Science.gov

Sample records for reaction residues occurring

  1. Insights into secondary reactions occurring during atmospheric ablation of micrometeoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, Richard W.; Tan, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Ablation of micrometeoroids during atmospheric entry yields volatile gases such as water, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, capable of altering atmospheric chemistry and hence the climate and habitability of the planetary surface. While laboratory experiments have revealed the yields of these gases during laboratory simulations of ablation, the reactions responsible for the generation of these gases have remained unclear, with a typical assumption being that species simply undergo thermal decomposition without engaging in more complex chemistry. Here, pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that mixtures of meteorite-relevant materials undergo secondary reactions during simulated ablation, with organic matter capable of taking part in carbothermic reduction of iron oxides and sulfates, resulting in yields of volatile gases that differ from those predicted by simple thermal decomposition. Sulfates are most susceptible to carbothermic reduction, producing greater yields of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide at lower temperatures than would be expected from simple thermal decomposition, even when mixed with meteoritically relevant abundances of low-reactivity Type IV kerogen. Iron oxides were less susceptible, with elevated yields of water, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide only occurring when mixed with high abundances of more reactive Type III kerogen. We use these insights to reinterpret previous ablation simulation experiments and to predict the reactions capable of occurring during ablation of carbonaceous micrometeoroids in atmospheres of different compositions.

  2. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    PubMed

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  3. Structural consequences of chromophore formation and exploration of conserved lid residues amongst naturally occurring fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Matthew H.; Li, Binsen; Shahid, Ramza; Peshkepija, Paola; Zimmer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods were used to generate the lowest energy conformations of the immature precyclized forms of the 28 naturally occurring GFP-like proteins deposited in the pdb. In all 28 GFP-like proteins, the beta-barrel contracts upon chromophore formation and becomes more rigid. Our prior analysis of over 260 distinct naturally occurring GFP-like proteins revealed that most of the conserved residues are located in the top and bottom of the barrel in the turns between the β-sheets (Ong et al. 2011) [1]. Structural analyses, molecular dynamics simulations and the Anisotropic Network Model were used to explore the role of these conserved lid residues as possible folding nuclei. Our results are internally consistent and show that the conserved residues in the top and bottom lids undergo relatively less translational movement than other lid residues, and a number of these residues may play an important role as hinges or folding nuclei in the fluorescent proteins.

  4. Radon as a naturally occurring tracer for the assessment of residual NAPL contamination of aquifers.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Lau, Steffen; Geyer, Wolfgang; Knöller, Kay

    2007-02-01

    The noble gas radon has a strong affinity to non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPLs). That property makes it applicable as naturally occurring partitioning tracer for assessing residual NAPL contamination of aquifers. In a NAPL contaminated aquifer, radon dissolved in the groundwater partitions preferably into the NAPL. The magnitude of the resulting radon deficit in the groundwater depends on the NAPL-specific radon partition coefficient and on the NAPL saturation of the pore space. Hence, if the partition coefficient is known, the NAPL saturation is attainable by determination of the radon deficit. After a concise discussion of theoretical aspects regarding radon partitioning into NAPL, related experimental data and results of a field investigation are presented. Aim of the laboratory experiments was the determination of radon partition coefficients of multi-component NAPLs of environmental concern. The on-site activities were carried out in order to confirm the applicability of the "radon method" under field conditions.

  5. Analysis of naturally-occurring radionuclides in coal combustion fly ash, gypsum, and scrubber residue samples.

    PubMed

    Roper, Angela R; Stabin, Michael G; Delapp, Rossane C; Kosson, David S

    2013-03-01

    Coal combustion residues from coal-fired power plants can be advantageous for use in building and construction materials. These by-products contain trace quantities of naturally occurring radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series, as well as other naturally occurring radionuclides such as K. Analysis was performed on samples of coal fly ash, flue gas desulfurization, gypsum and scrubber sludges, fixated scrubber sludges, and waste water filter cakes sampled from multiple coal-fired power plants in the United States. The radioactive content of U and Th decay series nuclides was determined using gamma photopeaks from progeny Pb at 352 keV and Tl at 583 keV, respectively; K specific activities were determined using the 1,461 keV photopeak. The samples were hermetically sealed to allow for secular equilibrium between the radium parents and the radon and subsequent progeny. Samples were analyzed in a common geometry using two high purity germanium photon detectors with low energy detection capabilities. The specific activities (Bq kg) were compared to results from literature studies including different building materials and fly ash specific activities. Fly ash from bituminous and subbituminous coals had U specific activities varying from 30-217 Bq kg (mean + 1 s.d. 119 ± 45 Bq kg) and 72-209 Bq kg (115 ± 40 Bq kg), respectively; Th specific activities from 10-120 Bq kg (73 ± 26 Bq kg) and 53-110 Bq kg (81 ± 18 Bq kg), respectively; and K specific activities from 177 to 928 Bq kg (569 ± 184 Bq kg) and 87-303 Bq kg (171 ± 69 Bq kg), respectively. Gypsum samples had U, Th, and K specific activities approximately one order of magnitude less than measured for fly ash samples.

  6. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Coals and Coal Combustion Residuals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Nancy E; Hower, James C; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Taggart, Ross K; Vengosh, Avner

    2015-09-15

    The distribution and enrichment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in coal combustion residuals (CCRs) from different coal source basins have not been fully characterized in the United States. Here we provide a systematic analysis of the occurrence of NORM ((232)Th, (228)Ra, (238)U, (226)Ra, and (210)Pb) in coals and associated CCRs from the Illinois, Appalachian, and Powder River Basins. Illinois CCRs had the highest total Ra ((228)Ra + (226)Ra = 297 ± 46 Bq/kg) and the lowest (228)Ra/(226)Ra activity ratio (0.31 ± 0.09), followed by Appalachian CCRs (283 ± 34 Bq/kg; 0.67 ± 0.09), and Powder River CCRs (213 ± 21 Bq/kg; 0.79 ± 0.10). Total Ra and (228)Ra/(226)Ra variations in CCRs correspond to the U and Th concentrations and ash contents of their feed coals, and we show that these relationships can be used to predict total NORM concentrations in CCRs. We observed differential NORM volatility during combustion that results in (210)Pb enrichment and (210)Pb/(226)Ra ratios greater than 1 in most fly-ash samples. Overall, total NORM activities in CCRs are 7-10- and 3-5-fold higher than NORM activities in parent coals and average U.S. soil, respectively. This study lays the groundwork for future research related to the environmental and human health implications of CCR disposal and accidental release to the environment in the context of this elevated radioactivity.

  7. Emphasizing Multiple Levels of Representation to Enhance Students' Understandings of the Changes Occurring during Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    An alternative program of instruction was implemented with 33 high-achieving Grade 9 students (15-16 years old) in Singapore that overtly focused on the use of macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic representations to describe and explain the changes that occurred during the burning of metals, reactions of dilute acids, ionic precipitations,…

  8. Fusion and quasifission studies in reactions forming Rn via evaporation residue measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamlath, A.; Prasad, E.; Madhavan, N.; Laveen, P. V.; Gehlot, J.; Nasirov, A. K.; Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nath, S.; Banerjee, Tathagata; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Shareef, M.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Kumar, Dvgrks; Devi, P. Sandya; Khushboo, Jisha, P.; Kumar, Neeraj; Hosamani, M. M.; Kailas, S.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Formation of the compound nucleus (CN) is highly suppressed by quasifission in heavy-ion collisions involving massive nuclei. Though considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fusion-fission and quasifission, the exact dependence of fusion probability on various entrance channel variables is not completely clear, which is very important for the synthesis of new heavy and superheavy elements. Purpose: To study the interplay between fusion and quasifission in reactions forming CN in the boundary region where the fusion probability starts to deviate from unity. Methods: Fusion evaporation residue cross sections were measured for the Si,3028+180Hf reactions using the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyser at IUAC, New Delhi. Experimental data were compared with data from other reactions forming the same CN or isotopes of the CN. Theoretical calculations were performed using the dinuclear system and statistical models. Results: Reduced evaporation residue cross sections were observed for the reactions studied compared with the asymmetric reaction forming the same CN, indicating fusion suppression in more symmetric systems. The observations are consistent with fission fragment measurements performed in the same or similar systems. Larger ER cross sections are observed with increase in mass in the isotopic chain of the CN. Conclusions: Fusion probability varies significantly with the entrance channels in reactions forming the same CN. While complete fusion occurs for the 16O+194Pt reaction, the fusion probability drops to approximately 60 -70 % for the 30Si+180Hf and less than 20 % for the 50Ti+160Gd reactions, respectively, forming the same CN at similar excitation energies.

  9. Combustion reaction kinetics of guarana seed residue applying isoconversional methods and consecutive reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rezende; Tannous, Katia; Rueda-Ordóñez, Yesid Javier

    2016-11-01

    This work aims the study of decomposition kinetics of guarana seed residue using thermogravimetric analyzer under synthetic air atmosphere applying heating rates of 5, 10, and 15°C/min, from room temperature to 900°C. Three thermal decomposition stages were identified: dehydration (25.1-160°C), oxidative pyrolysis (240-370°C), and combustion (350-650°C). The activation energies, reaction model, and pre-exponential factor were determined through four isoconversional methods, master plots, and linearization of the conversion rate equation, respectively. A scheme of two-consecutive reactions was applied validating the kinetic parameters of first-order reaction and two-dimensional diffusion models for the oxidative pyrolysis stage (149.57kJ/mol, 6.97×10(10)1/s) and for combustion stage (77.98kJ/mol, 98.611/s), respectively. The comparison between theoretical and experimental conversion and conversion rate showed good agreement with average deviation lower than 2%, indicating that these results could be used for modeling of guarana seed residue.

  10. Residual recombination in Neurospora crassa spo11 deletion homozygotes occurs during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Bowring, F J; Yeadon, P J; Catcheside, D E A

    2013-09-01

    Spo11 is considered responsible for initiation of meiotic recombination in higher organisms, but previous analysis using spo11 (RIP) mutants suggests that the his-3 region of Neurospora crassa experiences spo11-independent recombination. However, despite possessing several stop codons, it is conceivable that the mutants are not completely null. Also, since lack of spo11 interferes with chromosomal pairing and proper segregation at Meiosis I, spores can be partially diploid for a period after meiosis. Thus, it is possible that the recombination observed could be an abnormal event, occurring during the period of aneuploidy rather than during meiosis. To test the former hypothesis, we generated spo11 deletion homozygotes. Using crosses heteroallelic for his-3 mutations, we showed that His(+) progeny are generated in spo11 deletion homozygotes at a frequency at least as high as in wild type and, as in the spo11 (RIP) mutants, local crossing over is not reduced. To test the latter hypothesis, we utilised mutations in either end of a histone H1-GFP fusion gene, inserted between the recombination hotspot cog and his-3, in which GFP(+) spores arise as a result of recombination in a cross between the two GFP alleles. In a control cross homozygous for spo11 (+), the frequency at which GFP(+) spores arise is comparable to the frequency of His(+) spores and glowing nuclei first appear during prophase, prior to metaphase I, as expected for a product of meiotic recombination. Similarly in spo11 deletion homozygotes, GFP(+) spores arise at high frequency and glowing nuclei are first seen before metaphase, indicating that allelic recombination occurs during meiosis in the absence of spo11. We have therefore shown that spo11 is not essential for either his-3 allelic recombination or crossing over in the vicinity of his-3, and that spo11-independent allelic recombination is meiotic, indicating that there is a spo11-independent mechanism for initiation of recombination in Neurospora.

  11. Control of response timing occurs during the simple reaction time interval but on-line for choice reaction time.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Klapp, Stuart T; Jagacinski, Richard J; Franks, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The preparation of multiple element movements has been examined for decades, with no clear explanation offered for the disparate results observed. Results from 2 experiments are presented and, in conjunction with previous results, a theoretical interpretation is offered regarding the preparatory processes that occur before, during and after the reaction time (RT) interval for multiple element movements during both simple and choice RT paradigms. In Experiment 1, number of elements and timing complexity were manipulated in a simple RT key-press task, using a startling acoustic stimulus to probe advance preparation. Both startle and nonstartle RT increased with number of movement elements and for a movement with increased timing complexity, providing evidence that the control of response timing occurs during the RT interval. In Experiment 2, the production of key-press movements of varying number of elements was compared in a simple versus choice RT paradigm. Results indicated that simple RT was affected by the number of elements, yet choice RT was not. Additionally, choice RT trials showed significantly longer interresponse intervals compared with those observed in simple RT trials, providing evidence for online processing in choice RT. The results of both studies, together with previous findings, suggest that planning of the timing of the onsets of the elements is prepared during simple RT, whereas planning of other aspects of the sequence of elements seems to occur in the foreperiod prior to the "go" signal. Conversely, in the choice RT paradigm, timing seems to be controlled online. This explanation may bring closure on difficulties encountered in over 50 years of research examining response preparation for complex movements.

  12. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  13. Communication between the nucleotide binding domains of P-glycoprotein occurs via conformational changes that involve residue 508.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Mark P; Storm, Janet; Rothnie, Alice; Taylor, Andrew M; Linton, Kenneth J; Kerr, Ian D; Callaghan, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Our aim is to provide molecular understanding of the mechanisms underlying the (i) interaction between the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and (ii) coupling between NBDs and transmembrane domains within P-glycoprotein (Pgp) during a transport cycle. To facilitate this, we have introduced a number of unique cysteine residues at surface exposed positions (E393C, S452C, I500C, N508C, and K578C) in the N-terminal NBD of Pgp, which had previously been engineered to remove endogenous cysteines. Positions of the mutations were designed using a model based on crystallographic features of prokaryotic NBDs. The single cysteine mutants were expressed in insect cells using recombinant baculovirus and the proteins purified by metal affinity chromatography by virtue of a polyhistidine tag. None of the introduced cysteine residues perturbed the function of Pgp as judged by the characteristics of drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis. The role of residues at each of the introduced sites in the catalytic cycle of Pgp was investigated by the effect of covalent conjugation with N-ethyl-maleimide (NEM). All but one mutation (K578C) was accessible to labeling with [(3)H]-NEM. However, perturbation of ATPase activity was only observed for the derivitized N508C isoform. The principle functional manifestation was a marked inhibition of the "basal" rate of ATP hydrolysis. Neither the extent nor potency to which a range of drugs could affect the ATPase activity were altered in the NEM conjugated N508C isoform. The results imply that the accessibility of residue 508, located in the alpha-helical subdomain of NBD1 in Pgp, is altered by the conformational changes that occur during ATP hydrolysis.

  14. Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of MscS Occurs Independently of the Positively Charged Residues in the Transmembrane Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    MscS (mechanosensitive channel of small conductance) is ubiquitously found among bacteria and plays a major role in avoiding cell lysis upon rapid osmotic downshock. The gating of MscS is modulated by voltage, but little is known about how MscS senses membrane potential. Three arginine residues (Arg-46, Arg-54, and Arg-74) in the transmembrane (TM) domain are possible to respond to voltage judging from the MscS structure. To examine whether these residues are involved in the voltage dependence of MscS, we neutralized the charge of each residue by substituting with asparagine (R46N, R54N, and R74N). Mechanical threshold for the opening of the expressed wild-type MscS and asparagine mutants did not change with voltage in the range from −40 to +100 mV. By contrast, inactivation process of wild-type MscS was strongly affected by voltage. The wild-type MscS inactivated at +60 to +80 mV but not at −60 to +40 mV. The voltage dependence of the inactivation rate of all mutants tested, that is, R46N, R54N, R74N, and R46N/R74N MscS, was almost indistinguishable from that of the wild-type MscS. These findings indicate that the voltage dependence of the inactivation occurs independently of the positive charges of R46, R54, and R74. PMID:28101504

  15. A Multiscale Analysis of the Residual Stresses Occurring During Cooling of Thick-Walled Unidirectionally Filament-Wound Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarianfard, H.; Turusov, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical multiscale analysis to predict the residual thermal stresses occurring during cooling in thick-walled filament-wound cylinders made of a reinforced polymer at macro-and microscales is presented. Two types of contact — bonded and unbonded — between the mandrel and the composite are considered. The fields of microstresses are calculated in three different zones across the thickness of the cylinder by using the multiscale finite-element method. Results of the microscale analysis showed that the microstresses several times exceeded the macrostresses in these areas. The value and position of the maximum microstresses were found to depend on the type of contact between the mandrel and the thick-walled cylinder.

  16. Two-step mechanism of photodamage to photosystem II: step 1 occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex and step 2 occurs at the photochemical reaction center.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Norikazu; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Takahashi, Shunichi; Higashi, Shoichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Murata, Norio

    2005-06-14

    Under strong light, photosystem II (PSII) of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is inactivated, and this phenomenon is called photoinhibition. In a widely accepted model, photoinhibition is induced by excess light energy, which is absorbed by chlorophyll but not utilized in photosynthesis. Using monochromatic light from the Okazaki Large Spectrograph and thylakoid membranes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we observed that UV and blue light inactivated the oxygen-evolving complex much faster than the photochemical reaction center of PSII. These observations suggested that the light-induced damage was associated with a UV- and blue light-absorbing center in the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII. The action spectrum of the primary event in photodamage to PSII revealed the strong effects of UV and blue light and differed considerably from the absorption spectra of chlorophyll and thylakoid membranes. By contrast to the photoinduced inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex in untreated thylakoid membranes, red light efficiently induced inactivation of the PSII reaction center in Tris-treated thylakoid membranes, and the action spectrum resembled the absorption spectrum of chlorophyll. Our observations suggest that photodamage to PSII occurs in two steps. Step 1 is the light-induced inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Step 2, occurring after step 1 is complete, is the inactivation of the PSII reaction center by light absorbed by chlorophyll. We confirmed our model by illumination of untreated thylakoid membranes with blue and UV light, which inactivated the oxygen-evolving complex, and then with red light, which inactivated the photochemical reaction center.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10445 - 2-Propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. 721.10445 Section 721.10445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10445 - 2-Propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. 721.10445 Section 721.10445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... hydrogen sulfide, distn. residues. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 2-propen-1-ol, reaction products with hydrogen sulfide,...

  19. Is it true that polymerization of vegetable oil occurs through Diels-Alder reaction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is known to be one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. However, our NMR study showed no evidence for Diels-Alder products. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ...

  20. Employee Reactions to an Open-Plan Office: A Naturally Occurring Quasi-Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldham, Greg R.; Brass, Daniel J.

    1979-01-01

    Examines changes in reactions of employees to work after they moved from a conventional office to an open-plan office. Employee satisfaction and internal motivation decreased significantly after the move to the open office. (Author/IRT)

  1. A Role-Play to Illustrate the Energy Changes Occurring in an Exothermic Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyas, Toby; Cabot, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes a role-play activity designed to help students understand the energy changes involved in an exothermic reaction by modeling the concepts of bond-breaking takes in energy, activation energy, temperature rise, and bond breaking gives out energy. (WRM)

  2. Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Berroa, F; Goikoetxea, M J; Moncada, R; Núñez-Córdoba, J M; Cabrera-Freitag, P; D'Amelio, C; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2013-06-01

    Allergic skin tests have to be performed 4-6 weeks after an allergic anesthetic reaction. Patients with allergic reactions during anesthesia were prospectively included (n = 44). Skin tests were performed in two stages: (i) Stage 1 (S1), 0-4 days after the reaction; and (ii) Stage 2 (S2), 4-8 weeks after. Five (11.5%) surgical procedures were suspended due to the reaction. Positive skin tests were obtained in 25/44 patients (57%). Allergic diagnosis was carried out at S1 in 15/25 (60%) and at S2 in 10/25 (40%). Three patients resulted positive only in S1. Overall agreement among S1 and S2 skin tests was 70.45%. The kappa statistic was 0.41 (P-value = 0.002). Odds ratio of obtaining a false negative in S1 (compared with S2) was 3.33. Early allergological study is useful, could minimize false negatives, but should be considered as a complement to late skin tests.

  3. Reactions occurring during the sulfation of sodium chloride deposited on alumina substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Birks, N.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction between solid NaCl and air containing 1 pct SO2 has been studied between 500 and 700 C. The reaction product, Na2SO4, forms not only on the surface of the NaCl but also on surrounding areas of the substrate due to the volatility of the NaCl at these temperatures. At the higher temperatures, the vapor pressure of NaCl is so high that the majority of the reaction product is distributed on the substrate. Above 625 C, the reaction product is a liquid solution of NaCl and Na2SO4 that exists only so long as NaCl is supplied from the original crystal source. Eventually, the liquid solidifies by constitutional solidification as the NaCl is converted to Na2SO4. While it exists, the liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 solution is shown to be highly corrosive to Al2O3 and, on a scale of Al2O3 growing on alloy HOS 875, particularly attacks the grain boundaries of the scale at preferred sites where chromium and iron oxides and sulfides rapidly develop. This is proposed as one mechanism by which NaCl deposition contributes to the initiation of low temperature hot corrosion.

  4. Induction of mitotic gene conversion by browning reaction products and its modulation by naturally occurring agents.

    PubMed

    Rosin, M P; Stich, H F; Powrie, W D; Wu, C H

    1982-05-01

    Mitotic gene conversion in the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was significantly enhanced by exposure to non-enzymatic browning reaction products. These products were formed during the heating of sugar (caramelization reaction) or sugar-amino acid mixtures (Maillard reaction) at temperatures normally used during the cooking of food. Several modulating factors of this convertogenic activity were identified. These factors included two main groups: (1) trace metals which are widely distributed in the environment; and (2) several cellular enzymatic systems. The convertogenic activities of a heated glucose-lysine mixture and a commercial caramel powder were completely suppresses when yeast were concurrently exposed to these products and to either FeIII or CuII. Equimolar concentrations of MnII or sodium selenite had no effect on the convertogenic activity of the products of either model system. Horse-radish peroxidase, beef liver catalase and rat liver S9 preparations each decreased the frequency of gene conversion induced by the caramel powder and the heated glucose-lysine products. This modulating activity of the enzymes was lost if they were heat-inactivated. These studies indicate the presence of a variety of protective mechanisms which can modify genotoxic components in complex food mixtures.

  5. Novel approach for identifying key residues in enzymatic reactions: proton abstraction in ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mika; Brinck, Tore

    2014-11-20

    We propose a computationally efficient approach for evaluating the individual contributions of many different residues to the catalytic efficiency of an enzymatic reaction. This approach is based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, and it defines the energy of a deletion form, i.e., the energy of the system when a particular residue is deleted. Using this approach, we found that, among 10 investigated residues, three, Tyr14, Asp99, and Tyr55, in this order, significantly reduce the activation energy of the proton abstraction from a substrate, cyclopent-2-enone, catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). The relative activation energies estimated in this study are in good agreement with available previous experimental and theoretical data obtained for the similar proton abstraction with a native substrate and substitution mutants of KSI. It was thus indicated that the new approach is efficient for rationally evaluating the catalytic effects of multiple residues on an enzymatic reaction.

  6. Mathematical model for describing reactions of residual chlorine with organic matter in reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Funamizu, N; Iwamoto, T; Takakuwa, T

    2004-01-01

    Among several applications of urban wastewater reuse, use of reclaimed wastewater to sustain stream flows has become attractive in the urban area. Since these rivers are used for recreational purposes and for restoring aquatic eco-system, the adequate control of residual chlorine is essential. Mathematical model for describing reactions between residual chlorine and organic matter in reclaimed wastewater has been developed. The model considers the effect of molecular weight distribution of organic matter on the reaction rate. Lab-scale experiments were performed to estimate reaction rates constants and to examine their temperature dependency. The experiments showed that 1) the smaller organic matter gave the larger reaction rate; 2) temperature effect on reaction rate was described by the Arrhenius formula; 3) decline of free chlorine had more temperature dependency than combined chlorine. The comparison of computed results with data from lab-scale experiments confirmed the validity of the model. We used the one-dimensional dispersion model with proposed reaction model and examined the seasonal variation of residual chlorine profile along the river sustained by reclaimed wastewater in Sapporo. Simulation showed that seasonal variation of nitrification performance in secondary treatment as well as change in temperature caused seasonal variation in residual chlorine profile along the river.

  7. Subject Reaction to Human-Caused and Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belford, Susan; Gibbs, Margaret

    While research has shown that people are adversely psychologically affected by knowledge that their communities have been toxically contaminated, it has been suggested that those who see a disaster as naturally occurring tend to be less adversely affected than those who see a disaster as caused by human acts. To examine this issue, questionnaires…

  8. Just three water molecules can trigger the undesired nonenzymatic reactions of aspartic acid residues: new insight from a quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.

    2014-03-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (L-Asp) can undergo spontaneous, nonenzymatic reactions under physiological conditions by which abnormal L-β-Asp, D-Asp, and/or D-β-Asp residues are formed. These altered Asp residues may affect the three-dimensional structures of the peptides and proteins and hence their properties and functions. In fact, the altered Asp residues are relevant to age-related diseases such as cataract and Alzheimer's disease. Most of the above reactions of the L-Asp residue proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, I propose a detailed mechanism of cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for a small Asp-containing model compound complexed with three water molecules which act as general acid-base catalysts in proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form. Then, successive reorientation of a water molecule and conformational change occur followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen atom on the carboxyl carbon atom of the Asp side chain to form a five-membered ring. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  9. 1H-n.m.r. investigation of naturally occurring and chemically oversulphated dermatan sulphates. Identification of minor monosaccharide residues.

    PubMed Central

    Bossennec, V; Petitou, M; Perly, B

    1990-01-01

    The 1H-n.m.r. spectra of various dermatan sulphate preparations present, besides the major signals of the basic disaccharide unit, several other minor signals. We have assigned most of them by n.m.r., using two-dimensional proton-proton double-quantum-correlation and nuclear-Overhauser-effect spectroscopy experiments. This allowed us to identify 2-O-sulphated L-iduronic acid and D-glucuronic acid residues as well as 6-sulphated N-acetylgalactosamine (presumably 4-O-sulphated as well). 2-O-Sulphated iduronic acid was present to similar extents (6-10% of total uronic acids) in pig skin dermatan sulphate and pig intestine dermatan sulphate, whereas glucuronic acid represented 17% of the uronic acid of pig skin dermatan sulphate and was virtually absent (1%) from the other preparation. 6-O-Sulphated N-acetylgalactosamine was present in minor amounts in pig intestine dermatan sulphate only. The influence of sulphation of iduronic acid units on their conformation was assessed by using chemically oversulphated pig intestine dermatan sulphate. Introduction of sulphate groups in this unit in dermatan sulphate tends to shift the conformational equilibrium towards the 1C4 conformer. PMID:2339978

  10. The selective reaction of methoxyamine with cytidine residues in mammalian initiator transfer ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Peter W.; Clark, Brian F.C.

    1974-01-01

    Methoxyamine reacts selectively with tRNA molecules at certain exposed cytosine residues usually located in non base-paired regions of the two dimensional clover leaf structure. Here methoxyamine is used for the first time in a study of a mammalian tRNA structure. One of the sequence abnormalities of myeloma initiator tRNA is a cytosine instead of the usual uracil immediately preceding the anticodon. A study of the reaction of the cytosine residues with methoxyamine indicates that the accessibility of bases to chemical reagents in the anticodon loop of this mammalian initiator tRNA is very similar to that observed for the bacterial initiator tRNA. Images PMID:10793658

  11. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 64}Ni + {sup 144,154}Sm reaction -- Energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The fission hindrance of hot nuclei was deduced recently from an enhanced emission of GDR {gamma} rays, neutrons and charged particles prior to scission of heavy nuclei. In the most recent experiments addressing this topic, namely new measurements of the pre-scission {gamma} rays and evaporation residues from the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reaction, a rather sharp transition from negligible to full one-body dissipation occurs over the excitation energy region E{sub exc} = 60-100 MeV. However, the cross section does not appear to level out or start to decline again at the upper end of the energy range as expected in this interpretation. It is therefore clearly desirable to extend the excitation energy range to look for such an effect in order to either corroborate or refute this interpretation.

  12. Calculation of evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in hot fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinjuan; Wang, Chengbin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2013-07-01

    A systematic calculation of the production cross sections of superheavy elements (SHEs) in hot fusion reactions is performed. First, we analyze the reactions of 48Ca + 238U, 244Pu, and 248Cm, from which the parameter values in the model for each process are determined by comparing the calculated capture, fusion, and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections, respectively, with the measured data. Then, we calculate the ER cross sections of other hot fusion reactions with the derived parameter values. The calculated results are in good agreement with the available data. Furthermore, the possible isotope production cross sections of elements 118 and 117 in the reactions of 48Ca + ACf and ABk are computed. We find that with the increase of the neutron number of the target, the production cross sections of the SHEs increase, primarily caused by the smaller neutron separation energies of the corresponding neutron-rich compound nucleus (CN). Finally, the production cross sections of elements 120 and 119 are evaluated in fusion-evaporation reactions with 50Ti as a projectile.

  13. Spin distributions and cross sections of evaporation residues in the 28Si+176Yb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshan, K.; Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.; Gehlot, J.; Madhavan, N.; Nath, S.; Mohanto, G.; Mukul, I.; Jhingan, A.; Mazumdar, I.

    2017-02-01

    Background: Non-compound-nucleus fission in the preactinide region has been an active area of investigation in the recent past. Based on the measurements of fission-fragment mass distributions in the fission of 202Po, populated by reactions with varying entrance channel mass asymmetry, the onset of non-compound-nucleus fission was proposed to be around ZpZt˜1000 [Phys. Rev. C 77, 024606 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevC.77.024606], where Zp and Zt are the projectile and target proton numbers, respectively. Purpose: The present paper is aimed at the measurement of cross sections and spin distributions of evaporation residues in the 28Si+176Yb reaction (ZpZt=980 ) to investigate the fusion hindrance which, in turn, would give information about the contribution from non-compound-nucleus fission in this reaction. Method: Evaporation-residue cross sections were measured in the beam energy range of 129-166 MeV using the hybrid recoil mass analyzer (HYRA) operated in the gas-filled mode. Evaporation-residue cross sections were also measured by the recoil catcher technique followed by off-line γ -ray spectrometry at few intermediate energies. γ -ray multiplicities of evaporation residues were measured to infer about their spin distribution. The measurements were carried out using NaI(Tl) detector-based 4π-spin spectrometer from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, coupled to the HYRA. Results: Evaporation-residue cross sections were significantly lower compared to those calculated using the statistical model code pace2 [Phys. Rev. C 21, 230 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevC.21.230] with the coupled-channel fusion model code ccfus [Comput. Phys. Commun. 46, 187 (1987), 10.1016/0010-4655(87)90045-2] at beam energies close to the entrance channel Coulomb barrier. At higher beam energies, experimental cross sections were close to those predicted by the model. Average γ -ray multiplicities or angular momentum values of evaporation residues were in agreement with the

  14. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-03-01

    Interquinone QA‑ → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions.

  15. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    PubMed Central

    Shlyk, Oksana; Samish, Ilan; Matěnová, Martina; Dulebo, Alexander; Poláková, Helena; Kaftan, David; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-01-01

    Interquinone QA− → QB electron-transfer (ET) in isolated photosystem II reaction centers (PSII-RC) is protein-gated. The temperature-dependent gating frequency “k” is described by the Eyring equation till levelling off at T ≥ 240 °K. Although central to photosynthesis, the gating mechanism has not been resolved and due to experimental limitations, could not be explored in vivo. Here we mimic the temperature dependency of “k” by enlarging VD1-208, the volume of a single residue at the crossing point of the D1 and D2 PSII-RC subunits in Synechocystis 6803 whole cells. By controlling the interactions of the D1/D2 subunits, VD1-208 (or 1/T) determines the frequency of attaining an ET-active conformation. Decelerated ET, impaired photosynthesis, D1 repair rate and overall cell physiology upon increasing VD1-208 to above 130 Å3, rationalize the >99% conservation of small residues at D1-208 and its homologous motif in non-oxygenic bacteria. The experimental means and resolved mechanism are relevant for numerous transmembrane protein-gated reactions. PMID:28300167

  16. {sup 29}Si solid state NMR investigation of pozzolanic reaction occurring in lime-treated Ca-bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Pomakhina, Elena; Deneele, Dimitri; Gaillot, Anne-Claire; Paris, Michael; Ouvrard, Guy

    2012-04-15

    Lime is widely used as additive to improve the mechanical properties of natural soil used in earthworks. However, the physico-chemical mechanisms involved are yet not well understood. In order to develop and optimize this treatment method, a better understanding of the interaction between lime and the minerals of the soils, in particular clay minerals, is required. In this study, Ca-bentonite was treated with 2, 5 and 10 wt.% of lime during 1 to 98 days. Modifications in the Si local environment were then monitored by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the pozzolanic reaction. All the soil mineral phases contribute to the release of Si and to the pozzolanic reaction, with a rapid and total consumption of Si-polymorph and an exacerbated dissolution of montmorillonite. Mechanism of C-S-H formation, function of the Ca content in the system, was found to match the sorosilicate-tobermorite model described in cement systems.

  17. Determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein via moving reaction boundary titration in microdevice electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-yu; Li, Si; Tang, Yun-yun; Dong, Jing-yu; Fan, Liu-yin; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-06-21

    As two important physico-chemical parameters, the acidic and alkaline residues of protein are of evident significance for the evaluation of protein properties and the design of relevant separation and analysis. However, there is still no electrophoretic method used for the direct detection of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. Herein, we developed the concepts of moving reaction boundary (MRB) and MRB titration, relevant MRB titration theory, and the method of microdevice electrophoresis for the determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. In the MRB titration, the boundary was created with acid or alkali and target protein immobilized via highly cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG). It was theoretically revealed that the number of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein was as a function of MRB displacement in the electrophoretic titration system. As a proof of concept, seven model proteins were chosen for the determination of acidic or alkaline residues of protein via MRB titration. The results showed that the numbers of free acidic and alkaline residues of proteins detected were in good agreement with those obtained from the relevant amino sequences in the NCBI database, demonstrating the feasibility of the developed concept, theory and technique. The general methodology of MRB titration has potential application for inexpensive, facilitative and informative protein structure analysis of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein.

  18. Thermal glycosylation and degradation reactions occurring at the reducing ends of cellulose during low-temperature pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Seiji; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2011-02-01

    Thermal glycosylation and degradation reactions of cellulose (Avicel PH-101) were studied in the presence or absence of alcohols (glycerol, mannitol, 1,2,6-hexanetriol, 3-phenoxy-1,2-propanediol, and 1-tetradecanol) under N(2) at 60-280°C. In the presence of glycerol (heating time, 10 min), the reducing ends were converted into glycosides when the temperature of the glycerol was >140°C without the addition of any catalysts. A temperature of 140°C is close to that required for the initiation of thermal polymerization (glycosylation). Although the conversion was only around 20% in the range of 140-180°C, the reactivity increased above 200-240°C where the thermal expansion of cellulose crystals is reported to become significant. Finally, all reducing ends were converted into glycosides at 260°C. Such heterogeneous reactivity likely arose from the lower reactivities of the reducing ends in the crystalline region due to their lower accessibility to glycerol, although the reactivity in the non-crystalline region was similar to that of glucose. Alcohols that have a lower OH/C ratio did not react with the reducing ends, suggesting that the hydrophilicity of the alcohol was critical for the glycosylation reaction to proceed. The glycosylated cellulose samples were found to be significantly stabilized against pyrolytic coloration. The results of neat cellulose pyrolysis indicated that two competitive reactions, thermal glycosylation and degradation, formed a dark-colored substance at the reducing ends while the internal glucose units in the cellulose were comparatively stable.

  19. Identification of co-occurring Branchinecta fairy shrimp species from encysted embryos using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Wood, D.A.; Simovich, M.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Morphological identification of many fairy shrimp species is difficult because distinguishing characters are restricted to adults. We developed two multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays that differentiate among three Branchinecta fairy shrimp with distributional overlap in southern California vernal pools. Two of the species are federally listed as threatened. Molecular identification of Branchinecta from cysts allows for species surveys to be conducted during the dry season, expanding the timeframe for population assessment and providing a less intrusive method of sampling sensitive vernal pool habitats. ?? Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Jan; Bergman, Ann-Charlotte; Adamson, Ulf; Blombaeck, Margareta; Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may

  1. Additive effect of waste tire on the hydrogenolysis reaction of coal liquefaction residue

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyuki Sugano; Daigorou Onda; Kiyoshi Mashimo

    2006-12-15

    A numerous amount of waste tire is landfilled or dumped all over the world, which causes environmental problems, such as destruction of natural places and the risk of fires. On the other hand, the coal liquefaction residue (CLR) is produced in 30% yield through the process supporting unit (PSU) of the NEDOL coal liquefaction process. Therefore, the investigation on an effective method for utilization of waste tire and CLR is required. In this study, the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and pulverized waste tire was carried out by using tetralin. The yields in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis were compared with algebraic sum of the yields of the individual hydrogenolyses of waste tire alone and coal alone. In the simultaneous hydrogenolysis, the synergistic effects to upgrading, such as an increase in the yield of the oil constituent and a decrease in the yield of the asphaltene constituent, occurred because of the stabilization of asphaltenic radicals from CLR with aliphatic radicals from tire. The decrease in asphaltene yield in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis was pronounced with the increase in the tire:CLR ratio because the solvent effects of liquefied tire, such as stabilization of radicals, hydrogen shuttling, and heat transfer, were enhanced. Accordingly, it is estimated that the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and waste tire is an effective method for processing both materials. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t2), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  3. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction -- energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    In this experiment we tried to measure the evaporation residue cross section over a wide range of beam energies for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction using the FMA. However, because of longer-than-estimated runs needed at each beam energy, and the difficulty of bending evaporation residues at the higher energies in the FMA, data were taken only at beam energies of E{sub beam} = 460, 490, and 521 MeV, which correspond to excitation energies of E{sub exc} = 62, 78, and 95 MeV, respectively. By comparing to results for the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reactions measured recently, we expect to demonstrate a strong entrance channel effect related to the hindrance of complete fusion in near-symmetric heavy systems (a fusion hindrance factor of the order 7-10 is expected on the basis of the Extra-Push Model). The data are being analyzed.

  4. Oxidation and inactivation of SERCA by selective reaction of cysteine residues with amino acid peroxides.

    PubMed

    Dremina, Elena S; Sharov, Victor S; Davies, Michael J; Schöneich, Christian

    2007-10-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins plays an important role in a wide range of pathological processes and aging. Proteins are modified by numerous biologic oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, singlet oxygen, and oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals. More recently, an additional class of physiologically important oxidants has been identified, peptide and protein peroxides. The latter react quite rapidly and selectively with protein cysteine residues. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) is reversibly regulated through NO-dependent S-glutathiolation of specific cysteine residues. The irreversible oxidation of these cysteine residues could, therefore, impair NO-dependent muscle relaxation. Here, we show that specific protein-derived (amino acid) peroxides react selectively with a subset of the 22 reduced cysteine residues of SERCA1, including a peptide-containing Cys674 and Cys675, where Cys674 (in SERCA2) represents one of the targets for NO-dependent S-glutathiolation. Out of 11 tested amino acid, peptide, and protein peroxides, those derived from free tryptophan and free tyrosine showed the highest reactivity towards SERCA, while no oxidation under similar experimental conditions was detected through hydrogen peroxide. Among the peroxides from tryptophan, those of free tryptophan showed a significantly higher reactivity as compared to those from N- and C-terminally blocked tryptophan. Quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis demonstrated that the highest reactivity of the tryptophan-derived peroxides was observed for Cys774 and Cys938, cysteine residues, which are embedded within the transmembrane domains of SERCA1. This unusual reactivity of transmembrane domains cannot be solely rationalized by the hydrophobicity of the oxidant, as the peroxide from dl-tryptophan shows considerable higher reactivity as compared to the one derived from N-acetyl-tryptophan methyl ester. Our data demonstrate a potential role of peptide- and protein

  5. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Impact of Cement Reactions on Release of Contaminants from Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-09-01

    The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. Initial work to produce release models was conducted on residual tank sludge using pure water as the leaching agent. The results were reported in an earlier report. The decision has now been made to close the tanks after waste retrieval with a cementitious grout to minimize infiltration and maintain the physical integrity of the tanks. This report describes testing of the residual waste with a leaching solution that simulates the composition of water passing through the grout and contacting the residual waste at the bottom of the tank.

  6. Comparison between qualitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate minimal residual disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Francisco Danilo Ferreira; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; Ganazza, Mônica Aparecida; Jotta, Patricia Yoshioka; Yunes, José Andrés; Viana, Marcos Borato; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minimal residual disease is an important independent prognostic factor that can identify poor responders among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze minimal residual disease using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements by conventional polymerase chain reaction followed by homo-heteroduplex analysis and to compare this with real-time polymerase chain reaction at the end of the induction period in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods Seventy-four patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled. Minimal residual disease was evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in 57 and by both tests in 44. The Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox methods and the log-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results Nine patients (15.8%) were positive for minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction and 11 (25%) by real-time polymerase chain reaction considering a cut-off point of 1 × 10−3 for precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 1 × 10−2 for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using the qualitative method, the 3.5-year leukemia-free survival was significantly higher in children negative for minimal residual disease compared to those with positive results (84.1% ± 5.6% versus 41.7% ± 17.3%, respectively; p-value = 0.004). There was no significant association between leukemia-free survival and minimal residual disease by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Minimal residual disease by qualitative polymerase chain reaction was the only variable significantly correlated to leukemia-free survival. Conclusion Given the difficulties in the implementation of minimal residual disease monitoring by real-time polymerase chain reaction in most treatment centers in Brazil, the qualitative polymerase chain reaction strategy may be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:26670399

  7. Analysis of residual phases in nickel aluminide powders produced by reaction synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, K.P.; Shaw, K.G.; Trogolo, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    The use of x-ray diffraction has been used to determine phases present after reaction synthesis of Ni{sub 3}Al powder. The complex diffraction spectra produced by the powder prompted the development of a simulator. The simlulator uses nonlinear regression to determine the weight percent of the phases present. The simulator also determines the broadening of each peak in the spectrum. The phases present in Ni{sub 3}Al powder produced by reaction synthesis has been determined with the simulator. The simulator has been used to monitor the progress of phase transformation during various thermal treatments of Ni{sub 3}Al powder. A thermal cycle of 1200{degrees}C for two hours has been shown to produce a phase-pure product. The activation energy for the interdiffusion of nickel and aluminum has been determined to be 260{plus_minus}35 kJ/mole.

  8. Analysis of residual phases in nickel aluminide powders produced by reaction synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, K.P.; Shaw, K.G. ); Trogolo, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The use of x-ray diffraction has been used to determine phases present after reaction synthesis of Ni[sub 3]Al powder. The complex diffraction spectra produced by the powder prompted the development of a simulator. The simlulator uses nonlinear regression to determine the weight percent of the phases present. The simulator also determines the broadening of each peak in the spectrum. The phases present in Ni[sub 3]Al powder produced by reaction synthesis has been determined with the simulator. The simulator has been used to monitor the progress of phase transformation during various thermal treatments of Ni[sub 3]Al powder. A thermal cycle of 1200[degrees]C for two hours has been shown to produce a phase-pure product. The activation energy for the interdiffusion of nickel and aluminum has been determined to be 260[plus minus]35 kJ/mole.

  9. Modification of histones by sugar β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) occurs on multiple residues, including histone H3 serine 10, and is cell cycle-regulated.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suisheng; Roche, Kevin; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Lowndes, Noel Francis

    2011-10-28

    The monosaccharide, β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), can be added to the hydroxyl group of either serines or threonines to generate an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue (Love, D. C., and Hanover, J. A. (2005) Sci. STKE 2005 312, 1-14; Hart, G. W., Housley, M. P., and Slawson, C. (2007) Nature 446, 1017-1022). This post-translational protein modification, termed O-GlcNAcylation, is reversible, analogous to phosphorylation, and has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we present evidence that in human cells all four core histones of the nucleosome are substrates for this glycosylation in the relative abundance H3, H4/H2B, and H2A. Increasing the intracellular level of UDP-GlcNAc, the nucleotide sugar donor substrate for O-GlcNAcylation enhanced histone O-GlcNAcylation and partially suppressed phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10ph). Expression of recombinant H3.3 harboring an S10A mutation abrogated histone H3 O-GlcNAcylation relative to its wild-type version, consistent with H3S10 being a site of histone O-GlcNAcylation (H3S10glc). Moreover, O-GlcNAcylated histones were lost from H3S10ph immunoprecipitates, whereas immunoprecipitation of either H3K4me3 or H3K9me3 (active or inactive histone marks, respectively) resulted in co-immunoprecipitation of O-GlcNAcylated histones. We also examined histone O-GlcNAcylation during cell cycle progression. Histone O-GlcNAcylation is high in G(1) cells, declines throughout the S phase, increases again during late S/early G(2), and persists through late G(2) and mitosis. Thus, O-GlcNAcylation is a novel histone post-translational modification regulating chromatin conformation during transcription and cell cycle progression.

  10. Environmentally friendly system for the degradation of multipesticide residues in aqueous media by the Fenton's reaction.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Bruno de S; Kleemann, Natiele; Caldas, Sergiane S; Costa, Fabiane P; Silveira, Maria A K; Duarte, Fabio A; Primel, Ednei G

    2014-01-01

    A Fenton oxidation system employing zero-valent iron (whose source was swarf, a residue of metallurgical industries, in powder form) and hydrogen peroxide for the treatment of an aqueous solution with six pesticides was developed, and the effect of the iron metal content, pH, and hydrogen peroxide concentration was evaluated. The characterization of the aqueous solution resulted in: pH 5.6, 105 mg L(-1) of dissolved organic carbon, and 44.6 NTU turbidity. In addition, the characterization of the swarf by FAAS and ICP-MS showed 98.43 ± 7.40 % of zero-valent iron. The removal was strongly affected by the content of iron metal, pH, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The best degradation conditions were 2.0 g swarf, pH 2.0, and 5 mmol L(-1) H2O2. At the end of the treatment, the pesticide degradation ranged from 60 to 100%, leading to 55% mineralization. Besides, all hydrogen peroxide was consumed and the determination of total dissolved iron resulted in 2 mg L(-1). Thus, the advantages of this system are rapid degradation (up to 20 min), high-degradation rates, simple handling, and low cost.

  11. [Role of the ribose residue of substrates in reactions catalyzed by ribonuclease].

    PubMed

    Avramova, Z V; Dudkin, S M

    1978-01-01

    The rate constants and Km for the hydrolysis of the optically active nonglycosidic analogues of the CpA and C greater than p catalysed by RNase A and RNase BS-I were measured. The rate of hydrolysis of the model substrates in 10(5) and 10(3) slower that for the appropriate dinucleoside phosphate and nucleoside cyclophosphate. However, substitution of the relatively rigid ribofuranose ring with flexible alifatic chains is accompanied by little variation in binding constants. The analyses based on the single substrate system indicate that the observed difference in rate constants must be accounted for by a difference between the binding of the substrates in the transition state to the RNase active site. Consequently, the "rigidity" of the ribose rings in RNA leads to large decreases in the free energy of activation for the reactions catalysed by RNases.

  12. Nonenzymatic oligomerization reactions on templates containing inosinic acid or diaminopurine nucleotide residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides on standard oligonucleotide templates has been studied extensively. Here, we describe experiments with templates in which inosinic acid (I) is substituted for guanylic acid, or 2,6-diaminopurine nucleotide (D) for adenylic acid. We find that the substitution of I for G in a template is strongly inhibitory and prevents any incorporation of C into internal positions in the oligomeric products of the reaction. The substitution of D for A, on the contrary, leads to increased incorporation of U into the products. We found no evidence for the template-directed facilitation of oligomerization of A or I through A-I base pairing. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Brazilian coal mining residues and sulphide oxidation by Fenton's reaction: an accelerated weathering procedure to evaluate possible environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Silva, L F O; Querol, X; da Boit, K M; Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, S; Madariaga, J M

    2011-02-15

    Fenton's reaction is proposed as an accelerated weathering test for sulphides associated with Brazilian Coal Mining Residues (CMR), that are exposed to oxygen and water during the mining of coal. TEM and SEM/EDX were used to evaluate the nature, occurrence and distribution of minerals in remaining coals and other lithological units, before and after applying the test. Oxidation of CMRs was examined by analyzing soluble sulphur (sulphate) and dissolved metals by ICP-MS or ICP OES. As dissolved sulphate increases, dissolved Zn, Cd, Cu and Co concentrations increase, leading to undetectable amounts in the remaining solid phases; dissolved Ni and Mn also increase with the mobilized sulphur, but the remainder in the solids is the most important fraction; Fe and Pb are not mobilized due to precipitation as jarosite or hematite in the case of Fe or as sulphate in the case of Pb. Agreement between the observed results and the predictions by geochemical modelling is discussed.

  14. Nitrogen dioxide reaction with proteins: Evidence for peptide bond cleavage at lysine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), an air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels and a component of cigarette smoke, is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases, such as emphysema. To gain information on the mechanism by which NO{sub 2} damages the lung, in vitro exposures of {alpha}{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor ({alpha}{sub 1}-PI), elastin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA) and synthetic poly-L-lysine were performed. A genetic deficiency of {alpha}{sup 1}-PI predisposes humans to emphysema and NO{sub 2} has been hypothesized to damage {alpha}{sub 1}-PI, which would leave proteases such as human neutrophil elastase, (HNE) free to attack lung structural proteins. The ability of {alpha}{sub 1}-PI to inhibit HNE declined with exposure to 50% of the control value at molar ratios of NO{sub 2}:{alpha}{sub 1}-PI of 400:1 and greater. Exposure of {alpha}{sub 1}-PI to NO{sub 2} resulted in a 50% lose of immunoreactivity with either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at molar ratios of NO{sub 2}:{alpha}{sub 1}-PI of essentially 100:1 and greater. The mechanisms of these effects were investigated via ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and amino acid analysis. The remaining target molecules were labeled by reductive methylation of amino groups with {sup 3}H-HCHO prior to treatment with NO{sub 2} in aqueous solutions at physiological pH. Time course exposure of 5 mg {sup 3}H-insoluble bovine ligamentum nuchae elastin suspensions with up to 120 {mu}moles of NO{sub 2} resulted in 90% solubilization of the label. Amino acid analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions from these exposures confirmed that 80% of the {sup 3}H-dimethyllysine residues were in the soluble fraction.

  15. Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Uranium for Energies between 20 and 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uosif, M. A. M.; Michel, R.; Herpers, U.; Kubik, P.-W.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-01

    Within the HINDAS project, proton-irradiation experiments were performed at the injector cyclotron of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen/Switzerland in order to investigate the production of residual nuclides from natural uranium. The stacked-foil technique was used to cover proton energies between 20 MeV and 70 MeV. Copper targets were used for monitoring the proton beam using the reaction 65Cu (p,n)65Zn. Residual radionuclides were measured by off-line γ-spectrometry. Excitation functions were obtained for the production of 91Y, 95Zr, 95mNb, 99Mo, 103Ru, 112Pd, 115Cd, 124Sb, 126Sb, 127Sb, 132Te, 131I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce, 144Ce, 147Nd, and 238Np. The experimental data are compared to the sparse results of earlier measurements and with theoretical excitation functions calculated by the newly developed TALYS code. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained for product masses up to 115. For higher-mass fission products and for 238Np, there are still systematic deviations between theory and experiment. These deviations are discussed as deficits of the fission model in the heavy part of the fission product distribution.

  16. Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Uranium for Energies between 20 and 70 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Uosif, M.A.M.; Michel, R.; Herpers, U.; Kubik, P.-W.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.

    2005-05-24

    Within the HINDAS project, proton-irradiation experiments were performed at the injector cyclotron of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen/Switzerland in order to investigate the production of residual nuclides from natural uranium. The stacked-foil technique was used to cover proton energies between 20 MeV and 70 MeV. Copper targets were used for monitoring the proton beam using the reaction 65Cu (p,n)65Zn. Residual radionuclides were measured by off-line {gamma}-spectrometry. Excitation functions were obtained for the production of 91Y, 95Zr, 95mNb, 99Mo, 103Ru, 112Pd, 115Cd, 124Sb, 126Sb, 127Sb, 132Te, 131I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce, 144Ce, 147Nd, and 238Np. The experimental data are compared to the sparse results of earlier measurements and with theoretical excitation functions calculated by the newly developed TALYS code. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained for product masses up to 115. For higher-mass fission products and for 238Np, there are still systematic deviations between theory and experiment. These deviations are discussed as deficits of the fission model in the heavy part of the fission product distribution.

  17. Evidence for the Role of Active Site Residues in the Hairpin Ribozyme from Molecular Simulations along the Reaction Path

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme accelerates a phosphoryl transfer reaction without catalytic participation of divalent metal ions. Residues A38 and G8 have been implicated as playing roles in general acid and base catalysis, respectively. Here we explore the structure and dynamics of key active site residues using more than 1 μs of molecular dynamics simulations of the hairpin ribozyme at different stages along the catalytic pathway. Analysis of results indicates hydrogen bond interactions between the nucleophile and proR nonbridging oxygen are correlated with active inline attack conformations. Further, the simulation results suggest a possible alternative role for G8 to promote inline fitness and facilitate activation of the nucleophile by hydrogen bonding, although this does not necessarily exclude an additional role as a general base. Finally, we suggest that substitution of G8 with N7- or N3-deazaguanosine which have elevated pKa values, both with and without thio modifications at the 5′ leaving group position, would provide valuable insight into the specific role of G8 in catalysis. PMID:24842535

  18. Reaction of a histidyl residue analogue with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper(II) ion

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Koji; Kawakishi, Shunro )

    1990-03-01

    Site-specific damage to a specific amino acid residue of a protein by Cu{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was investigated. Observation of specific damage to the histidine residue of the protein was fully supported by a model experiment using N-benzoylhistidine. The reaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} toward the substrate was characteristic of a Cu{sup 2+}-catalyzed system and was significantly influenced by pH. Other peroxides and peracids were slightly reactive to the substrate even in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}. Under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.2, room temperature), incubation with Cu{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.5 mM CuSO{sub 4}, 50 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) resulted in complete destruction of the substrate within 1 h. Four products including N-benzoyl derivatives of asparagine, aspartic acid, aspartylurea, and formylasparagine were detected as the ring-ruptured products, and three products including 5-(2-benzamidovinyl)imidazole, benzamide, and benzoate were detected as the oxidation products at the {alpha}- and {beta}-positions of the substrate. Plausible mechanisms for oxidation of histidine are proposed.

  19. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural changes occurring in aluminium matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles during casting and welding: interface reactions

    PubMed

    Urena; Gomez De Salazar JM; Gil; Escalera; Baldonedo

    1999-11-01

    Processing of aluminium matrix composites (AMCs), especially those constituted by a reactive system such as Al-SiC, presents great difficulties which limit their potential applications. The interface reactivity between SiC and molten Al generates an aluminium carbide which degrades the composite properties. Scanning and transmission electron microscopes equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopes are essential tools for determining the structure and chemistry of the Al-SiC interfaces in AMCs and changes occurring during casting and arc welding. In the present work, an aluminium-copper alloy (AA2014) reinforced with three different percentages of SiC particles was subjected to controlled remelting tests, at temperatures in the range 750-900 degrees C for 10 and 30 min. Arc welding tests using a tungsten intert gas with power inputs in the range 850-2000 W were also carried out. The results of these studies showed that during remelting there is preferential SiC particle consumption with formation of Al4C3 by interface reaction between the solid SiC particle and the molten aluminium matrix. The formation of Al4C3 by the same mechanism has also been detected in molten pools of arc welded composites. However, in this case there was formation of an almost continuous layer of Al4C3, which protects the particle against further consumption, and formation of aciculate aluminium carbide on the top weld. Both are formed by fusion and dissolution of the SiC in molten aluminium followed by reaction and precipitation of the Al4C3 during cooling.

  20. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Importance of Residues in the Orotate Binding Site†

    PubMed Central

    Iiams, Vanessa; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by exceptional values for the rate enhancement [kcat/knon = 7.1 × 1016] and catalytic proficiency [(kcat/KM)/knon = 4.8 × 1022 M−1]. Although a stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate is located on the reaction coordinate, the structural strategies by which the reduction in the activation energy barrier is realized remain incompletely understood. This laboratory recently reported that “substrate destabilization” by Asp 70 in the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) lowers the activation energy barrier by ~5 kcal/mol (contributing ~2.7 × 103 to the rate enhancement) [K. K. Chan, B. M. Wood, A. A. Fedorov, E. V. Fedorov, H. J. Imker, T. L. Amyes, J. P. Richard, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5518–31]. We now report that substitutions of hydrophobic residues in a pocket proximal to the carboxylate group of the substrate (Ile 96, Leu 123, and Val 155) with neutral hydrophilic residues decrease the value of kcat by as much as 400-fold but have minimal effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of the FUMP product analog with solvent deuterium; we hypothesize that this pocket destabilizes the substrate by preventing hydration of the substrate carboxylate group. We also report that substitutions for Ser 127 that is proximal to O4 of the orotate ring decrease the value of kcat/KM, with the S127P substitution that eliminates hydrogen-bonding interactions with O4 producing a 2.5 × 106-fold reduction in the value of kcat/KM; this effect is consistent with delocalization of the negative charge of the carbanionic intermediate on O4 to produce an anionic carbene intermediate and thereby provide a structural strategy for stabilization of the intermediate. These observations provide additional information on the identities of the active site residues that contribute to the rate enhancement and, therefore, insights into the

  1. Quantitative assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) in canine lymphoma by using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Baba, Kenji; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Setoguchi-Mukai, Asuka; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2008-12-15

    Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic malignancy in dogs. Although a large proportion of dogs with lymphoma can achieve clinical remission by initial chemotherapy, most dogs die as a consequence of tumor relapse. We established a quantitative detection system for minimal residual disease (MRD) in canine lymphoma by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A canine T-cell lymphoma-derived cell line, namely, UL-1, was used to examine the specificity and sensitivity of the MRD detecting system. Allele-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes were designed based on the sequence of T-cell receptor gamma chain (TCRgamma) gene fragment of UL-1 cells in conjunction with its downstream sequence, which were obtained from the dog genome database. The real-time PCR system for plasmid DNA containing the TCRgamma gene derived from UL-1 cells and the genomic DNA of UL-1 cells revealed that the system was accurate for 10-100,000 copies per reaction and its sensitivity was 1 cell per 10,000 cells. In order to monitor the kinetics of tumor cell number in canine lymphoma, we quantified the level of MRD in the peripheral blood of 7 dogs with lymphoma under chemotherapy. Since the lymphoma cells from the 7 patients were shown to be B-cell origin from the finding of clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene, allele-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes were prepared based on the sequence of rearranged IgH gene in each case. The number of peripheral blood tumor cells measured by the real-time PCR was comparable to that estimated by conventional hematological examination in 2 cases of stage V lymphoma. MRD in the peripheral blood was detectable in all 7 cases, even in the complete remission (CR) phase. In the 7 lymphoma dogs, changes in the MRD levels of peripheral blood generally paralleled with the changes in the volumes of lymph nodes. Molecular CR, in which the MRD level was below the detection limit, was not observed in any of these 7 patients

  2. [The detection of minimal residual disease in patients with chronic B-cell lymphatic leukemia using patient-specified polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Iu V; Sorokina, T V; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kisilichina, D G; Naumova, E V; Pochtar', M E; Lugovskaia, S A; Ivanova, V L; Kovaleva, L G; Ptushkin, V V; Nikitin, E A; Sudarikov, A B

    2011-12-01

    The new effective protocols of treatment of chronic B-cell lymphatic leukemia, including purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies, provide robust remissions under this disease. Accordingly, the requirements to remission quality assessment are changed too. In particular the assessment of minimal residual disease is obligatory. To assess minimal residual disease in terms of quantity in case of chronic B-cell lymphatic leukemia the technique of polymerase chain reaction was applied in real time with patient-specific primers from the area of V-D-J combinations of genes of heavy chain of immunoglobulin. The study included samples from 60 patients suffering of chronic B-cell lymphatic leukemia. In 15 of them (25%), it was impossible to apply neither the sequence analysis of genes of heavy chain of immunoglobulin nor the fitting of patient-specific primer. The results of quantitative determination of minimal residual disease were obtained in 45 patients (55 tests). The minimal residual disease was detected in 30 of 55 samples (54.5%) and was not detected in 25 of 55 samples (45.5%). At the same time, the quantitative determination of minimal residual disease was implemented in regard to the initial level of neoplastic cells. The method sensitivity qualified by serial dilutions, consisted 10(-5) or 1 neoplastic cell to 100 000 normal cells. The comparative analysis was applied to the results of determination of minimal residual disease using two methods -polymerase chain reaction in real time using patient-specified primers and four-color flow cytofluometry. The determination of minimal residual disease with both methods was implemented in 37 patients (45 tests). The results of both methods matched in 93.3% (42 tests out of 45) with maximal disparity of one degree. Then Spearman factor consisted 0.87 (p < 0.0001). In 3 out of 45 tests (6.7%) neoplastic cells were detected with only one method. In the first case, it was the method of four-color flow cytofluometry and in

  3. Reactivity and selectivity patterns in hydrogen atom transfer from amino acid C-H bonds to the cumyloxyl radical: polar effects as a rationale for the preferential reaction at proline residues.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Basili, Federica; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-04-03

    Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of N-Boc-protected amino acids to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) were measured by laser flash photolysis. With glycine, alanine, valine, norvaline, and tert-leucine, HAT occurs from the α-C-H bonds, and the stability of the α-carbon radical product plays a negligible role. With leucine, HAT from the α- and γ-C-H bonds was observed. The higher kH value measured for proline was explained in terms of polar effects, with HAT that predominantly occurs from the δ-C-H bonds, providing a rationale for the previous observation that proline residues represent favored HAT sites in the reactions of peptides and proteins with (•)OH. Preferential HAT from proline was also observed in the reactions of CumO(•) with the dipeptides N-BocProGlyOH and N-BocGlyGlyOH. The rate constants measured for CumO(•) were compared with the relative rates obtained previously for the corresponding reactions of different hydrogen-abstracting species. The behavior of CumO(•) falls between those observed for the highly reactive radicals Cl(•) and (•)OH and the significantly more stable Br(•). Taken together, these results provide a general framework for the description of the factors that govern reactivity and selectivity patterns in HAT reactions from amino acid C-H bonds.

  4. Calculation of the evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of the superheavy element Z=119 via the {sup 50}Ti+{sup 249}Bk hot fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zuhua; Bao, Jing-Dong

    2011-09-15

    The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for 3n and 4n evaporation channels in the {sup 50}Ti + {sup 249}Bk reaction leading the formation of {sup 296}119 and {sup 295}119 isotopes are evaluated by means of a modified fusion-by-diffusion model. In the model, the dynamic evolution from dinucleus to mononucleus is taken into account with the two-dimensional coupled Langenvin equations. The calculated maximum ER cross sections in 3n and 4n evaporation channels of the {sup 50}Ti + {sup 249}Bk reaction are 0.17 and 0.57 pb, respectively. The cross section of 0.57 pb is close to the present experimental limit for the registration of the evaporation residual nuclei. Therefore, superheavy element 119 may be the most hopeful new element with Z>118 to be synthesized under somehow improved experimental conditions in the near future.

  5. Kinetics of the competitive reactions of isomerization and peptide bond cleavage at l-α- and d-β-aspartyl residues in an αA-crystallin fragment.

    PubMed

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    d-β-aspartyl (Asp) residue has been found in a living body such as aged lens crystallin, although l-α-amino acids are constituents in natural proteins. Isomerization from l-α- to d-β-Asp probably modulates structures to affect biochemical reactions. At Asp residue, isomerization and peptide bond cleavage compete with each other. To gain insight into how fast each reaction proceeds, the analysis requires the consideration of both pathways simultaneously and independently. No information has been provided, however, about these competitive processes because each reaction has been studied separately. The contribution of Asp isomers to the respective pathways has still been veiled. In this work, the two competitive reactions, isomerization and spontaneous peptide bond cleavage at Asp residue, were simultaneously observed and compared in an αA-crystallin fragment, S(51) LFRTVLD(58) SG(60) containing l-α- and d-β-Asp58 isomers. The kinetics showed that the formation of l- and d-succinimide (Suc) intermediate, as a first step of isomerization, was comparable at l-α- and d-β-Asp. Although l-Suc was converted to l-β-Asp, d-Suc was liable to return to the original d-β-Asp, the reverse reaction marked enough to consider d-β-Asp as apparently stable. d-β-Asp was also resistant to the peptide bond cleavage. Such apparent less reactivity is probably the reason for gradual and abnormal accumulation of d-β-Asp in a living body under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Chemical reaction engineering studies on cocracking of petroleum vacuum residue with coal, plastics, and biomass (bagasse and petrocrop)

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K.

    2007-07-01

    This article deals with the studies on cocracking of petroleum vacuum residue (XVR) with thermosetting plastic, I. e., bakelite (BL), Samla coal (SC), biomass, I. e., bagasse (BG) or C. procera (CL) and their binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The kinetic studies were performed using the Coats and Redfern kinetic modeling equation. The overall activation energies obtained were 25 kJ/mole for petroleum vacuum residue, 99 kJ/mole for polypropylene, 21 kJ/mole for coal, 23 kJ/mole for Calotropis procera, and 25 kJ/mole for the combination of these four materials. However, other models, such as van Krevelan et al. and Horowitz and Metzger have also been used in some cases to compare the results with those obtained by the Coats and Redfern kinetic models. In the present work, the effect of catalysts on the cracking of Basra vacuum residue (BVR) has also been reported.

  7. Reaction of variant sperm-whale myoglobins with hydrogen peroxide: the effects of mutating a histidine residue in the haem distal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, T; Baker, A R; Butler, C S; Little, R H; Lowe, D J; Greenwood, C; Watmough, N J

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with a number of variants of sperm-whale myoglobin in which the distal pocket histidine residue (His64) had been mutated was studied with a combination of stopped-flow spectroscopy and freeze-quench EPR. The rate of the initial bimolecular reaction with hydrogen peroxide in all the proteins studied was found to depend on the polarity of the amino acid side chain at position 64. In wild-type myoglobin there were no significant optical changes subsequent to this reaction, suggesting the rapid formation of the well-characterized oxyferryl species. This conclusion was supported by freeze-quench EPR data, which were consistent with the pattern of reactivity previously reported [King and Winfield (1963) J. Biol. Chem. 238, 1520-1528]. In those myoglobins bearing a mutation at position 64, the initial bimolecular reaction with hydrogen peroxide yielded an intermediate species that subsequently decayed via a second hydrogen peroxide-dependent step leading to modification or destruction of the haem. In the mutant His64-->Gln the calculated electronic absorption spectrum of the intermediate was not that of an oxyferryl species but seemed to be that of a low-spin ferric haem. Freeze-quench EPR studies of this mutant and the apolar mutant (His64-->Val) revealed the accumulation of a novel intermediate after the first hydrogen peroxide-dependent reaction. The unusual EPR characteristics of this species are provisionally assigned to a low-spin ferric haem with bound peroxide as the distal ligand. These results are interpreted in terms of a reaction scheme in which the polarity of the distal pocket governs the rate of binding of hydrogen peroxide to the haem iron and the residue at position 64 governs both the rate of heterolytic oxygen scission and the stability of the oxyferryl product. PMID:9337857

  8. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of catalytic mechanism and role of key residues in methylation reactions catalyzed by dimethylxanthine methyltransferase in caffeine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yufei; Guo, Hong

    2014-02-24

    The caffeine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the beverage and pharmaceutical industries which produces two blockbuster products: theobromine and caffeine. The major biochemistry in caffeine biosynthesis starts from the initial substrate of xanthosine and ends with the final product caffeine, with theobromine serving as an intermediate. The key enzyme, S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) dependent 3,7-dimethyl-xanthine methyltransferase (DXMT), catalyzes two important methyl transfer steps in caffeine biosynthesis: (1) methylation of N3 of 7-methylxanthine (7mX) to form theobromine (Tb); (2) methylation of N1 of theobromine to form caffeine (Cf). Although DXMT has been structurally characterized recently, our understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and role of key catalytic residues is still lacking. In this work, the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD and free energy simulations are performed to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme-catalyzed reactions and to explain experimental observations concerning the activity of this enzyme. The roles of certain active-site residues are studied, and the results of computer simulation seem to suggest that a histidine residue (His160) at the active site of DXMT may act as a general base/acid catalyst during the methyl transfer process.

  9. Naturally occurring esterification reactions with Bryostatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bryostatin structures share a commonality of a central bryophan ring, but each differs due to two groups (R1 and R2) that are attached to the bryophan ring via ester bonds. This research examines the impact that conditions such as UV light, acidic and basic conditions can have on the bryostatin stru...

  10. Comparison of two real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation in lymphoproliferative disorders: correlation between immunoglobulin gene mutation load and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction performance.

    PubMed

    Della Starza, Irene; Cavalli, Marzia; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Barbero, Daniela; Mantoan, Barbara; Genuardi, Elisa; Urbano, Marina; Mannu, Claudia; Gazzola, Anna; Ciabatti, Elena; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin; Galimberti, Sara; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Ladetto, Marco; Monitillo, Luigia

    2014-09-01

    We compared two strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a variable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) genes mutation load. Twenty-five samples from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n = 18) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 7) patients were analyzed. Based on IGH variable region genes, 22/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 20/25 > 5%. In the IGH joining region genes, 23/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 18/25 > 5%. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on IGH genes using two strategies: method A utilizes two patient-specific primers, whereas method B employs one patient-specific and one germline primer, with different positions on the variable, diversity and joining regions. Twenty-three samples (92%) resulted evaluable using method A, only six (24%) by method B. Method B poor performance was specifically evident among mutated IGH variable/joining region cases, although no specific mutation load above, which the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction failed was found. The molecular strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation should be adapted to the B-cell receptor features of the disease investigated.

  11. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  12. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry method in multiple reaction monitoring mode to determine 17alpha-ethynylestradiol residues in cattle hair without previous digestion.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, S; Lolo, M; Vázquez, B I; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A; Fente, C

    2007-11-14

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed for determination of ethynylestradiol residues in cattle hair. Hair samples were pulverized with a cryogenic mill followed by a simple extraction with acetonitrile. A dansyl derivatization procedure to improve ethynylestradiol detection was used before the LC-MS/MS analysis in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using alpha-estradiol as an internal standard. The method was validated following the latest EU guidelines using blank hair samples spiked at 2 ng g(-1). The detection capability (CCbeta) was less than 2 ng g(-1), and the decision limit (CCalpha) was 1 ng g(-1). Incurred samples obtained 56 days after cow treatment with ethynylestradiol were analyzed, and the presence of ethynylestradiol in the hair was confirmed in all cases.

  13. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring method for determining multiple pesticide residues in tomato.

    PubMed

    Andrade, G C R M; Monteiro, S H; Francisco, J G; Figueiredo, L A; Botelho, R G; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-05-15

    A quick and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method, using dynamic multiple reaction monitoring and a 1.8-μm particle size analytical column, was developed to determine 57 pesticides in tomato in a 13-min run. QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method for samples preparations and validations was carried out in compliance with EU SANCO guidelines. The method was applied to 58 tomato samples. More than 84% of the compounds investigated showed limits of detection equal to or lower than 5 mg kg(-1). A mild (<20%), medium (20-50%), and strong (>50%) matrix effect was observed for 72%, 25%, and 3% of the pesticides studied, respectively. Eighty-one percent of the pesticides showed recoveries ranging between 70% and 120%. Twelve pesticides were detected in 35 samples, all below the maximum residue levels permitted in the Brazilian legislation; 15 samples exceeded the maximum residue levels established by the EU legislation for methamidophos; and 10 exceeded limits for acephate and four for bromuconazole.

  14. Expressing Redundancy among Linear-Epitope Sequence Data Based on Residue-Level Physicochemical Similarity in the Context of Antigenic Cross-Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Epitope-based design of vaccines, immunotherapeutics, and immunodiagnostics is complicated by structural changes that radically alter immunological outcomes. This is obscured by expressing redundancy among linear-epitope data as fractional sequence-alignment identity, which fails to account for potentially drastic loss of binding affinity due to single-residue substitutions even where these might be considered conservative in the context of classical sequence analysis. From the perspective of immune function based on molecular recognition of epitopes, functional redundancy of epitope data (FRED) thus may be defined in a biologically more meaningful way based on residue-level physicochemical similarity in the context of antigenic cross-reaction, with functional similarity between epitopes expressed as the Shannon information entropy for differential epitope binding. Such similarity may be estimated in terms of structural differences between an immunogen epitope and an antigen epitope with reference to an idealized binding site of high complementarity to the immunogen epitope, by analogy between protein folding and ligand-receptor binding; but this underestimates potential for cross-reactivity, suggesting that epitope-binding site complementarity is typically suboptimal as regards immunologic specificity. The apparently suboptimal complementarity may reflect a tradeoff to attain optimal immune function that favors generation of immune-system components each having potential for cross-reactivity with a variety of epitopes. PMID:27274725

  15. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  16. Measurement of evaporation residue cross-sections of the reaction 30Si + 238U at subbarrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Tsuruta, K.; Hofmann, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Heinz, S.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Mazzocco, M.; Schoett, H. J.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.

    2007-02-26

    The reaction 30Si + 238U {yields} 268Sg* was studied at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier. At the above barrier energy of Ec.m. = 144.0 MeV (center-of-mass energy at half thickness of the target), we measured three decay chains of 263Sg produced by evaporation of five neutrons. The cross-section was (67{sub -37}{sup +67}) pb. At subbarrier energy of Ec.m. = 133.0 MeV we measured three spontaneously fissioning nuclei which we assigned to the isotope 264Sg. The half-life of (120{sub -44}{sup +126}) ms was determined. The production cross-section was (10{sub -6}{sup +10}) pb, which is about four orders magnitude larger than the calculation based on the one-dimensional barrier penetration model in the fusion process, showing fusion enhancement caused by the prolate deformation of 238U. At Ec.m. = 128.0 MeV an upper cross-section limit of 15 pb was measured. Compared to excitation functions measured for the lighter system 16O + 238U {yields} 254Fm*, a reduction of the fusion probability was observed at low beam energies indicating increasing competition from quasifission processes.

  17. Effects of ionizable residues on the absorption spectrum and initial electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E T; Nagarajan, V; Zazubovich, V; Riley, K; Small, G J; Parson, W W

    2003-11-25

    Effects of ionizable amino acids on spectroscopic properties and electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated by site-directed mutations designed to alter the electrostatic environment of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer that serves as the photochemical electron donor (P). Arginine residues at homologous positions in the L and M subunits (L135 and M164) are changed independently: Arg L135 is replaced by Lys, Leu, Glu, and Gln and Arg M164 by Leu and Glu. Asp L155 also is mutated to Asn, Tyr L164 to Phe, and Cys L247 to Lys and Asp. The mutations at L155, L164, and M164 have little effect on the absorption spectrum, whereas those at L135 and L247 shift the long-wavelength absorption band of P to higher energies. Fits to the ground-state absorption and hole-burned spectra indicate that the blue shift and increased width of the absorption band in the L135 mutants are due partly to changes in the distribution of energies for the zero-phonon absorption line and partly to stronger electron-phonon coupling. The initial electron-transfer kinetics are not changed significantly in most of the mutants, but the time constant increases from 3.0 +/- 0.2 in wild-type RCs to 4.7 +/- 0.2 in C(L247)D and 7.0 +/- 0.3 ps in C(L247)K. The effects of the mutations on the solvation free energies of the product of the initial electron-transfer reaction (P(+)) and the charge-transfer states that contribute to the absorption spectrum ( and ) were calculated by using a distance-dependent electrostatic screening factor. The results are qualitatively in accord with the view that electrostatic interactions of the bacteriochlorophylls with ionized residues of the protein are strongly screened and make only minor contributions to the energetics and dynamics of charge separation. However, the slowing of electron transfer in the Cys L247 mutants and the blue shift of the spectrum in some of the Arg L135 and Cys L247 mutants cannot be

  18. Protonation of interacting residues in a protein by a Monte Carlo method: application to lysozyme and the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Beroza, P; Fredkin, D R; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1991-01-01

    We used Monte Carlo methods to treat statistical problem of electrostatic interactions among many titrating amino acids and applied these methods to lysozyme and the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, including all titrating sites. We computed the average protonation of residues as a function of pH from an equilibrium distribution of states generated by random sampling. Electrostatic energies were calculated from a finite difference solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation using the coordinates from solved protein structures. For most calculations we used the Metropolis algorithm to sample protonation states; for strongly coupled sites, we substantially reduced sampling errors by using a modified algorithm that allows multiple site transitions. The Monte Carlo method agreed with calculations for a small test system, lysozyme, for which the complete partition function was calculated. We also calculated the pH dependence of the free energy change associated with electron transfer from the primary to the secondary quinone in the photosynthetic reaction center. The shape of the resulting curve agreed fairly well with experiment, but the proton uptake from which the free energy was calculated agreed only to within a factor of two with the observed values. We believe that this discrepancy resulted from errors in the individual electrostatic energy calculations rather than from errors in the Monte Carlo sampling. PMID:2062860

  19. Oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior of a simple model for cool flames, Sal'nikov's reaction, P{yields}A {yields}B, occurring in a spherical batch reactor with varying intensities of natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Cardoso, S.S.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.

    2008-07-15

    When cool flames, or indeed any exothermic chemical reaction, occur in a fluid inside an unstirred vessel, the heat from the reaction often induces temperature gradients and consequently motion, i.e., natural convection. The intensity of the resulting flow is governed by the Rayleigh number (Ra). This work simulates numerically the behavior of Sal'nikov's reaction, P{yields} A{yields}B, under the influence of natural convection in an unstirred spherical reactor. This reaction is the simplest to exhibit the thermokinetic oscillations characterizing cool flames. The behavior of this system can be represented on a three-dimensional regime diagram, whose axes are ratios of the characteristic timescales ({tau}) for chemical reaction, diffusion (of both heat and mass), and natural convection. Previous work has identified a region of oscillations on this diagram in the purely diffusive limit, when Ra=0. This work extends this analysis to the general 3D space, where diffusion and natural convection are both important. A region in which oscillations are observed has been found for fixed values of the first-order rate constants for Sal'nikov's reaction. There is a distinct change in the shape of the region of oscillations around the critical value of Ra{proportional_to}500, when natural convection becomes important. When diffusion dominates transport (Ra<500), the boundaries between oscillatory and nonoscillatory solutions are largely independent of the ratio of timescales {tau}{sub step}2/{tau}{sub convection} and agree well with the values found previously in the purely diffusive limit. When natural convection is important (Ra>500), the oscillations occur over a wider range of parameters than is the case for a diffusive system. The presence of natural convection also leads to various, more complex behaviors than are seen in the diffusive or well-mixed limits. A region in the regime diagram was found where the oscillations in temperature and the concentration of A have

  20. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  1. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  2. Chemical structure and properties of interstrand cross-links formed by reaction of guanine residues with abasic sites in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Michael J; Liu, Shuo; Andersen, Nisana; Yang, Zhiyu; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S

    2015-03-25

    A new type of interstrand cross-link resulting from the reaction of a DNA abasic site with a guanine residue on the opposing strand of the double helix was recently identified, but the chemical connectivity of the cross-link was not rigorously established. The work described here was designed to characterize the chemical structure and properties of dG-AP cross-links generated in duplex DNA. The approach involved characterization of the nucleoside cross-link "remnant" released by enzymatic digestion of DNA duplexes containing the dG-AP cross-link. We first carried out a chemical synthesis and complete spectroscopic structure determination of the putative cross-link remnant 9b composed of a 2-deoxyribose adduct attached to the exocyclic N(2)-amino group of dG. A reduced analogue of the cross-link remnant was also prepared (11b). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed that the retention times and mass spectral properties of synthetic standards 9b and 11b matched those of the authentic cross-link remnants released by enzymatic digestion of duplexes containing the native and reduced dG-AP cross-link, respectively. These results establish the chemical connectivity of the dG-AP cross-link released from duplex DNA and provide a foundation for detection of this lesion in biological samples. The dG-AP cross-link in duplex DNA was remarkably stable, decomposing with a half-life of 22 days at pH 7 and 23 °C. The intrinsic chemical stability of the dG-AP cross-link suggests that this lesion in duplex DNA may have the power to block DNA-processing enzymes involved in transcription and replication.

  3. Characterization of biomass burning emissions from cooking fires, peat, crop residue, and other fuels with high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, C. E.; Veres, P. R.; Williams, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We deployed a high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) to measure biomass-burning emissions from peat, crop residue, cooking fires, and many other fire types during the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4) laboratory campaign. A combination of gas standard calibrations and composition sensitive, mass-dependent calibration curves was applied to quantify gas-phase non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) observed in the complex mixture of fire emissions. We used several approaches to assign the best identities to most major "exact masses", including many high molecular mass species. Using these methods, approximately 80-96% of the total NMOC mass detected by the PTR-TOF-MS and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was positively or tentatively identified for major fuel types. We report data for many rarely measured or previously unmeasured emissions in several compound classes including aromatic hydrocarbons, phenolic compounds, and furans; many of these are suspected secondary organic aerosol precursors. A large set of new emission factors (EFs) for a range of globally significant biomass fuels is presented. Measurements show that oxygenated NMOCs accounted for the largest fraction of emissions of all compound classes. In a brief study of various traditional and advanced cooking methods, the EFs for these emissions groups were greatest for open three-stone cooking in comparison to their more advanced counterparts. Several little-studied nitrogen-containing organic compounds were detected from many fuel types, that together accounted for 0.1-8.7% of the fuel nitrogen, and some may play a role in new particle formation.

  4. Two rare variations, D478N and D478E, that occur at the same amino acid residue in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α2 subunit influence nAChR function.

    PubMed

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Li, Ming D

    2014-10-01

    There occur two rare variations, Asp(D)478Asn(N) and Asp(D)478Glu(E), in the putative cytoplasmic amphipathic α-helices of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α2 subunit as a result of mutation in the 1st (G → A: rs141072985) and 3rd (C → A: rs56344740) nucleotide of its 478th triplet codon (GAC). We assessed the effects of these two variations on the function of α2β2- and α2β4-nAChRs as they could alter the electronegativity and/or the structure of the cytoplasmic 'portals' (framed by subunit amphipathic α-helices) necessary for obligate ion permeation from extracellular space to cytoplasm. We injected decreasing ratio of subunit cRNAs (α:β; 10:1, 1:1 and 1:10) into Xenopus oocytes to express putative low-sensitivity (LS; 10:1), intermediate-sensitivity (IS; 1:1) and high sensitivity (HS; 1:10) isoforms of wild type and variant α2β2- and α2β4-nAChRs. Two-electrode voltage clamp analyses indicate that the agonist (ACh or nicotine) induced peak current responses (Imax) of α2β2-nAChR isoforms and those of α2β4-nAChR isoforms are increased (1.3-4.7-fold) as a result of D478E variation. The α2 subunit D478N variation only increases the Imax of IS (∼2-fold) or HS (1.4-2.1-fold) α2β2-nAChRs. Concentration-response curves constructed indicate no effect on agonist sensitivities of LS and HS isoforms of α2β2- or α2β4-nAChRs as a result of either variation in α2 subunit. Between the two variant nAChRs, α2(D478E)*-nAChR isoforms generally yield higher Imax than those of respective α2(D478N)*-nAChR isoforms. These effects could be attributed to alteration in cytoplasmic 'portals' and/or ion permeation through it owing to change in amino acid electronegativity (D → N) and side chain length (D → E) in nAChR α2 subunit.

  5. Excitation functions of heavy residues produced in the 14N+103Rh reaction up to 400 MeV: Analysis of the pre-equilibrium mechanism with the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Steyn, G. F.; Singh, N. L.; Chatterjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    The excitation functions of heavy residues, produced in the interaction of 14N with 103Rh, have been measured over the projectile energy region from a threshold up to 400 MeV by means of the activation method in conjunction with γ-ray spectroscopy. Cross sections for 15 reaction residues are presented, namely, 104Cd, Ag-105103, Pd-10199, 97,99,101Rh, Ru,9795, and Tc-9694. The experimental data are compared with theoretical model predictions using the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation model as implemented in the recently released alice2014 code. The theory assumes that the dominant pre-equilibrium mechanism includes multinucleon and cluster emissions in the initial stages of the interaction between the projectile and the target nucleus. Overall, the theoretical predictions provide a satisfactory agreement with the trend of the present experimental results for most of the observed reaction residues. This provides strong evidence that the underlying reaction mechanisms in the code are appropriately described. Overall, the Obninsk level densities give the best results in the present study.

  6. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  7. Specific function of the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct radical and residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the atypical catalase reaction of catalase-peroxidase KatG.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M; Jarzecki, Andrzej A; Magliozzo, Richard S

    2012-10-26

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H(2)O(2), the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H(2)O(2) consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction.

  8. Naturally occurring insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Soloway, S B

    1976-01-01

    Naturally occurring insecticides are abundant and varied in their effects, though but a few are articles of commerce. Even for these, pyrethrum, nicotine, rotenone, hellebore, ryania, and sabadilla, there is a paucity of information on mammalian toxicology and environmental effects. In general, these materials are characterized favorably by low acute toxicity and ready dissipation in nature. Unfavorable aspects of natural insecticides are the contained mixture of active and inactive components and the low active ingredient content on a crop yield basis pointing to a high unit cost. Natural insecticides can serve additionally as leads to unnatural mimics, of which the commercially successful synthetic pyrethroids are prime examples. The chemical nature, relationship of insecticidal activity to chemical structure, occurrence, production, and utilization, registered uses, metabolism, and insect and mammalian toxicity are reviewed. PMID:789058

  9. On the Formation and Properties of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-links Forged by Reaction of an Abasic Site With the Opposing Guanine Residue of 5′-CAp Sequences in Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Price, Nathan E.; Wang, Jin; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Dutta, Sanjay; Seiner, Derrick R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the aldehyde residue of an abasic (Ap) site in duplex DNA can generate an interstrand cross-link via reaction with a guanine residue on the opposing strand. This finding is intriguing because the highly deleterious nature of interstrand cross-links suggests that even small amounts of Ap-derived cross-links could make a significant contribution to the biological consequences stemming from the generation of Ap sites in cellular DNA. Incubation of 21-bp duplexes containing a central 5′-CAp sequence under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3, pH 5.2) generated much higher yields of cross-linked DNA than reported previously. At pH 7, in the absence of reducing agents, these Ap-containing duplexes also produced cross-linked duplexes that were readily detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Cross-link formation was not highly sensitive to reaction conditions and, once formed, the cross-link was stable to a variety of work-up conditions. Results of multiple experiments including MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, gel mobility, methoxyamine capping of the Ap aldehyde, inosine-for-guanine replacement, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and LCMS/MS were consistent with a cross-linking mechanism involving reversible reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the N2-amino group of the opposing guanine residue in 5′-CAp sequences to generate hemiaminal, imine, or cyclic hemiaminal cross-links (7-10) that were irreversibly converted under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3/pH 5.2) to a stable amine linkage. Further support for the importance of the exocyclic N2-amino group in this reaction was provided by an experiment showing that installation of a 2-aminopurine-thymine base pair at the cross-linking site produced high yields (15-30%) of a cross-linked duplex at neutral pH, in the absence of NaCNBH3. PMID:23215239

  10. Interconversion of ketoprofen recognition in firefly luciferase-catalyzed enantioselective thioesterification reaction using from Pylocoeria miyako (PmL) and Hotaria parvura (HpL) just by mutating two amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Kato, Dai-ichiro; Hiraishi, Yoshihiro; Maenaka, Mika; Yokoyama, Keisuke; Niwa, Kazuki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We identified the critical amino acid residues for substrate recognition using two firefly luciferases from Pylocoeria miyako (PmL) and Hotaria parvura (HpL), as these two luciferase enzymes exhibit different activities toward ketoprofen. Specifically, PmL can catalyze the apparent enantioselective thioesterification reaction, while HpL cannot. By comparing the amino acid sequences around the active site, we identified two residues (I350 and M397 in PmL and F351 and S398 in HpL) that were different between the two enzymes, and the replacement of these amino acids resulted in changing the ketoprofen recognition pattern. The inactive HpL was converted to the active enzyme toward ketoprofen and vice versa for PmL. These residues also affected the enantioselectivity toward ketoprofen; however, the bioluminescent color was not affected. In addition, using molecular dynamics calculations, the replacement of these two amino acids induced changes in the state of hydrogen bonding between ketoprofen and the S349 side chain through the active site water. As S349 is not considered to influence color tuning, these changes specifically caused the differences in ketoprofen recognition in the enzyme.

  11. Pesticide residues in birds and mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; Edwards, C.A.

    1973-01-01

    exposure to an organochlorine pesticide, the concentrations of residues in the different tissues are ordinarily directly correlated with each other. When the dosage is at lethal levels, or when stored residues are mobilised to lethal levels, the balanced relationship is disrupted. The concentrations of residues in the brain provide the most rigorous criteria for diagnosis of death due to these chemicals, and levels are generally similar across a wide range of species of birds and mammals. Residues in liver are closely correlated with recent dose, either from direct intake or from mobilisation from storage, and so reflect hazardous exposure. Residues in the whole carcass show the storage reserve, and so indicate the potential for adverse effects from lethal mobilisation or from the continuous slow mobilisation that occurs during the normal processes of metabolism and excretion. A synchronous, rapid, and widespread decline in weight and thickness of shells of eggs laid by many species of wild birds occurred in the late 1940's and has persisted. Birds of prey were primarily affected; exceptions apparently are the result of lesser exposure because of different food habits. Many species of fish-eating birds are also affected. Others, however, appear to be more resistant and to accumulate much higher residues before shell-thinning occurs. Seed-eating birds do not appear to have been generally affected; their exposure is ordinarily lower, but physiological factors also seem to be involved. A relationship between shell-thinning and population decline has been established for many species. In exceptional cases, such as the herring gull, persistent re-nesting and other population reactions have overcome adverse effects at the population level. The discovery of shell-thinning among natural populations, and the hypothesis that this thinning was related to the occurrence of organochlorine pesticides, stimulated experimental studies to determine wheth

  12. A density functional theory study on peptide bond cleavage at aspartic residues: direct vs cyclic intermediate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sang-aroon, Wichien; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-12-01

    In this work, peptide bond cleavages at carboxy- and amino-sides of the aspartic residue in a peptide model via direct (concerted and step-wise) and cyclic intermediate hydrolysis reaction pathways were explored computationally. The energetics, thermodynamic properties, rate constants, and equilibrium constants of all hydrolysis reactions, as well as their energy profiles were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The result indicated that peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue occurred most preferentially via the cyclic intermediate hydrolysis pathway. In all reaction pathways, cleavage of the peptide bond at the amino-side occurred less preferentially than at the carboxy-side. The overall reaction rate constants of peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue at the carboxy-side for the assisted system were, in increasing order: concerted < step-wise < cyclic intermediate.

  13. Replacement of tyrosine residues by phenylalanine in cytochrome P450cam alters the formation of Cpd II-like species in reactions with artificial oxidants.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Dawson, John H; Ballou, David P

    2008-05-01

    Our previous rapid-scanning stopped-flow studies of the reaction of substrate-free cytochrome P450cam with peracids [Spolitak et al. (2005) J Biol Chem 280:20300-20309; (2006) J Inorg Biochem 100:2034-2044] spectrally characterized compound I [ferryl iron plus a porphyrin pi-cation radical (Fe(IV) = O/Por(+))], as well as Cpd ES (Fe(IV) = O/Tyr.). In the present studies, we report how the substitutions in Y75F, Y96F, and Y96F/Y75F P450cam variants permit the formation of a species we attribute to Cpd II (Fe(IV) = O) in reactions with peracids and cumene hydroperoxide. These variants produce changes in hydrogen bonding patterns and increased hydrophobicity that affect the ratio of heterolytic to homolytic pathways in reactions with cumene hydroperoxide, resulting in a shift of this ratio from 84/16 for WT to 72/28 for the Y96F/Y75F double mutant. Various ways of generating the Cpd II-like species were explored, and it was possible, especially with the more hydrophobic variants, to generate large fractions of the P450cam variants as Cpd II. The Cpd II-like species is ineffective at hydroxylating camphor, but can be readily reduced by ascorbate (as well as other peroxidase substrates) to ferric P450cam, which could then bind camphor to form the high-spin heme. The difference in the spectral properties of Cpd ES and Cpd II was rationalized as possibly being due to different states of protonation.

  14. Quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using amplicon-fusion-site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR).

    PubMed

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Zur Stadt, Udo; Horstmann, Martin; Krohn, Knut; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Leiblein, Sabine; Christiansen, Holger

    2012-11-09

    The amplification of putative oncogenes is a common finding within the genome of various cancer types. Identification and further targeting of specific junction sites within the sequence of genomic amplicons (amplicon fusion sites, AFS) by PCR (AFS-PCR) is suitable for quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD). This approach has recently been developed and described for MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. To compare AFS-PCR directly to routinely used MRD diagnostic strategies, we mapped the amplified genomic regions (ampGR) of an iAMP21-amplicon in high resolution of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Successfully, we established AFS-PCR covering junction sites between ampGR within the iAMP21-amplicon. Quantification of MRD by AFS-PCR was directly comparable to IgH/TCR based real time quantitative PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in consecutive bone marrow (BM) specimens. Our data give an additional proof of concept of AFS-PCR for quantification of MRD. The method could be taken into account for ALL patients with genomic amplifications as alternative MRD diagnostic, if no or qualitatively poor Ig/TCR-PCRs are available.

  15. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from E. coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid – general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid – general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step. PMID:23942051

  16. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L

    2013-10-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from Escherichia coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid-general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid-general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step.

  17. Effect of the chirality of residues and γ-turns on the electronic excitation spectra, excited-state reaction paths and conical intersections of capped phenylalanine-alanine dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Dorit; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2011-07-11

    The capped dipeptides Ac-L-Phe-Xxx-NH(2) , Xxx=L-Ala, D-Ala, Aib, where Aib (aminoisobutyric acid) is a non-chiral amino acid, have been investigated by means of UV/IR double-resonance spectroscopy in supersonic jets and density functional theory calculations by Gloaguen et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2007, 9, 4491]. The UV and IR spectra of five different species were observed and their structures assigned by comparison with calculated vibrational frequencies in the NH-stretching region. The peptides with two chiral residues can form homochiral or heterochiral species. In addition, γ-turns exist as two helical forms (γ(D), γ(L)) of opposite handedness. Herein, we explore the excited-state potential-energy surfaces of these dipeptides with ab initio calculations. Vertical and adiabatic excitation energies, excited-state reaction paths and conical intersections are characterized with the ADC(2) propagator method. It is shown that electron/proton transfer along the hydrogen bond of the γ-turn gives rise to efficient radiationless deactivation of the (1)ππ* state of the chromophore via several conical intersections. While the homo/hetero chirality of the residues appears to have a negligible effect on the photophysical dynamics, we found evidence that the γ(L) conformers may have shorter excited-state lifetimes (and thus higher photostability) than the γ(D) conformers.

  18. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Testing for Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-20

    reactions. Prior to temperature cycling, this moderately heat stable enzyme selectively excises uracil residues which have been incorporated into DNA... temperature . Despite these precautions, some non-specific annealing of PCR primers does occur, even with single copy gene detection, and more so with...Mallinckrodt) in slightly hypotonic saline and allowed to remain at ambient temperature for 5 minutes, during which time RBC’s are lysed. Centrifugation

  19. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G J; Smyth, Wesley G; Armstrong Hewitt, S; van Ginkel, Leen; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-05-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance of two product ions, acquired in selected reaction monitoring mode, the ion ratio should be within certain ranges for confirmation of the identity of a substance. The acceptable tolerance of the ion ratio varies with the relative abundance of the two product ions and for retention time, CD 2002/657/EC allows a tolerance of 5%. Because of rapid technical advances in analytical instruments and new approaches applied in the field of contaminant testing in food products (multi-compound and multi-class methods) a critical assessment of these criteria is justified. In this study a large number of representative, though challenging sample extracts were prepared, including muscle, urine, milk and liver, spiked with 100 registered and banned veterinary drugs at levels ranging from 0.5 to 100 µg/kg. These extracts were analysed using SRM mode using different chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometers from different vendors. In the initial study, robust data was collected using four different instrumental set-ups. Based on a unique and highly relevant data set, consisting of over 39 000 data points, the ion ratio and retention time criteria for applicability in confirmatory analysis were assessed. The outcomes were verified based on a collaborative trial including laboratories from all over the world. It was concluded that the ion ratio deviation is not related to the value of the ion ratio, but rather to the intensity of the lowest product ion. Therefore a fixed ion ratio deviation tolerance of 50% (relative) is proposed, which also is applicable for compounds present at sub-ppb levels or having poor ionisation efficiency. Furthermore, it was observed that retention time

  20. The Mechanism of the AppABLUF Photocycle Probed by Site-Specific Incorporation of Fluorotyrosine Residues: The Effect of the Y21 pKa on the Forward and Reverse Ground State Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Laptenok, Sergey P.; Brust, Richard; Lukacs, Andras; Iuliano, James; Jeng, Jessica; Melief, Eduard; Zhao, Rui-Kun; Yoon, EunBin; Clark, Ian; Towrie, Michael; Greetham, Gregory M.; Ng, Annabelle; Truglio, James; French, Jarrod; Meech, Stephen R.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional antirepressor AppA is a blue light using flavin (BLUF) photoreceptor that releases the transcriptional repressor PpsR upon photoexcitation. Light activation of AppA involves changes in a hydrogen bonding network that surrounds the flavin chromophore on the nanosecond timescale, while the dark state of AppA is then recovered in a light independent reaction with a dramatically longer half-life of ~18 min. Residue Y21, a component of the hydrogen bonding network, is known to be essential for photoactivity. Here we directly explore the effect of the Y21 pKa on dark state recovery by replacing Y21 with fluorotyrosine analogs that increase the acidity of Y21 by 3.5 pH units. Ultrafast transient infrared measurements confirm that the structure of AppA is unperturbed by fluorotyrosine substitution, and that there is a small (3-fold) change in the photokinetics of the forward reaction over the fluorotyrosine series. However, reduction of 3.5 pH units in the pKa of Y21 increases the rate of dark state recovery by 4,000-fold with a Brønsted coefficient of ~ 1, indicating that the Y21 proton is completely transferred in the transition state leading from light to dark adapted AppA. A large solvent isotope effect of ~6-8 is also observed on the rate of dark state recovery. These data establish that the acidity of Y21 is a crucial factor for stabilizing the light activated form of the protein, and have been used to propose a model for dark state recovery that will ultimately prove useful for tuning the properties of BLUF photosensors for optogenetic applications. PMID:26708408

  1. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  2. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  3. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  4. Identification of follicular lymphoma by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the t(14;18) translocation: An improved method for staging of malignancy and detection of minimal residual disease

    SciTech Connect

    La Spada, A.R.; Lakey, C.; Hanke, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    60 to 85% of follicular non-Hodgkin`s lymphomas have a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 14 and 18 (t(14q21;18q32)). As a result of this translocation, the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (J{sub H}) on chromosome 14 is juxtaposed to the bcl-2 gene on chromosome 18. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification across the translocation breakpoint may be used to detect follicular lymphoma cells in the peripheral blood and bone marrow, as morphological examination for lymphoma cells is extremely insensitive. We performed PCR assays with a universal J{sub H} primer and pairs of major breakpoint region (MBR) primers or minor cluster region (MCR) primers from the bcl-2 gene. PCR products were then visualized on ethidium-stained agarose gels, along with size markers and appropriate positive and negative controls. We began by comparing the PCR assay to Southern blot analysis and found that Southern blot analysis detected 9 translocations in 24 follicular lymphomas (37.5%), while PCR amplification detected 13 (58.3%), making it the more sensitive technique. By using adjacent MBR and MCR primer pairs in the PCR assay, we were also able to attain very high specificities (>95%). As detection of minimal residual disease after therapy is likely important for the prognosis and further management of these patients, we decided to use our PCR assay to evaluate peripheral blood stem cell preparations from patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation. Of the 26 patients analyzed thus far, 4 (15%) have been found positive for MBR translocations. These results indicate that PCR amplification of the t(14;18) translocation is a sensitive and specific method for detection of follicular lymphoma cells, and therefore has potential application as a tool not only for the staging but also for the management of this malignancy.

  5. Repetition Blindness Occurs in Nonwords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Catherine L.; Morris, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    Theorists have predicted that repetition blindness (RB) should be absent for nonwords because they do not activate preexisting mental types. The authors hypothesized that RB would be observed for nonwords because RB can occur at a sublexical level. Four experiments showed that RB is observed for word-nonword pairs (noon noof), orthographically…

  6. Reactions of latent prints exposed to blood.

    PubMed

    Praska, Nicole; Langenburg, Glenn

    2013-01-10

    We explored whether an undeveloped latent print (fingermark) exposed to blood and later developed by enhancement with blood reagents such as amido black (AB) or leucocrystal violet (LCV) could appear as a genuine blood mark. We examined three different experimental conditions. In Experiment I, fingermark residue only was tested, as a control to confirm that fingermark residue alone does not react with the blood reagents AB and LCV. Experiment II investigated whether latent fingermarks exposed to blood dilutions could be treated with AB or LCV and subsequently appear as a genuine blood mark enhanced with AB or LCV. Experiment III tested whether latent fingermarks exposed to whole blood could be processed with AB or LCV and subsequently appear as a genuine blood mark enhanced with AB or LCV. The present study found that indeed, fingermark residue alone does not react with the blood reagents AB and LCV. In Experiment II, an interaction occurred between the fingermark residue and the diluted blood that caused the ridges to appear a red color. In the present study, this interaction is called a faux blood mark. While the faux blood mark phenomenon occurred most often following exposure to diluted blood, it did not occur consistently, and a predictable pattern could not be established. However, the reaction occurred more frequently following extended fingermark residue drying times. Faux blood marks are distinguishable from genuine blood marks prior to enhancement with blood reagents. Following treatment with blood reagents, it became increasingly difficult to determine whether the enhanced mark was a genuine blood print or a latent fingermark exposed to diluted blood. Latent fingermarks exposed to whole blood often resulted in a void prior to enhancement, but following treatment with blood reagents, were difficult to distinguish from a genuine blood mark enhanced with blood reagents.

  7. POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

    2011-03-08

    At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a

  8. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  9. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-12-20

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  10. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Dow, Brian A.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. PMID:25085775

  11. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  12. Enhancement of accelerated carbonation of alkaline waste residues by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Araizi, Paris K; Hills, Colin D; Maries, Alan; Gunning, Peter J; Wray, David S

    2016-04-01

    The continuous growth of anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere and the disposal of hazardous wastes into landfills present serious economic and environmental issues. Reaction of CO2 with alkaline residues or cementitius materials, known as accelerated carbonation, occurs rapidly under ambient temperature and pressure and is a proven and effective process of sequestering the gas. Moreover, further improvement of the reaction efficiency would increase the amount of CO2 that could be permanently sequestered into solid products. This paper examines the potential of enhancing the accelerated carbonation of air pollution control residues, cement bypass dust and ladle slag by applying ultrasound at various water-to-solid (w/s) ratios. Experimental results showed that application of ultrasound increased the CO2 uptake by up to four times at high w/s ratios, whereas the reactivity at low water content showed little change compared with controls. Upon sonication, the particle size of the waste residues decreased and the amount of calcite precipitates increased. Finally, the sonicated particles exhibited a rounded morphology when observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Selective Loss of Cysteine Residues and Disulphide Bonds in a Potato Proteinase Inhibitor II Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Tieling; Donnelly, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short) superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C), and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution. PMID:21494600

  14. When Yawning Occurs in Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Zoë T.; Hart, Benjamin L.; Greco, Brian J.; Young, Debbie; Padfield, Clare; Weidner, Lisa; Gates, Jennifer; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Yawning is a widely recognized behavior in mammalian species. One would expect that elephants yawn, although to our knowledge, no one has reported observations of yawning in any species of elephant. After confirming a behavioral pattern matching the criteria of yawning in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in a zoological setting, this study was pursued with nine captive African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at a private reserve in the Western Cape, South Africa, the Knysna Elephant Park. Observations were made in June–September and in December. In the daytime, handlers managed seven of the elephants for guided interactions with visitors. At night, all elephants were maintained in a large enclosure with six having limited outdoor access. With infrared illumination, the elephants were continuously recorded by video cameras. During the nights, the elephants typically had 1–3 recumbent sleeping/resting bouts, each lasting 1–2 h. Yawning was a regular occurrence upon arousal from a recumbency, especially in the final recumbency of the night. Yawning was significantly more frequent in some elephants. Yawning was rare during the daytime and during periods of standing around in the enclosure at night. In six occurrences of likely contagious yawning, one elephant yawned upon seeing another elephant yawning upon arousal from a final recumbency; we recorded the sex and age category of the participants. The generality of yawning in both African and Asian elephants in other environments was documented in video recordings from 39 zoological facilities. In summary, the study provides evidence that yawning does occur in both African and Asian elephants, and in African elephants, yawning was particularly associated with arousal from nighttime recumbencies. PMID:28293560

  15. When Yawning Occurs in Elephants.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Zoë T; Hart, Benjamin L; Greco, Brian J; Young, Debbie; Padfield, Clare; Weidner, Lisa; Gates, Jennifer; Hart, Lynette A

    2017-01-01

    Yawning is a widely recognized behavior in mammalian species. One would expect that elephants yawn, although to our knowledge, no one has reported observations of yawning in any species of elephant. After confirming a behavioral pattern matching the criteria of yawning in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in a zoological setting, this study was pursued with nine captive African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at a private reserve in the Western Cape, South Africa, the Knysna Elephant Park. Observations were made in June-September and in December. In the daytime, handlers managed seven of the elephants for guided interactions with visitors. At night, all elephants were maintained in a large enclosure with six having limited outdoor access. With infrared illumination, the elephants were continuously recorded by video cameras. During the nights, the elephants typically had 1-3 recumbent sleeping/resting bouts, each lasting 1-2 h. Yawning was a regular occurrence upon arousal from a recumbency, especially in the final recumbency of the night. Yawning was significantly more frequent in some elephants. Yawning was rare during the daytime and during periods of standing around in the enclosure at night. In six occurrences of likely contagious yawning, one elephant yawned upon seeing another elephant yawning upon arousal from a final recumbency; we recorded the sex and age category of the participants. The generality of yawning in both African and Asian elephants in other environments was documented in video recordings from 39 zoological facilities. In summary, the study provides evidence that yawning does occur in both African and Asian elephants, and in African elephants, yawning was particularly associated with arousal from nighttime recumbencies.

  16. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  17. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  18. residue and shunting pinholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Nima E.

    2014-09-01

    The present work considers two observable phenomena through the experimental fabrication and electrical characterization of the rf-sputtered CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells that extremely reduce the overall conversion efficiency of the device: CdCl2 residue on the surface of the semiconductor and shunting pinholes. The former happens through nonuniform treatment of the As-deposited solar cells before annealing at high temperature and the latter occurs by shunting pinholes when the cell surface is shunted by defects, wire-like pathways or scratches on the metallic back contact caused from the external contacts. Such physical problems may be quite common in the experimental activities and reduce the performance down to 4-5 % which leads to dismantle the device despite its precise fabrication. We present our electrical characterization on the samples that received wet CdCl2 surface treatment (uniform or nonuniform) and are damaged by the pinholes.

  19. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  20. Naturally occurring contamination in the Mancos Shale.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stan J; Goodknight, Craig S; Tigar, Aaron D; Bush, Richard P; Gil, April

    2012-02-07

    Some uranium mill tailings disposal cells were constructed on dark-gray shale of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Shale of this formation contains contaminants similar to those in mill tailings. To establish the contributions derived from the Mancos, we sampled 51 locations in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Many of the groundwater samples were saline with nitrate, selenium, and uranium concentrations commonly exceeding 250, 000, 1000, and 200 μg/L, respectively. Higher concentrations were limited to groundwater associated with shale beds, but were not correlated with geographic area, stratigraphic position, or source of water. The elevated concentrations suggest that naturally occurring contamination should be considered when evaluating groundwater cleanup levels. At several locations, seep water was yellow or red, caused in part by dissolved organic carbon concentrations up to 280 mg/L. Most seeps had (234)U to (238)U activity ratios greater than 2, indicating preferential leaching of (234)U. Seeps were slightly enriched in (18)O relative to the meteoric water line, indicating limited evaporation. Conceptually, major ion chemical reactions are dominated by calcite dissolution following proton release from pyrite oxidation and subsequent exchange by calcium for sodium residing on clay mineral exchange sites. Contaminants are likely released from organic matter and mineral surfaces during weathering.

  1. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  2. On the structural context and identification of enzyme catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  3. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  4. Factors affecting the amperometric determination of trace quantities of total residual chlorine in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.T.F.

    1982-11-01

    The standard scheme for the determination of total residual chlorine in seawater by amperometric titration is not suitable for many recent studies that require lower and lower detection limits (<0.1 mg L/sup -1/ or <1.4 ..mu..equiv L/sup -1/). The interference of iodate that originated from the reaction between iodide and hypobromite and from naturally occurring iodate in seawater may yield variable blank and/or grossly underestimated results. The pH chosen in the present analytical scheme is at a value where the reaction between iodate and iodide is sluggish and the extent to which iodate is converted to triiodide is most sensitive to small pH changes. A titration at pH 2 will yield the true concentrations of total residual chlorine after the contribution from naturally occurring iodate is corrected for. The interference from nitrite should be considered if a submilligram per liter level of residual chlorine is to be measured and/or if the titration is carried out at a pH below 3. This interference may be removed by the addition of sulfamic acid.

  5. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  6. Pauli-blocking effects in neutron-alpha reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M. |; Avrigeanu, V.; Antonov, A.N.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hodgson, P.E.; Stoitsov, M.V.

    1994-06-01

    We present a knockout model for direct (n,{alpha}) reactions in which the residual nucleus is left in a continuum excited state. The interaction of the neutron with a preformed alpha particle inside the nucleus is related to the free neutron-alpha scattering cross-section, with modifications to account for nuclear medium effects, including Fermi motion, Pauli-blocking, and barrier penetration. Phase space restrictions for the four nucleons of the alpha-particle after the knockout are imposed by a Pauli-blocking function. We apply this model, along with evaporation contributions, to analyze excitation functions of (n,{alpha} reactions on {sup 48}Ti, {sup 51}V, {sup 52}Cr, {sup 54}Fe, {sup 55}Mn, and {sup 59}Co. Good agreement is obtained between our calculations and experimental measurements. Values for the local Fermi energy in the region from where knockout occurs indicate a surface reaction.

  7. Antioxidant properties of roasted coffee residues.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wen-Jye; Wang, Bor-Sen; Chang, Lee-Wen; Duh, Pin-Der

    2005-04-06

    The antioxidant activity of roasted coffee residues was evaluated. Extraction with four solvents (water, methanol, ethanol, and n-hexane) showed that water extracts of roasted coffee residues (WERCR) produced higher yields and gave better protection for lipid peroxidation. WERCR showed a remarkable protective effect on oxidative damage of protein. In addition, WERCR showed scavenging of free radicals as well as the reducing ability and to bind ferrous ions, indicating that WERCR acts as both primary and secondary antioxidants. The HPLC analyses showed that phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and nonphenolic compounds [caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfuraldehyde] remained in roasted coffee residues. These compounds showed a protective effect on a liposome model system. The concentrations of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds in roasted coffee residues were 8,400 and 20,400 ppm, respectively. In addition, the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) remaining in roasted coffee residues were believed to show antioxidant activity. These data indicate that roasted coffee residues have excellent potential for use as a natural antioxidant source because the antioxidant compounds remained in roasted coffee residues.

  8. Serpentine ore microtextures occurring in the magnola magnesium process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.; White, Carl

    2000-04-01

    Serpentine ore was leached at 95°C and 100°C in 7.0 M HCl media to study the reactions occurring in Noranda’s Magnola magnesium process. Magnesium leaches rapidly from the serpentine Mg3Si2O5(OH)4, and the silicon remains in-situ as an amorphous silica pseudomorph after the original serpentine particles. Negligible silica dissolution occurs, and silica gelation was never observed. The reaction interface extends over 300 400 µm; as a consequence, fine grinding does not significantly accelerate the rate of magnesium dissolution. Associated inclusions of brucite Mg(OH)2, awaruite Ni8Fe3, and magnetite Fe3O4 dissolve rapidly; whereas, chromite FeCr2O4 and a chromium-rich spinel (Cr,Fe,Al,Mg)3O4 remain largely unaffected.

  9. On residues in the disallowed region of the Ramachandran map.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debnath; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2002-03-01

    An analysis of the occurrence of nonglycyl residues in conformations disallowed in the Ramachandran plot is presented. Ser, Asn, Thr, and Cys have the highest propensities to exhibit such conformations, and the branched aliphatic residues the lowest. Residues cluster in five regions and there are some trends in the types of residues and their side-chain conformations (chi(1)) occupying these. Majority of the residues are found at the edge of helices and strands and in short loops, and are involved in different types of weak, stabilizing interactions. A structural motif has been identified where a residue in disallowed conformation occurs as the first residue of a short 3(10)-helix. On the basis of the types of neighboring residues, the location in the three-dimensional structure and accessibility, there are similarities with the occurrence of cis peptide bonds in protein structures.

  10. Abiotic hydrogen production in fresh and altered MSWI-residues: texture and microstructure investigation.

    PubMed

    Heuss-Assbichler, S; Magel, G; Fehr, K T

    2010-10-01

    Long-term hydrogen generation was observed in a Bavarian mono-landfill for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues. Hydration reactions of non-noble metals, especially aluminum, predominantly produce hydrogen at alkaline reaction conditions. Microscopic investigations show that aluminum metal may occur in different forms: as larger single grains, as small particles embedded in a vitrified matrix or less frequently in blowholes together with metallic silica. Four types of corrosion texture were observed, indicating different reaction mechanisms: aluminum hydroxide rims caused by hydration reactions at alkaline reaction conditions (reaction type 1) and multiphase rims with ettringite and hydrocalumite due to the reaction of aluminum hydroxide with sulfate and chloride ions which are solved in the pore water (reaction type 2). Galvanic corrosion textures due to the electric potential difference between aluminum and embedded intermetallic Fe- or Cu-rich exsolution phases lead to two further corrosion textures: Strong hydration effects of aluminum except a border of aluminum remnant directly beside the Fe- or Cu-rich segregations were only observed in fresh samples (reaction type 3). The reaction type 4 shows a network of Al-hydroxide veins occurring along the embedded intermetallic Fe- or Cu-rich exsolution segregation pattern within the metallic aluminum grain. Metal particles enclosed in vitrified particles offers the potential for future corrosion processes. The occurrence of corrosion types 1, 2 and 3 in fresh bottom ashes indicates that these reaction mechanisms predominate during the first reaction period in the presence of chlorine in an alkaline solution. Corrosion type 4, however, was additionally observed in aged samples. Here aluminum acts as sacrificed anode implying electrochemical reaction due to electrolytic pore water. Chloride in the system keeps the reaction alive as Al-hydroxide is solved which normally builds a protection shield around

  11. Assessment of tetracycline, lead and cadmium residues in frozen chicken vended in Lagos and Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olusola, Adetunji Victoria; Diana, Belleh Efie; Ayoade, Odetokun Ismail

    2012-09-01

    This study determined the levels of tetracycline and heavy metals (lead and cadmium) levels in frozen chicken. One hundred frozen chicken muscle samples were sourced from major markets in Lagos and Ibadan (fifty samples each). The samples were analyzed using high power liquid chromatography (HPLC) for tetracycline residue determination while atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine the levels of lead and cadmium residues in the samples. Mean concentrations of tetracycline residue levels in the frozen chicken sampled ranged from 1.1589-1.0463ppm which is higher than the maximum residue limit set by international food safety agencies. Pb contents were higher in chicken muscles sampled from markets in Ibadan (0.0227 +/- 0.0069 microg dL(-2)) than Lagos (0.0207 +/- 0.0082 microg dL(-1)), while Cd levels were 0.0013 microg dL(-1) higher than in the Lagos samples (0.0065 +/- 0.0026 microg dL(-1)). These values were within maximum residue limits. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) in levels of tetracycline, lead and cadmium levels from the two market locations (Lagos and Ibadan) and parts (wings and thigh muscles). However, significant differences occurred in tetracycline and Pb levels in frozen chicken sourced from Cotonou. Though not significant, tetracycline contents in the thigh muscles of the frozen chicken samples was higher than that of the wings muscles and this was attributed to the site of administration of antibiotic injection and failure to observe the pre-slaughter withdrawal period by the farmers. This study is of public health importance as the presence of these residues above the maximum residue limit in frozen chicken predisposes consumers to drug resistance, allergic reactions and poisoning as a result of toxicity.

  12. Characterization of welding residual stresses with neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Taljat, B.; Feng, Z.

    1998-03-01

    Welding residual stresses are a key concern in the fabrication and use of structural components containing welds. Residual stresses in welds are caused by non-uniform expansion and shrinkage of differently heated zones during the thermal transient of a weld pass. In some alloys, solid state phase transformations occurring during the welding transient contribute additional residual stresses. Manufacturing problems arising from welding residual stresses include cracking and dimensional distortion. During use, tensile stresses in the welded zone limit the fatigue resistance of the component under cyclic loading. In an aggressive environment, tensile welding residual stresses also create a necessary condition for stress-corrosion cracking to take place.

  13. Antioxidant activity of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2005-12-28

    Proteins dispersed in the continuous phase of oil-in-water emulsions are capable of inhibiting lipid oxidation reactions. The antioxidant activity of these proteins is thought to encompass both free radical scavenging by amino acid residues and chelation of prooxidative transition metals; however, the precise mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. In this study, the oxidative stability of cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine residues in continuous phase beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) in a Brij-stabilized menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was determined. The presence of low concentrations of continuous phase beta-Lg (250 and 750 microg/mL) significantly inhibited lipid oxidation as determined by lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. It was observed that cysteine oxidized before tryptophan in beta-Lg, and both residues oxidized before lipid oxidation could be detected. No oxidation of the methionine residues of beta-Lg was observed despite its reported high oxidative susceptibility. It is conceivable that surface exposure of amino acid residues greatly affects their oxidation kinetics, which may explain why some residues are preferentially oxidized relative to others. Further elucidation of the mechanisms governing free radical scavenging of amino acids could lead to more effective applications of proteins as antioxidants within oil-in-water food emulsions.

  14. TENORM (Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials)

    MedlinePlus

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive ...

  15. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  16. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

  17. TENORM: Coal Combustion Residuals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burning coal in boilers to create steam for power generation and industrial applications produces a number of combustion residuals. Naturally radioactive materials that were in the coal mostly end up in fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag.

  18. A deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector screening method for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Liping; Ma, Zhongjun

    2011-07-01

    Because electrophiles regulate many signalling pathways in cells, by modifying cysteine residues in proteins, they have a wide range of biological activity. In this study, a deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector (MS-DAD) screening method was established for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles. Glutathione (GSH) was used as a probe and incubated with natural product extracts. To distinguish different types of electrophile, incubation was performed in two reaction solvents, H(2)O and D(2)O. Ten types of naturally occurring electrophile were chosen, on the basis of their properties, to undergo the screening assay. By using this screening method, we successfully discovered the bioactive electrophile 4-hydroxyderricin in an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei. This electrophile had potent NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-inducing activity at a concentration of 20 μmol L(-1).

  19. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley; Crum, Bruce Robert; Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  20. Allergies and Asthma: They Often Occur Together

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur together. The same substances that trigger your hay fever symptoms, such as pollen, dust mites and pet ... a major risk factor for allergic asthma. Having hay fever or other allergies yourself also increases your risk ...

  1. Naturally Occurring Radon and 120(h) transfers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains a discussion regarding how the presence of naturally occurring radon on closing military bases affects the United States' ability to transfer parcels under §120(h) (3) and §120(h) (4).

  2. Residual images in charged-coupled device detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Mündermann, Lars; Widenhorn, Ralf; Bodegom, Erik; McGlinn, T. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present results of a systematic study of persistent, or residual, images that occur in charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors. A phenomenological model for these residual images, also known as "ghosting," is introduced. This model relates the excess dark current in a CCD after exposure to the number of filled impurity sites which is tested for various temperatures and exposure times. We experimentally derive values for the cross section, density, and characteristic energy of the impurity sites responsible for the residual images.

  3. Molten Metal Explosions are Still Occurring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    recycling plant. Another recent 665 Light Metals 2009 Edited by: Geoff Bearne TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2009 catastrophic...occurred recently in a recycling plant casting small ingots over a water tank. An explosion occurred that extensively damaged the machine and...have been held in Europe as a joint activity with the European Aluminium Association (EAA) and the International Aluminium Institute (IAI). These

  4. Trichotillomania and Co-occurring Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jon E.; Redden, Sarah A.; Leppink, Eric W.; Chamberlain, Samuel R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Trichotillomania appears to be a fairly common disorder, with high rates of co-occurring anxiety disorders. Many individuals with trichotillomania also report that pulling worsens during periods of increased anxiety. Even with these clinical links to anxiety, little research has explored whether trichotillomania with co-occurring anxiety is a meaningful subtype. Methods 165 adults with trichotillomania were examined on a variety of clinical measures including symptom severity, functioning, and comorbidity. Participants also underwent cognitive testing assessing motor inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Clinical features and cognitive functioning were compared between those with current co-occurring anxiety disorders (i.e. social anxiety, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and anxiety disorder NOS) (n=38) and those with no anxiety disorder (n=127). Results Participants with trichotillomania and co-occurring anxiety reported significantly worse hair pulling symptoms, were more likely to have co-occurring depression, and were more likely to have a first-degree relative with obsessive compulsive disorder. Those with anxiety disorders also exhibited significantly worse motor inhibitory performance on a task of motor inhibition (stop-signal task). Conclusions This study suggests that anxiety disorders affect the clinical presentation of hair pulling behavior. Further research is needed to validate our findings and to consider whether treatments should be specially tailored differently for adults with trichotillomania who have co-occurring anxiety disorders, or more pronounced cognitive impairment. PMID:27668531

  5. An In Situ Method for Sizing Insoluble Residues in Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axson, J. L.; Creamean, J.; Bondy, A. L.; Warner, K. Y.; Ault, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) play an important role in the climate effects of clouds. Wet deposition of these particles via rainout, washout, or cloud seeding is an important removal mechanism for aerosols in the atmosphere. Many of these particles, especially those that serve as IN, are insoluble and remain suspended after uptake within precipitating droplets/crystals as insoluble residues. While studies have measured the dissolved ions or mass of species within collected precipitation, no studies to date have quantified the number and size of insoluble residues. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time an in situ method for determining the number concentration, number size distribution, and surface area distribution of insoluble residues < 1 μm in diameter in samples of melted snow and rain. This work evaluates the use of nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), a new and novel technique for determining particle size distributions in a liquid medium, to determine in situ size distributions of insoluble residue particles in precipitation and evaluate this technique versus other analytical methods, including dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Number size distribution modes ranged from 80-150 nm and were strongly sample dependent. Surface area distribution modes ranged from 150-400 nm. Differences were observed between concentrations and size distributions for snow collected at different locations and elevations and between rain and melted snow. These differences can indicate changes in the insoluble residues that vary with ambient aerosol concentration, cloud microphysics, and meteorological dynamics. This method has great potential for improving our understanding of the properties of the particles nucleating droplets and crystals, the surface area available for reactions to occur, and the number of particles removed by scavenging. Additionally, the snow samples were further evaluated

  6. Self-catalyzed site-specific depurination of guanine residues within gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Coulter, Richard; Fresco, Jacques R

    2006-03-21

    A self-catalyzed, site-specific guanine-depurination activity has been found to occur in short gene sequences with a potential to form a stem-loop structure. The critical features of that catalytic intermediate are a 5'-G-T-G-G-3' loop and an adjacent 5'-T.A-3' base pair of a short duplex stem stable enough to fix the loop structure required for depurination of its 5'-G residue. That residue is uniquely depurinated with a rate some 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of random "spontaneous" depurination. In contrast, all other purine residues in the sequence depurinate at the spontaneous background rate. The reaction requires no divalent cations or other cofactors and occurs under essentially physiological conditions. Such stem-loops can form in duplex DNA under superhelical stress, and their critical sequence features have been found at numerous sites in the human genome. Self-catalyzed stem-loop-mediated depurination leading to flexible apurinic sites may therefore serve some important biological role, e.g., in nucleosome positioning, genetic recombination, or chromosome superfolding.

  7. Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-06-01

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  8. Lowering energy barriers in surface reactions through concerted reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sakong, Sung; Mosch, Christian; Lozano, Ariel; Busnengo, H Fabio; Gross, Axel

    2012-10-22

    Any technologically important chemical reaction typically involves a number of different elementary reaction steps consisting of bond-breaking and bond-making processes. Usually, one assumes that such complex chemical reactions occur in a step-wise fashion where one single bond is made or broken at a time. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory we show that the barriers of rate-limiting steps for technologically relevant surface reactions are significantly reduced if concerted reaction mechanisms are taken into account.

  9. Young Children's Reports of when Learning Occurred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Connie M.; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about…

  10. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma occurring in an eyelid scar.

    PubMed

    Rayner, S A; Duncombe, A S; Keefe, M; Theaker, J; Manners, R M

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) in a 76-year-old Caucasian lady occurring as a nodule in a blepharoplasty scar. NXG is a rare histiocytic disease with progressive orbital and systemic features. Management options of excision biopsy or chemotherapy are discussed.

  11. Treatment of vacuum residues in hydroconversion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, A. Y.; Mendoza, D. L.; Espinosa, J. O.; Laverde, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the use of a liquid homogeneous catalyst has been studied in reactivity vacuum residues by hydroconversion under different conditions. To cover a wide range of compositions, six (6) vacuum residues were selected from crude mixtures. Hydroconversion test were performed in batch reactor with hydrogen atmosphere at about 2000psi in a temperature range between 430 and 480°C. The results allowed to establish that the reactivity hydroconversion conditions about coke formation is higher in vacuum residues with higher content of resins and asphaltenes. The reaction conditions promote distillate formation, however, with increasing stringency conditions, the distillate yield decreases due to distillate transformation into temperature range 430 and 460°C compared to the tests performed without catalyst demonstrating that the use of homogeneous catalyst is an alternative to treating vacuum residues and results are satisfactory in the conversion processes. Finally, predictive expressions have been developed in the formation of products depending on the conditions of temperature and physicochemical properties of processed vacuum residue.

  12. A noncanonical function of sortase enables site-specific conjugation of small molecules to lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Joseph J; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-07

    We provide the first demonstration that isopeptide ligation, a noncanonical activity of the enzyme sortase A, can be used to modify recombinant proteins. This reaction was used in vitro to conjugate small molecules to a peptide, an engineered targeting protein, and a full-length monoclonal antibody with an exquisite level of control over the site of conjugation. Attachment to the protein substrate occurred exclusively through isopeptide bonds at a lysine ε-amino group within a specific amino acid sequence. This reaction allows more than one molecule to be site-specifically conjugated to a protein at internal sites, thereby overcoming significant limitations of the canonical native peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by sortase A. Our method provides a unique chemical ligation procedure that is orthogonal to existing methods, supplying a new method to site-specifically modify lysine residues that will be a valuable addition to the protein conjugation toolbox.

  13. Preferential flow occurs in unsaturated conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Because it commonly generates high-speed, high-volume flow with minimal exposure to solid earth materials, preferential flow in the unsaturated zone is a dominant influence in many problems of infiltration, recharge, contaminant transport, and ecohydrology. By definition, preferential flow occurs in a portion of a medium – that is, a preferred part, whether a pathway, pore, or macroscopic subvolume. There are many possible classification schemes, but usual consideration of preferential flow includes macropore or fracture flow, funneled flow determined by macroscale heterogeneities, and fingered flow determined by hydraulic instability rather than intrinsic heterogeneity. That preferential flow is spatially concentrated associates it with other characteristics that are typical, although not defining: it tends to be unusually fast, to transport high fluxes, and to occur with hydraulic disequilibrium within the medium. It also has a tendency to occur in association with large conduits and high water content, although these are less universal than is commonly assumed. Predictive unsaturated-zone flow models in common use employ several different criteria for when and where preferential flow occurs, almost always requiring a nearly saturated medium. A threshold to be exceeded may be specified in terms of the following (i) water content; (ii) matric potential, typically a value high enough to cause capillary filling in a macropore of minimum size; (iii) infiltration capacity or other indication of incipient surface ponding; or (iv) other conditions related to total filling of certain pores. Yet preferential flow does occur without meeting these criteria. My purpose in this commentary is to point out important exceptions and implications of ignoring them. Some of these pertain mainly to macropore flow, others to fingered or funneled flow, and others to combined or undifferentiated flow modes.

  14. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  15. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid by Lactobacillus casei: interchain transacylation of D-alanyl ester residues

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.C. 3d.; Taron, D.J.; Neuhaus, F.C.

    1985-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus casei contains poly(glycerophosphate) substituted with D-alanyl ester residues. The distribution of these residues in the in vitro-synthesized polymer is uniform. Esterification of LTA with D-alanine may occur in one of two modes: (i) addition at random or (ii) addition at a defined locus in the poly(glycerophosphate) chain followed by redistribution of the ester residues. A time-dependent transacylation of these residues from D-(/sup 14/C)alanyl-lipophilic LTA to hydrophilic acceptor was observed. The hydrophilic acceptor was characterized as D-alanyl-hydrophilic LTA. This transacylation requires neither ATP nor the D-alanine incorporation system, i.e., the D-alanine activating enzyme and D-alanine:membrane acceptor ligase. No evidence for an enzyme-catalyzed transacylation reaction was observed. The authors propose that this process of transacylation may be responsible for the redistribution of D-alanyl residues after esterification to the poly(glycerophosphate). As a result, it is difficult to distinguish between these proposed modes of addition.

  16. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  17. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  18. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Prime, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  19. Ethical issues occurring within nursing education.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Marsha D; Davis, Anne J

    2013-03-01

    The large body of literature labeled "ethics in nursing education" is entirely devoted to curricular matters of ethics education in nursing schools, that is, to what ought to be the ethics content that is taught and what theory or issues ought to be included in all nursing curricula. Where the nursing literature actually focuses on particular ethical issues, it addresses only single topics. Absent from the literature, however, is any systematic analysis and explication of ethical issues or dilemmas that occur within the context of nursing education. The objective of this article is to identify the spectrum of ethical issues in nursing education to the end of prompting a systematic and thorough study of such issues, and to lay the groundwork for research by identifying and provisionally typologizing the ethical issues that occur within the context of academic nursing.

  20. Coping with Traumatic Stress Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Estrés Traumático | Ver todos When trauma survivors take direct action to cope with their stress reactions, they ... impact of trauma on your life and taking direct action to improve things. Active coping occurs even ...

  1. Naturally Occuring Fish Poisons from Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Jonathan G.; Burton, Robert A.; Wood, Steven G.; Owen, Noel L.

    2004-10-01

    Since prehistoric times, cultures throughout the world have used piscicidal (fish poisoning) plants for fishing. In recent times, scientists have identified many of the plant compounds responsible for killing the fish and have found that these compounds possess other important biological properties, such as insecticidal and anti-cancer activities. This article reviews some of the chemical research that has been performed on naturally occurring fish poisons, including plant sources, methods of use, toxicity, and mechanisms of action of piscicides.

  2. spin pumping occurred under nonlinear spin precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong; Ma, Li; Zhou, Shiming; Xue, Desheng

    Spin pumping occurs when a pure-spin current is injected into a normal metal thin layer by an adjacent ferromagnetic metal layer undergoing ferromagnetic resonance, which can be understood as the inverse effect of spin torque, and gives access to the physics of magnetization dynamics and damping. An interesting question is that whether spin pumping occurring under nonlinear spin dynamics would differ from linear case. It is known that nonlinear spin dynamics differ distinctly from linear response, a variety of amplitude dependent nonlinear effect would present. It has been found that for spin precession angle above a few degrees, nonlinear damping term would present and dominated the dynamic energy/spin-moment dissipation. Since spin pumping are closely related to the damping process, it is interesting to ask whether the nonlinear damping term could be involved in spin pumping process. We studied the spin pumping effect occurring under nonlinear spin precession. A device which is a Pt/YIG microstrip coupled with coplanar waveguide was used. High power excitation resulted in spin precession entering in a nonlinear regime. Foldover resonance lineshape and nonlinear damping have been observed. Based on those nonlinear effects, we determined the values of the precession cone angles, and the maximum cone angle can reach a values as high as 21.5 degrees. We found that even in nonlinear regime, spin pumping is still linear, which means the nonlinear damping and foldover would not affect spin pumping process.

  3. Algorithm for reaction classification.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Hans; Eiblmaier, Josef; Grethe, Guenter; Löw, Peter; Matuszczyk, Heinz; Saller, Heinz

    2013-11-25

    Reaction classification has important applications, and many approaches to classification have been applied. Our own algorithm tests all maximum common substructures (MCS) between all reactant and product molecules in order to find an atom mapping containing the minimum chemical distance (MCD). Recent publications have concluded that new MCS algorithms need to be compared with existing methods in a reproducible environment, preferably on a generalized test set, yet the number of test sets available is small, and they are not truly representative of the range of reactions that occur in real reaction databases. We have designed a challenging test set of reactions and are making it publicly available and usable with InfoChem's software or other classification algorithms. We supply a representative set of example reactions, grouped into different levels of difficulty, from a large number of reaction databases that chemists actually encounter in practice, in order to demonstrate the basic requirements for a mapping algorithm to detect the reaction centers in a consistent way. We invite the scientific community to contribute to the future extension and improvement of this data set, to achieve the goal of a common standard.

  4. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  5. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  6. Depleting methyl bromide residues in soil by reaction with bases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite generally being considered the most effective soil fumigant, methyl bromide (MeBr) use is being phased out because its emissions from soil can lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, a large amount is still currently used due to Critical Use Exemptions. As strategies for reducing the...

  7. Depleting methyl bromide residues in soil by reaction with bases.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Richeng; Ashworth, Daniel J; Luo, Lifang; Wang, Haizhen; Yates, Scott R

    2010-12-01

    Despite generally being considered the most effective soil fumigant, methyl bromide (MeBr) use is being phased out because its emissions from soil can lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, a large amount is still currently used due to Critical Use Exemptions. As strategies for reducing the postfumigation emissions of MeBr from soil, Ca(OH)(2), K(2)CO(3), and NH(3) were assessed as means of promoting MeBr degradation. Ammonia aqueous solution (NH(4)OH) was the most effective, because MeBr can be degraded by both hydrolysis and ammonolysis. At 20 °C, the half-lives (t(1/2)) of MeBr were 18.0, 2.5, and 1.3 h in 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 M NH(4)OH, respectively. In 1.0 M NH(4)OH, increasing the solution temperature to 40 °C reduced the half-life of MeBr to 0.23 h. Ammonia amendment to moist soil also promoted MeBr transformation, and the MeBr degradation rate increased with increasing soil temperature. NH(4)OH (30%, 16 M) very effectively reacted with MeBr that was contained under plastic film. Under Hytibar (a virtually impermeable film, VIF), over 99.5% of the MeBr could be destroyed by 30% NH(4)OH in 8 h at 20 °C. On the basis of these results, good management practices (i.e., VIF plus NH(4)OH) could be developed for continued use of MeBr as a soil fumigant under Critical Use Exemptions, without significant emissions.

  8. Key amino acid residues in the regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase catalysis by component B.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2003-05-20

    The regulatory component MMOB of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has been hypothesized to control access of substrates into the active site of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) through formation of a size specific channel or region of increased structural flexibility tuned to methane and O(2). Accordingly, a decrease in the size of four MMOB residues (N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A, the Quad mutant) was shown to accelerate the reaction of substrates larger than methane with the reactive MMOH intermediate Q [Wallar, B. J., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 2220-2233]. Here, this hypothesis is tested by construction of single and double mutations involving the residues of the Quad mutant. It is shown that mutations of residues that extend into the core structure of MMOB alter many aspects of the MMOH catalyzed reaction but do not mimic the effects of the Quad mutant. In contrast, the MMOB residues that are thought to form part of the interface in the MMOH-MMOB complex increase active site accessibility as observed for the Quad mutant. In particular, the mutant T111A mimics most of the effects of the Quad mutant; thus, Thr111 is proposed to most directly control access. Unexpectedly, mutation of Thr111 to the larger Tyr greatly increases the rate constant for the reaction of larger substrates such as ethane, furan, and nitrobenzene with Q while decreasing the rate constant for the reaction with methane. Other steps in the cycle are dramatically slowed, the regiospecificity for nitrobenzene oxidation is altered, and 10-fold more T111Y than wild-type MMOB is required to maximize the rate of turnover. Thus, T111Y appears to make a more extensive change in local interface structure that allows hydrocarbons at least as large as ethane to bind and react with Q similarly. As a result, the bond cleavage rates for methane, ethane, and their deuterated analogues are shown for the first time to correlate with bond strength in accord with a mechanism in which C-H bond

  9. Effect of the sarcosine residue on sequence scrambling in peptide b(5) ions.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alex G

    2014-02-01

    The effect of N-methylation on sequence scrambling in the fragmentation of b5 ions has been investigated by studying a variety of peptides containing sarcosine (N-methylglycine). The product ion mass spectra for the b5 ions derived from Sar-A-A-A-Y-A and Sar-A-A-Y-A-A show only minor signals for non-direct sequence ions the major fragmentation reactions occurring from the unrearranged structures. This is in contrast to the b5 ions where the Sar residue is replaced by Ala and sequence scrambling occurs. The b5 ion derived from Y-Sar-A-A-A-A shows a product ion mass spectrum essentially identical to the spectrum of the b5 ion derived from Sar-A-A-A-Y-A, indicating that in the former case macrocyclization has occurred but the macrocyclic form shows a strong preference to reopen to put the Sar residue in the N-terminal position. Similar results were obtained in the comparison of b5 ions derived from A-Sar-A-A-Y-A and Sar-A-A-Y-A-A. The product ion mass spectra of the MH(+) ions of Y-Sar-A-A-A-A and A-Sar-A-A-Y-A show substantial signals for non-direct sequence ions indicating that fragmentation of the MH(+) ions channels extensively through the respective b5 ions and further fragmentation of these species.

  10. The ASCE Residuals Transport Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Albertson, O.E.; Bizier, P.A.; Brown, J.; Koch, C.; Sadick, T.

    1999-07-01

    This presentation will highlight the ASCE Residuals Transport Manual, which has been published by ASCE this year. This document, which represents the state of the art in information on residuals transport, is designed to be used by both the active practitioner, as well as for instructional purposes. The authors will present the various chapters which cover the following topics: Conveyance of Water and Wastewater Residuals, Rheology, Sludge Characteristics, Quality and Quantity, Overview of Residuals Conveyance Devices, Pumping of Viscous Sludges and Slurries, Transport of Thickened Residuals, Conveyance of Dewatered Residuals, Transport of Granular and Compactable Residuals, and Case Studies. The Objective of the Transport Monograph is to summarize in one concise volume the general state of knowledge regarding residuals transport from both water and wastewater residuals. The presentation will cover each chapter and will review the pertinent information contained in the manual.

  11. Naturally occurring products in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Sankari, Leena S.; Malathi, L.; Krupaa, Jayasri R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been used for the treatment of various diseases and are becoming an important research area for drug discovery. These products, especially phytochemicals have been extensively studies and have exhibited anti-carcinogenic activities by interfering with the initiation, development and progression of cancer through the modulation of various mechanisms including cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. This concept is gaining attention because it is a cost-effective alternative to cancer treatment. In this article, we have discussed some of the naturally occurring products used in cancer treatment. PMID:26015704

  12. Jerky Periods: Myoclonus Occurring Solely During Menses

    PubMed Central

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    Background In this case report, we describe an unusual case of a patient with myoclonus only occurring during menses. Case Report A 41-year-old female, known to have neurological sequelae after a car accident 1 year earlier, presented with myoclonic movements of the right arm and hand only during menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is compatible with head trauma. Electromyography shows brief irregular bursts with a duration of about 20 ms. Discussion This appears to be the first description of myoclonus appearing only during menses. We suggest a cortical origin for myoclonus. PMID:23724361

  13. Muscle damage occurring in wheelchair sports people.

    PubMed

    Ide, M; Ogata, H; Kobayashi, M; Wada, F

    1997-04-01

    Seven college-age healthy men exercised on a wheelchair treadmill to evaluate muscle damage that may occur from wheelchair propulsion. An experimental model in which a participant performs up-hill running in a wheelchair was prepared. Plasma creatinekinase (CK), myoglobin (Mb) and lactatedehydrogenase (LDH) were measured as parameters. Blood samples were taken pre-, immediately after-, 24 h after- and 72 h after the exercise. All of these parameters significantly increased after the exercise, but their time-courses were apparently varied. It is concluded that wheelchair propulsion causes muscle damage in certain situations such as up-hill running.

  14. Attention turns to naturally occurring methane seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Reeburgh, William S.

    Methane is the most abundant organic compound in the Earth's atmosphere. As a powerful greenhouse gas, it has implications for global climate change. Sources of methane to the atmosphere are varied. Depending on the source, methane can contain either modern or ancient carbon. Methane exiting from swamps and wetlands contains modern carbon, whereas methane leaking from petroleum reservoirs contains ancient carbon. The total annual source of methane to the atmosphere has been constrained to about 540 teragrams (Tg) per year “Cicerone and Oremland, 1988”. Notably absent from any identified sources is the contribution of geologically sourced methane from naturally occurring seepage.

  15. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  16. Single-residue posttranslational modification sites at the N-terminus, C-terminus or in-between: To be or not to be exposed for enzyme access.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Fernanda L; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Many protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are the result of an enzymatic reaction. The modifying enzyme has to recognize the substrate protein's sequence motif containing the residue(s) to be modified; thus, the enzyme's catalytic cleft engulfs these residue(s) and the respective sequence environment. This residue accessibility condition principally limits the range where enzymatic PTMs can occur in the protein sequence. Non-globular, flexible, intrinsically disordered segments or large loops/accessible long side chains should be preferred whereas residues buried in the core of structures should be void of what we call canonical, enzyme-generated PTMs. We investigate whether PTM sites annotated in UniProtKB (with MOD_RES/LIPID keys) are situated within sequence ranges that can be mapped to known 3D structures. We find that N- or C-termini harbor essentially exclusively canonical PTMs. We also find that the overwhelming majority of all other PTMs are also canonical though, later in the protein's life cycle, the PTM sites can become buried due to complex formation. Among the remaining cases, some can be explained (i) with autocatalysis, (ii) with modification before folding or after temporary unfolding, or (iii) as products of interaction with small, diffusible reactants. Others require further research how these PTMs are mechanistically generated in vivo.

  17. Modeling of surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models are used to elucidate properties of the monomer-monomer and monomer-dimer type chemical reactions on a two-dimensional surface. The authors use mean-field and lattice gas models, detailing similarities and differences due to correlations in the lattice gas model. The monomer-monomer, or AB surface reaction model, with no diffusion, is investigated for various reaction rates k. Study of the exact rate equations reveals that poisoning always occurs if the adsorption rates of the reactants are unequal. If the adsorption rates of the reactants are equal, simulations show slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also shown for the two-dimensional voter model. The authors analyze precisely the slow poisoning kinetics by an analytic treatment for the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate, and by direct comparison with the voter model. They extend the results to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion, and they compare the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate and no diffusion to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. They also consider the relationship of the voter model to the monomer-dimer model, and investigate the latter model for small reaction rates. The monomer-dimer, or AB[sub 2] surface reaction model is also investigated. Specifically, they consider the ZGB-model for CO-oxidation, and in generalizations of this model which include adspecies diffusion. A theory of nucleation to describe properties of non-equilibrium first-order transitions, specifically the evolution between [open quote]reactive[close quote] steady states and trivial adsorbing states, is derived. The behavior of the [open quote]epidemic[close quote] survival probability, P[sub s], for a non-poisoned patch surrounded by a poisoned background is determined below the poisoning transition.

  18. Persulfate activation by naturally occurring trace minerals.

    PubMed

    Teel, Amy L; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Watts, Richard J

    2011-11-30

    The potential for 13 naturally occurring minerals to mediate the decomposition of persulfate and generate a range of reactive oxygen species was investigated to provide fundamental information on activation mechanisms when persulfate is used for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Only four of the minerals (cobaltite, ilmenite, pyrite, and siderite) promoted the decomposition of persulfate more rapidly than persulfate-deionized water control systems. The other nine minerals decomposed persulfate at the same rate or more slowly than the control systems. Mineral-mediated persulfate activation was conducted with the addition of one of three probe compounds to detect the generation of reactive oxygen species: anisole (sulfate+hydroxyl radical), nitrobenzene (hydroxyl radical), and hexachloroethane (reductants and nucleophiles). The reduced mineral pyrite promoted rapid generation of sulfate+hydroxyl radical. However, the remainder of the minerals provided minimal potential for the generation of reactive oxygen species. The results of this research demonstrate that the majority of naturally occurring trace minerals do not activate persulfate to generate reactive oxygen species, and other mechanisms of activation are necessary to promote contaminant destruction in the subsurface during persulfate ISCO.

  19. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  20. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  1. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  2. Tetrahydroberberine, a pharmacologically active naturally occurring alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Subramanya; Donahue, James P; Payton-Stewart, Florastina

    2015-04-01

    Tetrahydroberberine (systematic name: 9,10-dimethoxy-5,8,13,13a-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[g][1,3]benzodioxolo[5,6-a]quinolizine), C20H21NO4, a widely distributed naturally occurring alkaloid, has been crystallized as a racemic mixture about an inversion center. A bent conformation of the molecule is observed, with an angle of 24.72 (5)° between the arene rings at the two ends of the reduced quinolizinium core. The intermolecular hydrogen bonds that play an apparent role in crystal packing are 1,3-benzodioxole -CH2···OCH3 and -OCH3···OCH3 interactions between neighboring molecules.

  3. Does dietary learning occur outside awareness?

    PubMed

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2004-09-01

    Several forms of dietary learning have been identified in humans. These include flavor-flavor learning, flavor-postingestive learning (including flavor-caffeine learning), and learned satiety. Generally, learning is thought to occur in the absence of contingency (CS-US) or demand awareness. However, a review of the literature suggests that this conclusion may be premature because measures of awareness lack the rigor that is found in studies of other kinds of human learning. If associations do configure outside awareness then this should be regarded as a rare instance of automatic learning. Conversely, if awareness is important, then successful learning may be governed by an individual's beliefs and predilection to attend to stimulus relationships. For researchers of dietary learning this could be critical because it might explain why learning paradigms have a reputation for being unreliable. Since most food preferences are learned, asking questions about awareness can also tell us something fundamental about everyday dietary control.

  4. Hibernation in a primate: does sleep occur?

    PubMed Central

    Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Faherty, Sheena L.; Klopfer, Peter; Krystal, Andrew D.; Schopler, Robert; Yoder, Anne D.

    2016-01-01

    During hibernation, critical physiological processes are downregulated and thermogenically induced arousals are presumably needed periodically to fulfil those physiological demands. Among the processes incompatible with a hypome tabolic state is sleep. However, one hibernating primate, the dwarf lemur Cheirogaleus medius, experiences rapid eye movement (REM)-like states during hibernation, whenever passively reaching temperatures above 30°C, as occurs when it hibernates in poorly insulated tree hollows under tropical conditions. Here, we report electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, temperature data and metabolic rates from two related species (C. crossleyi and C. sibreei), inhabiting high-altitude rainforests and hibernating underground, conditions that mirror, to some extent, those experienced by temperate hibernators. We compared the physiology of hibernation and spontaneous arousals in these animals to C. medius, as well as the much more distantly related non-primate hibernators, such as Arctic, golden-mantled and European ground squirrels. We observed a number of commonalities with non-primate temperate hibernators including: (i) monotonous ultra-low voltage EEG during torpor bouts in these relatively cold-weather hibernators, (ii) the absence of sleep during torpor bouts, (iii) the occurrence of spontaneous arousals out of torpor, during which sleep regularly occurred, (iv) relatively high early EEG non-REM during the arousal, and (v) a gradual transition to the torpid EEG state from non-REM sleep. Unlike C. medius, our study species did not display sleep-like states during torpor bouts, but instead exclusively exhibited them during arousals. During these short euthermic periods, non-REM as well as REM sleep-like stages were observed. Differences observed between these two species and their close relative, C. medius, for which data have been published, presumably reflect differences in hibernaculum temperature. PMID:27853604

  5. Limitations in the determination of maximum residue limits and highest residues of pesticides: Part I.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Sali, Judit; Zentai, Andrea; Dorogházi, Enikő; Farkas, Zsuzsa; Kerekes, Kata; Ambrus, Árpád

    2014-01-01

    The pesticide usages are controlled by comparing residue concentrations in treated commodities to legally permitted maximum levels (MRLs) determined based on supervised trials designed to reflect likely maximum residues occurring in practice following authorised use. The number of trials available may significantly affect the accuracy of estimated maximum residues. We conducted a study with synthetic lognormal distributions with mean of 1 and standard deviations of 0.8 and 1.0, which reflect the residue distributions observed in practice. The likely residues in samples were modelled by drawing random samples of size 3, 5, 10 and 25 from the synthetic populations. The results indicate that the estimations of highest residues (HR), used for calculation of short-term intake, and the MRLs, serving as legal limits, are very uncertain based on 3-5 trials indicated by the calculated HR0.975/HR0.025 and MRL0.975/MRL0.025 ratios of 12 and 9, and 13 and 10, respectively, which question the suitability of such trials for the intended purpose. As the 95% range of HR and MRL rapidly decreases with number of trials, ideally ≥15 but minimum 6-8 trials should be used for estimation of HR and MRL according to the current typical practice of Codex Alimentarius.

  6. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  7. 78 FR 78748 - 2,5-Furandione, polymer With ethenylbenzene, Reaction Products With polyethylene-polypropylene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 2,5-Furandione, polymer With ethenylbenzene, Reaction Products With polyethylene... for residues of 2,5-furandione, polymer with ethenylbenzene, reaction products with polyethylene... permissible level for residues of 2,5-furandione, polymer with ethenylbenzene, reaction products...

  8. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  9. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  10. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  11. Racemization in Prins Cyclization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jasti, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic labeling experiments were performed in order to elucidate a new mechanism for racemization in Prins cyclization reactions. The loss in optical activity for these reactions was shown to occur by 2-oxonia-Cope rearrangements by way of a (Z)-oxocarbenium ion intermediate. Reaction conditions such as solvent, temperature, and the nucleophile employed played a critical role in whether an erosion in enantiomeric excess was observed. Additionally, certain structural features of Prins cyclization precursors were also shown to be important for preserving optical purity in these reactions. PMID:17031979

  12. Commonly occurring plant flavonoids have estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Miksicek, R J

    1993-07-01

    A remarkable diversity of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds have been shown to mimic the biological effects of 17 beta-estradiol by virtue of their ability to bind to and activate the nuclear estrogen receptor. This report extends the family of nonsteroidal estrogens to include several multiply hydroxylated chalcones, flavanones, and flavones. The hormone-like activity of these natural plant products is indicated by their ability to stimulate an estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional response and to promote growth of estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells in culture. The transcriptional response can be inhibited by the steroidal estrogen antagonist ICI-164,384 and is specific for the estrogen receptor. Evidence is presented to show that selected hydroxylated flavonoids interact directly with the estrogen receptor, based on their ability to compete for the binding of 17 beta-[3H]estradiol to the receptor in cell-free extracts. These compounds are less active, on a molar basis, than 17 beta-estradiol or the synthetic dihydroxystilbene estrogens, but they have potencies comparable to those of other known phytoestrogens. Together, these findings broaden our understanding of the structure-activity relationships for nonsteroidal estrogens and present a series of new chemical prototypes for the future development of potentially useful agonists and antagonists for this nuclear receptor. The wide distribution of weakly estrogenic flavonoid pigments in food crops and medicinal plants raises additional questions about the possible health risks and benefits of these compounds, meriting closer examination of their presence in the human diet.

  13. Medicinal significance of naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Muna Ali

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive natural products are serendipitous drug candidates, which stimulate synthetic approaches for improving and supporting drug discovery and development. Therefore, the search for bioactive metabolites from different natural sources continues to play an important role in fashioning new medicinal agents. Several cyclic peptides were produced by organisms, such as β-defensins, gramicidin S, and tyrocidine A, and exhibited a wide range of bioactivities, such as antiviral activity against HIV-1, influenza A viruses, or antibacterial activity. Cyclic tetrapeptides are a class of natural products that were found to have a broad range of biological activities, promising pharmacokinetic properties, as well as interesting conformational dynamics and ability of slow inter-conversion to several different structures. Cyclooligopeptides, particularly medium ring-sized peptides, were obtained from marine microorganisms and exhibited a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial and anti-dinoflagellate activities, cytotoxicity, and inhibitory activity against enzyme sortase B. Most of the naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides are obtained from fungi. Some natural cyclic tetrapeptides were found to inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC), which regulate the expression of genes. These compounds are very useful as cancer therapeutics. Various analogues of the natural cyclotetrapeptides were successfully synthesized to find novel lead compounds for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. Therefore, in this review, previously reported novel natural cyclotetrapeptides are briefly discussed, along with their important biological activities as drug candidates, together with their promising therapeutic properties. Moreover, their future perspective in drug discovery as potential therapeutic agents will be determined.

  14. Does Shear Thickening Occur in Semisolid Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Helen V.; Favier, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    In the various forms of semisolid processing such as thixoforming and thixoforging, the entry into the die occurs in a fraction of a second so it is the transient rheological behavior which governs the initial stages of flow. In experiments in the literature, this rheological behavior is probed through applying rapid transitions in shear rate under isothermal conditions. There is contradictory evidence as to whether the behavior during these transitions is shear thinning or shear thickening, although it is clear that once in the die the material is thinning. Here the data in the literature are reanalyzed to obtain a rationalization of the contradictions which has not previously been available. It is argued that if a suspension is initially in a disagglomerated state ( i.e., one which is initially sheared), the instantaneous behavior with a jump-up in shear rate is shear thickening (even if the long-term steady-state behavior is shear thinning) provided the fraction solid is greater than about 0.36 and the final shear rate at the end of the jump is greater than about 100 s-1. If the jump-up in shear rate is made from rest then yield masks the shear thickening.

  15. Structural Insights into Intermediate Steps in the Sir2 Deacetylation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Fatkins, David G.; Daines, Alison; Zubkova, Olga V.; Schramm, Vern L.; Zheng, Weiping; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Sirtuin enzymes comprise a unique class of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. Although structures of many sirtuin complexes have been determined, structural resolution of intermediate chemical steps are needed to understand the deacetylation mechanism. We report crystal structures of the bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, in complex with an S-alkylamidate intermediate, analogous to the naturally occurring O-alkylamidate intermediate, and a Sir2Tm ternary complex containing a dissociated NAD{sup +} analog and acetylated peptide. The structures and biochemical studies reveal critical roles for the invariant active site histidine in positioning the reaction intermediate, and for a conserved phenylalanine residue in shielding reaction intermediates from base exchange with nicotinamide. The new structural and biochemical studies provide key mechanistic insight into intermediate steps of the Sir2 deacetylation reaction.

  16. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  17. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  18. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  19. Characterization of reaction conditions providing rapid and specific cysteine alkylation for peptide-based mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    Alkylation converts Cys thiols to thioethers and prevents unwanted side reactions, thus facilitating mass spectrometric identification of Cys-containing peptides. Alkylation occurs preferentially at Cys due to its high nucleophilicity, however reactions at other such sites are possible. N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) shows rapid reaction kinetics with Cys and careful definition of reaction conditions results in little reactivity at other sites. Analysis of a protein standard alkylated under differing reaction conditions (pH, NEM concentrations and reaction times) was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of NEM-modified and unmodified peptide pairs. Mis-alkylation sites at primary and secondary amines were identified and limited to one equivalent of NEM. No evidence for hydroxyl or thioether alkylation was observed. Improved specificity was achieved by restricting the pH below neutral, NEM concentration below 10mM and/or reaction time to below 5min. Maximal removal of Cys activity was observed in tissue homogenates at 40mM NEM within 1min, dependent upon efficient protein denaturation. SRM assays identified peptide-specific levels of mis-alkylation, indicating that NEM-modified to unmodified ratios did not exceed 10%, with the exception of Cys alkylation that proceeded to 100%, and some Lys residues that resulted in tryptic missed cleavages. High reactivity was observed for His residues considering their relatively low abundance. These data indicate that rapid and specific Cys alkylation is possible with NEM under relatively mild conditions, with more abrasive conditions leading to increased non-specific alkylation without appreciable benefit for MS-based proteomics.

  20. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  1. Secondary Reactions and Strategies to Improve Quantitative Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Kiselar, J.; He, Q.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting permits detailed examination of structure and dynamic processes of proteins and large biological assemblies, as changes in the rate of reaction of radicals with target peptides are governed by changes in the solvent accessibility of the side-chain probe residues. The precise and accurate determination of peptide reaction rates is essential to successfully probing protein structure using footprinting. In this study, we specifically examine the magnitude and mechanisms of secondary oxidation occurring after radiolytic exposure and prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Secondary oxidation results from hydrogen peroxide and other oxidative species generated during radiolysis, significantly impacting the oxidation of Met and Cys but not aromatic or other reactive residues. Secondary oxidation of Met with formation of sulfoxide degrades data reproducibility and inflates the perceived solvent accessibility of Met-containing peptides. It can be suppressed by adding trace amounts of catalase or millimolar Met-NH{sub 2} (or Met-OH) buffer immediately after irradiation; this leads to greatly improved adherence to first-order kinetics and more precise observed oxidation rates. The strategy is shown to suppress secondary oxidation in model peptides and improve data quality in examining the reactivity of peptides within the Arp2/3 protein complex. Cysteine is also subject to secondary oxidation generating disulfide as the principal product. The disulfides can be reduced before mass spectrometric analysis by reducing agents such as TCEP, while methionine sulfoxide is refractory to reduction by this reagent under typical reducing conditions.

  2. Selective cleavage of an azaGly peptide bond by copper(II). Long-range effect of histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Mhidia, Reda; Melnyk, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    Several reports have highlighted the interest of replacing Gly, a frequent amino acid within bioactive peptides, by azaGly (Agly) to improve their stability, activity or for the design of prodrugs. Because metal catalysis is increasingly used for tailoring peptide molecules, we have studied the stability of Agly peptides in the presence of metal ions. In this study, we show that Cu(II), unlike other metal ions such as Fe(II), Fe(III), Pd(II), or Pt(II), induces the cleavage of Agly peptides at room temperature and pH 7.3. The cleavage occurred in the absence of an anchoring His residue within the peptide but it was accelerated when this amino acid was present in the sequence. The influence of His residue on the cleavage rate was minimal when His and Agly were adjacent, whereas large effects were observed for distant His residues. The reaction between Cu(II) and Agly peptides induced the formation of Cu(I) species, which could be detected using bicinchoninic acid as a probe. The nature of products formed in this reaction allowed suggesting a mechanism for the Cu(II)-induced cleavage of Agly peptides.

  3. Mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Umeda, Tomoko; Kawai, Yuki; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Abe, Hajime; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Tani, Tohru; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    Male breast carcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm, accounting for 0.6% of all breast carcinomas. Invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type is the most common type of male breast carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma occurring in the male breast is extremely rare. In the present study, we report a case of mucinous carcinoma of the male breast and discuss the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. A 63-year-old Japanese male presented with a gradually enlarged nodule in the right breast. The resected breast specimen revealed pure mucinous carcinoma and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that tumor cells were positive for estrogen receptor (ER), but negative for progesterone receptor (PgR). In addition, HER2 expression was not amplified. Pure mucinous carcinoma is generally associated with a low incidence of lymph node or distant metastases, and excellent disease-free survival in females. However, certain cases of this type of tumor with axillary lymph node metastasis in the male breast have been reported. In addition, the immunoprofiles of mucinous carcinoma in males are fundamentally the same as those in females. More than 90% of cases show positive immunoreactivity for ER and/or PgR, and HER2 expression is not amplified. However, it has been reported that breast cancer in males is more frequently positive for ER than in females, and has less HER2 overexpression. The high rate of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in males is considered to be due to similar conditions as those in breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The pathogenesis of male breast carcinoma, including mucinous carcinoma, remains unclear; therefore, additional clinicopathological studies are required.

  4. Differential dormancy of co-occurring copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Drits, Aleksandr V.; Elizabeth Clarke, M.; Plourde, Stéphane

    1998-08-01

    Four species of planktonic calanoid copepods that co-occur in the California Current System ( Eucalanus californicus Johnson, Rhincalanus nasutus Giesbrecht, Calanus pacificus californicus Brodsky, and Metridia pacifica Brodsky) were investigated for evidence of seasonal dormancy in the San Diego Trough. Indices used to differentiate actively growing from dormant animals included developmental stage structure and vertical distribution; activity of aerobic metabolic enzymes (Citrate Synthase and the Electron Transfer System complex); investment in depot lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols); in situ grazing activity from gut fluorescence; and egg production rates in simulated in situ conditions. None of the 4 species exhibited a canonical calanoid pattern of winter dormancy - i.e., synchronous developmental arrest as copepodid stage V, descent into deep waters, reduced metabolism, and lack of winter reproduction. Instead, Calanus pacificus californicus has a biphasic life history in this region, with an actively reproducing segment of the population in surface waters overlying a deep dormant segment in winter. Eucalanus californicus is dormant as both adult females and copepodid V's, although winter females respond relatively rapidly to elevated food and temperature conditions; they begin feeding and producing eggs within 2-3 days. Rhincalanus nasutus appears to enter dormancy as adult females, although the evidence is equivocal. Metridia pacifica shows no evidence of dormancy, with sustained active feeding, diel vertical migration behavior, and elevated activity of metabolic enzymes in December as well as in June. The four species also differ markedly in water content, classes of storage lipids, and specific activity of Citrate Synthase. These results suggest that copepod dormancy traits and structural composition reflect diverse adaptations to regional environmental conditions rather than a uniform, canonical series of traits that remain invariant among taxa

  5. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  6. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is right for you. In many instances, allergy immunotherapy in the form of shots or tablets is an effective, cost-efficient long term treatment approach. While there is not yet ... Healthy Tips • Allergy symptoms are the result of a chain reaction ...

  7. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into a municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant.

  8. Filtrates & Residues: Olfactory Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John T.; Eddy, Roberta M.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment that uses a unique acid-base indicator--the odor of raw onion--to indicate the end point of the titration of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Allows the student to detect the completion of the neutralization reaction by olfaction rather than sight. (JRH)

  9. Information Needs While A Disaster Is Occurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    that rainfall intensity at their homes might be less than the intensity up in the mountains where the debris flows would start. Nor did they know that debris flows travel too quickly to be outrun. These and many other examples indicate need for social and natural scientists to increase awareness of what to expect when the disaster strikes. This information must be solidly understood before the event occurs - while a disaster is unfolding there are no teachable moments. Case studies indicate that even those who come into a disaster well educated about the phenomenon can struggle to apply what they know when the real situation is at hand. In addition, psychological studies confirm diminished ability to comprehend information at times of stress.

  10. Biosynthesis of T1 Antigen in Salmonella: Origin of d-Galactofuranose and d-Ribofuranose Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sarvas, Matti; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    1971-01-01

    The “T1 side chain” portion of cell wall lipopolysaccharide from T1 strains of Salmonella contains d-galactofuranose and d-ribofuranose residues. Isotope labeling studies, using intact cells of mutants each blocked at either of the two different steps of d-galactose metabolism (uridine diphosphate-glucose 4-epimerase and galactose-1-P uridylyl transferase) or at phosphoglucoisomerase, led to the following conclusions. (i) d-Galactofuranose residues are synthesized from d-galactopyranose or its derivatives, rather than by a direct conversion from other hexopyranoses or their derivatives. (ii) The pyranose-to-furanose conversion does not appear to take place at the level of the free d-galactose or d-galactose 1-phosphate. This result suggests that the conversion may occur at the stage of uridine diphosphate-d-galactose. (iii) In a mutant lacking phosphoglucoisomerase, d-ribofuranose residues in T1 side chains contained 14C derived from exogenous d-fructose-U-14C, but little 3H from exogenous d-glucose-1-3H. Thus, no evidence was found for a direct pathway of aldohexose-to-ribose conversion involving a loss of one of the carbons in the C2-C6 moiety of aldohexoses. This suggests, but does not prove, that the T1 ribofuranose residues are synthesized by conventional mechanisms involving hexose monophosphate shunt and transketolase-transaldolase reactions. PMID:4926677

  11. Characterizing Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-03-03

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241 C 106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred into and out of each tank and the different sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. The studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or coprecipitated within oxide/hydroxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; böhmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides/hydroxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. The studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements, respectively, may alter the composition of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other

  12. Ultracold chemistry and its reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Florian; Becker, Daniel; Bény, Cédric; Schulze, Torben A.; Ospelkaus, Silke; Osborne, Tobias J.

    2015-05-01

    We study the reaction kinetics of chemical processes occurring in the ultracold regime and systematically investigate their dynamics. Quantum entanglement is found to play a key role in driving an ultracold reaction towards a dynamical equilibrium. In case of multiple concurrent reactions Hamiltonian chaos dominates the phase space dynamics in the mean field approximation.

  13. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. All feedstock are suited for gasification, which produces syngas that can be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol and diesel, or can undergo steam reformation to produce hydrogen. Implementing a network of mobile facilities reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use a fraction of the biomass energy content to meet thermal or electrical demands. The total energy delivered by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energy content, respectively. However, implementing mobile facilities is economically feasible when large transport distances are required. For an annual harvest of 1.717 million m3 (equivalent to 2000 ODTPD), transport costs are reduced to less than 40% of the total levelised delivered feedstock cost when mobile facilities are implemented; transport costs account for up to 80% of feedstock costs for conventional woodchip delivery. Torrefaction provides the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.25 million m3 or when transport distances greater than 250 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs of feedstock are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, thermal and electrical demands of mobile facilities, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost

  14. Chemical modification of the tryptophan residue in adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Canova-Davis, E; Ramachandran, J

    1976-02-24

    The single tryptophan residue in the pituitary hormone adrenocorticotropin was modified selectively by reaction with a variety of substituted o-nitrophenylsulfenyl chlorides. In addition to quantitative modification of the tryptophan residue, the reaction invariably resulted in partial oxidation of the methionine residue to the sulfoxide. The methionine sulfoxide derivative could be separated from the desired product by partition chromatography on Sephadex G-50 in the solvent system 1-butanol-pyridine-0.1% acetic acid (5:3:11). Thus, the 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfenyl, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenylsulfenyl, and 2-nitro-4-carbamidophenylsulfenyl derivatives of adrenocorticotropin were prepared and characterized. Modifications in the isolation of adrenocorticotropin from ovine pituitaries are also described. The melanocyte stimulating activities of the native hormone and the analogues are discussed.

  15. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  16. Pyrethroid insecticides: A naturally occurring toxin. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of pyrethrum and pyrethroid insecticides. Topics examine toxicity to fish, worms, flies, mosquitoes, and moths. Chemical residue on crops, the transportation of pyrethrum from soils to crops, and pyrethrum accumulation in ponds and lakes are among the topics discussed. Naturally occurring and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides are included. (Contains a minimum of 173 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  18. Microwave emission and crop residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to determine the significance of crop residues or stubble in estimating the emission of the underlying soil. Observations using truck-mounted L and C band passive microwave radiometers showed that for dry wheat and soybeans the dry residue caused negligible attenuation of the background emission. Green residues, with water contents typical of standing crops, did have a significant effect on the background emission. Results for these green residues also indicated that extremes in plant structure, as created using parallel and perpendicular stalk orientations, can cause very large differences in the degree of attenuation.

  19. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  20. Death in pediatric Cushing syndrome is uncommon but still occurs

    PubMed Central

    Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Lodish, Maya B.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is rare. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of CS may be associated with increased morbidity and, unfortunately, mortality. We performed a retrospective review of all patients with CS under the age of 18 referred to the NIH from 1998 to 2013 in order to describe deceased patients among cases of pediatric CS referred to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The deaths of 4 children (3 females and 1 male), aged 7.5–15.5 years (mean age 11.2 years) with length of disease 2–4 years were recorded among 160 (2.5%) children seen at, or referred to the NIH over the last 15 years. All died at different institutions, prior to coming to the NIH (two of them) or after leaving NIH (two of them). Presenting symptoms included increasing weight and decreasing height gain, facial plethora, dorsocervical fat pad (webbed neck), striae, headache, vision disturbances and depression and other mood or behavior changes; there were no differences between how these patients presented and the others in our cohort. The causes of CS in the deceased patients were also not different, in fact, they spanned the entire spectrum of CS: pituitary disease (on of them), ectopic corticotropin production (one of them), and primary adrenal hyperplasia (1). In one patient, the cause of CS could not be verified. Three died of sepsis and one due to residual disease and complications of the primary tumor. Conclusions Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric CS, a 2.5% mortality rate was identified in a large cohort of patients with this condition referred to an experienced, tertiary care referral center (although these deaths occurred elsewhere). Pediatricians need to recognize the possibility of death, primarily due to sepsis, in a patient with pediatric CS and act accordingly. PMID:25241829

  1. Infrared Emission from Gas-Aerosol Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Gaseous Amonia Infrared (IR) "Gas-aerosol Reactions Sulfuric Acid- amonia IR Luminescence Exothermic Reactions Octanoic Acid- amonia IR Laser Acid-base...of radiation observed from the reactions of chloro- sulfuric acid aerosol with gaseous amonia and water. Other systems which were screened including...phase diffusion, diffusion of reactants and/or products in the particle, by the bulk chemical reaction, or by processes occurring in the droplet

  2. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  3. Residue-based scattering factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    A glob is defined as a group of atoms in the crystal which can be chosen in various ways. Globs themselves can be used as scattering elements in the theory of structure determination, just as atoms are used at present. In this paper, amino-acid residues are chosen to form globs and empirical formulas for residue-based scattering factors have been developed.

  4. The reaction of monochloramine and hydroxylamine: implications for ammonia–oxidizing bacteria in chloraminated drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water chloramine use may promote ammonia–oxidizing bacteria (AOB) growth because of naturally occurring ammonia, residual ammonia remaining from chloramine formation, and ammonia released from chloramine decay and demand. A rapid chloramine residual loss is often associa...

  5. Surface reactions in microelectronics process technology.

    PubMed

    Levitin, Galit; Hess, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    Current integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing consists of more than 800 process steps, nearly all of which involve reactions at surfaces that significantly impact device yield and performance. From initial surface preparation through film deposition, patterning, etching, residue removal, and metallization, an understanding of surface reactions and interactions is critical to the successful continuous scaling, yield, and reliability of electronic devices. In this review, some of the most important surface reactions that drive the development of microelectronic device fabrication are described. The reactions discussed do not constitute comprehensive coverage of this topic in IC manufacture but have been selected to demonstrate the importance of surface/interface reactions and interactions in the development of new materials, processing sequences, and process integration challenges. Specifically, the review focuses on surface reactions related to surface cleaning/preparation, semiconductor film growth, dielectric film growth, metallization, and etching (dry and wet).

  6. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  7. The Frequency, Nature, and Effects of Naturally Occurring Appearance-Focused Social Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Mickelson, Kristin D.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the effects of naturally occurring appearance-focused social comparisons on women's affect, body satisfaction, and weight-related cognitions. During their daily activities, women reporting body dissatisfaction (n = 53) and women reporting body satisfaction (n = 34) recorded their reactions to comparison information.…

  8. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  9. A review of residual stress analysis using thermoelastic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. F.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Burguete, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) is a full-field technique for experimental stress analysis that is based on infra-red thermography. The technique has proved to be extremely effective for studying elastic stress fields and is now well established. It is based on the measurement of the temperature change that occurs as a result of a stress change. As residual stress is essentially a mean stress it is accepted that the linear form of the TSA relationship cannot be used to evaluate residual stresses. However, there are situations where this linear relationship is not valid or departures in material properties due to manufacturing procedures have enabled evaluations of residual stresses. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of using a TSA based approach for the evaluation of residual stresses and to provide some examples of where promising results have been obtained.

  10. Evaluation Of Residual Stresses In Inner Ring Of The Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malotová, Šárka; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Kyncl, Ladislav; Mrázik, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Residual stresses are undesirable and it should not be underestimated. They occur in many components and it is necessary to identify and try to avoid them. For detection the Residual stresses, there are many methods, but not all are suitable, because they can completely destroy of the components. The article deals with the evaluation of Residual stresses in the inner rings of Bearings, which are made from steel 100Cr6 (ČSN 14 109.4. The surfaces were turning at different cutting parameters and subsequently are evaluated Residual stresses. The stresses have been evaluated by non - destructive method X - Ray. The experiment was realized in cooperation Faculty of Mechanical Engineering VSB - TU Ostrava and Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of ZU Zilina - machining in the laboratories of ZU Žilina, Slovak Republic.

  11. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots.

  12. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  13. A comparison of substorms occurring during magnetic storms with those occurring during quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.-S.

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that there may be a fundamental difference between substorms that occur during magnetic storms and those that occur at other times. [1996] presented evidence that there is no obvious change in lobe field in "quiet time" substorms but that "storm time" substorms exhibit the classic pattern of storage and release of lobe field energy. This result led them to speculate that the former are caused by current sheet disruption, while the latter are caused by reconnection of lobe flux. In this paper we examine their hypothesis with a much larger data set using definitions of the two types of substorms similar to theirs, as well as additional more restrictive definitions of these classes of events. Our results show that the only differences between the various classes are the absolute value of the lobe field and the size of the changes. When the data are normalized to unit field amplitude, we find that the percent change during storm time and non-storm time substorms is nearly the same. The above conclusions are demonstrated with superposed epoch analysis of lobe field (Bt and Bz) for four classes of substorms: active times (Dst < -50 nT, mostly recovery phase), main phase substorms, non-storm times (Dst > -25 nT), and quiet time substorms (no evidence of storm in Dst). Epoch zero for the analysis was taken as the main substorm onset (Pi2 onset closest to sharp break in AL index). Our results suggest that there is no qualitative distinction between the various classes of substorms, and so they are all likely to be caused by the same mechanism.

  14. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  15. MODELING CHLORINE RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass-transfer-based model is developed for predicting chlorine decay in drinking-water distribution networks. The model considers first-order reactions of chlorine to occur both in the bulk flow and at the pipe wall. The overall rate of the wall reaction is a function of the ...

  16. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: MAGNETIC TAPE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Magnetic Tape Manufacturing source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Magnetic Tape Manufacturing source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  17. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  18. Dynamical model of surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2011-08-15

    A new dynamical model is developed to describe the whole process of surrogate reactions: Transfer of several nucleons at an initial stage, thermal equilibration of residues leading to washing out of shell effects, and decay of populated compound nuclei are treated in a unified framework. Multidimensional Langevin equations are employed to describe time evolution of collective coordinates with a time-dependent potential energy surface corresponding to different stages of surrogate reactions. The new model is capable of calculating spin distributions of the compound nuclei, one of the most important quantities in the surrogate technique. Furthermore, various observables of surrogate reactions can be calculated, for example, energy and angular distribution of ejectile and mass distributions of fission fragments. These features are important to assess validity of the proposed model itself, to understand mechanisms of the surrogate reactions, and to determine unknown parameters of the model. It is found that spin distributions of compound nuclei produced in {sup 18}O+{sup 238}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 240}*U and {sup 18}O+{sup 236}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 238}*U reactions are equivalent and much less than 10({h_bar}/2{pi}) and therefore satisfy conditions proposed by Chiba and Iwamoto [Phys. Rev. C 81, 044604 (2010)] if they are used as a pair in the surrogate ratio method.

  19. Reaction profiles in porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katan, T.; Carlen, P. J.

    1985-05-01

    An experimental program was conducted to ascertain causes of alkaline zinc electrode shape change and to determine the development of reaction profiles within the pores of porous zinc electrodes. Various analog electrochemical cells were operated to isolate and evaluate the individual processes occurring during charge and discharge. It was found that both edge effects and osmosis can be responsible for the shape change phenomenon.

  20. Inhibition of retrogressive reactions in coal/petroleum co-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Tomic, J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the reactions occurring at the onset of coke formation during the co-processing of coals with petroleum residua. The specific objectives include examination of chemical components, or groups of components, in coals and petroleum feedstocks to quantify and rank the effects of these components in retarding or enhancement of coke formation. The work involves bench scale reactions in microautoclaves, supplemented by studies of the carbonaceous residues by such techniques as diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. During this reporting period work focused on identification of mechanisms of coke formation. The objective of this task is to identify those compounds or components which are specifically responsible for initiating coke formation.

  1. Oxetane synthesis through the Paternò-Büchi reaction.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco

    2013-09-16

    The Paternò-Büchi reaction is a photochemical reaction between a carbonyl compound and an alkene to give the corresponding oxetane. In this review the mechanism of the reaction is discussed. On this basis the described use in the reaction with electron rich alkenes (enolethers, enol esters, enol silyl ethers, enanines, heterocyclic compounds has been reported. The stereochemical behavior of the reaction is particularly stressed. We pointed out the reported applications of this reaction to the synthesis of naturally occuring compounds.

  2. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  3. Production of macromolecular chloramines by chlorine-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Bedner, Mary; MacCrehan, William A; Helz, George R

    2004-03-15

    Chlorination of treated wastewaters is undertaken to prevent dispersal of human pathogens into the environment. Except in well-nitrified effluents, the primary agents in chlorination, Cl2(g) or NaOCl(aq), are short-lived and quickly transfer oxidative chlorine to secondary agents (N-chloramines), which then participate in the disinfection process. Maturation of residual chlorine resulting from chlorine-transfer reactions is still poorly characterized. Using gel permeation and reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with a novel, oxidant-specific detector, unanticipated trends during the maturation of residual chlorine in wastewater are identified. Within 2 min after addition of NaOCl, and continuing for several hours at least, significant amounts of oxidative chlorine are transferred to secondary agents that are moderately to strongly hydrophobic and to agents that have high relative molecular masses (Mr 1300-25000). It is hypothesized that hydrophobic stabilization of organic chloramines (RNHCl(o)) thermodynamically drives these transfers, making macromolecular chloramines the ultimate oxidative chlorine carriers. Macromolecular chloramines are expected to be sluggish oxidants, as observed in their reduction by sulfite, and are expected to be poor disinfectants. If transfer of oxidative chlorine to high Mr components occurs widely at treatment plants, then this phenomenon offers a new, physicochemical explanation for the well-known impotency of organic chloramines in wastewater disinfection.

  4. Oxidative decolorization of methylene blue by leached sea-nodule residues generated by the reduction-roasting ammoniacal leaching process.

    PubMed

    Satapathy, P K; Randhawa, N S; Das, N N

    2012-01-01

    The leached residue, generated after selective extraction of Cu, Ni and Co by reductive-roasting ammoniacal leaching of sea nodules, was characterized by various physicochemical methods. The finely divided residue, containing mainly manganese carbonate/silicates and manganese (III, IV) (hydr)oxides along with iron oxides, showed a lower surface area (66.3 m2 g(-1)) than that of the parent sea nodule (130 m2 g(-1)). The catalytic efficiency of water-washed sea nodule residue (WSNR) was evaluated taking oxidative decolorization of methylene blue (MB) as the test reaction. The extent of decolorization was decreased with increase in pH but increased in the presence of H2O2 or NaCl. Decolorization of MB occurred in two consecutive steps; the rate constant of the first step was -10 times higher than that of the second step. The formation of a surface precursor complex between WSNR and MB at a rate-limiting step, followed by electron transfer from MB to the active metal centre of WSNR and release of product(s), was proposed as the decolorization process.

  5. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  6. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  7. A method for enhancing gunshot residue patterns on dark and multicolored fabrics compared with the modified Griess test.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James A; Casanova, Ruby S; Bufkin, Kim

    2006-07-01

    In using infrared or infrared-enhanced photography to examine gunshot residue (GSR) on dark-colored clothing, the GSR particles are microscopically examined directly on the fabric followed by the modified Griess test (MGT) for nitrites. In conducting the MGT, the GSR is transferred to treated photographic paper for visualization. A positive reaction yields an orange color on specially treated photographic paper. The examiner also evaluates the size of the powder pattern based on the distribution of nitrite reaction sites or density. A false-positive reaction can occur using the MGT due to contaminants or dyes that produce an orange cloud reaction as well. A method for enhancing visualization of the pattern produced by burned and partially unburned powder is by treatment of the fabric with a solution of sodium hypochlorite. In order to evaluate the results of sodium hypochlorite treatment for GSR visualization, the MGT was used as a reference pattern. Enhancing GSR patterns on dark or multicolored clothing was performed by treating the fabric with an application of 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite. Bleaching the dyes in the fabric enhances visualization of the GSR pattern by eliminating the background color. Some dyes are not affected by sodium hypochlorite; therefore, bleaching may not enhance the GSR patterns in some fabrics. Sodium hypochlorite provides the investigator with a method for enhancing GSR patterns directly on the fabric. However, this study is not intended to act as a substitute for the MGT or Sodium Rhodizonate test.

  8. The effect of co-occurring polychlorinated biphenyls on quantitation of toxaphene in fish tissue samples by gas chromatography negative ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lao, Wenjian; Tsukada, David; Maruya, Keith A

    2012-12-28

    Determinative methods based on gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS) provide improved sensitivity and specificity for toxaphene in environmental samples, but are subject to misidentification due to oxygen reaction in the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of co-occurring PCBs in fish tissue samples when utilizing single quadrupole instruments to implement this method. Mixtures of PCB congeners and technical toxaphene, and extracts of fish tissue with varying concentrations of PCBs were analyzed for individual congener and total toxaphene concentrations by GC-NCI/MS. The contribution of co-injected PCB 204 ranged from 23% to 88% of the total peak area for the Cl-9 toxaphene homolog quantitation ion, a contribution that increased as the ratio of technical toxaphene to PCB 204 decreased. PCB interferences in fish tissue extracts, including a standard reference material, were subtracted using a three-step procedure featuring spectral analysis of isotopic patterns for target peaks. Total toxaphene concentrations without PCB subtraction in three fish tissue samples with low, intermediate and high co-occurring PCBs were overestimated by 33, 55 and 745%, respectively, underscoring the need for practical strategies to account for PCB interferences in GC-NCI/MS based protocols. In contrast, no appreciable interference or resulting positive bias in concentrations was observed for quantitation of eight common toxaphene residue congeners.

  9. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  10. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  11. Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J; Tobian, Aaron AR; Savage, Jessica H; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T; Ness, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multi-factorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed. PMID:22998777

  12. Tidal residual current and its role in the mean flow on the Changjiang Bank

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan, Jiliang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Huang, Daji; Wang, Taiping; Zhou, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Tidal residual current may play an important role in the mean flow in the Changjiang Bank region, in addition to other residual currents, such as the Taiwan Warm Current, the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, and the Yellow Sea Warm Current. In this paper, a detailed structure of the tidal residual current, in particular the meso-scale eddies, in the Changjiang Bank region is observed from model simulations, and its role in the mean flow is quantified using the well-validated Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model). The tidal residual current in the Changjiang Bank region consists of two components: an anticyclonic regional-scale tidal residual circulation around the edge of the Changjiang Bank and some cyclonic meso-scale tidal residual eddies across the Changjiang Bank. The meso-scale tidal residual eddies occur across the Changjiang Bank and contribute to the regional-scale tidal residual circulation offshore at the northwest boundary and at the northeast edge of the Changjiang Bank, southeastward along the 50 m isobath. Tidal rectification is the major mechanism causing the tidal residual current to flow along the isobaths. Both components of the tidal residual current have significant effects on the mean flow. A comparison between the tidal residual current and the mean flow indicates that the contribution of the tidal residual current to the mean flow is greater than 50%.

  13. Tidal residual current and its role in the mean flow on the Changjiang Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Jiliang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Huang, Daji; Wang, Taiping; Zhou, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The tidal residual current may play an important role in the mean flow in the Changjiang Bank region, in addition to other residual currents, such as the Taiwan Warm Current, the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, and the Yellow Sea Warm Current. In this paper, a detailed structure of the tidal residual current, in particular the meso-scale eddies, in the Changjiang Bank region is observed from model simulations, and its role in the mean flow is quantified using the well-validated Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The tidal residual current in the Changjiang Bank region consists of two components: an anticyclonic regional-scale tidal residual circulation around the edge of the Changjiang Bank and some cyclonic meso-scale tidal residual eddies across the Changjiang Bank. The meso-scale tidal residual eddies occur across the Changjiang Bank and contribute to the regional-scale tidal residual circulation offshore at the northwest boundary and on the northeast edge of the Changjiang Bank, southeastward along the 50 m isobath. Tidal rectification is the major mechanism causing the tidal residual current to flow along the isobaths. Both components of the tidal residual current have significant effects on the mean flow. A comparison between the tidal residual current and the mean flow indicates that the contribution of the tidal residual current to the mean flow is greater than 50%.

  14. Fluorogenic "click" reaction for labeling and detection of DNA in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Lee, L Andrew; Lu, Xiaobing; Wang, Qian

    2010-07-01

    A thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), has been reported as a rapid labeling tool for direct measurement of cells in S-phase. The alkynyl group of EdU is a biologically inert group that undergoes an extremely selective reaction with azido-functionalized groups via Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyneazide cycloaddition (CuAAC or "click") reaction. Here we report the highly efficient reaction of the terminal alkynyl group of EdU with a pro-fluorogenic compound, 3-azido-7-hydroxycoumarin, to afford an intense fluorescent 1,2,3-triazole product, which occurs only after the CuAAC reaction. This new method eliminates concerns for residual fluorescence since the unreacted precursors are optically inactive. The procedure therefore does not require extensive wash steps to remove the unreacted fluorescent dyes in the sample, allowing for immediate quantification and visualization after the reaction. The advantage over currently available commercial products is its potential to streamline high-throughput applications and help minimize errors.

  15. Dechlorination reaction of hexachlorobenzene with calcium oxide at 300-400 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xingbao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao

    2009-09-30

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was thermally treated with calcium oxide (CaO) at 300-400 degrees C. Analyses of chloride ions and residual HCB confirmed that a dechlorination reaction had occurred. The dechlorination mechanism was investigated with a series of analytical methods including X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The final products detected were CaCO(3) by XRD and Raman spectroscopy, amorphous carbon by Raman spectroscopy, and CaCl(2) by XPS. The newly produced species of CaCO(3) and amorphous carbon were thought to be the ultimate fate of the C element of HCB. After identification of the final dechlorination products, we can conclude that the reaction of HCB with CaO at 300-400 degrees C is through a dechlorination/polymerization pathway, which is induced by electron transfer. An overall reaction formula for HCB reaction with CaO was proposed and was energetically quite favorable. The results are helpful for the further comprehension of the reaction mechanism for thermal dechlorination of PCDD/Fs in CaO rich matrices.

  16. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  17. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  18. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    PubMed Central

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; D’Andrea, Daniel; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the assessment of the intra-molecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect inter-domain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9. PMID:23760879

  19. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion willmore » help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.« less

  20. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-23

    The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.

  1. Implication of an unfavorable residue (Thr346) in intrinsic flexibility of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2012-09-10

    In order to better understand the functional role of an unusual residue (Thr346) of firefly luciferase mutagenesis at this residue was performed. Firefly luciferase, catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction and is an excellent tool as a reporter in nano-system biology studies. Nonetheless, the enzyme rapidly loses its activity at temperatures above 30 °C and this leads to reduced sensitivity and precision in analytical applications. Residue Thr346 in a connecting loop (341-348) of firefly luciferase is located in a disallowed region of Ramachandran plot. In this study, we have substituted this residue (T346) with anomalous dihedral angles with Val, Gly and Pro to clarify the role of this residue in structure and function of the enzyme using site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of this unfavorable residue (T346) with atypical dihedral angles (ψ, φ) with other residues brought about an increase of thermostability and decrease of specific activity. Structural and functional properties of the mutants were analyzed using different spectroscopic methods. It seems that this residue is a critically conserved residue to support the functional flexibility for a fast kinetic bioluminescence reaction at the expense of lower stability.

  2. The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

    1994-08-01

    Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

  3. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  4. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  5. Characterization of naturally-occurring and modified fullerenes by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettich, Robert L.; Jin, Changming; Compton, Robert N.; Buseck, Peter R.; Tsipursky, Semeon J.

    1993-10-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) employing both laser desorption/ionization and thermal desorption/electron ionization is useful for the detection and structural characterization of fullerenes and chemically-modified fullerenes. Examination of a carbon-rich shungite rock sample from Russia by transmission electron microscopy and FTMS provided evidence of naturally-occurring fullerenes. Ion-molecule reactions can be studied with FTMS to investigate the electron affinities of modified fullerenes. By monitoring charge exchange reactions, the electron affinities of C60Fx (x=44,46) and C70Fy (y=52,54) were found to be substantially higher than the values for the parent fullerenes.

  6. Residual effects of flurazepam and brotizolam on psychomotor performance

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, H.; Müller-Limmroth, W.

    1983-01-01

    1 Residual effects of brotizolam (0.25 mg) and flurazepam (30 mg) were studied in healthy young adults. Performance and subjective assessments were observed from 7 to 8 h after overnight ingestion, and effects were compared with that of placebo. 2 Visuo-motor coordination, visuo-mental processing time, visuo-motor reaction time and reading errors were not impaired with brotizolam. 3 There were residual effects with 30 mg flurazepam. Visuo-motor coordination, visuo-mental processing time, visuo-motor reaction time, and reading errors were impaired compared with placebo and 0.25 mg brotizolam. 4 Subjective assessments of performance correlated with measured performance. There was a decrease with flurazepam (visuo-motor coordination and visuo-mental processing time) compared with placebo. PMID:6661380

  7. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  8. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  9. Astrophysical Reaction Rates Obtained By Indirect Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, R. E.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Alharbi, A.; Banu, A.; Chen, X.; Clark, H. L.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Lui, Y.-W.; McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Roeder, B.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tokimoto, Y.; Trache, L.

    2010-08-12

    Indirect techniques have been used to obtain information about reaction rates for several proton capture reactions that occur on short-lived nuclei. The techniques used to carry out the measurements are reviewed and the results obtained are presented. Also future prospects for further measurements with a new facility, T-REX are discussed.

  10. Theoretical considerations for Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) formation by molten silicon infiltration into slurry-derived preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Singh, M.

    1993-01-01

    For reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics produced by silicon melt infiltration of porous carbon preforms, equations are developed to relate the amount of residual silicon to the initial carbon density. Also, for a slurry derived preform containing both carbon and silicon powder, equations are derived which relate the amount of residual silicon in the RFSC to the relative density of the carbon in the preform and to the amount of silicon powder added to the slurry. For a porous carbon preform that does not have enough porosity to prevent choking-off of the silicon infiltration, these results show that complete silicon infiltration can occur by adding silicon powder to the slurry mixture used to produce these preforms.

  11. Fission hindrance studies in {sup 200}Pb: Evaporation residue cross section and spin distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shidling, P. D.; Badiger, N. M.; Nath, S.; Kumar, R.; Jhingan, A.; Singh, R. P.; Sugathan, P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Sinha, A. K.; Pal, Santanu; Kailas, S.; Verma, S.; Kalita, K.; Mandal, S.; Singh, R.; Behera, B. R.; Varier, K. M.; Radhakrishna, M. C.

    2006-12-15

    Evaporation residue cross sections and spin distributions have been measured for {sup 200}Pb compound nucleus formed in {sup 16}O+{sup 184}W reaction at the laboratory beam energies of 84, 92, 100, 108, 116, and 120 MeV. The evaporation residues have been selected using the recoil mass spectrometer, HIRA and detected using a 2D position sensitive silicon detector. The evaporation residue spin distributions have been measured by detecting gamma rays with 14 element BGO multiplicity filter. Measured evaporation residue cross sections and spin distributions are compared with the values predicted by a standard statistical model code. Comparison shows that, in the energy region studied, the nuclear viscosity parameter {gamma}=3 is required to explain total evaporation residue cross sections and evaporation residue spin distributions.

  12. Mobilization of Cr(VI) from chromite ore processing residue through acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Tinjum, James M; Benson, Craig H; Edil, Tuncer B

    2008-02-25

    Batch leaching studies on chromite ore processing residue (COPR) were performed using acids to investigate leaching of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), with respect to particle size, reaction time, and type of acid (HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)). Aqueous Cr(VI) is maximized at approximately 0.04 mol Cr(VI) per kg of dry COPR at pH 7.6-8.1. Cr(VI) mobilized more slowly for larger particles, and the pH increased with time and increased more rapidly for smaller particles, suggesting that rate limitations occur in the solid phase. With H(2)SO(4), the pH stabilized at a higher value (8.8 for H(2)SO(4) vs. 8.0 for HNO(3)) and more rapidly (16 h vs. 30 h), and the differences in pH for different particle sizes were smaller. The acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of COPR is very large (8 mol HNO(3) per kg of dry COPR for a stable eluate pH of 7.5). Changes to the elemental and mineralogical composition and distribution in COPR particles after mixing with acid indicate that Cr(VI)-bearing solids dissolved. However, concentrations of Cr(VI) >2800 mg kg(-1) (>50% of the pre-treatment concentration) were still found after mixing with acid, regardless of the particle size, reaction time, or type of acid used. The residual Cr(VI) appears to be partially associated with poorly-ordered Fe and Al oxyhydroxides that precipitated in the interstitial areas of COPR particles. Remediation strategies that use HNO(3) or H(2)SO(4) to neutralize COPR or to maximize Cr(VI) in solution are likely to require extensive amounts of acid, may not mobilize all of the Cr(VI), and may require extended contact time, even under well-mixed conditions.

  13. Hydrothermal carbonization of agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ivo; Blöhse, Dennis; Ramke, Hans-Günter

    2013-08-01

    The work presented in this article addresses the application of hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) to produce a solid fuel named HTC-Biochar, whose characteristics are comparable to brown coal. Several batch HTC experiments were performed using agricultural residues (AR) as substrates, commonly treated in farm-based biogas plants in Germany. Different AR were used in different combinations with other biomass residues. The biogas potential from the resulting process water was also determined. The combination of different AR lead to the production of different qualities of HTC-Biochars as well as different mass and energy yields. Using more lignocellulosic residues lead to higher mass and energy yields for the HTC-Biochar produced. Whilst residues rich in carbohydrates of lower molecular weight such as corn silage and dough residues lead to the production of a HTC-Biochar of better quality and more similar to brown coal. Process water achieved a maximum of 16.3 L CH4/kg FM (fresh matter).

  14. The Primary Photochemistry of Vision Occurs at the Molecular Speed Limit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip J M; Farag, Marwa H; Halpin, Alexei; Morizumi, Takefumi; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L C; Ernst, Oliver P; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-03-30

    Ultrafast photochemical reactions are initiated by vibronic transitions from the reactant ground state to the excited potential energy surface, directly populating excited state vibrational modes. The primary photochemical reaction of vision, the isomerization of retinal in the protein rhodopsin, is known to be a vibrationally-coherent reaction, but the Franck-Condon factors responsible for initiating the process have been difficult to resolve with conventional time-resolved spectroscopies. Here, we employ experimental and theoretical two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy to directly resolve for the first time the Franck-Condon factors which initiate isomerization on the excited potential energy surface and track the reaction dynamics. The spectral dynamics reveal vibrationally-coherent isomerization occurring on the fastest possible timescale, that of a single period of the local torsional reaction coordinate. We successfully model this process as coherent wavepacket motion through a conical intersection on a ~30 fs timescale, confirming the reaction coordinate as a local torsional coordinate with a frequency of ∼570 cm(-1). As a result of spectral features being spread out along two frequency coordinates, we unambiguously assign reactant and product states following passage through the conical intersection, which reveal the key vibronic transitions which initiate the vibrationally coherent photochemistry of vision.

  15. Causes and Outcomes of Pediatric Injuries Occurring at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Scala, Carla; Gallagher, Susan Scavo; Schneps, Sue E.

    1997-01-01

    Used the National Pediatric Trauma Registry, which collects data on child injuries requiring hospitalization, to examine causes and outcomes of injuries occurring at school. Analysis of 1,558 cases indicated that most injuries were unintentional and occurred among students age 10-14 years. Nearly half occurred in recreational areas. Falls and…

  16. Location of. gamma. -carboxyglutamyl residues in partially carboxylated prothrombin preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.; Suttie, J.W.

    1988-11-15

    Prothrombin contains 10-..gamma..-carboxylglutamyl (Gla) residues in the N-terminal (fragment 1) domain of the protein. Following anticoagulant administration, a spectrum of undercarboxylated, physiologically less active forms of prothrombin is secreted into bovine or human plasma. The sites of undercarboxylation in these prothrombin species have now been investigated. Plasma containing a mixture of partially carboxylated forms of prothombin was obtained from a dicoumarol-treated bovine, and three pools of partially carboxylated (four, six, or eight Gla) species were purified by adsorption onto barium citrate and barium oxalate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and chromatography. Fragment 1 obtained from these variants was equilibrated with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O and heated in a dry state to decarboxylate Gla and incorporate /sup 3/H into the resulting Glu residues. This peptide was then sequenced by Edman degradation, and the specific radioactivity of PTH-Glu was determined for each potential Gla-containing site. Data obtained from normal prothrombin fragment 1 fit a linear model when the log of specific activity of PTH-Glu was plotted against the cycle number. Analysis of the 80% variant showed a decrease in carboxylation only in the last two Gla residues, while data obtained from the 60% variant indicated a general decrease in carboxylation from the most amino-terminal of the Gla residues. In the 40% Gla variant, all but the most amino-terminal of the Gla residues appeared to be undercarboxylated. These data indicate that the ..gamma..-carboxylation of glutamyl residues in prothrombin does not occur randomly but instead with preferential carboxylation of the most amino-terminal Gla residues. When carboxylation is limited, the impairment of carboxylation is more severe at the more carboxyl-terminal residues.

  17. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  18. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  19. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  1. Residual Stress Effect on the Delayed Fracture of Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Gi; Yoon, Jae Ik; Baek, Seung Mi; Seo, Min Hong; Cho, Won Tae; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2017-03-01

    Residual stress effect of the deep drawn TWIP steel on delayed fracture was investigated. Microstructural features of the TWIP steels did not change after stress relief annealing, while the elastic lattice strain dropped to 0.0007. Delayed fracture of the drawn TWIP steel occurred after 203 hours of HCl immersion testing, but did not occur in the annealed one. It is clear that residual stress after the drawing is the primary reason for the delayed fracture of TWIP steels.

  2. Dynamic Residual Complexity of the Isoliquiritigenin-Liquiritigenin Interconversion During Bioassay†

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, Charlotte; Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Lankin, David C.; Bolton, Judy L.; Jones, Tristesse; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive components in food plants can undergo dynamic processes that involve multiple chemical species. For example, 2′-hydroxychalcones can readily isomerize into flavanones. Although chemically well documented, this reaction has barely been explored in the context of cell-based assays. The present time-resolved study fills this gap by investigating the isomerization of isoliquiritigenin (a 2′-hydroxychalcone) and liquiritigenin (a flavanone) in two culture media (DMEM and RPMI) with and without MCF-7 cells, using HPLC-DAD-ESI/APCI-MS for analysis. Both compounds isomerized and epimerized under all investigated biological conditions, leading to mixtures of isoliquiritigenin and R/S-liquiritigenin, with 19.6% R enantiomeric excess. Consequently, all three species can potentially modulate the biological responses. This exemplifies dynamic residual complexity and demonstrates how both non-chiral reactions and enantiomeric discrimination can occur in bioassay media, with or without cells. The findings highlight the importance of controlling in situ chemical reactivity, influenced by biological systems when evaluating the mode of action of bioactives. PMID:23427769

  3. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  4. Pesticide residues in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Lentza-Rizos, C; Avramides, E J

    1995-01-01

    The attacks of pests and diseases and the presence of weeds make it necessary to apply pesticides to olive trees to ensure crop protection. Residues of these compounds may remain and contaminate the oil produced. For the analysis of pesticide residues in olive oil, the most common methods are multiresidue methods for fatty substrates, based on partitioning between hexane or light petroleum and acetonitrile. Recently, other methods have been applied, such as ready-to-use, disposable minicolumns or direct injection of oil into a capillary gas chromatograph equipped with a precolumn with an oil recovery tank. Although several pesticides are registered in oil-producing countries for use on olive trees, available literature on the level and fate of residues is very limited. However, it is clear that fat-soluble pesticides tend to concentrate in the oil, both after full coverage and bait spraying, and their use close to harvest should therefore be avoided. Because it is sometimes necessary to use such pesticides late in autumn because of their effectiveness in cases of severe attack, residue trials should be carried out to determine the residue concentration in oil and to set a reasonable preharvest safety interval. Data produced by such trials would permit the establishment of MRLs (tolerances) in olive oil to cover cases where the residues, although relatively high, are not of toxicological significance for consumers (risk assessment). Such is the case with corn oil and the fat-soluble insecticide methyl pirimiphos, registered in the U.S. for use on corn. The U.S. EPA tolerance for methyl pirimiphos in corn is 8 mg/kg, whereas it is 11 times higher (88 mg/kg) for corn oil because it is known to concentrate in the oil. Similar provisions for olive oil, based on data from residue trials according to Good Agricultural Practice, the long-term toxicity of each pesticide as expressed by its ADI for man, and olive oil consumption patterns, would facilitate international trade

  5. [Consensus position document on the child with an allergic reaction after vaccination or an allergy to vaccine components].

    PubMed

    Echeverría Zudaire, L; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Alonso Lebrero, E; Álvarez García, F J; Cortés Álvarez, N; García Sánchez, N; Martorell Aragonés, A

    2015-07-01

    Vaccinations are one of the main public health tools for the control of vaccine-preventable diseases. If a child is labeled to have had an allergic reaction to a vaccine, the next immunizations will probably be suspended in that child, with the risks involved in this decision. The rate of severe allergic reactions is very low, ranging between 0.5-1/100,000 doses. The causes of allergic reactions to vaccines, more than the vaccine itself, are often due to residual protein components in the manufacturing process, such as gelatin or egg, and rarely to yeast or latex. Most of vaccine reactions are mild, localized at the site of injection, but in some circumstances, severe anaphylactic reactions can occur. If an immediate-type allergic reaction is suspected when vaccinating, or a child allergic to some of the vaccine components has to be vaccinated, a correct diagnosis of the possible allergy has to be made. The usual components of each vaccine should be known, in order to determine if vaccination can be performed safely on the child.

  6. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. 3. Incorporation of adenosine and uridine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T.; Orgel, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have used [32P]-labeled hairpin oligonucleotides to study template-directed synthesis on templates containing one or more A or T residues within a run of C residues. When nucleoside-5'-phosphoro(2-methyl)imidazolides are used as substrates, isolated A and T residues function efficiently in facilitating the incorporation of U and A, respectively. The reactions are regiospecific, producing mainly 3'-5'-phosphodiester bonds. Pairs of consecutive non-C residues are copied much less efficiently. Limited synthesis of CA and AC sequences on templates containing TG and GT sequences was observed along with some synthesis of the AA sequences on templates containing TT sequences. The other dimer sequences investigated, AA, AG, GA, TA, and AT, could not be copied. If A is absent from the reaction mixture, misincorporation of G residues is a significant reaction on templates containing an isolated T residue or two consecutive T residues. However, if both A and G are present, A is incorporated to a much greater extent than G. We believe that wobble-pairing between T and G is responsible for misincorporation when only G is present.

  7. Collection of sugarcane crop residue for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Crop residue left after sugarcane harvesting was recovered using a forage harvester and a large round baler. The quantity, bulk density and moisture content of the crop residue was determined in four fields. Crop residue from 7 ha was burned in boilers at a sugar mill. Samples of this residue were tested by a laboratory and compared to sugarcane bagasse.

  8. Application of the organic on water reactions to prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2012-10-01

    The old view that prebiotic reactions in water are hampered by the low solubility of the organic compounds in water is now being revised due to the discoveries of the reactions "on water". These reactions occur in the heterogeneous system comprising of the organic compounds and water. Unexpectedly, such reactions are extremely efficient; they often give quantitative yields, and are accelerated in the presence of water as compared to the organic solvents. These "on water" reactions are not the same as the "in water" reactions, which occur in solution, and are thus homogenous. Examples of the "on water" reactions include Diels-Alder, Claisen, Passerini and Ugi reactions, among many others. Some of these reactions are multicomponent, but give a single product. We survey a selected number of the "on water" reactions, which have a potential prebiotic applications.

  9. A naturally occurring, noncanonical GTP aptamer made of simple tandem repeats

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we used in vitro selection to identify a new class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer called the G motif. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a second class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer, the “CA motif.” The primary sequence of this aptamer is unusual in that it consists entirely of tandem repeats of CA-rich motifs as short as three nucleotides. Several active variants of the CA motif aptamer lack the ability to form consecutive Watson-Crick base pairs in any register, while others consist of repeats containing only cytidine and adenosine residues, indicating that noncanonical interactions play important roles in its structure. The circular dichroism spectrum of the CA motif aptamer is distinct from that of A-form RNA and other major classes of nucleic acid structures. Bioinformatic searches indicate that the CA motif is absent from most archaeal and bacterial genomes, but occurs in at least 70 percent of approximately 400 eukaryotic genomes examined. These searches also uncovered several phylogenetically conserved examples of the CA motif in rodent (mouse and rat) genomes. Together, these results reveal the existence of a second class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer whose sequence requirements, like that of the G motif, are not consistent with those of a canonical secondary structure. They also indicate a new and unexpected potential biochemical activity of certain naturally occurring tandem repeats. PMID:24824832

  10. Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  11. COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  12. [Abnormal grief reaction].

    PubMed

    Meyer, J E

    1977-01-01

    Pathological grief reactions following the death of a child are reported on the basis of five case studies. In contrast to acute grief reactions these pathological syndromes are of long standing. One parent had not truly accepted the death of the child. The denial of reality is sometimes a defence against aggression towards the deceased, because of his having left one behind. The mourning process comes to no end but remains in its initial phase. At the same time the life of the mourner stands still, as in the house and the family everything is left unchanged. Family interactions alter, particularly between the parents. For the genesis of these grief syndromes the following is of relevance: The death occurs at a time, when another child cannot replace the one who died. Mature independence had not been reached by either parent or child. Death destroyed expectations that this child would succeed in that which the parent had been unable to achieve. The parent had not seen the child after death--a gap in the continuity of experiencing which made acceptance of the irreversibility of the loss even more difficult.

  13. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  14. A Calibration Reaction For NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Kolk, B.; Chen, Y.; Deboer, R. J.; Gilardy, G.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Manukyan, K.; Moran, M.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Strauss, S.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) can produce a temperature range imitating that which occurs in a star during its hydrogen burning phase. The 10B(p, α)7Be reaction has been selected as a way to determine the temperatures created at NIF. The advantage of this calibration reaction is the product: Be-7 has a half-life of 53.2 days, sufficient for gathering and studying the abundance created while also decaying within several months. A 10 keV resonance exists which dominates the 10B(p, α)7Be reaction as well as 10B(p, γ)11C, another reaction channel of 10B+p. Additionally, another resonance exists for both reactions at 600 keV. There is not reliable extrapolation to the low energies corresponding to those of NIF due to the two mentioned resonances interfering, with a shared spin-parity 5/2+. Measurements were performed and will be presented for the cross-sections of the 10B(p, α)7Be and 10B(p, γ)11C reactions to more confidently extrapolate to lower energies. Research supported by NSF PHY-1419765 and JINA-CEE PHY-1430152.

  15. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-12-29

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show 'malariogenic potential', a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination.

  16. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Loren A.; Michel, David J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  17. Characterization of Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9277

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from the underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred in and out each tank and the sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. Our studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; boehmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. Our studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements respectively, may alter the compositions of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Fe oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other transition metals, such Cr, Mn

  18. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  19. Quantitation of the residual DNA from rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Dai, Huixia; Liu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Liping; Pang, Jianlei; Ou, Jiquan; Yang, Daichang

    2014-04-01

    Residual DNA in recombinant protein pharmaceuticals can potentially cause safety issues in clinical applications; thus, maximum residual limit has been established by drug safety authorities. Assays for residual DNA in Escherichia coli, yeast, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression systems have been established, but no rice residual DNA assay for rice expression systems has been designed. To develop an assay for the quantification of residual DNA that is produced from rice seed, we established a sensitive assay using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. We found that a 40-cycle qPCR exhibited a linear response when the template concentration was in the range of 2×10(4) to 0.2pg of DNA per reaction in TaqMan and SYBR Green I assays. The amplification efficiency was 103 to 104%, and the amount of residual DNA from recombinant human serum albumin from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) was less than 3.8ng per dosage, which was lower than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our results indicate that the current purification protocol could efficiently remove residual DNA during manufacturing and processing. Furthermore, this protocol could be viable in other cereal crop endosperm expression systems for developing a residual DNA quantitation assay using the highly conserved 5S rRNA gene of the crops.

  20. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  1. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  2. Potential hazards of fumigant residues.

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, L

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of fumigants (primarily ethylene dibromide, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, ethylene oxide, symdibromotetetrachloroethane, 1,3-dichloropropene, dichlorovos, carbon tetrachloride, methyl bromide) as well as their degradation products in foodstuffs and soil have been examined mainly in regard to the potential mutagenicity of their residues. PMID:789068

  3. Residual Stresses in Ground Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-13

    stress near the surface can be lower. The level of residual stress is also strongly affected by carbon,’3 which influences the microplastic behaviour of...1966, Vol. 14, 99-104. 14. C. 3. )4cMahon: “ Microplastic Behaviour in Iron” in Mv. in Mater . S d . Res., Vol. 2, 121-140, Interscience, New York

  4. Reaction of vicinal dihalopolyfluoroalkanes with sodium azide

    SciTech Connect

    Postovoi, S.A.; Zeifman, Yu.V.; Knunyants, I.L.

    1986-12-10

    Vicinal dihalopolyfluoroalkanes react readily with nucleophilic reagents to form the products of the replacement of one halogen by a nucleophilic residue. These reactions have been studied with F/sup -/ anion and C-, O-, and S-nucleophiles as examples. The present work studies the analogous reaction with the azide anion. When vicinal dibromopolyfluoroalkanes and related compounds react with NaN/sub 3/ in DMF, N-methylpyrrolidone, or hexametapol, halogen is replaced by an azide group, and ..beta..-halopolyfluoroalkyl azides form. The reaction of vicinal dihalopolyfluoroalkanes and related compounds with sodium azide causes replacement of halogen by an azide group probably by an ionic cleavage-addition chain mechanism. Nucleophilic azidobromination of fluoroolefins has been carried out by the action of sodium azide and bromine. These reactions were used to synthesize new ..beta..-halopolyfluoroalkyl azides.

  5. Inhibited Release of Mobile Contaminants from Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2011-03-03

    Investigations of contaminant release from Hanford Site tank residual waste have indicated that in some cases certain contaminants of interest (Tc and Cr) exhibit inhibited release. The percentage of Tc that dissolved from residual waste from tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, and 241-C-203 ranged from approximately 6% to 10%. The percent leachable Cr from residual waste from tanks C-103, C 202, and C-203 ranged from approximately 1.1% to 44%. Solid phase characterization results indicate that the recalcitrant forms of these contaminants are associated with iron oxides. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of Tc and Cr in residual waste indicates that these contaminants occur in Fe oxide particles as their lower, less soluble oxidation states [Tc(IV) and Cr(III)]. The form of these contaminants is likely as oxides or hydroxides incorporated within the structure of the Fe oxide. Leaching behavior of U from tank residual waste was studied using deionized water, and CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions as leachants. The release behavior of U from tank residual waste is complex. Initial U concentrations in water and CaCO3 leachants are high due to residual amounts of the highly soluble U mineral cejkaite. As leaching and dilution occur NaUO2PO4 {center_dot} xH2O, Na2U2O7(am) and schoepite (or a similar phase) become the solubility controlling phases for U. In the case of the Ca(OH)2 leachant, U release from tank residual waste is dramatically reduced. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the solubility of CaUO4(c) controls release of U from residual waste in the Ca(OH)2 leachants. It is assumed the solubility controlling phase is actually a hydrated version of CaUO4 with a variable water content ranging from CaUO4 to CaUO4 {center_dot} (H2O). The critically reviewed value for CaUO4(c) (log KSP0 = 15.94) produced good agreement with our experimental data for the Ca(OH)2 leachates.

  6. SYSTEMIC TOXIC REACTIONS TO LOCAL ANESTHETICS

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel C.; Green, John

    1956-01-01

    The topical use of anesthetic agents involves an element of risk. Systemic toxic reactions are rare, but they do occur and may result in death. When a reaction occurs from a topical application, it usually progresses rapidly to respiratory and cardiovascular collapse, and thus therapy must be instituted with more haste to avoid deaths. Fatal systemic toxic reactions from topically administered anesthetic drugs are, in effect, usually not due to well informed use of the drug but to misuse owing to less than complete understanding of absorption. Emphasis is placed on the causes, prophylaxis and treatment of severe systemic toxic reactions which follow the topical application of local anesthetic drugs. If systemic toxic reactions resulting from a safe dose of a local anesthetic agent are correctly treated, there will usually follow an uneventful recovery rather than a catastrophe. PMID:13343009

  7. Horseradish-Peroxidase-Catalyzed Tyrosine Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-02

    The efficiency of protein chemical modification on tyrosine residues with N-methylluminol derivatives was drastically improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the previous method, based on the use of hemin and H2 O2 , oxidative side reactions such as cysteine oxidation were problematic for functionalization of proteins selectively on tyrosine residues. Oxidative activation of N-methylluminol derivatives with a minimum amount of H2 O2 prevented the occurrence of oxidative side reactions under HRP-catalyzed conditions. As probes for HRP-catalyzed protein modification, N-methylluminol derivatives showed much higher efficiency than tyramide without inducing oligomerization of probe molecules. Tyrosine modification also proceeded in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, H2 O2 -free conditions).

  8. Enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction to form salicylic acid from phenol: enzymatic characterization and gene identification of a novel enzyme, Trichosporon moniliiforme salicylic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Gunji, Hiroaki; Wakayama, Rumiko; Hattori, Takasumi; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-02

    Salicylic acid decarboxylase (Sdc) can produce salicylic acid from phenol; it was found in the yeast Trichosporon moniliiforme WU-0401 and was for the first time enzymatically characterized, with the sdc gene heterologously expressed. Sdc catalyzed both reactions: decarboxylation of salicylic acid to phenol and the carboxylation of phenol to form salicylic acid without any byproducts. Both reactions were detected without the addition of any cofactors and occurred even in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that this Sdc is reversible, nonoxidative, and oxygen insensitive. Therefore, it is readily applicable in the selective production of salicylic acid from phenol, the enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene, sdc, encoding Sdc comprises 350 amino acid residues corresponding to a 40-kDa protein. The recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing sdc converted phenol to salicylic acid with a 27% (mol/mol) yield at 30 degrees C for 9h.

  9. Two autolytic processing reactions of a satellite RNA proceed with inversion of configuration.

    PubMed

    van Tol, H; Buzayan, J M; Feldstein, P A; Eckstein, F; Bruening, G

    1990-04-25

    Both polarities of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus occur in infected cells in multimeric forms which are capable of autolytic processing, using different sequences and structures [Feldstein, P.A., et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA (1990) 87 (in press)]. These transesterification reactions generate a 2',3'-cyclophosphate and a 5'-hydroxyl as the two new end groups. Cleavage is at a CpA for the (+) polarity RNA and at an ApG for the (-) polarity RNA. We enzymically synthesized oligoribonucleotides with processing capability and with specific 35S-labeled phosphorothioate diesters in the Rp configuration. After processing had occurred, the terminal nucleoside-2',3'-cyclophosphorothioate diester residues were recovered from the appropriate product by digestion with nuclease and phosphatase. Comparisons with specially prepared endo- and exoisomer reference compounds by thin layer chromatography and autoradiography revealed that the [35S]cytidine- and [35S]adenosine-2',3'-cyclophosphorothioate both were endo-isomers. The results are consistent with transesterification occurring by an inline SN2(P) attack of the 2'-hydroxyl group in the autolytic processing reactions of both polarities of the satellite RNA.

  10. Two autolytic processing reactions of a satellite RNA proceed with inversion of configuration.

    PubMed Central

    van Tol, H; Buzayan, J M; Feldstein, P A; Eckstein, F; Bruening, G

    1990-01-01

    Both polarities of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus occur in infected cells in multimeric forms which are capable of autolytic processing, using different sequences and structures [Feldstein, P.A., et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA (1990) 87 (in press)]. These transesterification reactions generate a 2',3'-cyclophosphate and a 5'-hydroxyl as the two new end groups. Cleavage is at a CpA for the (+) polarity RNA and at an ApG for the (-) polarity RNA. We enzymically synthesized oligoribonucleotides with processing capability and with specific 35S-labeled phosphorothioate diesters in the Rp configuration. After processing had occurred, the terminal nucleoside-2',3'-cyclophosphorothioate diester residues were recovered from the appropriate product by digestion with nuclease and phosphatase. Comparisons with specially prepared endo- and exoisomer reference compounds by thin layer chromatography and autoradiography revealed that the [35S]cytidine- and [35S]adenosine-2',3'-cyclophosphorothioate both were endo-isomers. The results are consistent with transesterification occurring by an inline SN2(P) attack of the 2'-hydroxyl group in the autolytic processing reactions of both polarities of the satellite RNA. Images PMID:1692411

  11. Atrazine sorption-desorption hysteresis by sugarcane mulch residue.

    PubMed

    Selim, H M; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    Sorption and desorption kinetics are essential components for modeling the movement and retention of applied agricultural chemicals in soils and the fraction of chemicals susceptible to runoff. In this study, we investigated the retention characteristics of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) mulch residue for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) based on studies of sorption-desorption kinetics. A sorption kinetic batch method was used to quantify retention of the mulch residue for a wide range of atrazine concentrations and reaction times. Desorption was performed following 504 h of sorption using successive dilutions, followed by methanol extraction. Atrazine retention by the mulch residue was well described using a linear model where the partitioning coefficient (K(d)) increased with reaction time from 10.40 to 23.4 cm3 g(-1) after 2 and 504 h, respectively. Values for mulch residue K(d) were an order of magnitude higher than those found for Commerce silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Fluvaquentic Endoaquepts) where the sugarcane crop was grown. A kinetic multireaction model was successful in describing sorption behavior with reaction time. The model was equally successful in describing observed hysteretic atrazine behavior during desorption for all input concentrations. The model was concentration independent where one set of model parameters, which was derived from all batch results, was valid for the entire atrazine concentration range. Average atrazine recovery following six successive desorption steps were 63.67 +/- 4.38% of the amount adsorbed. Moreover, a hysteresis coefficient based on the difference in the area between sorption and desorption isotherms was capable of quantifying hysteresis of desorption isotherms.

  12. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a ``glass like`` material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  13. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a glass like'' material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  14. Organochlorine insecticide residues in the free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) at Bracken Cave, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Martin, C.O.; Swineford, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-nine free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana ) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and analyzed for organochlorine insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Residues of DDE in the brain were greater in 12 young collected from the floor than in 15 young taken from the ceiling, but food deprivation, not higher residues in the brain, apparently caused young to fall....Among 18 pregnant females, residues of DDE and DDT were highest in yearlings. The first lactation by yearlings caused their residue loads to drop sharply. Thereafter, increasing age was accompanied by increasing residues but amounts generally did not exceed those in yearlings.....Residue levels in embryos were a function both of levels in the female parent and degree of embryonic development. Residues accumulated rapidly in nursing young, and lactating females may excrete from 1.3 to 16.2 (mean = 4.3) micrograms of DDE in milk per day. Maximum individual residue loads may be attained toward the end of nursing, and mobilization of these residues during southward migration may subject Bracken Cave free-tails to maximum lifetime residues in the brain....Comparison of our data with residue data for the free-tail population at Eagle Creek Cave (Arizona) in 1970 produced the following conclusions: ( 1) residues of DDE appeared similar in pregnant females, embryos, lactating females, and fallen young for the two populations; (2) residues of DDT and dieldrin appeared greater in pregnant females at Bracken Cave; (3) DDE and DDT occurred at greater levels in guano samples from Bracken Cave. On this basis, the population decline observed at Eagle Creek Cave between 1963 and 1969 does not appear to be related to the residues observed in the 1970 samples taken from that cave.

  15. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  16. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  17. Interplay between oxygen demand reactions and kinetic gas-water transfer in porous media.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Sascha E; Griepentrog, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Balcke, Gerd U

    2008-08-01

    Gas-water phase transfer associated with the dissolution of trapped gas in porous media is a key process that occurs during pulsed gas sparging operations in contaminated aquifers. Recently, we applied a numerical model that was experimentally validated for abiotic situations, where multi-species kinetic inter-phase mass transfer and dissolved gas transport occurred during pulsed gas penetration-dissolution events [Balcke, G.U., Meenken, S., Hoefer, C. and Oswald, S.E., 2007. Kinetic gas-water transfer and gas accumulation in porous media during pulsed oxygen sparging. Environmental Science & Technology 41(12), 4428-4434]. Here we extend the model by using a reactive term to describe dissolved oxygen demand reactions via the formation of a reaction product, and to study the effects of such an aerobic degradation process on gas-water mass transfer and dissolution of trapped gas in porous media. As a surrogate for microbial oxygen reduction, first-order oxygen demand reactions were based on the measured oxidation of alkaline pyrogallol in column experiments. This reaction allows for adjusting the rate to values close to expected biodegradation rates and detection of the reaction product. The experiments and model consistently demonstrated accelerated oxygen gas-water mass transfer with increasing oxygen demand rates associated with an influence on the partitioning of other gases. Thus, as the oxygen demand accelerates, less gas phase residues, consisting mainly of nitrogen, are observed, which is in general beneficial to the performance of field biosparging operations. Model results additionally predict how oxygen demand influences oxygen mass transfer for a range of biodegradation rates. A typical field case scenario was simulated to illustrate the observed coupling of oxygen consumption and gas bubble dissolution. The model provides a tool to improve understanding of trapped gas behavior in porous media and contributes to a model-assisted biosparging.

  18. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  19. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  20. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  1. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  2. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  3. Angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment: a case series.

    PubMed

    Cross, David L; Short, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    Clinical experience has shown that angular cheilitis can occur during orthodontic treatment and may persist into retention, but the incidence of the condition is unknown. The purpose of this paper is to increase the awareness among clinicians of angular cheilitis occurring during orthodontic treatment. It also proposes a treatment regime which may be used.

  4. Model for reaction kinetics in pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, P.; Singh, P.C.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    A reaction model for the pyrolysis of small and large particles of wood Is developed. The chemical reactions that take place when biomass is pyrolyzed are the devolatilization reactions (primary) and due to the vapour-solid interactions (secondary). In the case of small particles, when the volatiles are immediately removed by the purge gas, only primary reactions occur and the reaction model is described by weight loss and char forming reactions. The of heterogeneous secondary reactions occur in the case of large particles due to the interaction between the volatiles and the hot nascent primary char. A chain reaction mechanism of secondary char formation is proposed. The model takes both the volatiles retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. [Diagnosis of osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune thyroid gland disease].

    PubMed

    Radojković, Ivan; Radojković, Jana; Djurica, Snezana

    2005-10-01

    Osteoporosis or porotic bone is a general, systemic bone disease, which is manifested by fracture as its consequence. The main characteristic of this disease is the loss of bone microarchitecture, bone mass reduction, and its increased fragility. The result, thereof, is susceptibility to fracture. Etiology of osteoporosis is polymorph. Its socio-medical importance is enormous, since there is one osteoporotic fracture every 20 sec. worldwide. Million and six hundred thousand osteoporotic fractures occur annualy throughout the world. Thyroid gland is susceptible to autoimmune reactions that lead to autoimmune diseases, just like many other organs. The autoimmune disorder is a final consequence of a failure, in some instance, within the crucial mechanism of regulation of self tissue tolerance. The main goal is to prove the presence of osteoporosis, its inexpensive and quick diagnostics; to make a distinction among the causes that lead to it. In addition, to indicate the importance of osteoporosis that is caused by normal, metabolic processes which are an inevitable part of ageing. Diagnosis of osteoporosis can be done through laboratory, which is a tiresome, time consuming task. Measurements of BMD could be also performed by using new devices. Osteometers could be constructed on the basis of X-ray photon energy or US. Utilization most contemporary one uses laser beam, and it approximates the distance of additional tissue that also absorbs part of energy changing absorption of the reception unit and thus making the measurement results accurate. In diagnosing BMD by osteometer, one faces with certain difficulties. When axial quantitative CT is used, the value may be falsely lower, because of the loss of energy absorbed by aorta which is often calcified in elderly people. In devices with transversal scanning, of the same nature and technology, a part of the energy is being absorbed by transversal and spinal vertebrals. After the research, one may conclude that the most

  6. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A →B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A +B→B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A +B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A →B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031102]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A +B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A +B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall

  7. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-05-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo.

  8. Skin reactions to sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R L; Frowen, K E; Lewis, A E

    1997-06-01

    Sunscreen reactions are said not to be uncommon. A population referred to a patch testing clinic was evaluated for reactions to sunscreen by questionnaire initially and then, if relevant, by patch testing to sunscreen products and their components. Irritant reactions were more common than allergic contact dermatitis. Allergic reactions to sunscreens were less common than to non-sunscreen chemicals present in sunscreen products.

  9. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  10. Pesticidal residues in animal tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Menzie, C.M.; Adomaitis, V.A.; Reichel, W.L.

    1960-01-01

    Tests with penned starlings, rats, pheasants, and ducks indicated that each species differs in sensitivity to the various pesticides. Residues in tissues are proportional to the degree of exposure during area treatment and they are also found in animals shot six or more months after treatment. The presence of more than 20-30 ppm of DDT, 20 ppm of chlordan, and 6-20 ppm of heptachlor epoxide in quail tissues indicated that the birds had ingested lethal dosages of the pesticides.

  11. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O`Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination.

  12. Electromechanical Apparatus Measures Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J.; Flom, Yury

    1993-01-01

    Nondestructive test exploits relationship between stress and eddy-current-probe resistance. Yields data on residual stress or strain in metal tension/compression specimen (stress or strain remaining in specimen when no stress applied from without). Apparatus is assembly of commercial equipment: tension-or-compression testing machine, eddy-current probe, impedance gain-and-phase analyzer measuring impedance of probe coil, and desktop computer, which controls other equipment and processes data received from impedance gain-and-phase analyzer.

  13. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  14. Alcohol Dependence, Co-occurring Conditions and Attributable Burden

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, B.L.; Gual, A.; DeCourcy, J.; Perry, R.; Pike, J.; Heron, L.; Rehm, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Alcohol dependence is associated with high rates of co-occurring disorders which impact health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and add to the cost-of-illness. This study investigated the burden of alcohol dependence and associated co-occurring conditions on health and productivity. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in eight European countries. Physicians (Psychiatrists and General Practitioners) completed patient record forms, which included assessment of co-occurring conditions, and patients completed matching self-completion forms. Drinking risk level (DRL) was calculated and the relationship between DRL, co-occurring conditions, work productivity, hospitalisations and rehabilitation stays was explored. Results Data were collected for 2979 alcohol-dependent patients (mean age 48.8 ± 13.6 years; 70% male). In total, 77% of patients suffered from moderate-to-severe co-occurring psychiatric and/or somatic conditions. High DRL was significantly associated with depression, greater work productivity losses, increased hospitalisations and rehabilitation stays. Co-occurring conditions were significantly associated with poorer HRQoL and decreased work productivity, with a statistical trend towards an increased frequency of rehabilitation stays. Conclusions Alcohol-dependent patients manifest high rates of co-occurring psychiatric and somatic conditions, which are associated with impaired work productivity and HRQoL. The continued burden of illness observed in these already-diagnosed patients suggests an unmet need in both primary and secondary care. PMID:26246514

  15. Application of activated carbons from coal and coconut shell for removing free residual chlorine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Ueda, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuko; Iwata, Yuka; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the removal of free residual chlorine by activated carbon (AC). ACs were prepared from coal (AC1) and coconut shell (AC2). The specific surface area of AC1 was larger than that of AC2. The removal of free residual chlorine increased with elapsed time and amount of adsorbent. The removal mechanism of free residual chlorine was the dechlorination reaction between hypochlorous acid or hypochlorite ion and AC. Moreover, AC1 was useful in the removal of free residual chlorine in tap water. The optimum condition for the removal of free residual chlorine using a column is space velocity 306 1/h; liner velocity 6.1 m/h.

  16. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  17. Tirofiban-Induced Thrombocytopenia Occurring with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; El Karak, Fady; Araji, Assem; El Rassy, Elie

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man, with severe refractory Crohn's disease, presented with acute coronary syndrome that required angioplasty. He developed severe tirofiban-induced thrombocytopenia (TIT) heralded by type I allergic reaction that required steroids and a combination of antihistamine H1 and antihistamine H2 for symptomatic management. The thrombocytopenia spontaneously resolved uneventfully in 48 hours thereafter. This case report suggests a possible association between TIT and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, strict monitoring of the platelet count is required in patients who develop allergic reactions to tirofiban. PMID:27144035

  18. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    PubMed

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Valls-Solé, Josep; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-11-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consist of a generalized startle reaction, with a similar muscle synergy as the acoustic startle response, combined with an automatic postural reaction. Therefore we compared acoustic startle responses to first trial postural reactions. Eight healthy subjects stood on a support surface that unexpectedly rotated backwards 10 times, followed by 10 startling acoustic stimuli, or vice versa. Outcome measures included full body kinematics and surface EMG from muscles involved in startle reactions or postural control. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both elicited a clear first trial reaction, as reflected by larger kinematic and EMG responses. The ensuing habituation rate to repeated identical stimuli was comparable for neck and trunk muscles in both conditions. Onset latencies in neck muscles occurred significantly later for first trial perturbations compared with startle responses, but earlier in trunk muscles. Our results show that platform tilting initially induces reactions larger than needed to maintain equilibrium. For neck and trunk muscles, these first trial postural reactions resembled acoustic startle reflexes. First trial postural reactions may be triggered by interaction of afferent volleys formed by somatosensory and vestibular inputs. Acoustic startle reactions may also be partially triggered by vestibular inputs. Similar muscle activation driven by vestibular inputs may be the common element of first trial postural responses and acoustic startle reactions.

  19. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  20. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  1. Interpretation on Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is considering an interpretation of its regulations that would generally allow for recycling of plastic separated from shredder residue under the conditions described in the Voluntary Procedures for Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue.

  2. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  3. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  4. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  5. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  6. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  7. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  8. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  9. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  10. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  11. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  13. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  15. PESTICIDE RESIDUE RECOVERIES FROM SURFACE WIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure is a consequence of pesticide use indoors with a primary source resulting from residue deposition on household surfaces. Accurate measurements of surface residues is essential for estimating exposure from different routes. Various procedures have been developed ...

  16. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380 RMH....0 991.0 1010.0 991.0 1010.0 ISO 3675 or ISO 12185: 1996/Cor 1:2001 (see also ISO 8217:2005(E) 7.1). Kinematic viscosity at 50 °C, max cSt 30.0 80.0 180.0 380.0 700.0 ISO 3104:1994/Cor 1:1997. Flash point,...

  18. Organochlorine residues in eggs of Alaskan seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Bartonek, J.C.; Divoky, G.J.; Klass, E.

    1982-01-01

    One egg from each of 440 clutches of eggs of 19 species of Alaskan seabirds collected in 1973-76 was analyzed for organochlorine residues. All eggs contained DDE; 98.9% contained PCB's; 84.3%, oxychlordane; and 82.7%, HCB. Endrin was found in only one egg, but DDD, DDT, dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, mirex, cis-chlordane (or trans-nonachlor), cis-nonachlor, and toxaphene each occurred in at least 22% of the samples.Concentrations of organochlorines in the samples were generally low. Mean concentrations of eight compounds were highest in eggs of glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens) from three sites: DDE (5.16 ppm, wet weight), dieldrin (0.214 ppm), oxychlordane (0.251 ppm), and PCB's (3.55 ppm) in eggs from Bogoslof Island; heptachlor epoxide (0.037 ppm), cis-chlordane (0.075 ppm), and HCB (0.188 ppm) in eggs from Buldir Island; and cis-nonachlor (0.026 ppm) in eggs from the Semidi Islands. Highest concentrations of DDD (0.157 ppm), DDT (0.140 ppm), and toxaphene (0.101 ppm) were in eggs of fork-tailed storm-petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) from Buldir Island, and the highest concentration of mirex (0.044 ppm) was in fork-tailed storm-petrel eggs from the Barren Islands.Both frequency of occurrence and concentration of residues in the eggs differed geographically and by species, apparently reflecting non-uniform distribution of organochlorines in the environment, dissimilar feeding habits and migration patterns of the species, or metabolic differences among the species.The overall frequency of residue occurrence was highest in eggs from the Pribilof Islands, but only three species were represented in the samples collected there. Detectable residues also were more frequent in eggs from the Gulf of Alaska colonies than elsewhere, and the lowest frequency was in eggs from nesting colonies on or near the Seward Peninsula. Regionally, concentrations of DDE and PCB's were usually higher than average in eggs from the Gulf of Alaska and lower than average in eggs from the

  19. Organochlorine insecticide residues in African Fauna: 1971-1995.

    PubMed

    Wiktelius, S; Edwards, C A

    1997-01-01

    maximum and mean residues in the various groups of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates and vertebrates. Overall, residues in the fauna were the greatest for DDT, followed in turn by those of dieldrin, HCH, endosulfan, and endrin, with small amounts of aldrin and toxaphene being found in some animals. There were relatively few reports of OCL residues in terrestrial invertebrates and virtually none in aquatic invertebrates. Only a few reports demonstrated OCL residues in terrestrial vertebrates, although high levels of DDT, dieldrin, and HCH were found in crocodile eggs and large residues of dieldrin occurred in bats, squirrels, and monkeys. Considerable OCL residues were reported in a few species of fish, especially Barbus, Clarias, Hydrocynus, Labeo, Sarotherodon, Epiplatys, and Synodontis. These residues were at levels that could have caused chronic toxicity or behavioral changes. The calculated maximum and mean OCL residues in the various elements of the African fauna until 1995 were compared with those calculated for corresponding faunal groups in Europe and the U.S. from their development and introduction up to 1973. The OCL residues reported in African fauna between 1971 and 1975 tended to be significantly higher overall than those published for Europe and the U.S. In particular, residues of DDT and dieldrin in African birds and their eggs were greater than those that had been incriminated as causing significant eggshell thinning and reproductive failure in European and U.S. aquatic and terrestrial birds up to 1973. Additionally, high DDT and dieldrin residues were reported from some species of African fish at levels that could potentially affect their reproduction, have chronic toxic and behavioral effects, and even drastically affect populations. Holistic case studies on the use of OCLs to control tsetse flies and desert locusts were discussed. OCL levels in trophic levels of fauna associated with Lake Kariba (between Zambia and Zimbabwe) were summarized. (AB

  20. Electrostriction effects on electron transfer reactions in solution. I. Adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Kim, Hyung J.

    1997-04-01

    The outer-sphere unimolecular electron transfer reactions, DA⇌D+A-, in polar solvents are studied theoretically. By employing a recent theory of fluctuating cavities [H. J. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6818, 6833 (1996)], we construct a nonequilibrium free energy formulation that accounts for both the solvation and electrostriction aspects of the changing solute dipole moment during the reaction. With a two-state diabatic description for the solute electronic structure, we obtain a two-dimensional free energy surface in terms of the cavity radius a and a solvent coordinate that gauges the nonequilibrium solvent orientational polarization Por. The equilibrium a values for the reactant and product states are found to differ significantly, indicating that the cavity reorganization plays an important role in the reaction free energetics and dynamics. The reaction mechanism and rate constant are analyzed via the solution-phase reaction path, which is found to vary markedly with the relative time scales of the Por and a motions. To be specific, the charge transfer proceeds in a concerted fashion with active participation of both Por and a when their characteristic times are comparable. By contrast, a stepwise mechanism results when there is a large mismatch between the Por and a time scales. In the slow cavity limit where a is much slower than Por, the reorganization through the cavity size adjustment precedes the barrier crossing that occurs exclusively along the Por coordinate. In the opposite fast cavity regime where Por is mainly responsible for activation and deactivation, it is found that the saddle point on the free energy surface is no longer rate-determining due to the nonlinear residual entropic effects. A brief comparison with other reaction systems involving charge shift in solution is also made.

  1. Inhibition of retrogressive reactions in coal/petroleum co-processing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Tomic, J.

    1993-05-25

    The objective of this study was to examine the processes in coal/petroleum coprocessing systems which led to coke formation. Specifically, the interactions between the petroleum residue and coal, leading to retrogressive products, were investigated. Five coals were reacted with five model compounds in order to investigate the coal conversions in a variety of solvents and to determine the role of the solvent in promoting or inhibiting coal conversion. The selected model compounds range from paraffinic to fully aromatic and were chosen as representative of types of compounds that are found in petroleum residua. Coprocessing experiments were conducted using the five coals and three petroleum residua. The effect of temperature on coal conversions was crucial. The coal conversions at 350 and 400{degree}C seem to be governed by the nature of the coal and to a lesser extent by the petroleum residua. Negative coal conversions were observed above 400{degree}C indicating that retrogressive processes had occurred. At temperatures higher than 400{degree}C, the petroleum residua undergo physical and chemical transformations and the influence of the petroleum residua on coal conversions is significant. The structural features of the residues indicated that the residues were predominately coal-derived. An overall increase in aromaticity was observed with increasing temperature which was also accompanied by loss of oxygen functional groups. The retrogressive reactions with non-caking coals involve carbonyl and carboxyl group leading to a final solid characterized by a cross-linked structure. In the case of caking coal, these reactions are governed by loss of aromatic oxygen groups and loss of alkyl groups.

  2. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  3. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  4. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  5. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  6. 48 CFR 50.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Residual powers. 50.104... EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS AND THE SAFETY ACT Extraordinary Contractual Actions 50.104 Residual powers. This section prescribes standards and procedures for exercising residual powers under Pub. L....

  7. 40 CFR 158.2290 - Residue chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Residue chemistry. 158.2290 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Antimicrobial Pesticide Data Requirements § 158.2290 Residue chemistry. (a) General... determine the residue chemistry data requirements for antimicrobial pesticide products. Notes that apply...

  8. Tween-80 and impurity induce anaphylactoid reaction in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Lao, Qiao-Cong; Yu, Hang-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Hong-Cui; Luan, Lin; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Chun-Qi

    2015-03-01

    A number of recent reports suspected that Tween-80 in injectable medicines, including traditional Chinese medicine injections could cause life-threatening anaphylactoid reaction, but no sound conclusion was drawn. A drug-induced anaphylactoid reaction is hard to be assayed in vitro and in conventional animal models. In this study, we developed a microplate-based quantitative in vivo zebrafish assay for assessing anaphylactoid reaction and live whole zebrafish mast cell tryptase activity was quantitatively measured at a wavelength of 405 nm using N-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide as a substrate. We assessed 10 batches of Tween-80 solutions from various national and international suppliers and three Tween-80 impurities (ethylene glycol, 2-chloroethanol and hydrogen peroxide) in this model and found that three batches of Tween-80 (nos 2, 20080709 and 20080616) and one Tween-80 impurity, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), induced anaphylactoid reactions in zebrafish. Furthermore, we found that H2 O2 residue and peroxide value were much higher in Tween-80 samples 2, 20080709 and 20080616. These findings suggest that H2 O2 residue in combination with oxidized fatty acid residues (measured as peroxide value) or more likely the oxidized fatty acid residues in Tween-80 samples, but not Tween-80 itself, may induce anaphylactoid reaction. High-throughput zebrafish tryptase assay developed in this report could be used for assessing safety of Tween-80-containing injectable medicines and potentially for screening novel mast cell-modulating drugs.

  9. Quasifission and fusion-fission in reactions with massive nuclei: Comparison of reactions leading to the Z=120 element

    SciTech Connect

    Nasirov, A. K.; Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Hanappe, F.; Heinz, S.; Hofmann, S.; Muminov, A. I.; Scheid, W.

    2009-02-15

    The yields of evaporation residues, fusion-fission, and quasifission fragments in the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144,154}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 186}W reactions are analyzed in the framework of the combined theoretical method based on the dinuclear system concept and advanced statistical model. The measured yields of evaporation residues for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm reaction can be well reproduced. The measured yields of fission fragments are decomposed into contributions coming from fusion-fission, quasifission, and fast-fission. The decrease in the measured yield of quasifission fragments in {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm at the large collision energies and the lack of quasifission fragments in the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 144}Sm reaction are explained by the overlap in mass angle distributions of the quasifission and fusion-fission fragments. The investigation of the optimal conditions for the synthesis of the new element Z=120 (A=302) show that the {sup 54}Cr+{sup 248}Cm reaction is preferable in comparison with the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U reactions because the excitation function of the evaporation residues of the former reaction is some orders of magnitude larger than that for the last two reactions.

  10. Distribution, Identification, and Quantification of Residues after Treatment of Ready-To-Eat Salami with (36)Cl-Labeled or Nonlabeled Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Giddings, J Michael; Herges, Grant R; Ernst, William

    2016-11-09

    When ready-to-eat salami was treated in a closed system with (36)Cl-labeled ClO2 (5.5 mg/100 g of salami), essentially all radioactivity was deposited onto the salami. Administered (36)ClO2 was converted to (36)Cl-chloride ion (>97%), trace levels of chlorate (<2%), and detectable levels of chlorite. In residue studies conducted with nonlabeled ClO2, sodium perchlorate residues (LOQ, 4 ng/g) were not formed when reactions were protected from light. Sodium chlorate residues were present in control (39.2 ± 4.8 ng/g) and chlorine dioxide treated (128 ± 31.2 ng/g) salami. If sanitation occurred under conditions of illumination, detectable levels (3.7 ± 1.5 ng/g) of perchlorate were formed along with greater quantities of sodium chlorate (183.6 ± 75.4 ng/g). Collectively, these data suggest that ClO2 is chemically reduced by salami and that slow-release formulations might be appropriate for applications involving the sanitation of ready-to-eat meat products.

  11. Reactions of Dinuclear Platinum(II) Complexes with Peptides.

    PubMed

    Rajković, Snežana; Živković, Marija D; Djuran, Miloš I

    2016-01-01

    The present review article highlights recent findings in the reactions between different dinuclear Pt(II) complexes with peptides containing cysteine, methionine and histidine residues. The reactions of {trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl]2(μ-X)}(2+) and {trans-[Pt(NH3)2(H2O)]2(μ-X)}(4+) type complexes with different bridging ligands (X) (X = pyrazine, 4,4'-bipyridyl and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) with the tripeptide glutathione proceeded in two steps. In the first step, one water or chlorido ligand of the dinuclear Pt(II) complex was substituted by the sulfhydryl group of GSH, while in the second step, the remaining water or chlorido ligand from the dinuclear Pt(II)-peptide complex was replaced by the second molecule of glutathione, finally leading to the formation of the {trans-[Pt(NH3)2(GS)]2(μ-X)}(2+) complex. It was shown that the bridging ligand had an important influence on the reactivity of these complexes with glutathione. No hydrolytic cleavage of any amide bond was observed in the reactions between these complexes and glutathione. However, in reactions performed in acidic media (2.0 < pH < 2.5) between dinuclear Pt(II) complexes with the general formulae {[Pt(L)(H2O)]2(μ-diazine)}(4+) (L is different bidentate coordinated diamine ligands and diazine is a pyrazine- or pyridazine-bridging ligand) and Nacetylated peptides containing L-methionine and L-histidine amino acids in the side chains (Ac-L-Met-Gly, Ac-L-His-Gly and Ac-L-Met-Gly-L-His-GlyNH2), regioselective cleavage of these peptides occurred. The mechanism of these hydrolytic reactions was discussed in relation to the structure of the diazine-bridged Pt(II) complex and the investigated peptides. A systematic summary of these results could contribute to the future design of new dinuclear Pt(II) complexes as potential reagents for regioselective cleavage of peptides and proteins.

  12. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Characterization of naturally-occurring and modified fullerenes by Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, R.L.; Jin, C.; Compton, R.N. ); Buseck, P.R.; Tsipursky, S.J. )

    1993-10-10

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) employing both laser desorption/ionization and thermal desorption/electron ionization is useful for the detection and structural characterization of fullerenes and chemically-modified fullerenes. Examination of a carbon-rich shungite rock sample from Russia by transmission electron microscopy and FTMS provided evidence of naturally-occurring fullerenes. Ion-molecule reactions can be studied with FTMS to investigate the electron affinities of modified fullerenes. By monitoring charge exchange reactions, the electron affinities of C[sub 60]F[sub x] (x=44,46) and C[sub 70]F[sub y] (y=52,54) were found to be substantially higher than the values for the parent fullerenes.

  14. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  15. NIF Gamma Reaction History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Lee, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics is to provide bang time and burn width information based upon measurement of fusion gamma-rays. This is accomplished with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. In addition, the GRH detectors can perform γ-ray spectroscopy to explore other nuclear processes from which additional significant implosion parameters may be inferred (e.g., plastic ablator areal density). Implementation is occurring in 2 phases: 1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the NIF target chamber at ˜6 m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and 2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at ˜15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the wall into well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. This suite of diagnostics will allow exploration of interesting γ-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign. Recent data from OMEGA and NIF will be shown.

  16. Effects of aluminate ion toxicity on plant growth and mineral nutrition in bauxite residue reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum from bauxite ore with caustic sodium hydroxide produces an alkaline waste termed bauxite residue. Methods of vegetating bauxite residue impoundments were investigated utilizing alkaline tolerant species with readily available organic amendments. Species screening experiments identified Distichlis spicata var. stricta, an alkaline tolerant grass, as a potential species for bauxite residue reclamation. Additions of sewage sludge to bauxite residue increased growth over 10-fold. Low yields were associated with high shoot tissue concentrations of Fe and Al, and low concentrations of Mg, K, P, Ca and N. In field experiments at a bauxite residue impoundment in Mobile, Alabama, organic amendments (paper pulp waste, coastal bermuda grass mulch and sewage sludge) were tested as ameliorants to increase growth of Distichlis. In coarse textured bauxite residue amended with sewage sludge, a dense cover of Distichlis formed within 1.5 years. After 2.5 years, substantial declines in Distichlis cover occured. Additions of large quantities (6 cm) of sewage sludge to the surface of fine textured bauxite residue fostered growth of numerous local species. Most successful were Panicum dichotomiflorum and Cynodon dactylon. This research indicates the use of alkaline tolerant species with organic ameliorants has potential for bauxite residue reclamation. Problems with aluminum toxicity and Mn/sup 2 +/ deficiency must be overcome through additional research. The use of local, perhaps Al tolerant, species is also indicated if methods of effectively isolating roots from bauxite residue alkalinity are successful.

  17. On co-design of filter and fault estimator against randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liu, Steven; Ji, Donghai; Li, Shanqiang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the co-design problem of filter and fault estimator is studied for a class of time-varying non-linear stochastic systems subject to randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks. Two mutually independent random variables obeying the Bernoulli distribution are employed to characterize the phenomena of the randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks, respectively. By using the augmentation approach, the co-design problem of the robust filter and fault estimator is converted into the recursive filter design problem. A new compensation scheme is proposed such that, for both randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks, an upper bound of the filtering error covariance is obtained and such an upper bound is minimized by properly designing the filter gain at each sampling instant. Moreover, the explicit form of the filter gain is given based on the solution to two Riccati-like difference equations. It is shown that the proposed co-design algorithm is of a recursive form that is suitable for online computation. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the usefulness of the developed filtering approach.

  18. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  19. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  20. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  1. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  2. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  3. DYSBARISM: GRADE IV CHAMBER REACTIONS OR INSTANCES OF NEUROCIRCULATORY COLLAPSE OCCURRING IN THE U. S. AIR FORCE, 1950-1955,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BLOOD CIRCULATION, *BAROMETRIC PRESSURE), DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, SHOCK(PATHOLOGY), HIGH ALTITUDE, CLASSIFICATION, MORTALITY RATES , SKIN(ANATOMY), NERVOUS SYSTEM, RESPONSE(BIOLOGY), MILITARY PERSONNEL

  4. Measurement of Residual Flexibility for Substructures Having Prominent Flexible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.

    1994-01-01

    Verification of a dynamic model of a constrained structure requires a modal survey test of the physical structure and subsequent modification of the model to obtain the best agreement possible with test data. Constrained-boundary or fixed-base testing has historically been the most common approach for verifying constrained mathematical models, since the boundary conditions of the test article are designed to match the actual constraints in service. However, there are difficulties involved with fixed-base testing, in some cases making the approach impractical. It is not possible to conduct a truly fixed-base test due to coupling between the test article and the fixture. In addition, it is often difficult to accurately simulate the actual boundary constraints, and the cost of designing and constructing the fixture may be prohibitive. For use when fixed-base testing proves impractical or undesirable, alternate free-boundary test methods have been investigated, including the residual flexibility technique. The residual flexibility approach has been treated analytically in considerable detail and has had limited frequency response measurements for the method. This concern is well-justified for a number of reasons. First, residual flexibilities are very small numbers, typically on the order of 1.0E-6 in/lb for translational diagonal terms, and orders of magnitude smaller for off-diagonal values. This poses difficulty in obtaining accurate and noise-free measurements, especially for points removed from the excitation source. A second difficulty encountered in residual measurements lies in obtaining a clean residual function in the process of subtracting synthesized modal data from a measured response function. Inaccuracies occur since modes are not subtracted exactly, but only to the accuracy of the curve fits for each mode; these errors are compounded with increasing distance from the excitation point. In this paper, the residual flexibility method is applied to a simple

  5. Study on the residual stress relaxation in girth-welded steel pipes under bending load using diffraction methods

    DOE PAGES

    Hempel, Nico; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Nitschke-Pagel, Thomas; ...

    2017-02-02

    This research is dedicated to the experimental investigation of the residual stress relaxation in girth-welded pipes due to quasi-static bending loads. Ferritic-pearlitic steel pipes are welded with two passes, resulting in a characteristic residual stress state with high tensile residual stresses at the weld root. Also, four-point bending is applied to generate axial load stress causing changes in the residual stress state. These are determined both on the outer and inner surfaces of the pipes, as well as in the pipe wall, using X-ray and neutron diffraction. Focusing on the effect of tensile load stress, it is revealed that notmore » only the tensile residual stresses are reduced due to exceeding the yield stress, but also the compressive residual stresses for equilibrium reasons. Furthermore, residual stress relaxation occurs both parallel and perpendicular to the applied load stress.« less

  6. The soda-ash roasting of chromite ore processing residue for the reclamation of chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, M. P.; Tathavadkar, V. D.; Calvert, C. C.; Jha, A.

    2001-12-01

    Sodium chromate is produced via the soda-ash roasting of chromite ore with sodium carbonate. After the reaction, nearly 15 pct of the chromium oxide remains unreacted and ends up in the waste stream, for landfills. In recent years, the concern over environmental pollution from hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from the waste residue has become a major problem for the chromium chemical industry. The main purpose of this investigation is to recover chromium oxide present in the waste residue as sodium chromate. Cr2O3 in the residue is distributed between the two spinel solid solutions, Mg(Al,Cr)2O4 and γ-Fe2O3. The residue from the sodium chromate production process was analyzed both physically and chemically. The compositions of the mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The influence of alkali addition on the overall reaction rate is examined. The kinetics of the chromium extraction reaction resulting from the residue of the soda-ash roasting process under an oxidizing atmosphere is also investigated. It is shown that the experimental results for the roasting reaction can be best described by the Ginstling and Brounshtein (GB) equation for diffusion-controlled kinetics. The apparent activation energy for the roasting reaction was calculated to be between 85 and 90 kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range 1223 to 1473 K. The kinetics of leaching of Cr3+ ions using the aqueous phase from the process residue is also studied by treating the waste into acid solutions with different concentrations.

  7. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  8. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  9. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  10. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  11. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  12. Surfactant-based EOR mediated by naturally occurring microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.; Duvall, M.L.; Robertson, E.P.; Barrett, K.B.; Bala, G.A. )

    1993-11-01

    Oil recovery experiments using Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 (ATCC 39307) and a sucrose-based nutrient were performed with Berea sandstone cores (permeability 0.084 to 0.503 [mu]m [85 to 510 md]). Oil recovery efficiencies for four different crude oils (0.9396 to 0.8343 g/cm[sup 3] [19.1 to 38.1 [degree] API]) varied from 2.8% to 42.6% of the waterflood residual oil. Microbial systems reduced interfacial tension (IFT) [approximately]20 mN/m [[approximately]20 dyne/cm] for all oils tested. After the microbial flood experimentation, organisms were distributed throughout the core, with most cells near the outlet.

  13. Multifractality in intracellular enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan S; Salgado, Edgar; Muñoz-Diosdado, Alejandro

    2006-05-21

    Enzymatic kinetics adjust well to the Michaelis-Menten paradigm in homogeneous media with dilute, perfectly mixed reactants. These conditions are quite different from the highly structured cell plasm, so applications of the classic kinetics theory to this environment are rather limited. Cytoplasmic structure produces molecular crowding and anomalous diffusion of substances, modifying the mass action kinetic laws. The reaction coefficients are no longer constant but time-variant, as stated in the fractal kinetics theory. Fractal kinetics assumes that enzymatic reactions on such heterogeneous media occur within a non-Euclidian space characterized by a certain fractal dimension, this fractal dimension gives the dependence on time of the kinetic coefficients. In this work, stochastic simulations of enzymatic reactions under molecular crowding have been completed, and kinetic coefficients for the reactions, including the Michaelis-Menten parameter KM, were calculated. The simulations results led us to confirm the time dependence of michaelian kinetic parameter for the enzymatic catalysis. Besides, other chaos related phenomena were pointed out from the obtained KM time series, such as the emergence of strange attractors and multifractality.

  14. Anaphylactic reactions to tolperisone (Mydocalm).

    PubMed

    Ribi, Camillo; Vermeulen, Christophe; Hauser, Conrad

    2003-06-28

    Four patients with anaphylaxis attributed to the intake of the centrally acting muscle relaxant tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) were observed at the Emergency Department of the Geneva University Hospital between November 2001 and March 2003. All patients were middle-aged women who took tolperisone for chronic muscular pain. All reactions occurred within an hour after oral intake of this drug frequently prescribed in Switzerland. The severity of anaphylaxis ranged from urticarial reactions to shock with arterial hypotension. Prick-to-prick skin testing performed in one patient with a tablet of tolperisone diluted in water was negative. Its globally restricted commercialisation may explain the lack of reports on such adverse effects in the MedLine database. Anaphylactic reactions to this drug, however, are mentioned in other sources such as the Swiss Drug Compendium and the WHO drug reaction database. Together, these findings suggest that anaphylaxis to tolperisone is not uncommon and should be known to physicians in countries where this drug is available.

  15. Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.

    PubMed

    Hopkirk, R G

    1987-10-01

    An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock.

  16. Naturally occurring and forced azimuthal modes in a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    Naturally occurring instability modes in an axisymmetric jet are studied utilizing the modal frequency spectrum method. In the early evolution of the jet the axisymmetric mode was predominant, with the azimuthal modes growing quickly but dominating only after the end of the potential core. The growth of the azimuthal modes is seen nearer to the nozzle exit for the jet in the laminar boundary layer case than for the turbulent. Based on the results from these naturally occurring jet instability mode tests, target modes for efficient excitation were determined and two cases of excitation were examined.

  17. Addressing Naturally Occurring Asbestos in the Mining Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    Mining companies deal with naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) issues on their sites in two ways, avoidance and management. Avoidance simply means that to the extent practical, new mines are located in areas where NOA is unlikely to occur. Where mines are located in areas where NOA may be present, mines implement management procedures to identify and control potential sources of NOA. Management practices may include procedures set forth in regulations such as California's Air Toxicity Control Measure that deals with surface mining, voluntary procedures, or a combination of both. The mining industry generally recognizes that addressing NOA issues is a cost of doing business.;

  18. An essential tyrosine residue of Aspergillus polygalacturonase.

    PubMed

    Stratilová, E; Dzúrová, M; Markovic, O; Jörnvall, H

    1996-03-11

    Based on strict conservation of a tyrosine residue in 24 polygalacturonases, tyrosine modification was assessed in two different forms of the Aspergillus enzyme. The second subform was unknown in structure but submitted to sequence analysis and was found also to have the conserved tyrosine residue. Results of chemical modifications are consistent in showing inactivation of the proteins with all tyrosine-reactive agents tested, acetic anhydride, N-acetyl imidazole, and tetranitromethane. Furthermore, after acetylation, regeneration of enzyme activity was possible with hydroxylamine. Spectrophotometric pH titration showed that one accessible tyrosine residue is ionized at pH 9.3-9.5, whereas the remaining, masked residues are all ionized at pH 10.5. It is concluded that one tyrosine residue is catalytically important, in agreement with the inactivation and reactivation data, that this residue is accessible, and that it is likely to correspond to the strictly conserved residue observed in all forms.

  19. Residual number processing in dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia - a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts - is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia.

  20. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  1. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  2. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  3. Different structural changes occur in blue- and green-proteorhodopsins during the primary photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Kralj, Joel M; Bergo, Vladislav B; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2008-11-04

    We examine the structural changes during the primary photoreaction in blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR), a light-driven retinylidene proton pump, using low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy. Comparison of the light-induced BPR difference spectrum recorded at 80 K to that of green-absorbing proteorhodopsin (GPR) reveals that there are several differences in the BPR and GPR primary photoreactions despite the similar structure of the retinal chromophore and all-trans --> 13-cis isomerization. Strong bands near 1700 cm(-1) assigned previously to a change in hydrogen bonding of Asn230 in GPR are still present in BPR. However, additional bands in the same region are assigned on the basis of site-directed mutagenesis to changes occurring in Gln105. In the amide II region, bands are assigned on the basis of total (15)N labeling to structural changes of the protein backbone, although no such bands were previously observed for GPR. A band at 3642 cm(-1) in BPR, assigned to the OH stretching mode of a water molecule on the basis of H2(18)O substitution, appears at a different frequency than a band at 3626 cm(-1) previously assigned to a water molecule in GPR. However, the substitution of Gln105 for Leu105 in BPR leads to the appearance of both bands at 3642 and 3626 cm(-1), indicating the waters assigned in BPR and GPR exist in separate distinct locations and can coexist in the GPR-like Q105L mutant of BPR. These results indicate that there exist significant differences in the conformational changes occurring in these two types proteorhodopsin during the initial photoreaction despite their similar chromophore structures, which might reflect a different arrangement of water in the active site as well as substitution of a hydrophilic for hydrophobic residue at residue 105.

  4. Biased Signaling in Naturally Occurring Mutations in Human Melanocortin-3 Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Huang, Hui; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) is primarily expressed in the hypothalamus and plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Recently, some studies demonstrated that MC3R also signals through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). ERK1/2 signaling is known to alter gene expression, potentially contributing to the prolonged action of melanocortins on energy homeostasis regulation. In the present study, we performed detailed functional studies on 8 novel naturally occurring MC3R mutations recently reported, and the effects of endogenous MC3R agonist, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), on ERK1/2 signaling on all 22 naturally occurring MC3R mutations reported to date. We found that mutants D158Y and L299V were potential pathogenic causes to obesity. Four residues, F82, D158, L249 and L299, played critical roles in different aspects of MC3R function. α-MSH exhibited balanced activity in Gs-cAMP and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in 15 of the 22 mutant MC3Rs. The other 7 mutant MC3Rs were biased to either one of the signaling pathways. In summary, we provided novel data about the structure-function relationship of MC3R, identifying residues important for receptor function. We also demonstrated that some mutations exhibited biased signaling, preferentially activating one intracellular signaling pathway, adding a new layer of complexity to MC3R pharmacology. PMID:25798062

  5. A Review on the Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Pharmacokinetics of Amentoflavone, a Naturally-Occurring Biflavonoid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Li; Shan, Mingqiu; Chen, Peidong; Ding, Anwei; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2017-02-16

    Amentoflavone (C30H18O10) is a well-known biflavonoid occurring in many natural plants. This polyphenolic compound has been discovered to have some important bioactivities, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, anti-diabetes, and anti-senescence effects on many important reactions in the cardiovascular and central nervous system, etc. Over 120 plants have been found to contain this bioactive component, such as Selaginellaceae, Cupressaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Podocarpaceae, and Calophyllaceae plant families. This review paper aims to profile amentoflavone on its plant sources, natural derivatives, pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, and to highlight some existing issues and perspectives in the future.

  6. 40 CFR 180.432 - Lactofen; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Lactofen; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide... for residues of the herbicide lactofen, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  7. 40 CFR 180.432 - Lactofen; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Lactofen; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide... for residues of the herbicide lactofen, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  8. 40 CFR 180.432 - Lactofen; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Lactofen; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide... for residues of the herbicide lactofen, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  9. 40 CFR 180.432 - Lactofen; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Lactofen; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide... for residues of the herbicide lactofen, including its metabolites and degradates, in or on...

  10. Identification of catalytically important residues in yeast transketolase.

    PubMed

    Wikner, C; Nilsson, U; Meshalkina, L; Udekwu, C; Lindqvist, Y; Schneider, G

    1997-12-16

    The possible roles of four histidine residues in the active site of yeast transketolase were examined by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of the invariant His69 with alanine yielded a mutant enzyme with 1.5% of the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme and with an increased KM for the donor. This residue is located at the bottom of the substrate cleft close to the C1 hydroxyl group of the donor substrate, and the side chain of His69 might be required for recognition of this hydroxyl group and possibly for maintenance of the proper orientation of the reaction intermediate, (alpha, beta-dihydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate. Amino acid replacements of His481 by alanine, serine, and glutamine resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly increased KM values for the donor substrate and specific activities of 4.4%, 1.9%, and 5.5% of the wild-type enzyme. The kinetic data suggest that this residue, although close to the C2 carbonyl oxygen of the substrate, is not absolutely required for stabilization of the negative charge that develops at this oxygen in the transition state. This points toward the 4'-NH2 group of the pyrimidine ring of thiamin diphosphate as the major source of charge stabilization. Mutations at positions His30 and His263 result in mutant enzymes severely impaired in catalytic activity (1.5% and less of the activity of wild-type transketolase). The KM value for the donor substrate was increased for the His30Ala mutant but remained unchanged in the His263Ala enzyme. The side chains of both residues interact with the C3 hydroxyl group of the donor substrate, and the results indicate that the two residues act in concert during proton abstraction of the C3 hydroxyl proton during catalysis.

  11. Cold vacuum drying residual free water test description

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A.L.

    1997-12-23

    Residual free water expected to remain in a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) after processing in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility is investigated based on three alternative models of fuel crevices. Tests and operating conditions for the CVD process are defined based on the analysis of these models. The models consider water pockets constrained by cladding defects, water constrained in a pore or crack by flow through a porous bed, and water constrained in pores by diffusion. An analysis of comparative reaction rate constraints is also presented indicating that a pressure rise test can be used to show MCO`s will be thermally stable at operating temperatures up to 75 C.

  12. Phasic alertness and residual switch costs in task switching.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Darryl W

    2017-02-01

    Residual switch costs are deficits in task-switching performance that occur despite considerable time to prepare for a task switch. In the present study, the author investigated whether increased phasic alertness modulates residual switch costs. In 2 experiments involving the task-cuing procedure, subjects performed numerical categorization tasks on target digits, with and without an alerting stimulus presented shortly before the target (alert and no-alert trials, respectively). Switch costs were obtained that decreased with a longer cue-target interval, indicating subjects engaged in preparation, but large residual switch costs remained. Alerting effects were obtained in the form of faster overall performance on alert than on no-alert trials, indicating the alerting stimuli increased phasic alertness. Critically, residual switch costs were similar on alert and no-alert trials in both experiments, unaffected by manipulations of alert type, alert availability, and alert-target interval. Implications of the results for understanding the relationship between phasic alertness and cognitive control in task switching are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Formation of nonextractable soil residues: A stable isotope approach

    SciTech Connect

    Richnow, H.H.; Eschenback, A.; Mahro, B.; Kaestner, M.; Annweiler, E.; Seifert, R.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-11-01

    Stable carbon isotopic measurements were employed to characterize the transformation of a {sup 13}C-labeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), anthracene, in a closed soil bioreactor system. The {sup 13}C-label was used to calculate a carbon mass balance including mineralization and the formation of nonextractable soil-bound residues. Similar results were obtained from {sup 13}C-labeled carbon and {sup 14}C-labeled carbon mass balance calculations for separate batch experiments with labeled anthracene. In concentration ranges typical for real PAH-contaminated sites, the sensitivity of the {sup 13}C tracer method meets the requirements of classical radiotracer experiments. Therefore, the authors balancing method based on stable isotope-labeled chemicals may supplement or substitute radiotracer experiments under many circumstances. One major advantage of using stable isotope-labeled tracers is the possible application in transformation studies where the use of radioactive substances is of environmental concern. The transformation of {sup 13}C-labeled PAH into nonextractable residues clearly depends on the metabolic activity of the soil microflora and occurs during an early phase of biodegradation. Successive contamination of the soil by anthracene leads to a progressive adaptation of the microflora to a complete mineralization of anthracene in the soil. The extent of residue formation is controlled by the capability of the microflora to degrade the contaminant. Results of long-term experiments indicate that nonextractable residues are relatively stable over time.

  14. Modeling the oxidation of methionine residues by peroxides in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chennamsetty, Naresh; Quan, Yong; Nashine, Vishal; Sadineni, Vikram; Lyngberg, Olav; Krystek, Stanley

    2015-04-01

    We report the use of molecular modeling to predict the oxidation propensity of methionine residues in proteins. Oxidation of methionine to the sulfoxide form is one of the major degradation pathways for therapeutic proteins. Oxidation can occur during production, formulation, or storage of pharmaceuticals and it often reduces or eliminates biological activity. We use a molecular model based on atomistic simulations called 2-shell water coordination number to predict the oxidation rates for several model proteins and therapeutic candidates. In addition, we implement models that are based on static and simulation average of the solvent-accessible area (SAA) for either the side chain or the sulfur atom in the methionine residue. We then compare the results from the different models against the experimentally measured relative rates of methionine oxidation. We find that both the 2-shell model and the simulation-averaged SAA models are accurate in predicting the oxidation propensity of methionine residues for the proteins tested. We also find the appropriate parameter ranges where the models are most accurate. These models have significant predictive power and can be used to enable further protein engineering or to guide formulation approaches in stabilizing the unstable methionine residues.

  15. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  16. Application of neutron diffraction to measure residual strains in high temperature composites

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kupperman, D.S. )

    1991-01-01

    An experimental neutron diffraction technique was used to measure residual thermal strains developed in high temperature composites during postfabrication cooling. Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide (over the temperature range 20--950{degree}C) and tungsten and saphikon fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide composites (at room temperature) were investigated. As a result of thermal expansion mismatch, compressive residual strains and stresses were generated in the silicon carbide fibers during cooldown. The axial residual strains were tensile in the matrix and were lower in nickel aluminide matrix as compared to those in titanium aluminide matrix. The average transverse residual strains in the matrix were compressive. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal-cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ruminal Methanogen Community in Dairy Cows Fed Agricultural Residues of Corn Stover, Rapeseed, and Cottonseed Meals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengpeng; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Xingwen; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-13

    The purpose was to reveal changes in the methanogen community in the rumen of dairy cows fed agricultural residues of corn stover, rapeseed, and cottonseed meals, compared with alfalfa hay or soybean meal. Analysis was based on cloning and sequencing the methyl coenzyme M reductase α-subunit gene of ruminal methanogens. Results revealed that predicted methane production was increased while population of ruminal methanogens was not significantly affected when cows were fed diets containing various amounts of agricultural residues. Richness and diversity of methanogen community were markedly increased by addition of agricultural residues. The dominant ruminal methanogens shared by all experimental groups belonged to rumen cluster C, accounting for 71% of total, followed by the order Methanobacteriales (29%). Alterations of ruminal methanogen community and prevalence of particular species occurred in response to fed agricultural residue rations, suggesting the possibility of regulating target methanogens to control methane production by dairy cows fed agricultural residues.

  18. Discovering co-occurring patterns and their biological significance in protein families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The large influx of biological sequences poses the importance of identifying and correlating conserved regions in homologous sequences to acquire valuable biological knowledge. These conserved regions contain statistically significant residue associations as sequence patterns. Thus, patterns from two conserved regions co-occurring frequently on the same sequences are inferred to have joint functionality. A method for finding conserved regions in protein families with frequent co-occurrence patterns is proposed. The biological significance of the discovered clusters of conserved regions with co-occurrences patterns can be validated by their three-dimensional closeness of amino acids and the biological functionality found in those regions as supported by published work. Methods Using existing algorithms, we discovered statistically significant amino acid associations as sequence patterns. We then aligned and clustered them into Aligned Pattern Clusters (APCs) corresponding to conserved regions with amino acid conservation and variation. When one APC frequently co-occured with another APC, the two APCs have high co-occurrence. We then clustered APCs with high co-occurrence into what we refer to as Co-occurrence APC Clusters (Co-occurrence Clusters). Results Our results show that for Co-occurrence Clusters, the three-dimensional distance between their amino acids is closer than average amino acid distances. For the Co-occurrence Clusters of the ubiquitin and the cytochrome c families, we observed biological significance among the residing amino acids of the APCs within the same cluster. In ubiquitin, the residues are responsible for ubiquitination as well as conventional and unconventional ubiquitin-bindings. In cytochrome c, amino acids in the first co-occurrence cluster contribute to binding of other proteins in the electron transport chain, and amino acids in the second co-occurrence cluster contribute to the stability of the axial heme ligand

  19. Allergic reactions to insect stings and bites.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, John E

    2003-11-01

    Insect stings are an important cause of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can also occur from insect bites but is less common. Insect venoms contain several well-characterized allergens that can trigger anaphylactic reactions. Effective methods to diagnose insect sting allergy and assess risk of future sting reactions have been developed. Management strategies using insect avoidance measures, self-injectable epinephrine, and allergen immunotherapy are very effective in reducing insect-allergic patients' risk of reaction from future stings. Diagnostic and management strategies for patients allergic to insect bites are less developed.

  20. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  1. Integrative Priming Occurs Rapidly and Uncontrollably during Lexical Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Zachary; Jones, Lara L.

    2009-01-01

    Lexical priming, whereby a prime word facilitates recognition of a related target word (e.g., "nurse" [right arrrow] "doctor"), is typically attributed to association strength, semantic similarity, or compound familiarity. Here, the authors demonstrate a novel type of lexical priming that occurs among unassociated, dissimilar,…

  2. On Translating French Occurring in English into Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebastian, Robert N.

    1989-01-01

    Explores problems encountered during attempts to translate French expressions occurring in English (such as concierge) into Spanish, particularly when the English interpretation of the expression is different from the standard French usage. Spanish translations are provided for about 200 French terms and expressions commonly used in English. (61…

  3. Syntheses of naturally occurring terphenyls and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Sawayama, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Takashi; Sugino, Kumi; Nishikawa, Toshio; Isobe, Minoru; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2006-12-01

    Naturally occurring terphenyls and related compounds such as terferol and its corresponding quinone and phlebiarubrone were synthesized from 2,5-diphenyl-1,4-benzoquinone. According to the proposed biosynthetic pathway, chemical conversion of phlebiarubrone to ustalic acid, a toxic compound isolated from the poisonous mushroom, Tricholoma ustale, was examined to find a low-yield conversion to the ustalic acid dimethyl ester.

  4. Neutropenia occurring after starting gabapentin for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, E; Martin, D

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of neutropenia occurring in a patient receiving gabapentin for neuropathic pain. Five weeks after treatment started, the patient was admitted to hospital with neutropenic sepsis. Gabapentin is widely used, and neutropenia is a rare adverse effect. This case highlights a serious and potential life-threatening complication.

  5. Temporal Sequencing of Brain Activations During Naturally Occurring Thermoregulatory Events

    PubMed Central

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Murphy, Eric R.; Freedman, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoregulatory events are associated with activity in the constituents of the spinothalamic tract. Whereas studies have assessed activity within constituents of this pathway, in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have not determined if neuronal activity in the constituents of the tract is temporally ordered. Ordered activity would be expected in naturally occurring thermal events, such as menopausal hot flashes (HFs), which occur in physiological sequence. The origins of HFs may lie in brainstem structures where neuronal activity may occur earlier than in interoceptive centers, such as the insula and the prefrontal cortex. To study such time ordering, we conducted blood oxygen level-dependent-based fMRI in a group of postmenopausal women to measure neuronal activity in the brainstem, insula, and prefrontal cortex around the onset of an HF (detected using synchronously acquired skin conductance responses). Rise in brainstem activity occurred before the detectable onset of an HF. Activity in the insular and prefrontal trailed that in the brainstem, appearing following the onset of the HF. Additional activations associated with HF's were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex and the basal ganglia. Pre-HF brainstem responses may reflect the functional origins of internal thermoregulatory events. By comparison insular, prefrontal and striatal activity may be associated with the phenomenological correlates of HFs. PMID:23787950

  6. On properties of certain classical operators occurring in Fourier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhiashvili, L. V.; Tkebuchava, G. E.

    2004-10-01

    Properties of conjugate functions, Hilbert transforms, and certain maximal operators occurring in Fourier analysis in weighted Lebesgue spaces are established. For functions of several variables in Orlicz spaces the divergence in measure of the Cesáro and the Abel means of the conjugate trigonometric series, and the question of the existence of conjugate functions are investigated.

  7. On properties of certain classical operators occurring in Fourier analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhizhiashvili, L V; Tkebuchava, G E

    2004-10-31

    Properties of conjugate functions, Hilbert transforms, and certain maximal operators occurring in Fourier analysis in weighted Lebesgue spaces are established. For functions of several variables in Orlicz spaces the divergence in measure of the Cesaro and the Abel means of the conjugate trigonometric series, and the question of the existence of conjugate functions are investigated.

  8. Naturally occurring fatty acids: source, chemistry and uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural occurring fatty acids are a large and complex class of compounds found in plants and animals. Fatty acids are abundant and of interest because of their renewability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, low cost, and fascinating chemistry. Of the many fatty acids, only 20-25 of them are widel...

  9. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction.

    PubMed

    Algasaier, Sana I; Exell, Jack C; Bennet, Ian A; Thompson, Mark J; Gotham, Victoria J B; Shaw, Steven J; Craggs, Timothy D; Finger, L David; Grasby, Jane A

    2016-04-08

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5'-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5'-terminiin vivo Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5'-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5'-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr(40), Asp(181), and Arg(100)and a reacting duplex 5'-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5'-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage.

  10. Alteration of substrate specificity by a naturally-occurring aldolase B mutation (Ala337-->Val) in fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Rellos, P; Ali, M; Vidailhet, M; Sygusch, J; Cox, T M

    1999-05-15

    A molecular analysis of human aldolase B genes in two newborn infants and a 4-year-old child with hereditary fructose intolerance, the offspring of a consanguineous union, has identified the novel mutation Ala337-->Val in homozygous form. This mutation was also detected independently in two other affected individuals who were compound heterozygotes for the prevalent aldolase B allele, Ala149-->Pro, indicating that the mutation causes aldolase B deficiency. To test for the effect of the mutation, catalytically active wild-type human aldolase B and the Val337 variant enzyme were expressed in Escherichia coli. The specific activities of the wild-type recombinant enzyme were 4.8 units/mg and 4.5 units/mg towards fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and fructose 1-phosphate (F-1-P) as substrates with Michaelis constants of 4 microM and 2.4 mM respectively. The specific activities of purified tetrameric Val337 aldolase B, which affects an invariant residue in the C-terminal region, were 4.2 units/mg and 2.6 units/mg towards FBP and F-1-P as substrates respectively; the corresponding Michaelis constants were 22 microM and 24 mM. The FBP-to-F-1-P substrate activity ratios were 0.98 and 1.63 for wild-type and Val337 variant enzymes respectively. The Val337 mutant aldolase had an increased susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage in E. coli and rapidly lost activity on storage. Comparative CD determinations showed that the Val337 protein had a distinct thermal denaturation profile with markedly decreased enthalpy, indicating that the mutant protein is partly unfolded. The undegraded mutant had preferentially decreased affinity and activity towards its specific F-1-P substrate and maintained appreciable activity towards FBP. In contrast, fluorescence studies of the mutant showed an increased binding affinity for products of the aldolase reaction, indicating a role for the C-terminus in mediating product release. These findings in a rare but widespread naturally occurring mutant

  11. Residual mode filters and adaptive control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in controlling large systems and structures is compensating for the destructive interaction which can occur between the reduced-order model (ROM) of the plant, which is used by the controller, and the unmodeled dynamics of the plant, often called the residual modes. The problem is more significant in the case of large space structures because their naturally light damping and high performance requirements lead to more frequent, destructive residual mode interaction (RMI). Using the design/compensation technique of residual mode filters (RMF's), effective compensation of RMI can be accomplished in a straightforward manner when using linear controllers. The use of RMF's has been shown to be effective for a variety of large structures, including a space-based laser and infinite dimensional systems. However, the dynamics of space structures is often uncertain and may even change over time due to on-orbit erosion from space debris and corrosive chemicals in the upper atmosphere. In this case, adaptive control can be extremely beneficial in meeting the performance requirements of the structure. Adaptive control for large structures is also based on ROM's and so destructive RMI may occur. Unfortunately, adaptive control is inherently nonlinear, and therefore the known results of RMF's cannot be applied. The purpose is to present the results of new research showing the effects of RMI when using adaptive control and the work which will hopefully lead to RMF compensation of this problem.

  12. Carbonylation of myofibrillar proteins through the maillard pathway: effect of reducing sugars and reaction temperature.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Adriana; Estévez, Mario

    2013-03-27

    Carbonylation is recognized as one of the most remarkable chemical modifications in oxidized proteins and is generally ascribed to the direct attack of free radicals to basic amino acid residues. The purpose of this work was to investigate the formation of specific carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes (AAS and GGS, respectively), in myofibrillar proteins (MP) through a Maillard-type pathway in the presence of reducing sugars. The present study confirmed the concurrent formation of protein carbonyls and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) during incubation (80 °C/48 h) of MP (4 mg/mL) in the presence of reducing sugars (0.5 M). Copper irons (10 μM) were found to promote the formation of protein carbonyls, and a specific inhibitor of the Maillard reaction (0.02 M pyridoxamine) blocked the carbonylation process which emphasize the occurrence of a Maillard-type pathway. The Maillard-mediated carbonylation occurred in a range of reducing sugars (0.02-0.5 M) and reaction temperatures (4-110 °C) compatible with food systems. Upcoming studies on this topic may contribute further to shed light on the complex interactions between protein oxidation and the Maillard reaction and the impact of the protein damage on food quality and human health.

  13. The characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Moudrakovski, I.; Udachin, K.; Enright, G.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, extensive analyses have been carried out for characterizing the natural gas hydrate samples from Cascadia, offshore Vancouver Island; Mallik, Mackenzie Delta; Mount Elbert, Alaska North Slope; Nankai Trough, offshore Japan; Japan Sea and offshore India. With the results obtained, it is possible to give a general picture of the characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment. Gas hydrate can occur in sediments of various types, from sands to clay, although it is preferentially enriched in sediments of certain types, for example coarse sands and fine volcanic ash. Most of the gas hydrates in sediments are invisible, occurring in the pores of the sediments, while some hydrates are visible, appearing as massive, nodular, planar, vein-like forms and occurring around the seafloor, in the fractures related to fault systems, or any other large spaces available in sediments. Although methane is the main component of most of the natural gas hydrates, C2 to C7 hydrocarbons have been recognized in hydrates, sometimes even in significant amounts. Shallow marine gas hydrates have been found generally to contain minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Gas hydrate samples with complex gas compositions have been found to have heterogeneous distributions in composition, which might reflect changes in the composition of the available gas in the surrounding environment. Depending on the gas compositions, the structure type of a natural gas hydrate can be structure I, II or H. For structure I methane hydrate, the large cages are almost fully occupied by methane molecules, while the small cages are only partly occupied. Methane hydrates occurring in different environments have been identified with almost the same crystallographic parameters.

  14. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  15. Reproduction, growth, and tissue residues of deer fed dieldrin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, D.A.; Korschgen, L.J.

    1970-01-01

    Feeding tests were conducted from January, 1966, to January, 1969, to ascertain the effects of daily ingestions of sublethal amounts of dieldrin on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Groups of deer on 0 ppm dieldrin (controls), 5 ppm, and 25 ppm dieldrin were maintained at these respective levels, as were their progeny. Treated food was readily accepted. Dieldrin intoxication was not observed, and 9 of 10 animals of each group survived 3 years of treatment. No differences in conception or in utero mortality were found between groups. Fawns from dieldrin-fed does were smaller at birth and greater post-partum mortality occurred. Fertility of male progeny was not affected. Growth was slower and remained reduced in dieldrin-treated females which were immature when the study began. Hematologic values and serum protein concentrations were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to treatment. Liver/body weight ratios were significantly (P < 0.05) larger for the 25-ppm-dieldrin group. Pituitary glands were smaller and thyroids were larger in dieldrin-fed deer. Weight gains of fawns were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced 2 of 3 years in dieldrin-treated groups. Placental transfer of dieldrin occurred. Whole milk from does fed 25 ppm dieldrin contained residues of 17 ppm. Residue levels in brain, liver, and thigh muscle tissues showed no evidence of increasing with length of treatment, but showed definite relationships to levels of dieldrin in daily diets. Nursing fawns had higher residues in brain tissues than did older deer on 5 ppm a d 25 ppm dieldrin. Highest brain residues (12.60 and 12.10 ppm, wet weight) occurred in fawns only a few days of age at death. Equilibrium between ingestion and storage or excretion of dieldrin occurred prior to 200 days and continued until nearly 1,100 days. There was no evidence of a sharp decline in residues after a long period of continued dosage. Daily ingestion of 100 and 200 ppm of dieldrin proved fatal to yearling male deer at 27

  16. Dicofol and DDT residues in lizard carcasses and bird eggs from Texas, Florida, and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Flickinger, Edward L.; White, D.H.; Hothem, R.L.; Belisle, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Relatively high dicofol residues occured in some lizards in Texas citrus orchards in early summer when female lizards were producing eggs. The data from bird eggs were too few for conclusions, but to detect peak residue loads, future dicofol studies should concentrate on predaceous bird species likely to feed within the treated agricultural habitats, and collecting of eggs for analysis should begin within days after spray application.

  17. Evaluation of Cement, Lime, and Asphalt Amended Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Residues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    waste does not contain sufficient pozzolans for lime solidification, or if organics in the cement residue mixes are excessive, a low 3 strength material...occur due to insufficient coverage of the residue by the asphalt binder . This defeats the asphalt’s primary metal immobilization mechanism...stabilized waste form direct contact with an cidic environment (Cote, 1986). Asphalt Amended Wastes. As with most thermoplastic agent, asphalt binder

  18. Histidine residues in the peptide D-Lys(6)-GnRH: potential for copolymerization in polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylcyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles containing the bioactive d-Lys(6)-GnRH were manufactured by an in situ interfacial polymerization process using a w/o-microemulsion template containing the peptide in the dispersed aqueous pseudophase of the microemulsion. Polymeric nanoparticles were characterized using PCS, RP-HPLC (bulk level) and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry (molecular level). The peptide d-Lys(6)-GnRH was reactive with the alkylcyanoacrylate monomer, resulting in some of the peptide copolymerizing with the monomer. MALDI TOF/TOF (tandem) analysis revealed that the histidine residue in position 2 of d-Lys(6)-GnRH interacts covalently in the polymerization process. A reaction mechanism for this nucleophilic interference is suggested. The copolymerization reaction appeared to occur within seconds after the addition of the monomer to the microemulsion. The surface charge of resulting nanoparticles was less negative (-3 mV) compared with the zeta potential of empty nanoparticles (-27.5 mV). The copolymerization yielded high entrapment rates of 95 +/- 4% of peptide, but showed limited release ( approximately 11%) of free peptide over 5 days. A separate experiment demonstrated that the addition of d-Lys(6)-GnRH to preformed empty PECA nanoparticles (ex situ) also yielded fractions of copolymerized peptide suggesting a certain proportion of polymer remains available for copolymerization possibly through an unzipping depolymerization/repolymerization process. Therefore, the reactivity of histidine residues in bioactives needs to be considered whenever using the bioactive in situ or ex situ with polymeric PECA nanoparticles.

  19. A Minimum-Residual Mixed Reduced Basis Method: Exact Residual Certification and Simultaneous Finite-Element Reduced-Basis Refinement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    µ)w. The Helmholtz equation — with the wavenumber as the parameter — results from A(w,∇w;µ) = −∇w and C(w;µ) = −µ2w. The form also supports the...reduced basis method for parametrized partial differential equations certified by a dual-norm bound of the residual computed not in the typical finite...effectiveness of the approach for a parametrized reaction-diffusion equation and a parametrized advection-diffusion equation with a corner singularity; not only

  20. Steam plasmatron gasification of distillers grains residue from ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Tsou, Feng-Ju; Lin, Kae-Long

    2010-07-01

    In this study, a plasmatron reactor was used for gasifying the waste of distillers grains at different temperatures (773, 873, 973 K) and water flow rates (1, 2, 3 mL min(-1)), which were heated to produce steam. Among all the gas products, syngas was the major component (88.5 wt.% or 94.66 vol.%) with temperatures yielding maximum concentrations at 873 K with a relatively high reaction rate. The maximum concentrations regarding gaseous production occurring times are all below 1 min. With the increase of steam, the recovery mass yield of syngas also increases from 34.14 to 45.47 approximately 54.66 wt.% at 873 K. Water-gas reactions and steam-methane reforming reactions advance the production of syngas with the increase of steam. Furthermore, the water-shift reaction also increases in the context of steam gasification which leads to the decrease of CO(2) at the same time.

  1. Naturally Occurring Human Antiglobulins with Specificity for γE

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ralph C.; Griffiths, Robert W.; Emmons, Jean D.; Field, Richard C.

    1972-01-01

    Human sera have been examined for antibodies with specific reactivity for γE using the tanned cell hemagglutination test. Cells tanned with three different γE myeloma proteins provided a reproducible test system. Inhibition of agglutination reactions by γE proteins, but not by γG, γA, γM, or γD confirmed the specificity of these reactions. 8.5% of 304 serial serum samples obtained from miscellaneous hospitalized patients showed clear-cut anti-γ-globulins with specificity for γE. In most of these instances no definite clinical history of concomitant allergic disorders could be obtained. 53% of 73 patients with well-established allergic disorders (hay fever, extrinsic asthma) showed serum anti-γ-globulins with reactivity for γE. Some patients studied before and after desensitization to Bermuda grass allergen showed an increase in titer or a conversion from negative to positive reactions for anti-γE antibodies following several month courses of progressive desensitization. Gradient and gel filtration studies indicated that anti-γE globulins were 19S γM in all instances. No clear correlation was noted between quantitative serum γE levels and titer of anti-γE antibodies. 19S serum fractions with anti-γE antibody activity did not release histamine from normal human peripheral blood leukocytes, whereas specific rabbit anti-γE antisera consistently induced leukocytic histamine release. Moreover, macroglobulin fractions with anti-γE activity did not block allergen-specific leukocyte histamine release induced by in vitro leukocyte challenge with allergens such as Bermuda grass and leukocytes from allergic donors. In some instances 19S human serum fractions with anti-γE activity appeared to potentiate histamine release when incubated concomitantly with specific allergen and leukocytes from allergic individuals. PMID:4111367

  2. Functional residual capacity: the human windbag.

    PubMed

    Villars, Penelope S; Kanusky, Joseph T; Levitzky, Michael G

    2002-10-01

    Like the windbag of a bagpipe, the functional residual capacity (FRC) is the lung volume that acts as a reservoir of air for physiologic use. This reserve volume is particularly important during the period of apnea that occurs during induction of general anesthesia. The balance of the inward elastic recoil of the lung and the outward chest wall forces determines the FRC. Inward recoil forces are dependent on the interaction between the fibrous skeleton of the lung tissue and the alveolar surface tension regulated by pulmonary surfactant. Positioning and the use of inhaled and intravenous anesthetics influence outward chest wall forces. Factors that affect the FRC may be altered by volume recruitment maneuvers such as administration of vital capacity breaths, the application of positive end-expiratory pressure, and/or maintenance of anesthesia with a fraction of inspired oxygen of less than 1.0. This course reviews the basic anatomy and physiology of the FRC during the perioperative period. Understanding the processes that contribute to intraoperative loss of lung volume and knowledge of interventions that can allay them are paramount to providing a reliable and safe general anesthetic.

  3. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Shen, Boxiong; Li, Yongwang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH4Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg(0) occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5wt.% NH4Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg(0) removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH4Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O2 increased Hg(0) adsorption whereas H2O inhibited Hg(0) adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO2 was observed on Hg(0) removal, namely, low concentration of SO2 promoted Hg(0) removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO2 suppressed Hg(0) removal. The Hg(0) removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg(0) to form HgCl2, and the active state of C−Cl(*) groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg(0) sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents.

  4. Pyrolysis of ramie residue: kinetic study and fuel gas produced in a cyclone furnace.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Leguan; He, Piwen; Yan, Feng; Xiao, Bo; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Yanli; Guo, Dabin

    2011-02-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of ramie residue (RR) and the characteristics of fuel gas produced in a cyclone furnace were studied. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at heating rates of 5-20°C/min. The results showed that RR mainly decomposed between 250 and 390°C, and the apparent activation energy ranged from 200 to 258 kJ/mol. In the cyclone furnace, fast pyrolysis, partial combustion and gasification occurred almost simultaneously, and the thermal energy was supplied by partial combustion of RR powder at the hypo stoichiometric amount of air. Higher effect of equivalence ratio (ER) led to higher reaction temperature and fewer contents of tar and char, but too high ER lowered fuel gas content and degraded fuel gas quality. Over the ranges of the experimental conditions, the gas yield varied between 1.07 and 2.08 N m(3)/kg and the LHV was between 3350 and 4798 kJ/Nm(3).

  5. Influence of moisture content on microbial activity and silage quality during ensilage of food processing residues.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yates, Matthew; Aung, Hnin; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Yu, Chaowei; Guo, Hongyun; Zhang, Ruihong; Vandergheynst, Jean; Jenkins, Bryan M

    2011-10-01

    Seasonally produced biomass such as sugar beet pulp (SBP) and tomato pomace (TP) needs to be stored properly to meet the demand of sustainable biofuel production industries. Ensilage was used to preserve the feedstock. The effect of moisture content (MC) on the performance of ensilage and the relationship between microorganism activities and MC were investigated. For SBP, MC levels investigated were 80, 55, 30, and 10% on a wet basis. For TP, MC levels investigated were 60, 45, 30, and 10%. Organic acids, ethanol, ammonia, pH and water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) were measured to evaluate the silage quality. Ensilage improved as the MC decreased from 80 to 55% for SBP and from 60 to 45% for TP. When the MC decreased to 30%, a little microbial activity was detected for both feedstocks. Storage at 10% MC prevented all the microbial activity. The naturally occurring microorganisms in TP were found to preserve TP during silage and were isolated and determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results suggest that partial drying followed by ensilage may be a good approach for stabilization of food processing residues for biofuels production.

  6. The Natural Occurring Compounds Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai; Yang, Jianqiong; Li, Linfu; Shi, Weimei

    2016-01-01

    ER stress has been implicated in pathophysiological development of many diseases. Persistent overwhelming stimuli trigger ER stress to initiate apoptosis, autophagy, and cell death. IRE1-JNK and eIF2α-CHOP signaling pathways are the two important players of ER stress, which is also modulated by ROS production, calcium disturbance, and inflammatory factors. ER stress has been developed as a novel strategy for diseases management. Recently, a vast of research focuses on the natural occurring compounds targeting ER stress, which results in medical benefits to human diseases. These small reported molecules mainly include polyphenols, alkaloids, and saponins. Many of them have been developed for use in clinical applications. To better understand the pharmacological mechanism of these molecules in ER stress in diseases, efforts have been made to discover and deliver medical merits. In this paper, we will summarize the natural occurring compounds targeting ER stress. PMID:27563337

  7. [Pathologic characteristics of malignant neoplasms occurring in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tomio; Matsuda, Yoko; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2015-08-01

    Malignant neoplasm preferentially occurs in the elderly. Common cancers in the elderly are gastric, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers in men whereas colorectal, lung, gastric and pancreatic cancers in women. There are several characteristic features such as tumor location, histology, biological behavior and pathway of carcinogenesis in malignant neoplasms occurring in the elderly. Multiple cancers increase with aging. Although it is generally believed that carcinoma in the elderly shows well differentiation, slow growth, low incidence of metastasis and favorable prognosis, the tumor does not always show such features. Regarding biological behavior of malignant tumor in the elderly, age-related alterations of the host such as stromal weakness and decreased immune response against cancer cell invasion should be considered as well as characteristics of tumor cell itself. Thus, we need a specific strategy for treatment for malignant neoplasms in the elderly.

  8. Naturally Occurring Animal Models with Outer Retina Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Wolfgang; Frederick, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring and laboratory generated animal models serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human retinal degenerations, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP), Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), cone dystrophies (CD) and macular degeneration (MD). Much progress has been made in elucidating gene defects underlying disease, in understanding mechanisms leading to disease, and in designing molecules for translational research and gene-based therapy to interfere with the progression of disease. Key to this progress has been study of naturally occurring murine and canine retinal degeneration mutants. This article will review the history, phenotypes and gene defects of select animal models with outer retina (photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium) degeneration phenotypes. PMID:19375447

  9. Nucleation processes occurring during dynamic recrystallization in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Barou, F.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Mainprice, D.; Piazolo, S.; Wheeler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of ice deformation mechanisms is a key point for ice flow modeling and interpretation of climatic signal extracted from ice cores. During deformation inside an ice sheet, recrystallization processes will impact texture and viscosity of ice. Recrystallization processes in ice are very similar to the ones observed in metals and rocks. Along ice cores, Continous (rotation) Dynamic Recrystallization (CDRX) and Discontinuous (migration) Dynamic Recrystallization (DDRX) occur, le later being observed mainly in the deeper part, where temperature and deviatoric stress are higher. The role of nucleation and grain boundary migration associated with DRX on texture development are still badly constrained. In this study, we associated ice creep experiments and high resolution EBSD observations (Electronic Microscopy) to better understand nucleation processes occurring during DRX. Ice is an hexagonal material in which deformation mainly occurs by dislocation glide along the basal plane conferring a strong viscoplastic anisotropy to the single crystal. Hence, during polycrystalline ice deformation the incompatibilty between grains lead to highly heterogeneous strain-field. DRX mechanisms arrise from these strong heterogeneities and induce a new microstructure and texture that relaxe the incompatibilites. The high resolution EBSD observations shown in this study are performed on selected samples of laboratory made polycrystalline columnar ice deformed until 3% macro strain (T=-7°C and σ=0.5 MPa). The analyse show that various kind of nucleation occur under these conditions such as polygonization (tilt bands, kink bands), bulge nucleation by SIGBM (strain Induced Grain Boundary Migration), and nucleation of grains with no obvious relationship with surrounding grains. All these nucleation processes are discussed regarding the associated dislocation fields using the Weigthed Burgers Vector analysis. These analyses highlight the strong heterogeneity of these fields

  10. Co-occurring depression and pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alschuler, Kevin N; Ehde, Dawn M; Jensen, Mark P

    2013-11-01

    Depression and pain are highly prevalent among individuals with multiple sclerosis, and they often co-occur. The purpose of this article is to summarize the literature and theory related to the comorbidity of pain and depression and describe how their presence can impact individuals with multiple sclerosis. Additionally, the article discusses how existing treatments of pain and depression could be adapted to address shared mechanisms and overcome barriers to treatment utilization.

  11. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear.

  12. Sensory-motor transformations for speech occur bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Gregory B; Thesen, Thomas; Carlson, Chad; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Pesaran, Bijan

    2014-03-06

    Historically, the study of speech processing has emphasized a strong link between auditory perceptual input and motor production output. A kind of 'parity' is essential, as both perception- and production-based representations must form a unified interface to facilitate access to higher-order language processes such as syntax and semantics, believed to be computed in the dominant, typically left hemisphere. Although various theories have been proposed to unite perception and production, the underlying neural mechanisms are unclear. Early models of speech and language processing proposed that perceptual processing occurred in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area) and motor production processes occurred in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area). Sensory activity was proposed to link to production activity through connecting fibre tracts, forming the left lateralized speech sensory-motor system. Although recent evidence indicates that speech perception occurs bilaterally, prevailing models maintain that the speech sensory-motor system is left lateralized and facilitates the transformation from sensory-based auditory representations to motor-based production representations. However, evidence for the lateralized computation of sensory-motor speech transformations is indirect and primarily comes from stroke patients that have speech repetition deficits (conduction aphasia) and studies using covert speech and haemodynamic functional imaging. Whether the speech sensory-motor system is lateralized, like higher-order language processes, or bilateral, like speech perception, is controversial. Here we use direct neural recordings in subjects performing sensory-motor tasks involving overt speech production to show that sensory-motor transformations occur bilaterally. We demonstrate that electrodes over bilateral inferior frontal, inferior parietal, superior temporal, premotor and somatosensory cortices exhibit robust sensory-motor neural

  13. [A solitary ganglioneuroma occurring in the sigmoid colon].

    PubMed

    Rabjerg, Maj; Kolodziejczyk, Adam

    2012-09-24

    We report a case of a rare solitary ganglioneuroma occurring in the sigmoid colon of a 70-year-old woman. She experienced sudden onset of abdominal pain and loss of old blood from the gastrointestinal tract. A colonoscopy disclosed a pedunculate polyp in the sigmoid colon 20 cm from the anus, and a histopathologic examination revealed a polypoid mucosa with abundant ganglionic cells and nerve fibres.

  14. Snapthrough occurring in the postbuckling of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, G.; Colin, J.; Coupeau, C.; Foucher, F.; Cimetière, A.; Grilhé, J.

    2005-02-01

    The postbuckling transition from an initially straight-sided wrinkle to a distribution of bubbles has been investigated by means of finite element simulations in the case of a thin film relying on a rigid substrate. The calculations show that a snapthrough occurs when the buckling wavelength exceeds a critical value. Experimental atomic force microscopy observations of this transition have been reported and found to be in good agreement with the calculations.

  15. Ticks of Medical Importance Occurring in the Western Hemisphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    disease agents such as protozoa, viruses , bacteria, rickettsiae and toxins. Ticks may also cause Irritation and discomfnrt directly as a result of their...the virus . BabEsiosis Human babesiosis is a malaria-like disease of varying severity which becomes clinically apparent I to 4 weeks after exposure. The...Panama, Colombia , Venezuela, and Ecuador (8). Distribution: This species (Figs. 7, 8) occurs in Panama (10), Paraguay, Colombia (3), Venezuela ,11

  16. When can inverted water tables occur beneath streams?

    PubMed

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G; Brunner, Philip; Irvine, Dylan J; Simmons, Craig T

    2014-01-01

    Decline in regional water tables (RWT) can cause losing streams to disconnect from underlying aquifers. When this occurs, an inverted water table (IWT) will develop beneath the stream, and an unsaturated zone will be present between the IWT and the RWT. The IWT marks the base of the saturated zone beneath the stream. Although a few prior studies have suggested the likelihood of an IWT without a clogging layer, most of them have assumed that a low-permeability streambed is required to reduce infiltration from surface water to groundwater, and that the IWT only occurs at the bottom of the low-permeability layer. In this study, we use numerical simulations to show that the development of an IWT beneath an unclogged stream is theoretically possible under steady-state conditions. For a stream width of 1 m above a homogeneous and isotropic sand aquifer with a 47 m deep RWT (measured in an observation point 20 m away from the center of the stream), an IWT will occur provided that the stream depth is less than a critical value of 4.1 m. This critical stream depth is the maximum water depth in the stream to maintain the occurrence of an IWT. The critical stream depth decreases with stream width. For a stream width of 6 m, the critical stream depth is only 1 mm. Thus while theoretically possible, an IWT is unlikely to occur at steady state without a clogging layer, unless a stream is very narrow or shallow and the RWT is very deep.

  17. Clinical experience of esophageal perforation occurring with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Inoue, H; Ikeda, H; Grace R Santi, E; Yoshida, A; Onimaru, M; Kudo, S

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal perforation occurring during or after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a rare, but serious complication. However, reports of its characteristics, including endoscopic imaging and management, have not been fully detailed. To analyze and report the clinical presentation and management of esophageal perforations occurred during or after EMR/ESD. Four hundred seventy-two esophageal neoplasms in 368 patients were treated (171 EMR; ESD 306) at Northern Yokohama Hospital from 2003 to 2012. Esophageal perforation occurred in a total of seven (1.9%) patients, all of whom were male and had undergone ESD. The etiology of perforation was: three (42.9%) intraoperative; three (42.9%) balloon dilatation for stricture prevention; one (14.2%) due to food bolus impaction. All cases were managed non-operatively based on the comprehensive assessment of clinical severity, extent of the injury, and the time interval from perforation to treatment onset. Conservative management included (i) bed rest and continuous monitoring to determine the need for operative intervention; (ii) fasting and intravenous fluid infusion/ tube feeding; and (iii) intravenous antibiotics. All defects closed spontaneously, save one case where closure was achieved by endoscopic clipping. Surgery was not required. Conservative management for esophageal perforation during advanced endoscopic resection is may be possible when there is no delay in diagnosis or treatment. Decision-making should be governed purely by multidisciplinary discussion.

  18. A novel trauma model: naturally occurring canine trauma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kelly E; Sharp, Claire R; Adams, Cynthia R; Beilman, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In human trauma patients, most deaths result from hemorrhage and brain injury, whereas late deaths, although rare, are the result of multiple organ failure and sepsis. A variety of experimental animal models have been developed to investigate the pathophysiology of traumatic injury and evaluate novel interventions. Similar to other experimental models, these trauma models cannot recapitulate conditions of naturally occurring trauma, and therefore therapeutic interventions based on these models are often ineffective. Pet dogs with naturally occurring traumatic injury represent a promising translational model for human trauma that could be used to assess novel therapies. The purpose of this article was to review the naturally occurring canine trauma literature to highlight the similarities between canine and human trauma. The American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Veterinary Committee on Trauma has initiated the establishment of a national network of veterinary trauma centers to enhance uniform delivery of care to canine trauma patients. In addition, the Spontaneous Trauma in Animals Team, a multidisciplinary, multicenter group of researchers has created a clinical research infrastructure for carrying out large-scale clinical trials in canine trauma patients. Moving forward, these national resources can be utilized to facilitate multicenter prospective studies of canine trauma to evaluate therapies and interventions that have shown promise in experimental animal models, thus closing the critical gap in the translation of knowledge from experimental models to humans and increasing the likelihood of success in phases 1 and 2 human clinical trials.

  19. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yueh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25866536

  20. Evolution of virulence when transmission occurs before disease.

    PubMed

    Osnas, Erik E; Dobson, Andrew P

    2010-08-23

    Most models of virulence evolution assume that transmission and virulence are constant during an infection. In many viral (HIV and influenza), bacterial (TB) and prion (BSE and CWD) systems, disease-induced mortality occurs long after the host becomes infectious. Therefore, we constructed a model with two infected classes that differ in transmission rate and virulence in order to understand how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) depends on the relative difference in transmission and virulence between classes, on the transition rate between classes and on the recovery rate from the second class. We find that ESS virulence decreases when expressed early in the infection or when transmission occurs late in an infection. When virulence occurred relatively equally in each class and there was disease recovery, ESS virulence increased with increased transition rate. In contrast, ESS virulence first increased and then decreased with transition rate when there was little virulence early in the infection and a rapid recovery rate. This model predicts that ESS virulence is highly dependent on the timing of transmission and pathology after infection; thus, pathogen evolution may either increase or decrease virulence after emergence in a new host.

  1. Pharmacotherapy of Co-Occurring Schizophrenia and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Sarah C.; Brunette, Mary F.; Noordsy, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders, common in patients with schizophrenia, can lead to poor outcomes. Here we review the literature on the use of antipsychotics in patients with co-occurring schizophrenia and substance use disorder as well as evidence for the use of adjunctive pharmacological treatments targeting substance use in these patients. We also discuss a neurobiological formulation suggesting that the cooccurrence of these disorders may be related to a dysfunction in the dopamine mediated brain reward circuitry. Typical antipsychotics do not appear to decrease substance use in this population. Randomized, controlled trials provide some support for use of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine for co-occurring cannabis use disorder, naltrexone and disulfiram for alcohol use disorder, and also nicotine replacement therapy, sustained-release bupropion and varenicline for tobacco use disorder. Nonetheless, data regarding treatment in patients with these co-occurring disorders are still limited, and many studies reported to date have been either underpowered or did not include a control condition. Further research is needed to evaluate optimal pharmacotherapeutic strategies for this population. PMID:27226947

  2. Surfactant based enhanced oil recovery mediated by naturally occurring microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.; Bala, G.A.; Duvall, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Oil recovery experiments using Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 and a sucrose based nutrient were performed using Berea sandstone cores ranging in permeability from 85 to 510 md (0.084 to 0.503 {mu}m{sup 2}). Bacillus licheniformis JF-2, a surfactant producing microorganism isolated from an oilfield environment, is nonpathogenic and will not reduce sulfate. Oil recovery efficiencies (E{sub r}) for four different crude oils ranging from 19.1 to 38.1{degrees}API (0.9396 to 0.8343 g/cm{sup 3}) varied from 2.8 to 42.6% of the waterflood residual oil. Injection of cell-free'' supernatants resulted in E{sub r} values from 7.0 to 16.4%. Microbially-mediated systems reduced interfacial tension (IFT) about 20 mN/m for four different crude oils. Following microbial flood experimentation microorganisms were distributed throughout the core (110 md (0.109 {mu}m{sup 2}) Berea sandstone) with a predominance of cells located near the outlet end. 34 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Application of organic geochemistry to coastal tar residues from Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Hostettler, F.D.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Tar residues are common on the coastline of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. These coastal tar residues have been washed ashore and usually occur on headlands near the high-tide line. In this study, 18 coastal tar residues were collected and analyzed to determine their carbon isotopic compositions and the values of selected biomarker ratios. All of the residues have very heavy (13C-enriched) carbon isotopic compositions spanning a narrow range (??13C = -22.2 to -23.4???), and 28,30-bisnorhopane is present in all samples. These same geochemical characteristics are found in Monterey Formation oils from which the coastal tar residues were likely derived. These coastal residues could result from natural seeps or from accidental spills. Statistically the coastal tar residues can be organized into three groups, each of which may represent different spill or seep events. Seven samples of potential local representative sources for the tar residues were examined, but none could account for the coastal tars.

  4. Comparison of test methods to screen for residual chemical contamination on medical device surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prachi; Shoff, Megan; Lucas, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Reprocessing medical devices involves several steps including cleaning and disinfection or sterilization. Chemical residuals can occur at various stages of reprocessing. These residues could interfere with device function and potentially harm patients. These solutions are composed of a combination of various chemicals and their residues are highly diluted post rinsing, therefore, it is difficult to find a sensitive and rapid method to detect toxicity due to chemical residues. This study focused on (1) finding the levels of residues that are cytotoxic using two mammalian cell lines and Daphnia magna, and (2) evaluating two test methods, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and the Luminescent Bacteria Test (LBT), to measure residual chemicals levels. The two mammalian cell lines were equal in their cytotoxicity responses. However, Daphnia were more sensitive to some chemical residue than the two mammalian cell lines. TOC and LBT were able to detect the presence of residue well below the levels that were determined to cause mammalian cytotoxicity. LBT was more sensitive for some chemicals and TOC for others, both in solution and in simulated cleaning and rinsing for the limited number of solutions tested in this study.

  5. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Bailey, Michael A.; Popernack, Paul M.; Cunningham, James M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2010-06-05

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  6. Biological activity of some naturally occurring resins, gums and pigments against in vitro LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K; Kaliora, Andriana C; Assimopoulou, Andreana N; Papapeorgiou, Vassilios P

    2003-05-01

    Naturally occurring gums and resins with beneficial pharmaceutical and nutraceutical properties were tested for their possible protective effect against copper-induced LDL oxidation in vitro. Chiosmastic gum (CMG) (Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia resin) was the most effective in protecting human LDL from oxidation. The minimum and maximum doses for the saturation phenomena of inhibition of LDL oxidation were 2.5 mg and 50 mg CMG (75.3% and 99.9%, respectively). The methanol/water extract of CMG was the most effective compared with other solvent combinations. CMG when fractionated in order to determine a structure-activity relationship showed that the total mastic essential oil, collofonium-like residue and acidic fractions of CMG exhibited a high protective activity ranging from 65.0% to 77.8%. The other natural gums and resins (CMG resin 'liquid collection', P. terebinthus var. Chia resin, dammar resin, acacia gum, tragacanth gum, storax gum) also tested as above, showed 27.0%-78.8% of the maximum LDL protection. The other naturally occurring substances, i.e. triterpenes (amyrin, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, lupeol, 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid) and hydroxynaphthoquinones (naphthazarin, shikonin and alkannin) showed 53.5%-78.8% and 27.0%-64.1% LDL protective activity, respectively. The combination effects (68.7%-76.2% LDL protection) of ursolic-, oleanolic- and ursodeoxycholic- acids were almost equal to the effect (75.3%) of the CMG extract in comparable doses.

  7. Non-equilibrium effects in high temperature chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rate data were collected for chemical reactions occurring at high temperatures during reentry of space vehicles. The principle of detailed balancing is used in modeling kinetics of chemical reactions at high temperatures. Although this principle does not hold for certain transient or incubation times in the initial phase of the reaction, it does seem to be valid for the rates of internal energy transitions that occur within molecules and atoms. That is, for every rate of transition within the internal energy states of atoms or molecules, there is an inverse rate that is related through an equilibrium expression involving the energy difference of the transition.

  8. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Eyng, C.; Murakami, A. E.; Santos, T. C.; Silveira, T. G. V.; Pedroso, R. B.; Lourenço, D. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control – macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and

  9. Citrus Peel Additives for One-Pot Triazole Formation by Decarboxylation, Nucleophilic Substitution, and Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Desiree E.; Schoffstall, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory experiment consists of three different reactions occurring in the same flask: a cycloaddition reaction, preceded by decarboxylation and nucleophilic substitution reactions. The decarboxylation and cycloaddition reactions occur using identical Cu(I) catalyst and conditions. Orange, lemon, and other citrus fruit…

  10. Studies Of Residual Flexibility And Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, John R.; Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports presents theoretical and experimental studies in which concept of residual flexibility applied to modal vibration testing and verification of mathematical models of vibrations of flexible structure constrained by another structure. "Residual flexibility" denotes that part of interface flexibility due to mode shapes out of frequency range of test. Studies directed toward assessing residual-flexibility approach as substitute for fixed-base vibrational testing of payloads installed in spacecraft.

  11. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  12. Identification of an active site cysteine residue in Escherichia coli pyruvate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Gennis, R B

    1982-06-10

    The cysteine-directed reagent N-ethylmaleimide rapidly and completely inactivates pyruvate oxidase. This inactivation is correlated with the reaction of one cysteine residue per enzyme monomer. In the presence of the cofactor, thiamin pyrophosphate, the enzyme is not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Furthermore, the N-ethylmaleimide-inactivated enzyme exhibits a very low affinity for the cofactor as determined by a fluorescence quenching technique. The presence of a reactive cysteine residue at the thiamin pyrophosphate binding site is therefore indicated. Although N-ethylmaleimide completely inactivates the enzyme, a second sulfhydryl reagent methylmethanethiosulfonate is only partially inhibitory. It is shown that methylmethanethiosulfonate and N-ethylmaleimide react with the same cysteine residue. Thus, the N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive residue is probably not directly involved in catalysis.

  13. Chloride leaching from air pollution control residues solidified using ground granulated blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Lampris, Christos; Stegemann, Julia A; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2008-11-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag (ggbs) has been used to solidify air pollution control (APC) residues obtained from a major UK energy-from-waste plant. Samples were prepared with ggbs additions between 10 and 50 wt% of total dry mass and water/solids ratios between 0.35 and 0.80. Consistence, setting time, compressive strength and leaching characteristics have been investigated. Results indicated that the highly alkaline nature of APC residues due to the presence of free lime can be used to activate ggbs hydration reactions. Increasing ggbs additions and reducing the water content resulted in increased compressive strengths, with 50 wt% ggbs samples having average 28 d strengths of 20.6 MPa. Leaching tests indicate low physical encapsulation and minimal chemical fixation of chloride in ggbs solidified APC residues. The results suggest that more than 50 wt% ggbs additions would be required to treat APC residues to meet the current waste acceptance criteria limits for chloride.

  14. Studies on residue-free decontaminants for chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Wagner, George W

    2015-03-17

    Residue-free decontaminants based on hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes to water and oxygen in the environment, are examined as decontaminants for chemical warfare agents (CWA). For the apparent special case of CWA on concrete, H2O2 alone, without any additives, effectively decontaminates S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), pinacolyl methylphosphorofluoridate (GD), and bis(2-choroethyl) sulfide (HD) in a process thought to involve H2O2 activation by surface-bound carbonates/bicarbonates (known H2O2 activators for CWA decontamination). A plethora of products are formed during the H2O2 decontamination of HD on concrete, and these are characterized by comparison to synthesized authentic compounds. As a potential residue-free decontaminant for surfaces other than concrete (or those lacking adsorbed carbonate/bicarbonate) H2O2 activation for CWA decontamination is feasible using residue-free NH3 and CO2 as demonstrated by reaction studies for VX, GD, and HD in homogeneous solution. Although H2O2/NH3/CO2 ("HPAC") decontaminants are active for CWA decontamination in solution, they require testing on actual surfaces of interest to assess their true efficacy for surface decontamination.

  15. Catalytic mechanism of a family 3 beta-glucosidase and mutagenesis study on residue Asp-247.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y K; Chir, J; Chen, F Y

    2001-01-01

    A family 3 beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum has been cloned and overexpressed. The mechanistic action of the enzyme was probed by NMR spectroscopy and kinetic investigations, including substrate reactivity, secondary kinetic isotope effects and inhibition studies. The stereochemistry of enzymic hydrolysis was identified as occurring with the retention of an anomeric configuration, indicating a double-displacement reaction. Based on the k(cat) values with a series of aryl glucosides, a Bronsted plot with a concave-downward shape was constructed. This biphasic behaviour is consistent with a two-step mechanism involving the formation and breakdown of a glucosyl-enzyme intermediate. The large Bronsted constant (beta=-0.85) for the leaving-group-dependent portion (pK(a) of leaving phenols >7) indicates substantial bond cleavage at the transition state. Secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects with 2,4-dinitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside, o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside and p-cyanophenyl beta-D-glucopyanoside as substrates were 1.17+/-0.02, 1.19+/-0.02 and 1.04+/-0.02 respectively. These results support an S(N)1-like mechanism for the deglucosylation step and an S(N)2-like mechanism for the glucosylation step. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to study essential amino acid residues. The activities (k(cat)/K(m)) of the D247G and D247N mutants were 30000- and 200000-fold lower respectively than that of the wild-type enzyme, whereas the D247E mutant retained 20% of wild-type activity. These results indicate that Asp-247 is an essential amino acid. It is likely that this residue functions as a nucleophile in the reaction. This conclusion is supported by the kinetics of the irreversible inactivation of the wild-type enzyme by conduritol-B-epoxide, compared with the much slower inhibition of the D247E mutant and the lack of irreversible inhibition of the D247G mutant. PMID:11311148

  16. Establishing optimal quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assays for routine diagnosis and tracking of minimal residual disease in JAK2-V617F-associated myeloproliferative neoplasms: a joint European LeukemiaNet/MPN&MPNr-EuroNet (COST action BM0902) study

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, J V; Ivey, A; Vannucchi, A M; Lippert, E; Oppliger Leibundgut, E; Cassinat, B; Pallisgaard, N; Maroc, N; Hermouet, S; Nickless, G; Guglielmelli, P; van der Reijden, B A; Jansen, J H; Alpermann, T; Schnittger, S; Bench, A; Tobal, K; Wilkins, B; Cuthill, K; McLornan, D; Yeoman, K; Akiki, S; Bryon, J; Jeffries, S; Jones, A; Percy, M J; Schwemmers, S; Gruender, A; Kelley, T W; Reading, S; Pancrazzi, A; McMullin, M F; Pahl, H L; Cross, N C P; Harrison, C N; Prchal, J T; Chomienne, C; Kiladjian, J J; Barbui, T; Grimwade, D

    2013-01-01

    Reliable detection of JAK2-V617F is critical for accurate diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs); in addition, sensitive mutation-specific assays can be applied to monitor disease response. However, there has been no consistent approach to JAK2-V617F detection, with assays varying markedly in performance, affecting clinical utility. Therefore, we established a network of 12 laboratories from seven countries to systematically evaluate nine different DNA-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, including those in widespread clinical use. Seven quality control rounds involving over 21 500 qPCR reactions were undertaken using centrally distributed cell line dilutions and plasmid controls. The two best-performing assays were tested on normal blood samples (n=100) to evaluate assay specificity, followed by analysis of serial samples from 28 patients transplanted for JAK2-V617F-positive disease. The most sensitive assay, which performed consistently across a range of qPCR platforms, predicted outcome following transplant, with the mutant allele detected a median of 22 weeks (range 6–85 weeks) before relapse. Four of seven patients achieved molecular remission following donor lymphocyte infusion, indicative of a graft vs MPN effect. This study has established a robust, reliable assay for sensitive JAK2-V617F detection, suitable for assessing response in clinical trials, predicting outcome and guiding management of patients undergoing allogeneic transplant. PMID:23860450

  17. Establishing optimal quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assays for routine diagnosis and tracking of minimal residual disease in JAK2-V617F-associated myeloproliferative neoplasms: a joint European LeukemiaNet/MPN&MPNr-EuroNet (COST action BM0902) study.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, J V; Ivey, A; Vannucchi, A M; Lippert, E; Oppliger Leibundgut, E; Cassinat, B; Pallisgaard, N; Maroc, N; Hermouet, S; Nickless, G; Guglielmelli, P; van der Reijden, B A; Jansen, J H; Alpermann, T; Schnittger, S; Bench, A; Tobal, K; Wilkins, B; Cuthill, K; McLornan, D; Yeoman, K; Akiki, S; Bryon, J; Jeffries, S; Jones, A; Percy, M J; Schwemmers, S; Gruender, A; Kelley, T W; Reading, S; Pancrazzi, A; McMullin, M F; Pahl, H L; Cross, N C P; Harrison, C N; Prchal, J T; Chomienne, C; Kiladjian, J J; Barbui, T; Grimwade, D

    2013-10-01

    Reliable detection of JAK2-V617F is critical for accurate diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs); in addition, sensitive mutation-specific assays can be applied to monitor disease response. However, there has been no consistent approach to JAK2-V617F detection, with assays varying markedly in performance, affecting clinical utility. Therefore, we established a network of 12 laboratories from seven countries to systematically evaluate nine different DNA-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, including those in widespread clinical use. Seven quality control rounds involving over 21,500 qPCR reactions were undertaken using centrally distributed cell line dilutions and plasmid controls. The two best-performing assays were tested on normal blood samples (n=100) to evaluate assay specificity, followed by analysis of serial samples from 28 patients transplanted for JAK2-V617F-positive disease. The most sensitive assay, which performed consistently across a range of qPCR platforms, predicted outcome following transplant, with the mutant allele detected a median of 22 weeks (range 6-85 weeks) before relapse. Four of seven patients achieved molecular remission following donor lymphocyte infusion, indicative of a graft vs MPN effect. This study has established a robust, reliable assay for sensitive JAK2-V617F detection, suitable for assessing response in clinical trials, predicting outcome and guiding management of patients undergoing allogeneic transplant.

  18. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  19. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  20. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  1. Disinhibitory reactions to benzodiazepines: a review.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, P; Roelofse, J A

    1991-05-01

    This article reviews some of the important aspects of benzodiazepine-induced disinhibitory reactions. Although reactions of this type are relatively rare, they may sometimes manifest themselves in aggressive behavior accompanied by suicidal or homicidal tendencies. It appears that these reactions occur more commonly in younger patients, although the elderly (above 65 years) may also be at risk. Many mechanisms have been postulated, but none truly explain how these reactions arise. The concept that central cholinergic mechanisms may play a role, however, remains attractive and stems primarily from physostigmine's ability to successfully reverse this type of reaction. The potential role of the benzodiazepine antagonists, eg, flumazenil, in reversing disinhibitory reactions is also discussed. Apart from patients who previously exhibited poor impulse control, there are no reliable indicators for recognizing potential candidates for this type of reaction. To minimize the occurrence of disinhibitory reactions, some guidelines, which include the avoidance of certain drug combinations, the use of low doses of benzodiazepines, slow incremental intravenous administration, and good rapport with patients, are presented.

  2. Mechanism of HDS/HDN reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F.

    1993-06-01

    One method for exploring the mechanisms involved in HDS/HDN reactions is to study the elementary reaction steps that occur for model systems using UHV surface science techniques. Our approach has been to examine reactions involving a prototypical organosulfur molecule, methanethiol, adsorbed on different clean and modified metal surfaces. In general, as the surface is heated, this molecule follows two principle reaction pathways on most transition metal surfaces. At low coverages, the molecule undergoes total decomposition producing adsorbed atomic sulfur and carbon and gaseous H{sub 2}. At higher coverages a competing pathway results in adsorbed sulfur and gaseous methane. In order to understand these reactions, the different chemical intermediates are identified, and the differences in reactivity for these intermediates are studied as a function of adsorbate coverage, surface composition and sample temperature. Several analytical techniques are employed in these experiments. Temperature programmed desorption, TPD, is used to identify the desorbed reaction products, their desorption temperature and the branching ratio as the system is modified. Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, is used to determine the amount of adsorbed atomic species that result from the reaction. The reaction intermediates are studied by high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Mechanism of HDS/HDN reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    One method for exploring the mechanisms involved in HDS/HDN reactions is to study the elementary reaction steps that occur for model systems using UHV surface science techniques. Our approach has been to examine reactions involving a prototypical organosulfur molecule, methanethiol, adsorbed on different clean and modified metal surfaces. In general, as the surface is heated, this molecule follows two principle reaction pathways on most transition metal surfaces. At low coverages, the molecule undergoes total decomposition producing adsorbed atomic sulfur and carbon and gaseous H[sub 2]. At higher coverages a competing pathway results in adsorbed sulfur and gaseous methane. In order to understand these reactions, the different chemical intermediates are identified, and the differences in reactivity for these intermediates are studied as a function of adsorbate coverage, surface composition and sample temperature. Several analytical techniques are employed in these experiments. Temperature programmed desorption, TPD, is used to identify the desorbed reaction products, their desorption temperature and the branching ratio as the system is modified. Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, is used to determine the amount of adsorbed atomic species that result from the reaction. The reaction intermediates are studied by high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-11-05

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  5. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  6. Glycoconjugate residues in a subpopulation of feline taste cells.

    PubMed

    Sotthibandhu, Pongsiwa; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    There have been a number of studies which have categorized cells of feline taste buds: Types I, II, III and IV; however, few studies have examined whether feline taste bud cell types differ from each other histochemically. The goal of the present study is to figure out what kinds of glycoconjugates correspond to the four different types of cells in the taste bud. We have detected glycochains by lectin histochemistry. We have also identified Types II and III by immunohistochemistry. Then, we combined lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to determine which types of cells have which glycochains. In addition, we have compared these reactions in different papillae in the oral cavity: circumvallate papillae, fungiform papillae and epiglottises. Our results demonstrated that glycoconjugates showed a variety of distributions among cells in these papillae, although immunopositive reactions of the proteins involved in the taste transduction showed similar distributions in the taste buds in these papillae. Amongst all, N-acetyllactosamine was the most prominently detected glycoconjugate residue in a subpopulation of Type II (receptor) cells and Type III (pre-synaptic) cells. Our findings suggest that 1) Different localization of glycol-residues in taste buds might be owing to the possibility that different types of cells need different types of glycoconjugates, possibly for the function of cells in the taste buds, and 2) N-acetyllactosamine might play some roles in taste sensation perception and their transfer by Type II and III cells.

  7. Photoneutron Reactions in Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    Photoneutron reactions are discussed in the context of nucleosynthesis with emphasis on a unified understanding of (γ, n) and (n, γ) reactions for heavy nuclei through the γ-ray strength function and a revisit to explosive nucleosynthesis of 9Be through the reciprocity theorem. The role of photonuclear reactions in nucleosynthesis is supplemented by the photonuclear data project (IAEA-CRP F42032) and will be strengthened in the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in the future.

  8. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  9. Inhibition of retrogressive reactions in coal/petroleum co-processing. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1991--December 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.; Tomic, J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the reactions occurring at the onset of coke formation during the co-processing of coals with petroleum residua. The specific objectives include examination of chemical components, or groups of components, in coals and petroleum feedstocks to quantify and rank the effects of these components in retarding or enhancement of coke formation. The work involves bench scale reactions in microautoclaves, supplemented by studies of the carbonaceous residues by such techniques as diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. During this reporting period work focused on identification of mechanisms of coke formation. The objective of this task is to identify those compounds or components which are specifically responsible for initiating coke formation.

  10. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  11. Designing occupancy studies when false-positive detections occur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    1.Recently, estimators have been developed to estimate occupancy probabilities when false-positive detections occur during presence-absence surveys. Some of these estimators combine different types of survey data to improve estimates of occupancy. With these estimators, there is a tradeoff between the number of sample units surveyed, and the number and type of surveys at each sample unit. Guidance on efficient design of studies when false positives occur is unavailable. 2.For a range of scenarios, I identified survey designs that minimized the mean square error of the estimate of occupancy. I considered an approach that uses one survey method and two observation states and an approach that uses two survey methods. For each approach, I used numerical methods to identify optimal survey designs when model assumptions were met and parameter values were correctly anticipated, when parameter values were not correctly anticipated, and when the assumption of no unmodelled detection heterogeneity was violated. 3.Under the approach with two observation states, false positive detections increased the number of recommended surveys, relative to standard occupancy models. If parameter values could not be anticipated, pessimism about detection probabilities avoided poor designs. Detection heterogeneity could require more or fewer repeat surveys, depending on parameter values. If model assumptions were met, the approach with two survey methods was inefficient. However, with poor anticipation of parameter values, with detection heterogeneity, or with removal sampling schemes, combining two survey methods could improve estimates of occupancy. 4.Ignoring false positives can yield biased parameter estimates, yet false positives greatly complicate the design of occupancy studies. Specific guidance for major types of false-positive occupancy models, and for two assumption violations common in field data, can conserve survey resources. This guidance can be used to design efficient

  12. Leaching Properties of Naturally Occurring Heavy Metals from Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Hoshino, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Hara, J.; Sugita, H.

    2014-12-01

    The major threats to human health from heavy metals are associated with exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, as well as some other elements. The effects of such heavy metals on human health have been extensively studied and reviewed by international organizations such as WHO. Due to their toxicity, heavy metal contaminations have been regulated by national environmental standards in many countries, and/or laws such as the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan. Leaching of naturally occurring heavy metals from the soils, especially those around abandoned metal mines into surrounding water systems, either groundwater or surface water systems, is one of the major pathways of exposure. Therefore, understanding the leaching properties of toxic heavy metals from naturally polluted soils is of fundamentally importance for effectively managing abandoned metal mines, excavated rocks discharged from infrastructure constructions such as tunneling, and/or selecting a pertinent countermeasure against pollution when it is necessary. In this study, soil samples taken from the surroundings of abandoned metal mines in different regions in Japan were collected and analyzed. The samples contained multiple heavy metals such as lead, arsenic and chromium. Standard leaching test and sequential leaching test considering different forms of contaminants, such as trivalent and pentavalent arsenics, and trivalent and hexavalent chromiums, together with standard test for evaluating total concentration, X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) tests were performed. In addition, sequential leaching tests were performed to evaluate long-term leaching properties of lead from representative samples. This presentation introduces the details of the above experimental study, discusses the relationships among leaching properties and chemical and mineral compositions, indicates the difficulties associated with

  13. Using the method of weighted residuals to compute potentials of mean force

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, Eric C. . E-mail: ericcyr@uiuc.edu; Bond, Stephen D. . E-mail: sdbond@uiuc.edu

    2007-07-01

    We propose a general framework for approximating the potential of mean force (PMF) along a reaction coordinate in conformational space. This framework, based on the method of weighted residuals, can be viewed as a generalization of thermodynamic integration and direct histogram methods. Using weighted residuals allows for higher-order approximations to the PMF in the form of a global spectral method or a finite element method. In addition, the higher degree of continuity provided by spectral and higher-order elements makes weighted residual methods an attractive choice for use in tandem with biasing force methods. As an analysis tool, the weighted residuals framework provides a context for direct comparison of thermodynamic integration and histogram based methods. For validation of the new method, numerical experiments are performed on two systems: a simple double-well and alanine dipeptide in vacuum. Comparisons between the new weighted residual methods, thermodynamic integration, and WHAM are performed. When configuration space is perfectly sampled the high-order weighted residual methods are found to exhibit exponential convergence. For more realistic sampling, the weighted residual methods performed comparably to the other two. However, results suggest that spectral type methods are more robust with respect to parameter choices describing the solution space.

  14. On incompressibility of a matrix in naturally occurring composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatikh, Larissa; Pingle, Pawan

    2007-12-01

    The work illustrates that a soft matrix, which has the Poisson ratio close to 0.5 and is reinforced with a rigid-line inclusion, possesses an interesting behavior at the inclusion/matrix interface. It experiences a hydrostatic stress state and behaves as an incompressible fluid under longitudinal and transverse loads. The stress singularities are eliminated ahead of the inclusion tips, and when interface defects are formed, their effect on the composite compliance is minimal. These observations have far reaching applications when one is interested in mechanisms of multifunctional property improvement of composites (such as toughness and stiffness) learned from naturally occurring composites.

  15. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  16. Photoprotective substance occurs primarily in outer layers of fish skin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabacher, D.L.; Little, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    Methanol extracts of dorsal skin layers, eyes, gills, and livers from ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation-sensitive and UVB-tolerant species of freshwater fish were examined for a substance that appears to be photoprotective. Significantly larger amounts of this substance were found in extracts of outer dorsal skin layers from both UVB-sensitive and UVB-tolerant fish when compared with extracts of inner dorsal skin layers. This substance occurred in minor amounts or was not detected in eye, gill, and liver extracts. The apparent primary function of this substance in fish is to protect the cells in outer dorsal skin layers from harmful levels of UVB radiation.

  17. An Update on Antitumor Activity of Naturally Occurring Chalcones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, En-Hui; Wang, Ru-Feng; Guo, Shu-Zhen; Liu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Chalcones, which have characteristic 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one skeleton, are mainly produced in roots, rhizomes, heartwood, leaves, and seeds of genera Angelica, Sophora, Glycyrrhiza, Humulus, Scutellaria, Parartocarpus, Ficus, Dorstenia, Morus, Artocarpus, and so forth. They have become of interest in the research and development of natural antitumor agents over the past decades due to their broad range of mechanisms including anti-initiation, induction of apoptosis, antiproliferation, antimetastasis, antiangiogenesis, and so forth. This review summarizes the studies on the antitumor activity of naturally occurring chalcones and their underlying mechanisms in detail during the past decades. PMID:23690855

  18. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:6576377

  19. Naturally occurring anti-tissue antibodies in rat sera

    PubMed Central

    Weir, D. M.; Pinckard, R. N.; Elson, C. J.; Suckling, Deirdre E.

    1966-01-01

    Seventy per cent of normal rat sera have been shown to contain heat labile serum component(s) active against various rat organ homogenates as demonstrated by haemolytic complement fixation and passive haemagglutination tests. The main antigenic activity in rat liver has been found in the mitochondrial fractions. It was also demonstrated by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique that both guinea-pig complement and high molecular weight rat globulins were fixed to rat organ sections. Chemotactic activity has also been observed with rat serum and rat liver mitochondria and it is suggested that these naturally occurring antibodies may be implicated in the removal of tissue breakdown products. PMID:5338951

  20. Dangerous bifurcation at border collision: when does it occur?

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Anindita; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2005-05-01

    It has been shown recently that border collision bifurcation in a piecewise smooth map can lead to a situation where a fixed point remains stable at both sides of the bifurcation point, and yet the orbit becomes unbounded at the point of bifurcation because the basin of attraction of the stable fixed point shrinks to zero size. Such bifurcations have been named "dangerous bifurcations." In this paper we provide explanation of this phenomenon, and develop the analytical conditions on the parameters under which such dangerous bifurcations will occur.