTF units are bound to the Al center on opposite faces of the porphyrin; the C60 through a covalent axial bond using a benzoate spacer, and the TTF through a coordination bond via an appended pyridine. Time-resolved optical and EPR spectroscopic methods and computational studies are used to demonstrate that excitation of the porphyrin leads to step-wise, sequential electron transfer (ET) between TTF and C60, and to study the electron transfer rates and exchange coupling between the components of the triads as a function of the bridge lengths. Femtosecond transient absorption studies show that the rates of charge separation, kCS are in the range of 109-1011 s-1, depending on the length of the bridges. The lifetimes of the charge-separated state TTF&z.rad;+-C&z.rad;-60 obtained from transient absorbance experiments and the singlet lifetimes of the radical pairs obtained by time-resolved EPR are in good agreement with each other and range from 60-130 ns in the triads. The time-resolved EPR data also show that population of the triplet sublevels of the charge-separated state in the presence of a magnetic field leads to much longer lifetimes of >1 μs. The data show that a modest stabilization of the charge separation lifetime occurs in the triads. The attenuation factor β = 0.36 Å-1 obtained from the exchange coupling values between TTF&z.rad;+ and C&z.rad;-60 is consistent with values reported in the literature for oligophenylene bridged TTF-C60 conjugates. The singlet charge recombination lifetime shows a much weaker dependence on the distance between the donor and acceptor, suggesting that a simple superexchange model is not sufficient to describe the back reaction

  7. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  8. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 10 (PERIODS 1-3): DAY CARE CENTER CHILD ACTIVITY DIARY AND FOOD SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form collects information on the child's activities at the day care center over the 48-hr monitoring period. The diary is divided into three time periods over the 48-monitoring interval. The Food Survey collects information on the frequency and types of frui...

  9. From Evaluation to Collaborative Reflection: Teacher Candidate Perceptions of a Digital Learner-Centered Classroom Observation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Raymond; Krutka, Daniel G.; Mason, Katherine; Bergman, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    In efforts to promote a more learner-centered approach to supervision, faculty members at a Midwestern U.S. university piloted a new digital classroom observation form. Participants included middle/secondary teacher candidates (N = 28) in their final semester of their programs. The overall goal of this study was to gather teacher candidates'…

  10. A Client Reaction Analysis: Final Report for the Lifelong Learning Center, Reading, Pa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William; Croyle, Guy E., Jr.

    The Lifelong Learning Center at the Reading Public Library conducted a study to determine how the clients perceived various aspects of the center's activities in terms of their needs and expectations. A survey was mailed to 329 clients; the response rate was 51%. Survey questions asked about (1) clients' satisfaction with access conditions, staff…

  11. A Client Reaction Analysis: Final Report for the Lifelong Learning Center, Reading, Pa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William; Croyle, Guy E., Jr.

    The Lifelong Learning Center at the Reading Public Library conducted a study to determine how the clients perceived various aspects of the center's activities in terms of their needs and expectations. A survey was mailed to 329 clients; the response rate was 51%. Survey questions asked about (1) clients' satisfaction with access conditions, staff…

  12. Direct Measurement of the Effective Rate Constant for Primary Charge Separation in Isolated Photosystem II Reaction Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S. R.; Seibert, M.; Govindjee; Wasielewski, M. R.

    1997-03-27

    Transient absorption measurements of the pheophytin a anion band and Qx band bleach region using preferential excitation of P680 are performed on isolated photosystem II reaction centers to determine the effective rate constant for charge separtion. A novel analysis of the Qx band bleach region explicity takes the changing background into account in order to directly measure the rate of growth of the bleach. Both spectral regions reveal biphasic kinetics, with a ca. (8 ps)-1 rate constant for the faster component, and a ca. (50 ps)-1 rate constant for the slower component. We propose that the fster component corresponds to the effective rate constant for charge separation from within the equilibrated reaction center core and provides a lower limit for the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The slower component corresponds to charge separation that is limited by slow energy transfer from a long-wavelength accessory chlorophyll a.

  13. Isolation of a photosystem II reaction center consisting of D-1 and D-2 polypeptides and cytochrome b-559

    SciTech Connect

    Nanba, O.; Satoh, K.

    1987-01-01

    A photosystem II reaction center complex consisting of D-1 and D-2 polypeptides and cytochrome b-559 was isolated from spinach grana thylakoids, treated with 4% (wt/vol) Triton X-100, by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl 650S. The isolated complex appears to contain five chlorophyll a, two pheophytin a, one ..beta..-carotene, and one or two cytochrome b-559 heme(s) (molar ratio) and exhibits a reversible absorbance change attributable to the photochemical accumulation of reduced pheophytin typical for the intermediary electron acceptor of photosystem II reaction center. These results strongly suggest that the site of primary charge separation in photosystem II is located on the heterodimer composed of D-1 and D-2 subunits.

  14. Basic character of rare earth metal alkoxides. Utilization in catalytic C-C bond-forming reactions and catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasai, H.; Suzuki, T.; Arai, S.

    1992-05-20

    In a recent paper, the authors reported that Zr(O-t-Bu){sub 4} was an efficient and convenient basic reagent in organic synthesis. However, all reactions examined were performed with stoichiometric quantities of the reagent. The authors envisioned that rare earth metal alkoxides would be stronger bases than group 4 metal alkoxides due to the lower ionization potential (ca. 5.4-6.4 eV) and the lower electronegativity (1.1-1.3) of rare earth elements; thus, the catalytic use of rare earth metal alkoxides in organic synthesis was expected. Although a variety of rare earth metal alkoxides have been prepared for the last three decades, to the authors knowledge, there have been few reports concerning the basicity of rare earth metal alkoxides. Herein, the authors report several carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions catalyzed by rare earth metal alkoxides and their application to a catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reaction.

  15. A reaction center-dependent photoprotection mechanism in a highly robust photosystem II from an extremophilic red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Krupnik, Tomasz; Kotabová, Eva; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Mazur, Radoslaw; Garstka, Maciej; Nixon, Peter J; Barber, James; Kaňa, Radek; Boekema, Egbert J; Kargul, Joanna

    2013-08-09

    Members of the rhodophytan order Cyanidiales are unique among phototrophs in their ability to live in extremely low pH levels and moderately high temperatures. The photosynthetic apparatus of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae represents an intermediate type between cyanobacteria and higher plants, suggesting that this alga may provide the evolutionary link between prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs. Although we now have a detailed structural model of photosystem II (PSII) from cyanobacteria at an atomic resolution, no corresponding structure of the eukaryotic PSII complex has been published to date. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a highly active and robust dimeric PSII complex from C. merolae. We show that this complex is highly stable across a range of extreme light, temperature, and pH conditions. By measuring fluorescence quenching properties of the isolated C. merolae PSII complex, we provide the first direct evidence of pH-dependent non-photochemical quenching in the red algal PSII reaction center. This type of quenching, together with high zeaxanthin content, appears to underlie photoprotection mechanisms that are efficiently employed by this robust natural water-splitting complex under excess irradiance. In order to provide structural details of this eukaryotic form of PSII, we have employed electron microscopy and single particle analyses to obtain a 17 Å map of the C. merolae PSII dimer in which we locate the position of the protein mass corresponding to the additional extrinsic protein stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex, PsbQ'. We conclude that this lumenal subunit is present in the vicinity of the CP43 protein, close to the membrane plane.

  16. A Reaction Center-dependent Photoprotection Mechanism in a Highly Robust Photosystem II from an Extremophilic Red Alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae*

    PubMed Central

    Krupnik, Tomasz; Kotabová, Eva; van Bezouwen, Laura S.; Mazur, Radosław; Garstka, Maciej; Nixon, Peter J.; Barber, James; Kaňa, Radek; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kargul, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Members of the rhodophytan order Cyanidiales are unique among phototrophs in their ability to live in extremely low pH levels and moderately high temperatures. The photosynthetic apparatus of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae represents an intermediate type between cyanobacteria and higher plants, suggesting that this alga may provide the evolutionary link between prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs. Although we now have a detailed structural model of photosystem II (PSII) from cyanobacteria at an atomic resolution, no corresponding structure of the eukaryotic PSII complex has been published to date. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a highly active and robust dimeric PSII complex from C. merolae. We show that this complex is highly stable across a range of extreme light, temperature, and pH conditions. By measuring fluorescence quenching properties of the isolated C. merolae PSII complex, we provide the first direct evidence of pH-dependent non-photochemical quenching in the red algal PSII reaction center. This type of quenching, together with high zeaxanthin content, appears to underlie photoprotection mechanisms that are efficiently employed by this robust natural water-splitting complex under excess irradiance. In order to provide structural details of this eukaryotic form of PSII, we have employed electron microscopy and single particle analyses to obtain a 17 Å map of the C. merolae PSII dimer in which we locate the position of the protein mass corresponding to the additional extrinsic protein stabilizing the oxygen-evolving complex, PsbQ′. We conclude that this lumenal subunit is present in the vicinity of the CP43 protein, close to the membrane plane. PMID:23775073

  17. Reduction of hip joint reaction force via medio-lateral foot center of pressure manipulation in bilateral hip osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Haim, Amir; Levin, Daniel; Elboim-Gabyzon, Michal; Rozen, Nimrod; Peled, Eli; Wolf, Alon

    2016-10-01

    Loading/excessive loading of the hip joint has been linked to onset and progression of hip osteoarthritis. Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation in the frontal plane has been previously shown in a cohort of healthy subjects to cause a specific gait adaption when the foot center of pressure trajectory was shifted medially, which thereby significantly reduced hip joint reaction force. The objective of the present study was to validate these results in a cohort of female bilateral hip osteoarthritis patients. Sixteen patients underwent gait analysis while using a footworn biomechanical device, allowing controlled foot center of pressure manipulation, in three para-sagittal configurations: medial, lateral, and neutral. Hip osteoarthritis patients exhibited similar results to those observed in healthy subjects in that a medial center of pressure led to an increase in inter-maleolar distance while step width (i.e., distance between right and left foot center of pressure) remained constant. This adaptation, which we speculate subjects adopt to maintain base of support, was associated with significantly greater hip abduction, significantly decreased hip adduction moment, and significantly reduced joint reaction force compared to the neutral and lateral configurations. Recommendations for treatment of hip osteoarthritis emphasize reduction of loads on the pathological joint(s) during daily activities and especially in gait. Our results show that a medially deviated center of pressure causes a reduction in hip joint reaction force. The present study does not prove, but rather suggests, clinical significance, and further investigation is required to assess clinical implications. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1762-1771, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Coupling of cytochrome and quinone turnovers in the photocycle of reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, S; Maróti, P

    1997-01-01

    A minimal kinetic model of the photocycle, including both quinone (Q-6) reduction at the secondary quinone-binding site and (mammalian) cytochrome c oxidation at the cytochrome docking site of isolated reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was elaborated and tested by cytochrome photooxidation under strong continuous illumination. The typical rate of photochemical excitation by a laser diode at 810 nm was 2.200 s-1, and the rates of stationary turnover of the reaction center (one-half of that of cytochrome photooxidation) were 600 +/- 70 s-1 at pH 6 and 400 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 8. The rate of turnover showed strong pH dependence, indicating the contribution of different rate-limiting processes. The kinetic limitation of the photocycle was attributed to the turnover of the cytochrome c binding site (pH < 6), light intensity and quinone/quinol exchange (6 < pH < 8), and proton-coupled second electron transfer in the quinone acceptor complex (pH > 8). The analysis of the double-reciprocal plot of the rate of turnover versus light intensity has proved useful in determining the light-independent (maximum) turnover rate of the reaction center (445 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 7.8). PMID:9251814

  19. Infrared spectroelectrochemistry of bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins: Implications for the binding of the pigments in the reaction center from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mäntele, W G; Wollenweber, A M; Nabedryk, E; Breton, J

    1988-11-01

    The IR spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll a and b cations and the bacteriopheophytin a and b anions were obtained by using an IR and optically transparent electrochemical cell. Prominent effects of radical formation on the vibrational spectra were found for bands assigned to the ester, keto, and acetyl C=O groups and for vibrations from macrocycle bonds. The (radical-minus-neutral) difference spectra are compared to the light-induced difference spectra of the primary donor photooxidation and the intermediary acceptor photoreduction in the reaction center of photosynthetic bacteria. Light-induced absorbance changes from bacteriochlorophyll a-containing reaction centers bear striking similarities to the electrochemically induced absorbance changes observed upon formation of bacteriochlorophyll a(+)in vitro. Comparison of the radical formation in vitro in a hydrogen-bonding or a nonhydrogen-bonding solvent suggests an ester C=O group hydrogen bonded in the neutral state but free in the cation state. For the keto C=O group, the same comparison indicates one free carbonyl group. The (anion-minus-neutral) difference spectra of bacteriopheophytin a and b exhibit a single band in the ester C=O frequency range. In contrast, two bands are observed in the difference spectra of the intermediary acceptor reduction in the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The higher frequency band exhibits a sensitivity to (1)H-(2)H exchange, which suggests a contribution from a protonated carboxyl group of an amino acid side chain.

  20. Determination of the primary charge separation rate in isolated photosystem II reaction centers with 500-fs time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G. ); Seibert, M. ); Govindjee )

    1989-01-01

    The authors have measured directly the rate of formation of the oxidized chlorophyll a electron donor (P680+) and the reduced electron acceptor pheophytin a{sup {minus}} (Pheoa{sup {minus}}) following excitation of isolated spinach photosystem II reaction centers at 4{degree}C. The reaction-center complex consists of D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, and cytochrome b-559 proteins and was prepared by a procedure that stabilizes the protein complex. Transient absorption difference spectra were measured from 440 to 850 nm as a function of time with 500-fs resolution following 610-nm laser excitation. The formation of P680+-Pheoa{sup {minus}} is indicated by the appearance of a band due to P680+ at 820 nm and corresponding absorbance changes at 505 and 540 nm due to formation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}. The appearance of the 820-nm band is monoexponential with {tau} = 3.0 {plus minus} 0.6 ps. Treatment of the photosystem II reaction centers with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen followed by exposure to laser excitation, conditions known to result in accumulation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}, results in formation of a transient absorption spectrum due to {sup 1*}P680. They find no evidence for an electron acceptor that precedes the formation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}.

  1. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy: A Form of Psychotherapy for Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Emily A.; Irwin, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed “meaning-centered psychotherapy.” In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas. PMID:25182513

  2. Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

    1978-01-01

    Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

  3. Neck-shortening effect on prosaccade reaction time formed through saccadic training accompanied by maintenance of neck flexion.

    PubMed

    Kunita, Kenji; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the effect of neck-shortening on prosaccade reaction time formed through saccadic training accompanied by maintenance of neck flexion. The subjects were 30 university students who exhibited no significant shortening of prosaccade reaction time during maintenance of neck flexion, assigned to three groups: prosaccade training subjects at rest neck position (rest training group); prosaccade training subjects at 20 degrees neck flexion position (neck training group); and untrained subjects (control group). Saccadic training for 1 min was performed ten times per day, and the training period was 14 days. For the control group, no significant postural or training effects on reaction time were found. For both training groups, reaction time at the rest position after training was significantly shorter than that before training. For the neck training group, reaction time after training was significantly shorter at the neck flexion position than at the rest position. Conversely, no significant neck effect was found for the rest training group. This indicates that the shortening effect associated with maintenance of neck flexion on prosaccade reaction time is formed through saccadic training accompanied by maintenance of neck flexion.

  4. Multiple Isomers of La(C4H6) Formed in Reactions of la Atom with Small Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenjin; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    La(C_4H_6) was observed from the reactions of laser-vaporized La atom with propene (CH_2CHCH_3),isobutene [CH_2C(CH_3)2],1-butyne (CHCC_2H_5), and 2-butyne (CH_3CCCH_3) in a metal cluster beam source and investigated by mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations and spectral simulations. La(cyclobutene) [La(CH_2CHCHCH_2)] and La(trimethylenemethane) [LaC(CH_2)_3] were identified from the La + propene reaction. The formation of the two isomers involves two steps: the first step is the reaction of La+ CH_2CHCH_3 with the products of La(CH_2) + C_2H_4, and the second step is the reaction of LaCH_2 + CH_2CHCH_3 which preduces La(C_4H_6) + H_2. For the La + isobutene reaction, La(trimethylenemethane) was formed by dehydrogenation. For the reaction of La + 1- and 2-butynes, preliminary data analysis suggested that La(C_4H_6) was formed by simple association. All these structural isomers have similar geometries in the neutral and singly charged ion states, as evidenced by the very strong origin bands and short Franck-Condon profiles in the MATI spectra.

  5. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  6. Transition state in the carbonyl-forming elimination reaction of alkyl nitrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwart, H.; George, T.J.; Horgan, A.G.; Lin, Y.T.

    1981-04-24

    The title reaction, now found to involve proton tunneling with base catalysis and a cyclic, nonlinear proton transfer in the uncatalyzed gas-phase process, cannot have (as previously formulated) an E/sub CO/2 mechanism.

  7. Venus trough-and-ridge tessera - Analog to earth oceanic crust formed at spreading centers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The similarity between the morphologies of Venus trough-and-ridge tessera and the earth's ocean floor is discussed. The hypothesis that tessera texture might be related to a crustal fabric produced at spreading centers is examined. It is suggested that the proccesses that produce the ocean floor fabric on earth are good candidates for the origin and production of the trough-and-ridge tessera. To support this hypothesis, the characteristics of the trough-and-ridge terrain in Laima Tessera are described and compared to the seafloor at spreading centers.

  8. Domino Michael-Michael and Aldol-Aldol Reactions: Diastereoselective Synthesis of Functionalized Cyclohexanone Derivatives Containing Quaternary Carbon Center.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Manas K; Halder, Sandipan; Das, Subhomoy

    2015-10-02

    A simple strategy for the synthesis of highly functionalized cyclohexanone derivatives containing an all-carbon quaternary center from α-(aryl/alkyl)methylidene-β-keto esters or β-diketones via a K-enolate mediated domino Michael-Michael reaction sequence with moderate to good yield and excellent diastereoselectivity (de > 99%) is described. Interestingly, Li-base mediated reaction of α-arylmethylidene-β-diketones affords functionalized 3,5-dihydroxy cyclohexane derivatives as the kinetically controlled products via a domino aldol-aldol reaction sequence with excellent diastereoselectivity. Li-enolates of the β-keto esters or β-diketones undergo facile domino Michael-Michael reaction with nitro-olefins to afford the corresponding nitrocyclohexane derivatives in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivity (de > 99%). The formation of the products and the observed stereoselectivity were explained by plausible mechanisms and supported by extensive computational study. An asymmetric version of the protocol was explored with (L)-menthol derived nonracemic substrates, and the corresponding nonracemic cyclohexanone derivatives containing an all-carbon quaternary center were obtained with excellent stereoselectivity (de, ee > 99%).

  9. Acetic acid promoted metal-free aerobic carbon-carbon bond forming reactions at α-position of tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Kei; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2014-08-15

    The oxidative functionalization of the benzylic C-H bonds in tetrahydroisoquinolines and tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives was investigated. C-C bond forming reactions proceeded with a range of nucleophiles (nitroalkane, enol silyl ether, indole, allylstannane, and tetrabutylammonium cyanide) under metal-free conditions and an oxygen atmosphere. Acetic acid caused a significant acceleration effect.

  10. INTEGRATED LABORATORY AND FIELD CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN PM 2.5 FORMED THROUGH CHEMICAL REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated laboratory and field research program is underway at the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) to characterize organic carbon in PM2.5 (particulate matter) formed through chemical reactions. Information from this study will provide critical data ne...

  11. Solid-Phase Reactions of D with CN to Form DNC and DCN at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, K.; Ushiama, S.; Enoura, T.; Unagiike, H.; Mochizuki, N.; Wada, A.

    2006-06-01

    A mixed gas of N2/HCN (50/1) at a few torr was activated by a direct current discharge and was deposited on a gold-plated copper substrate at 10, 15, and 20 K. During the deposition of plasma-activated sample gas, D atoms produced by the direct current discharge of D2 were simultaneously sprayed over the solid film. The association reactions of CN with D at 10 K were found to generate DNC and DCN with an intensity ratio DNC/DCN of about 3 in the infrared absorption spectra. This high ratio is in line with the high abundance ratios of HNC/HCN observed in the dark clouds. The formation of DNC and DCN became negligible at 20 K, due to the decrease of the sticking probability of D atoms on the solid surface. Ammonia was not detected as a reaction product from reaction of D with N atoms trapped in the N2 matrix.

  12. Opening of Aryl-Substituted Epoxides to form Quaternary Stereogenic Centers: Synthesis of (−)-Mesembrine

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Douglass F.; He, Yigang

    2011-01-01

    Cycloalkanones are easily converted into aryl-substituted cyclic alkenes by the addition of an aryl Grignard reagent followed by dehydration. These alkenes are good substrates for asymmetric epoxidation. We have found that the addition of allylic and benzylic Grignard reagents can occur preferentially at the benzylic position of the derived epoxides, to give the quaternary stereogenic center. This approach led to a short synthesis of the nanomolar serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (−)-mesembrine. PMID:16149803

  13. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect

    Delis, Dimitrios Nicholas

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A 197Au + 12C, 27Al, 51V, natCu, and 197Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  14. Puffy pink clouds form a canopy over the Space Shuttle Endeavour as processing continues in the Mate-Demate Device at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-12-07

    Puffy pink clouds form a canopy over the Space Shuttle Endeavour as processing continues in the Mate-Demate Device at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in preparation for its ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center.

  15. In Pursuit of an Ideal C-C Bond-Forming Reaction

    PubMed Central

    RajanBabu, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts to introduce the highly versatile vinyl group into other organic molecules in a chemo-, regio- and stereoselective fashion via catalytic activation of ethylene provided challenging opportunities to explore new ligand and salt effects in homogeneous catalysis. This review provides a personal account of the development of enantioselective reactions involving ethylene. PMID:19606231

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CASO4 FORMED BY REACTION OF CAO AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The injection of calcium-based sorbents into coal-fired boilers for reaction with, and reduction in the levels of, sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the flue gas has undergone considerable research and development. Significant effort has also been made in developing models for the overall ...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CASO4 FORMED BY REACTION OF CAO AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The injection of calcium-based sorbents into coal-fired boilers for reaction with, and reduction in the levels of, sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the flue gas has undergone considerable research and development. Significant effort has also been made in developing models for the overall ...

  18. Electron transfer kinetics in purified reaction centers from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum studied by multiple-flash excitation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, N; Sétif, P; Brettel, K; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    1999-09-14

    Reaction center preparations from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, which contain monoheme cytochrome c, were studied by flash-absorption spectroscopy in the near-UV, visible, and near-infrared regions. The decay kinetics of the photooxidized primary donor P840(+), together with the amount of photooxidized cytochrome c, were analyzed along a series of four flashes spaced by 1 ms: 95% of the P840(+) was reduced by cytochrome c with a t(1/2) of approximately 65 micros after the first flash, 80% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the second flash, and 23% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the third flash; after the fourth flash, almost no cytochrome c oxidation occurred. The observed rates, the establishment of redox equilibrium after each flash, and the total amount of photooxidizable cytochrome c are consistent with the presence of two equivalent cytochrome c molecules per photooxidizable P840. The data are well fitted assuming a standard free energy change DeltaG degrees of -53 meV for electron transfer from one cytochrome c to P840(+), DeltaG degrees being independent of the oxidation state of the other cytochrome c. These observations support a model with two monoheme cytochromes c which are symmetrically arranged around the reaction center core. From the ratio of menaquinone-7 to the bacteriochlorophyll pigment absorbing at 663 nm, it was estimated that our preparations contain 0.6-1.2 menaquinone-7 molecules per reaction center. However, no transient signal due to menaquinone could be observed between 360 and 450 nm in the time window from 10 ns to 4 micros. No recombination reaction between the primary partners P840(+) and A(0)(-) could be detected under normal conditions. Such a recombination was observed (t(1/2) approximately 19 ns) under highly reducing conditions or after accumulation of three electrons on the acceptor side during a series of flashes, showing that the secondary acceptors can stabilize three electrons

  19. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Diborane with 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley; Allen, Harrison, Jr.

    1953-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with 1,3-butadiene was found to be 18,700+/-150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 19,075+/-150 Btu per pound. Since this value is approximately the same as the heat of combustion of butadiene, it seems certain that the material is partially oxidized.

  20. On molecular origin of mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes in the ozone forming recombination reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Mikhail V.; Babikov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical treatment of ozone forming reaction is developed within the framework of mixed quantum/classical dynamics. Formation and stabilization steps of the energy transfer mechanism are both studied, which allows simultaneous capture of the delta zero-point energy effect and η-effect and identification of the molecular level origin of mass-independent isotope fractionation. The central role belongs to scattering resonances; dependence of their lifetimes on rotational excitation, asymmetry; and connection of their vibrational wave functions to two different reaction channels. Calculations, performed within the dimensionally reduced model of ozone, are in semiquantitative agreement with experiment. PMID:23431175

  1. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene and Diborane (LFPL-CZ-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction acetylene and diborane was found to be 20,100 +/- 100 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and chemical analyses both of the sample and of the combustion products indicated combustion in the bomb calorimeter to have been 97 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,700 +/- 100 Btu per pound.

  2. Influence of Surface and Bulk Water Ice on the Reactivity of a Water-forming Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberts, Thanja; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    On the surface of icy dust grains in the dense regions of the interstellar medium, a rich chemistry can take place. Due to the low temperature, reactions that proceed via a barrier can only take place through tunneling. The reaction {{H}}+{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}2\\longrightarrow {{{H}}}2{{O}}+{OH} is such a case with a gas-phase barrier of ∼26.5 kJ mol‑1. Still, the reaction is known to be involved in water formation on interstellar grains. Here, we investigate the influence of a water ice surface and of bulk ice on the reaction rate constant. Rate constants are calculated using instanton theory down to 74 K. The ice is taken into account via multiscale modeling, describing the reactants and the direct surrounding at the quantum mechanical level with density functional theory (DFT), while the rest of the ice is modeled on the molecular mechanical level with a force field. We find that H2O2 binding energies cannot be captured by a single value, but rather they depend on the number of hydrogen bonds with surface molecules. In highly amorphous surroundings, the binding site can block the routes of attack and impede the reaction. Furthermore, the activation energies do not correlate with the binding energies of the same sites. The unimolecular rate constants related to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism increase as the activation energy decreases. Thus, we provide a lower limit for the rate constant and argue that rate constants can have values up to two order of magnitude larger than this limit.

  3. More than Smile Sheets: Rasch Analysis of Training Reactions in a Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLinden, Daniel; Boone, William John

    2009-01-01

    Reaction questionnaires administered at the conclusion of a training program are a common method of evaluation. Because such questionnaires are often constructed and analyzed in an ad hoc manner, their usefulness is often difficult to gauge. However, if properly constructed and analyzed, such instruments can help to make clear the strengths and…

  4. Enantioselective Palladium-Catalyzed Alkenylation of Trisubstituted Alkenols to form Allylic Quaternary Centers

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harshkumar H.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe the generation of remote allylic quaternary stereocenters β, γ, and δ relative to a carbonyl in high enantioselectivity. We utilize a redox-relay Heck reaction between alkenyl triflates and acyclic trisubstituted alkenols of varying chain-lengths. A wide array of terminal (E)-alkenyl triflates are suitable for this process. The utility of this functionalization is validated further by conversion of the products, via simple organic processes to access remotely functionalized chiral tertiary acid, amine and alcohol products. PMID:27768842

  5. Improvement of fluorescence intensity of nitrogen vacancy centers in self-formed diamond microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Furuyama, S.; Yaita, J.; Kondo, M.; Tahara, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Shimizu, M.; Kodera, T.; Hatano, M.

    2015-10-19

    We present umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures with metal mirrors at the bottom in order to improve the amount of collected photons from nitrogen vacancy centers. The metal mirrors at the bottom are self-aligned to the umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures which are selectively grown through holes created on a metal mask. By the finite-difference time-domain simulations, we found that the umbrella-shaped microstructures, which have an effect similar to solid immersion lens, could collect photons more efficiently than bulk or pillar-shaped microstructures. Improvement of the fluorescence intensity by factors of from 3 to 5 is shown experimentally.

  6. The decay of hot nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A=45 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    The decay of hot nuclei formed in the reactions 139La + 27Al, 51V, natCu, and 139La were studied by the coincident detection of up to four complex fragments (Z > 3) emitted in these reactions. Fragments were characterized as to their atomic number, energy and in- and out-of-plane angles. The probability of the decay by an event of a given complex fragment multiplicity as a function of excitation energy per nucleon of the source is nearly independent of the system studied. Additionally, there is no large increase in the proportion of multiple fragment events as the excitation energy of the source increases past 5 MeV/nucleon. This is at odds with many prompt multifragmentation models of nuclear decay. The reactions 139La + 27Al, 51V, natCu were also studied by combining a dynamical model calculation that simulates the early stages of nuclear reactions with a statistical model calculation for the latter stages of the reactions. For the reaction 139La + 27Al, these calculations reproduced many of the experimental features, but other features were not reproduced. For the reaction 139La + 51V, the calculation failed to reproduce somewhat more of the experimental features. The calculation failed to reproduce any of the experimental features of the reaction 139La + natCu, with the exception of the source velocity distributions.

  7. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    PubMed

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  8. Cosmic Rays are originated in Astronomical Jets formed at the Galaxy center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    The Particles emerging from Astronomical Jets will have sufficient velocities and they will have direction perpendicular to Galaxy center. As the central plane of Galaxies will have different orientations the directions of astronomical jet also vary. There can be many origins for the Cosmic rays, but this can be another source. This is another result from Dynamic Universe Model. It solves new problems like a. Variable Mass Rocket Trajectory Problem b. Explaining Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations c. Astronomical jets observed from Milkyway Center d. Prediction of Blue shifted Galaxies To support Dynamic Universe Model the we can find the following supporting observations a.Mathematical Prediction of Existence of Blue shifted Galaxies b. SN1987A- Neutrino emission c. The first Redshifted Quasar 3C273 is blue shifted. (Supporting Existence of Blue Shifted Galaxies): d.The most distant Quasar eso1122 found to have a Blue Shift of 0.110473 (Supporting Existence of Blue Shifted Galaxies) Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step

  9. Joining of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramics by Reaction Forming Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Kiser, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the development and testing of silicon-based ceramics and composite components for a number of aerospace and ground based systems. The designs often require fabrication of complex shaped parts which can be quite expensive. One attractive way of achieving this goal is to build up complex shapes by joining together geometrically simple shapes. However, the joints should have good mechanical strength and environmental stability comparable to the bulk materials. These joints should also be able to maintain their structural integrity at high temperatures. In addition, the joining technique should be practical, reliable, and affordable. Thus, joining has been recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of silicon carbide based ceramic components in high temperature applications. Overviews of various joining techniques, i.e., mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, welding, brazing, and soldering have been provided in recent publications. The majority of the techniques used today are based on the joining of monolithic ceramics with metals either by diffusion bonding, metal brazing, brazing with oxides and oxynitrides, or diffusion welding. These techniques need either very high temperatures for processing or hot pressing (high pressures). The joints produced by these techniques have different thermal expansion coefficients than the ceramic materials, which creates a stress concentration in the joint area. The use temperatures for these joints are around 700 C. Ceramic joint interlayers have been developed as a means of obtaining high temperature joints. These joint interlayers have been produced via pre-ceramic polymers, in-situ displacement reactions, and reaction bonding techniques. Joints produced by the pre-ceramic polymer approach exhibit a large amounts of porosity and poor mechanical properties. On the other hand, hot pressing or high pressures are needed for in-situ displacement

  10. Collision Dynamics of O(3P) + DMMP Using a Specific Reaction Parameters Potential Form

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-27

    renewed interest in the fundamental chemistry of nerve agents such as sarin and VX and their main simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP).1−8 For... carbon , 12 AM1 Figure 1. Major collisional reactions for DMMP + O(3P): (1) and (2) hydrogen abstraction; (3) and (4) hydrogen elimination; (5) and (6...optimized, and for hydrogen 5 AM1 parameters are optimized. Therefore there are 41 (12*(phosphorus, oxygen, and carbon ) + 5 hydrogen) AM1 parameters

  11. Thermal heterocyclization of methyl aryl ketazines. 2. Reactions of tautomeric enehydrazine form

    SciTech Connect

    Shurukhin, Yu.V.; Klyuev, N.A.; Grandberg, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Over the temperature range 220-280C the thermal reactions of methyl aryl ketazines (Ar = C6H5-, 4-CH3OC6H4-, and -naphthyl-) proceed with their cyclization to give pyrazoline and benzodiazepine derivatives. With an increase in temperature to 320-350C the subsequent transformations of these compounds lead to the formation of substituted pyrazoles, 1-methyl-1,2-diarylcyclopropanes isomeric olefins, low-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbons, and isoquionlines.

  12. Fission fragment mass distributions in reactions forming the {sup 213}Fr compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Appannababu, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Deshmukh, N. N.; Rath, P. K.; Singh, N. L.; Nayak, B. K.; Thomas, R. G.; Choudhury, R. K.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Negi, D.; Prasad, E.

    2011-03-15

    The fission fragment mass angle correlations and mass ratio distributions have been investigated for the two systems {sup 16}O+{sup 197}Au and {sup 27}Al+{sup 186}W, leading to the same compound nucleus {sup 213}Fr around the Coulomb barrier energies. Systematic analysis of the variance of the mass distributions as a function of temperature and angular momentum suggests true compound nuclear fission for both the reactions, indicating the absence of nonequilibrium fission processes.

  13. Analysis of the Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Complex-Forming Bimolecular Reaction CH3OCH3 + Fe(.).

    PubMed

    Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Martinez, Oscar; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Troe, Jürgen; Viggiano, Albert

    2016-07-14

    The kinetics of the reaction CH3OCH3 + Fe(+) has been studied between 250 and 600 K in the buffer gas He at pressures between 0.4 and 1.6 Torr. Total rate constants and branching ratios for the formation of Fe(+)O(CH3)2 adducts and of Fe(+)OCH2 + CH4 products were determined. Quantum-chemical calculations provided the parameters required for an analysis in terms of statistical unimolecular rate theory. The analysis employed a recently developed simplified representation of the rates of complex-forming bimolecular reactions, separating association and chemical activation contributions. Satisfactory agreement between experimental results and kinetic modeling was obtained that allows for an extrapolation of the data over wide ranges of conditions. Possible reaction pathways with or without spin-inversion are discussed in relation to the kinetic modeling results.

  14. Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Jie Song Xubo; Zhang Yaohua; Li Yan; Li Xingguo; Pu Yikang

    2007-01-15

    Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by simply heating aluminum nanoparticles in ammonia at 1000 deg. C. The as-synthesized sphere shells are polycrystalline with cavity diameters ranging from 15 to 100 nm and shell thickness from 5 to 15 nm. The formation mechanism can be explained by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, which results from the difference in diffusion rates between aluminum and nitrogen. The Al nanoparticles served as both reactant and templates for the hollow sphere formation. The effects of precursor particle size and temperature were also investigated in terms of product morphology. Room temperature cathode luminescence spectrum of the nanosized hollow spheres showed a broad emission band centered at 415 nm, which is originated from oxygen related luminescence centers. The hollow structure survived a 4-h heat treatment at 1200 deg. C, exhibiting excellent thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by nitridation of aluminum nanoparticles at 1000 deg. C using ammonia.

  15. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 07: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER POST-MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to provide information on the child's daily activities and potential exposures to pollutants at their homes. It includes questions on chemicals applied and cigarettes smoked at the home over the 48-hr monitoring period. It also collects informati...

  16. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 07: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER POST-MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to provide information on the child's daily activities and potential exposures to pollutants at their homes. It includes questions on chemicals applied and cigarettes smoked at the home over the 48-hr monitoring period. It also collects informati...

  17. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify eligible preschool children who attend day care during the day and recruit them into the study.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate ex...

  18. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 01: RECRUITMENT SURVEY FOR DAY CARE CENTER SAMPLE SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data collection form is used to identify eligible preschool children who attend day care during the day and recruit them into the study.

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate ex...

  19. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  20. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE.

    PubMed

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  1. Principal component analysis in ground reaction forces and center of pressure gait waveforms of people with transfemoral amputation.

    PubMed

    Soares, Denise Paschoal; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Mendes, Emilia Assunção; Machado, Leandro

    2016-12-01

    The alterations in gait pattern of people with transfemoral amputation leave them more susceptible to musculoskeletal injury. Principal component analysis is a method that reduces the amount of gait data and allows analyzing the entire waveform. To use the principal component analysis to compare the ground reaction force and center of pressure displacement waveforms obtained during gait between able-bodied subjects and both limbs of individuals with transfemoral amputation. This is a transversal study with a convenience sample. We used a force plate and pressure plate to record the anterior-posterior, medial-lateral and vertical ground reaction force, and anterior-posterior and medial-lateral center of pressure positions of 12 participants with transfemoral amputation and 20 able-bodied subjects during gait. The principal component analysis was performed to compare the gait waveforms between the participants with transfemoral amputation and the able-bodied individuals. The principal component analysis model explained between 74% and 93% of the data variance. In all ground reaction force and center of pressure waveforms relevant portions were identified; and always at least one principal component presented scores statistically different (p < 0.05) between the groups of participants in these relevant portions. Principal component analysis was able to discriminate many portions of the stance phase between both lower limbs of people with transfemoral amputation compared to the able-bodied participants. Principal component analysis reduced the amount of data, allowed analyzing the whole waveform, and identified specific sub-phases of gait that were different between the groups. Therefore, this approach seems to be a powerful tool to be used in gait evaluation and following the rehabilitation status of people with transfemoral amputation. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  2. Decay analysis of compound nuclei with masses A ≈30 - 200 formed in reactions involving loosely bound projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Singh, BirBikram; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of compound nuclei formed in the reactions using loosely bound projectiles are analyzed within the framework of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and Collaborators. We have considered the reactions with neutron-rich and neutron-deficient projectiles, respectively, as 7Li , 9Be , and 7Be , on various targets at three different Elab energies, forming compound nuclei in the mass region A ˜30 - 200. For these reactions, the contributions of light-particle (LP, A ≤4 ) cross sections σLP, energetically favored intermediate-mass-fragment (IMF, 5 ≤A2≤20 ) cross sections σIMF, as well as the fusion-fission ff cross sections σff constitute the σfus(=σLP+σIMF+σff ), i.e., the contributions of the emitted LPs, IMFs, and ff fragments are added for all the angular momenta up to the ℓmax value for the respective reactions. Interestingly, we find that the empirically fitted neck-length parameter Δ Remp , the only parameter of the DCM, is uniquely fixed to address σfus for all the reactions having the same loosely bound projectile at a chosen incident laboratory energy. It may be noted that, in DCM, the dynamical collective mass motion of preformed LPs, IMFs, and ff fragments or clusters, through the modified interaction potential barrier, are treated on parallel footing. The modification of the barrier is due to nonzero Δ Remp , and the values of corresponding modified interaction-barrier heights Δ VBemp for such reactions are almost of the same order, specifically at the respective ℓmax value.

  3. Synthetic Antenna Functioning As Light Harvester in the Whole Visible Region for Enhanced Hybrid Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    PubMed

    Hassan Omar, Omar; la Gatta, Simona; Tangorra, Rocco Roberto; Milano, Francesco; Ragni, Roberta; Operamolla, Alessandra; Argazzi, Roberto; Chiorboli, Claudio; Agostiano, Angela; Trotta, Massimo; Farinola, Gianluca M

    2016-07-20

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterium has been covalently bioconjugated with a NIR-emitting fluorophore (AE800) whose synthesis was specifically tailored to act as artificial antenna harvesting light in the entire visible region. AE800 has a broad absorption spectrum with peaks centered in the absorption gaps of the RC and its emission overlaps the most intense RC absorption bands, ensuring a consistent increase of the protein optical cross section. The covalent hybrid AE800-RC is stable and fully functional. The energy collected by the artificial antenna is transferred to the protein via FRET mechanism, and the hybrid system outperforms by a noteworthy 30% the overall photochemical activity of the native protein under the entire range of visible light. This improvement in the optical characteristic of the photoenzyme demonstrates the effectiveness of the bioconjugation approach as a suitable route to new biohybrid materials for energy conversion, photocatalysis, and biosensing.

  4. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  5. Bio-nanocomposite Photoelectrode Composed of the Bacteria Photosynthetic Reaction Center Entrapped on a Nanocrystalline TiO2 Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidong; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Jingjing; Xu, Chunhe; Liu, Baohong; Kong, Jilie

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of bio-nanocomposite photoelectrode was fabricated through direct immobilization of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) proteins on a nanocrystalline TiO2 matrix prepared by anodic electrodeposition. The near-infrared (NIR)-visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectra displayed that structure and activity of the RC remained unaltered on the nano-TiO2 film surface. High efficient light-harvesting of the NIR light energy by RC contributed to the distinct enhancement of the photoelectric conversion on such nanoporous matrix, which would provide a new strategy to develop versatile biomimic energy convertors or photoelectric sensors.

  6. Evidence of cross-cutting and redox reaction in Khatyrka meteorite reveals metallic-Al minerals formed in outer space.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaney; Hollister, Lincoln S; MacPherson, Glenn J; Bindi, Luca; Ma, Chi; Andronicos, Christopher L; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2017-05-09

    We report on a fragment of the quasicrystal-bearing CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Khatyrka recovered from fine-grained, clay-rich sediments in the Koryak Mountains, Chukotka (Russia). We show higher melting-point silicate glass cross-cutting lower melting-point Al-Cu-Fe alloys, as well as unambiguous evidence of a reduction-oxidation reaction history between Al-Cu-Fe alloys and silicate melt. The redox reactions involve reduction of FeO and SiO2 to Fe and Fe-Si metal, and oxidation of metallic Al to Al2O3, occurring where silicate melt was in contact with Al-Cu-Fe alloys. In the reaction zone, there are metallic Fe and Fe-Si beads, aluminous spinel rinds on the Al-Cu-Fe alloys, and Al2O3 enrichment in the silicate melt surrounding the alloys. From this and other evidence, we demonstrate that Khatyrka must have experienced at least two distinct events: first, an event as early as 4.564 Ga in which the first Al-Cu-Fe alloys formed; and, second, a more recent impact-induced shock in space that led to transformations of and reactions between the alloys and the meteorite matrix. The new evidence firmly establishes that the Al-Cu-Fe alloys (including quasicrystals) formed in outer space in a complex, multi-stage process.

  7. Global sensitivity of aviation NOx effects to the HNO3-forming channel of the HO2 + NO reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschaldt, K.; Voigt, C.; Jöckel, P.; Righi, M.; Deckert, R.; Dietmüller, S.

    2013-03-01

    The impact of a recently proposed HNO3-forming channel of the HO2 + NO reaction on atmospheric ozone, methane and their precursors is assessed with the aim to investigate its effects on aviation NOx induced radiative forcing. The first part of the study addresses the differences in stratospheric and tropospheric HOx-NOx chemistry in general, by comparing a global climate simulation without the above reaction to two simulations with different rate coefficient parameterizations for HO2 + NO → HNO3. A possible enhancement of the reaction by humidity, as found by a laboratory study, particularly reduces the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, increasing methane lifetime significantly. Since methane lifetime is an important parameter for determining global methane budgets, this might affect estimates of the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. In the second part aviation NOx effects are isolated independently for each of the three above simulations. Warming and cooling effects of aircraft NOx emissions are both enhanced when considering the HNO3-forming channel, but the sum is shifted towards negative radiative forcing. Uncertainties associated with the inclusion of the HO2 + NO → HNO3 reaction and with its corresponding rate coefficient propagate a considerable additional uncertainty on estimates of the climate impact of aviation and on NOx-related mitigation strategies.

  8. Serratia marcescens strains implicated in adverse transfusion reactions form biofilms in platelet concentrates and demonstrate reduced detection by automated culture.

    PubMed

    Greco-Stewart, V S; Brown, E E; Parr, C; Kalab, M; Jacobs, M R; Yomtovian, R A; Ramírez-Arcos, S M

    2012-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in adverse transfusion reactions associated with contaminated platelet concentrates. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the ability of S. marcescens to form surface-attached aggregates (biofilms) could account for contaminated platelet units being missed during screening by the BacT/ALERT automated culture system. Seven S. marcescens strains, including biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative control strains and five isolates recovered from contaminated platelet concentrates, were grown in enriched Luria-Bertani medium and in platelets. Biofilm formation was examined by staining assay, dislodging experiments and scanning electron microscopy. Clinical strains were also analysed for their ability to evade detection by the BacT/ALERT system. All strains exhibited similar growth in medium and platelets. While only the biofilm-positive control strain formed biofilms in medium, this strain and three clinical isolates associated with transfusion reactions formed biofilms in platelet concentrates. The other two clinical strains, which had been captured during platelet screening by BacT/ALERT, failed to form biofilms in platelets. Biofilm-forming clinical isolates were approximately three times (P<0·05) more likely to be missed by BacT/ALERT screening than biofilm-negative strains. S. marcescens strains associated with transfusion reactions form biofilms under platelet storage conditions, and initial biofilm formation correlates with missed detection of contaminated platelet concentrates by the BacT/ALERT system. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. Steric congestion at, and proximity to, a ferrous center leads to hydration of α-nitrile substituents forming coordinated carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Thallaj, Nasser K; Orain, Pierre-Yves; Thibon, Aurore; Sandroni, Martina; Welter, Richard; Mandon, Dominique

    2014-08-04

    The question of the conversion of nitrile groups into amides (nitrile hydration) by action of water in mild and eco-compatible conditions and in the presence of iron is addressed in this article. We come back to the only known example of hydration of a nitrile function into carboxamide by a ferrous [Fe(II)] center in particularly mild conditions and very efficiently and demonstrate that these unusual conditions result from the occurrence of steric stress at the reaction site and formation of a more stable end product. Two bis(cyano-substituted) (tris 2-pyridyl methyl amine) ligands have been prepared, and the structures of the corresponding FeCl2 complexes are reported, both in the solid state and in solution. These two ligands only differ by the position of the nitrile group on the tripod in the α and β position, respectively, with respect to the pyridine nitrogen. In any case, intramolecular coordination is impossible. Upon action of water, the nitrile groups are hydrated however only if they are located in the α position. The fact that the β-substituted β-(NC)2TPAFeCl2 complex is not water sensitive suggests that the reaction proceeds in an intramolecular way at the vicinity of the metal center. In the bis α-substituted α-(NC)2TPAFeCl2 complex, both functions are converted in a very clean fashion, pointing out that this complex exhibits ligand flexibility and is not deactivated after the first hydration. At a preparative scale, this reaction allows the one-pot conversion of the bis(cyano-substituted) tripod into a bis(amido-substituted) one in particularly mild conditions with a very good yield. Additionally, the XRD structure of a ferric compound in which the two carboxamido ligands are bound to the metal in a seven-coordinate environment is reported.

  10. Glycopolymers Prepared by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization Followed by Glycoconjugation Using a Triazole-Forming "Click" Reaction.

    PubMed

    Okoth, Ronald; Basu, Amit

    2016-01-01

    We describe a protocol for the preparation of glycopolymers derived from the ring-opening polymerization of a norbornene carboxylic acid derivative. Polymerization is followed by attachment of a linker and subsequent glycoconjugation via a triazole-forming azide-alkyne click reaction. The use of a protected amine-terminating agent allows for the attachment of a probe molecule such as a fluorescein dye. The syntheses of a neutral galactopolymer as well a polyanionic poly-3-O-sulfo-galactopolymer are described.

  11. Thiamine inhibits formation of dityrosine, a specific marker of oxidative injury, in reactions catalyzed by oxoferryl forms of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Stepuro, A I; Adamchuk, R I; Oparin, A Yu; Stepuro, I I

    2008-09-01

    Effects of thiamine and its derivatives on inhibition of dityrosine formation were studied in reactions catalyzed by oxoferryl forms of hemoglobin. At high thiamine concentrations, a complete inhibition of dityrosine formation was observed due to interaction of tyrosyl radicals with thiamine tricyclic and thiol forms. In neutral and alkaline media, tyrosyl radicals oxidized thiamine to thiochrome, oxodihydrothiochrome, and thiamine disulfide. In the absence of tyrosine, oxoferryl forms of hemoglobin manifested peroxidase activity towards thiamine and its phosphate esters by inducing their oxidation to disulfide compounds, thiochrome, oxodihydrothiochrome, and their phosphate esters, respectively, in neutral media. Thiamine and its phosphate esters were oxidized by both oxoferryl forms of hemoglobin, viz., +*Hb(IV=O) (compound I with an additional radical on the globin) and Hb(IV=O) (compound II). Putative mechanisms of thiamine conversions under oxidative stress and the protective role of hydrophobic thiamine metabolites are discussed.

  12. A DFT study on the reaction pathways for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions between propargylic alcohols and alkenes or ketones catalyzed by thiolate-bridged diruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ken; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-05

    The reaction pathways of two types of the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions catalyzed by thiolate-bridged diruthenium complexes have been investigated by density-functional-theory calculations. It is clarified that both carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions proceed through a ruthenium-allenylidene complex as a common reactive intermediate. The attack of pi electrons on propene or the vinyl alcohol on the ruthenium-allenylidene complex is the first step of the reaction pathways. The reaction pathways are different after the attack of nucleophiles on the ruthenium-alkynyl complex. In the reaction with propene, the carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction proceeds through a stepwise process, whereas in the reaction with vinyl alcohol, it proceeds through a concerted process. The interactions between the ruthenium-allenylidene complex and propene or vinyl alcohol have been investigated by applying a simple way of looking at orbital interactions.

  13. Study of the racemization observed in the amide bond forming reaction on silica gel.

    PubMed

    Norick, Amanda L; Li, Tingyu

    2005-01-01

    Racemization resulting from the coupling of N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)-L-leucine and 3-aminopropyl silica gel with several amide-coupling reagents is further investigated in order to explain the much higher degree of racemization on silica gel, as compared with the similar reaction in solution. Based on experiments using different types of solid supports, limited pore access and surface microchemical environment are ruled out as the possible reason for the higher degree of racemization that occurred on silica gel. Steric hindrance of the solid support is thought to have caused the amino group to be more basic relative to its nucleophilicity, leading to a higher degree of racemization.

  14. Separation and identification of DMPO adducts of oxygen-centered radicals formed from organic hydroperoxides by HPLC-ESR, ESI-MS and MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiong; Qian, Steven Y; Mason, Ronald P

    2003-08-01

    Many electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) radical adducts from the reaction of organic hydroperoxides with heme proteins or Fe(2+) were assigned to the adducts of DMPO with peroxyl, alkoxyl, and alkyl radicals. In particular, the controversial assignment of DMPO/peroxyl radical adducts was based on the close similarity of their ESR spectra to that of the DMPO/superoxide radical adduct in conjunction with their insensitivity to superoxide dismutase, which distinguishes the peroxyl adducts from the DMPO/superoxide adduct. Although recent reports assigned the spectra suggested to be DMPO/peroxyl radical adducts to the DMPO/methoxyl adduct based on independent synthesis of the adduct and/or (17)O-labeling, (17)O-labeling is extremely expensive, and both of these assignments were still based on hyperfine coupling constants, which have not been confirmed by independent techniques. In this study, we have used online high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC or LC)/ESR, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to separate and directly characterize DMPO oxygen-centered radical adducts formed from the reaction of Fe(2+) with t-butyl or cumene hydroperoxide. In each reaction system, two DMPO oxygen-centered radical adducts were separated and detected by online LC/ESR. The first DMPO radical adduct from both systems showed identical chromatographic retention times (t(R) = 9.6 min) and hyperfine coupling constants (a(N) = 14.51 G, a(H)(beta) = 10.71 G, and a(H)(gamma) = 1.32 G). The ESI-MS and MS/MS spectra demonstrated that this radical was the DMPO/methoxyl radical adduct, not the peroxyl radical adduct as was thought at one time, although its ESR spectrum is nearly identical to that of the DMPO/superoxide radical adduct. Similarly, based on their MS/MS spectra, we verified that the second adducts (a(N) = 14.86 G and a(H)(beta) = 16.06 G in the reaction system containing t

  15. Energetics of protein fluctuations: Ligand binding to myoglobin and electron transfer in reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Benjamin Hamilton

    We have measured the temperature dependent kinetics of two different protein reactions: Psp+Qsbsp{A}{-}-> PQsb{A} electron transfer (ET) in the photosynthetic reaction (RC), and recombination of carbonmonoxide (CO) to myoglobin (Mb) after flash photolysis. The ET reaction allows determination of the temperature dependence of energy dissipation as RC adapts to charge transfer on the 100 ms, 10sp3 and 10sp4 s time scales at temperatures from 5 to 300 K. The adaptation, or conformational relaxation, of RC is observed in four distinct tiers of conformational substrates, with average apparent Arrhenius activation enthalpies of 17, 50, 78, and 110 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factors of 10sp{13},\\ 10sp{15},\\ 10sp{21}, and 10sp{25}\\ ssp{-1}, respectively. This parameterization provides a prediction of the time course of relaxations at all temperatures. At 300 K, relaxations are expected to occur from 1 ps to 1 ms; at lower temperatures the distribution of relaxation times broaden. We extend this study to samples of different pH, viscosity, and salt composition. We observe kinetics of CO recombination to horse heart myoglobin between 10 ns and 100 s at temperatures from 80 to 320 K. Essentially all recombination is visible in this time window, allowing the effect of relaxations to be observed on the nanosecond time scale at high temperatures, as well as microsecond to second time scales at lower temperatures. Variation of the solvent pH from 5.1 to 8.0 changes the average low temperature enthalpy barrier to recombination from 6 to 13 kJ/mol, shifting the time scale probed by the recombination reaction by an order of magnitude. Addition of 500 mM KCl, KSCN, or (NHsb4)sb2SOsb4 significantly changes the probability of geminate recombination without affecting either the enthalpy barrier to recombination or the energetics of CO entry to and exit from the heme pocket of the protein. We present a model of recombination which emphasizes the role of protein fluctuations in

  16. Synthesis and luminescence of silicon remnants formed by truncated glassmelt-particle reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbud, Subhash H.; Liu, Li-Chi; Shackelford, James F.

    1993-09-01

    We have obtained nanometer sized silicon remnants sequestered in glass matrices by terminating the reaction of pure silicon powders dispersed in the viscous melt at a temperature of 1400 °C. Repeated use of this truncated melt-particle reaction process dilutes the amount and size of silicon remnants, and bulk samples containing nanosize silicon crystallites embedded in a glass matrix were eventually obtained. These quantum dot sized silicon-in-glass materials emit greenish luminescence with peak wavelengths from ≊480 to 530 nm, considerably shorter than the reddish luminescence (at about 700-850 nm) observed in porous silicon structures prepared by electrochemical etching techniques; upon complete digestion of Si particles by the melt, the luminescence peaks disappear. Since our silicon-in-glass preparation method does not involve etching, the origin of the luminescence is not likely to be due to Si-O-H compounds (e.g., siloxene) postulated recently. The location of the luminescence peaks and the observed silicon crystallite size suggest quantum confinement leading to a widened silicon band gap arising from remnants in the glass matrix smaller than the exciton diameter of bulk silicon (10 nm).

  17. Eosinophilic granuloma as a form of inflammatory reaction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Diniz Freitas, M; Madriñán Graña, P; Antúnez López, J; Gándara Vila, P; Gándara Rey, J M; García García, A

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma consists of the proliferation and/or accumulation of Langerhans cells in the bones, generally of the cranium and face, as a uni- or multifocal cystic lesion. It is considered to be a localized chronic form of Langerhans cell disease. The most frequent oral location is the posterior part of the mandible, where the bone lesion often gives rise to lesions of the overlying soft tissues. We report a case showing bilateral involvement of the upper jaw and unilateral involvement of the mandible. The eosinophilic granulomas arose in association with odontogenic periapical infectious processes, suggesting that this disorder may be a form of inflammatory response.

  18. Observation of Organometallic and Radical Intermediates Formed during the Reaction of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase with Bromoethanesulfonate†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianghui; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Gerfen, Gary; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) from methanogenic archaea catalyzes the final step of methane formation, in which methyl-coenzyme M (2-methylthioethane sulfonate, methyl-SCoM) is reduced with coenzyme B (N-7-mercaptoheptanolyl-threonine phosphate, CoBSH) to form methane and the heterodisulfide CoBS-SCoM. The active dimeric form of MCR contains two Ni(I)-F430 prosthetic groups, one in each monomer. This manuscript describes studies of the reaction of the active Ni(I) state of MCR (MCRred1) with BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate) and CoBSH or its analog, CoB6SH (N-6-mercaptohexanolyl-threonine phosphate), by transient kinetic measurements using EPR and UV-visible spectroscopy and by global fits of the data. This reaction is shown to lead to the formation of three intermediates, the first of which is assigned as an alkyl-Ni(III) species that forms as the active Ni(I)-MCRred1 state of the enzyme decays. Subsequently, a radical (MCRBES radical) is formed that was characterized by multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies at X (~ 9 GHz)-, Q (~35 GHz)- and D (~135 GHz)-bands and by electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy. The MCRBES radical is characterized by g-values at 2.00340 and 1.99832 and includes a strongly coupled non-exchangeable proton with a hyperfine coupling constant of 50 MHz. Based on transient kinetic measurements, the formation and decay of the radical coincides with a species that exhibits absorption peaks at 426 nm and 575 nm. Isotopic substitution, multifrequency EPR and ENDOR spectroscopic experiments rule out the possibility that MCRBES is a tyrosyl radical and indicate that if a tyrosyl radical is formed during the reaction, it does not accumulate to detectable levels. The results provide support for a hybrid mechanism of methanogenesis by MCR that includes both alkyl-Ni and radical intermediates. PMID:20597483

  19. Assembly and disassembly of the photosystem II manganese cluster reversibly alters the coupling of the reaction center with the light-harvesting phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hong Jin; Nagarajan, Aparna; McLain, Aaron; Burnap, Robert L

    2008-09-16

    The light-driven oxidative assembly of Mn (2+) ions into the H 2O oxidation complex (WOC) of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center is termed photoactivation. The fluorescence yield characteristics of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells undergoing photoactivation showed that basal fluorescence, F 0, exhibited a characteristic decline when red, but not blue, measuring light was employed. This result was traced to a progressive increase in the coupling of the phycobilisome (PBS) to the PSII reaction center as determined by observing the changes in room temperature and 77 K fluorescence emission spectra that accompany photoactivation. The results support the hypothesis that strong energetic coupling of the PBS to the PSII reaction center depends upon the formation of an active WOC, which presumably diminishes the likelihood of photodamage to reaction centers that have either lost an intact Mn cluster or are in the process of assembling an active WOC.

  20. The X-ray structure of the complex formed in the reaction between oxaliplatin and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Messori, Luigi; Marzo, Tiziano; Merlino, Antonello

    2014-08-07

    The X-ray structure of the adduct formed between oxaliplatin and the model protein hen egg white lysozyme is reported here. The structure is compared with those of cisplatin and carboplatin derivatives, previously solved. Relevant changes are highlighted among these crystal structures that are suggestive of significant differences in the reactivity of platinum drugs with this protein; possible biological implications are discussed.

  1. Blockade of STAT3 in T Cells Inhibits Germinal Center Reactions against Intranasal Allergens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Garam; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the developmental mechanisms of humoral immunity against intranasal antigens is essential for the development of therapeutic approaches against air-borne pathogens as well as allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation. Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells expressing CXCR5 are required for humoral immunity by providing IL-21 and ICOS costimulation to activated B cells. However, the regulation of Tfh cell responses against intranasal antigens remains unclear. Here, we found that the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells in the bronchial lymph node against intranasal proteinase antigens was independent of TGF-β. In contrast, administration of STAT3 inhibitor STA-21 suppressed the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells. Compared with wild-type OT-II T cells, STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells transferred into recipients lacking T cells not only showed significantly reduced frequency Tfh cells, but also induced diminished IgG as well as IgE specific for the intranasal antigens. Cotransfer study of wild-type OT-II and STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells revealed that the latter failed to differentiate into Tfh cells. These findings demonstrate that T cell-intrinsic STAT3 is required for the generation of Tfh cells to intranasal antigens and that targeting STAT3 might be an effective approach to ameliorate antibody-mediated pathology in the lung.

  2. An Alternative Pathway of Light-Induced Transmembrane Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Khatypov, R A; Khristin, A M; Fufina, T Yu; Shuvalov, V A

    2017-06-01

    In the absorption spectrum of Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, a minor absorption band was found with a maximum at 1053 nm. The amplitude of this band is ~10,000 times less and its half-width is comparable to that of the long-wavelength absorption band of the primary electron donor P870. When the primary electron donor is excited by femtosecond light pulses at 870 nm, the absorption band at 1053 nm is increased manifold during the earliest stages of charge separation. The growth of this absorption band in difference absorption spectra precedes the appearance of stimulated emission at 935 nm and the appearance of the absorption band of anion-radical BA(-) at 1020 nm, reported earlier by several researchers. When reaction centers are illuminated with 1064 nm light, the absorption spectrum undergoes changes indicating reduction of the primary electron acceptor QA, with the primary electron donor P870 remaining neutral. These photoinduced absorption changes reflect the formation of the long-lived radical state PBAHAQA(-).

  3. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyeva, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-05-21

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a {pi}-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  4. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a π-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  5. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells to isolate temperature-selective anti-PEG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Al-Qaisi, Talal S; Tung, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Chen, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R

    2014-01-01

    Modification of antibody class and binding properties typically requires cloning of antibody genes, antibody library construction, phage or yeast display and recombinant antibody expression. Here, we describe an alternative “cloning-free” approach to generate antibodies with altered antigen-binding and heavy chain isotype by mimicking the germinal center reaction in antibody-secreting hybridoma cells. This was accomplished by lentiviral transduction and controllable expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to generate somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in antibody genes coupled with high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of hybridoma cells to detect altered antibody binding properties. Starting from a single established hybridoma clone, we isolated mutated antibodies that bind to a low-temperature structure of polyethylene glycol (PEG), a polymer widely used in nanotechnology, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. FACS of AID-infected hybridoma cells also facilitated rapid identification of class switched variants of monoclonal IgM to monoclonal IgG. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells may offer a general method to identify and isolate antibodies with altered binding properties and class-switched heavy chains without the need to carry out DNA library construction, antibody engineering and recombinant protein expression. PMID:24874693

  6. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells to isolate temperature-selective anti-PEG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Al-Qaisi, Talal S; Tung, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Chen, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R

    2014-01-01

    Modification of antibody class and binding properties typically requires cloning of antibody genes, antibody library construction, phage or yeast display and recombinant antibody expression. Here, we describe an alternative "cloning-free" approach to generate antibodies with altered antigen-binding and heavy chain isotype by mimicking the germinal center reaction in antibody-secreting hybridoma cells. This was accomplished by lentiviral transduction and controllable expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to generate somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in antibody genes coupled with high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of hybridoma cells to detect altered antibody binding properties. Starting from a single established hybridoma clone, we isolated mutated antibodies that bind to a low-temperature structure of polyethylene glycol (PEG), a polymer widely used in nanotechnology, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. FACS of AID-infected hybridoma cells also facilitated rapid identification of class switched variants of monoclonal IgM to monoclonal IgG. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells may offer a general method to identify and isolate antibodies with altered binding properties and class-switched heavy chains without the need to carry out DNA library construction, antibody engineering and recombinant protein expression.

  7. Synthesis and Photophysical Characterization of an Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center Exhibiting Acid-Responsive Regulation of Charge Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahk, Ian

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a photoprotective regulatory mechanism essential to the robustness of the photosynthetic apparatus of green plants. Energy flow within the low-light adapted reaction centers is dynamically optimized to match the continuously fluctuating light conditions found in nature. Activated by compartmentalized decreases in pH resulting from photosynthetic activity during periods of elevated photon flux, NPQ induces rapid thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy that would otherwise overwhelm the apparatus's ability to consume it. Consequently, the frequency of charge separation decreases and the formation of potentially deleterious, high-energy intermediates slows, thereby reducing the threat of photodamage by disallowing their accumulation. Herein is described the synthesis and photophysical analysis of a molecular triad that mimics the effects of NPQ on charge separation within the photosynthetic reaction centers. Steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies were used to demonstrate reversible quenching of the first singlet excited state affecting the quantum yield of charge separation by approximately one order of magnitude. As in the natural system, the populations of unquenched and quenched states and, therefore, the overall yields of charge separation were found to be dependent upon acid concentration.

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of photosynthetic reaction centers and tetrapyrrole chromophores for biomedical and solar-energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Hooi Ling

    2008-10-01

    The photophysical properties of diverse tetrapyrrole chromophores as well as energy and electron transfer processes in tetrapyrrole dyads are investigated using static and time-resolved (femtoseconds to seconds) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of these studies is to elucidate the molecular design principals necessary to construct chromophores with the specific and tunable properties that will enhance applications in optical molecular imaging, photodynamic therapy, and solar-energy conversion. The kinetic properties of the transient intermediate P+H B- involving the bacteriopheophytin molecule HB on the normally inactive (B) cofactor branch of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center are examined in Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants. Using nanosecond flash photolysis and F(L181)Y/Y(M208)F/L(M212)H mutant, the decay pathways and yields of P+HB- were measured, giving an overall yield of 13% for B-side charge separation P* → P+HB- → P+ QB- in this mutant. The goal of these studies is to understand the fundamental differences in the rates, yields, and mechanisms of charge separation and charge recombination along the two parallel electron-transport chains in the bacterial reaction center.

  9. Low temperature absorption, fluorescence, and hole-burning spectroscopy of photosystem II reaction center complex containing 1 and 2 carotenoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dědic, R.; Lovčinský, M.; Pšenčík, J.; Vácha, M.; Vácha, F.; Hála, J.

    1999-05-01

    Well defined photosystem II reaction centers from Pisum sativum containing 5 or 6 chlorophyll a (Chl a), 2 pheophytine a (Pheo a), and 1 or 2 β-carotene ( β Car) molecules were prepared by using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Samples containing 6 Chl a and 1 or 2 β-Car and containing 5 Chl a and 1 β-Car were measured using low temperature absorption, fluorescence and hole-burning spectroscopy. Absorption bands of the β Car (462, 490, and 508 nm) can be clearly distinguished next to the Soret absorption band of Chl a at low temperature. Their relative intensities strongly depend on Chl/Car ratio. The shapes of fluorescence bands are the same for all samples. Persistent spectral holes were burnt into both absorption and fluorescence spectra. This technique provides lifetime of excited state τ1 and Huang-Rhys factor S. Values of τ1 correspond to two picoseconds energy transfer in reaction centers. Huang-Rhys factor S=0.4 appears to be the same for all studied samples.

  10. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  11. Synthesis of Diverse Heterocyclic Scaffolds via Tandem Additions to Imine Derivatives and Ring-Forming Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sunderhaus, James D.; Dockendorff, Chris; Martin, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy has been developed for the efficient syntheses of diverse arrays of heterocyclic compounds. The key elements of the approach comprise a Mannich-type, multicomponent coupling reaction in which functionalized amines, aromatic aldehydes, acylating agents, and π- and organometallic nucleophiles are combined to generate intermediates that are then further transformed into diverse heterocyclic scaffolds via a variety of cyclization manifolds. Significantly, many of these scaffolds bear functionality that may be exploited by further manipulation to create diverse collections of compounds having substructures found in biologically active natural products and clinically useful drugs. The practical utility of this strategy was exemplified by its application to the first, and extraordinarily concise synthesis of the isopavine alkaloid roelactamine. PMID:20625454

  12. Electric field effects on the chlorophylls, pheophytins, and beta-carotenes in the reaction center of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Frese, Raoul N; Germano, Marta; de Weerd, Frank L; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Shkuropatov, Anatoli Ya; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; van Gorkom, Hans J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Dekker, Jan P

    2003-08-05

    We present an electric field modulated absorption spectroscopy (Stark effect) study of isolated photosystem II reaction center complexes, including a preparation in which the inactive pheophytin H(B) was exchanged for 13(1)-deoxo-13(1)-hydroxy-pheophytin. The results reveal that the Stark spectrum of the Q(x) and Q(y) transitions of the pheophytins has a second-derivative line shape, indicating that the Stark effect is dominated by differences in the dipole moment between the ground and the electronically excited states of these transitions (Delta mu). The Delta mu values for the Q(x) and Q(y) transitions of H(B) are small (Delta mu = 0.6-1.0 D f(-1)), whereas that of the Q(x) transition of the active pheophytin H(A) is remarkably large (Delta mu = 3 D f(-1)). The Stark spectrum of the red-most absorbing pigments also shows a second-derivative line shape, but this spectrum is considerably red-shifted as compared to the second derivative of the absorption spectrum. This situation is unusual but has been observed before in heterodimer special pair mutants of purple bacterial reaction centers [Moore, L. J., Zhou, H., and Boxer, S. G. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 11949-11960]. The red-shifted Stark spectra can be explained by a mixing of exciton states with a charge-transfer state of about equal energy. We conclude that the charge transfer state involves H(A) and its immediate chlorophyll neighbor (B(A)), and we suggest that this (B(A)(delta+)H(A)(delta-)) charge transfer state plays a crucial role in the primary charge separation reaction in photosystem II. In contrast to most other carotenes, the two beta-carotene molecules of the photosystem II reaction center display a very small Delta mu, which can most easily be explained by excitonic coupling of both molecules. These results favor a model that locates both beta-carotene molecules at the same side of the complex.

  13. Enhancing the light harvesting capability of a photosynthetic reaction center by a tailored molecular fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Milano, Francesco; Tangorra, Rocco Roberto; Hassan Omar, Omar; Ragni, Roberta; Operamolla, Alessandra; Agostiano, Angela; Farinola, Gianluca M; Trotta, Massimo

    2012-10-29

    Light machine: The simplest photosynthetic protein able to convert sunlight into other energy forms is covalently functionalized with a tailored organic dye to obtain a fully functional hybrid complex that outperforms the natural system in light harvesting and conversion ability. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Disulfide and Sulfenic Acid to Form the Strongly Nucleophilic Persulfide*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Lange, Mike; Bonanata, Jenner; Coitiño, E. Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Filipovic, Milos R.; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increasingly recognized to modulate physiological processes in mammals through mechanisms that are currently under scrutiny. H2S is not able to react with reduced thiols (RSH). However, H2S, more precisely HS−, is able to react with oxidized thiol derivatives. We performed a systematic study of the reactivity of HS− toward symmetric low molecular weight disulfides (RSSR) and mixed albumin (HSA) disulfides. Correlations with thiol acidity and computational modeling showed that the reaction occurs through a concerted mechanism. Comparison with analogous reactions of thiolates indicated that the intrinsic reactivity of HS− is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of thiolates. In addition, H2S is able to react with sulfenic acids (RSOH). The rate constant of the reaction of H2S with the sulfenic acid formed in HSA was determined. Both reactions of H2S with disulfides and sulfenic acids yield persulfides (RSSH), recently identified post-translational modifications. The formation of this derivative in HSA was determined, and the rate constants of its reactions with a reporter disulfide and with peroxynitrite revealed that persulfides are better nucleophiles than thiols, which is consistent with the α effect. Experiments with cells in culture showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide enhanced the formation of persulfides. Biological implications are discussed. Our results give light on the mechanisms of persulfide formation and provide quantitative evidence for the high nucleophilicity of these novel derivatives, setting the stage for understanding the contribution of the reactions of H2S with oxidized thiol derivatives to H2S effector processes. PMID:26269587

  15. Measurement of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factors via the Spin Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Quemener; Mark K. Jones; Charles F. Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    1999-08-01

    The ratio of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton has been measured at the Jefferson Laboratory at Q{sup 2} values ranging from 0.5 GeV{sup 2} up to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. The experiment used the recently commissioned Hall A Focal Plane Polarimeter (FPP) to measure the polarization of the recoiling proton in elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons on a liquid hydrogen target.

  16. Adverse drug reactions associated with ceftaroline use: A two-center retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G.; Kuhlen, James L.; Weil, Ana A.; Varughese, Christy A.; Kubiak, David W.; Banerji, Aleena; Shenoy, Erica S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ceftaroline fosamil is a cephalosporin approved for treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective We aimed to study ceftaroline use and associated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), among inpatients. Methods We performed a retrospective electronic health record review of inpatients from Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital who received ceftaroline between May 2012 and February 2015. ADRs diagnosed by clinical providers during the course of clinical care were subsequently verified and classified. Risk factors for ADRs were identified. Results Among 96 patients (median age 57 years, 54% female) who received a median of 28 [IQR 6, 63] ceftaroline doses, 54% were being treated for MRSA and treatment indications other than SSTI and CAP comprised 59% of care. There were 31 ADRs observed in 20 (21%) of patients; hematologic (n=15) and cutaneous (n=9) findings were most common. Observed HSRs included rash with mucosal lesions (n=1), rash with skin desquamation (n=1) and possible organ specific HSRs (n=2). Patients who suffered an ADR received more doses of ceftaroline (median 46 vs. 21, p=0.013). There was no increased risk of ceftaroline ADR among patients with prior reported beta-lactam allergy (p >0.5). Conclusions Ceftaroline is used to treat a range of infections beyond SSTI and CAP. We observed a high rate of ADRs from ceftaroline, including signs of severe HSRs. More data are needed to understand the frequency and predictors of ceftaroline ADRs and HSRs. PMID:27130709

  17. Isolation and characterization of homodimeric type-I reaction center complex from Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum, an aerobic chlorophototroph.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Romberger, Steven P; Golbeck, John H; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-02-17

    The recently discovered thermophilic acidobacterium Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum is the first aerobic chlorophototroph that has a type-I, homodimeric reaction center (RC). This organism and its type-I RCs were initially detected by the occurrence of pscA gene sequences, which encode the core subunit of the RC complex, in metagenomic sequence data derived from hot spring microbial mats. Here, we report the isolation and initial biochemical characterization of the type-I RC from Ca. C. thermophilum. After removal of chlorosomes, crude membranes were solubilized with 0.1% (w/v) n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside, and the RC complex was purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The RC complex comprised only two polypeptides: the reaction center core protein PscA and a 22-kDa carotenoid-binding protein denoted CbpC. The absorption spectrum showed a large, broad absorbance band centered at ∼483 nm from carotenoids as well as smaller Q(y) absorption bands at 672 and 812 nm from chlorophyll a and bacteriochlorophyll a, respectively. The light-induced difference spectra of whole cells, membranes, and the isolated RC showed maximal bleaching at 840 nm, which is attributed to the special pair and which we denote as P840. Making it unique among homodimeric type-I RCs, the isolated RC was photoactive in the presence of oxygen. Analyses by optical spectroscopy, chromatography, and mass spectrometry revealed that the RC complex contained 10.3 bacteriochlorophyll a(P), 6.4 chlorophyll a(PD), and 1.6 Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a(P)' molecules per P840 (12.8:8.0:2.0). The possible functions of the Zn-bacteriochlorophyll a(P)' molecules and the carotenoid-binding protein are discussed.

  18. Mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer for quinone (Q{sub B}) reduction in reaction centers of Rb sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Graige, M.S.; Paddock, M.L; Feher, G.; Okamura, M.Y.; Bruce, J.M.

    1996-09-25

    The mechanism of the proton-coupled electron transfer reaction, Q{sub A}{sup -}Q{sub B}{sup -} + H{sup +} {yields} Q{sub A}(Q{sub B}H){sup -} (i.e. k{sup (2)}{sub AB}), was studied in reaction centers (RCs) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rb. sphaeroides by substituting quinones with different redox potentials into the Q{sub A} site. These substitutions change the driving force for electron transfer without affecting proton transfer rates or proton binding equilibria around the Q{sub B} site. The measured rate constants, k{sup (2)}{sub AB}, increased with increasing electron driving force (by a factor of 10 per 160 meV change in redox free energy). The proton-coupled electron transfer was modeled. The free energy dependencies of these possible mechanisms were predicted using Marcus theory and were compared to the observed dependence. The best agreement with the experimental data is given by a two-step mechanism in which fast reversible proton transfer is followed by rate limiting electron transfer. For this mechanism the observed free energy dependence for k{sup (2)}{sub AB} can be fitted using reasonable parameters of the Marcus theory. The free energy dependence predicted using a simple model for a concerted reaction also provides a reasonable fit to the data. 75 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. In Situ-Forming Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Hydrogels with Tunable Properties Prepared via Aza-Michael Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; He, Hongliang; Cooper, Remy C; Yang, Hu

    2017-03-29

    In this work, we describe synthesis and characterization of novel in situ-forming polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer hydrogels (DHs) with tunable properties prepared via highly efficient aza-Michael addition reaction. PAMAM dendrimer G5 was chosen as the underlying core and functionalized with various degrees of acetylation using acetic anhydride. The nucleophilic amines on the dendrimer surface reacted with α, β-unsaturated ester in acrylate groups of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA, Mn = 575 g/mol) via aza-Michael addition reaction to form dendrimer hydrogels without the use of any catalyst. The solidification time, rheological behavior, network structure, swelling, and degradation properties of the hydrogel were tuned by adjusting the dendrimer surface acetylation degree and dendrimer concentration. The DHs were shown to be highly cytocompatible and support cell adhesion and proliferation. We also prepared an injectable dendrimer hydrogel formulation to deliver the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and demonstrated that the injectable formulation efficiently inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, this new class of dendrimer hydrogel prepared by aza-Michael addition reaction can serve as a safe tunable platform for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  20. Synthesis, Identification, and Structure Elucidation of Adducts Formed by Reactions of Hydroxycinnamic Acids with Glutathione or Cysteinylglycine.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Lima, Nayla; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Sommerer, Nicolas; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T; Cheynier, Véronique; Le Guernevé, Christine

    2016-09-23

    Grape polyphenols, especially hydroxycinnamic acids such as caftaric and caffeic acid, are prone to enzymatic oxidation reactions during the winemaking process, forming o-quinones and leading to color darkening. Glutathione is capable of trapping these o-quinones and thus limiting juice browning. In this study, the addition of glutathione or cysteinylglycine onto caftaric or caffeic acid o-quinones formed by polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed reactions was investigated by UPLC-DAD-ESIMS and NMR data analyses. Complete identification of adducts has been achieved via NMR data. The results confirmed that the favored reaction is the substitution of the sulfanyl group of cysteine at C-2 of the aromatic ring. Several minor isomers, namely, the cis-isomer of the 2-S adduct and trans-isomers of the 5-S and 6-S adducts, and the 2,5-di-S-glutathionyl adducts were also identified and quantified by qNMR. With the exception of 2-(S-glutathionyl)- and 2,5-di(S-glutathionyl)-trans-caftaric acid, these products had never been formally identified. In particular, the 5-S and 6-S derivatives are reported here for the first time. The first formal identification of 2-S cis-derivatives is also provided. Moreover, NMR and UPLC-DAD-ESIMS analysis showed that signature UV and MS spectra can serve as markers of the conformation and substitution position in the aromatic ring for each of the isomers.

  1. Exact model reduction with delays: closed-form distributions and extensions to fully bi-directional monomolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Leier, Andre; Barrio, Manuel; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-06-06

    In order to systematically understand the qualitative and quantitative behaviour of chemical reaction networks, scientists must derive and analyse associated mathematical models. However, biochemical systems are often very large, with reactions occurring at multiple time scales, as evidenced by signalling pathways and gene expression kinetics. Owing to the associated computational costs, it is then many times impractical, if not impossible, to solve or simulate these systems with an appropriate level of detail. By consequence, there is a growing interest in developing techniques for the simplification or reduction of complex biochemical systems. Here, we extend our recently presented methodology on exact reduction of linear chains of reactions with delay distributions in two ways. First, we report that it is now possible to deal with fully bi-directional monomolecular systems, including degradations, synthesis and generalized bypass reactions. Second, we provide all derivations of associated delays in analytical, closed form. Both advances have a major impact on further reducing computational costs, while still retaining full accuracy. Thus, we expect our new methodology to respond to current simulation needs in pharmaceutical, chemical and biological research.

  2. Closed-Form 3-D Localization for Single Source in Uniform Circular Array with a Center Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eun-Hyon; Lee, Kyun-Kyung

    A novel closed-form algorithm is presented for estimating the 3-D location (azimuth angle, elevation angle, and range) of a single source in a uniform circular array (UCA) with a center sensor. Based on the centrosymmetry of the UCA and noncircularity of the source, the proposed algorithm decouples and estimates the 2-D direction of arrival (DOA), i.e. azimuth and elevation angles, and then estimates the range of the source. Notwithstanding a low computational complexity, the proposed algorithm provides an estimation performance close to that of the benchmark estimator 3-D MUSIC.

  3. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Kerry Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  4. Flexible Epoxy Resin Formed Upon Blending with a Triblock Copolymer through Reaction-Induced Microphase Separation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a matrix, the ABA block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide–b–propylene oxide–b–ethylene oxide) (Pluronic F127) as an additive, and diphenyl diaminosulfone (DDS) as a curing agent to prepare flexible epoxy resins through reaction-induced microphase separation (RIMPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the existence of hydrogen bonding between the poly(ethylene oxide) segment of F127 and the OH groups of the DGEBA resin. Small-angle X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy all revealed evidence for the microphase separation of F127 within the epoxy resin. Glass transition temperature (Tg) phenomena and mechanical properties (modulus) were determined through differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively, of samples at various blend compositions. The modulus data provided evidence for the formation of wormlike micelle structures, through a RIMPS mechanism, in the flexible epoxy resin upon blending with the F127 triblock copolymer. PMID:28773571

  5. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: implications for nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  6. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: Implications for nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  7. Transition-metal-free C-C bond forming reactions of aryl, alkenyl and alkynylboronic acids and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Roscales, S; Csákÿ, A G

    2014-12-21

    Investigation of new methods for the synthesis of C-C bonds is fundamental for the development of new organic drugs and materials. Aryl-, alkenyl- and alkynylboronic acids and their derivatives constitute attractive reagents towards this end, due to their stability, low toxicity and ease of handling. However, these compounds are only moderately nucleophilic. Consequently, the most popular C-C bond forming reactions of these boronic acids, such as the Suzuki-Miyaura, Heck, and Hayashi-Miyaura reactions, or additions to C=O and C=N bonds, require catalysis by transition metals. However, due to the toxicity and cost of transition metals, some new methods for C-C bond formation using aryl-, alkenyl- and alkynylboronic acids under transition-metal-free conditions are beginning to emerge. In this tutorial review, the recent synthetic advances in this field are highlighted and discussed.

  8. The antenna reaction center complex of heliobacteria: composition, energy conversion and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Neerken, S; Amesz, J

    2001-10-30

    A survey is given of various aspects of the photosynthetic processes in heliobacteria. The review mainly refers to results obtained since 1995, which had not been covered earlier. It first discusses the antenna organization and pigmentation. The pigments of heliobacteria include some unusual species: bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g, the main pigment, 8(1) hydroxy chlorophyll a, which acts as primary electron acceptor, and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene, a carotenoid with 30 carbon atoms. Energy conversion within the antenna is very fast: at room temperature thermal equilibrium among the approx. 35 BChls g of the antenna is largely completed within a few ps. This is then followed by primary charge separation, involving a dimer of BChl g (P798) as donor, but recent evidence indicates that excitation of the acceptor pigment 8(1) hydroxy chlorophyll a gives rise to an alternative primary reaction not involving excited P798. The final section of the review concerns secondary electron transfer, an area that is relatively poorly known in heliobacteria.

  9. Incidence of infusion reactions to anti-neoplastic agents in early phase clinical trials: The MD Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Bupathi, Manojkumar; Hajjar, Joud; Bean, Stacie; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Karp, Daniel; Stephen, Bettzy; Hess, Kenneth; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Naing, Aung

    2017-02-01

    Infusion reactions (IRs) to anti-neoplastic agents require prompt recognition and immediate treatment to avert significant complications. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of consecutive patients who received anti-neoplastic therapy in the outpatient treatment center of the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics from January 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013. Of the 597 patients who received treatment, 9 (1.5 %) had IRs (all ≤ grade 2). The most common IRs observed on first occurrence were chills (n = 5), itching, rash, and facial flushing (n = 3 each). There were no IR-related deaths. All the IRs were reversible with appropriate symptomatic treatment and the therapy was completed after temporary cessation of infusion in 7 of the 9 patients. The infusion was stopped in 2 patients due to symptoms suggestive of IgE-mediated allergic reaction and cytokine storm. Five of the 8 patients who were re-challenged with the same therapy developed a similar reaction. However, the infusion was completed in 4 of the 5 patients after administration of intravenous diphenhydramine and/or hydrocortisone, or slowing the rate of infusion. And, subsequent cycles with the same agents were uneventful. IRs to anti-neoplastic agents are rare. Though the clinical presentations are overlapping, most IRs are not IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Appropriate premedication and slow rate of infusion facilitates uneventful administration of the anti-neoplastic agents in subsequent cycles. Further study in a larger cohort of patients to identify biomarkers of hypersensitivity is warranted.

  10. Quasifission and fission rates and their lifetimes in asymmetric reactions forming 216Ra within a dinuclear system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanlari, M. Varasteh; Soheyli, S.

    2017-02-01

    Background: The study of evolution of asymmetric dinuclear systems (DNSs) formed in heavy ion collisions is a topic of intense research. The DNS evolution leads to a variety of reaction channels such as deep inelastic, complete fusion, quasifission, fast fission, fusion-fission, and evaporation of particles. The time evolution of the DNS in the quasifission process and the role of relevant parameters are still not fully understood. Purpose: The influence of the entrance channel mass asymmetry on the time evolution of an excited and rotating DNS, populated via four reactions with different entrance channel mass asymmetry parameters which all lead to the compound nucleus 216Ra, is explored. Method: The driving potential, emission barriers for the binary decay (namely the quasifission and intrinsic fusion barriers), rate of the quasifission channel, and the lifetime of an excited DNS, as well as the fission rate and fission lifetime of the compound nucleus 216Ra formed in the 12C+204Pb,19F+197Au,30Si+186W , and 48Ca+168Er reactions, are calculated by the dinuclear system approach. Results: Our results show that the intrinsic fusion barrier values are equal to zero for the 12C+204Pb and 19F+197Au reactions. Therefore, the quasifission signature is extremely hindered for these reactions, while the 30Si+186W and 48Ca+168Er calculated results contain quasifission contributions. Provided the quasifission rate is nonzero, the quasifission rate increases with increasing orbital angular momentum ℓ of the composite system for a given excitation energy ECN * of the compound nucleus. On the other hand, the quasifission lifetime decreases moderately with increasing ℓ . Furthermore, both quasifission and fission rates increase with increasing excitation energy ECN *, while the quasifission and fission lifetimes decrease with increasing ECN * for a given ℓ . Conclusions: Although these reactions with different entrance channels populate the same compound nucleus 216Ra at

  11. Symmetry-related mutants in the quinone binding sites of the reaction center -- The effects of changes in charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Schiffer, M.

    1997-09-01

    To probe the structural elements that contribute to the functional asymmetries of the two ubiquinone{sub 10}binding pockets in the reaction center of Rhodobacter capsulatus, the authors targeted the L212Glu-L213Asp (near Q{sub B}) and the M246Ala-M247Ala (near Q{sub A}) pairs of symmetry-related residues for site-specific mutagenesis. They have constructed site-specific mutants that eliminate the sequence differences at these positions (L212Glu-L213Asp{yields}Ala-Ala or M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Glu-Asp), and have reversed that asymmetry by constructing a quadruple-mutant strain, RQ (L212Glu-L213Asp-M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Ala-Ala-Glu-Asp). The mutations were designed to change the charge distribution in the quinone-binding region of the reaction center; none of the strains is capable of photosynthetic growth. In photocomponent phenotypic revertants of the RQ strain, second-site mutations which affect Q{sub B} function are coupled to mutations in the Q{sub A} site which restore an Ala or substitute a Tyr at the M247 site; one strain carries an additional Met{yields}Glu substitution at M260 near Q{sub A}. All of the RQ revertants retain the engineered M246Ala{yields}Glu mutation in the Q{sub A} site as well as the L212Ala-L213Ala mutations in the Q{sub B} site. Kinetic characterization of the RQ revertants will give them an idea of what structural and functional elements are important for restoring efficiency to electron and proton transfer pathways in the RQRC, which is far from native. To date, these preliminary results underscore the importance of an asymmetric distribution of polar amino acids in the quinone binding pockets and its influence on the functional properties of the reaction center.

  12. [Soothing effect of Ganoderma lucidum antlered form on cyclophosphamide-induced adverse reaction].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yuji; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Nakai, Masaaki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Abe, Shigeru

    2005-10-01

    The immunological functions of Ganoderma lucidum antlered form (AF) (Rokkaku-Reishi in Japanese), a variant type of Ganoderma lucidum, were investigated in C57BL/6 mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CY). Ganoderma lucidum AF alleviated CY-induced decrease in body weight and abnormal increase in blood neutrophil level, when the mice were fed a diet containing 2.5% Ganoderma lucidum AF starting one week before CY treatment (150 mg/kg, ip). The recovery of CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells in the spleen was accelerated in Ganoderma lucidum AF group compared to the control group. Ganoderma lucidum AF also both alleviated CY-induced splenic lymphopenia and suppressed the abnormal increase in splenocytes 7 days after CY treatment. These results suggest that ingestion of Ganoderma lucidum AF is beneficial for improvement of quality of life reduced by anti-cancer chemotherapeutic drugs such as CY.

  13. Yields of β-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of 2-methyl-1-alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Aiko; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Yields of β-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates, in particles formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of C9-C15 2-methyl-1-alkenes in the presence of NOx were measured by using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatograph with a UV-visible (UV-vis) detector. Yields of β-hydroxynitrates and dihydroxynitrates increased with carbon number primarily due to enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning before reaching plateaus at ≈C14-C15, where the compounds were essentially entirely in the particle phase. Plateau yields of β-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates were 0.183 ± 0.005, 0.045 ± 0.005, and 0.034 ± 0.005, and, after normalization for OH radical addition to the C = C double bond, were 0.225 ± 0.007, 0.055 ± 0.006, and 0.042 ± 0.006. The fractions of 1-hydroxy and 2-hydroxy β-hydroxynitrate isomers were 0.90/0.10. Yields measured here and in our previous study of reactions of linear internal alkenes and linear 1-alkenes indicate that, for these alkene classes, the relative branching ratios for forming tertiary, secondary, and primary β-hydroxyalkyl radicals by OH radical addition to the C = C double bond are 4.3/1.9/1.0, and the branching ratios for forming β-hydroxynitrates from reactions of tertiary, secondary, and primary β-hydroxyperoxy radicals with NO are 0.25, 0.15, and 0.12. The effects of H2O vapor and NH3 on yields were also explored. PMID:20080570

  14. Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of 2-methyl-1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Aiko; Ziemann, Paul J

    2010-04-13

    Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates, in particles formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of C(9)-C(15) 2-methyl-1-alkenes in the presence of NO(x) were measured by using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer coupled to a high-performance liquid chromatograph with a UV-visible (UV-vis) detector. Yields of beta-hydroxynitrates and dihydroxynitrates increased with carbon number primarily due to enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning before reaching plateaus at approximately C(14)-C(15), where the compounds were essentially entirely in the particle phase. Plateau yields of beta-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates were 0.183 +/- 0.005, 0.045 +/- 0.005, and 0.034 +/- 0.005, and, after normalization for OH radical addition to the C = C double bond, were 0.225 +/- 0.007, 0.055 +/- 0.006, and 0.042 +/- 0.006. The fractions of 1-hydroxy and 2-hydroxy beta-hydroxynitrate isomers were 0.90/0.10. Yields measured here and in our previous study of reactions of linear internal alkenes and linear 1-alkenes indicate that, for these alkene classes, the relative branching ratios for forming tertiary, secondary, and primary beta-hydroxyalkyl radicals by OH radical addition to the C=C double bond are 4.3/1.9/1.0, and the branching ratios for forming beta-hydroxynitrates from reactions of tertiary, secondary, and primary beta-hydroxyperoxy radicals with NO are 0.25, 0.15, and 0.12. The effects of H(2)O vapor and NH(3) on yields were also explored.

  15. Photosynthetic antenna-reaction center mimicry with a covalently linked monostyryl boron-dipyrromethene-aza-boron-dipyrromethene-C60 triad.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Jing; El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ng, Dennis K P

    2013-08-19

    An efficient functional mimic of the photosynthetic antenna-reaction center has been designed and synthesized. The model contains a near-infrared-absorbing aza-boron-dipyrromethene (ADP) that is connected to a monostyryl boron-dipyrromethene (BDP) by a click reaction and to a fullerene (C60 ) using the Prato reaction. The intramolecular photoinduced energy and electron-transfer processes of this triad as well as the corresponding dyads BDP-ADP and ADP-C60 have been studied with steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods in benzonitrile. Upon excitation, the BDP moiety of the triad is significantly quenched due to energy transfer to the ADP core, which subsequently transfers an electron to the fullerene unit. Cyclic and differential pulse voltammetric studies have revealed the redox states of the components, which allow estimation of the energies of the charge-separated states. Such calculations show that electron transfer from the singlet excited ADP ((1) ADP*) to C60 yielding ADP(.+) -C60 (.-) is energetically favorable. By using femtosecond laser flash photolysis, concrete evidence has been obtained for the occurrence of energy transfer from (1) BDP* to ADP in the dyad BDP-ADP and electron transfer from (1) ADP* to C60 in the dyad ADP-C60 . Sequential energy and electron transfer have also been clearly observed in the triad BDP-ADP-C60 . By monitoring the rise of ADP emission, it has been found that the rate of energy transfer is fast (≈10(11)  s(-1) ). The dynamics of electron transfer through (1) ADP* has also been studied by monitoring the formation of C60 radical anion at 1000 nm. A fast charge-separation process from (1) ADP* to C60 has been detected, which gives the relatively long-lived BDP-ADP(.+) C60 (.-) with a lifetime of 1.47 ns. As shown by nanosecond transient absorption measurements, the charge-separated state decays slowly to populate mainly the triplet state of ADP before returning to the ground state

  16. The X-ray structure of the primary adducts formed in the reaction between cisplatin and cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Giarita; Messori, Luigi; Merlino, Antonello

    2015-02-14

    In the present study, the interactions between cisplatin and cytochrome c are investigated. Based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction data, two monometalated species, i.e. cyt c-Pt(NH3)2 and cyt c-Pt(NH3)2Cl, are found to be the main adducts that form in the reaction between the protein and the drug. Both monodentate and bidentate platinum coordination to the protein is observed, with platinum binding either to Met65 or to Met65 and Glu61, simultaneously.

  17. Room temperature gas-solid reaction of titanium on glass surfaces forming a very low resistivity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Hugo; Clark, Neville; Azofeifa, Daniel; Avendano, E.

    2016-09-01

    Titanium films were deposited on quartz, glass, polyamide and PET substrates in a high vacuum system at room temperature and their electrical resistance monitored in vacuo as a function of thickness. These measurements indicate that a low electrical resistance layer is formed in a gas-solid reaction during the condensation of the initial layers of Ti on glass and quartz substrates. Layers begin to show relative low electrical resistance at around 21 nm for glass and 9nm for quartz. Samples deposited on polyamide and PET do not show this low resistance feature.

  18. Mechanistic Insights into the Carbon Dioxide/Cyclohexene Oxide Copolymerization Reaction: Is One Metal Center Enough?

    PubMed

    González-Fabra, Joan; Castro-Gómez, Fernando; Kleij, Arjan W; Bo, Carles

    2017-03-22

    A detailed study on the mechanism for the alternating copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and CO2 mediated by an [Al{amino-tri(phenolate)}]/NBu4 I binary catalyst system was performed by using DFT-based methods. Four potential mechanisms (one monometallic and three bimetallic) were considered for the first propagation cycle of the CHO/CO2 copolymerization. The obtained Gibbs free energies provided a rationale for the relative high activity of a non-covalent dimeric structure formed in situ and thus for the feasibility of a bimetallic mechanism to obtain polycarbonates quantitatively. Gibbs free energies also indicated that the alternating copolymerization was favored over the cyclic carbonate formation.

  19. Homochiral frameworks formed by reactions of lanthanide ions with a chiral antimony tartrate secondary building unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Wang, Xiqu; Jacobson, Allan J

    2011-09-19

    A chiral cluster compound, dipotassium bis(μ-tartrato)diantimony(III), K(2)Sb(2)L(2) (H(4)L = L-tartaric acid), was used as a secondary building unit to react with lanthanide ions. Three series of homochiral coordination compounds were obtained: 0D [La(H(2)L)(H(2)O)(4)](2)[Sb(2)L(2)]·7H(2)O (0D-La), 1D Ln(Sb(2)L(2))(H(2)O)(5)(NO(3))·H(2)O (1D-Ln) (Ln = La-Lu or Y, expect Pm), 2D(I) [(Ln(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·5H(2)O (2D(I)-Ln) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr), and 2D(II) [(La(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·6H(2)O (2D(II)-La). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies indicated that 0D-La crystallizes in space group P1, and the structure contains isolated Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units located between chains of composition La(H(2)L)(H(2)O)(4). The series of 1D-Ln compounds is isostructural and crystallizes in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). In the structure, Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units are coordinated to two Ln ions by two out of the four free tartrate oxygen atoms to form a linear chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a homochiral structure that can be formed for the whole lanthanide series. In the 2D(I)-Ln structure series, which crystallizes in space group P2(1), the Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units have two distinct coordination modes: one is the same as that found in the 1D structure, while in the other all four free tartrate oxygen atoms are coordinated to four Ln ions in a very distorted tetrahedral arrangement. The connectivity between Sb(2)L(2)(2-) secondary units and LnO(9) polyhedra gives rise to infinite layers. 2D(II) [(La(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·6H(2)O, which crystallizes in space group C2, has a similar network to the 2D(I)-Ln compounds. The trends in lattice parameters, bond lengths, and ionic radii in the 1D-Ln series were analyzed to show the effect of the lanthanide contraction.

  20. Low-temperature (77 K) phosphorescence of triplet chlorophyll in isolated reaction centers of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Zabelin, Alexey A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorescence characterized by the main emission band at 952 ± 1 nm (1.30 eV), the lifetime of 1.5 ± 0.1 ms and the quantum yield nearly equal to that for monomeric chlorophyll a in aqueous detergent dispersions, has been detected in isolated reaction centers (RCs) of spinach photosystem II at 77 K. The excitation spectrum shows maxima corresponding to absorption bands of chlorophyll a, pheophytin a, and β-carotene. The phosphorescence intensity strongly depends upon the redox state of RCs. The data suggest that the phosphorescence signal originates from the chlorophyll triplet state populated via charge recombination in the radical pair [Formula: see text].

  1. Slowing of proton transport processes in the structure of bacterial reaction centers and bacteriorhodopsin in the presence of dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Knox, P P; Lukashev, E P; Mamedov, M D; Semenov, A Y; Seifullina, N H; Zakharova, N I

    2000-02-01

    Dipyridamole, 2,6-bis(diethanolamino)-4,8-dipiperidinopyrimido(5, 4-d)pyrimidine, is employed in clinical practice as a vasodilator. It can also inhibit a specific membrane protein (glycoprotein P) which pumps anticancer drugs out of tumor cells. Dipyridamole (10-4 M) markedly slows down the kinetics of the electrogenic phase of the photoelectric response in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores. This phase is due to proton transfer from the external medium to the secondary quinone acceptor in the reaction center. In purple membranes of bacterium Halobacterium salinarium containing bacteriorhodopsin dipyridamole (in its charged state) significantly slowed the kinetics of proton transfer from the primary donor, Asp-96 (in membranes from bacteria of wild type), or from the external medium (in D96N mutant) to the Schiff base. It is suggested that dipyridamole can influence the structural-dynamic state of membrane proteins including modification of the structure of their hydrogen bonds involved in proton-transport processes.

  2. Pressure-induced spectral changes for the special-pair radical cation of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi; Dahlbom, Mats G; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2007-06-07

    The effect of pressure up to 6 kbars on the near to mid infrared absorption spectrum (7500-14,300 cm(-1) or 1333-700 nm) of the oxidized reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is measured and interpreted using density-functional B3LYP, INDO, and PM5 calculations. Two weak electronic transition origins at approximately 8010 and approximately 10,210 cm(-1) are unambiguously identified. The first transition is assigned to a Qy tripdoublet band that involves, in the localized description of the excitation, a triplet absorption on one of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules (PM) in the reaction center's special pair intensified by the presence of a radical cation on the other (PL). While most chlorophyll transition energies decrease significantly with increasing pressure, the tripdoublet band is found to be almost pressure insensitive. This difference is attributed to the additional increase in the tripdoublet-band energy accompanying compression of the pi-stacked special pair. The second band could either be the anticipated second Qy tripdoublet state, a Qx tripdoublet state, or a state involving excitation from a low-lying doubly occupied orbital to the half-occupied cationic orbital. A variety of absorption bands that are also resolved in the 8300-9600 cm(-1) region are assigned as vibrational structure associated with the first tripdoublet absorption. These sidebands are composites that are shown by the calculations to comprise many unresolved individual modes; while the calculated pressure sensitivity of each individual mode is small, the calculated pressure dependence of the combined sideband structure is qualitatively similar to the observed pressure dependence, preventing the positive identification of possible additional electronic transitions in this spectral region.

  3. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ωsp, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  4. High-pressure modulation of the structure of the bacterial photochemical reaction center at physiological and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpmann, Kõu; Kangur, Liina; Lõhmus, Ants; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-07-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence response to external high pressure of the reaction center membrane chromoprotein complex from the wild-type non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using the native pigment cofactors as local molecular probes of the reaction center structure at physiological (ambient) and cryogenic (79 K) temperatures. In detergent-purified complexes at ambient temperature, abrupt blue shift and accompanied broadening of the special pair band was observed at about 265 MPa. These reversible in pressure features were assigned to a pressure-induced rupture of a lone hydrogen bond that binds the photo-chemically active L-branch primary electron donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactor to the surrounding protein scaffold. In native membrane-protected complexes the hydrogen bond rupture appeared significantly restricted and occurred close to about 500 MPa. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the special pair hydrogen bond in isolate complexes was estimated to be equal to about 12 kJ mol-1. In frozen samples at cryogenic temperatures the hydrogen bond remained apparently intact up to the maximum utilized pressure of 600 MPa. In this case, however, heterogeneous spectral response of the cofactors from the L-and M-branches was observed due to anisotropic build-up of the protein structure. While in solid phase, the special pair fluorescence as a function of pressure exactly followed the respective absorption spectrum at a constant Stokes shift, at ambient temperature, the two paths began to deviate strongly from one other at the hydrogen bond rupture pressure. This effect was tentatively interpreted by different emission properties of hydrogen-bound and hydrogen-unbound special pair exciton states.

  5. Comments on the optical lineshape function: Application to transient hole-burned spectra of bacterial reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, Mike; Kell, Adam; Pruitt, Thomas; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-03-07

    The vibrational spectral density is an important physical parameter needed to describe both linear and non-linear spectra of multi-chromophore systems such as photosynthetic complexes. Low-temperature techniques such as hole burning (HB) and fluorescence line narrowing are commonly used to extract the spectral density for a given electronic transition from experimental data. We report here that the lineshape function formula reported by Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)] in the mean-phonon approximation and frequently applied to analyzing HB data contains inconsistencies in notation, leading to essentially incorrect expressions in cases of moderate and strong electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling strengths. A corrected lineshape function L(ω) is given that retains the computational and intuitive advantages of the expression of Hayes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 98, 7337 (1994)]. Although the corrected lineshape function could be used in modeling studies of various optical spectra, we suggest that it is better to calculate the lineshape function numerically, without introducing the mean-phonon approximation. New theoretical fits of the P870 and P960 absorption bands and frequency-dependent resonant HB spectra of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reaction centers are provided as examples to demonstrate the importance of correct lineshape expressions. Comparison with the previously determined el-ph coupling parameters [Johnson et al., J. Phys. Chem. 94, 5849 (1990); Lyle et al., ibid. 97, 6924 (1993); Reddy et al., ibid. 97, 6934 (1993)] is also provided. The new fits lead to modified el-ph coupling strengths and different frequencies of the special pair marker mode, ω{sub sp}, for Rb. sphaeroides that could be used in the future for more advanced calculations of absorption and HB spectra obtained for various bacterial reaction centers.

  6. Pressure-induced spectral changes for the special-pair radical cation of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi; Dahlbom, Mats G.; Hush, Noel S.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of pressure up to 6kbars on the near to mid infrared absorption spectrum (7500-14300cm-1 or 1333-700nm) of the oxidized reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is measured and interpreted using density-functional B3LYP, INDO, and PM5 calculations. Two weak electronic transition origins at ˜8010 and ˜10210cm-1 are unambiguously identified. The first transition is assigned to a Qy tripdoublet band that involves, in the localized description of the excitation, a triplet absorption on one of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules (PM) in the reaction center's special pair intensified by the presence of a radical cation on the other (PL). While most chlorophyll transition energies decrease significantly with increasing pressure, the tripdoublet band is found to be almost pressure insensitive. This difference is attributed to the additional increase in the tripdoublet-band energy accompanying compression of the π-stacked special pair. The second band could either be the anticipated second Qy tripdoublet state, a Qx tripdoublet state, or a state involving excitation from a low-lying doubly occupied orbital to the half-occupied cationic orbital. A variety of absorption bands that are also resolved in the 8300-9600cm-1 region are assigned as vibrational structure associated with the first tripdoublet absorption. These sidebands are composites that are shown by the calculations to comprise many unresolved individual modes; while the calculated pressure sensitivity of each individual mode is small, the calculated pressure dependence of the combined sideband structure is qualitatively similar to the observed pressure dependence, preventing the positive identification of possible additional electronic transitions in this spectral region.

  7. Autologous rosette-forming T cells as the responding cells in human autologous mixed-lymphocyte reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Llorente, L; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Ruíz-Arguelles, A; Díaz-Jouanen, E

    1980-01-01

    Autologous rosette-forming cells (Tar cells) have surface and functional characteristics of post-thymic precursors and among these characteristics there are some that have been identified in the responsive cell of the autologous mixed-lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). We therefore did AMLR with circulating mononuclear cells from normal subjects using as responding cells either total T cells, T cells depleted of Tar cells, or purified Tar cells. The response of Tar cells in AMLR was significantly greater than that of total T cells and these responded significantly more than Tar-depleted T cells. Conversely, Tar cells responded less than total T cells or T cells depleted of Tar cells in allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reactions. Increasing numbers of Tar cells gave significantly greater AMLR responses both alone and when added to diminishing proportions of Tar-depleted T cells to keep the number of T cells constant in the system. Tar cells are the responding cells in AMLR but not in allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reactions. PMID:6447710

  8. Photoreduction and reoxidation of the three iron-sulfur clusters of reaction centers of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sétif, P; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    2001-09-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters are the terminal electron acceptors of the photosynthetic reaction centers of green sulfur bacteria and photosystem I. We have studied electron-transfer reactions involving these clusters in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, using flash-absorption spectroscopic measurements. We show for the first time that three different clusters, named F(X), F(1), and F(2), can be photoreduced at room temperature during a series of consecutive flashes. The rates of electron escape to exogenous acceptors depend strongly upon the number of reduced clusters. When two or three clusters are reduced, the escape is biphasic, with the fastest phase being 12-14-fold faster than the slowest phase, which is similar to that observed after single reduction. This is explained by assuming that escape involves mostly the second reducible cluster. Evidence is thus provided for a functional asymmetry between the two terminal acceptors F(1) and F(2). From multiple-flash experiments, it was possible to derive the intrinsic recombination rates between P840(+) and reduced iron-sulfur clusters: values of 7, 14, and 59 s(-1) were found after one, two and three electron reduction of the clusters, respectively. The implications of our results for the relative redox potentials of the three clusters are discussed.

  9. Integration of photoswitchable proteins, photosynthetic reaction centers and semiconductor/biomolecule hybrids with electrode supports for optobioelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2013-01-18

    Light-triggered biological processes provide the principles for the development of man-made optobioelectronic systems. This Review addresses three recently developed topics in the area of optobioelectronics, while addressing the potential applications of these systems. The topics discussed include: (i) the reversible photoswitching of the bioelectrocatalytic functions of redox proteins by the modification of proteins with photoisomerizable units or by the integration of proteins with photoisomerizable environments; (ii) the integration of natural photosynthetic reaction centers with electrodes and the construction of photobioelectrochemical cells and photobiofuel cells; and (iii) the synthesis of biomolecule/semiconductor quantum dots hybrid systems and their immobilization on electrodes to yield photobioelectrochemical and photobiofuel cell elements. The fundamental challenge in the tailoring of optobioelectronic systems is the development of means to electrically contact photoactive biomolecular assemblies with the electrode supports. Different methods to establish electrical communication between the photoactive biomolecular assemblies and electrodes are discussed. These include the nanoscale engineering of the biomolecular nanostructures on surfaces, the development of photoactive molecular wires and the coupling of photoinduced electron transfer reactions with the redox functions of proteins. The different possible applications of optobioelectronic systems are discussed, including their use as photosensors, the design of biosensors, and the construction of solar energy conversion and storage systems. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mutation-induced perturbation of the special pair P840 in the homodimeric reaction center in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Azai, Chihiro; Sano, Yuko; Kato, Yuki; Noguchi, Takumi; Oh-oka, Hirozo

    2016-01-25

    Homodimeric photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria are functional homologs of Photosystem (PS) I in oxygenic phototrophs. They show unique features in their electron transfer reactions; however, detailed structural information has not been available so far. We mutated PscA-Leu688 and PscA-Val689 to cysteine residues in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum; these residues were predicted to interact with the special pair P840, based on sequence comparison with PS I. Spectroelectrochemical measurements showed that the L688C and V689C mutations altered a near-infrared difference spectrum upon P840 oxidation, as well as the redox potential of P840. Light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference measurements showed that the L688C mutation induced a differential signal of the S-H stretching vibration in the P840(+)/P840 spectrum, as reported in P800(+)/P800 difference spectrum in a heliobacterial RC. Spectral changes in the 13(1)-keto C=O region, caused by both mutations, revealed corresponding changes in the electronic structure of P840 and in the hydrogen-bonding interaction at the 13(1)-keto C=O group. These results suggest that there is a common spatial configuration around the special pair sites among type 1 RCs. The data also provided evidence that P840 has a symmetric electronic structure, as expected from a homodimeric RC.

  11. Regulation of autoimmune germinal center reactions in lupus-prone BXD2 mice by follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Uk; Lim, Hoyong; Jung, Ha Eun; Wetsel, Rick A; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    BXD2 mice spontaneously develop autoantibodies and subsequent glomerulonephritis, offering a useful animal model to study autoimmune lupus. Although initial studies showed a critical contribution of IL-17 and Th17 cells in mediating autoimmune B cell responses in BXD2 mice, the role of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells remains incompletely understood. We found that both the frequency of Th17 cells and the levels of IL-17 in circulation in BXD2 mice were comparable to those of wild-type. By contrast, the frequency of PD-1+ CXCR5+ Tfh cells was significantly increased in BXD2 mice compared with wild-type mice, while the frequency of PD-1+ CXCR5+ Foxp3+ follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells was reduced in the former group. The frequency of Tfh cells rather than that of Th17 cells was positively correlated with the frequency of germinal center B cells as well as the levels of autoantibodies to dsDNA. More importantly, CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells isolated from BXD2 mice induced the production of IgG from naïve B cells in an IL-21-dependent manner, while CCR6+ CD4+ T cells failed to do so. These results together demonstrate that Tfh cells rather than Th17 cells contribute to the autoimmune germinal center reactions in BXD2 mice.

  12. EPR and optical spectroscopic properties of the electron carrier intermediate between the reaction center bacteriochlorophylls and the primary acceptor in Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Tiede, D M; Prince, R C; Dutton, P L

    1976-12-06

    1. A reaction center-cytochrome c complex has been isolated from Chromatium vinosum which is capable of normal photochemistry and light-activated rapid cytochrome c553 and c555 oxidation, but which has no antenna bacteriochlorophyll. As is found in whole cells, ferrocytochrome c553 is oxidized irreversibly in milliseconds by light at 7 K. 2. Room temperature redox potentiometry in combination with EPR analysis at 7 K, of cytochrome c553 and the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer (BChl)2 absorbing at 883 nm yields identical results to those previously reported using optical analytical techniques at 77 K. It shows directly that two cytochrome c553 hemes are equivalent with respect to the light induced (BChl)2+. At 7 K, only one heme can be rapidly oxidized in the light, commensurate with the electron capacity of the primary acceptor (quinone-iron) being unity. 3. Prior chemical reduction of the quinone-iron followed by illumination at 200K, however, leads to the slow (t1/2 approximately equal to 30 s) oxidation of one cytochrome c553 heme, with what appears to be concommitant reduction of one of the two bacteriophytins (BPh) of the reaction center as shown by bleaching of the 760 nm band, a broad absorbance increase at approx. 650 nm and a bleaching at 543 nm. The 800 nm absorbing bacteriochlorophyll is also involved since there is also bleaching at 595 and 800 nm; at the latter wave-length the remaining unbleached band appears to shift significantly to the blue. No redox changes in the 883 absorbing bacteriochlorophyll dimer are seen during or after illumination under these conditions. The reduced part of the state represents what is considered to be the reduced form of the electron carrier (I) which acts as an intermediate between the bacteriochlorophyll dimer and quinone-iron. The state (oxidized c553/reduced I) relaxes in the dark at 200K in t1/2 approx. 20 min but below 77 K it is trapped on a days time scale. 4. EPR analysis of the state trapped as

  13. Lycopene epoxides and apo-lycopenals formed by chemical reactions and autoxidation in model systems and processed foods.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Evelyn B; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2009-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the reactions and the underlying mechanisms of the oxidative degradation of lycopene, the products formed by epoxidation with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (MCPBA), oxidative cleavage with KMnO(4), and autoxidation in low-moisture and aqueous model systems, under light exposure, at ambient temperature were identified. The presence of oxidation products was also verified in processed products (tomato juice, tomato paste, tomato puree, guava juice, "goiabada"). A total of 8 lycopene epoxides and a cyclolycopene diol were formed by the reaction of lycopene with MCPBA and 6 apo-lycopenals were produced with KMnO(4). Some of these oxidation products were not detected in the model systems and in the foods analyzed, but the acid-catalyzed rearrangement product 2,6-cyclolycopene-1,5-diol and apo-12'-lycopenal were found in all model and food systems and lycopene-1,2-epoxide and 2,6-cyclolycopene-1,5-epoxide were found in the model systems and in all but 1 ("goiabada") of the 5 foods analyzed. Other epoxides and apo-lycopenals were found in some systems. The inability to detect an intermediate product could be due to a fast turn over. Increased Z-isomerization was also observed and Z-isomers of the oxidation products were detected.

  14. Virus-based Photo-Responsive Nanowires Formed By Linking Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Murali; Abbineni, Gopal; Nimmo, Susan L.; Cao, Binrui; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-05-01

    Owing to the genetic flexibility and error-free bulk production, bio-nanostructures such as filamentous phage showed great potential in materials synthesis, however, their photo-responsive behaviour is neither explored nor unveiled. Here we show M13 phage genetically engineered with tyrosine residues precisely fused to the major coat protein is converted into a photo-responsive organic nanowire by a site-specific chemical reaction with an aromatic amine to form an azo dye structure on the surface. The resulting azo-M13-phage nanowire exhibits reversible photo-responsive properties due to the photo-switchable cis-trans isomerisation of the azo unit formed on the phage. This result shows that site-specific display of a peptide on bio-nanostructures through site-directed genetic mutagenesis can be translated into site-directed chemical reaction for developing advanced materials. The photo-responsive properties of the azo-M13-phage nanowires may open the door for the development of light controllable smart devices for use in non-linear optics, holography data storage, molecular antenna, and actuators.

  15. Residual Water Modulates QA−-to-QB Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers Embedded in Trehalose Amorphous Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Mallardi, Antonia; Cordone, Lorenzo; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics in the electron transfer from the reduced primary quinone, QA−, to the secondary quinone, QB, was studied at room temperature in isolated reaction centers (RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by incorporating the protein in trehalose water systems of different trehalose/water ratios. The effects of dehydration on the reaction kinetics were examined by analyzing charge recombination after different regimes of RC photoexcitation (single laser pulse, double flash, and continuous light) as well as by monitoring flash-induced electrochromic effects in the near infrared spectral region. Independent approaches show that dehydration of RC-containing matrices causes reversible, inhomogeneous inhibition of QA−-to-QB electron transfer, involving two subpopulations of RCs. In one of these populations (i.e., active), the electron transfer to QB is slowed but still successfully competing with P+QA− recombination, even in the driest samples; in the other (i.e., inactive), electron transfer to QB after a laser pulse is hindered, inasmuch as only recombination of the P+QA− state is observed. Small residual water variations (∼7 wt %) modulate fully the relative fraction of the two populations, with the active one decreasing to zero in the driest samples. Analysis of charge recombination after continuous illumination indicates that, in the inactive subpopulation, the conformational changes that rate-limit electron transfer can be slowed by >4 orders of magnitude. The reported effects are consistent with conformational gating of the reaction and demonstrate that the conformational dynamics controlling electron transfer to QB is strongly enslaved to the structure and dynamics of the surrounding medium. Comparing the effects of dehydration on P+QA−→PQA recombination and QA−QB→QAQB− electron transfer suggests that conformational changes gating the latter process are distinct from those stabilizing the primary

  16. Transplant Center Search Form

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital dyskeratosis Other: Desmoid small round cell Other: Diamond Blackfan Anemia Other: DiGeorge anomaly Other: Dyserythropoietic anemia ... Retinoblastoma Other: Rhabdomyosarcoma Other: Sanfillipo Syndrome Other: Schwachman-Diamond ... SCIDS Other: Scleroderma Other: Scleromyxedema Other: ...

  17. Deformation and orientation effects in the decay of 268Sg* formed in a 30Si-induced reaction across the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamical cluster decay model (DCM) is used to study the decay of the 268Sg* compound nucleus formed in the 30Si+238U reaction at above and below the Coulomb barrier energies. The neutron evaporation residues and fission cross sections are calculated in reference to the available data, including β2i-static deformations with ‘optimum' orientations. The role of spherical and the β2i-dynamic deformed choices of fragmentation are also studied explicitly at the highest 169 MeV energy. The fission fragment distribution is symmetric at above-barrier energies, where equatorial collisions are preferred, but becomes asymmetric when the nuclei approach in pole-to-pole configuration at sub-barrier energies. Therefore, at above-barrier energies the calculations are carried out by considering ‘hot fusion', equatorial collisions, whereas at sub-barrier energies the ‘cold fusion', polar configuration is considered. The asymmetric peaks at sub-barrier energies may be associated with some competing process, like quasifission. The analysis of polar and equatorial configurations suggests that larger barrier modification is required at sub-barrier energies for neutron evaporation residue and fission fragments, i.e., the contribution of barrier modification at sub-barrier energies is relatively higher for a cold elongated polar configuration as compared to a hot compact equatorial configuration. Finally, the potential energies surfaces for the Si-induced reaction are compared with the S-induced reaction on the 238U target, at comparable center of mass energies.

  18. Competing analysis of α and 2p2n-emission from compound nuclei formed in neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The decay mechanism of compound system 61Ni* formed in fast neutron induced reactions is explored within the collective clusterization approach of the Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM) in reference to a recent experiment over an energy spread of En = 1- 100 MeV. The excitation functions for the decay of the compound nucleus 61Ni* formed in the n +60Ni reaction show a double humped variation with incident beam energy where the peak at lower energy corresponds to α-emission while the one at higher energy originates from 2 p 2 n-emission. The experimentally observed transmutation of α-emission at lower energy into 2 p 2 n-emission at higher incident energies is explained on the basis of temperature dependence of the binding energies used within the framework of DCM. The cross-sections for the formation of the daughter nucleus 57Fe after emission of α-cluster from the 61Ni* nucleus are addressed by employing the neck length parameter (ΔR), finding decent agreement with the available experimental data. The calculations are done for non-sticking choice of moment of inertia (INS) in the centrifugal potential term, which forms the essential ingredient in DCM based calculations. In addition to this, the effect of mass (and charge) of the compound nucleus is exercised in view of α and 2 p 2 n emission and comparative study of the decay profiles of compound systems with mass A = 17-93 is employed to get better description of decay patterns.

  19. Flux pinning behavior in Nb50Ti/Cu superconducting composite with different form of artificial pinning center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. H.; Zhou, L.; Wu, X. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; Wang, F. Y.; Zhang, P. X.; Feng, Y.; Weber, H. W.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial pinning center (APC) niobium-titanium composites achieve very high critical current density value at low magnetic field (below 5 T), but they are inferior to conventional composites at high magnetic fields (above 7 T) due to weak flux pining force. Therefore, realization of flux pinning behavior and improvement of flux pinning force of NbTi composite are very important. In this paper, three forms of niobium APC were introduced into Nb50Ti/Cu composites, that is, island-shaped, net-shaped and sheet-shaped Nb APC. The results show that Nb50Ti/Cu composites with island-shaped APC have highest flux pinning force over other two kinds of composites with net-shaped and sheet-shaped APC, however, this difference will be reduced after heat treatment process.

  20. A novel off-center paddle impeller (OPI) dissolution testing system for reproducible dissolution testing of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Armenante, Piero M

    2012-02-01

    Dissolution testing is routinely conducted in the pharmaceutical industry to provide in vitro drug release information for quality control purposes. The most common dissolution testing system for solid dosage forms is the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Dissolution Testing Apparatus 2. This apparatus is very sensitive to the initial location of the tablet, which cannot be controlled because the tablet is dropped into the vessel at the beginning of the test and it may rest at random locations at the vessel's bottom. In this work, a modified Apparatus 2 in which the impeller was placed 8 mm off center in the vessel was designed and tested. This new design was termed "OPI" for "off-center paddle impeller." Dissolution tests were conducted with the OPI apparatus for nine different tablet locations using both disintegrating tablets (prednisone) and nondisintegrating tablets (salicylic acid). The dissolution profiles in the OPI apparatus were largely independent of the tablet location at the vessel's bottom, whereas those obtained in the Standard System generated statistically different profiles depending on the tablet location. The newly proposed OPI system can effectively eliminate artifacts generated by random settling of the tablet at the vessel's bottom, thus making the test more robust. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Four-dimensional quantum study on exothermic complex-forming reactions: Cl- + CH3Br-->ClCH3+Br-.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Carsten; Schmatz, Stefan

    2005-06-15

    The exothermic gas-phase bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S(N)2) reaction Cl(-)+CH(3)Br (upsilon1',upsilon2',upsilon3')-->ClCH(3) (upsilon1,upsilon2,upsilon3)+Br- and the corresponding endothermic reverse reaction have been studied by time-independent quantum scattering calculations in hyperspherical coordinates on a coupled-cluster potential-energy surface. The dimensionality-reduced model takes four degrees of freedom into account [Cl-C and C-Br stretching modes (quantum numbers upsilon3' and upsilon3); totally symmetric modes of the methyl group, i.e., C-H stretching (upsilon1' and upsilon1) and umbrella bending vibrations (upsilon2' and upsilon2)]. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian was performed employing the Lanczos algorithm with a variation of partial reorthogonalization. A narrow grid in the total energy was employed so that long-living resonance states could be resolved and extracted. While excitation of the reactant umbrella bending mode already leads to a considerable enhancement of the reaction probability, its combination with vibrational excitation of the broken C-Br bond, (0, 1, 1), results in a strong synergic effect that can be rationalized by the similarity with the classical transitional normal mode. Exciting the C-H stretch has a non-negligible effect on the reaction probability, while for larger translational energies this mode follows the expected spectatorlike behavior. Combination of C-Br stretch and symmetric C-H, (1,0,1), stretch does not show a cooperative effect. Contrary to the spectator mode concept, energy originally stored in the C-H stretching mode is by no means conserved, but almost completely released in other modes of the reaction products. Products are most likely formed in states with a high degree of excitation in the new C-Cl bond, while the internal modes of the methyl group are less important. Reactants with combined umbrella/C-Br stretch excitation, (0, 1, 1), may yield products with two quanta in the umbrella mode.

  2. Proton ENDOR study of the primary donor P740 +, a special pair of chlorophyll d in photosystem I reaction center of Acaryochloris marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Hiroyuki; Kawamori, Asako; Aoyama, Daisuke; Tomo, Tatsuya; Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru

    2005-08-01

    Oxidized primary electron donor P740, a special pair of chlorophyll (Chl) d in photosystem (PS) I reaction center of a newly identified cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was studied by EPR and proton ENDOR spectroscopy. EPR and ENDOR spectra of P740 + were compared with those of P700 + in PS I reaction center of spinach. The g-factors of the purified Chl a+ and Chl d+ in CH 2Cl 2/THF, P700 + and P740 + in PS I reaction centers were determined to be 2.0025, 2.0032, 2.0027 and 2.0028, respectively. Hyperfine coupling constants of 1.9, 2.8 and 3.8 MHz that were detected in the ENDOR spectrum of P700 + were absent in the ENDOR spectrum of P740 +. These features of P740 + were mainly ascribed to the difference between the chemical structures of Chl a and Chl d.

  3. An examination of the reaction pathways for the HOOOBr and HOOBrO complexes formed from the HO{sub 2} + BrO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Francisco, J.S.

    1999-10-07

    The geometries, vibrational spectra, and relative energetics of the HBrO{sub 3} isomers (HOOOBr and HOOBrO) and their transition states have been examined by using the quadratic configuration interaction method in conjunction with various basis sets. From the dissociation energies of the HBrO{sub 3} isomers, it is found that the most energetically favorable process during the HO{sub 2} + BrO reaction pathway is the formation of HOOBrO as an intermediate, and its eventual dissociation into HOBr and O{sub 2}, due to the very low energy barrier (2.8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) involved. The HOOOBr species, if formed as an intermediate, will be more likely to dissociate into HBr + O{sub 3} rather than HOBr + O{sub 2}, as the energy barrier for the latter process is quite high (26.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) relative to the energy barrier for the HOOOBr {r{underscore}arrow} HBr + O{sub 3} dissociation process.

  4. Combining characteristic forms of boundary conditions and conservation equations at boundaries of cell-centered Euler-flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1987-04-01

    A numerical method to obtain the additional equations in Euler-flow calculations based on cell-centered schemes when the number of equations required to determine the flow-state evaluation at grid points half a mesh outside the flow domain exceeds the number of boundary-condition equations provided by characteristic theory, is presented. A layer of auxiliary cells on flow boundaries is introduced, and semidiscrete conservation equations for these cells are defined. The time variations of the state in these auxiliary cells at the boundary are transformed into characteristic form, and time variations of characteristic variables corresponding to incoming information from the boundary into the flow are replaced by boundary conditions for these time variations. The boundary equations so obtained are mapped back into a form with primitive variables, and numerically integrated in time. The characteristic boundary conditions are first-order differential equations for time variations at boundary points of characteristic variables. These equations may be chosen to express that given functions of the flow state on the boundary should asymptotically tend with time to prescribed steady-state values.

  5. Type III hypersensitivity reactions to a B cell epitope antigen are abrogated using a depot forming vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Lisa D; MacKay, Alecia; Kaliaperumal, Valarmathy; Weir, Genevieve; Penwell, Andrea; Rajagopalan, Rajkannan; Langley, Joanne; Halperin, Scott; Mansour, Marc; Stanford, Marianne M

    2017-09-21

    Peptide antigens are combined with an adjuvant in order to increase immunogenicity in vivo. The immunogenicity and safety of a RSV vaccine formulated in a novel oil-based platform, DepoVax™ (DPX), was compared to an alum formulation. A peptide B cell epitope derived from RSV small hydrophobic ectodomain (SHe) served as the antigen. Both vaccines induced SHe-specific antibodies after immunization of mice. A single dose of the DPX-based formulation resulted in anti-SHe titres for up to 20 weeks. Boosting with Alum-SHe, but not with DPX-SHe, led to unexpected clinical signs such as decreased activity, cyanosis and drop in body temperature in mice but not in rabbits. The severity of adverse reactions correlated with magnitude of SHe-specific IgG immune responses and decreased complement component 3 plasma levels, indicating a type III hypersensitivity reaction. By RP-HPLC analysis, we found that only 8-20% of the antigen was found to be adsorbed to alum in vitro, indicating that this antigen is likely released systemically upon injection in vivo. Clinical signs were not observed in rabbits, indicating the response correlates with peptide dose relative to size of animal. These results suggest that peptide antigens targeted to produce B cell mediated response may result in increased incidence of type III hypersensitivity reactions when delivered in non-depot forming vaccines. The DPX formulation induced strong antibody titres to the antigen without causing adverse events, likely due to the strength of the depot in vivo, and demonstrates the potential safety and immunogenicity of this platform for B cell peptide antigens.

  6. Energy dissipation in photosynthesis: does the quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence originate from antenna complexes of photosystem II or from the reaction center?

    PubMed

    Bukhov, N G; Heber, U; Wiese, C; Shuvalov, V A

    2001-04-01

    Dissipation of light energy was studied in the moss Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus (Hedw.) Warnst., and in leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., using chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator reaction. Maximum chlorophyll fluorescence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU)-treated spinach leaves, as produced by saturating light and studied between and -20 degrees C, revealed an activation energy delta E of 0.11 eV. As this suggested recombination fluorescence produced by charge recombination between the oxidized primary donor of photosystem II and reduced pheophytin, a mathematical model explaining fluorescence, and based in part on known characteristics of primary electron-transport reactions, was developed. The model permitted analysis of different modes of fluorescence quenching, two localized in the reaction center of photosystem II and one in the light-harvesting system of the antenna complexes. It predicted differences in the relationship between quenching of variable fluorescence Fv and quenching of basal, so-called F0 fluorescence depending on whether quenching originated from antenna complexes or from reaction centers. Such differences were found experimentally, suggesting antenna quenching as the predominant mechanism of dissipation of light energy in the moss Rhytidiadelphus, whereas reaction-center quenching appeared to be important in spinach and Arabidopsis. Both reaction-center and antenna quenching required activation by thylakoid protonation but only antenna quenching depended on or was strongly enhanced by zeaxanthin. De-protonation permitted relaxation of this quenching with half-times below 1 min. More slowly reversible quenching, tentatively identified as so-called qI or photoinhibitory quenching, required protonation but persisted for prolonged times after de-protonation. It appeared to originate in reaction centers.

  7. Theoretical considerations for Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) formation by molten silicon infiltration into slurry-derived preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Singh, M.

    1993-01-01

    For reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics produced by silicon melt infiltration of porous carbon preforms, equations are developed to relate the amount of residual silicon to the initial carbon density. Also, for a slurry derived preform containing both carbon and silicon powder, equations are derived which relate the amount of residual silicon in the RFSC to the relative density of the carbon in the preform and to the amount of silicon powder added to the slurry. For a porous carbon preform that does not have enough porosity to prevent choking-off of the silicon infiltration, these results show that complete silicon infiltration can occur by adding silicon powder to the slurry mixture used to produce these preforms.

  8. Microstructure and properties of platelet-reinforced ceramics formed by the directed reaction of zirconium with boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Claar, T.D.; Johnson, W.B.; Andersson, C.A.; Schiroky, G.H.

    1989-08-01

    A new family of platelet-reinforced ceramics has been developed using the DIMOX (directed-metal oxidation) process. These materials consist of a metal carbide matrix reinforced with metal diboride platelets and a residual metal phase. Microstructure/property relationships are presented for the ZrB2/ZrC(x)/Zr system, which is formed by the directed reaction of molten zirconium with boron carbide. The metal content can be varied to tailor the mechanical, physical, and thermal properties. These platelet-reinforced ceramics exhibit an attractive combination of high strength (800-1030 MPa), high fracture toughness (11-23 MPa sq rt m), and high thermal conductivity (50-70 W/m K). The effects of the platelet and metal phases on the toughness and fracture behavior are shown. Engineering properties are presented and discussed relative to potential applications. 9 refs.

  9. Characterization of products formed in the reaction of ozone with alpha-pinene: case for organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Venkatachari, Prasanna; Hopke, Philip K

    2008-08-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their subsequent induced pulmonary and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated as an important molecular mechanism of PM-mediated toxicity. However, recent work has shown that there is significant ROS associated with ambient PM. In order to understand the formation mechanisms as well as understand the potential health effects of particle-bound oxidative species, the alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation chemical system was studied to elucidate the structures of reaction products using liquid chromatography-multiple stage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)). The classes of compounds identified based on their multiple stage-MS fragmentation patterns, mechanistic considerations of alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation, and general fragmentation rules, of the products from this reaction system were highly oxygenated species, predominantly containing hydroperoxide and peroxide functional groups. The oxidant species observed were clearly stable for the 1-3 h that elapsed during aerosol collection and analysis, and probably for much longer, thus rendering it possible for these species to bind onto particles forming fine particulate organic peroxides that concentrate on the particles and could deliver concentrated doses of ROS in vivo to tissue.

  10. Reactivity of Cations and Zwitterions Formed in Photochemical and Acid-Catalyzed Reactions from m-Hydroxycycloalkyl-Substituted Phenol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cindro, Nikola; Antol, Ivana; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Halasz, Ivan; Wan, Peter; Basarić, Nikola

    2015-12-18

    Three m-substituted phenol derivatives, each with a labile benzylic alcohol group and bearing either protoadamantyl 4, homoadamantyl 5, or a cyclohexyl group 6, were synthesized and their thermal acid-catalyzed and photochemical solvolytic reactivity studied, using preparative irradiations, fluorescence measurements, nanosecond laser flash photolysis, and quantum chemical calculations. The choice of m-hydroxy-substitution was driven by the potential for these phenolic systems to generate m-quinone methides on photolysis, which could ultimately drive the excited-state pathway, as opposed to forming simple benzylic carbocations in the corresponding thermal route. Indeed, thermal acid-catalyzed reactions gave the corresponding cations, which undergo rearrangement and elimination from 4, only elimination from 5, and substitution and elimination from 6. On the other hand, upon photoexcitation of 4-6 to S1 in a polar protic solvent, proton dissociation from the phenol, coupled with elimination of the benzylic OH (as hydroxide ion) gave zwitterions (formal m-quinone methides). The zwitterions exhibit reactivity different from the corresponding cations due to a difference in charge distribution, as shown by DFT calculations. Thus, protoadamantyl zwitterion has a less nonclassical character than the corresponding cation, so it does not undergo 1,2-shift of the carbon atom, as observed in the acid-catalyzed reaction.

  11. Forming a Two-Ring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon without a Benzene Intermediate: the Reaction of Propargyl with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David; Savee, John; Selby, Talitha; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig

    The reaction of acetylene (HCCH) with a resonance-stabilized free radical is a commonly invoked mechanism for the generation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are likely precursors of soot particles in combustion. In this work, we examine the sequential addition of acetylene to the propargyl radical (H2CCCH) at temperatures of 800 and 1000 K. Using time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable ionizing radiation, we identified the isomeric forms of the C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence, and confirmed that the final C9H8 product is the two-ring aromatic compound indene. We identified two different resonance-stabilized C5H5 intermediates, with different temperature dependencies. Furthermore, the C7H7 intermediate is the tropyl radical (c-C7H7) , not the benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) , as is usually assumed in combustion environments. These experimental results are in general agreement with the latest electronic structure / master equation results of da Silva et al. This work shows a pathway for PAH formation that bypasses benzene / benzyl intermediates.

  12. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the Qb semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the Qa site.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2011-04-13

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites, using samples of (15)N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe(2+) exchanged for diamagnetic Zn(2+), prepared in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the Q(A) SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J.2007, 92, 671-682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6-5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the Q(B) SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T ≈ 5.2, 3.7 MHz and T ≈ 1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the Q(B) site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the Q(B) SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T = 5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 N(δ)H···O(4) (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T = 3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the Q(B) site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the Q(A) site, consistent with available experimental data for (13)C and (17)O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for Q

  13. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the QB semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the QA site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Narasimhulu, Kupala V.; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O’Malley, Patrick J.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the QA and QB sites, using samples of 15N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe2+ exchanged for diamagnetic Zn2+, prepared in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the QA SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J. 2007, 92, 671–682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6–5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the QB SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T~5.2, 3.7 MHz and T~1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the QB site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the QB SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T=5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 NδH…O4 (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T =3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the QB site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the QA site, consistent with available experimental data for 13C and 17O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for QB function and comparisons with the QA site are discussed

  14. Excited-state electronic asymmetry of the special pair in photosynthetic reaction center mutants: absorption and Stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, L J; Zhou, H; Boxer, S G

    1999-09-14

    The electronic absorption line shape and Stark spectrum of the lowest energy Q(y)() transition of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers contain a wealth of information on mixing with charge transfer states and electronic asymmetry. Both vary greatly in mutants that perturb the chemical composition of the special pair, such as the heterodimer mutants, and in mutants that alter interactions between the special pair and the surrounding reaction center protein, such as those that add or remove hydrogen bonds. The conventional and higher-order Stark spectra of a series of mutants are presented with the aim of developing a systematic description of the electronic structure of the excited state of the special pair that initiates photosynthetic charge separation. The mutants L168HF, M197FH, L131LH and L131LH/M160LH/M197FH are known to have different hydrogen-bonding patterns to the special pair; however, they exhibit Stark effects that are very similar to wild type. By contrast, the addition of a hydrogen bond to the M-side keto carbonyl group of the special pair in M160LH greatly affects both the absorption and Stark spectra. The heterodimer special pairs, L173HL and M202HL, exhibit much larger Stark effects than wild type, with the greatest effect in the M-side mutant. Double mutants that combine the M-side heterodimer and a hydrogen-bond addition to the L-side of the special pair decrease the magnitude of the Stark effect. These results suggest that the electronic asymmetry of the dimer can be perturbed either by the formation of a heterodimer or by adding or deleting a hydrogen bond to a keto carbonyl group. From the pattern observed, it is concluded that the charge transfer state P(L)(+)P(M)(-) has a larger influence on the excited state of the dimer in wild type than the P(L)(-)P(M)(+)charge transfer state. Furthermore, asymmetry can be varied continuously, from extreme cases in which the heterodimer and hydrogen-bond effects work together, to cases in which

  15. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Abrogates Conjugate-Induced Germinal Center Reaction and Depletes Antibody Secreting Cell Pool, Causing Hyporesponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnarson, Stefania P.; Benonisson, Hreinn; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2013-01-01

    Background Plain pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) booster administered during second year of life has been shown to cause hyporesponsiveness. We assessed the effects of PPS booster on splenic memory B cell responses and persistence of PPS-specific long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Methods Neonatal mice were primed subcutanously (s.c.) or intranasally (i.n.) with pneumococcal conjugate (Pnc1-TT) and the adjuvant LT-K63, and boosted with PPS+LT-K63 or saline 1, 2 or 3 times with 16 day intervals. Seven days after each booster, spleens were removed, germinal centers (GC), IgM+, IgG+ follicles and PPS-specific antibody secreting cells (AbSC) in spleen and BM enumerated. Results PPS booster s.c., but not i.n., compromised the Pnc1-TT-induced PPS-specific Abs by abrogating the Pnc1-TT-induced GC reaction and depleting PPS-specific AbSCs in spleen and limiting their homing to the BM. There was no difference in the frequency of PPS-specific AbSCs in spleen and BM between mice that received 1, 2 or 3 PPS boosters s.c.. Repeated PPS+LT-K63 booster i.n. reduced the frequency of PPS-specific IgG+ AbSCs in BM. Conclusions PPS booster-induced hyporesponsiveness is caused by abrogation of conjugate-induced GC reaction and depletion of PPS-specific IgG+ AbSCs resulting in no homing of new PPS-specific long-lived plasma cells to the BM or survival. These results should be taken into account in design of vaccination schedules where polysaccharides are being considered. PMID:24069152

  16. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of 3,3'-diaryloxindoles as triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center: phase-transfer-catalyzed S(N)Ar reaction.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Koga, Kenta; Tokuda, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Maruoka, Keiji

    2014-06-10

    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of unsymmetrical triarylmethanes with a chiral all-carbon quaternary center was achieved by using a chiral bifunctional quaternary phosphonium bromide catalyst in the S(N)Ar reaction of 3-aryloxindoles under phase-transfer conditions. The presence of a urea moiety in the chiral phase-transfer catalyst was important for obtaining high enantioselectivity in this reaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Asymmetric Catalytic aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction for the Synthesis of 3-Substituted-3-Aminooxindoles with Chiral Quaternary Carbon Centers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fang-Le; Wei, Yin; Shi, Min; Pindi, Suresh; Li, Guigen

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric catalytic aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (aza-MBH) reaction of isatin-derived ketimines with MVK has been established by using chiral amino and phosphino catalysts. The reaction resulted in biomedically important 3-substituted 3-amino-2-oxindoles in good yields (>80% for most cases) and excellent enantioselectivity (90–99%ee). Twenty-eight cases assembled with chiral quaternary stereogenic centers have been examined under convenient systems. PMID:23407608

  18. Femtosecond and Picosecond Dynamics of Recombinant Bacteriorhodopsin Primary Reactions Compared to the Native Protein in Trimeric and Monomeric Forms.

    PubMed

    Smitienko, O A; Nekrasova, O V; Kudriavtsev, A V; Yakovleva, M A; Shelaev, I V; Gostev, F E; Dolgikh, D A; Kolchugina, I B; Nadtochenko, V A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feldman, T B; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-04-01

    Photochemical reaction dynamics of the primary events in recombinant bacteriorhodopsin (bRrec) was studied by femtosecond laser absorption spectroscopy with 25-fs time resolution. bRrec was produced in an Escherichia coli expression system. Since bRrec was prepared in a DMPC-CHAPS micelle system in the monomeric form, its comparison with trimeric and monomeric forms of the native bacteriorhodopsin (bRtrim and bRmon, respectively) was carried out. We found that bRrec intermediate I (excited state of bR) was formed in the range of 100 fs, as in the case of bRtrim and bRmon. Further processes, namely the decay of the excited state I and the formation of intermediates J and K of bRrec, occurred more slowly compared to bRtrim, but similarly to bRmon. The lifetime of intermediate I, judging from the signal of ΔAESA(470-480 nm), was 0.68 ps (78%) and 4.4 ps (22%) for bRrec, 0.52 ps (73%) and 1.7 ps (27%) for bRmon, and 0.45 ps (90%) and 1.75 ps (10%) for bRtrim. The formation time of intermediate K, judging from the signal of ΔAGSA(625-635 nm), was 13.5 ps for bRrec, 9.8 ps for bRmon, and 4.3 ps for bRtrim. In addition, there was a decrease in the photoreaction efficiency of bRrec and bRmon as seen by a decrease in absorbance in the differential spectrum of the intermediate K by ~14%. Since photochemical properties of bRrec are similar to those of the monomeric form of the native protein, bRrec and its mutants can be considered as a basis for further studies of the mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin functioning.

  19. C-terminal processing of reaction center protein D1 is essential for the function and assembly of photosystem II in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yufen; Fu, Aigen; Hou, Xin; McDonald, Kent; Buchanan, Bob B.; Huang, Weidong; Luan, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein D1 is synthesized as a precursor (pD1) with a short C-terminal extension. The pD1 is processed to mature D1 by carboxyl-terminal peptidase A to remove the C-terminal extension and form active protein. Here we report functional characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding D1 C-terminal processing enzyme (AtCtpA) in the chloroplast thylakoid lumen. Recombinant AtCtpA converted pD1 to mature D1 and a mutant lacking AtCtpA retained all D1 in precursor form, confirming that AtCtpA is solely responsible for processing. As with cyanobacterial ctpa, a knockout Arabidopsis atctpa mutant was lethal under normal growth conditions but was viable with sucrose under low-light conditions. Viable plants, however, showed deficiencies in PSII and thylakoid stacking. Surprisingly, unlike its cyanobacterial counterpart, the Arabidopsis mutant retained both monomer and dimer forms of the PSII complexes that, although nonfunctional, contained both the core and extrinsic subunits. This mutant was also essentially devoid of PSII supercomplexes, providing an unexpected link between D1 maturation and supercomplex assembly. A knock-down mutant expressing about 2% wild-type level of AtCtpA showed normal growth under low light but was stunted and accumulated pD1 under high light, indicative of delayed C-terminal processing. Although demonstrating the functional significance of C-terminal D1 processing in PSII biogenesis, our study reveals an unsuspected link between D1 maturation and PSII supercomplex assembly in land plants, opening an avenue for exploring the mechanism for the association of light-harvesting complexes with the PSII core complexes. PMID:24043802

  20. Regulation of the primary quinone binding conformation by the H subunit in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Taguchi, Alexander T; Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2015-11-19

    Unlike photosystem II (PSII) in higher plants, bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (bRCs) from Proteobacteria have an additional peripheral membrane subunit "H". The H subunit is necessary for photosynthetic growth, but can be removed chemically in vitro. The remaining LM dimer retains its activity to perform light-induced charge separation. Here we investigate the influence of the H subunit on interactions between the primary semiquinone and the protein matrix, using a combination of site-specific isotope labeling, pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The data reveal substantially weaker binding interactions between the primary semiquinone and the LM dimer than observed for the intact bRC; the amount of electron spin transferred to the nitrogen hydrogen bond donors is significantly reduced, the methoxy groups are more free to rotate, and the spectra indicate a heterogeneous mixture of bound semiquinone states. These results are consistent with a loosening of the primary quinone binding pocket in the absence of the H subunit.

  1. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  2. Large photocurrent response and external quantum efficiency in biophotoelectrochemical cells incorporating reaction center plus light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Houman; Lafalce, Evan; Jun, Daniel; Jiang, Xiaomei; Beatty, J Thomas; Takshi, Arash

    2015-04-13

    Bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are promising materials for solar energy harvesting, due to their high ratio of photogenerated electrons to absorbed photons and long recombination time of generated charges. In this work, photoactive electrodes were prepared from a bacterial RC-light-harvesting 1 (LH1) core complex, where the RC is encircled by the LH1 antenna, to increase light capture. A simple immobilization method was used to prepare RC-LH1 photoactive layer. Herein, we demonstrate that the combination of pretreatment of the RC-LH1 protein complexes with quinone and the immobilization method results in biophotoelectrochemical cells with a large peak transient photocurrent density and photocurrent response of 7.1 and 3.5 μA cm(-2), respectively. The current study with monochromatic excitation showed maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) and photocurrent density of 0.21% and 2 μA cm(-2), respectively, with illumination power of ∼6 mW cm(-2) at ∼875 nm, under ambient conditions. This work provides new directions to higher performance biophotoelectrochemical cells as well as possibly other applications of this broadly functional photoactive material.

  3. Light-induced conformational changes in photosynthetic reaction centers: dielectric relaxation in the vicinity of the dimer.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Kálmán, László

    2011-01-25

    Conformational changes near the bacteriochlorophyll dimer induced by continuous illumination were identified in the wild type and 11 different mutants of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The properties of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, which has a different hydrogen bonding pattern with the surrounding protein in each mutant, were characterized by steady-state and transient optical spectroscopy. After illumination for 1 min, in the absence of the secondary quinone, the recovery of the charge-separated states was nearly 1 order of magnitude slower in one group of mutants including the wild type than in the mutants carrying the Leu to His mutation at the L131 position. The slower recovery was accompanied by a substantial decrease in the electrochromic absorption changes associated with the Q(y) bands of the nearby monomers during the illumination. The other set of mutants containing the Leu L131 to His substitution exhibited slightly altered electrochromic changes that decreased only half as much during the illumination as in the other family of mutants. The correlation between the recovery of the charge-separated states in the light-induced conformation and the electrochromic absorption changes suggests a dielectric relaxation of the protein that stabilizes the charge on the dimer.

  4. Electrostatic calculations of amino acid titration and electron transfer, Q-AQB-->QAQ-B, in the reaction center.

    PubMed Central

    Beroza, P; Fredkin, D R; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1995-01-01

    The titration of amino acids and the energetics of electron transfer from the primary electron acceptor (QA) to the secondary electron acceptor (QB) in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are calculated using a continuum electrostatic model. Strong electrostatic interactions between titrating sites give rise to complex titration curves. Glu L212 is calculated to have an anomalously broad titration curve, which explains the seemingly contradictory experimental results concerning its pKa. The electrostatic field following electron transfer shifts the average protonation of amino acids near the quinones. The pH dependence of the free energy between Q-AQB and QAQ-B calculated from these shifts is in good agreement with experiment. However, the calculated absolute free energy difference is in severe disagreement (by approximately 230 meV) with the observed experimental value, i.e., electron transfer from Q-A to QB is calculated to be unfavorable. The large stabilization energy of the Q-A state arises from the predominantly positively charged residues in the vicinity of QA in contrast to the predominantly negatively charged residues near QB. The discrepancy between calculated and experimental values for delta G(Q-AQB-->QAQ-B) points to limitations of the continuum electrostatic model. Inclusion of other contributions to the energetics (e.g., protein motion following quinone reduction) that may improve the agreement between theory and experiment are discussed. PMID:7647231

  5. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  6. Chlorine in solid fuels fired in pulverized fuel boilers sources, forms, reactions, and consequences: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Tillman; Dao Duong; Bruce Miller

    2009-07-15

    Chlorine is a significant source of corrosion and deposition, both from coal and from biomass, and in PF boilers. This investigation was designed to highlight the potential for corrosion risks associated with once-through units and advanced cycles. The research took the form of a detailed literature investigation to evaluate chlorine in solid fuels: coals of various ranks and origins, biomass fuels of a variety of types, petroleum cokes, and blends of the above. The investigation focused upon an extensive literature review of documents dating back to 1991. The focus is strictly corrosion and deposition. To address the deposition and corrosion issues, this review evaluates the following considerations: concentrations of chlorine in available solid fuels including various coals and biomass fuels, forms of chlorine in those fuels, and reactions - including reactivities - of chlorine in such fuels. The assessment includes consideration of alkali metals and alkali earth elements as they react with, and to, the chlorine and other elements (e.g., sulfur) in the fuel and in the gaseous products of combustion. The assessment also includes other factors of combustion: for example, combustion conditions including excess O{sub 2} and combustion temperatures. It also considers analyses conducted at all levels: theoretical calculations, bench scale laboratory data and experiments, pilot plant experiments, and full scale plant experience. Case studies and plant surveys form a significant consideration in this review. The result of this investigation focuses upon the concentrations of chlorine acceptable in coals burned exclusively, in coals burned with biomass, and in biomass cofired with coal. Values are posited based upon type of fuel and combustion technology. Values are also posited based upon both first principles and field experience. 86 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Quantitative affinity chromatographic studies of mitochondrial cytochrome c binding to bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, reconstituted in liposome membranes and immobilized by detergent dialysis and avidin--biotin binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Liu, X Y; Hara, M; Lundahl, P; Miyake, J

    2000-04-10

    In order to study the affinity binding of c-type cytochromes to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) by quantitative affinity chromatography (QAC), RC from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was reconstituted into liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) and 2 mol% of biotinyl phosphatidylethanolamine simultaneously as the liposomes were formed and immobilized in (strept)avidin-coupled gel beads by rotary detergent dialysis. The immobilized amount was up to 80 nmol of RC and 33 micromol of lipid/g of moist gel in streptavidin-coupled Sephacryl S-1000 gel. By QAC frontal runs, retardation of mitochondrial cyt c on immobilized RC liposome columns was demonstrated. The dissociation constant for the RC-cyt c interaction was determined to be 0.20-0.57 microM. QAC studies also allowed evaluation of the orientation of reconstituted RC in immobilized liposomes by comparison of the total amount of cyt c binding sites with the amount of available binding sites obtained by QAC. It seems that the RC proteoliposomes immobilized in Sephacryl S-1000 gel exposed the cyt c binding sites on the outer surface of the liposomes due to effects of the gel network pore size and the resulting liposomal size.

  8. Electrostatics of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center. Protonation of Glu L 212 and Asp L 213 - A new method of calculation.

    PubMed

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Krishtalik, Lev I

    2015-12-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies of anions from water into aprotic solvents gives the figures erroneous by order of magnitude. This is due to the hydrogen bond disruption that suggests the necessity to reconsider the traditional approach of the purely electrostatic calculation of the transfer energy from water into protein. In this paper, the method combining the experimental estimates of the transfer energies from water into aprotic solvent and the electrostatic calculation of the transfer energies from aprotic solvent into protein is proposed. Hydrogen bonds between aprotic solvent and solute are taken into account by introducing an imaginary aprotic medium incapable to form hydrogen bonds with the solute. Besides, a new treatment of the heterogeneous intraprotein dielectric permittivity based on the microscopic protein structure and electrometric measurements is elaborated. The method accounts semi-quantitatively for the electrostatic effect of diverse charged amino acid substitutions in the donor and acceptor parts of the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Analysis of the volatile secondary acceptor site QB revealed that in the conformation with a minimal distance between quinone QB and Glu L 212 the proton uptake upon the reduction of QB is prompted by Glu L 212 in alkaline and by Asp L 213 in slightly acidic regions. This agrees with the pH dependences of protonation degrees and the proton uptake. The method of pK calculation was applied successfully also for dissociation of Asp 26 in bacterial thioredoxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antioxidative, Antibacterial, and Food Functional Properties of the Half-Fin Anchovy Hydrolysates-Glucose Conjugates Formed via Maillard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Ru; Yang, Peiyu; Wei, Rongbian; Ruan, Guanqiang

    2016-06-20

    The antioxidative, antibacterial, and food functional properties of the half-fin anchovy hydrolysates (HAHp)-glucose conjugates formed by Maillard reaction (MR) were investigated, respectively. Results of sugar and amino acid contents loss rates, browning index, and molecular weight distribution indicated that the initial pH of HAHp played an important role in the process of MR between HAHp and glucose. HAHp-glucose Maillard reaction products (HAHp-G MRPs) demonstrated enhanced antioxidative activities of reducing power and scavenging DPPH radicals compared to control groups. HAHp-G MRPs produced from the condition of pH 9.6 displayed the strongest reducing power. The excellent scavenging activity on DPPH radicals was found for HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs which was produced at pH 5.6. Additionally, HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs showed variable antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, and Sarcina lutea, with the MIC values ranging from 8.3 to 16.7 μg/mL. Result of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on E. coli suggested that HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs exhibited antibacterial activity by destroying the cell integrity through membrane permeabilization. Moreover, HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs had excellent foaming ability and stability at alkaline conditions of pH 8.0, and showed emulsion properties at acidic pH 4.0. These results suggested that specific HAHp-G MRPs should be promising functional ingredients used in foods.

  10. Excitation energy pathways in the photosynthetic units of reaction center LM- and H-subunit deletion mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Sergiu; Lupo, Domenico; Lenz, Martin O; Saegesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-03-01

    Light-induced reaction dynamics of isolated photosynthetic membranes obtained from wild-type (WT) and reaction center (RC)-subunit deletion strains SPUHK1 (an H-subunit deletion mutant) and SK Delta LM (an (L+M) deletion mutant) of the purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum have been investigated by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon excitation of the spirilloxanthin (Spx) S(2) state at 546 nm, of the bacteriochlorophyll Soret band at 388 nm and probing spectral regions, which are characteristic for carotenoids, similar dynamics in the SPUHK1, SK Delta LM and WT strains could be observed. The excitation of Spx S(2) is followed by the simultaneous population of the lower singlet excited states S(1) and S* which decay with lifetimes of 1.4 and 5 ps, respectively for the mutants, and 1.4 and 4 ps, respectively, for the wild-type. The excitation of the BChl Soret band is followed by relaxation into BChl lower excited states which compete with excitation energy transfer BChl-to-Spx. The deexcitation pathway BChl(Soret) --> Spx(S(2)) --> Spx(S(1)) occurs with the same transition rate for all investigated samples (WT, SPUHK1 and SK Delta LM). The kinetic traces measured for the Spx S(1) --> S(N) transition display similar behaviour for all samples showing a positive signal which increases within the first 400 fs (i.e. the time needed for the excitation energy to reach the Spx S(1) excited state) and decays with a lifetime of about 1.5 ps. This suggests that the Spx excited state dynamics in the investigated complexes do not differ significantly. Moreover, a longer excited state lifetime of BChl for SPUHK1 in comparison to WT was observed, consistent with a photochemical quenching channel present in the presence of RC. For long delay times, photobleaching of the RC special pair and an electrochromic blue shift of the monomeric BChl a can be observed only for the WT but not for the mutants. The close similarity of the excited state decay

  11. Primary Charge Separation in the Photosystem II Reaction Center Revealed by a Global Analysis of the Two-dimensional Electronic Spectra.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I; Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta; Thorwart, Michael; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-09-27

    The transfer of electronic charge in the reaction center of Photosystem II is one of the key building blocks of the conversion of sunlight energy into chemical energy within the cascade of the photosynthetic reactions. Since the charge transfer dynamics is mixed with the energy transfer dynamics, an effective tool for the direct resolution of charge separation in the reaction center is still missing. Here, we use experimental two-dimensional optical photon echo spectroscopy in combination with the theoretical calculation to resolve its signature. A global fitting analysis allows us to clearly and directly identify a decay pathway associated to the primary charge separation. In particular, it can be distinguished from regular energy transfer and occurs on a time scale of 1.5 ps under ambient conditions. This technique provides a general tool to identify charge separation signatures from the energy transport in two-dimensional optical spectroscopy.

  12. "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Reaction of Chalcone and Cinnamaldehyde to Give 1,3,4-Triphenylcyclopentene Using Organocatalysis to Form a Homoenolate Equivalent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, students carry out a modern organocatalytic reaction using IMes·HCl and NaOH to catalyze the formation of 1,3,4-triphenylcyclopentene from cinnamaldehyde and chalcone in water. Deprotonation of IMes·HCl with NaOH forms the "N"-heterocyclic carbene IMes that reacts with cinnamaldehyde to form a homoenolate equivalent…

  13. "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed Reaction of Chalcone and Cinnamaldehyde to Give 1,3,4-Triphenylcyclopentene Using Organocatalysis to Form a Homoenolate Equivalent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    In this experiment, students carry out a modern organocatalytic reaction using IMes·HCl and NaOH to catalyze the formation of 1,3,4-triphenylcyclopentene from cinnamaldehyde and chalcone in water. Deprotonation of IMes·HCl with NaOH forms the "N"-heterocyclic carbene IMes that reacts with cinnamaldehyde to form a homoenolate equivalent…

  14. Comparison of the morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in limestones in concrete affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) and alkali–silica reaction (ASR)

    SciTech Connect

    Grattan-Bellew, P.E.; Chan, Gordon

    2013-05-15

    The morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in dolomitic limestone affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) is compared to that formed in a siliceous limestone affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR). The particle of dolomitic limestone was extracted from the experimental sidewalk in Kingston, Ontario, Canada that was badly cracked due to ACR. The siliceous limestone particle was extracted from a core taken from a highway structure in Quebec, affected by ASR. Both cores exhibited marked reaction rims around limestone particles. The aggregate particles were polished and given a light gold coating in preparation for examination in a scanning electron microscope. The gel in the ACR aggregate formed stringers between the calcite crystals in the matrix of the rock, whereas gel in ASR concrete formed a thick layer on top of the calcite crystals, that are of the same size as in the ACR aggregate.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation on kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism for electron transfer reaction of iron(III) complex with sulphur centered radical in stimulated biological system.

    PubMed