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Sample records for reaction zone formations

  1. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  2. FLUID EVOLUTION AND MINERAL REACTIONS DURING SHEAR ZONE FORMATION AT NUSFJORD, LOFOTEN, NORWAY (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullerud, K.

    2009-12-01

    At Nusfjord in Lofoten, Norway, three 0.3 - 3 m thick shear zones occur in a gabbro-anorthosite. During deformation, the shear zones were infiltrated by a hydrous fluid enriched in Cl. In the central parts of the shear zones, fluid-rock interaction resulted in complete break-down of the primary mafic silicates. Complete hydration of these minerals to Cl-free amphibole and biotite suggests that the hydrous fluid was present in excess during deformation in these parts of the shear zones. Along the margins of the shear zones, however, the igneous mafic silicates (Cpx, Bt, Opx) were only partly overgrown by hydrous minerals. Here, Cl-enriched minerals (Amph, Bt, Scp, Ap) can be observed. Amphibole shows compositions covering the range 0.1 - 4.0 wt % Cl within single thin sections. Mineral textures and extreme compositional variations of the Cl-bearing minerals indicate large chemical gradients of the fluid phase. Relics of primary mafic silicates and compositionally zoned reaction coronas around primary mafic silicates suggest that the free fluid was totally consumed before the alteration of the primary phases were completed. The extreme variations in the Cl-content of amphibole are inferred to monitor a gradual desiccation of the Cl-bearing grain-boundary fluid during fluid-mineral reactions accordingly: 1) The first amphibole that formed during the reactions principally extracted water from the fluid, resulting in a slight increase in the Cl content of the fluid. 2) Continued amphibole-forming reactions resulted in gradual consumption of the free fluid phase, principally by extracting water from the fluid, resulting in an increase in its Cl-content. Higher Cl-content of the fluid resulted in higher Cl-content of the equilibrium amphibole. 3) The most Cl-enriched amphibole (4 wt % Cl) formed in equilibrium with the last volumes of the grain-boundary fluid, which had evolved to a highly saline solution. Mineral reactions within a 1-2 thick zone of the host rock along

  3. Secondary Reaction Zone Formations in coated Ni-base Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Rae, C. M. F.

    2009-05-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) has been added to the latest 4th Generation Ni-base superalloys to improve phase stability and modify creep life. Various coatings are routinely applied to these advanced alloys to protect the turbine blade at elevated temperature, however, this creates several problems such as the precipitation of brittle Topologically Close-Packed (TCP) phases and the formation of Secondary Reaction Zones (SRZ). The SRZ forms under the plat-aluminized coating of turbine blades and consists of γ, γ and TCP phases growing into substrate by the migration of high-angle grain boundaries. Surface residual stress and chemical super-saturation of alloying elements are associated to SRZ formation. In the thin sections of high-pressure turbine blades this is critical in determining blade performance and longevity. It is essential to know how Ru additions affect coating and SRZ morphologies during exposure. In this study, we focus on the effects of three variables on the SRZ formation: Ru concentration, alloy composition in Ru-containing alloys and surface finish. A series of Platinum-Aluminised superalloys containing 2-5wt% Ru and having various surface finishes was studied after isothermal exposure at 1100°C for up to 500h. The alloys were classified into two groups by their distinctive SRZ morphology. At the lowest Ru levels sporadic formation of SRZ was observed, whilst a continuous SRZ was formed in the higher Ru alloys. EBSD analysis revealed that the latter group have a higher nucleation rate of individual SRZ grains and also showed more rapid SRZ growth. The precipitation of TCPs in the substrate also inhibited the growth of the SRZ towards the end of the exposure further reducing the penetration of the SRZ into the substrate. It is concluded that Ru-additions to Ni-base superalloys are effective in impeding TCP phase formation in the substrate, but increase both the extent and the rate of SRZ formation beneath coating.

  4. Formation of Secondary Reaction Zones in Diffusion Aluminide-Coated Ni-Base Single-Crystal Superalloys Containing Ruthenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dipak K.; Murphy, Kenneth S.; Ma, Shuwei; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2008-07-01

    The formation of secondary reaction zones (SRZs) beneath aluminide coatings in several Ru-bearing single-crystal Ni-base superalloys has been investigated. The presence of significant amounts of Ru in the superalloys did not prevent the formation of the secondary reaction zone. However, the Ru content of the alloys affected the type of refractory element-rich phase formed during the transformation. As the Ru content increased, the phase involved in the transformation shifted from the orthorhombic P to the β-RuAl phase. A differential tendency to SRZ formation was observed between the dendritic and interdendritic regions of the alloys. Significant growth of the SRZ was also observed during the high-temperature oxidation exposure of the coated alloys. The effects of the alloying elements on SRZ formation are discussed.

  5. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation due to neighboring nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David P.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Hooper, Ryan J.; Manuel, Michelle V.

    2015-09-01

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. Much of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To enhance the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of evaluating new foil-substrate combinations for screening and optimization. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and different alloys.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  8. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  9. Three zones for illite formation during burial diagenesis and metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Reinterpretation of published data for shale cuttings from the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin identifies three reaction zones for illite formation with increasing depth for well CWRU6. In a shallow zone (1.85 to 3 km), non-expanding illite-like layers formed primarily by the coalescence of smectite 2:1 layers around interlayer K+. In a middle zone (3 to 4 km), illite crystals neoformed from solution as coarser K-bearing phases and smectite were dissolved by organic acids. In the deepest zone (>4 km), illite recrystallized as less stable illite crystals dissolved, and more stable illite crystals grew during mineral ripening. -from Author

  10. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear zones play a first-order role in lithospheric kinematics, accurate conceptual and numerical models of orogenic development require predicting when and where they form. Although a strain-based algorithm in the upper crust for weakening due to faulting appears to succeed (e.g., Koons et al., 2010, doi:10.1029/2009TC002463), a comparable general rule for the viscous crust remains unestablished. Here we consider two aspects of the geological argument for a similar algorithm in the viscous regime, namely (1) whether predicting km-scale shear zone development based on a single parameter (such as strain or shear heating) is reasonable; and (2) whether lithologic variability inherent in most orogenic systems precludes a simple predictive rule. A review of tectonically significant shear zones worldwide and more detailed investigations in the Central Gneiss belt of the Ontario segment of the Grenville Province reveals that most km-scale shear zones occur at lithological boundaries and involve mass transfer, but have fairly little else in common. As examples, the relatively flat-lying Twelve Mile Bay shear zone in the western Central Gneiss belt bounds the Parry Sound domain and is likely the product of both localized anatexis and later retrograde hydration with attendant metamorphism. Moderately dipping shear zones in granitoids of the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone apparently resulted from cooperation among several complementary microstructural processes, such as grain size reduction, enhanced diffusion, and a small degree of metamorphic reaction. Localization into shear zones requires the operation of some spatially restricted processes such as stress concentration, metamorphism/fluid access, textural evolution, and thermal perturbation. All of these could be due in part to strain, but not necessarily linearly related to strain. Stress concentrations, such as those that form at rheological boundaries, may be sufficient to nucleate high strain

  11. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Nino, J. C.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical model for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.

  12. Prediction and characterization of heat-affected zone formation in tin-bismuth alloys due to nickel-aluminum multilayer foil reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, R. J.; Davis, C. G.; Johns, P. M.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Reactive multilayer foils have the potential to be used as local high intensity heat sources for a variety of applications. In this study, most of the past research effort concerning these materials have focused on understanding the structure-property relationships of the foils that govern the energy released during a reaction. To improve the ability of researchers to more rapidly develop technologies based on reactive multilayer foils, a deeper and more predictive understanding of the relationship between the heat released from the foil and microstructural evolution in the neighboring materials is needed. This work describes the development of a numerical modelmore » for the purpose of predicting heat affected zone size in substrate materials. The model is experimentally validated using a commercially available Ni-Al multilayer foils and alloys from the Sn-Bi binary system. To accomplish this, phenomenological models for predicting the variation of physical properties (i.e., thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity) with temperature and composition in the Sn-Bi system were utilized using literature data.« less

  13. The formation of grounding zone wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Worster, Grae

    2016-11-01

    Ice sheets are generally lubricated by a layer of sub-glacial sediment, or till, which plays a central role in determining their large-scale dynamics. Sub-glacial till has been found to accumulate into distinctive sedimentary wedges at ice-sheet grounding zones, separating floating ice shelves from grounded ice sheets. These grounding-zone wedges have important implications for stabilizing ice sheets against grounding-zone retreat in response to rising sea levels. We develop a theoretical model of wedge formation in which we treat both ice and till as viscous fluids spreading under gravity into an inviscid ocean and present a fluid-mechanical explanation of the formation of these wedges in terms of the jump in hydrostatic loading and unloading of till across the grounding zone. We also conduct a series of fluid-mechanical experiments in a confined setting in which we find that the underlying layer of less viscous fluid accumulates spontaneously in a similar wedge-shaped region at the experimental grounding line. We also extend our theory to more natural, unconfined settings in two dynamical regimes in which the overlying ice is resisted dominantly either by vertical shear or by extensional stresses and compare our findings with available geophysical data. Currently at Northwestern University.

  14. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  15. Regular satellite formation and evolution in a dead zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-01-01

    The dead zone in a circumplanetary disk is a non-turbulent region at the disk midplane that is an ideal location for regular satellite formation. The lower viscosity in the dead zone allows small objects to accrete and grow. We model the evolution of a circumplanetary disk with a dead zone for a range of disk and dead zone parameters. We investigate how these affect the formation and subsequent evolution of regular satellites that form in the disk.

  16. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Xie, Xueying; Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  17. Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K.

    2008-07-01

    Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

  18. The study of polyoxometalates formation using capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zdanov, Artem A; Shuvaeva, Olga V

    2014-09-01

    The formation process of polyoxometalates [PMo12 O40 ](3-) and [PMo12 - x Vx O40 ](-3-x) has been studied in aqueous solutions of 0.1 M malonate buffer at pH 2.8-3.0 using CZE. Two different approaches, pre-capillary and in-capillary, were examined and compared. In precapillary mode, the reaction mixture of the reactants and reaction products was injected into the capillary followed by the separation procedure. In in-capillary mode, the sequential input of the reagents and running electrolyte into the capillary and the species separation occurs simultaneously. The optimal parameters of in-capillary separation were established as functions of applied voltage and the length of the intermediate buffer zone between the reagents in the capillary. As a result the best-compromise conditions for the separation of the mixtures containing the reactants, intermediates, and reaction products, in order to achieve the best efficiency, symmetry, and peak areas, were achieved at -18 kV and the input parameter of 900 mbar·s. It was also shown that in-capillary mode is more informative than pre-capillary mode for studying the complex compound formation process.

  19. A library of prompt detonation reaction zone data

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Tables are given listing literature data that allows calculation of sonic reaction zones at or near steady-state for promptly detonating explosive cylinders. The data covers homogeneous, heterogeneous, composite, inorganic and binary explosives and allows comparison across the entire explosive field. Table 1 lists detonation front curvatures. Table 2 lists Size Effect data, i.e. the change of detonation velocity with cylinder radius. Table 3 lists failure radii and detonation velocities. Table 4 lists explosive compositions. A total of 51 references dating back into the 1950`s are given. Calculated reaction zones, radii of curvature and growth rate coefficients are listed.

  20. Audience Reactions to Two Visual Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Richard David

    One hundred undergraduate business students completed a questionnaire designed to determine their reactions to a traditional and a "flashier" textbook format. Before completing the questionnaire, subjects spent several minutes examining two business textbooks--one an older textbook with black ink on white paper, narrow margins, and few…

  1. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  2. Density Effect on Detonation Reaction Zone Length in Solid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyatinsky, S. N.; Loboiko, B. G.

    1997-07-01

    Density effect on detonation reaction zone length have been studied on RDX and PETN using a photoelectric technique to record the radiation intensity history of the shock front in chloroform placed on the charge face. Charge density was found to drastically affect the reaction zone length as well as the charge appearance. The charges pressed to 0.92 of crystal density were completely opaque and exhibited the von Neumann spike of 0.3 mm in length, typical for high explosives. The charges solvent-pressed to 0.99 of crystal density were agated (semi-transparent, resembling agates) and did not exhibited the von Neumann spike, which implies that its length did not exceed 0.03 mm. The following explanation was offered. In agated, practically non-porous, charges the detonation front is a strong plane shock inducing almost instant reaction. In charges consisting of separate crystals the detonation front becomes three-dimensional. As a result some fraction of explosive is compressed by a sequence of shocks almost isentropically and reacts relatively slowly, so that it can be measured.

  3. Effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine the effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on the formation of smoke and other gaseous pollutants in an experimental can combustor. Several fuel injection techniques were examined at primary-zone equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 2.0. The main emphasis was on reducing fuel-rich-combustion smoke levels. Two of the four fuel injection configurations studied produced smoke levels below a smoke number of 20 at a primary-zone equivalence ratio of about 1.7. As the fuel mixing and atomization were recorded at primary-zone equivalence ratios as high as 2.0. The gaseous emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen were quite sensitive to the fuel injection configuration as well as to the primary-zone equilvalence ratio.

  4. Reaction enhanced channelised fluid-flux along mid- crustal shear zone: An example from Mesoproterozoic Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sadhana M.; Choudhury, Manideepa Roy; Das, Subhrajyoti

    2016-10-01

    Fluid infiltration at great depth during regional metamorphism plays a major role in mass transport and is responsible for significant rheological changes in the rock. Calc-silicate rocks of the Kajalbas area of Delhi Fold Belt, Rajasthan, are characterised by foliation parallel alternate bands of amphibole-rich and clinopyroxene-plagioclase feldspar-rich layers of varying thicknesses (mm to decimetre thick). Textural relation suggests that the amphibole grains formed from clinopyroxene and plagioclase in the late phase of regional deformation. Algebraic analysis of the reaction textures and mineral compositions was performed with the computer program C-Space to obtain the balanced chemical reactions that led to the formation of amphibole-rich bands. The computed balanced reaction is 70.74 Clinopyroxene + 27.23 Plagioclase + 22.018 H2O + 5.51 K++ 1.00 Mg2++ 27.15 Fe2+ = 22.02 Amphibole + 67.86 SiO2 aqueous + 36.42 Ca2++ 8.98 Na+. The constructed reaction suggests that aqueous fluid permeated the calc-silicate rock along mm to decimetre thick channels, metasomatized the clinopyroxene-plagioclase bearing rocks to form the amphibole-rich layers. The regional deformation presumably created the fluid channels thereby allowing the metasomatic fluid to enter the rock system. The above reaction has large negative volume change for solid phases indicating reaction-induced permeability. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the fluid-rock interaction occurred at 665 ±05∘C and 6.6 ±0.25 kbar (corresponding to ˜20 km depth). Textural modeling integrating the textural features and balanced chemical reaction of the calc-silicate rocks of Mesoproterozoic Phulad Shear Zone thus indicate that extremely channelled fluid flow was reaction enhanced and caused major change in the rock rheology.

  5. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions in subduction zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron-Navarta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale deep water cycling takes place through subduction zones in the Earth, making our planet unique in the solar system. This idiosyncrasy is the result of a precise but unknown balance between in-gassing and out-gassing fluxes of volatiles. Water is incorporated into hydrous minerals during seafloor alteration of the oceanic lithosphere. The cycling of volatiles is triggered by dehydration of these minerals that release fluids from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and eventually to the crust or to the deep mantle. Whereas the loci of such reactions are reasonably well established, the mechanisms of fluid migration during dehydration reactions are still barely known. One of the challenges is that dehydration reactions are dynamic features evolving in time and space. Experimental data on low-temperature dehydration reactions (i.e. gypsum) and numerical models applied to middle-crust conditions point to a complex spatiotemporal evolution of the dehydration process. The extrapolation of these inferences to subduction settings has not yet been explored but it is essential to understand the dynamism of these settings. Here I propose an alternative approach to tackle this problem through the textural study of high-pressure terrains that experienced dehydration reactions. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions should be recorded during mineral nucleation and growth through variations in time and space of the reaction rate. Insights on the fluid migration mechanism could be inferred therefore by noting changes in the texture of prograde assemblages. The dehydration of antigorite in serpentinite is a perfect candidate to test this approach as it releases a significant amount of fluid and produces a concomitant porosity. Unusual alternation of equilibrium and disequilibrium textures observed in Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, S Spain)[1, 2] attest for a complex fluid migration pattern for one of the most relevant reactions in subduction zones

  6. FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS IN A DEAD ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Armitage, Philip J.; Alexander, Richard D.

    2013-08-10

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 AU from the center of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely, and hence planet formation may be more difficult there.

  7. Aquifer/aquitard interfaces: mixing zones that enhance biogeochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Several important biogeochemical reactions are known to occur near the interface between aquifer and aquitard sediments. These reactions include O2 reduction; denitrification; and Fe3+, SO42-, and CO2 (methanogenesis) reduction. In some settings, these reactions occur on the aquitard side of the interface as electron acceptors move from the aquifer into the electron-donor-enriched aquitard. In other settings, these reactions occur on the aquifer side of the interface as electron donors move from the aquitard into the electron-acceptor-enriched, or microorganism-enriched, aquifer. Thus, the aquifer/aquitard interface represents a mixing zone capable of supporting greater microbial activity than either hydrogeologic unit alone. The extent to which biogeochemical reactions proceed in the mixing zone and the width of the mixing zone depend on several factors, including the abundance and solubility of electron acceptors and donors on either side of the interface and the rate at which electron acceptors and donors react and move across the interface. Biogeochemical reactions near the aquifer/aquitard interface can have a substantial influence on the chemistry of water in aquifers and on the chemistry of sediments near the interface. Résumé. Il se produit au voisinage de l'interface entre les aquifères et les imperméables plusieurs réactions biogéochimiques importantes. Il s'agit des réactions de réduction de l'oxygène, de la dénitrification et de la réduction de Fe3+, SO42- et CO2 (méthanogenèse). Dans certaines situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté imperméable de l'interface, avec des accepteurs d'électrons qui vont de l'aquifère vers l'imperméable riche en donneurs d'électrons. Dans d'autres situations, ces réactions se produisent du côté aquifère de l'interface, avec des donneurs d'électrons qui se déplacent de l'imperméable vers l'aquifère riche en accepteurs d'électrons ou en microorganismes. Ainsi, l'interface aquif

  8. Mechanisms of myrmekite formation: case study from the Weinsberg granite, Moldanubian zone, Upper Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abart, Rainer; Heuser, David; Habler, Gerlinde

    2014-11-01

    Myrmekites have attracted the attention of petrographers over more than a century, and several genetic models have been proposed. We report on myrmekites from the Weinsberg granite of the Moldanubian zone of Upper Austria. Based on petrographic evidence, fluid-mediated replacement of alkali feldspar by myrmekite during the sub-solidus evolution of the granite is inferred. The replacement was metasomatic on the scale of the myrmekite domains requiring addition of sodium and calcium and removal of potassium from the reaction site. In contrast, silica and aluminum were conserved across the reaction front. Myrmekite formation appears to have been synchronous with and related to the hydration of orthopyroxene and concomitant replacement of primary magmatic plagioclase by biotite at around 500 °C. The evolution of the myrmekite microstructure and a peculiar composition zoning of the plagioclase constituting the myrmekite matrix is qualitatively explained by a model for discontinuous precipitation, which accounts for chemical segregation by diffusion within the reaction front and the propagation of the reaction front with finite mobility as potentially rate limiting processes. Constraints on the underlying reaction rates are derived from the preserved microstructure and chemical pattern. Crystal orientation imaging by electron backscatter diffraction reveals grain-internal deformation, which is primarily concentrated in the quartz and less pronounced in the plagioclase matrix of the myrmekite. This is interpreted as a growth feature related to different transformation strain at the segments of the myrmekite reaction front, where quartz and plagioclase are formed.

  9. Dynamics of formation of the Exclusion Zone near hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ninno, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    EZ water is unable to host solutes, what provides the root of the name Exclusion Zone, and its formation law points towards a diffusive process. These peculiarities have attracted the interest of scientists because it challenges all the theories which have tried to describe the structure of liquid water. The mixture of H-bond stable and H-bond distorted structures envisaged by very recent experimental findings, cannot account for the long-lived hexagonal configuration observed near the Nafion surface. A theoretical account for the phenomenology of H-bond is provided which looks able to explain many among the most striking feature of this water.

  10. Diffusion layer formation drives zone migration in travelling wave electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Booth, William Albert; Edwards, Boyd; Jo, Kyoo; Timperman, Aaron; Schiffbauer, Jarrod

    2017-04-04

    COMSOL finite element modeling software is used to simulate 2D traveling-wave electrophoresis for microfluidic separations and sample concentration. A four-phase AC potential is applied to a periodic interdigitated four-electrode array to produce a longitudinal electric wave that travels through the channel. Charged particles are carried along with the electric wave or left behind, depending on their mobilities. A simplified model of asymmetric electrode reactions resolves the issue of electric double layer shielding at the electrodes. Selective reactions allow for the formation of diffusion layers of charged particles which follow the traveling electric wave. These diffusion layers determine the transport of charged species through the system. Our model reproduces experimental separations of charged species based on mobility. With easy control over the frequency and direction, one may employ this method for concentrating and/or separating charged particles.

  11. Modeling of formation of intraplate partial melting zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study suggests the mathematical model of dynamics of partial melting in lithosphere causing formation of magmatic systems. The intraplate magmatic systems can be formed at achievement of required thermodynamic conditions, which can be developed due to the following mechanisms: contact heating; decompression melting at mantle matter penetration into lithosphere; and heating by filtering mantle melts and fluids in the weakened lithosphere zones above the asthenospheric structure related to a hotspot. The most efficient mechanism from the point of time and heating degree is the latter one. It is heating of lithosphere matter by mantle melts and fluids, which is especially important for development of melting sites in these systems. At formation of intraplate magmatic systems the fluid is filtered in a porous medium, porous matrix melts partially, and finally a granulated medium is formed there. To decrease the processes of heat and mass transfer in this system, the equations of dynamics of multiphase multivelocity media are derived in this study. In contrast to the Darcy-type models used in previous studies, the suggested two-velocity hydrodynamics theory describing fluid motions in a porous medium with complex reology is the thermodynamically consistent one and allows the description of nonstationary nonlinear processes. The governing equations of the model describe both the process of filtration through the deformed porous matrix and hydrodynamics of heterophase granulated medium without pressure equilibrium in phases. The work was supported by the grants 08-05-00467, 09-05-00602, 09-05-01084 from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  12. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  13. Periodic Vesicle Formation in Tectonic Fault Zones--an Ideal Scenario for Molecular Evolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dávila, María J

    2015-06-01

    Tectonic fault systems in the continental crust offer huge networks of interconnected channels and cavities. Filled mainly with water and carbon dioxide (CO2), containing a wide variety of hydrothermal chemistry and numerous catalytic surfaces, they may offer ideal reaction conditions for prebiotic chemistry. In these systems, an accumulation zone for organic compounds will develop at a depth of approximately 1 km where CO2 turns sub-critical and dissolved components precipitate. At this point, periodic pressure changes caused for example by tidal influences or geyser activity may generate a cyclic process involving repeated phase transitions of carbon dioxide. In the presence of amphiphilic compounds, this will necessarily lead to the transient formation of coated water droplets in the gas phase and corresponding vesicular structures in the aqueous environment. During this process, the concentration of organic components inside the droplets and vesicles would be drastically increased, allowing for favorable reaction conditions and, in case of the vesicles generated, large trans-membrane concentration gradients. Altogether, the process of periodic formation and destruction of vesicles could offer a perfect environment for molecular evolution in small compartments and for the generation of protocells. The basic process of vesicle formation is reproduced experimentally with a lipid in a water/CO2 system.

  14. The influence of colloid formation in a granite groundwater bentonite porewater mixing zone on radionuclide speciation.

    PubMed

    Kunze, P; Seher, H; Hauser, W; Panak, P J; Geckeis, H; Fanghänel, Th; Schäfer, T

    2008-12-12

    In the context of deep geological storage of high level nuclear waste the repository will be designed as multiple barrier system including bentonite as buffer/backfill material and the host rock formation as geological barrier. The engineered barrier (bentonite) will be in contact with the host rock formation and consequently it can be expected that bentonite porewater will mix with formation groundwater. We simulate in this study the mixing of Grimsel groundwater (glacial melt water) with synthetic Febex porewater (assuming already saturated state) in a batch-type study and investigate the formation of colloids by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) and SEM-EDX as well as the changes in radionuclide (U, Th, Eu) speciation via ultrafiltration or via time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) analysis in the case of Cm(III). Based on PHREEQC saturation index (SI) calculations a precipitation of calcite might be expected at low Febex porewater (FPW) content (<20%), fluorite precipitation at FPW contents <60% and gibbsite precipitation at FPW contents above 10%. The colloids generated in the mixing zone aggregate when the synthetic FPW content exceeds 10%. LIBD analysis of the time-dependent colloid generation/aggregation revealed a low concentration of colloids to be stable with an estimated plateau value around 100-200 ppt and an average colloid diameter around 30 nm after 140 days reaction time at FPW admixture >10%. SEM/EDX mostly identifies Al/Si containing colloidal phases and some sulfates could be found under certain admixture ratios. TRLFS studies show that the Cm speciation is strongly influenced by colloid formation in all solutions. In the Febex pore water/GGW mixing zone with high groundwater contents (>80%) colloids are newly formed and Cm is almost quantitatively associated with most likely polysilicilic acid colloids.

  15. Current oscillations generated by precipitate formation in the mixing zone between two solutions inside a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yusko, Erik C; Billeh, Yazan N; Mayer, Michael

    2010-11-17

    Unlike biological protein pores in lipid membranes, nanopores fabricated in synthetic materials can withstand a wide range of environmental conditions including the presence of organic solvents. This capability expands the potential of synthetic nanopores to monitor chemical reactions occurring at the interface between solutions of organic and aqueous character. In this work, nanopores fabricated in borosilicate glass or silicon nitride connected a predominantly organic solvent to an aqueous solvent, thereby generating a mixing zone between these solutions inside the pore. This configuration was exploited to precipitate small organic molecules with low aqueous solubility inside the nanopores, and concomitantly, to monitor this precipitation by the decrease of the ionic conductance through the nanopores over time. Hence, this method provides a means to induce and investigate the formation of nanoprecipitates or nanoparticles. Interestingly, precipitates with a slight electric charge were cleared from the pore, causing the conductance of the pore to return to its original value. This process repeated, resulting in stable oscillations of the ionic current. Although such oscillations might be useful in fluidic logic circuits, few conditions capable of generating oscillations in ionic currents have been reported. The frequency and amplitude of oscillations could be tuned by changing the concentration of the precipitating molecule, the pH of the electrolyte, and the applied potential bias. In addition to generating oscillations, nanopores that separate two different solutions may be useful for monitoring and mediating chemical reactions in the mixing zone between two solutions.

  16. Determining the mechanical strength of CO2-induced reaction zones in wellbore cement: is it worth it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    CO2 injection, either for long-term CO2 storage (CCS) or Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), strongly hinges on maintaining storage integrity. Injection and legacy wells penetrating the caprock pose one of the most likely points of leakage. In order to be able to predict the long-term integrity of such wellbores, it's important to understand their chemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviour, and how it may change due to CO2 exposure. Generally, in response to CO2/brine/cement interactions, a number of different reaction zones are observed, each with their own chemical, and hence mechanical, signature. To aid mechanical modelling efforts, assessing the risk of cement failure caused by stress and temperature changes, knowledge is required of the strength of each of these zones. We performed experiments on Class G Portland cement to investigate the chemical-mechanical coupling due to CO2-exposure. Batch reaction experiments, in the presence of CO2-rich brine, were performed under typical storage conditions (T = 65° C, PCO2 = 8 MPa) for various periods of time (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months). After exposure, mechanical tests were performed on the observed reaction zones, using the so-called core scratching technique, to evaluate the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) as a function of exposure time. Chemical analyses (CT-imaging, SEM microscopy, EDX chemical analysis) showed the formation of three reaction zones, similarly to what has been observed in other studies. Measurements of the mechanical strength of these different zones showed highly variable results. Such variations have also been observed in other studies, using different measurement techniques. The large variability in strength measurements is most likely an inherent result of the heterogenic nature of cement, which affects the extent and location of reaction throughout the sample. This begs the question: is it worth studying the mechanical strength of reaction-induced zones in cement? Or will it suffice to

  17. Authigenic iron oxide formation in the estuarine mixing zone of the Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D. J.; Neuser, R. D.; Sun, X. G.; Yang, Z. S.; Guo, Z. G.; Zhai, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Estuaries are elementary geochemical fronts where river water and seawater mix. Within this mixing zone, iron and other non-conservative elements can undergo complex reactions to form new solid phases. In order to understand authigenic iron oxide formation in the Yangtze River Estuary, two onsite water-mixing sets of experiments were conducted, one by mixing variable amounts of unfiltered Yangtze River water with filtered East China Sea water of different salinity (set 1), the other by mixing variable amounts of filtered Yangtze River water with filtered East China Sea water of different salinity (set 2). In set 2, the minerals newly formed in the course of mixing were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope fitted with an energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system. It was found that ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite were formed in these mixing experiments, coexisting in nearly equal amounts. These iron oxides appear as aggregated particles with a large grain-size range of several microns to more than 100 μm. The electrolytic properties of seawater played an important role in the formation of these authigenic iron oxides. Kaolinite and organic aggregates were also found in the experimentally mixed pre-filtered waters. Amounts of newly formed suspended matter (set 2) were one to three orders of magnitude lower than those of total suspended matter (TSM) (set 1). This implies that newly formed minerals represent only a very small proportion of TSM in the estuarine mixing zone of the Yangtze River.

  18. Thermochemistry for silicic acid formation reaction: Prediction of new reaction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2009-08-01

    Reaction between SiO 2 and water has been studied extensively using ab initio methods. The mechanism for formation of metasilicic acid SiO(OH) 2 and orthosilicic acid Si(OH) 4 has been explored and a new pathway for formation of Si(OH) 4 is predicted. Heats of reaction ( ΔrH298∘) and heats of formation ( ΔfH298∘) at 298 K for the related reactions and species calculated at two different theoretical levels G3B3 and G3MP2B3 agree well with the literature values. It is found that when SiO 2 reacts simultaneously with two water molecules, the thermodynamic as well as kinetic feasibility of the process is much greater than that when SiO 2 reacts with one molecule of water.

  19. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation.

    PubMed

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2016-06-15

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of the α-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the β-O reaction. The catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets.

  20. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2016-05-28

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of the $\\alpha$-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the $\\beta$-O reaction. In conclusion, the catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets.

  1. Coupling and Reactions of 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol in Lignin Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Elder, Thomas; Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; ...

    2016-05-28

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol are linear homopolymers and, as such, may have properties that make them amenable for use in value-added products, such as lignin-based carbon fibers. In the current work, results from density functional theory calculations for the reactions of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, taking stereochemistry into account, are reported. Dehydrogenation and quinone methide formation are found to be thermodynamically favored for 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, over coniferyl alcohol. The comparative energetics of the rearomatization reactions suggest that the formation of the benzodioxane linkage is under kinetic control. Ring-opening reactions of the benzodioxane groups show that the bond dissociation enthalpy of themore » $$\\alpha$$-O cleavage reaction is lower than that of the $$\\beta$$-O reaction. In conclusion, the catechol lignins represent a novel form of the polymer that may offer new opportunities for bioproducts and genetic targets.« less

  2. Development and testing of a compartmentalized reaction network model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, R.H.; Loague, K.; Kent, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The work reported here is the first part of a larger effort focused on efficient numerical simulation of redox zone development in contaminated aquifers. The sequential use of various electron acceptors, which is governed by the energy yield of each reaction, gives rise to redox zones. The large difference in energy yields between the various redox reactions leads to systems of equations that are extremely ill-conditioned. These equations are very difficult to solve, especially in the context of coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical simulations. We have developed a general, rational method to solve such systems where we focus on the dominant reactions, compartmentalizing them in a manner that is analogous to the redox zones that are often observed in the field. The compartmentalized approach allows us to easily solve a complex geochemical system as a function of time and energy yield, laying the foundation for our ongoing work in which we couple the reaction network, for the development of redox zones, to a model of subsurface fluid flow and solute transport. Our method (1) solves the numerical system without evoking a redox parameter, (2) improves the numerical stability of redox systems by choosing which compartment and thus which reaction network to use based upon the concentration ratios of key constituents, (3) simulates the development of redox zones as a function of time without the use of inhibition factors or switching functions, and (4) can reduce the number of transport equations that need to be solved in space and time. We show through the use of various model performance evaluation statistics that the appropriate compartment choice under different geochemical conditions leads to numerical solutions without significant error. The compartmentalized approach described here facilitates the next phase of this effort where we couple the redox zone reaction network to models of fluid flow and solute transport.

  3. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  4. Multiple Sand Bar Formation in the Nearshore Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absalonsen, L.; Dean, R.

    2011-12-01

    Sand bars are prominent features on many beaches, and can represent a major source of morphologic change in the cross-shore profile. The breaking waves are concentrated at the bar crests, resulting in reduced energy in the landward zone. Bars respond to different wave energy conditions, slowly moving shoreward with low waves and rapidly moving offshore with higher waves. However the formation and evolution of bars on multiple barred beaches is poorly understood. The presentation will describe preliminary efforts to predict the location of sand bars in the cross-shore profile, to quantify the number of sand bars under different hydrodynamic conditions and to illustrate the capability to predict profile evolution. A wave height transformation model (Dally model), a sediment transport model and conservation model are applied. The two-dimensional wave height model establishes wave height across the nearshore zone due to wave shoaling and breaking, including wave setup and bottom stress. This model utilizes two threshold values to predict the breaking position and after breaking, in the deeper water of the bar trough, the position where the waves stabilize and start to shoal again (stability criterion). Both criteria depend on the local water depth. At present, the sediment transport model consists of three components. First, the moment of momentum due to breaking waves is transferred to the bottom as a seaward shear stress concentrated somewhat landward of the bar crest. Secondly, the onshore shear stress is due to the nonlinearity of the breaking waves. Finally, the onshore transport is magnified by the proximity of turbulence to the bottom in shallow water. This model is of the "open loop" type, thus there is no guarantee of convergence to a stable profile. The capability of the model to predict bar locations on an actual profile is illustrated as follows. A profile consisting of three bars is selected from Volusia County along the northeast Florida Atlantic

  5. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  6. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  7. Preliminary Study of Coupling Electrical Energy to Detonation Reaction Zone of Primasheet-1000 Explosive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Preliminary Study of Coupling Electrical Energy to Detonation Reaction Zone of Primasheet-1000 Explosive by Thuvan Piehler, Charles Hummer...1000 Explosive Thuvan Piehler, Charles Hummer, Richard Benjamin, Eugene Summers, and Kevin McNesby Weapons and Materials Research Directorate...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Thuvan Piehler, Charles Hummer, Richard Benjamin, Eugene Summers, Kevin McNesby

  8. Formation of superheavy elements in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolańczuk, Robert

    2001-04-01

    We calculate the formation cross sections of transactinides (superheavy elements), as well as heavy actinides (No and Lr), which have been or might be obtained in fusion reactions with the evaporation of only one neutron. We use both more realistic fusion barrier and survival probability of the compound nucleus in comparison with the original phenomenological model [Phys. Rev. C 59, 2634 (1999)] that prompted the Berkeley experiment on the synthesis of a new superheavy element 118 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1104 (1999)]. Calculations are performed for asymmetric and symmetric target-projectile combinations and for reactions with stable and radioactive-ion beams. The formation cross sections measured at GSI-Darmstadt for transactinides and heavy actinides, as well as that for superheavy element 118 reported by the LBNL-Berkeley group, are reproduced within a factor of 2.4, on average. Based on the obtained relatively large cross sections, we predict that optimal reactions with stable beams for the synthesis of so far unobserved superheavy elements 119, 120, and 121 are 209Bi(86Kr, 1n)294119, 208Pb(88Sr, 1n)295120, and 209Bi(88Sr, 1n)296121, respectively. This is because of the magic of both the target and the projectile that leads to larger Q value and, consequently, lower effective fusion barrier with larger transmission probability. The same effect is responsible for relatively large cross sections predicted for the symmetric reactions 136Xe(124Sn, 1n)259Rf, 136Xe(136Xe, 1n)271Hs,138Ba(136Xe, 1n)273110, and 140Ce(136Xe, 1n)275112. Although shell effects in the magic nuclei 124Sn, 136Xe, 138Ba, and 140Ce are not as strong as in 208Pb and 209Bi, they act on both the target and the projectile and lead to the prediction of measurable cross sections.

  9. Hyporheic zone denitrification: controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, John Karl; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To demonstrate at a field site, we injected 15NO3−, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways transport where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  10. The influence of metasomatic reactions on distributed vs. localized slip in ultramafic shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarling, Matthew S.; Tulley, Chris J.; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Livingstone Fault is a >1000 km long terrane boundary in New Zealand that juxtaposes ultramafic rocks of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt against quartzofeldspathic rocks of the continental Caples Terrane. The fault is characterized by a zone of sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide with a generally well-defined scaly fabric, containing entrained pods of massive serpentinite, volcanic rocks and quartzofeldspathic rocks. Talc- and tremolite- forming metasomatic reactions occurred frequently within the mélange zone, along the margins of the mélange and at the edges of entrained pods. These reactions were the result of the interaction between the serpentine minerals and silica bearing fluids derived from the quartzofeldspathic Caples Terrane. In the bulk of the mélange, structures such as distributed scaly fabrics, S-C fabrics, and networks of fibrous serpentine veins suggest a broad delocalization of strain, likely accommodated by pressure-solution mechanisms along the serpentinite- and talc-bearing fabrics. However, at the margins of the mélange zone and the edges of pods, layers of tremolite tens of centimeters thick are characterized by a highly indurated microstructure consisting of networks of tightly interwoven, acicular tremolite crystals forming a semi-nephritic to nephritic texture. In these metasomatic regions, discrete cataclastic slip zones associated with well-polished slickenlined surfaces are observed at the interfaces of the serpentinite and Caples Terrane quartzofeldspathics. In the Livingstone Fault, this style of highly-localized slip is uniquely associated withthe development of the indurated nephritic textures. Because tremolite is a frictionally-strong and generally velocity-weakening calc-silicate, we speculate that the tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions may have promoted localized and unstable fault slip within a shear zone that was otherwise deforming by creep. Employing scanning and transmission

  11. Thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of scramjet cooling channels at different channel aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Silong; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Yuguang; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen; Han, Jiecai; Haidn, Oskar J.

    2016-10-01

    To study the thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of regeneratively cooled scramjet cooling channels at different aspect ratios, 3-D model of fuel flow in terms of the fuel's real properties and cracking reaction is built and validated through experiments. The whole cooling channel is divided into non-cracking and cracking reaction zones. Only the cracking reaction zone is studied in this article. The simulation results indicate that the fuel conversion presents a similar distribution with temperature because the fuel conversion in scramjet cooling channels is co-decided by the temperature and velocity but the temperature plays the dominate role. For the cases given in this paper, increasing the channel aspect ratio will increase the pressure drop and it is not beneficial for reducing the wall temperature because of the much severer thermal stratification, larger conversion non-uniformity, the corresponding M-shape velocity profile which will cause local heat transfer deterioration and the decreased chemical heat absorption. And the decreased chemical heat absorption caused by stronger temperature and conversion non-uniformities is bad for the utilization of chemical heat sink, chemical recuperation process and the ignition performance.

  12. The effect of Co alloying content on the kinetics of reaction zone growth in tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Tien, J. K.; Caulfield, T.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    A Co-free modified superalloy similar in composition to Waspaloy is investigated in an effort to understand the effect of Co on reaction zone growth kinetics and verify the chemistry dependence of reaction zone growth in the matrix of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites. The values of the parabolic rate constant, characterizing the kinetics of reaction zone growth, for the Waspaloy matrix and the C-free alloy as well as five other alloys from a previous study confirm the dependence of reaction zone growth kinetics on cobalt content of the matrix. The Co-free alloy composite exhibits the slowest reaction zone growth among all tungsten fiber reinforced composites studied to date.

  13. Reaction-zone expansions and mechanism of the O{sub 2}, Ag/yttria-stabilized zirconia electrode reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, R.; Kloidt, T.; Kleitz, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experimental data obtained by impedance spectroscopy with silver droplet electrodes of different radii have been reanalyzed in the medium-frequency range under the assumption of rate-limiting oxygen diffusion through a thin slab of the electrode material. The model, which is based on literature data and has no adjustable parameters, gives a good fit. This demonstrates that in the medium-frequency range, oxygen diffusion through the electrode material is evenly distributed over the whole electrode interface. On the other hand, under dc conditions it is concentrated along the electrode triple-phase perimeter. Therefore, the distribution of the transfer current over the interface varies with the applied signal frequency. It follows that the electrode resistance and capacitance determined from the impedance diagram are related to an electrode reaction occurring over a reaction zone variable with the signal frequency.

  14. Theoretical aspects of product formation from the NCO + NO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; He, Y. ); Melius, C.F. )

    1993-09-09

    The reaction of NCO with NO, an important elementary process involved in the reduction of NO[sub x] by HNCO, has been studied theoretically using the BAC-MP4 technique in conjunction with RRKM calculations. The computed molecular structures and thermochemical data for various intermediates and transition states suggest that the reaction takes place primarily via the singlet, ground electronic state OCNNO molecule according to the following mechanism; (step a) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] N[sub 2]O + CO; (step b) NCO + NO [leftrightarrow] [sup 1]OCNNO [yields] c-OCNNO[minus] N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2]. The formation of N[sub 2]O + CO occurs by the fragmentation of the singlet OCNNO intermediate step (a), whereas the production of N[sub 2] + CO[sub 2] by cyclization-fragmentation occurs via step b. The tight transition states leading to the formation of these products, coupled with the loose entrance channel, give rise to the experimentally observed strong negative temperature dependence which can be quantitatively accounted for by the results of RRKM calculations based on the BAC-MP4 data. The experimentally measured product branching ratio for channels a and b could be accounted for theoretically by lowering the calculated energy barrier for step a by 3.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to about 15% of the barrier height. 22 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian Kent; Quemener, Goulven; Balakrishman, Naduvalath

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

  16. Reactions of OH and Cl with isopropyl formate, isobutyl formate, n-propyl isobutyrate and isopropyl isobutyrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Liang, P.; Jiang, Z. H.; Cazaunau, M.; Daële, V.; Mu, Y. J.; Mellouki, A.

    2014-05-01

    The rate coefficients for the reactions of OH with isopropyl formate, isobutyl formate, n-propyl isobutyrate and isopropyl isobutyrate have been determined using both absolute and relative methods. The relative rate method has been also used to measure the room temperature rate coefficient for the reaction of Cl with the same esters. In addition, a series of runs conducted on the OH-initiated oxidation of isopropyl formate, isobutyl formate and n-propyl isobutyrate showed the formation of acetone from the three reactions. The formation of propanal was also observed for n-propyl isobutyrate.

  17. Aerosol formation yields from the reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Tomas, Alexandre; Guilloteau, Angélique; Henry, Françoise; Ledoux, Frédéric; Visez, Nicolas; Riffault, Véronique; Wenger, John C.; Bedjanian, Yuri

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers. Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer and loss of the precursor was determined by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy, whilst ozone concentrations were measured using a UV photometric analyzer. The overall organic aerosol yield ( Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses ( Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm -3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas-particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The results of this work are compared to similar studies reported in the literature.

  18. Ignition and growth modeling of detonation reaction zone experiments on single crystals of PETN and HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that detonating single crystals of solid explosives have much larger failure diameters than those of heterogeneous charges of the same explosive pressed or cast to 98 - 99% theoretical maximum density (TMD). In 1957, Holland et al. demonstrated that PETN single crystals have failure diameters of about 8 mm, whereas heterogeneous PETN charges have failure diameters of less than 0.5 mm. Recently, Fedorov et al. quantitatively determined nanosecond time resolved detonation reaction zone profiles of single crystals of PETN and HMX by measuring the interface particle velocity histories of the detonating crystals and LiF windows using a PDV system. The measured reaction zone time durations for PETN and HMX single crystal detonations were approximately 100 and 260 nanoseconds, respectively. These experiments provided the necessary data to develop Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model parameters for the single crystal detonation reaction zones. Using these parameters, the calculated unconfined failure diameter of a PETN single crystal was 7.5 +/- 0.5 mm, close to the 8 mm experimental value. The calculated failure diameter of an unconfined HMX single crystal was 15 +/- 1 mm. The unconfined failure diameter of an HMX single crystal has not yet been determined precisely, but Fedorov et al. detonated 14 mm diameter crystals confined by detonating a HMX-based plastic bonded explosive (PBX) without initially overdriving the HMX crystals.

  19. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  20. Method for controlling a producing zone of a well in a geological formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Amini, B. Jon (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic pulses through a geological formation. A preferably programmable transmitter having an all-digital portion in a preferred embodiment may be operated at frequencies below 1 MHz without loss of target resolution by transmitting and over sampling received long PN codes. A gated and stored portion of the received signal may be correlated with the PN code to determine distances of interfaces within the geological formation, such as the distance of a water interfaces from a wellbore. The received signal is oversampled preferably at rates such as five to fifty times as high as a carrier frequency. In one method of the invention, an oil well with multiple production zones may be kept in production by detecting an approaching water front in one of the production zones and shutting down that particular production zone thereby permitting the remaining production zones to continue operating.

  1. Method for Controlling a Producing Zone of a Well in a Geological Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Amini, B. Jon (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic pulses through a geological formation. A preferably programmable transmitter having an all-digital portion in a preferred embodiment may be operated at frequencies below 1 MHz without loss of target resolution by transmitting and over sampling received long PN codes. A gated and stored portion of the received signal may be correlated with the PN code to determine distances of interfaces within the geological formation, such as the distance of a water interfaces from a wellbore. The received signal is oversampled preferably at rates such as five to fifty times as high as a carrier frequency. In one method of the invention, an oil well with multiple production zones may be kept in production by detecting an approaching water front in one of the production zones and shutting down that particular production zone thereby permitting the remaining production zones to continue operating.

  2. Kartogenin with PRP promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone in the tendon-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Jianying; Yang, Jinsong; Narava, Manoj; Zhao, Guangyi; Yuan, Ting; Wu, Haishan; Zheng, Nigel; Hogan, MaCalus V; Wang, James H-C

    2017-01-27

    Treatment of tendon-bone junction injuries is a challenge because tendon-bone interface often heals poorly and the fibrocartilage zone, which reduces stress concentration, at the interface is not formed. In this study, we used a compound called kartogenin (KGN) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to induce the formation of fibrocartilage zone in a rat tendon graft-bone tunnel model. The experimental rats received KGN-PRP or PRP injections in the tendon graft-bone tunnel interface. The control group received saline. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, Safranin O staining of the tendon graft-bone tunnels revealed abundant proteoglycans in the KGN-PRP group indicating the formation of cartilage-like transition zone. Immunohistochemical and immuno-fluorescence staining revealed collagen types I (Col-I) and II (Col-II) in the newly formed fibrocartilage zone. Both fibrocartilage zone formation and maturation were healing time dependent. In contrast, the PRP and saline control groups had no cartilage-like tissues and minimal Col-I and Col-II staining. Some gaps were also present in the saline control group. Finally, pull-out strength in the KGN-PRP-treated group at 8 weeks was 1.4-fold higher than the PRP-treated group and 1.6-fold higher than the saline control group. These findings indicate that KGN, with PRP as a carrier, promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone between the tendon graft and bone interface. Thus, KGN-PRP may be used as a convenient cell-free therapy in clinics to promote fibrocartilage zone formation in rotator calf repair and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, thereby enhancing the mechanical strength of the tendon-bone interface and hence the clinical outcome of these procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro; Hut, Piet; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kinoshita, Daisuke

    2004-02-05

    Recent observations have revealed that an unexpectedly high fraction--a few per cent--of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) that inhabit the Kuiper belt are binaries. The components have roughly equal masses, with very eccentric orbits that are wider than a hundred times the radius of the primary. Standard theories of binary asteroid formation tend to produce close binaries with circular orbits, so two models have been proposed to explain the unique characteristics of the TNOs. Both models, however, require extreme assumptions regarding the size distribution of the TNOs. Here we report a mechanism that is capable of producing binary TNOs with the observed properties during the early stages of their formation and growth. The only required assumption is that the TNOs were initially formed through gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary dust disk. The basis of the mechanism is an exchange reaction in which a binary whose primary component is much more massive than the secondary interacts with a third body, whose mass is comparable to that of the primary. The low-mass secondary component is ejected and replaced by the third body in a wide but eccentric orbit.

  4. The Formation of Cores of Giant Planets at Convergence Zones of Planetary Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirono, Sin-iti; Katayama, Masahumi

    2016-10-01

    The formation of solid cores in giant planets of mass ∼ 10 {M}\\oplus is numerically simulated following the scenario of Sándor et al. In this scenario, there are two convergence zones, corresponding to the outer and inner edges of the dead zone, where the torque exerted on planetary embryos by the gas nebula is zero. At the outer edge of the dead zone, anticyclonic vortices accumulate infalling dust aggregates, and planetary embryos are continuously formed in this scenario. We performed N-body simulations and show that massive objects of ≃ 10 {M}\\oplus are formed in ∼2.5 Myr, starting from the embryos. The largest object is formed at the inner convergence zone, although planetary embryos are placed at the outer convergence zone. This is due to the scattering of embryos from the outer to the inner convergence zone, and the shorter damping timescale of eccentricity at the inner convergence zone compared to the outer one. We varied the migration timescale due to the torque from gas by changing the gas surface density around the convergence zones. We found that there is a critical migration timescale below which 10 {M}\\oplus -sized objects are formed. Furthermore, we conducted simulations in which the gas surface density evolves according to viscous accretion. The largest object is also formed at the inner convergence zone irrespective of the strength of turbulence. Throughout the simulations, the location of the largest mass is the inner convergence zone. We confirmed that the formation timescale of a core of a Jovian planet can be explained in this scenario.

  5. Preferential dealkylation reactions of s-triazine herbicides in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, M.S.; Michael, Thurman E.

    1994-01-01

    The preferential dealkylation pathways of the s-triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), propazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine], and simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine], and two monodealkylated triazine metabolites, deisopropylatrazine (DIA: 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine) and deethylatrazine (DEA: 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) were investigated on two adjacent Eudora silt-loam plots growing corn (Zea mays L.). Results from the shallow unsaturated zone and surface-water runoff showed preferential removal of an ethyl side chain from atrazine, simazine, and DIA relative to an isopropyl side chain from atrazine, propazine, and DEA. It is hypothesized that deethylation reactions may proceed at 2-3 times the rate of deisopropylation reactions. It is concluded that small concentrations of DIA reportedly associated with the degradation of atrazine may be due to a rapid turnover rate of the metabolite in the unsaturated zone, not to small production levels. Because of continued dealkylation of both monodealkylated metabolites, a strong argument is advanced for the presence of a didealkylated metabolite in the unsaturated zone.

  6. PLANETESIMAL FORMATION IN MAGNETOROTATIONALLY DEAD ZONES: CRITICAL DEPENDENCE ON THE NET VERTICAL MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2012-07-01

    Turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI) affects planetesimal formation by inducing diffusion and collisional fragmentation of dust particles. We examine conditions preferred for planetesimal formation in MRI-inactive 'dead zones' using an analytic dead-zone model based on our recent resistive MHD simulations. We argue that successful planetesimal formation requires not only a sufficiently large dead zone (which can be produced by tiny dust grains) but also a sufficiently small net vertical magnetic flux (NVF). Although often ignored, the latter condition is indeed important since the NVF strength determines the saturation level of turbulence in MRI-active layers. We show that direct collisional formation of icy planetesimal across the fragmentation barrier is possible when the NVF strength is lower than 10 mG (for the minimum-mass solar nebula model). Formation of rocky planetesimals via the secular gravitational instability is also possible within a similar range of the NVF strength. Our results indicate that the fate of planet formation largely depends on how the NVF is radially transported in the initial disk formation and subsequent disk accretion processes.

  7. Migration of humus substances from soil to water and the main chemical reaction (in different natural zone of Russian Federation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Moiseenko, Tatiana; Gashkina, Natalia; Kremleva, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Migration of humus substances (HS) from soil to natural water has zonal specificity. Soil HS of different natural areas characterized by specific functional features, different molecular weight (MW) distribution and other physicochemical parameters. Due to the specifics of formation, waters in Russia widely distributed colored water with high concentrations of humus substances. HS involved in many chemical reactions in natural waters/soil. The most important: 1.Dissociation, association and same destruction - reactions are particularly important for assessing the acidification of natural waters 2.Complexation with metals - reactions reduce the toxicity of most metals We researched the differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition of soil HS catchment and HS in natural waters of some climatic zones. Samples were taking: the mixing zone forests (sod-podzolic soils) and the steppe zone (black earth) European Territory of Russia (ETR). In order to examine process of migration humus substances from soil to water have been performed HPLC, IR spectrometry and mass spectrometry analyses. We funded change of HS structure and MW in soil/water. The water HS of the mixed forest characterized as same ratio of functional groups as soil catchments. The molecular weight distribution in water - predominate medium (500-1000 kDa), and low molecular weight fractions (<100 kDa). HS water in steppe zone differs from catchment soils. In HS catchment soils predominate nitrogen- and sulfur- functional group and in HS water - nitrogen-, oxygen- functional group. The molecular weight of HS in natural waters is macromolecular fractions ( > 1000 kDa). For evaluating of the acidification effect on structures of humic substances in natural waters/soil we used date of survey more than 300 lakes on the European Russia (ETP) and Western Siberia (WS) for assessing chemical parameters. Chemical analyzes of water samples were performed by a single method in accordance with the

  8. Ammonite zonation in condensed zone, middle Ozan formation (Taylor group, upper Cretaceous) in Northeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, J.

    1984-04-01

    Recognition of condensed zones is important because they may be marker horizons that are useful in exploration. Such a zone is demonstrated by the occurrence of ammonites belonging to 12 species and 9 genera from the middle Ozan Formation (lower Taylor Marl) in northeast Texas. The 1-foot (0.3-m) thick bed of bioturbated glauconitic biomicrite contains many specimens of disarticulated vertebrates, molluscs, remanie' fossils (blackened phosphatic internal molds), and hiatus concretions. Four of 6 midcontinent ammonite range zones proposed by Cobban and others appear to be represented in the fauna, in ascending order, by Baculites aquilaensis Reeside, Delawarella delawarensis (Morton) (= zones of two unnamed species of Baculites), Baculites obtusus Meek, and Trachyscaphites spiniger porchi Adkins (=zones of Baculites mclearni and B. asperiformis). Young may be correct in assuming that the occurrence of Delawarella delawarensis and Baculites aquilaensis in the Ozan Formation may mean that rocks of the upper Austin Group and parts of the lower Taylor Group are the same age. If correlation with the midcontinent zonation is correct, then the sediments that formed the condensed zone slowly accumulated from 81 to 79 m.y. (mid early Campanian to early late Campanian). Several species of the fauna are preserved as both normal and remanie' fossils, indicating that members of these species lived in the area for an extended period of time, perhaps as a relict fauna. The fauna includes a mixture of cosmopolitan and endemic species (indicating open shelf environment) with several types of heteromorphs (indicating moderate water depths).

  9. Formate as an energy source for microbial metabolism in chemosynthetic zones of hydrothermal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Windman, Todd; Zolotova, Natalya; Schwandner, Florian; Shock, Everett L

    2007-12-01

    Formate, a simple organic acid known to support chemotrophic hyperthermophiles, is found in hot springs of varying temperature and pH. However, it is not yet known how metabolic strategies that use formate could contribute to primary productivity in hydrothermal ecosystems. In an effort to provide a quantitative framework for assessing the role of formate metabolism, concentration data for dissolved formate and many other solutes in samples from Yellowstone hot springs were used, together with data for coexisting gas compositions, to evaluate the overall Gibbs energy for many reactions involving formate oxidation or reduction. The result is the first rigorous thermodynamic assessment of reactions involving formate oxidation to bicarbonate and reduction to methane coupled with various forms of iron, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen for hydrothermal ecosystems. We conclude that there are a limited number of reactions that can yield energy through formate reduction, in contrast to numerous formate oxidation reactions that can yield abundant energy for chemosynthetic microorganisms. Because the energy yields are so high, these results challenge the notion that hydrogen is the primary energy source of chemosynthetic microbes in hydrothermal ecosystems.

  10. Modelling of Turbulent Scalar Fluxes in the Broken Reaction Zones Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Kasten, Christian; Arias, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The LES filtered species transport equation in turbulent reacting flow simulations contains the unclosed turbulent scalar flux that needs to be modelled. It is well known that the statistical behavior of this term and its alignment characteristics with resolved scalar gradient depend on the relative importance of heat release and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Counter-gradient transport has been reported in several earlier studies where the flames under investigation were located either in the corrugated flamelets or thin reaction zones regime of premixed turbulent combustion. Therefore it is useful to understand the statistical behavior of turbulent scalar fluxes if the flame represents the broken reaction zones regime (BRZR). The present analysis aims to provide improved understanding on this subject through an a-priori analysis of a detailed chemistry database consisting of three freely-propagating statistically planar turbulent H2-air premixed flames representing three different regimes of combustion. Results indicate that heat release effects weaken with increasing Karlovitz number, but that counter-gradient transport can still occur for large LES filter size in the BRZR. Furthermore the behaviour of the flux and in particular its sign are different for reactant and product species. KAUST, EPSRC, KAUST Supercomputing Lab, N8, Archer.

  11. Experimental Measurements of the Chemical Reaction Zone of Detonating Liquid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, Viviane; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Stahl, David B.; Doucet, Michel; Decaris, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    We have a joint project between CEA-DAM Le Ripault and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the chemical reaction zone in detonating high explosives using several different laser velocimetry techniques. The short temporal duration of the von Neumann spike and early part of the reaction zone make these measurements difficult. Here, we report results obtained from detonation experiments using VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) and PDV (photon Doppler velocimetry) methods to measure the particle velocity history at a detonating nitromethane/PMMA interface. Experiments done at CEA were high-explosive-plane-wave initiated and those at LANL were gas-gun-projectile initiated with a detonation run of about 6 charge diameters in all experiments. The experiments had either glass or brass confinement. Excellent agreement of the interface particle velocity measurements at both Laboratories were obtained even though the initiation methods and the velocimetry systems were somewhat different. Some differences were observed in the peak particle velocity because of the ˜2 ns time resolution of the techniques—in all cases the peak was lower than the expected von Neumann spike. This is thought to be because the measurements were not high enough time resolution to resolve the spike.

  12. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : the Effect of Pressure on the Rate of Propagation of the Reaction Zone and upon the Rate of Molecular Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1932-01-01

    This study of gaseous explosive reaction has brought out a number of important fundamental characteristics of the explosive reaction indicating that the basal processes of the transformation are much simpler and corresponds more closely to the general laws and principles of ordinary transformations than is usually supposed. The report calls attention to the point that the rate of molecular transformation within the zone was found in all cases to be proportional to pressure, that the transformation within the zone is the result of binary impacts. This result is of unusual interest in the case of the reaction of heavy hydrocarbon fuels and the reaction mechanism proposed by the recent kinetic theory of chain reactions.

  13. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip-based immunoassay with multiple reaction zones: Toward on-chip multiplex detection platform

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-20

    In this work, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip-based immuno-sensing platform with integrated pneumatic micro valves is described. The microchip was fabricated with multiple layer soft lithography technology. By controlling the activation status of corresponding valves, reagent flows in the microchannel network can be well manipulated so that immuno-reactions only take place at designated reaction zones (DRZs). Four DRZs are included in the prototype microchip. Since these DRZs are all isolated from each other by micro valves, cross contamination is prevented. Using the inner surface of the all-PDMS microchannel as immunoassay substrate, on-chip sandwich format solid phase immunoassay was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this immuno-sensing platform. Mouse IgG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the model analyte and the signal reporter respectively. Only 10 ul sample is needed for the assay and low detection limit of 5 ng/ml (≈33 pM) was achieved though low-cost polyclonal antibodies were used in our experiment for feasibility study only. The encouraging results from mouse IgG immunoassay proved the feasibility of our microchip design. With slight modification of the assay protocol, the same chip design can be used for multi-target detection and can provide a simple, cost-effective and integrated microchip solution for multiplex immunoassay applications.

  14. Origin and formation of carbonaceous material veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Li, Haibing; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    This paper establishes a reference data set of carbonaceous materials (CMs) from the active fault zone of the Longmen Shan fault belt that ruptured in the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and presents an application of these data for studies of both other exhumed carbonaceous-rich fault zones and deep-drilling cores. The CMs distributed in the active fault zone are found as narrow veins and located along the slip surfaces. Microstructural observation shows that the carbonaceous material veins (CMVs) are located along slip surfaces in the fault gouge zones. Some CMVs have a cataclastic fabric, and their branches intrude into voids around the slip surfaces. Raman spectra of the CMVs show a wide (full width at half maximum >200 cm-1) D-peak at ~1345 cm-1 (defect peak), which is much lower than the O-peak at ~1595 cm-1 (ordered peak), indicating a metamorphic temperature of zeolite facies or lower than 250 °C. In addition, the stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C values) of the CMVs, ranging from -23.4 to -26.4‰, are very similar to that of the kerogen collected from the Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation in Sichuan Basin. Given the data at which it may be formed, the Xujiahe Formation is the most likely origin of CMs for the CMVs, and it seems that some CMVs in the fault zone were crushed and intruded into the voids during coseismic events, possibly driven by an enhanced pore fluid pressure. Since graphitization is suggested as an indicator of transient frictional heating in this area, our study providing a reference data set of CMs would help future CM-rich fault-zone research to retrieve seismic signatures presumably occurring in the Longmen Shan fault zone belt.

  15. Subducted banded iron formations as a source of ultralow-velocity zones at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Dobson, David P; Brodholt, John P

    2005-03-17

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are regions of the Earth's core-mantle boundary about 1-10 kilometres thick exhibiting seismic velocities that are lower than radial-Earth reference models by about 10-20 per cent for compressional waves and 10-30 per cent for shear waves. It is also thought that such regions have an increased density of about 0-20 per cent (ref. 1). A number of origins for ULVZs have been proposed, such as ponding of dense silicate melt, core-mantle reaction zones or underside sedimentation from the core. Here we suggest that ULVZs might instead be relics of banded iron formations subducted to the core-mantle boundary between 2.8 and 1.8 billion years ago. Consisting mainly of interbedded iron oxides and silica, such banded iron formations were deposited in the world's oceans during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic eras. We argue that these layers, as part of the ocean floor, would be recycled into the Earth's interior by subduction, sink to the bottom of the mantle and may explain all of the observed features of ULVZs.

  16. Formation of the compression zone in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Solyakov, D. G. Petrov, Yu. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Ladygina, M. S.; Cherednichenko, T. N.; Morgal’, Ya. I.; Kulik, N. V.; Stal’tsov, V. V.; Eliseev, D. V.

    2013-12-15

    Processes occurring in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) during the formation of the compression zone are discussed. The paper presents results of measurements of the spatial distribution of the electric current in the plasma flow, the temporal and spatial (along the flow) distributions of the plasma density, and the profiles of the velocity of individual flow layers along the system axis. The spatial distribution of the electromagnetic force in the flow is analyzed. It is shown that the plasma flow is decelerated when approaching the compression zone and reaccelerated after passing it. In this case, the plasma flow velocity decreases from ν = (2–3) × 10{sup 7} cm/s at the MPC output to ν < 10{sup 6} cm/s in the region of maximum compression and then again increases to 10{sup 7} cm/s at a distance of 15–17 cm from the MPC output. In some MPC operating modes, a displacement of the magnetic field from the compression zone and the formation of toroidal electric current vortices in the plasma flow after passing the compression zone were detected.

  17. Reaction Weakening of Dunite in Friction Experiments at Hydrothermal Conditions and Its Relevance to Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    To improve our understanding of processes occurring in the mantle wedge near the downdip limit of seismicity in subduction zones, we conducted triaxial friction tests on dunite gouge at temperatures in the range 200-350°C, 50 MPa fluid pressure and 100 MPa effective normal stress. Dunite, quartzite, and granite forcing blocks were used respectively to approximate changing rock/fluid chemistry with decreasing distance above the subduction thrust. All experiments were characterized by an initial increase in frictional strength to a peak value, followed by a decrease associated with shearing-enhanced alteration of the dunite gouge. Reaction products and the extent of weakening varied with the chemical environment. In the dunite-block experiments, strength gradually declined from the peak value to a coefficient of friction, µ ~ 0.5-0.6, consistent with the frictional strength of serpentine that formed on the shear surfaces from alteration of the gouge. Interaction of dunite gouge with quartzite and granite driving blocks resulted in significantly greater weakening, to μ ~ 0.3, at temperatures of 250°C and higher. Talc and serpentine partly replaced dunite gouge sheared between quartzite blocks, and metastable saponitic smectite clays crystallized in dunite sheared between granite blocks, as a result of fluid-assisted chemical exchange with the minerals in the wall rocks. These results suggest that rapid and substantial weakening can occur in the mantle wedge immediately overlying the subducting slab. Whichever the chemical environment, attainment of peak strength typically was accompanied by oscillatory slip with small stress drops that gradually was replaced by stable slip with increasing displacement. This oscillatory behavior in some ways resembles the tremor events that have been reported near the forearc mantle corner in subduction zones, and it may indicate the possible involvement of mineral reactions in some instances of tremor.

  18. Characterization and modeling of premixed turbulent n-heptane ames in the thin reaction zone regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Bruno

    n-heptane/air premixed turbulent flames in the high-Karlovitz portion of the thin reaction zone regime are characterized and modeled in this thesis using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) with detailed chemistry. In order to perform these simulations, a time-integration scheme that can efficiently handle the stiffness of the equations solved is developed first. A first simulation with unity Lewis number is considered in order to assess the effect of turbulence on the flame in the absence of differential diffusion. A second simulation with non-unity Lewis numbers is considered to study how turbulence affects differential diffusion. In the absence of differential diffusion, minimal departure from the 1D unstretched flame structure (species vs. temperature profiles) is observed. In the non-unity Lewis number case, the flame structure lies between that of 1D unstretched flames with "laminar'' non-unity Lewis numbers and unity Lewis number. This is attributed to effective Lewis numbers resulting from intense turbulent mixing and a first model is proposed. The reaction zone is shown to be thin for both flames, yet large chemical source term fluctuations are observed. The fuel consumption rate is found to be only weakly correlated with stretch, although local extinctions in the non-unity Lewis number case are well correlated with high curvature. These results explain the apparent turbulent flame speeds. Other variables that better correlate with this fuel burning rate are identified through a coordinate transformation. It is shown that the unity Lewis number turbulent flames can be accurately described by a set of 1D (in progress variable space) flamelet equations parameterized by the dissipation rate of the progress variable. In the non-unity Lewis number flames, the flamelet equations suggest a dependence on a second parameter, the diffusion of the progress variable. A new tabulation approach is proposed for the simulation of such flames with these dimensionally

  19. Currents and voltages in the MFTF coils during the formation of a normal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.

    1980-08-01

    Expressions are obtained for the currents and voltages in a pair of inductively coupled superconducting coils under two conditions: formation of a normal zone and during a change in the level of the current in one coil. A dump resistor of low resistance and a detector bridge is connected across each coil. Calculated results are given for the MFTF coils. The circuit equations during formation of a normal zone are nonlinear and time-varying, consequently, only a series solution is possible. The conditions during a change in current are more easily found. After the transient has died away, the voltages in the coil associated with the changing source are all self-inductive, while the voltages in the other coil are all mutually inductive.

  20. Asymmetric hollow nanorod formation through a partial galvanic replacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daeha; Song, Hyunjoon

    2009-12-30

    An asymmetric single hollow structure was generated from Ag-Au-Ag heterometal nanorods by a partial galvanic replacement reaction for the first time. The C(2)-symmetry breaking took place because of the random generation of a single pit on only one end of the silver domain at an early stage of the reaction. Careful control of the reaction kinetics could also yield a double-hollow structure on both ends of the silver domain. The resulting single- and double-hollow nanorods exhibited characteristic extinctions in the near-IR range.

  1. Modelling the Formation of Liver Zones within the Scope of Fractional Order Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Atangana, Abdon; Oukouomi Noutchie, Suares Clovis

    2014-01-01

    We develop and extend earlier results related to mathematical modelling of the liver formation zone by the adoption of noninteger order derivative. The hidden uncertainties in the model are captured and controlled thanks to the Caputo derivative. The stationary states are investigated and the time-dependent solution is approximated using two recent iteration methods. In particular, we discuss the convergence of these methods by constructing a suitable Hilbert space. PMID:25276791

  2. Self-consistent orogenic wedge formation and shear zone propagation due to thermal softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    We present two dimensional numerical simulations of orogenic wedge formation for a viscoelastoplastic lithosphere under compression. The thermo-mechanical model is based on the principle of energy conservation and includes temperature-dependent rheologies. With this approach, shear zones caused by thermal softening develop spontaneously in the absence of strain softening. The initial locus of shear localization is controlled by either lateral temperature variations (100°C) at the model base or by lateral variations in crustal thickness. The first episode of strain localization occurs after 15% bulk shortening. With ongoing strain, a series of shear zones arise and propagate towards the foreland leading to the self-consistent formation of an orogenic wedge. We investigate the impact of bulk shortening rates, erosion and rheology on the dynamics of wedge formation, the associated topography and uplift rates. The maximum topography reaches up to 10 km and the surface morphology evolves according to shear zone activation and deactivation. Uplift rates are transient and peak values are maintained only on very short time scales. A running average of the uplift rate versus time curves with a time-window of 4 My provides average uplift rates in the order of a few millimeters per year. Erosion is an important parameter for the formation and the evolution of the wedge (e.g. can control the spacing of shear zones by modifying crustal thickness). Rheological parameters, such as the friction angle or the upper crustal viscosity, control the occurrence of strain localization. Bulk shortening rates between 10-15 and 10-16 s-1 do not have a major impact on the resulting wedge structure.

  3. Gas-oil fluids in the formation of travertines in the Baikal rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarinov, A. A.; Yalovik, L. I.; Shumilova, T. G.; Kanakin, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Active participation of gas-oil fluids in the processes of mineral formation and petrogenesis in travertines of the Arshan and Garga hot springs is substantiated. The parageneses of the products of pyrolytic decomposition and oxidation of the gas-oil components of hydrothermal fluids (amorphous bitumen, graphite-like CM, and graphite) with different genetic groups of minerals crystallized in a wide range of P-T conditions were established. Travertines of the Baikal rift zone were formed from multicomponent hydrous-gas-oil fluids by the following basic mechanisms of mineral formation: chemogenic, biogenic, cavitation, fluid pyrometamorphism, and pyrolysis.

  4. Understanding bond formation in polar one-step reactions. Topological analyses of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates.

    PubMed

    Roca-López, David; Polo, Victor; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2015-04-17

    The mechanism of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates has been studied using DFT methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ/PCM=THF level. After the formation of a starting complex an without energy barrier, in which the lithium atom is coordinated to both nitrone and ynolate, the reaction takes place in one single kinetic step through a single transition structure. However, the formation of C-C and C-O bonds takes place sequentially through a typical two-stage, one-step process. A combined study of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) and electron localization function (ELFs) of selected points along the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) of the reaction confirmed that, in the transition structure, only the C-C bond is being formed to some extent, whereas an electrostatic interaction is present between carbon and oxygen atoms previous to the formation of the C-O bond. Indeed, the formation of the second C-O bond only begins when the first C-C bond is completely formed without formation of any intermediate. Once the C-C bond is formed and before the C-O bond formation starts the RMS gradient norm dips, approaching but not reaching 0, giving rise to a hidden intermediate.

  5. Body-Fitted Detonation Shock Dynamics and the Pseudo-Reaction-Zone Energy Release Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Short, Mark; Chqiuete, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Programmed-burn methods are a class of models used to propagate a detonation wave, without the high resolution cost associated with a direct numerical simulation. They separate the detonation evolution calculation into two components: timing and energy release. The timing component is usually calculated with a Detonation Shock Dynamics model, a surface evolution representation that relates the normal velocity of the surface (Dn) to its local curvature. The energy release component must appropriately capture the degree of energy change associated with chemical reaction while simultaneously remaining synchronized with the timing component. The Pseudo-Reaction-Zone (PRZ) model is a reactive burn like energy release model, converting reactants into products, but with a conversion rate that is a function of the DSD surface Dn field. As such, it requires the DSD calculation produce smooth Dn fields, a challenge in complex geometries. We describe a new body-fitted approach to the Detonation Shock Dynamics calculation which produces the required smooth Dn fields, and a method for calibrating the PRZ model such that the rate of energy release remains as synced as possible with the timing component. We show results for slab, rate-stick and arc geometries.

  6. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  7. The methane hydrate formation and the resource estimate resulting from free gas migration in seeping seafloor hydrate stability zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jinan; Liang, Deqing; Wu, Nengyou; Fan, Shuanshi

    2009-10-01

    It is a typical multiphase flow process for hydrate formation in seeping seafloor sediments. Free gas can not only be present but also take part in formation of hydrate. The volume fraction of free gas in local pore of hydrate stable zone (HSZ) influences the formation of hydrate in seeping seafloor area, and methane flux determines the abundance and resource of hydrate-bearing reservoirs. In this paper, a multiphase flow model including water (dissolved methane and salt)-free gas hydrate has been established to describe this kind of flow-transfer-reaction process where there exists a large scale of free gas migration and transform in seafloor pore. In the order of three different scenarios, the conversions among permeability, capillary pressure, phase saturations and salinity along with the formation of hydrate have been deducted. Furthermore, the influence of four sorts of free gas saturations and three classes of methane fluxes on hydrate formation and the resource has also been analyzed and compared. Based on the rules drawn from the simulation, and combined information gotten from drills in field, the methane hydrate(MH) formation in Shenhu area of South China Sea has been forecasted. It has been speculated that there may breed a moderate methane flux below this seafloor HSZ. If the flux is about 0.5 kg m -2 a -1, then it will go on to evolve about 2700 ka until the hydrate saturation in pore will arrive its peak (about 75%). Approximately 1.47 × 10 9 m 3 MH has been reckoned in this marine basin finally, is about 13 times over preliminary estimate.

  8. Reaction path and crystallograpy of cobalt silicide formation on silicon(001) by reaction deposition epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chong Wee

    CaF2-structure CoSi2 layers were formed on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and compared with CoSi2 layers obtained by conventional solid phase growth (SPG). In the case of RDE, CoSi 2 formation occurred during Co deposition at elevated temperature while for SPG, Co was deposited at 25°C and silicidation took place during subsequent annealing. My results demonstrate that RDE CoSi2 layers are epitaxial with a cube-on-cube relationship, 001CoSi2 ‖001Si and 100CoSi2 ‖100 Si . In contrast, SPG films are polycrystalline with a mixed 111/002/022/112 orientation. I attribute the striking difference to rapid Co diffusion during RDE for which the high Co/Si reactivity gives rise to a flux-limited reaction resulting in the direct formation of the disilicide phase. Initial formation of CoSi2(001) follows the Volmer-Weber mode with two families of island shapes: inverse pyramids and platelets. The rectangular-based pyramidal islands extend along orthogonal <110> directions, bounded by four {111} CoSi2/Si interfaces, and grow with a cube-on-cube orientation with respect to Si(001). Platelet-shaped islands are bounded across their long <110> directions by {111} twin planes and their narrow <110> directions by 511CoSi2 ‖111Si interfaces. The top and bottom surfaces are {22¯1}, with 22¯1 CoSi2‖001 Si , and {1¯1¯1}, with 1¯1¯ 1CoSi2‖ 11¯1Si , respectively. The early stages of film growth (tCo ≤ 13 A) are dominated by the twinned platelets due to a combination of higher nucleation rates and rapid elongation along preferred <110> directions. However, at tCo ≥ 13 A, island coalescence becomes significant as orthogonal platelets intersect and block elongation along fast growth directions. Further island growth becomes dominated by the untwinned islands. I show that high-flux low-energy Ar+ ion irradiation during RDE growth dramatically increases the area fraction of untwinned regions from 0.17 in films grown under standard magnetically balanced

  9. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminant attenuation processes in the vadose zone of a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN have been simulated with a reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport, solute transport, and the most relevant biogeochemical reactions. Dissolution and volatilization of oil components, their aerobic and anaerobic degradation coupled with sequential electron acceptor consumption, ingress of atmospheric O2, and the release of CH4 and CO2 from the smear zone generated by the floating oil were considered. The focus of the simulations was to assess the dynamics between biodegradation and gas transport processes in the vadose zone, to evaluate the rates and contributions of different electron accepting processes towards vadose zone natural attenuation, and to provide an estimate of the historical mass loss. Concentration distributions of reactive (O2, CH4, and CO2) and non-reactive (Ar and N2) gases served as key constraints for the model calibration. Simulation results confirm that as of 2007, the main degradation pathway can be attributed to methanogenic degradation of organic compounds in the smear zone and the vadose zone resulting in a contaminant plume dominated by high CH4 concentrations. In accordance with field observations, zones of volatilization and CH4 generation are correlated to slightly elevated total gas pressures and low partial pressures of N2 and Ar, while zones of aerobic CH4 oxidation are characterized by slightly reduced gas pressures and elevated concentrations of N2 and Ar. Diffusion is the most significant transport mechanism for gases in the vadose zone; however, the simulations also indicate that, despite very small pressure gradients, advection contributes up to 15% towards the net flux of CH4, and to a more limited extent to O2 ingress. Model calibration strongly suggests that transfer of biogenically generated gases from the smear zone provides a major control on vadose zone gas distributions and vadose zone carbon

  10. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  11. Predicting brittle zones in the Bakken Formation using well logs and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecher, Michael E.

    The oil-in-place estimate for the Bakken Formation has varied from 10 billion barrels in 1974 to 503 billion barrels in 1999. However, only a small fraction of this estimate is recoverable due to the formation having very low porosity and permeability. Implementation of hydraulic fracture stages along horizontal wells in the Bakken has been productive. Recently, identification of zones where the formation is brittle has been used to improve hydraulic fracture stimulation efficiency in an effort to improve production. The first goal for this thesis is to identify a correlation between brittleness and production data by using elastic moduli and normalized production values. The hypothesis for this study is that rock with a low Poisson's ratio and high Young's modulus will be more brittle and will ultimately produce a higher amount of oil than more ductile rock. The next goal was to create and test a method to identify brittle zones with high normalized production in a 3D seismic data set without well control using producing wells from outside the survey with dipole sonic logs from the Bakken Formation. Correlations between normalized production values and elastic moduli were subsequently identified. Cumulative first-four-months' production was found to have the best correlation to the elastic moduli. Correlations of normalized production values and Poisson's ratio showed that sections of the middle Bakken with low Poisson's ratio yield higher normalized production values. Correlations of Young's modulus and normalized production showed that middle Bakken zones with low Young's modulus have higher normalized production values. However, when using additional wells that were not used for well-to-3D seismic correlations, the correlation shows that higher Young's modulus yield higher normalized production. The correlation with additional wells best represented the data and agrees with the initial hypothesis. Brittle zones were mapped in a 3D seismic data set by

  12. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  13. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  14. Chronostratigraphic significance of cathodoluminescence zoning in syntaxial cement: Mississippian Lake Valley Formation, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Tracy D.; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Meyers, William J.

    1996-08-01

    Echinoderm-syntax ial cement crystals have been collected at several stratigraphic levels within the Lake Valley Formation, which is overlain by a major pre-Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure surface. The crystals were microsampled along growth bands, and yielded high-resolution elemental and isotopic information that record fluid evolution during their growth. Although cement crystals show little variation in cathodoluminescence character and bulk chemistry throughout the regional extent of the formation, intracrystalline patterns in minor element and stable isotope chemistry allow for the identification of several settings of cementation, including the marine phreatic, marine-meteoric mixing, and meteoric phreatic zones. When placed in a regional-stratigraphic context, crystal growth records enable reconstruction of the temporal and spatial extent of these diagenetic environments. Isotopic, petrographic and stratigraphic constraints indicate that cementation was related to two temporally distinct meteoric systems. Most Lake Valley Formation syntaxial cement formed in the marine phreatic and marine-meteoric mixing zones during the earliest phase of cementation. Of this cement, in excess of 60% formed in the marine phreatic zone and lowermost marine-meteoric mixing zone. Smaller volumes precipitated from progressively fresher mixtures of marine and meteoric fluid during the gradual expansion of a freshwater lens that developed in response to pre-Pennsylvanian lowering of sea level. Meteoric phreatic fluids were relatively unimportant during this episode of cementation. In contrast, cement of entirely meteoric phreatic origin is associated with a later meteoric system, but is found only in the northern part of the study area and at stratigraphic levels immediately adjacent to the pre-Pennsylvanian unconforrnity. Our results indicate that cements in the upper and lower parts of the Lake Valley Formation are genetically and temporally unrelated. Thus, the cement

  15. Shock Separation and Dead-Zone Formation from Detonations in an Internal Air-Well Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John; Andreski, Henry; Garza, Raul; Batteux, Jan; Vitello, Peter; Souers, Clark

    2007-06-01

    Here we report on measurements of dead-zone formation due to shock separation from detonations attempting to corner-turn in an internal air-well geometry. This geometry is also known as a ``hockey-puck'' configuration. These measurements were performed on detonations in LX-17 and PBX9502 using time sequence radiography to image the event with surface contact timing pins as an additional diagnostic. In addition to an open corner in the high-explosive component we also examined the effects of steel defining the corner. In these experiments we find a long lived dead-zone consisting of shocked explosive that persists to very late times. Data and numerical modeling will be presented in addition to a comparison with previous work using an external air well. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  16. Periodic stripe formation by a Turing-mechanism operating at growth zones in the mammalian palate

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Andrew D.; Ohazama, Atsushi; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Sharpe, Paul T.; Kondo, Shigeru; Basson, M. Albert; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Green, Jeremy B.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present direct evidence of an activator-inhibitor system in the generation of the regularly spaced transverse ridges of the palate. We show that new ridges, or rugae, marked by stripes of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression, appear at two growth zones where the space between previously laid-down rugae increases. However, inter-rugal growth is not absolutely required: new stripes still appear when growth is inhibited. Furthermore, when a ruga is excised new Shh expression appears, not at the cut edge but as bifurcating stripes branching from the neighbouring Shh stripe, diagnostic of a Turing-type reaction-diffusion mechanism. Genetic and inhibitor experiments identify Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) and Shh as an activator-inhibitor pair in this system. These findings demonstrate a reaction-diffusion mechanism likely to be widely relevant in vertebrate development. PMID:22344222

  17. Interploidy hybridization in sympatric zones: the formation of Epidendrum fulgens × E. puniceoluteum hybrids (Epidendroideae, Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Ana P; Chinaglia, Mariana; Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Pinheiro, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is a primary cause of extensive morphological and chromosomal variation and plays an important role in plant species diversification. However, the role of interploidal hybridization in the formation of hybrid swarms is less clear. Epidendrum encompasses wide variation in chromosome number and lacks strong premating barriers, making the genus a good model for clarifying the role of chromosomes in postzygotic barriers in interploidal hybrids. In this sense, hybrids from the interploidal sympatric zone between E. fulgens (2n = 2x = 24) and E. puniceoluteum (2n = 4x = 56) were analyzed using cytogenetic techniques to elucidate the formation and establishment of interploidal hybrids. Hybrids were not a uniform group: two chromosome numbers were observed, with the variation being a consequence of severe hybrid meiotic abnormalities and backcrossing with E. puniceoluteum. The hybrids were triploids (2n = 3x = 38 and 40) and despite the occurrence of enormous meiotic problems associated with triploidy, the hybrids were able to backcross, producing successful hybrid individuals with broad ecological distributions. In spite of the nonpolyploidization of the hybrid, its formation is a long-term evolutionary process rather than a product of a recent disturbance, and considering other sympatric zones in Epidendrum, these events could be recurrent. PMID:24198942

  18. The feeding zones of terrestrial planets and insights into Moon formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2015-05-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of several hundred approximately lunar mass bodies accreting into a few terrestrial planets. This final stage is stochastic, making it hard to predict which parts of the original planetesimal disk contributed to each of our terrestrial planets. Here we present an extensive suite of terrestrial planet formation simulations that allows quantitative analysis of this process. Although there is a general correlation between a planet's location and the initial semi-major axes of its constituent planetesimals, we concur with previous studies that Venus, Earth, and Mars analogs have overlapping, stochastic feeding zones. We quantify the feeding zone width, Δa , as the mass-weighted standard deviation of the initial semi-major axes of the planetary embryos and planetesimals that make up the final planet. The size of a planet's feeding zone in our simulations does not correlate with its final mass or semi-major axis, suggesting there is no systematic trend between a planet's mass and its volatile inventory. Instead, we find that the feeding zone of any planet more massive than 0.1M⊕ is roughly proportional to the radial extent of the initial disk from which it formed: Δa ≈ 0.25 (amax -amin) , where amin and amax are the inner and outer edge of the initial planetesimal disk. These wide stochastic feeding zones have significant consequences for the origin of the Moon, since the canonical scenario predicts the Moon should be primarily composed of material from Earth's last major impactor (Theia), yet its isotopic composition is indistinguishable from Earth. In particular, we find that the feeding zones of Theia analogs are significantly more stochastic than the planetary analogs. Depending on our assumed initial distribution of oxygen isotopes within the planetesimal disk, we find a ∼ 5% or less probability that the Earth and Theia will form with an isotopic difference equal to or smaller than the Earth and Moon

  19. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  20. Experimental constraints on mineral-melt reactions in the Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, I. V.; Nielsen, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Eocene Skaergaard intrusion (East Greenland) is the classical example of the Fe enrichment trend in tholeitic magma. Despite numerous attempts to reproduce the trend experimentally, its direction in the Middle Zone (MZ) of the intrusion remains contentious. It remains unclear whether the strong Fe enrichment of the magma continued after the start of ilmenite and magnetite crystallization. Thy et al. (2009) recently showed that the modal ratio of Fe-Ti oxide minerals to Fe-Mg silicates in average Skaergaard rocks was lower than the experimentally determined cotectic proportions. In our view, the difference probably resulted from mineral-melt post-cumulus reactions. Cumulus assemblage in the MZ comprised plagioclase, high- and low-Ca pyroxenes, ilmenite and magnetite. Olivine is locally present as an inter-cumulus phase. All the minerals and the liquid were involved in continuous and discontinuous reaction series. Traces of the reactions are ubiquitous throughout the intrusion, and especially prominent around autolithic blocks (Irvine et al., 1998; McBirney, 2009). We examined experimental constraints on the reactions from 67 experimental equilibria compiled from 25 publications, in which dry silicate melts coexisted with plagioclase, olivine, and two pyroxenes. The experiments had been carried out at 1 atm, temperatures between 1040 and 1180 °C, and variable fO2. We found that the 4-mineral assemblage did not constrain a narrow range of liquid compositions. For example, SiO2 in the liquids varies broadly from 42 to 66 wt.%. Cotectic proportions of the crystal phases vary accordingly. FeO and alkalis impose strong and opposite effects on the cotectic proportions and equilibrium melt compositions. Thus, alkali-poor liquids evolve to FeO concentrations of up to 30 wt. %. We propose that the mineral-melt reactions compounded by migration of FeO and alkalis in the liquid may explain poorly understood phenomena such as the reverse evolution of plagioclase towards

  1. Contact resistance and normal zone formation in coated yttrium barium copper oxide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Robert Calvin

    2001-11-01

    This project presents a systematic study of contact resistance and normal zone formation in silver coated YBa2CU3Ox (YBCO) superconductors. A unique opportunity exists in YBCO superconductors because of the ability to use oxygen annealing to influence the interfacial properties and the planar geometry of this type of superconductor to characterize the contact resistance between the silver and YBCO. The interface represents a region that current must cross when normal zones form in the superconductor and a high contact resistance could impede the current transfer or produce excess Joule heating that would result in premature quench or damage of the sample. While it has been shown in single-crystalline YBCO processing methods that the contact resistance of the silver/YBCO interface can be influenced by post-process oxygen annealing, this has not previously been confirmed for high-density films, nor for samples with complete layers of silver deposited on top of the YBCO. Both the influence of contact resistance and the knowledge of normal zone formation on conductor sized samples is essential for their successful implementation into superconducting applications such as transmission lines and magnets. While normal zone formation and propagation have been studied in other high temperature superconductors, the amount of information with respect to YBCO has been very limited. This study establishes that the processing method for the YBCO does not affect the contact resistance and mirrors the dependence of contact resistance on oxygen annealing temperature observed in earlier work. It has also been experimentally confirmed that the current transfer length provides an effective representation of the contact resistance when compared to more direct measurements using the traditional four-wire method. Finally for samples with low contact resistance, a combination of experiments and modeling demonstrate an accurate understanding of the key role of silver thickness and substrate

  2. Identification of indicators of groundwater quality formation process using a zoning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiu-yan; Yang, Hongbin; Cao, Yuqing; Wang, Wenke

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water safety is a world-wide focus. In Yinchuan Plain of western China, groundwater is mostly saline water, and it has generated many problems for the life of local residents. Yinchuan Plain exhibits differences from the mountain area to the plain in terrain and elevation, and landforms and scales. Such differences resulted in hydro-geological water storage structures with different water yield properties and permeabilities of the aquifers. These water storage structures are the places where the groundwater moves and is retained, as well as where the air-water-rock interaction and the migration and differentiation between substances in the water take place. With the arid climate and intense irrigation in Yinchuan Plain, the hydro-chemical features of the groundwater exhibit distinct zonation. To explore the formative mechanism of the groundwater quality in Yinchuan Plain, a zoning model for the formation of groundwater quality is established in three layers, the first layer shows the geological and hydrogeological conditions that express the landform and landscape, geological age, lithology, and hydrodynamic features of the studied area. The second layer indicates the zonation of the formation of groundwater quality. According to the major hydro-geochemical actions, the plain is divided from west to east into lixiviation, evaporation, and evaporation-mixing zones. The third layer contains the hydrodynamic features that express the hydro-chemical type, salinity, and the contents of the major ions as well as trace elements fluorine and arsenic. The features of each zone are quantitatively expressed with thermodynamic, hydrodynamic, and hydro-chemical indicators.

  3. Formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) from reaction of monochloramine: a new disinfection by-product.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junghoon; Valentine, Richard L

    2002-02-01

    Studies have been conducted specifically to investigate the hypothesis that N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) can be produced by reactions involving monochloramine. Experiments were conducted using dimethylamine (DMA) as a model precursor. NDMA was formed from the reaction between DMA and monochloramine indicating that it should be considered a potential disinfection by-product. The formation of NDMA increased with increased monochloramine concentration and showed maximum in yield when DMA was varied at fixed monochloramine concentrations. The mass spectra of the NDMA formed from DMA and 15N isotope labeled monochloramine (15NH2Cl) showed that the source of one of the nitrogen atoms in the nitroso group in NDMA was from monochloramine. Addition of 0.05 and 0.5 mM of preformed monochloramine to a secondarily treated wastewater at pH 7.2 also resulted in the formation of 3.6 and 111 ng/L of NDMA, respectively, showing that this is indeed an environmentally relevant NDMA formation pathway. The proposed NDMA formation mechanism consists of (i) the formation of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) intermediate from the reaction of DMA with monochloramine followed by, (ii) the oxidation of UDMH by monochloramine to NDMA, and (iii) the reversible chlorine transfer reaction between monochloramine and DMA which is parallel to (i). We conclude that reactions involving monochloramine in addition to classical nitrosation reactions are potentially important pathways for NDMA formation.

  4. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  5. Quasifission in heavy and superheavy element formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Prasad, E.; Simenel, C.; Walshe, J.; Wahkle, A.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Rafferty, D. C.; Rietz, R. du; Simpson, E. C.; David, H. M.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.

    2016-12-01

    Superheavy elements are created in the laboratory by the fusion of two heavy nuclei. The large Coulomb repulsion that makes superheavy elements decay also makes the fusion process that forms them very unlikely. Instead, after sticking together for a short time, the two nuclei usually come apart, in a process called quasifission. Mass-angle distributions give the most direct information on the characteristics and time scales of quasifission. A systematic study of carefully chosen mass-angle distributions has provided information on the global trends of quasifission. Large deviations from these systematics reveal the major role played by the nuclear structure of the two colliding nuclei in determining the reaction outcome, and thus implicitly in hindering or favouring superheavy element production.

  6. Modeling the formation and reactions of benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Golding, Bernard T; Barnes, Martine L; Bleasdale, Christine; Henderson, Alistair P; Jiang, Dong; Li, Xin; Mutlu, Esra; Petty, Hannah J; Sadeghi, Majid M

    2010-03-19

    One or more of the muconaldehyde isomers is a putative product of benzene metabolism. As muconaldehydes are highly reactive dienals and potentially mutagenic they might be relevant to the carcinogenicity of benzene. Muconaldehydes may be derived through the action of a cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase on benzene oxide-oxepin, which are established metabolites of benzene. Oxidation of benzene oxide-oxepin either by the one-electron oxidant cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) or by iron(III) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) hexafluorophosphate in acetone at -78 degrees C or acetonitrile at -40 degrees C gave (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, which was a single diastereoisomer according to analysis by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reaction of toluene-1,2-oxide/2-methyloxepin with CAN gave (2E,4Z)-6-oxo-hepta-2,4-dienal. Similarly, the action of CAN on 1,6-dimethylbenzene oxide-2,7-dimethyloxepin gave (3Z,5E)-octa-3,5-diene-2,7-dione. In vivo, benzene oxide-oxepin could suffer one-electron oxidation by cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase giving (E,Z)-muconaldehyde. The observations presented may be relevant to the toxicology of benzene oxide-oxepin and other arene oxide-oxepins as we have previously shown that (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, analogously to (Z,Z)-muconaldehyde, affords pyrrole adducts with the exocyclic amino groups of the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Independent of their possible toxicological significance, the experiments described provide preparatively useful routes to (E,Z)-muconaldehyde and its congeners. Methods are also described for the trapping and analysis of reactive benzene metabolites, e.g. using the Diels-Alder reaction with the dienophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to trap arene oxides and with the diene 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran to trap enals.

  7. Characteristics of the reaction zone in a combustor operating at mild combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. B.; Peters, N.

    stretching rates of the large structures. However, the flue gases entrained up to this point increased the inert content of the fresh mixture with chemical time scales comparable to the time scales of the flow. This allowed the reactants to attain temperatures near to those of the flue gases and to ignite with a small temperature rise, which led to a much lower thermal NO formation. The results also showed that when the equivalence ratio of the non- premixed mixtures was increased, the region where the combustion took place was shifted away from the burner and extended further downstream towards the roof. In the case of premixed combustion, however, the reaction started and terminated earlier and was confined to regions in close proximity to the axis. The emissions of OH radical occurred rather patchily and in relatively high concentrations.

  8. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  9. An example of mixing-zone dolomite, Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Cander, H.S. )

    1994-07-01

    A late-formed dolomite cement in a core of the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, peninsular Florida, provides an example of dolomite cement from a mixing zone and illustrates how dolomite textural alteration and stabilization can occur at earth-surface conditions. The Avon Park Formation is a pervasively dolomitized peritidal platform carbonate 400 m thick in the Florida aquifer system. Typical Avon Park dolomite is inclusion-rich, fine-grained (< 40 mm), noncathodoluminescent, highly porous (average, 20%), and formed during the Eocene by normal to hypersaline seawater ([delta][sup 18]O = + 3.7[per thousand] PDB; [delta][sup 13]C = + 2.0[per thousand]; [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.70778; Sr = 167 ppm). In a 20 m interval in a core from southwest Florida, inclusion-free, cathodoluminescent dolomite overgrows the early-formed noncathodoluminescent marine dolomite. The cathodoluminescent dolomite cement profoundly alters the texture of Avon Park dolomite from typical Cenozoic-like porous, poorly crystalline dolomite to hard, dense, low-porosity, highly crystalline Paleozoic-like dolomite. The dolomite cement is not a replacement of limestone but an overgrowth of early-formed marine dolomite and pore-occluding cement. This study demonstrates that: (1) dolomite precipitated from a 75% seawater mixing-zone fluid that was both calcite saturated and sulfate-rich, and (2) dramatic textural maturation and stabilization in dolomite can occur in the near surface environment, without elevated temperature and burial conditions.

  10. Nickel-Catalyzed Reactions Directed toward the Formation of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2015-06-16

    Heterocycles have garnered significant attention because they are important functional building blocks in various useful molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, pesticides, and materials. Several studies have been conducted regarding the preparation of heterocyclic skeletons with an emphasis on selectivity and efficiency. Three strategies are typically employed to construct cyclic molecules, namely, cyclization, cycloaddition, and ring-size alterations. Although each method has certain advantages, cycloaddition may be superior from the viewpoint of divergence. Specifically, cycloadditions enable the construction of rings from several pieces. However, the construction of heterocycles via cycloadditions is more challenging than the construction of carbocycles. For heterocycle construction, simple pericyclic reactions rarely work smoothly because of the large HOMO-LUMO gap unless well-designed combinations, such as electron-rich dienes and aldehydes, are utilized. Thus, a different approach should be employed to prepare heterocycles via cycloadditions. To this end, the use of metallacycles containing heteroatoms is expected to serve as a promising solution. In this study, we focused on the preparation of heteroatom-containing nickelacycles. Because nickel possesses a relatively high redox potential and an affinity for heteroatoms, several methods were developed to synthesize heteronickelacycles from various starting materials. The prepared nickelacycles were demonstrated to be reasonable intermediates in cycloaddition reactions, which were used to prepare various heterocycles. In this Account, we introduce the following four methods to prepare heterocycles via heteronickelacycles. (1) Direct oxidative insertion of Ni(0) to α,β-unsaturated enone derivatives: treatment of 3-ethoxycarbonyl-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one with Ni(0) afforded an oxa-nickelacycle, which reacted with alkynes to give pyrans. (2) Substitution of a part of a cyclic compound with

  11. EEG reactions of the human brain in the gradient magnetic field zone of the active geological fault (pilot study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobachenko, S. V.; Shitov, A. V.; Grigorjev, P. E.; Sokolov, M. V.; Zubrilkin, A. I.; Vypiraylo, D. N.; Solovjev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the functional state of a person within the zone of an active geological fault characterized by abnormal spatial distribution of the magnetic- field vector values. It is shown that these geophysical modifications have a pronounced effect on the fluctuations of the electrical activity of the human brain. When the person gets into a zone with abnormal levels of gradient magnetic field in the absence of any subjective sensations, a nonspecific orientation activation reaction is observed, which is characterized by a significant increase in the levels of peak performance in key functional EEG frequency bands.

  12. Evaluating the Influence of Chemical Reactions on Wellbore Cement Integrity and Geochemical Tracer Behavior in Hydraulically-Fractured Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verba, C.; Lieuallen, A.; Yang, J.; Torres, M. E.; Hakala, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring wellbore integrity for hydraulically-fractured shale reservoirs is important for maintaining zonal isolation of gases and fluids within the reservoir. Chemical reactions between wellbore cements, the shale formation, formation fluids, and fracturing fluids could affect the ability for cement to form an adequate seal. This study focuses on experimental investigations to evaluate how cement, rock, brines, and fracturing fluids react under conditions similar to the perforated zone associated with the Marcellus shale (Greene County, Pennsylvania). Two pressure/temperature regimes were investigated- moderate (25 MPa, 50oC) and high (27.5 MPa, 90oC). Shale collected from the Lower Marcellus section was encased in Class A cement, cured for 24 hours, and then exposed to simulated conditions in experimental autoclave reactors. The simulated formation fluid was a synthetic brine, modeled after a flowback fluid contained 187,000 mg/l total dissolved solids and had a pH of 7.6. The effect of pH was probed to evaluate the potential for cement reactivity under different pH conditions, and the potential for contaminant or geochemical tracer release from the shale (e.g. arsenic and rare earth elements). In addition to dissolution reactions, sorption and precipitation reactions between solutes and the cement are being evaluated, as the cement could bond with solute-phase species during continued hydration. The cements are expected to show different reactivity under the two temperature conditions because the primary cement hydration product, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is heavily influenced by temperature. Results from these experimental studies will be used both to inform the potential changes in cement chemistry that may occur along a wellbore in the hydraulically-fractured portion of a reservoir, and the types of geochemical tracers that may be useful in tracking these reactions.

  13. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  14. Inside-out Planet Formation. III. Planet-Disk Interaction at the Dead Zone Inner Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many of them are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-out planet formation (IOPF) has been proposed as a scenario to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a pebble ring and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow in mass until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and also induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet undergoes significant migration from its formation location. Thus, planet-disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. Here we present numerical simulations that first assess the degree of migration for planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity is undergoing a rapid increase in the radially inward direction. We find that torques exerted on the planet by the disk tend to trap the planet at a location very close to the initial pressure maximum where it formed. We then study gap opening by these planets to assess at what mass a significant gap is created. Finally, we present a simple model for DZIB retreat due to penetration of X-rays from the star to the disk midplane. Overall, these simulations help to quantify both the mass scale of first (“Vulcan”) planet formation and the orbital separation to the location of second planet formation.

  15. INSIDE-OUT PLANET FORMATION. III. PLANET–DISK INTERACTION AT THE DEAD ZONE INNER BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many of them are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-out planet formation (IOPF) has been proposed as a scenario to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a pebble ring and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow in mass until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and also induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet undergoes significant migration from its formation location. Thus, planet–disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. Here we present numerical simulations that first assess the degree of migration for planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity is undergoing a rapid increase in the radially inward direction. We find that torques exerted on the planet by the disk tend to trap the planet at a location very close to the initial pressure maximum where it formed. We then study gap opening by these planets to assess at what mass a significant gap is created. Finally, we present a simple model for DZIB retreat due to penetration of X-rays from the star to the disk midplane. Overall, these simulations help to quantify both the mass scale of first (“Vulcan”) planet formation and the orbital separation to the location of second planet formation.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation from benzyl radicals: a reaction kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet

    2016-03-21

    The role of resonantly stabilized radicals such as propargyl, cyclopentadienyl and benzyl in the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in the high temperature environments has been long known. In this work, the possibility of benzyl recombination to form three-ring aromatics, phenanthrene and anthracene, is explored. A reaction mechanism for it is developed, where reaction energetics are calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and CBS-QB3, while temperature-dependent reaction kinetics are evaluated using transition state theory. The mechanism begins with barrierless formation of bibenzyl from two benzyl radicals with the release of 283.2 kJ mol(-1) of reaction energy. The further reactions involve H-abstraction by a H atom, H-desorption, H-migration, and ring closure to gain aromaticity. Through mechanism and rate of production analyses, the important reactions leading to phenanthrene and anthracene formation are determined. Phenanthrene is found to be the major product at high temperatures. Premixed laminar flame simulations are carried out by including the proposed reactions for phenanthrene formation from benzyl radicals and compared to experimentally observed species profiles to understand their effects on species concentrations.

  17. Spatially Periodic Domain Structure in Coupled Reaction--Diffusion Equations for Segment Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2012-02-01

    Segment formation is an important process of pattern formation in the developing vertebrate embryo. The mechanism of such pattern formation is considered to be different from that of Turing instability. We propose reaction--diffusion equations generating traveling pulses and coupled reaction--diffusion equations for two genes that generate a domain structure. Next, we construct a synthetic model for segment formation by combining the coupled reaction--diffusion equations. A spatially periodic domain structure is found in the numerical simulation of the model equation. It is shown that the wavelength of the spatially periodic pattern and the proportion of the sizes of the anterior and posterior domains in each segment can be controlled by adjusting some system parameters.

  18. Kinetic study of model reactions in the gas phase at the early stage of coke formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nohara, D.; Sakai, T. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the most probable gas-phase reactions at the early stage of coke formation were elucidated by kinetic study on the model reactions adopted for formation of cyclic compounds and growth of ring. It was revealed that the formation and growth of ring proceeded mainly through cycloaddition of butadiene or allyl radicals to unsaturated hydrocarbons at relatively low temperatures ({approximately}600{degrees}C), i.e., through a Diels-Alder type reaction. On the other hand, such growth of ring as formation of biphenyl accompanying dehydrogenation from benzene can proceed only at the higher temperatures. It was also revealed that in the growth of the ring, cycloaddition of butadiene favors a cyclic olefin molecule that possesses a nonconjugated double bond and a nearly planar structure.

  19. Photoinduced Vesicle Formation via the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Konetski, Danielle; Gong, Tao; Bowman, Christopher N

    2016-08-16

    Synthetic vesicles have a wide range of applications from drug and cosmetic delivery to artificial cell and membrane studies, making simple and controlled formation of vesicles a large focus of the field today. Here, we report the use of the photoinitiated copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction using visible light to introduce spatiotemporal control into the formation of vesicles. Upon the establishment of the spatiotemporal control over vesicle formation, it became possible to adjust initiation conditions to modulate vesicle sizes resulting in the formation of controllably small or large vesicles based on light intensity or giant vesicles when the formation was initiated in flow-free conditions. Additionally, this photoinitiated method enables vesicle formation at a density 400-fold higher than initiation using sodium ascorbate as the catalyst. Together, these advances enable the formation of high-density, controlled size vesicles using low-energy wavelengths while producing enhanced control over the formation characteristics of the vesicle.

  20. Paleomagnetism of Harutagawa formation in the Hohi Volcanic Zone in northeastern part of Kyushu Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudou, T.; Shibuya, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Beppu-Shimabara graben in the Hohi Volcanic Zone (HVZ) in northeastern part of Kyushu Island, Japan is thought to be a volcano-tectonic depression. Volcanic stratigraphy and age studies of the area have unraveled the late Pliocene structural formation history of HVZ (e.g. Kamata, 1994, Kido, 2007). The age and sedimentation rate of lacustrine deposits in HVZ is one of the keys for interpreting the temporal relation between the formation of Beppu-Shimabara graben and the huge pyroclastic flows appeared in the area. We study the magnetostratigraphy of the Harutagawa formation, which is one of those lacustrine deposits. The formation is dominated by conglomerates and mad stones to siltstones, in the lower and upper parts, respectively, but bares many tuff layers all over the formation. Fission track ages of two tuff layers, one is from lower part and the other is from upper part of Harutagawa formation, are determined as 3.86 ± 0.77Ma and 3.6 ± 0.2Ma, respectively (Kido, 2007). Samples for paleomagnetic analyses have been collected at 28 sites in several continuous outcrop of the Harutagawa formation. The sites are set to be spaced equally in the stratigraphy. Samples were collected by a portable electric motor drill. A few pilot specimens from each site are subjected to progressive thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization. However, AF demagnetization is not effective. All remaining specimens are, therefore, submitted to the progressive thermal demagnetization. The samples have mean magnetic intensity of 1.7 × 10- 4A/m and 7.7 × 10-5A/m before and after demagnetization, respectively. Samples from 6 sites have no stable component or are thought to be completely remagnetized by the present magnetic field. As the result, 22 sites are determined their polarities; 8 were reversed and 14 were normal. The normal polarity sites were correlative to Sidufjall, Nunivak and Cochiti subchrons in the Gilbert reversed polarity chron. This correlation indicates that

  1. Phosphorus Zoning Patterns and the Formation of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milman-Barris, M. S.; Baker, M.; Beckett, J.; Sobolev, A.; Vielzeuf, D.; Stolper, E.

    2006-12-01

    composition produced ol (to ~2 mm in size) with coupled zoning of P, Al, and Cr; some show oscillatory or sector-zoning. Nearly all experimental ol grains have embayments and interior melt pools (up to 1 mm in longest dimension). While many of these are likely in contact with far-field melt, some may be isolated (i.e., true inclusions). Interior melt pools have aspect ratios of 1-40; the more elongate pools are similar in appearance to those of [3]. Enclosed, interior melt pools are surrounded by P-poor ol, but near P-rich ol. Also, boundaries between high- and low-P zones are often deflected in the vicinity of melt pools. These observations are reminiscent of inclusions observed in Hawaiian ol phenocrysts. Our experiments show that P-zoning in ol and associated interior melt pools can be produced by simple linear cooling histories. The proximity of melt inclusions to P-rich zones in both Hawaiian and experimental ol points to the importance of rapid growth in the formation of both features. Cross-cutting (and perhaps replacement) of high-P features in ol by the low-P zones surrounding natural melt inclusions may reflect trapping of melt inclusions in pits formed by localized dissolution of growing ol, recrystallization of high-energy ol adjacent to melt inclusions after trapping, and/or melting/reprecipitation of ol adjacent to trapped melt inclusions due to transient thermal gradients. [1] Sobolev et al. (2000) Nature 404, 986-990. [2] Norman et al. (2002) Chem. Geol. 183, 143-68. [3] Faure &Schiano (2005) EPSL 236, 882-98.

  2. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  3. The sensitivity of mechanical properties of TFRS composites to variations in reaction zone size and properties. [Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, James N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Brindley, Pamela K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) composites are calculated using a 3-component micromechanical model. The properties and size of the reaction zone are varied and the effect of these variations on the composite properties are studied. Results are presented in graphical and tabular form. Post-matrix yield behavior is examined in terms of the tangent modulus of the composite and measures of the effective strength of the lamina.

  4. Computational study of peptide bond formation in the gas phase through ion-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pilar; Martínez, Henar; Cimas, Alvaro; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2013-08-21

    A computational study of peptide bond formation from gas-phase ion-molecule reactions has been carried out. We have considered the reaction between protonated glycine and neutral glycine, as well as the reaction between two neutral glycine molecules for comparison purposes. Two different mechanisms, concerted and stepwise, were studied. Both mechanisms show significant energy barriers for the neutral reaction. The energy requirements for peptide bond formation are considerably reduced upon protonation of one of the glycine molecules. For the reaction between neutral glycine and N-protonated glycine the lowest energy barrier is observed for the concerted mechanism. For the reaction between neutral glycine and protonated glycine at carbonyl oxygen, the preferred mechanism is the stepwise one, with a relatively small energy barrier (23 kJ mol(-1) at 0 K) and leading to the lowest-lying protonated glycylglycine isomer. In the case that the reaction could be initiated by protonated glycine at hydroxyl oxygen the process would be barrier-free and clearly exothermic. In that case peptide bond formation could take place even under interstellar conditions if glycine is present in space.

  5. Formation of HCN+ in Heterogeneous Reactions of N2+ and N+ with Surface Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A significant increase of the ion yield at m/z 27 in collisions of low-energy ions of N2+ and N+ with hydrocarbon-covered room-temperature or heated surfaces of tungsten, carbon-fiber composite, and beryllium, not observed in analogous collisions of Ar+, is ascribed to the formation of HCN+ in heterogeneous reactions between N2+ or N+ and surface hydrocarbons. The formation of HCN+ in the reaction with N+ indicated an exothermic reaction with no activation barrier, likely to occur even at very low collision energies. In the reaction with N2+, the formation of HCN+ was observed to a different degree on these room-temperature and heated (150 and 300 °C) surfaces at incident energies above about 50 eV. This finding suggested an activation barrier or reaction endothermicity of the heterogeneous reaction of about 3–3.5 eV. The main process in N2+ or N+ interaction with the surfaces is ion neutralization; the probability of forming the reaction product HCN+ was very roughly estimated for both N2+ and N+ ions to about one in 104 collisions with the surfaces. PMID:23614645

  6. Formation of harzburgite by pervasive melt/rock reaction in the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, P.B.; Dick, H.J.B.; Quick, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Many mantle peridotite samples are too rich in SiO2 (in the form of orthopyroxene) and have ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are too high to be consistent with an origin as the residuum of partial melting of the primitive mantle. Trace element studies of melt/rock reaction zones in the Trinity peridotite provide evidence for reaction of the mantle lithosphere with ascending melts, which dissolved calcium-pyroxene and precipitated orthopyroxene as magma mass decreased. This process can account for the observed major and trace element compositions of lithospheric mantle samples, and may accordingly be prevalent in the upper mantle.

  7. Orientation dependence for Br formation in the reaction of oriented OH radical with HBr molecule.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Po-Yu; Che, Dock-Chil; Nakamura, Masaaki; Lin, King-Chuen; Kasai, Toshio

    2011-01-28

    The orientation dependence of Br-atom formation in the reaction of the oriented OH radical with the HBr molecule using the hexapole electrostatic field was studied. Experimental results for the orientation dependence in the reaction were analyzed using a Legendre polynomial fit. The results show two reactive sites. It was found that O-end attack is most favored for this reaction, and that H-end attack also shows a pronounced reactivity. The reactivity of the side-ways attack was found to be small. By comparing the results of the orientation dependence in the reaction with studies of inelastic collisions and theoretical calculations, two reaction pathways are proposed. Reaction by O-end attack is followed by a direct abstraction of the H-atom from the HBr molecule. The mechanism for H-end attack may have H-atom migration from HBr to form the water molecule.

  8. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  9. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  10. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  11. Formation of Zones with Maximum Supersonic Cavitation Intensity in Single-Component and Multicomponent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtin, B. I.; Ivashov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the formation of highly active cavitation zones in fluid media at high pressures (up to 6.5 MPa) and temperatures (up to 150°C) with the use of a high-power ultrasonic installation. It has been shown that attempts to increase the cavitation intensity in single-component and multicomponent media by increasing the power of the ultrasonic installation to above a certain limit lead to a strong degradation of the cavitation processes. This is due to the appearance of hydrodynamical flows generated by longitudinal vibrations of the installation radiator waveguide. Eliminating or weakening such flows makes it possible to increase markedly the efficiency of cavitation treatment by increasing the medium pressure (in the range of 0.5-1.5 MPa) and choosing the optimum ratio between the temperature of the medium and the power of the ultrasonic installation (specific acoustic power of the radiator). We recommend to use for the cavitation intensity index the acoustic activity of the cavitation zone (acoustic noise amplitude in the frequency range of 200 kHz-10 MHz), as well as its physical activity determined by the destruction rate of thin-layer indicators.

  12. Reservoir characteristics of Putnam zone (Silurian Interlake Formation) lithofacies, southwestern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Inden, R. ); Oglesby, C. ); Byrnes, A. ); Cluff, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Reservoirs in the Putnam zone (lower Interlake Formation) in the southwestern part of the Williston basin include oolitic-pellet dolomite grainstone, fossil-pellet grainstone, and a wide spectrum of reef-related, fossil-corral dolomite packstones and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone/boundstones. Each of these potential reservoirs has a unique pore system and, thus a different set of petrophysical properties which define their reservoir characteristics. Oolitic grainstones have a homogeneous intercrystalline-micro-crystalline pore system, whereas the fossil-pellet dolomite grainstone facies consists of separate mesovugs dispersed in well-interconnected intercrystalline porosity. Capillary pressure curves indicate that pore-throat heterogeneity is greater, and entry pressures lower, for reefal lithofacies than for pelletal grainstones. These curves also demonstrate why many of the producing fields tend to have high water cuts. In many oolitic-pellet grainstone units, irreducible water saturations of 10% would not be reached until a hydrocarbon column of 700 ft was reached. High water production characteristics are therefore expected because Red River/Interlake structures attain only 50-100 ft of closure. This, however, does not mean that Putnam is not an economic zone, especially as a secondary objective. Wells in Putnam and Crane fields, for instance, have reserves in excess of 300,000 bbl of oil. The reservoirs here may be dominated by the reef-related facies, which have an extremely high relative permeability to oil.

  13. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Molecular-Weight Building Reactions of Biogenic Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsanti, K.; Guenther, A.; Matsunaga, S.; Smith, J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of atmospheric organic aerosols (OA) remains one of the significant challenges to accurately representing OA in air quality and climate models. Meeting this challenge will require further understanding of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), of which biogenic emissions are thought to be major precursors. Of recent interest is the significance of higher-molecular weight (MW) compounds (i.e., "oligomers"). Theoretical, laboratory, and field study results suggest that relatively volatile oxidation products may contribute to SOA formation through multi-phase MW- building reactions. The significance of such reactions for biogenic SOA formation, including for newly considered precursors such as isoprene, is explored in this work. Theoretical and field studies are employed to: 1) identify MW-building reactions that may contribute to SOA formation in the atmosphere, 2) identify MW-building reaction products in ambient samples, and 3) parameterize atmospheric SOA formation by MW-building reactions of biogenic oxidation products. Likely reactions of biogenic oxidation products include ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation. Each of the proposed reactions involves known oxidation productions of biogenic precursors (e.g., carboxylic acids and aldehydes) reacting with one another and/or other atmospheric constituents (e.g., sulfuric acid and ammonia) to form higher-MW/lower-volatility products that can condense to form SOA. It has been suggested that products of MW-building reactions can revert to the parent reactants during sampling and analysis. Thus, relatively volatile compounds detected in ambient particle samples in fact may be decomposition products of higher-MW products. The contribution of relatively volatile biogenic oxidation products to SOA via ester, amide, and peroxyhemiacetal formation, as determined by studies based on fundamental thermodynamics and gas/particle partitioning theory, will be discussed; in addition to

  14. Secondary organic aerosol formation from reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erupe, M. E.; Price, D. J.; Silva, P. J.; Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, L.; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2008-09-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation from the reaction of tertiary amines with nitrate radical was investigated in an indoor environmental chamber. Particle chemistry was monitored using a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer while gas-phase species were detected using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Trimethylamine, triethylamine and tributylamine were studied. Results indicate that tributylamine forms the most aerosol mass followed by trimethylamine and triethylamine respectively. Spectra from the aerosol mass spectrometer indicate the formation of complex non-salt aerosol products. We propose a reaction mechanism that proceeds via abstraction of a proton by nitrate radical followed by RO2 chemistry. Rearrangement of the aminyl alkoxy radical through hydrogen shift leads to the formation of hydroxylated amides, which explain most of the higher mass ions in the mass spectra. These experiments show that oxidation of tertiary amines by nitrate radical may be an important night-time source of secondary organic aerosol.

  15. Planetesimal formation via sweep-up growth at the inner edge of dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drążkowska, J.; Windmark, F.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The early stages of planet formation are still not well understood. Coagulation models have revealed numerous obstacles to the dust growth, such as the bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift barriers. Gas drag causes rapid loss, and turbulence leads to generally destructive collisions between the dust aggregates. Aims: We study the interplay between dust coagulation and drift to determine the conditions in protoplanetary disk that support the formation of planetesimals. We focus on planetesimal formation via sweep-up and investigate whether it can take place in a realistic protoplanetary disk. Methods: We have developed a new numerical model that resolves the spatial distribution of dust in the radial and vertical dimensions. The model uses representative particles approach to follow the dust evolution in a protoplanetary disk. The coagulation and fragmentation of solids is taken into account in the Monte Carlo method. A collision model adopting the mass transfer effect, which can occur for different-sized dust aggregate collisions, is implemented. We focus on a protoplanetary disk that includes a pressure bump caused by a steep decline of turbulent viscosity around the snow line. Results: Our results show that high enough resolution of the vertical disk structure in dust coagulation codes is needed to obtain adequately short growth timescales, especially in the case of a low turbulence region. We find that a sharp radial variation in the turbulence strength at the inner edge of dead zone promotes planetesimal formation in several ways. It provides a pressure bump that efficiently prevents the dust from drifting inwards. It also causes a radial variation in the size of aggregates at which growth barriers occur, favoring the growth of large aggregates by sweeping up of small particles. In our model, by employing an ad hoc α viscosity change near the snow line, it is possible to grow planetesimals by incremental growth on timescales of approximately 105

  16. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-08

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  17. Granular Shear Zone Formation: Acoustic Emission Measurements and Fiber-bundle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2013-04-01

    We couple the acoustic emissions method with conceptual models of granular material behavior for investigation of granular shear zone formation and to assess eminence of landslide hazard. When granular materials are mechanically loaded or sheared, they tend to produce discrete events of force network restructuring, and frictional interaction at grain contacts. Such abrupt perturbations within the granular lattice release part of the elastic energy stored in the strained material. Elastic waves generated by such events can be measured as acoustic emissions (AE) and may be used as surrogates for intermittent structural transitions associated with shear zone formation. To experimentally investigate the connection between granular shearing and acoustic signals we performed an array of strain-controlled shear-frame tests using glass beads. AE were measured with two different systems operating at two frequency ranges. High temporal resolution measurements of the shear stresses revealed the presence of small fluctuations typically associated with low-frequency (< 20 kHz) acoustic bursts. Shear stress jumps and linked acoustic signals give account of discrete events of grain network rearrangements and obey characteristic exponential frequency-size distributions. We found that statistical features of force jumps and AE events depend on mechanical boundary conditions and evolve during the straining process. Activity characteristics of high-frequency (> 30 kHz) AE events is linked to friction between grains. To interpret failure associated AE signals, we adapted a conceptual fiber-bundle model (FBM) that describes some of the salient statistical features of failure and associated energy production. Using FBMs for the abrupt mechanical response of the granular medium and an associated grain and force chain AE generation model provides us with a full description of the mechanical-acoustical granular shearing process. Highly resolved AE may serve as a diagnostic tool not only

  18. [THE THROMBUS FORMATION IN THE PROSTHESIS AS A REACTION OF ORGANISM ON ITS MATERIAL].

    PubMed

    Alekseyeva, T A; Gupalo, Yu M; Kolomoets, A M; Lazarenko, O N; Lazarenko, G O; Litvin, P M; Lohs, I V; Smorzhevskiy, V J; Stepkin, V I

    2016-04-01

    Abstract Vascular prostheses, excised because of their functional properties loss, were studied. Using different methods there was established, that this complication is caused by the thrombus formation as a reaction of organism on the prosthesis material. The testing procedure on compatibility was proposed, using atomic-power microscope. Components of a patient immunity may identify the prosthesis material and start the rejection mechanisms in case of negative reaction.

  19. Numerical study on the impacts of heterogeneous reactions on ozone formation in the Beijing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Wang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The air quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multiscale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution) was employed to simulate summer O3 formation in Beijing China, in order to explore the impacts of four heterogeneous reactions on O3 formation in an urban area. The results showed that the impacts were obvious and exhibited the characteristics of a typical response of a VOC-limited regime in the urban area. For the four heterogeneous reactions considered, the NO2 and HO2 heterogeneous reactions have the most severe impacts on O3 formation. During the O3 formation period, the NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased new radical creation by 30%, raising the atmospheric activity as more NO→NO2 conversion occurred, thus causing the O3 to rise. The increase of O3 peak concentration reached a maximum value of 67 ppb in the urban area. In the morning hours, high NO titration reduced the effect of the photolysis of HONO, which was produced heterogeneously at night in the surface layer. The NO2 heterogeneous reaction in the daytime is likely one of the major reasons causing the O3 increase in the Beijing urban area. The HO2 heterogeneous reaction accelerated radical termination, resulting in a decrease of the radical concentration by 44% at the most. O3 peak concentration decreased by a maximum amount of 24 ppb in the urban area. The simulation results were improved when the heterogeneous reactions were included, with the O3 and HONO model results close to the observations.

  20. Stream discharge events increase the reaction efficiency of the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Streambed structures such as dunes, pool-riffles or bars enhance the exchange of stream water and solutes with the subsurface, the hyporheic zone. Prior studies have evaluated the factors which control hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes for steady state hydrological conditions using numerical models. However, the impact of natural discharge variability on water and solute exchange, creating hydraulically specific conditions for the reactions in the shallow streambed, has not been studied so far. In our study, we set up a transient flow and reactive transport model to elucidate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport and reactions within the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar. The discharge events were varied by their duration and the maximum stream discharge. Temporally variable hydraulic heads were assigned as hydraulic head boundary conditions at the top of the reactive groundwater model MIN3P. A steady ambient groundwater flow field was introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries, generating in combination with the stream water level, losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions. Stream water borne dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate can infiltrate into the modelling domain across the top boundary and can react with each other by aerobic respiration and denitrification. Our results show that water and solute exchange through the hyporheic zone (only stream water that infiltrates into the subsurface and exfiltrates back to the stream) is highly dependent on the interplay between event characteristics and the ambient groundwater level. In scenarios where the stream discharge shifts the hydraulic system to strong and long-lasting losing conditions, hyporheic flow paths are longer and the extent of the hyporheic zone are deeper than under base flow conditions and small events where gaining conditions prevail. Consequently, stream discharge events may

  1. The Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way: Lessons about Star Formation from an extreme Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Thushara Pillai, G. S.; Zhang, Qizhou; Lu, Xing; Immer, Katharina

    2015-08-01

    The Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way (CMZ; innermost ~100pc) hosts a number of remarkably dense and massive clouds. These are subject to extreme environmental conditions, including very high cosmic ray fluxes and strong magnetic fields. Exploring star formation under such exceptional circumstances is essential for several of reasons. First, the CMZ permits to probe an extreme point in the star formation parameter space, which helps to test theoretical models. Second, CMZ clouds might help to understand the star formation under extreme conditions in more distant environments, such as in starbursts and the early universe.One particularly striking aspect is that — compared to the solar neighborhood — CMZ star formation in dense gas is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude (Longmore et al. 2012, Kauffmann et al. 2013). This questions current explanations for relations between the dense gas and the star formation rate (e.g., Gao & Solomon 2004, Lada et al. 2012). In other words, the unusually dense and massive CMZ molecular clouds form only very few stars, if any at all. Why is this so?Based on data from ALMA, CARMA, and SMA interferometers, we present results from the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud Survey (GCMS), the first study of a comprehensive sample of molecular clouds in the CMZ. This research yields a curious result: most of the major CMZ clouds are essentially devoid of significant substructure of the sort usually found in regions of high-mass star formation (Kauffmann et al. 2013). Preliminary analysis indicates that some clouds rather resemble homogeneous balls of gas. This suggests a highly dynamic picture of cloud evolution in the CMZ where clouds form, disperse, and re-assemble constantly. This concept is benchmarked against a new ALMA survey and first results from a legacy survey on the SMA.It is plausible that dense clouds in other galaxies have a similar internal structure. Instruments like ALMA and the JWST will soon permit to

  2. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone-initiated reactions with nicotine and secondhand tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Smith, Jared D.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Gundel, Lara A.

    2010-11-01

    We used controlled laboratory experiments to evaluate the aerosol-forming potential of ozone reactions with nicotine and secondhand smoke. Special attention was devoted to real-time monitoring of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of SOA as they are believed to be key factors determining the toxicity of SOA. The experimental approach was based on using a vacuum ultraviolet photon ionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and off-line thermal desorption coupled to mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) for gas-phase byproducts analysis. Results showed that exposure of SHS to ozone induced the formation of ultrafine particles (<100 nm) that contained high molecular weight nitrogenated species ( m/ z 400-500), which can be due to accretion/acid-base reactions and formation of oligomers. In addition, nicotine was found to contribute significantly (with yields 4-9%) to the formation of secondary organic aerosol through reaction with ozone. The main constituents of the resulting SOA were tentatively identified and a reaction mechanism was proposed to elucidate their formation. These findings identify a new component of thirdhand smoke that is associated with the formation of ultrafine particles (UFP) through oxidative aging of secondhand smoke. The significance of this chemistry for indoor exposure and health effects is highlighted.

  3. Deposition of a Jurassic ooid sand shoal - Smackover A zone of Buckner Formation, Corney Bayou field, Union Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, E.N.; Moore, C.H.

    1986-09-01

    The Smackover A zone of the Buckner Formation in northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas is lithologically similar to the more thoroughly studied upper Smackover Formation. However, in contrast to the regionally occurring thick, blanket-like ooid sands of the upper Smackover, the Smackover A zone carbonates occur as strike-parallel, individual carbonate sand bodies isolated within the clays, muds, and evaporites of the upper Buckner. This isolation and its potential effects on fluid movement, diagenetic processes, and ultimate porosity evolution in similar sequences across northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas emphasize the importance of a well-constrained core-based field study.

  4. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  5. Paternò-Büchi reaction between furan and heterocyclic aldehydes: oxetane formation vs. metathesis.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco; Viggiani, Licia

    2010-08-01

    The photochemical reaction of 2-substituted heterocyclic aldehydes with furan gave the corresponding exo oxetane derivatives through the excited triplet state. However, in situ the oxetane derivatives were converted through a metathesis reaction into the corresponding Z,E-butadienyl formate derivatives. On the contrary, 3-substituted heterocyclic aldehydes gave the corresponding exo oxetane derivatives. The effect of 2-substituted heterocyclic ring in order to facilitate the metathesis reaction is explained considering the possible participation of the pi aromatic orbitals in the oxetane C-O bond cleavage.

  6. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format. Revision 97/1

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1997-07-01

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Center Network. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility rather than optimization of data processing in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  7. Tectonic Activity and Processes Preceding the Formation of the Dead Sea Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.; Pilchin, A. N.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of geological-geophysical data indicates that at the end of the Proterozoic, blocks of the Arabian Shield (AS) were thrust to the north-west onto the crust of the proto-Mediterranean (PM). This was caused by the pushing of oceanic crust from the south-east forming the Najd faults system (NF). This thrusting took place between 630 and 590 Ma, and is confirmed by the offsets between the Yanbu suture of the AS and Allaqi-Sol Hamid suture of the Nubian Shield (NS), the Bi'r Umq suture of AS and Nakasib suture of NS, and parts of the Yanbu and Nabitah sutures of AS. This caused the separation of AS from NS, and AS from the continental crust to north-east of it with its north-western displacement, resulting in opening of the Persian Gulf. This caused the start of deposition of huge amounts of Vendian-Cambrian evaporites in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Persian Gulf, Zagros, central Iran and other regions. The fact of the formation and preservation of the evaporites, and the common similarities in Vendian-Triassic sedimentary cover of Central Iran, Zagros, Taurus, and Arabian Plate (AP) and common Late Proterozoic-Early Paleozioc magmatic activity, show that these regions did not change their position significantly since then. Results of the DESERT project show that the lowermost part of the crust is present east of the Dead Sea Fault Zone (DSFZ), but it is absent west of it. This could be explained by detachment of the bottom part of the crust west of DSFZ during AP thrusting onto the crust of PM. The lithospheric slice discovered by seismic data between Moho and depth of about 55 km in S. Israel could be a remnant of that crust. During the thrusting, the AP overrode the detached slice. The slice was later remelted during formation of the postorogenic magmatic rocks of 590-530 Ma widespread in Jordan. The formation of three dyke swarms in S. Israel (600-540 Ma), widespread dykes in Sinai (590-530 Ma) and AP (590-530 Ma), as well as high-T-low-P metamorphism between 600

  8. The formation of Uranus and Neptune in solid-rich feeding zones: Connecting chemistry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The core accretion theory of planet formation has at least two fundamental problems explaining the origins of Uranus and Neptune: (1) dynamical times in the trans-saturnian solar nebula are so long that core growth can take >15 Myr and (2) the onset of runaway gas accretion that begins when cores reach ˜10 M⊕ necessitates a sudden gas accretion cutoff just as Uranus and Neptune's cores reach critical mass. Both problems may be resolved by allowing the ice giants to migrate outward after their formation in solid-rich feeding zones with planetesimal surface densities well above the minimum-mass solar nebula. We present new simulations of the formation of Uranus and Neptune in the solid-rich disk of Dodson-Robinson et al. (Dodson-Robinson, S.E., Willacy, K., Bodenheimer, P., Turner, N.J., Beichman, C.A. [2009]. Icarus 200, 672-693) using the initial semimajor axis distribution of the Nice model (Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A. [2005]. Nature 435, 466-469; Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R. [2005]. Nature 435, 462-465; Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F. [2005]. Nature 435, 459-461), with one ice giant forming at 12 AU and the other at 15 AU. The innermost ice giant reaches its present mass after 3.8-4.0 Myr and the outermost after 5.3-6 Myr, a considerable time decrease from previous one-dimensional simulations (e.g. Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y. [1996]. Icarus 124, 62-85). The core masses stay subcritical, eliminating the need for a sudden gas accretion cutoff. Our calculated carbon mass fractions of 22% are in excellent agreement with the ice giant interior models of Podolak et al. (Podolak, M., Weizman, A., Marley, M. [1995]. Planet. Space Sci. 43, 1517-1522) and Marley et al. (Marley, M.S., Gómez, P., Podolak, M. [1995]. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 23349-23354). Based on the requirement that the ice giant-forming planetesimals contain >10% mass

  9. Implications of Shear Heating and Fracture Zones for Ridge Formation on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lijie; Showman, A. P.

    2007-10-01

    Ridges are ubiquitous on Europa; parts of the satellite are covered solely by multiple generations of overprinted ridge pairs. Typically, ridges are 100-300 m in height, a few kilometers in width, and contain a central trough. Many ridge-formation scenarios have been suggested, including runaway frictional heating along fractures, which causes a temperature increase and leads to buoyant uplift along the fracture. Here we present 2D and 3D numerical simulations of ice-shell convection to test the role of shear heating and weakening by fractures on Europan ridge formation. We used the finite-element codes ConMan and CitCom to solve the equations governing thermal convection in Europa's ice shell in two- and three- dimensional Cartesian geometry. Our simulations show that a pre-existing fracture zone promotes upwelling and lithospheric thinning, leading to topographic uplift of 50 m; although promising, this is insufficient to explain the topography of Europan ridges. Shear heating also promotes lithospheric thinning and buoyant ascent, producing a linear feature with topography up to 120 m. Topography remains linear along strike even under the influence of heterogeneous 3D convection within the ice shell. Our simulated topography broadly resembles that of Europan ridges, including (in most simulations) the shallow marginal troughs on either side of the ridge, although the central trough is not reproduced. Despite this deficiency, our simulations support the idea that shear heating can produce Europa's ridges. Although the simulations presented here assumed a pure-ice composition, compositional effects could play an important role in ridge formation, and these effects will be considered in a future study.

  10. Aqua-planet simulations of the formation of the South Atlantic convergence zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto Ferreira, Rosana; Chao, Winston C.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of Amazon Basin convection and cold fronts on the formation and maintenance of the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) is studied using aqua-planet simulations with a general circulation model. In the model, a circular patch of warm sea-surface temperature (SST) is used to mimic the effect of the Amazon Basin on South American monsoon convection. The aqua-planet simulations were designed to study the effect of the strength and latitude of Amazon Basin convection on the formation of the SACZ. The simulations indicate that the strength of the SACZ increases as the Amazon convection intensifies and is moved away from the equator. Of the two controls studied here, the latitude of the Amazon convection exerts the strongest effect on the strength of the SACZ. An analysis of the synoptic-scale variability in the simulations shows the importance of frontal systems in the formation of the aqua-planet SACZ. Composite time series of frontal systems that occurred in the simulations show that a robust SACZ occurs when fronts penetrate into the subtropics and become stationary there as they cross eastward of the longitude of the Amazon Basin. Moisture convergence associated with these frontal systems produces rainfall not along the model SACZ region and along a large portion of the northern model Amazon Basin. Simulations in which the warm SST patch was too weak or too close to the equator did not produce frontal systems that extended into the tropics and became stationary, and did not form a SACZ. In the model, the SACZ forms as Amazon Basin convection strengthens and migrates far enough southward to allow frontal systems to penetrate into the tropics and stall over South America. This result is in agreement with observations that the SACZ tends to form after the onset of the monsoon season in the Amazon Basin.

  11. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine in the soil and vadose zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, C.D.; Thurman, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and two degradation products were monitored at seven depths in the soil and vadose zone throughout the growing season in two experimental plots in which corn (Zea mays L.) was grown. The soils in these plots were a Kimo silty clay loam (clayey over loamy, montmorillonitic, mesic, Fluvaquentic Hapludoll) and a Eudora silt loam (course, silty, mixed, mesic, Fluventic Hapludoll). The purpose this field study was to identify and quantify the mobile and persistent degradation products of atrazine that comprise the input, or “source term,” to groundwater resulting from the application of atrazine to the soils. The formation of deethylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and deisopropylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine) was monitored at vurious depths using suction lysimeters to determine the relative proportions at which these compounds enter the aquifer. Deethylatrazine was the major degradation product of atrazine identified in the soil water and appeared to enter the underlying aquifer at a concentration of 5.0 µg/L, which was greater than the concentration of atrazine entering the aquifer. Deisopropylatrazine also was detected in the soil water, bnt only in minor concentrations relative to atrazine and deethylatrazine. Because deethylatrazine was the major degradation product in the unsaturated zone, the deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) may be a good indicator of transport of atrazine through the soil. The hypothesis is proposed that the DAR may be used to distinguish point-source from nonpoint-source contamination of an aquifer.

  12. Towards a multi-scale understanding of the gas-star formation cycle in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2017-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ, the central 500 pc of the Milky Way) contains the largest reservoir of high-density molecular gas in the Galaxy, but forms stars at a rate 10-100 times below commonly-used star formation relations. We discuss recent efforts in understanding how the nearest galactic nucleus forms its stars. The latest models of the gas inflow, star formation, and feedback duty cycle reproduce the main observable features of the CMZ, showing that star formation is episodic and that the CMZ currently resides at a star formation minimum. Using orbital modelling, we derive the three-dimensional geometry of the CMZ and show how the orbital dynamics and the star formation potential of the gas are closely coupled. We discuss how this coupling reveals the physics of star formation and feedback under the conditions seen in high-redshift galaxies, and promotes the formation of the densest stellar clusters in the Galaxy.

  13. Contrasting MORB-Boninite melt reaction trends in IBM forearc moho transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loocke, M. P.; Snow, J. E.; Ishizuka, O.

    2013-12-01

    Models of arc crust formation prior to subduction initiation are hampered by a paucity of observations from present-day arc lower crust. Here we report petrographic analysis and mineral chemistry of spinel from 35 lower crustal peridotites and gabbros recovered from the inner trench slope of the Bonin Ridge (BR). Two groups of these gabbroic samples appear to have reacted with distinct melt compositions. Group M consists of peridotite (a single cpx-harzburgite), wehrlites, and gabbroic rocks with medium Cr# (100 x Cr / Cr + Al) spinels ranging from 45 to 60 and high TiO2 and Al2O3 spanning ~0.1-2.25 and ~12-30 wt. % respectively. Group B consists of only dunites and cpx-free peridotites with high Cr# spinels ranging from 65 to 94 and low TiO2 and Al2O3 spanning ~0-0.12 and ~3-21 wt. % respectively. The group M and group B samples appear to be the result of melt-rock reaction with a MORB-like melt and a more depleted boninitic melt respectively. MORB-like forearc basalts (FAB) (~50-52 Ma) and younger boninites (~44-48 Ma) recovered from the BR have been interpreted to represent a change from decompression melting at subduction initiation to flux melting and boninitic volcanism after establishment of the arc. The gabbroic samples of group M and group B similarly represent a lower crustal record of the change from MORB-like melts created by decompression melting at or soon after subduction initiation to arc-type flux melting and boninite volcanism thereafter. The presence of lower crustal peridotites and gabbroic rocks with spinels belonging to group M and not group B suggests that the lower crust of the BR may be dominated by gabbroic rocks and material genetically related to the FABs. This would imply that a large portion of the lower crust in the fore-arc was formed during or shortly after subduction initiation and is similar in composition to MOR lower crust.

  14. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN

    1989-01-01

    The formation of oligomers from deoxynucleotides, catalyzed by Na(+)-montmorillonite, was investigated with special attention given to the effect of the monomer structure on the phosphodiester bond formation. It was found that adenine deoxynucleotides bind more strongly to montmorillonite than do the corresponding ribonucleotides and thymidine nucleotides. Tetramers of 2-prime-dpA were detected in the reaction of 2-prime-d-5-prime-AMP with a water-soluble carbodiimide EDAC in the presence of Na(+)-montmorillonite, illustrating the possible role of minerals in the formation of biopolymers on the primitive earth.

  15. Modeling dichloroacetic acid formation from the reaction of monochloramine with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Valentine, Richard L

    2006-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to predict dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) formation in chloraminated systems. Equations describing DCAA formation were incorporated into an established comprehensive monochloramine-natural organic matter (NOM) reaction model. DCAA formation was theorized to be proportional to the amount of NOM oxidized by monochloramine and described by a single dimensionless DCAA formation coefficient, theta(DCAA) (M(DCAA)/M(DOC(ox)). The applicability of the model to describe DCAA formation in the presence of six different NOM sources was evaluated. DCAA formation could be described by considering a single NOM source-specific value for theta(DCAA) over a wide range of experimental conditions (i.e., pH, NOM, free ammonia, and monochloramine concentrations). DCAA formation appears to be directly proportional to the amount of active chlorine (monochloramine and free chlorine) that reacted with the NOM under these experimental conditions. Values of theta(DCAA) for all six NOM sources, determined by nonlinear regression analysis, varied from 6.51 x 10(-3) to 1.15 x 10(-2) and were linearly correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA(280)). The ability to model monochloramine loss and DCAA formation in the presence of NOM provides insight into disinfection by-product (DBP) formation pathways under chloramination conditions. The subsequent model and correlations to SUVA has the potential to aid the water treatment industry as a tool in developing strategies that minimize DBP formation while maintaining the microbial integrity of the water distribution system.

  16. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  17. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed.

  18. A structured three-dimensional polymer electrolyte with enlarged active reaction zone for Li–O2 batteries

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet-Mercier, Nadège; Wong, Raymond A.; Thomas, Morgan L.; Dutta, Arghya; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Yogi, Chihiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-01-01

    The application of conventional solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) to lithium-oxygen (Li–O2) batteries has suffered from a limited active reaction zone due to thick SPE and subsequent lack of O2 gas diffusion route in the positive electrode. Here we present a new design for a three-dimensional (3-D) SPE structure, incorporating a carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode, adapted for a gas-based energy storage system. The void spaces in the porous CNT/SPE film allow an increased depth of diffusion of O2 gas, providing an enlarged active reaction zone where Li+ ions, O2 gas, and electrons can interact. Furthermore, the thin SPE layer along the CNT, forming the core/shell nanostructure, aids in the smooth electron transfer when O2 gas approaches the CNT surface. Therefore, the 3-D CNT/SPE electrode structure enhances the capacity in the SPE-based Li–O2 cell. However, intrinsic instability of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) of the SPE matrix to superoxide (O2·−) and high voltage gives rise to severe side reactions, convincing us of the need for development of a more stable electrolyte for use in this CNT/SPE design. PMID:25410536

  19. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  20. Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, J.G.; Hettinger, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Stratigraphic sections showing coal correlations within the lower coal zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Fillmore Ranch and Seaverson Reservoir quadrangles, Carbon County, Wyoming are presented.

  1. A quantitative approach to understanding amphibole reaction rims: Texture, mineralogy, and processes of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J. F.; Coombs, M. L.; Dunn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km) and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. Reaction rim thicknesses have been used to estimate timescales and rates of magma ascent, important parameters in determining eruptive style. However, the textures and mineralogy of reaction rims are complex; multiple forcing factors, such as heating and decompression, are responsible for their formation. Few studies have performed in-depth, systematic, and quantitative investigations of reaction rim textures and mineralogy: as a result, amphibole reaction rims are poorly understood. Based on natural reaction rims from Augustine Volcano Alaska, we have developed a new crystallization kinetics model for reaction rim formation in which the differences in reaction rim textures represent different degrees of forcing away from equilibrium. We present the results of an experimental study used to test this model. We performed experiments using a sintered high-silica andesite glass from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano. The starting powder was seeded with unrimmed amphibole phenocrysts. After at least 24 hours of equilibration at Augustine storage conditions (140 MPa/ 860oC), experiments were heated or decompressed. The experimental series experiments took samples to differing degrees of thermal of barometric instability, over different time scales, ranging from 3 hours to several days. The resulting reaction rims were analyzed using a variety of analytical imaging and X-ray mapping techniques. Reaction rims thickened and became more texturally and mineralogically complex as a result of 1) greater time spent outside of stability and; 2) the magnitude of instability experienced.

  2. Secondary organic aerosol formation initiated from reactions between ozone and surface-sorbed squalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyi; Waring, Michael S.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that ozone reactions on surface-sorbed D-limonene can promote gas phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation indoors. In this work, we conducted 13 steady state chamber experiments to measure the SOA formation entirely initiated by ozone reactions with squalene sorbed to glass, at chamber ozone of 57-500 ppb for two relative humidity (RH) conditions of 21% and 51%, in the absence of seed particles. Squalene is a nonvolatile compound that is a component of human skin oil and prevalent on indoor surfaces and in settled dust due to desquamation. The size distributions, mass and number secondary emission rates (SER), aerosol mass fractions (AMF), and aerosol number fractions (ANF) of formed SOA were quantified. The surface AMF and ANF are defined as the change in SOA mass or number formed, respectively, per ozone mass consumed by ozone-squalene reactions. All experiments but one exhibited nucleation and mass formation. Mass formation was relatively small in magnitude and increased with ozone, most notably for the RH = 51% experiments. The surface AMF was a function of the chamber aerosol concentration, and a multi-product model was fit using the 'volatility basis set' framework. Number formation was relatively strong at low ozone and low RH conditions. Though we cannot extrapolate our results because experiments were conducted at high air exchange rates, we speculate that this process may enhance particle number more than mass concentrations indoors.

  3. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  4. A Kinetic Ladle Furnace Process Simulation Model: Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone Model Using FactSage Macro Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ende, Marie-Aline; Jung, In-Ho

    2017-02-01

    The ladle furnace (LF) is widely used in the secondary steelmaking process in particular for the de-sulfurization, alloying, and reheating of liquid steel prior to the casting process. The Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone model using the FactSage macro processing code was applied to develop a kinetic LF process model. The slag/metal interactions, flux additions to slag, various metallic additions to steel, and arcing in the LF process were taken into account to describe the variations of chemistry and temperature of steel and slag. The LF operation data for several steel grades from different plants were accurately described using the present kinetic model.

  5. Subduction-related rodingites from East Othris, Greece: Mineral reactions and physicochemical conditions of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsovitis, Petros; Magganas, Andreas; Pomonis, Panagiotis; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2013-07-01

    The partly to pervasively metasomatized doleritic and gabbroic dykes or small to medium sized bodies found in East Othris, within Mid to Late Jurassic serpentinized peridotites of ophiolitic units and ophiolitic mélange formations are classified as rodingites and can be divided into two types. Type 1 rodingites are mainly characterized by the frequent occurrence of prehnite, while Type 2 rodingites include mostly garnets and vesuvianite. Isocon analysis showed that rodingitization essentially occurred with mass and volume preservation. Desilification, depletion of alkalies, as well as Ca enrichment was more intense for the Type 2 rodingites. Al, Fe and Mg remained rather immobile, while Ti, Y, Zr and REE were variably depleted. Rodingitization took place in an intraoceanic subduction system. It occurred in three successive stages during the exhumation of the mafic-ultramafic mantle wedge rocks in a fore-arc setting within a serpentinitic subduction channel, which developed close to the slab. The incorporation of the mafic rocks to the subduction channel probably resulted after entraining a directed mantle flow towards the slab. The first stage of rodingitization formed mainly grossular, hydrogrossular, Ti- and Cr-bearing hydrogarnets and calcite under relatively acidic and mildly oxidizing physicochemical conditions, with increased CO2/H2O ratio. During the second and more extensive rodingitization stage, alkaline and reducing conditions prevailed and CO2/H2O ratio was decreased. The modeling of the mineral reactions of this stage, using the software winTWQ v. 2.34 in the CFMASH system, reveals that in Type 1 rocks prehnite replaced most of the initial garnet, while Type 2 rocks continued to be rodingitized, mostly forming grossular and/or hydrogrossular and chlorite. Hydrogrossular, instead of grossular, was crystallized from hydrous fluids under high silica activity. Type 2 rodingites underwent further rodingitization during the third stage, due to infiltration

  6. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  7. Field-theoretical description of the formation of a crack tip process zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, Alexei; Korzhenevskii, Alexander L.

    2016-12-01

    The crack tip process zone is regarded as a region where the solid physical properties are altered due to high stress. They are controlled by the solid degrees of freedom existing within the zone and vanishing outside, and can be divided into two classes: (1) zones always existing at the tip and (2) those emerging as soon as certain conditions are met. We focus on the zones of the second kind and argue that they can be described analogously to phase transitions taking place locally. We report both a numerical and an analytical solution for the process zone. We find that the zone can only exist within a limited domain of the dynamic phase diagram, at one side of the phase transition line. We describe this domain and establish its dependence on the crack velocity. We show the existence of a critical crack velocity above which the zone cannot exist.

  8. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be replaced as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques develop at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that the authors have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time.

  9. Modelling of cloud formation due to air-sea interactions in an energy-active zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, K. Ya.; Khvorostyanov, V. I.

    1989-02-01

    A mesoscale 3D numerical model is described, with which detailed calculations have been made of turbulence and wind characteristics in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as well as cloud particle size distribution, longwave and solar radiation fluxes and flux divergences, and atmosphere-ocean heat exchange. Based on numerical experiments simulating winter conditions of the Newfoundland energy-active zone of the ocean (EAZO), atmosphere-ocean energy exchange is investigated. It is shown that the basic mechanisms for the EAZO formation involve the following processes: (i) at the hydrological front between cold and warm ocean currents, the fluxes of sensible and latent heat grow significantly; (ii) at this front, in a particular synoptic situation, overcast low-level cloudiness forms, screening solar radiation so that in winter, the radiation budget at the front is reduced, and the radiative flux into the ocean is less than the energy release to the atmosphere; (iii) frequent occurrence of such synoptic situations with cloudiness decreases the oceanic enthalpy and creates negative SST anomalies. The transport of these anomalies by currents to the western coasts of the continents causes anomalies of weather and climate.

  10. On the feeding zone of planetesimal formation by the streaming instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders E-mail: anders@astro.lu.se

    2014-09-10

    The streaming instability is a promising mechanism to overcome the barriers in direct dust growth and lead to the formation of planetesimals. Most previous studies of the streaming instability, however, were focused on a local region of a protoplanetary disk with a limited simulation domain such that only one filamentary concentration of solids has been observed. The characteristic separation between filaments is therefore not known. To address this, we conduct the largest-scale simulations of the streaming instability to date, with computational domains up to 1.6 gas scale heights both horizontally and vertically. The large dynamical range allows the effect of vertical gas stratification to become prominent. We observe more frequent merging and splitting of filaments in simulation boxes of high vertical extent. We find multiple filamentary concentrations of solids with an average separation of about 0.2 local gas scale heights, much higher than the most unstable wavelength from linear stability analysis. This measures the characteristic separation of planetesimal forming events driven by the streaming instability and thus the initial feeding zone of planetesimals.

  11. Formation of orthopyroxenite by reaction between peridotite and hydrous basaltic melt: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunguang; Liang, Yan; Dygert, Nick; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-09-01

    The consequences of hydrous basaltic melts and peridotite interaction were examined experimentally in Au-Pd, Pt, and graphite capsules using the reaction couple method. Reactions between a hydrous basaltic andesite (4 wt% H2O) and dunite or lherzolite in an Au-Pd capsule at 1 GPa and 1200 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-dunite sequence. Reactions between a hydrous ferro-basalt and lherzolite in Pt or Au-Pd capsules at 0.8-2 GPa and 1250-1385 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-harzburgite sequence. Reactions between the ferro-basalt and lherzolite in graphite capsules (not designed to retain water) result in a melt-bearing dunite-harzburgite sequence at 1 GPa and a melt-bearing harzburgite-lherzolite sequence at 2 GPa. The orthopyroxenite from the hydrous reaction experiments has a high porosity, and it is separated by a sharp lithological interface from the dunite or harzburgite. Orthopyroxenes in the orthopyroxenite are large in size with resorbed olivine inclusions. Formation of the high-porosity orthopyroxenite in the hydrous melt-rock reaction experiments is determined by the liquidus phase relation of the interface reacting melt and reaction kinetics. Reaction between orthopyroxene-saturated hydrous melt and olivine at melt-rock interface produces orthopyroxenite. Water infiltration induces hydrous melting of the lherzolite, producing a dunite or an orthopyroxene-depleted harzburgite. Efficient diffusive exchange between the partial melt and the hydrous reacting melt promotes orthopyroxene-oversaturation around the melt-rock interfacial region. The simplified experiments reveal end-member processes for understanding the formation of orthopyroxenite in the upper mantle. The presence of orthopyroxenites in mantle samples is a strong indication of hydrous melt and peridotite interaction.

  12. Formation of {beta}-hydroxycarbonyls from the OH radical-initiated reactions of selected alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Aschmann, S.M.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.

    2000-05-01

    {beta}-Hydroxycarbonyls can be formed from the gas-phase reactions of alkenes with the OH radical, both in the presence and in the absence of NO. To date, because of analytical difficulties, few data have been reported for the formation of this class of compound from the reactions of the OH radical with alkenes. The authors have determined that {beta}-hydroxy-ketones can be readily analyzed by gas chromatography, and in this work they have shown that in 1 atm of air the {beta}-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed in the reactions of the OH radical with trans-2-butene, trans-3-hexene, 1-butene, and {alpha}-pinene in the presence of NO primarily decompose rather than react with O{sub 2}. Rate constant ratios k{sub d}/k{sub 0{sub 2}} (or lower limits thereof), where k{sub d} and k{sub 0{sub 2}} are respectively the rate constants for the decomposition and the reaction with 0{sub 2} of the intermediate {beta}-hydroxyalkoxy radicals, have been obtained for the reactions of the CH{sub 3}CH(O)CH-(OH)CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH(O)CH{sub 2}OH, and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH(O)CH(OH)CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 3} radicals at 296 {+-} 2 K and atmospheric pressure. Using the O{sub 3} reactions with the alkenes to generate OH radicals, the reactions of the OH radical to generate OH radicals, the reactions of the OH radical with trans-2-butene, trans-3-hexene, and {alpha}-pinene in the absence of NO lead to the formation of the expected {beta}-hydroxycarbonyls and (at least for trans-2-butene) the {alpha},{beta}-diol.

  13. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  14. Chemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation from phenyl radical pyrolysis and reaction of phenyl and acetylene.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-15

    An experimental investigation of phenyl radical pyrolysis and the phenyl radical + acetylene reaction has been performed to clarify the role of different reaction mechanisms involved in the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) serving as precursors for soot formation. Experiments were conducted using GC/GC-MS diagnostics coupled to the high-pressure single-pulse shock tube present at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For the first time, comprehensive speciation of the major stable products, including small hydrocarbons and large PAH intermediates, was obtained over a wide range of pressures (25-60 atm) and temperatures (900-1800 K) which encompass the typical conditions in modern combustion devices. The experimental results were used to validate a comprehensive chemical kinetic model which provides relevant information on the chemistry associated with the formation of PAH compounds. In particular, the modeling results indicate that the o-benzyne chemistry is a key factor in the formation of multi-ring intermediates in phenyl radical pyrolysis. On the other hand, the PAHs from the phenyl + acetylene reaction are formed mainly through recombination between single-ring aromatics and through the hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism. Polymerization is the common dominant process at high temperature conditions.

  15. Contrasting reactions of hydrated electron and formate radical with 2-thio analogues of cytosine and uracil.

    PubMed

    Prasanthkumar, Kavanal P; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan R; Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-10-19

    2-Thiocytosine (TC) and 2-thiouracil (TU) were subjected to hydrated electron (eaq(-)), formate radical (CO2˙(-)) and 2-hydroxypropan-2-yl radical ((CH3)2˙COH) reactions in aqueous medium. Transients were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and the experimental findings were rationalized by DFT calculations at LC-ωPBE and M06-2X levels using a 6-311+G(d,p) basis set and SMD solvation. In eaq(-) reactions, a ring N-atom protonated radical of TC and an exocyclic O-atom protonated radical of TU were observed via addition of eaq(-) and subsequent protonation by solvent molecules. However, two competing but simultaneous mechanisms are operative in CO2˙(-) reactions with TC and TU. The first one corresponds to formations of N(O)-atom protonated radicals (similar to eaq(-) reactions); the second mechanism led to 2 center-3 electron, sulfur-sulfur bonded neutral dimer radicals, TCdim˙ and TUdim˙. DFT calculations demonstrated that H-abstraction by CO2˙(-) from TC(TU) results in S-centered radical which upon combination with TC(TU) provide the dimer radical. In some cases, DFT energy profiles were further validated by CBS-QB3//M06-2X calculations. This is the first time report for a contradictory behavior in the mechanisms of eaq(-) and CO2˙(-) reactions with any pyrimidines or their thio analogues.

  16. Radionuclide reactions with groundwater and basalts from Columbia River basalt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical reactions of radionuclides with geologic materials found in Columbia River basalt formations were studied. The objective was to determine the ability of these formations to retard radionuclide migration from a radioactive waste repository located in deep basalt. Reactions that can influence migration are precipitation, ion-exchange, complexation, and oxidation-reduction. These reactions were studied by measuring the effects of groundwater composition and redox potential (Eh) on radionuclide sorption on fresh basalt surfaces, a naturally altered basalt, and a sample of secondary minerals associated with a Columbia River basalt flow. In addition, radionuclide sorption isotherms were measured for these materials and reaction kinetics were determined. The radionuclides studied were /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 75/Se, /sup 95m/Tc, /sup 237/Np, /sup 241/Am, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 237/Pu. The Freundlich equation accurately describes the isotherms when precipitation of radionuclides does not occur. In general, sorption increased in the order: basalt < altered basalt < secondary minerals. This increase in sorption corresponds to increasing surface area and cation exchange capacity. The Eh of the system had a large effect on technetium, plutonium, and neptunium sorption. Technetium(VII), Pu(VI), and Np(V) are reduced to Tc(IV), Pu(IV), and Np(IV), respectively, under Eh conditions expected in deep basalt formations. The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and basalt-groundwater reactions were observed over a period of 18 weeks. Most sorption reactions stabilized after about four weeks. Groundwater composition changed the least in contact with altered basalt. Contact with secondary minerals greatly increased Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in the groundwater.

  17. Quantifying the ionic reaction channels in the Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxut, Aurelia; Nozière, Barbara; Rossignol, Stéphanie; George, Christian; Waxman, Eleanor Marie; Laskin, Alexander; Slowik, Jay; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal, a common organic gas in the atmosphere, has been identified in recent years as an important Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) precursor (Volkamer et al., 2007). But, unlike with other precursors, the SOA is largely produced by particle-phase reactions (Volkamer et al., 2009) and equilibria (Kampf et al. 2013) that are still not entirely characterized. Since 2009 series of smog chamber experiments have been performed within the Eurochamp program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to investigate SOA formation from glyoxal. In these experiments, glyoxal was produced by the gas-phase oxidation of acetylene in the presence of seeds, the seed composition and other conditions being varied. The 2011 campaign resulted in the identification of salting processes controlling the glyoxal partitioning in the seeds (Kampf et al. 2013). This presentation will report results of the 2013 campaign focusing on the identification of the various reactions (ionic or photo-induced) contributing to the SOA mass. In particular, the contribution of the ionic reactions, i.e. mediated by NH4+, were investigated by quantifying the formation of imidazoles (imidazole, imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-biimidazole) from the small condensation channel of glyoxal with ammonia. For this, the SOA produced were collected on quartz filters and analyzed by Orbitrap LC/MS (Q-Exactive Thermo Fisher). The formation of other products such as organic acids was also investigated to determine potential competing reactions. Time-resolved MOUDI sampling coupled with nano-DESY/ESI-MS/MS analysis was also used to identify nitrogen- and sulphur-containing products from all the reactions. The results obtained for a range of conditions will be presented and compared with recent mechanistic information on the ionic reaction channels (Nozière et al., in preparation, 2013). The implementation of all this new information into a glyoxal-SOA model will be discussed.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone reactions with single terpenoids and terpenoid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2011-08-01

    Ozone reacts with indoor-emitted terpenoids to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Most SOA research has focused on ozone reactions with single terpenoids or with consumer products, and this paper reports the results from an investigation of SOA formation from ozone reactions with both single terpenoids and mixtures of D-limonene, α-pinene, and α-terpineol. Transient experiments were conducted at low (25 ppb) and high (100 ppb) initial concentrations of ozone. The three terpenoids were tested singly and in combinations in a manner that controlled for their different reaction rates with ozone. The SOA formation was assessed by examining the evolution in time of the resulting number size-distributions and estimates of the mass concentrations. The results suggest that at higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations, SOA number formation follows a linear trend as a function of the initial rate of reaction. This finding was valid for both single terpenoids and mixtures. Generally speaking, higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations also led to larger geometric mean diameters and smaller geometric standard deviations of fitted lognormal distributions of the formed SOA. By assuming a density, mass concentrations were also assessed and did not follow as consistent of a trend. At low ozone concentration conditions, reactions with only D-limonene yielded the largest number concentrations of any experiment, even more than experiments with mixtures containing D-limonene and much higher overall terpenoid concentrations. This finding was not seen for high ozone concentrations. These experiments demonstrate quantifiable trends for SOA forming reactions of ozone and mixtures, and this work provides a framework for expanding these results to more complex mixtures and consumer products.

  19. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort through a well in the formation adjacent the retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, R.D.

    1982-08-17

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring in a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort, for condition in the retort affected by the advancement of such a processing zone through the retort. Monitoring can be effected by placing means for monitoring such a condition in such a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort.

  20. Chiral glycine formation on cold interstellar grains by quantum tunneling hydrogen-deuterium substitution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Kouchi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental evidence that chiral glycine (NH2CHDCOOH) is formed by the surface reaction of normal glycine (NH2CH2COOH) solid with deuterium (D) atom at 12 K under the simulative conditions of interstellar molecular clouds. Chiral glycine formation is most likely initiated by the tunneling abstraction reaction of H atom by D atom followed by the addition of D atom to the glycine radical (NH2CHCOOH). Given that chiral glycine can form in such a primordial low-temperature environment, it might source molecular chirality as molecular clouds evolve into planetary systems.

  1. Diffusion and reaction of pollutants in stratus clouds: application to nocturnal acid formation in plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Seigneur, C.; Saxena, P.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the transport, turbulent diffusion, and chemical reactions of air pollutants in stratus clouds. The chemical kinetic mechanism treats 97 gaseous, heterogeneous, and aqueous reactions between 54 species. The dispersion and night-time chemistry of a power plant plume in a stratus cloud is simulated. The contributions of various chemical pathways to the formation of sulfate and nitrate, the differences between plume and background concentrations, and the effect of reduced primary emissions on secondary pollutants are discussed. Calculated sulfate and nitrate concentrations are commensurate with measured atmospheric concentrations.

  2. Macroscopically structured polymer formation governed by spatial patterns in the Belousov Zhabotinsky reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalishyn, Yevhen Yu.; Khavrus, Vyacheslav O.; Strizhak, Peter E.; Seipel, Michael; Münster, Arno F.

    2002-09-01

    We report the formation of macroscopically structured cross-linked polyacrylamide hydrogel in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) system (oxidation of malonic acid by bromate catalyzed by ferroin). Here, acrylamide, the cross-linker bis-acrylamide, and polymerization initiator are added into the BZ system. We show that the formation of waves and ripples in the polymer is governed by spatial structures emerging in the BZ system. Without any spatial structures in the BZ system only the formation of a spatially uniform polymer is observed. Without cross-linker, a spatially uniform polymer was observed as well. Structured polymer formation is caused by the interaction of chemical reactions in the BZ system and the polymerization process including gelation and cross-linking of the monomer units.

  3. Giant scour-fills in ancient channel-lobe transition zones: Formative processes and depositional architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstra, M.; Hodgson, D. M.; Peakall, J.; Flint, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Scours are common features of modern deep-marine seascapes, particularly downstream of the mouths of slope channels within channel-lobe transition zones (CLTZs). Their dimensions can exceed hundreds of metres in width and length, and tens of metres in depth. However, the stratigraphic architecture of large (> 100 m width) scours have not been described in detail from exhumed CLTZs. Here, the infill of two erosional features (0.5-1 km long and 15-20 m thick) from the Permian Karoo Basin succession, South Africa, are presented from palaeogeographically well-constrained CLTZs; one from Fan 3 in the Tanqua depocentre and one from Unit A5 in the Laingsburg depocentre. The basal erosion surfaces of the features are asymmetric with steep, undulating, and composite upstream margins, and low gradient simple downstream margins. The basal infill consists of thin-bedded siltstone and sandstone beds cut by closely-spaced scours; these beds are interpreted as partially reworked fine grained tails of bypassing flows with evidence for flow deflection. The erosional features are interpreted as giant scour-fills. The Unit A5 scour-fill shows a simple cut-and-fill history with lateral and upward transitions from siltstone- to sandstone-prone deposits. In contrast, the Fan 3 scour-fill shows headward erosion and lengthening of the scour surface suggesting temporal changes in the interaction between turbidity currents and the scour surface. This relationship could support the occurrence of a hydraulic jump during scour formation, whilst the majority of the fill represents deposition from subcritical flows. Different scour preservation mechanisms can be used to explain the style of infill. The architecture, sedimentary facies and palaeoflow patterns of the scour-fills are distinctly different from well documented adjacent basin-floor channel-fills at the same stratigraphic levels. The recognition of scour-fills helps to constrain their sedimentological and stratigraphic expression in

  4. New Conceptual Model for Soil Treatment Units: Formation of Multiple Hydraulic Zones during Unsaturated Wastewater Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Geza, Mengistu; Lowe, Kathryn S; Huntzinger, Deborah N; McCray, John E

    2013-07-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are commonly used in the United States to reclaim domestic wastewater. A distinct biomat forms at the infiltrative surface, causing resistance to flow and decreasing soil moisture below the biomat. To simulate these conditions, previous modeling studies have used a two-layer approach: a thin biomat layer (1-5 cm thick) and the native soil layer below the biomat. However, the effect of wastewater application extends below the biomat layer. We used numerical modeling supported by experimental data to justify a new conceptual model that includes an intermediate zone (IZ) below the biomat. The conceptual model was set up using Hydrus 2D and calibrated against soil moisture and water flux measurements. The estimated hydraulic conductivity value for the IZ was between biomat and the native soil. The IZ has important implications for wastewater treatment. When the IZ was not considered, a loading rate of 5 cm d resulted in an 8.5-cm ponding. With the IZ, the same loading rate resulted in a 9.5-cm ponding. Without the IZ, up to 3.1 cm d of wastewater could be applied without ponding; with the IZ, only up to 2.8 cm d could be applied without ponding. The IZ also plays a significant role in soil moisture distribution. Without the IZ, near-saturation conditions were observed only within the biomat, whereas near-saturation conditions extended below the biomat with the IZ. Accurate prediction of ponding is important to prevent surfacing of wastewater. The degree of water and air saturation influences pollutant treatment efficiency through residence time, volatility, and biochemical reactions.

  5. Boundary-reaction-diffusion model for oscillatory zoning in binary crystals grown from solution.

    PubMed

    Kalischewski, Felix; Lubashevsky, Ihor; Heuer, Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Oscillatory Zoning (OZ) is a phenomenon exhibited by many geologically formed crystals. It is characterized by quasiperiodic oscillations in the composition of a solid solution, caused by self-organization. We present a model for OZ. The growth mechanism applied includes species diffusion through the solution bulk, particle adsorption, surface diffusion, and subsequently desorption or incorporation into the crystal. This mechanism, in particular, can provide the synchronization effects necessary to reproduce the layered structure of experimentally obtained crystals, lacking in other models. We conduct a linear stability analysis combined with numerical simulations. Our results reproduce the experimental findings with respect to the patterns formed and a critical supersaturation necessary for OZ to occur.

  6. First stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation during a solid-state reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Delattre, R.; Thomas, O.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C.; Rivero, C.; Simola, R.

    2014-12-28

    The kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} formation via a solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal Si has been the object of many studies in the past. Because of the importance of nucleation, complex kinetics has been reported. In this work, we investigate CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics with in-situ diffraction during isothermal annealing of CoSi films on Si (100). In-situ measurements allow capturing the initial stage of CoSi{sub 2} formation. An initial t{sup 3/2} time-dependent evolution is observed and attributed to 3D growth of individual nuclei. This first regime is followed after the coalescence of the nuclei by a classical parabolic t{sup 1/2} one-dimensional film growth. We evidence a marked influence of the initial Co thickness (50 nm vs 10 nm) on the growth kinetics. A significant slowdown of the CoSi{sub 2} formation kinetics is observed for the thinnest film, whereas the activation energy remains the same. These results shine a new light on the complex formation kinetics of CoSi{sub 2} during solid-state reaction between CoSi and single crystal silicon and bring new knowledge about what occurs in the ultra-thin film regime, which is important for nanotechnologies.

  7. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  8. Formation of monazite via prograde metamorphic reactions among common silicates: implications for age determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; Malloy, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    Three lines of evidence from schists of the Great Smoky Mountains, NC, indicate that isogradic monazite growth occurred at the staurolite-in isograd at ˜600°C: (1) Monazite is virtually absent below the staurolite-in isograd, but is ubiquitous (several hundred grains per thin section) in staurolite- and kyanite-grade rocks. (2) Many monazite grains are spatially associated with biotite coronas around garnets, formed via the reaction Garnet + Chlorite + Muscovite = Biotite + Plagioclase + Staurolite + H 2O. (3) Garnets contain high-Y annuli that result from prograde dissolution of garnet via the staurolite-in reaction, followed by regrowth, and rare monazite inclusions occur immediately outside the annulus and in the matrix, but not in the garnet core. Larger monazite grains also exhibit quasi-continuous Th zoning with high Th cores and low Th rims, consistent with monazite growth via a single reaction and fractional crystallization during prograde growth. Common silicates may host sufficient P and LREEs that reactions among them can produce observable LREE phosphate. Specifically phosphorus contents of garnet and plagioclase are hundreds of parts per million, and dissolution of garnet and recrystallization of plagioclase could form thousands of phosphate grains several micrometers in diameter per thin section. LREEs may be more limiting, but sheet silicates and plagioclase can contain tens to ˜100 (?) ppm LREE, so recrystallization of these silicates to lower LREE contents could produce hundreds of grains of monazite per thin section. Monazite ages, determined via electron and ion microprobes, are ˜400 Ma, directly linking prograde Barrovian metamorphism of the Western Blue Ridge with the "Acadian" orogeny, in contrast to previous interpretations that metamorphism was "Taconian" (˜450 Ma). Interpretation of ages from metamorphic monazite grains will require prior chemical characterization and identification of relevant monazite-forming reactions, including

  9. Brown carbon formation by aqueous-phase carbonyl compound reactions with amines and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Powelson, Michelle H; Espelien, Brenna M; Hawkins, Lelia N; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O

    2014-01-21

    Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyl compounds, ammonium sulfate (AS), and/or amines were evaluated for their ability to form light-absorbing species in aqueous aerosol. Aerosol chemistry was simulated with bulk phase reactions at pH 4, 275 K, initial concentrations of 0.05 to 0.25 M, and UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring. Glycolaldehyde-glycine mixtures produced the most intense absorbance. In carbonyl compound reactions with AS, methylamine, or AS/glycine mixtures, product absorbance followed the order methylglyoxal > glyoxal > glycolaldehyde > hydroxyacetone. Absorbance extended into the visible, with a wavelength dependence fit by absorption Ångstrom coefficients (Å(abs)) of 2 to 11, overlapping the Å(abs) range of atmospheric, water-soluble brown carbon. Many reaction products absorbing between 300 and 400 nm were strongly fluorescent. On a per mole basis, amines are much more effective than AS at producing brown carbon. In addition, methylglyoxal and glyoxal produced more light-absorbing products in reactions with a 5:1 AS-glycine mixture than with AS or glycine alone, illustrating the importance of both organic and inorganic nitrogen in brown carbon formation. Through comparison to biomass burning aerosol, we place an upper limit on the contribution of these aqueous carbonyl-AS-amine reactions of ≤ 10% of global light absorption by brown carbon.

  10. Formaldehyde Reactions with Amines and Ammonia: Particle Formation and Product Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Millage, K. D.; Rodriguez, A.; Sedehi, N.; Powelson, M. H.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Aqueous phase reactions between carbonyls and amines or ammonium salts have recently been implicated in secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon formation processes. Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, and is present in both the gas and aqueous phases. However, the reactions of formaldehyde in the aqueous phase have not been completely characterized. This study aims to determine the interactions between formaldehyde and amines or ammonium salts present in atmospheric droplets. Bulk phase reactions of formaldehyde with these reactive nitrogen-containing compounds were monitored with ESI-MS and NMR to determine reaction kinetics and for product characterization, while UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in light absorption over time. Hexamethylenetetramine was found to be a major product of the formaldehyde/ammonium sulfate reaction, appearing within minutes of mixing. No products were formed that absorbed light beyond 225 nm. Mono-disperse particles containing mixtures of formaldehyde and ammonium sulfate or an amine were dried and analyzed via SMPS to determine the non-volatile fraction of the reaction products. Similarly, aqueous droplets were dried in a humid atmosphere to determine residual aerosol sizes over time as a function of formaldehyde concentration. This work indicates that formaldehyde plays a key role in aqueous-phase organic processing, as it has been observed to contribute to both an increase and reduction in the diameter and volume of residual aerosol particles.

  11. Selective covalent bond formation in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion reaction chemistry.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongling; McLuckey, Scott A

    2009-09-16

    Primary amines present in protonated polypeptides can be covalently modified via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using bifunctional reagent ions. The use of reagent anions with a charge-bearing site that leads to strong interactions with the polypeptide, such as sulfonic acid, gives rise to the formation of a long-lived adduct. A distinct reactive functional group, an aldehyde in the present case, can then undergo reaction with the peptide. Collisional activation of the adduct ion formed from a reagent with an aldehyde group and a peptide ion with a primary amine gives rise to water loss in conjunction with imine (Schiff base) formation. The covalently bound modification is retained upon subsequent collisional activation. This work demonstrates the ability to selectively modify polypeptide ions in the gas phase within the context of a multistage mass spectrometry experiment.

  12. Applied velocity versus offset (VVO) to validated & characterized fracturing zone in intra Baturaja Formation, South Sumatera Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiyan, Hilman; Rusli, Saifatur

    2016-01-01

    The velocity versus offset (VVO) as new geophysical method can be applied to detect some geological phenomenon, such as hydrocarbon trap, structural-fracture anomaly, facies changes, etc. The VVO method is data driven, based on the normal move out equation (NMO) and measuring the local event correlation between adjacent traces to get velocity gradient attributes which is derived from cross-plotting the velocity versus offset (VVO). This paper is describing applied VVO model that controlled by well data which indicated fracture from logs data, especially Resistivity Imager Logs or Formation Micro Imager (FMI). Images FMI logs data at Intra-Baturaja Carbonate Formation (BRF) in South Palembang Sub-basin (SPB), South Sumatera, shows vugs with fractures which orientation is roughly NNW-SSE. Meanwhile, the 2D NMO seismic gathers indicated those all as hockey stick at far offset. By applying VVO method, hockey stick can be identified and then used to validated, characterized and localized where the fracturing zone in intra-Baturaja Formation is. Laterally, VVO quantified as velocity gradient attribute which associated with geological model as the fracturing zone in study area. Characterization fracturing zone in Intra Baturaja Formation as geological lateral model by design is a challenging task for most exploration and production. In term of exploration where limited data is available, it can be used step ahead as carbonate fracture reservoir candidate in proven area and adjacent, especially in SPB South Sumatra.

  13. Thermochemistry and reaction barriers for the formation of levoglucosenone from cellobiose.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  14. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-02-06

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  15. Thermochemistry and Reaction Barriers for the Formation of Levoglucosenone from Cellobiose

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-10-19

    Cellobiose jumps the barrier: High-level quantum mechanical studies show that the ether bond cleavage in cellobiose occurs through internal hydrogen transfer in the gas phase and that the activation energy required is similar to that required for activating cellulose. The reaction barriers are computed for various pathways for the formation of levoglucosenone from levoglucosan, and the most likely pathway requires a relatively low activation barrier compared to that for the activation of cellobiose.

  16. Negative collision energy dependence of Br formation in the OH + HBr reaction.

    PubMed

    Che, Dock-Chil; Matsuo, Takashi; Yano, Yuya; Bonnet, Laurent; Kasai, Toshio

    2008-03-14

    The reaction between HBr and OH leading to H(2)O and Br in its ground state is studied by means of a crossed molecular beam experiment for a collision energy varying from 0.05 to 0.26 eV, the initial OH being selected in the state |JOmega> = |3/2 3/2> by an electrostatic hexapole field. The reaction cross-section is found to decrease with increasing collision energy. This negative dependence suggests that there is no barrier on the potential energy surface for the formation pathway considered. The experimental results are compared with the previously reported quantum scattering calculations of Clary et al. (D. C. Clary, G. Nyman and R. Hernandez, J. Phys. Chem., 1994, 101, 3704), and briefly discussed in the light of skewed potential energy surfaces associated with heavy-light-heavy type reactions.

  17. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  18. Self-organized nanostructured spherulitic crystal pattern formation in Belousov-Zhabotinsky type reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    We report the formation of self-organized nanostructured spherulitic crystal pattern in a modified Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) type system. In liquid phase, we observed the reaction system to exhibit well distinguishable spatial patterns including stripe and hexagonal structures. The solid phase nucleation was found to occur in the colloidal phase and nanostructured spherulitic crystal patterns were obtained as one of the final products. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the spherulitic crystal pattern. The average diameter of the grown crystals was found to be ˜30-100 nm. In situ UV-Visible spectroscopic measurement exhibited damped oscillatory nature corresponding to ferroin in the reaction system. This oscillation was found to be well conjugated to the spherulitic structures. The paper elucidates the roles of the various possible factors behind such phase-transformation along with the plausible explanation of the corresponding reaction pathways.

  19. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  20. Reaction pathways towards the formation of dolomite-analogues at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Pina, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present results of a study of the crystallisation behaviour of the dolomite-analogues norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Whereas precipitation of norsethite was previously obtained by mixing solutions (Hood et al., 1974; Pimentel and Pina, 2014a,b), we report, for the first time, the synthesis of PbMg(CO3)2 by using the same method. The formation of both phases was promoted by ageing slurries for periods of time ranging from a few days (norsethite) up to 6 months (PbMg(CO3)2). The crystallisation of both norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 occurs by sequences of dissolution-precipitation reactions involving several amorphous and crystalline precursor phases, which were identified and characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the initial composition and Ba:Mg and Pb:Mg ratios in the slurries, different precursors and reaction kinetics were observed. This demonstrates the existence of different reaction pathways towards the formation of the investigated dolomite-analogues. Our experimental results provide new insights into the possible mechanisms of formation of dolomite and other double carbonates in nature.

  1. SOA formation from partitioning and heterogeneous reactions: model study in the presence of inorganic species.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Czoschke, Nadine M; Northcross, Amanda L; Cao, Gang; Shaof, David

    2006-05-01

    A predictive model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by both partitioning and heterogeneous reactions was developed for SOA created from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence of preexisting inorganic seed aerosols. SOA was created in a 2 m3 polytetrafluoroethylene film indoor chamber under darkness. Extensive sets of SOA experiments were conducted varying humidity, inorganic seed compositions comprising of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid, and amounts of inorganic seed mass. SOA mass was decoupled into partitioning (OM(P)) and heterogeneous aerosol production (OM(H)). The reaction rate constant for OM(H) production was subdivided into three categories (fast, medium, and slow) to consider different reactivity of organic products for the particle phase heterogeneous reactions. The influence of particle acidity on reaction rates was treated in a previous semiempirical model. Model OM(H) was developed with medium and strong acidic seed aerosols, and then extrapolated to OM(H) in weak acidic conditions, which are more relevant to atmospheric aerosols. To demonstrate the effects of preexisting glyoxal derivatives (e.g., glyoxal hydrate and dimer) on OM(H), SOA was created with a seed mixture comprising of aqueous glyoxal and inorganic species. Our results show that heterogeneous SOA formation was also influenced by preexisting reactive glyoxal derivatives.

  2. Formation of Chlorotriophenoxy Radicals from Complete Series Reactions of Chlorotriophenols with H and OH Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    The chlorothiophenoxy radicals (CTPRs) are key intermediate species in the formation of polychlorinated dibenzothiophenes/thianthrenes (PCDT/TAs). In this work, the formation of CTPRs from the complete series reactions of 19 chlorothiophenol (CTP) congeners with H and OH radicals were investigated theoretically by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The profiles of the potential energy surface were constructed at the MPWB1K/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The rate constants were evaluated by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT) theory with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution at 600–1200 K. The present study indicates that the structural parameters, thermal data, and rate constants as well as the formation potential of CTPRs from CTPs are strongly dominated by the chlorine substitution at the ortho-position of CTPs. Comparison with the study of formation of chlorophenoxy radicals (CPRs) from chlorophenols (CPs) clearly shows that the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by H is more efficient than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by H, whereas the thiophenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CTPs by OH is less impactful than the phenoxyl-hydrogen abstraction from CPs by OH. Reactions of CTPs with H can occur more readily than that of CTPs with OH, which is opposite to the reactivity comparison of CPs with H and OH. PMID:26270566

  3. Radar studies of the distribution of the formation zones of the first radar echo of hail clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyukhin, V. S.; Kushchev, S. A.; Liev, K. B.; Makitov, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    The results of studying the regions of hail-cell formation in the North Caucasus are considered. The optimal range of the underlying surface heights for their generation is determined based on an analysis of 392 hail cells. It is shown that the majority of hail cells are formed in the zone where the heights of the underlying surface vary from 900 to 2400 m. The most favorable conditions for the formation of hail clouds are recorded in the northern slopes of the Skalistyi (Rocky) ridge. This region accumulates the main maxima of the frequency of first radar echo recording. The second group of the frequency maxima is located over the Pastbishchnyi (Pasturable) and the Lesistyi (Woody) ridges. The generalized scheme for the region under study is constructed of three zones of generation of the first radar echo of the hail cells. It is shown that approximately 70% of hail clouds are formed over submontane and mountainous regions in the central North Caucasus (zones 2 and 3). The directions of motion of hail cells are quantified for each identified zone.

  4. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation as innate immune reactions against the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Ruiz, Antonio; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2010-01-15

    Eimeria bovis infections are under immunological control and recent studies have emphasized the role of early PMN-mediated innate immune responses in infected calves. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been demonstrated to act as a killing mechanism of PMN against several pathogens. In the present study, the interactions of bovine PMN with sporozoites of E. bovis were investigated in this respect in vitro. For demonstration and quantification of NET formation, extracellular DNA was stained by Sytox Orange. Fluorescence images after Sytox Orange staining as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed NET formation to occur upon contact with E. bovis sporozoites. Exposure of PMN to viable sporozoites induced stronger NET formation than to dead or homogenized parasites. NET formation was abolished by treatment with DNase and could be reduced by diphenylene iodonium, which is described as a potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. After sporozoite and PMN co-culture, extracellular fibres were found attached to sporozoites and seemed to trap them, strongly suggesting that NETs immobilize E. bovis sporozoites and thereby prevent them from infecting host cells. Thus, transfer of sporozoites, previously being confronted with PMN, to adequate host cells resulted in clearly reduced infection rates when compared to PMN-free controls. NET formation by PMN may therefore represent an effector mechanism in early innate immune reactions against E. bovis. This is the first report indicating Eimeria-induced NET formation.

  5. Modelling reaction front formation and oscillatory behaviour in a contaminant plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura; Fowler, Andrew; Mitchell, Sarah; Winstanley, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is a concern in all industrialised countries that suffer countless spills and leaks of various contaminants. Often, the contaminated groundwater forms a plume that, under the influences of regional groundwater flow, could eventually migrate to streams or wells. This can have catastrophic consequences for human health and local wildlife. The process known as bioremediation removes pollutants in the contaminated groundwater through bacterial reactions. Microorganisms can transform the contaminant into less harmful metabolic products. It is important to be able to predict whether such bioremediation will be sufficient for the safe clean-up of a plume before it reaches wells or lakes. Borehole data from a contaminant plume which resulted from spillage at a coal carbonisation plant in Mansfield, England is the motivation behind modelling the properties of a contaminant plume. In the upper part of the plume, oxygen is consumed and a nitrate spike forms. Deep inside the plume, nitrate is depleted and oscillations of organic carbon and ammonium concentration profiles are observed. While there are various numerical models that predict the evolution of a contaminant plume, we aim to create a simplified model that captures the fundamental characteristics of the plume while being comparable in accuracy to the detailed numerical models that currently exist. To model the transport of a contaminant, we consider the redox reactions that occur in groundwater systems. These reactions deplete the contaminant while creating zones of dominant terminal electron accepting processes throughout the plume. The contaminant is depleted by a series of terminal electron acceptors, the order of which is typically oxygen, nitrate, manganese, iron, sulphate and carbon dioxide. We describe a reaction front, characteristic of a redox zone, by means of rapid reaction and slow diffusion. This aids in describing the depletion of oxygen in the upper part of the plume. To

  6. Characterizing Pyroxene Reaction Space in Calcium-Aluminum Rich Inclusions: Oxidation During CAI Rim Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyl, K. A.; Young, E. D.

    2009-12-01

    We define the reaction space that controls changes in pyroxene composition in CAIs and Wark-Lovering (WL) rims in an oxidizing solar nebula. Ti-rich pyroxenes in CAIs record a sub-solar oxygen fugacity (Ti3+/Ti4+~1.5). WL rim pyroxenes in the CAI Leoville 144A have a distinctly lower oxidation state.This difference supports WL rim condensation in an environment of increasing O2(g) and Mg(g) (Simon et al. 2005). We used the following phase components to identify four linearly independent reactions (Thompson 1982): diopside, CaTs (Al2Mg-1Si-1), T3 (Ti3+AlMg-1Si-1), T4 (Ti4+Al2Mg-1Si-2), En (MgCa-1), perovskite, O(g), Mg(g), SiO(g), and Ca(g). Compositional variation in this system is dominated by two reactions. The first is oxidation of Ti3+ via reaction with O and Mg in the gas phase: 1.5 O(g) + Mg(g) → ¼ Di + [Ti4+Mg3/4Ti3+-1Ca-1/4Si-1/2] (1). Pyroxene is produced and En is introduced. The second reaction (2) is perovskite formation. It is observed in the WL rim of Leoville 144A, and experiments confirm that an elevated Ti component converts pyroxene to perovskite(Gupta et al. 1973). MgCa-1 is the third linearly independent reaction (3). They combine to give: ½ Di + x Ca(g)→ x Mg(g)+ Pv + [Mg1/2-xSiTi4+-1Ca-1/2+x](2,3). Unlike (1), pyroxene is consumed in this reaction. The parameter x defines the extent of Mg-Ca exchange. When x > 0.5, WL rim formation occurs in an environment where Mg is volatile and Ca condenses. The reaction space defined by reactions (1) and (2,3) describes the transition from CAI interior to WL rims. WL rim pyroxene Ti contents, [CaTs], and Ca < 1 pfu are all explained in this space. The fourth linearly independent reaction is SiO(g):1/8 Di + ¼ Mg(g)→ ¾ SiO(g) + [Mg3/8Ca1/8Ti4+Ti3+-1Si-1/2](4). Silica reduction forms Ti4+, releasing SiO(g). (4) does not describe the oxidation of Ti3+ in WL rim pyroxene, but (1) - (4) results in En formation directly from the gas phase. This may explain WL rim analyses that have Si contents in excess

  7. Formation of the μ phase in the transition zone of a diffusion chromium aluminide coating on a nickel superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskii, Yu. R.; Khadyev, M. S.; Lesnikov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. P.; Galoyan, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has shown the formation of two morphological types of the μ phase in the zone of a chromium aluminide coating on the ZhS36VI superalloy. Three types of orientation relationships between the crystal lattices of the μ and γ' phases have been revealed. The origin of the revealed morphological and crystallographic characteristics of the μ phase has been established.

  8. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  9. Early growth of Kohala volcano and formation of long Hawaiian rift zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    Transitional-composition pillow basalts from the toe of the Hilo Ridge, collected from outcrop by submersible, have yielded the oldest ages known from the Island of Hawaii: 1138 ?? 34 to 1159 ?? 33 ka. Hilo Ridge has long been interpreted as a submarine rift zone of Mauna Kea, but the new ages validate proposals that it is the distal east rift zone of Kohala, the oldest subaerial volcano on the island. These ages constrain the inception of tholeiitic volcanism at Kohala, provide the first measured duration of tholeiitic shield building (???870 k.y.) for any Hawaiian volcano, and show that this 125-km-long rift zone developed to near-total length during early growth of Kohala. Long eastern-trending rift zones of Hawaiian volcanoes may follow fractures in oceanic crust activated by arching of the Hawaiian Swell in front of the propagating hotspot. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  10. High Resolution Surveys of the Water and Methanol Star Formation Masers in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Krieger, Nico; SWAG

    2017-01-01

    We present some of the first high resolution fully interferometric surveys of 6.7 GHz methanol and 22 GHz water masers towards the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). These masers are good signposts for early (<0.05 Myrs) star formation. Using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), we searched the inner 3 x 0.7 deg of the Galactic Center (GC) for methanol masers with resolutions of 0.9” (0.04 pc) and 0.4 km/s (8 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. With this high resolution and sensitivity, we have detected ~100 methanol masers, which is over a factor of two more than has previously been detected. We have also conducted two surveys of water masers in this region. As part of the Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to survey a variety of molecular lines, including the 22 GHz water line. With the ATCA, we have detected over 200 water masers using resolutions of 26” (1 pc) and 2 km/s (60 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. Afterward, we conducted the first on-the-fly (OTF) VLA survey of water masers with improved resolutions of 0.7” (0.03 pc) and 0.4 km/s (26 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.05 Jy/beam. Although the analysis of this OTF survey is not yet complete, we have already identified water masers that were not visible in the SWAG data.The improvement in the number of detected masers allows us to better analyze the distribution of these masers. We show that the SWAG water masers appear uniformly distributed along the Galactic plane, despite the asymmetry of the molecular gas distribution, where ~2/3 of the gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes. The methanol masers follow the molecular gas distribution, with a majority of the masers being found at positive longitudes. This could indicate a difference in the star forming history of these two parts of the CMZ and/or that the 22 GHz water masers are contaminated by water

  11. Electrochemical Formation of Fe(V) (O) and Mechanism of Its Reaction with Water During O-O Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Santanu; Chowdhury, Debarati Roy; Garai, Bikash; Singh, Kundan K; Paul, Amit; Dhar, Basab B; Gupta, Sayam Sen

    2017-03-08

    A detailed electrochemical investigation of a series of iron complexes (biuret-modified tetraamido iron macrocycles Fe(III) -bTAML), including the first electrochemical generation of Fe(V) (O), and demonstration of their efficacy as homogeneous catalysts for electrochemical water oxidation (WO) in aqueous medium are reported. Spectroelectrochemical and mass spectral studies indicated Fe(V) (O) as the active oxidant, formed due to two redox transitions, which were assigned as Fe(IV) (O)/Fe(III) (OH2 ) and Fe(V) (O)/Fe(IV) (O). The spectral properties of both of these high-valent iron oxo species perfectly match those of their chemically synthesised versions, which were thoroughly characterised by several spectroscopic techniques. The O-O bond-formation step occurs by nucleophilic attack of H2 O on Fe(V) (O). A kinetic isotope effect of 3.2 indicates an atom-proton transfer (APT) mechanism. The reaction of chemically synthesised Fe(V) (O) in CH3 CN and water was directly probed by electrochemistry and was found to be first-order in water. The pKa value of the buffer base plays a critical role in the rate-determining step by increasing the reaction rate several-fold. The electronic effect on redox potential, WO rates, and onset overpotential was studied by employing a series of iron complexes. The catalytic activity was enhanced by the presence of electron-withdrawing groups on the bTAML framework. Changing the substituents from OMe to NO2 resulted in an eightfold increase in reaction rate, while the overpotential increased threefold.

  12. Strain Partitioning into Dry and Wet Zones, and the Formation of Calcic Myrmekites in Syntectonic Syenites During High-T Crystallization/Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Toni, G. B.; Bitencourt, M. D. F.; Nardi, L. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Myrmekites are fine intergrowths of (generally Na-rich) plagioclase and vermicular quartz developed on K-feldspar. The myrmekite-forming reaction is intimately related to deformation as it results in volume decrease and finer grainsize, thus enhancing plastic behaviour. In south Brazil, myrmekites are described in 642 Ma syntectonic syenites intrusive in a ca. 650 Ma collisional thrust pile comprised of granulite-facies gneisses. Syenites are porphyritic or fine-grained equigranular, with biotite, clinopyroxene (Cpx) and amphibole as mafic phases. They are variably deformed, and disposed in alternating m- to cm-thick layers. Within low-strain zones, well-developed magmatic foliation and lineation are marked by shape alignment of K-feldspar (Kf) and mafic minerals. Subgrains and recrystallized grains (ca. 0,5 mm) are common features at the border of Kf megacrysts, developed to different degrees. In highly deformed sites, the strain softening promoted by the inflow of late-magmatic fluids has lead to deformation partitioning into wet and dry zones, where different end-products are formed from a single syenite protolith. Within the dry zones, high-T recrystallization is abundant in both Kf and Cpx, but primary mineralogy is preserved. Within the wet zones the rock contains biotite and minor amphibole, but no Cpx. Kf megacrysts are progressively invaded by myrmekite (An38-43) mantles, especially along foliation-parallel faces. In their pressure shadows, 5mm-sized, subhedral plagioclase crystals (An44-48) containing irregular quartz inclusions are interpreted as crystallized from Ca-enriched, late-magmatic fluids which have destabilized Cpx. Large plagioclase crystals and myrmekite aggregates are further recrystallized, and the process has eventually lead to the formation of plagioclase-rich rocks restricted to m-thick bands. Deformation partitioning into dry and wet zones, and the fact that myrmekites are restricted to the latter demonstrate that fluids are the

  13. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  14. Radiative capture reaction for 17Ne formation within a full three-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Garrido, E.; de Diego, R.; Arias, J. M.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.

    2016-11-01

    Background: The breakout from the hot Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxigen (CNO) cycles can trigger the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this environment, a competition between 15O(α ,γ )19Ne and the two-proton capture reaction 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne is expected. Purpose: Determine the three-body radiative capture reaction rate for 17Ne formation including sequential and direct, resonant and nonresonant contributions on an equal footing. Method: Two different discretization methods have been applied to generate 17Ne states in a full three-body model: the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method and the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The binary p -15O interaction has been adjusted to reproduce the known spectrum of the unbound 16F nucleus. The dominant E 1 contributions to the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rate have been calculated from the inverse photodissociation process. Results: Three-body calculations provide a reliable description of 17Ne states. The agreement with the available experimental data on 17Ne is discussed. It is shown that the 15O(2 p ,γ )17Ne reaction rates computed within the two methods agree in a broad range of temperatures. The present calculations are compared with a previous theoretical estimation of the reaction rate. Conclusions: It is found that the full three-body model provides a reaction rate several orders of magnitude larger than the only previous estimation. The implications for the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts should be investigated.

  15. Fission and quasifission modes in heavy-ion-induced reactions leading to the formation of Hs{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Itkis, I. M.; Kozulin, E. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Goennenwein, F.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Hanappe, F.; Vardaci, E.; Goes Brennand, E. de

    2011-06-15

    Mass and energy distributions of binary reaction products obtained in the reactions {sup 22}Ne+{sup 249}Cf,{sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb have been measured. All reactions lead to Hs isotopes. At energies below the Coulomb barrier the bimodal fission of Hs{sup *}, formed in the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, is observed. In the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U, leading to the formation of a similar compound nucleus, the main part of the symmetric fragments arises from the quasifission process. At energies above the Coulomb barrier fusion-fission is the main process leading to the formation of symmetric fragments for both reactions with Mg and S ions. In the case of the {sup 58}Fe+{sup 208}Pb reaction the quasifission process dominates at all measured energies.

  16. Ozone process insights from field experiments - Part III: extent of reaction and ozone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Charles L.

    The analysis of ambient data offers a means of developing a qualitative understanding of the sensitivity of ozone formation at specific times and places to changes in VOC and NO x concentrations. The Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model (Johnson, 1984, Proceedings of the Eighth International Clean Air Conference, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 715-731) and two revisions known as the Smog Production (SP) algorithm (Blanchard et al., 1999, Atmospheric Environment 33, 369-381; Chang et al., 1997, Atmospheric Environment 31, 2787-2794) are reviewed. Applied to ambient data, the algorithm requires measurements of ozone, NO, and either NO x or NO y and computes a quantity known as the extent of reaction. The extent of reaction is shown to be related to photochemical age and serves as an indicator of the sensitivity of instantaneous ozone production to changes in VOC or NO x concentrations. Extent of reaction alone is insufficient as an indicator of the sensitivity of ozone concentration to a complex upwind history of emission changes. Consideration of daily, hourly, and spatial patterns of extent of reaction is needed to interpret applications of the SP algorithm.

  17. Formation of flavor components by the reaction of amino acid and carbonyl compounds in mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Pripis-Nicolau, L; de Revel, G; Bertrand, A; Maujean, A

    2000-09-01

    This work describe products of reactions between four alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (diacetyl, pentan-2,3-dione, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal) or two alpha-hydroxy ketones, (acetoine and acetol) and amino acids present in wines. The results shows the formation of odorous products or strong-smelling additives resulting from the Maillard and Strecker reaction in a primarily aqueous medium, at low temperature and low pH ( approximately pH 3.5) of the wine. GC/FID, GC/FPD, GC/NPD and GC/MS techniques were used. The olfactive characteristics of the products are described. In the presence of sulfur amino acids and in particular cysteine, many products were formed with a heterocycle production such as pyrazines and methylpyrazines, methylthiazoles, acetylthiazoles, acetylthiazolines, acetylthiazolidines, trimethyloxazole, and dimethylethyloxazoles. These various compounds present odors of sulfur, cornlike, pungent, nut, popcorn, roasted hazelnut, toasted, roasted, and ripe fruits. The chemical conditions of the model reactions are specified. The influence of temperature and pH on the reactions in the presence of cysteine were also studied.

  18. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  19. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  20. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26731734

  1. Redirection of the Reaction Specificity of a Thermophilic Acetolactate Synthase toward Acetaldehyde Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Maria; Yoshiyasu, Hayato; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao; Honda, Kohsuke

    2016-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase and pyruvate decarboxylase are thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes that convert pyruvate into acetolactate and acetaldehyde, respectively. Although the former are encoded in the genomes of many thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, the latter has been found only in mesophilic organisms. In this study, the reaction specificity of acetolactate synthase from Thermus thermophilus was redirected to catalyze acetaldehyde formation to develop a thermophilic pyruvate decarboxylase. Error-prone PCR and mutant library screening led to the identification of a quadruple mutant with 3.1-fold higher acetaldehyde-forming activity than the wild-type. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the increased activity of the mutant was due to H474R amino acid substitution, which likely generated two new hydrogen bonds near the thiamine pyrophosphate-binding site. These hydrogen bonds might result in the better accessibility of H+ to the substrate-cofactor-enzyme intermediate and a shift in the reaction specificity of the enzyme.

  2. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  3. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGES

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; ...

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  4. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  5. In vitro surface reaction layer formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate cement-bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changsheng; Chen, Chien-Wen; Ducheyne, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Composites of hydrated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and bioactive glass (BG) containing Si were immersed in vitro to study the effect of chemical composition on surface reaction layer formation and dissolution/precipitation behavior. The solutions used were 0.05 M tris hydroxymethyl aminomethane/HCl (tris buffer), tris buffer supplemented with plasma electrolyte (TE) with pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C, and this solution complemented with 10% newborn bovine serum (TES). The post-immersion solutions were analyzed for changes in Ca, PO(4) and Si concentrations. The reacted surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The sample weight variations after immersion were also determined. The results showed that the composition of the bioactive composite CPCs greatly affected their behavior in solution and the formation of apatite bioactive surface reaction layers. After immersion in the TE solution, Ca ions were taken up by all samples during the entire immersion duration. Initially, the P ion concentration increased sharply, and then decreased. This reaction pattern reveals the formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate layer on the surface of these composite CPCs. FTIR revealed that the layer was, in fact, poorly crystallized Ca-deficient carbonate apatite. The thickness of the layer was 12-14 microm and it was composed of rod-like apatite with directional arrangement. For immersion in the TES solution, the Ca and Si ion concentrations showed a similar behavior to that in TE, but the release rate of Si ions was higher. FTIR revealed that after TES immersion, not only did the typical, poorly crystallized, Ca-deficient carbonated apatite form, as it did in TE, but also the serum proteins co-adsorbed on the surface and thereby affected the surface reaction layer formation. A thinner apatite layer was formed and was composed of a micro-porous layer comprising rounded particles in a glue

  6. Detection of formaldehyde emissions from an industrial zone in the Yangtze River Delta region of China using a proton transfer reaction ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Diao, Yiwei; Zhang, Bingjie; Wang, Weiwei; Ren, Xinrong; Yang, Dongsen; Wang, Ming; Shi, Xiaowen; Zheng, Jun

    2016-12-01

    A proton transfer reaction ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PTR-ID-CIMS) equipped with a hydronium (H3+O) ion source was developed and deployed near an industrial zone in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China in spring 2015 to investigate industry-related emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Air pollutants including formaldehyde (HCHO), aromatics, and other trace gases (O3 and CO) were simultaneously measured. Humidity effects on the sensitivity of the PTR-ID-CIMS for HCHO detection were investigated and quantified. The performances of the PTR-ID-CIMS were also validated by intercomparing with offline HCHO measurement technique using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH) cartridges and the results showed fairly good agreement (slope = 0.81, R2 = 0.80). The PTR-ID-CIMS detection limit of HCHO (10 s, three-duty-cycle averages) was determined to be 0.9-2.4 (RH = 1-81.5 %) parts per billion by volume (ppbv) based on 3 times the standard deviations of the background signals. During the field study, observed HCHO concentrations ranged between 1.8 and 12.8 ppbv with a campaign average of 4.1 ± 1.6 ppbv, which was comparable with previous HCHO observations in other similar locations of China. However, HCHO diurnal profiles showed few features of secondary formation. In addition, time series of both HCHO and aromatic VOCs indicated strong influence from local emissions. Using a multiple linear regression fit model, on average the observed HCHO can be attributed to secondary formation (13.8 %), background level (27.0 %), and industry-related emissions, i.e., combustion sources (43.2 %) and chemical productions (16.0 %). Moreover, within the plumes the industry-related emissions can account for up to 69.2 % of the observed HCHO. This work has provided direct evidence of strong primary emissions of HCHO from industry-related activities. These primary HCHO sources can potentially have a strong impact on local and regional air pollution formation

  7. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION AROUND THE CIRCUMBINARY HABITABLE ZONE: INWARD MIGRATION IN THE PLANETESIMAL SWARM

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yanxiang; Zhou Jilin; Xie Jiwei E-mail: zhoujl@nju.edu.cn

    2013-01-20

    According to the core accretion theory, circumbinary embryos can form only beyond a critical semimajor axis (CSMA). However, due to the relatively high density of solid materials in the inner disk, a significant amount of small planetesimals must exist in the inner zone when embryos form outside this CSMA. Thus, embryo migration induced by the planetesimal swarm is possible after gas disk depletion. Through numerical simulations, we found that (1) the scattering-driven inward migration of embryos is robust and planets can form in the habitable zone if we adopt a mass distribution of an MMSN-like disk; (2) the total mass of the planetesimals in the inner region and continuous embryo-embryo scattering are two key factors that cause significant embryo migrations; and (3) the scattering-driven migration of embryos is a natural water-delivery mechanism. We propose that planet detections should focus on the close binary with its habitable zone near CSMA.

  8. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric

  9. Search for reaction conditions and catalyst for selective prebiotic formation of Aldopentoses from Glycolaldehyde and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Parmon, Valentin; Gromov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Formation of organic compounds from simple precursors appears to have been one of the first steps from geochemistry towards modern biochemistry. The Earth lagoons, hydrothermal springs, cosmic dust, meteorites, protoplanetary disk, etc. has been considered as the possible ``reactors'' in which the prebiotic synthesis could have taken place. The finding of reactions and reaction conditions which allow to produce the high yields of the biologically relevant substances from simple compounds could help us to verify different hypothesis of plausible prebotic conditions. In this work we have studied the formation of vitally important sugars, namely aldopentoses (ribose, xylose, lyxose and arabinose), from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde over catalysts. Aldopentoses nowadays play the important roles as the components of polysaccharides, glycosides, nucleic acids and ATP. Glycolaldehyde is the simplest monosaccharide, which was found in the interstellar space [1], where it could be generated as a result of several processes, for instance, condensation of formaldehyde under UV-radiation [2]. In this work the peculiarities of interaction between glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde in the presence of soluble (phosphate and borate buffers) and solid (minerals apatite and montmorillonites) catalysts were studied. The dependences of composition of the reaction products on the catalyst nature, molar ratio of substrates, pH value of reaction mixture were revealed. The yields of aldopentoses amount to ca. 60-65% in the presence of borate catalyst under optimized reaction conditions. Borate acts not only as a catalyst, but also as the stabilizer of active intermediates and aldopentoses from side reactions [3]. Borates are present in some mineral and clays (serpentine, montmorillonite etc.) and in water of Cityhot springs (Geyser valley, placeKamchatka) in rather high concentrations. Therefore catalysis by borates could be considered as plausible prebotic condition. Acknowledgements. We

  10. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  11. Formation of albitite-hosted uranium within IOCG systems: the Southern Breccia, Great Bear magmatic zone, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montreuil, Jean-François; Corriveau, Louise; Potter, Eric G.

    2015-03-01

    Uranium and polymetallic U mineralization hosted within brecciated albitites occurs one kilometer south of the magnetite-rich Au-Co-Bi-Cu NICO deposit in the southern Great Bear magmatic zone (GBMZ), Canada. Concentrations up to 1 wt% U are distributed throughout a 3 by 0.5 km albitization corridor defined as the Southern Breccia zone. Two distinct U mineralization events are observed. Primary uraninite precipitated with or without pyrite-chalcopyrite ± molybdenite within magnetite-ilmenite-biotite-K-feldspar-altered breccias during high-temperature potassic-iron alteration. Subsequently, pitchblende precipitated in earthy hematite-specular hematite-chlorite veins associated with a low-temperature iron-magnesium alteration. The uraninite-bearing mineralization postdates sodic (albite) and more localized high-temperature potassic-iron (biotite-magnetite ± K-feldspar) alteration yet predates potassic (K-feldspar), boron (tourmaline) and potassic-iron-magnesium (hematite ± K-feldspar ± chlorite) alteration. The Southern Breccia zone shares attributes of the Valhalla (Australia) and Lagoa Real (Brazil) albitite-hosted U deposits but contains greater iron oxide contents and lower contents of riebeckite and carbonates. Potassium, Ni, and Th are also enriched whereas Zr and Sr are depleted with respect to the aforementioned albitite-hosted U deposits. Field relationships, geochemical signatures and available U-Pb dates on pre-, syn- and post-mineralization intrusions place the development of the Southern Breccia and the NICO deposit as part of a single iron oxide alkali-altered (IOAA) system. In addition, this case example illustrates that albitite-hosted U deposits can form in albitization zones that predate base and precious metal ore zones in a single IOAA system and become traps for U and multiple metals once the tectonic regime favors fluid mixing and oxidation-reduction reactions.

  12. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  13. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Long-Chain Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Kong, Lingdong; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; Chen, Jianmin; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-22

    The heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds results in the efficient production of organosulfates for several fatty acids and long-chain alkenes. The presence of an acid group, the physical state of the reactants (solid or liquid), the nature of the double bond (cis, trans, terminal), and the use of light irradiation all have an impact on the reaction rate. The reaction was investigated using different set-ups (coated flow tube, aerosol flow tube, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform cell). The reaction products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and the impact of this reaction on organosulfate formation in the atmosphere is discussed.

  14. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-03-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12.

  15. Temperature perturbations evolution as a possible mechanism of exothermal reaction kernels formation in shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A. V.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2016-11-01

    The basic question raised in the paper concerns the origins of exothermal reaction kernels and the mechanisms of detonation onset behind the reflected shock wave in shock-tube experiments. Using the conventional experimental technique, it is obtained that in the certain diapason of conditions behind the reflected shocks a so-called “mild ignition” arises which is characterized by the detonation formation from the kernel distant from the end-wall. The results of 2-D and 3-D simulations of the flow evolution behind the incident and reflected shocks allow formulation of the following scenario of ignition kernels formation. Initial stage during and after the diaphragm rupture is characterized by a set of non-steady gasdynamical processes. As a result, the flow behind the incident shock occurs to be saturated with temperature perturbations. Further evolution of these perturbations provides generating of the shear stresses in the flow accompanied with intensification of velocity and temperature perturbations. After reflection the shock wave interacts with the formed kernels of higher temperature and more pronounced kernels arise on the background of reactivity profile determined by moving reflected shock. Exothermal reaction starts inside such kernels and propagates into the ambient medium as a spontaneous ignition wave with minimum initial speed equal to the reflected shock wave speed.

  16. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-01-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12. Images PMID:7510408

  17. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  18. Peptide Bond Formation through Gas-phase Reactions in the Interstellar Medium: Formamide and Acetamide as Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH_4+ with formaldehyde and CH_5+ with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  19. Organometallic nickel(III) complexes relevant to cross-coupling and carbon-heteroatom bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Tang, Fengzhi; Luo, Jia; Schultz, Jason W; Rath, Nigam P; Mirica, Liviu M

    2014-04-30

    Nickel complexes have been widely employed as catalysts in C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation reactions. In addition to Ni(0) and Ni(II) intermediates, several Ni-catalyzed reactions are proposed to also involve odd-electron Ni(I) and Ni(III) oxidation states. We report herein the isolation, structural and spectroscopic characterization, and organometallic reactivity of Ni(III) complexes containing aryl and alkyl ligands. These Ni(III) species undergo transmetalation and/or reductive elimination reactions to form new C-C or C-heteroatom bonds and are also competent catalysts for Kumada and Negishi cross-coupling reactions. Overall, these results provide strong evidence for the direct involvement of organometallic Ni(III) species in cross-coupling reactions and oxidatively induced C-heteroatom bond formation reactions.

  20. Overexpression of SlREV alters the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone and fruit formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guojian; Fan, Jing; Xian, Zhiqiang; Huang, Wei; Lin, Dongbo; Li, Zhengguo

    2014-12-01

    Versatile roles of REVOLUTA (REV), a Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) transcription factor, have been depicted mainly in Arabidopsis and Populus. In this study, we investigated the functions of its tomato homolog, namely SlREV. Overexpression of a microRNA166-resistant version of SlREV (35S::REV(Ris)) not only resulted in vegetative abnormalities such as curly leaves and fasciated stems, but also caused dramatic reproductive alterations including continuous production of flowers at the pedicel abscission zone (AZ) and ectopic fruit formation on receptacles. Microscopic analysis showed that meristem-like structures continuously emerged from the exodermises of the pedicel AZs and that ectopic carpels formed between the first and second whorl of floral buds in 35S::REV(Ris) plants. Transcriptional data suggest that SlREV may regulate genes related to meristem maintenance and cell differentiation in the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone, and modulate genes in homeodomain and MADS-box families and hormone pathways during fruit formation. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles of SlREV in tomato flower development and fruit formation.

  1. Global systematics of formation conditions of subduction zone magmas and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, I.; Ozawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction zone magmatism plays an important role in material recycling of the earth’s interior, and it is imperative to understand melt generation mechanisms in the wedge mantle. The subduction zone is more complicated and diverse as a magma generation site than that of mid-ocean ridge or hot spot mostly because of the more significant and variable contribution of H2O-rich fluid expelled from the subducting slab, and because of the complexity of thermal and flow structures in the wedge mantle. The spatial variations of compositions of primary magmas in subduction zones have been recognized (e.g., Kuno, 1966; Sakuyama and Nesbitt, 1986), and are attributed to the diversity of melt segregation depth, degree of melting, or involvement of hydrous fluids with peculiar geochemical signature. It is particularly critical if melting at subduction zone is controlled mostly by the addition of H2O-rich fluid (Tatsumi, 1986; Iwamori, 1998) or by thermal and flow structure in the wedge mantle (Plank and Langmuir, 1993; Schmidt and Poli, 1998). In order to address this issue, quantitative estimation of melting conditions with clarification of the critical tectonic factors controlling magma generation is requisite and has been attempted in many studies with limited success. In this study, melting conditions of frontal volcanoes of world subduction zones are quantitatively estimated on the basis of major element composition of volcanic rocks. For quantitative estimation of melting conditions, we adopted appropriate models not only for mantle melting but also for fractional crystallization in the crust, simultaneous determination of both of which ensures the consistency of estimation procedure (Ogitsu and Ozawa, in prep.). Unknown parameters are optimized by least-squares method with input from a major element data of volcanic rocks. This approach is applicable to more differentiated rocks, which are not suitable for olivine addition methods widely used in estimation of primary

  2. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol.

  3. Reaction between drug substances and pharmaceutical excipients: formation of esters between cetirizine and polyols.

    PubMed

    Yu, He; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2010-11-02

    Reactions between active drug substances and excipients are of interest in the drug formulation process and should also be considered in the following storage of final preparations. Some excipients react more readily with certain chemical groups in drug substances and in the present paper the ester formation between a drug substance having a carboxylic acid moiety and some polyols are described. The drug substance cetirizine was chosen as the model substance as it is already marketed and used as a common drug for treatment of allergic reactions. Among the marketed products are oral solutions and oral drops containing excipients like sorbitol and glycerol. It was found that the carboxylic acid cetirizine readily reacts with sorbitol and glycerol to form monoesters. At a temperature as low as 40 degrees C, more than 1% of the cetirizine content was transformed into a monoester within 1 week using concentrations similar to those used in marketed preparations. The kinetic studies of the reaction performed at 40, 60 and 80 degrees C also revealed that the esters were unstable and they degraded especially at higher temperatures. Analysis of two marketed preparations having expiry dates in 2011 showed content of the cetirizine esters corresponding to a range from 0.1 to 0.3% of the declared cetirizine content.

  4. Carbon Isotopic Fractionation During Formation of Macromolecular Organic Grain Coatings via FTT Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Elsila-Cook, J.; Kopstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of carbon isotopic fractionation of various organic compounds found in meteorites may provide useful diagnostic information concerning the environments and mechanisms that were responsible for their formation. Unfortunately, carbon has only two stable isotopes, making interpretation of such observations quite problematic. Chemical reactions can increase or decrease the C-13/C-12 ratio by various amounts, but the final ratio will depend on the total reaction pathway followed from the source carbon to the final product, a path not readily discernable after 4.5 billion years. In 1970 Libby showed that the C-13/C-12 ratios of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon were similar by comparing carbon from the Murchison meteorite to that of terrestrial sediments. More recent studies have shown that the C-13/C-12 ratio of the Earth and meteorites may be considerably enriched in C-13 compared to the ratio observed in the solar wind [2], possibly suggesting that carbon produced via ion-molecule reactions in cold dark clouds could be an important source of terrestrial and meteoritic carbon. However, meteoritic carbon has been subjected to parent body processing that could have resulted in significant changes to the C-13/C-12 ratio originally present while significant variation has been observed in the C-13/C-12 ratio of the same molecule extracted from different terrestrial sources. Again we must conclude that understanding the ratio found in meteorites may be difficult.

  5. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60-80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary

  6. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly

  7. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGES

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; ...

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the

  8. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  9. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  10. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (U(VI)O2(2+)) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing U(VI)O2(2+) and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [U(VI)O2(O)(H)](-). Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [U(VI)O2(OH)](+). Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to U(V)O2(+). Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [U(V)O2(O)](-). Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H(+) transfer process that leaves U(V)O2(+) coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [U(V)O2(O)](-). Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism for formation of enols in reaction of hydroxide radical with propene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Li, Ze-Rong; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2009-03-19

    Recently, enols have been found to be the common intermediates in hydrocarbon combustion flames (Taatjes et al. Science 2005, 308, 1887), but the knowledge of kinetic properties for such species in combustion flames is rare. Therefore in this work, particular attention is paid to the formation of enols in combustion flames. Starting with HO and propene (CH(3)CH=CH(2)), the reaction mechanism involving eight product channels has been investigated systematically. It is revealed that the electrophilic addition of OH to the double bond of CH(3)CH=CH(2) is unselective and the chemically activated adducts, CH(3)CHOH=CH(2) and CH(3)CH=CH(2)OH, may undergo dissociation in competition with H-abstractions. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HO and propene reaction have been evaluated in the temperature range of 200-3000 K by Variflex code, based on the weak collision master equation/microcanonical variational RRKM theory. Available experimental kinetic data can be quantitatively reproduced by this study, with a minor adjustment (1.0 kcal/mol) of the OH central addition barrier. From the theoretical calculations with multiple reflection correction included, the total rate constant is fitted to k(t) = 6.07 x 10(-5)T(-2.54) exp(108/T) cm(3) x molecule(-1) x s(-1) in the range of 200-800 K and k(t) = 7.11 x 10(-23)T(3.38) exp(-1097/T) cm(3) x molecule(-1) x s(-1) in the range of 800-3000 K, which are in close agreement with experimental data. The branching ratios of enol channels are consistent with the observation in low-pressure flames and hence the reaction mechanisms presented here provide valuable descriptions of enol formations in hydrocarbon combustion chemistry.

  13. Rapid-reaction kinetic characterization of the pathway of streptokinase-plasmin catalytic complex formation.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2008-09-19

    Binding of the fibrinolytic proteinase plasmin (Pm) to streptokinase (SK) in a tight stoichiometric complex transforms Pm into a potent proteolytic activator of plasminogen. SK binding to the catalytic domain of Pm, with a dissociation constant of 12 pm, is assisted by SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle, which accounts for a 11-20-fold affinity decrease when Pm lysine binding sites are blocked by 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) or benzamidine. The pathway of SK.Pm catalytic complex formation was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics of SK and the Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKDeltaK414) binding to Pm labeled at the active site with 5-fluorescein ([5F]FFR-Pm) and the reverse reactions by competitive displacement of [5F]FFR-Pm with active site-blocked Pm. The rate constants for the biexponential fluorescence quenching caused by SK and SKDeltaK414 binding to [5F]FFR-Pm were saturable as a function of SK concentration, reporting encounter complex affinities of 62-110 nm in the absence of lysine analogs and 4900-6500 and 1430-2200 nm in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine, respectively. The encounter complex with SKDeltaK414 was approximately 10-fold weaker in the absence of lysine analogs but indistinguishable from that of native SK in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine. The studies delineate for the first time the sequence of molecular events in the formation of the SK.Pm catalytic complex and its regulation by kringle ligands. Analysis of the forward and reverse reactions supports a binding mechanism in which SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle accompanies near-diffusion-limited encounter complex formation followed by two slower, tightening conformational changes.

  14. Histidinyl radical formation in the self-peroxidation reaction of bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Michael R; Peters, J Andrew; Sivaneri, Meena K

    2002-03-15

    In the absence of suitable oxidizable substrates, the peroxidase reaction of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) oxidizes SOD itself, ultimately resulting in its inactivation. A SOD-centered free radical adduct of 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) was detected upon incubation of SOD with the spin trap and a hydroperoxide (either H(2)O(2) or peracetic acid). Proteolysis by Pronase converted the anisotropic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of MNP/(center dot)SOD to a nearly isotropic spectrum with resolved hyperfine couplings to several atoms with non-zero nuclear spin. Authentic histidinyl radical (from histidine + HO(center dot)) formed a MNP adduct with a very similar EPR spectrum to that of the Pronase-treated MNP/(center dot)SOD, suggesting that the latter was centered on a histidine residue. An additional hyperfine coupling was detected when histidine specifically (13)C-labeled at C-2 of the imidazole ring was used, providing evidence for trapping at that atom. All of the experimental spectra were convincingly simulated assuming hyperfine couplings to 2 nearly equivalent nitrogen atoms and 2 different protons, also consistent with trapping at C-2 of the imidazole ring. Free histidinyl radical consumed oxygen, implying peroxyl radical formation. MNP-inhibitable oxygen consumption was also observed when cuprous SOD but not cupric SOD was added to a H(2)O(2) solution. Formation of 2-oxohistidine, the stable product of the SOD-hydroperoxide reaction, required oxygen and was inhibited by MNP. These results support formation of a transient SOD-peroxyl radical.

  15. HSO2+ formation from ion-molecule reactions of SO2.+ with water and methane: two fast reactions with reverse temperature-dependent kinetic trend.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, Antonella; Catone, Daniele; Bolognesi, Paola; Satta, Mauro; Markus, Pal; Avaldi, Lorenzo

    2017-02-08

    In this work an experimental and theoretical study on the formation of HSO2+ ion from the SO2.+ + CH4 and SO2.+ + H2O ion-molecule reactions at different temperatures is reported. Tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to produce the SO2.+ ion in excited ro-vibrational levels of the ionic ground state X2A1 and mass spectrometry has been employed to identify the product ions. Calculations in the frame of the density functional theory and variational transtition state theory have been combined to explore the dynamics of the reactions. The experimental results show that HSO2+ is the only product in both reactions. Its yield decreases monotonically with photon energy in the SO2.+ + H2O reaction, while it decreases at first and then increases in the SO2.+ + CH4 reaction. Theory confirms this trend by calculating the rate constants at different temperatures and explains the results by means of the polar, spin and charge effects as well as structural reorganization occuring in the reaction coordinate. The dynamic behavior observed in these two reactions is of general and fundamental interest. It can also provide some insights in the role of these reactions in astrochemistry as well as in their use as models for bond-activation reactions.

  16. Contribution of the photo-Fenton reaction to hydroxyl radical formation rates in river and rain water samples.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Ueda, Marina; Shindo, Hirotaka; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH radical) formation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction in river and rain water samples were determined by using deferoxamine mesylate (DFOM), which makes a stable and strong complex with Fe(III), resulting in a suppression of the photo-Fenton reaction. The difference between the OH radical formation rates with and without added DFOM denotes the rate from the photo-Fenton reaction. The photoformation rates from the photo-Fenton reaction were in the range of 0.7 - 45.8 x 10(-12) and 2.7 - 32.3 x 10(-12) M s(-1) in river and rain water samples, respectively. A strong positive correlation between the OH radical formation rate from the photo-Fenton reaction and the amount of fluorescent matter in river water suggests that fluorescent matter, such as humic substances, plays an important role in the photo-Fenton reaction. In rain water, direct photolysis of hydrogen peroxide was an important source of OH radicals as well as the photo-Fenton reaction. The contributions of the photo-Fenton reaction to the OH radical photoformation rates in river and rain water samples were in the ranges of 2 - 29 and 5 - 38%, respectively. Taking into account the photo-Fenton reaction, 33 - 110 (mean: 80) and 42 - 110 (mean: 84)% of OH radical sources in river and rain water samples, respectively, collected in Hiroshima prefecture were elucidated.

  17. Kinetics and Thermochemistry of ClCO Formation from the Cl + CO Association Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Kreutter, K. D.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis of Cl2/CO/M mixtures (M = N2, CO, Ar, CO2) has been employed in conjunction with Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) detection by time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate equilibration kinetics in the reactions Cl((sup 2)P(sub J)) + CO ClCO as a function of temperature (185-260 K) and pressure (14-200 Torr). The association and dissociation reactions are found to be in the low-pressure limit over the range of experimental conditions investigated. In N2 and/or CO buffer gases, the temperature dependences of the ClCO formation and dissociation reaction rate constants are described by the Arrhenius expressions k(sub 1) = (1.05 +/- 0.36) x 10(exp -34) exp[(810 +/- 70)/T] cm(exp 6)/molecules(exp 2).s and k(sub -1) = (4.1 +/- 3.1) x 10(exp -10) exp[(-2960 +/- 60)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s) (errors are 2 sigma). Second- and third-law analyses of the temperature dependence of the equilbrium constant (k/k-1) lead to the following thermodynamic parameters for the association reaction: Delta-H(sub 298) = -7.7 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol, Delta-H(sub 0) = -6.9 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, Delta-S(sub 298) = -23.8 +/- 2.0 cal/mole.K, Delta-H(sub f,298)(ClCO) = 5.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol (errors are 2 sigma). The results repported in this study significantly reduce the uncertainties in all reported kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

  18. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  19. Capillary zone electrophoresis-multiple reaction monitoring from 100 pg of RAW 264.7 cell lysate digest

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liangliang; Li, Yihan; Champion, Matthew M.; Zhu, Guijie; Wojcik, Roza; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis-multiple/single reaction monitoring (CZE-MRM/SRM), which employed an electrokinetically driven sheath-flow electrospray interface, was used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of protein analytes in complex tryptic digests. MRM channels were developed against a commercial exponential mixture of bovine proteins. Five proteins spanning four orders of magnitude concentration range were confidently detected from only 2.5 ng of the digest mixture; the mass detection limits (S/N=3) of two detected proteins, alpha-casein and glutamate dehydrogenasewere about 600 zmole and 30 amole, respectively. This technique was then applied to a RAW 264.7 cell lysate digest. Three proteins were confidently and reproducibly detected from 100 pg of this digest. The sample amount corresponds to the approximate protein content from a single cell, which suggests that CZE-MRM may be a useful analytical tool in chemical cytometry. In addition to providing highly sensitive detection of proteins in complex mixtures, this system is highly rapid; migration time of the protein digests was less than 10 min. PMID:23591184

  20. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  1. Time-dependent insulin oligomer reaction pathway prior to fibril formation: cooling and seeding.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Mirco; Grassucci, Robert A; Hahn, Ingrid; Frank, Joachim; Belfort, Georges

    2009-10-01

    The difficulty in identifying the toxic agents in all amyloid-related diseases is likely due to the complicated kinetics and thermodynamics of the nucleation process and subsequent fibril formation. The slow progression of these diseases suggests that the formation, incorporation, and/or action of toxic agents are possibly rate limiting. Candidate toxic agents include precursors (some at very low concentrations), also called oligomers and protofibrils, and the fibrils. Here, we investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of human insulin oligomers (imaged by cryo-EM) under fibril-forming conditions (pH 1.6 and 65 degrees C) by probing the reaction pathway to insulin fibril formation using two different types of experiments-cooling and seeding-and confirm the validity of the nucleation model and its effect on fibril growth. The results from both the cooling and seeding studies confirm the existence of a time-changing oligomer reaction process prior to fibril formation that likely involves a rate-limiting nucleation process followed by structural rearrangements of intermediates (into beta-sheet rich entities) to form oligomers that then form fibrils. The latter structural rearrangement step occurs even in the absence of nuclei (i.e., with added heterologous seeds). Nuclei are formed at the fibrillation conditions (pH 1.6 and 65 degrees C) but are also continuously formed during cooling at pH 1.6 and 25 degrees C. Within the time-scale of the experiments, only after increasing the temperature to 65 degrees C are the trapped insulin nuclei and resultant structures able to induce the structural rearrangement step and overcome the energy barrier to form fibrils. This delay in fibrillation and accumulation of nuclei at low temperature (25 degrees C) result in a decrease in the mean length of the fibers when placed at 65 degrees C. Fits of an empirical model to the data provide quantitative measures of the delay in the lag-time during the nucleation process and

  2. Time-dependent insulin oligomer reaction pathway prior to fibril formation: Cooling and seeding

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Mirco; Grassucci, Robert A.; Hahn, Ingrid; Frank, Joachim; Belfort, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty in identifying the toxic agents in all amyloid-related diseases is likely due to the complicated kinetics and thermodynamics of the nucleation process and subsequent fibril formation. The slow progression of these diseases suggests that the formation, incorporation and/or action of toxic agents is possibly rate limiting. Candidate toxic agents include precursors (some at very low concentrations), also called oligomers and protofibrils, and the fibrils. Here, we investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of human insulin oligomers (imaged by cryo-EM) under fibril forming conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) by probing the reaction pathway to insulin fibril formation using two different types of experiments – cooling and seeding – and confirm the validity of the nucleation model and its effect on fibril growth. The results from both the cooling and seeding studies confirm the existence of a time-changing oligomer reaction process prior to fibril formation that likely involves a rate-limiting nucleation process followed by structural rearrangements of intermediates (into β-sheet rich entities) to form oligomers that then form fibrils. The latter structural rearrangement step occurs even in the absence of nuclei (i.e. with added heterologous seeds). Nuclei are formed at the fibrillation conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) but are also continuously formed during cooling at pH 1.6 and 25°C. Within the time-scale of the experiments, only after increasing the temperature to 65°C are the trapped insulin nuclei and resultant structures able to induce the structural rearrangement step and overcome the energy barrier to form fibrils. This delay in fibrillation and accumulation of nuclei at low temperature (25°C), result in a decrease in the mean length of the fibers when placed at 65°C. Fits of an empirical model to the data provide quantitative measures of the delay in the lag-time during the nucleation process and subsequent reduction in fibril growth rate

  3. The α-Effect and Competing Mechanisms: The Gas-Phase Reactions of Microsolvated Anions with Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Ditte L.; Nichols, Charles M.; Reece, Jennifer N.; Hammerum, Steen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2013-12-01

    The enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles, which contain an electron lone pair adjacent to the reactive site, has been demonstrated in solution and in the gas phase and, recently, for the gas-phase SN2 reactions of the microsolvated HOO-(H2O) ion with methyl chloride. In the present work, we continue to explore the significance of microsolvation on the α-effect as we compare the gas-phase reactivity of the microsolvated α-nucleophile HOO-(H2O) with that of microsolvated normal alkoxy nucleophiles, RO-(H2O), in reactions with methyl formate, where three competing reactions are possible. The results reveal enhanced reactivity of HOO-(H2O) towards methyl formate, and clearly demonstrate the presence of an overall α-effect for the reactions of the microsolvated α-nucleophile. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water molecule significantly lowers the degree of proton abstraction and increases the SN2 and BAC2 reactivity compared with the unsolvated analogs. HOO-(H2O) reacts with methyl formate exclusively via the BAC2 channel. While microsolvation lowers the overall reaction efficiency, it enhances the BAC2 reaction efficiency for all anions compared with the unsolvated analogs. This may be explained by participation of the solvent water molecule in the BAC2 reaction in a way that continuously stabilizes the negative charge throughout the reaction.

  4. Hydroxy-group effect on the regioselectivity in a photochemical oxetane formation reaction (the Paternò-Büchi Reaction) of geraniol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Ken; Hiraga, Yoshikazu; Abe, Manabu

    2011-09-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction of geraniol derivatives 1, which contain allylic alcohol functionality and unfunctionalized double bonds, with benzophenone was investigated to see the effect of the hydroxyl group on the regioselectivity of the oxetane formation, i.e., 2/3. At low concentration of geraniol (1a), oxetanes 2a and 3a were formed in a ratio of 2a/3a = ca. 50/50. The oxetane 2a is derived from the PB reaction at the allylic alcohol moiety, whereas the PB reaction at the unfunctionalized double bond produces the oxetane 3a. The PB reaction of the hydroxy-protected methyl ether 1b and acetate 1c gave selectively oxetanes 3b,c derived from the reaction at the more nucleophilic double bond, 2/3∼ 15/85. The hydroxyl-group effect was found to be small, but apparently increased the formation of 2a in the PB reaction with geraniol (1a).

  5. Magma reservoirs and neutral buoyancy zones on Venus - Implications for the formation and evolution of volcanic landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    1992-01-01

    The production of magma reservoirs and neutral buoyancy zones (NBZs) on Venus and the implications of their development for the formation and evolution of volcanic landforms are examined. The high atmospheric pressure on Venus reduces volatile exsolution and generally serves to inhibit the formation of NBZs and shallow magma reservoirs. For a range of common terrestrial magma-volatile contents, magma ascending and erupting near or below mean planetary radius (MPR) should not stall at shallow magma reservoirs; such eruptions are characterized by relatively high total volumes and effusion rates. For the same range of volatile contents at 2 km above MPR, about half of the cases result in the direct ascent of magma to the surface and half in the production of neutral buoyancy zones. NBZs and shallow magma reservoirs begin to appear as gas content increases and are nominally shallower on Venus than on earth. For a fixed volatile content, NBZs become deeper with increasing elevation: over the range of elevations treated in this study (-1 km to +4.4 km) depths differ by a factor of 2-4. Factors that may account for the low height of volcanoes on Venus are discussed.

  6. [Formation and reactions of biogenic manganese oxides with heavy metals in environment].

    PubMed

    Meng, You-Ting; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2009-02-15

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are common minerals in natural environments that may play an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. Increasing evidences have shown that Mn (II) oxidation is a microbially-mediated process, and the Mn oxidizing microorganisms are thus recognized as the major drivers of the global Mn cycle. The major pathway for bacterial Mn (II) oxidation is catalysed by a multicopper oxidizing enzyme family. The primary Mn (IV) biooxides are phyllomanganate-like minerals most similar to delta-MnO2 or acid birnessite. Manganese oxides are known to have high sorption capacities for a wide variety of metal ions and considered to be the important environmental oxidant to many metal ions. This paper reviewed the mechanisms of biogenic manganese oxides formation and their reactions with heavy metal ions in environment.

  7. Uranyl triazolate formation via an in situ Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Knope, Karah E.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2010-08-27

    A two dimensional UO22+ coordination polymer, (UO2)3(C10H5N3O4)2(OH)2(H2O)2, has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The triazolate ligand, 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylic acid (CPTAZ) has been generated via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of 4-azidobenzoic acid and propiolic acid. Reactions of the UO22+ cation with both the in situ generated triazolate ligand and the presynthesized ligand have been explored. The structure, fluorescent and thermal behaviour of this material are presented, as is a discussion of the utility of in situ ligand formation versus direct assembly.

  8. Isomer-specific product formation in the proton transfer reaction of HOCO+ with CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascosa, Eduardo; Stei, Martin; Kainz, Martin A.; Wester, Roland

    2015-12-01

    The proton transfer reaction HOCO++CO → HCO+/HOC+ has been studied using crossed-beam velocity map imaging. Angular and energy differential cross sections were obtained for collision energies from 0.3 to 2.3 eV. Scattering in forward direction together with a prominent scattering angle-dependent internal excitation is found at all collision energies. The exothermic HCO+ product appears to be very dominant even at energies above the energy threshold for the formation of metastable HOC+ ion. To determine the HOC+ contribution for different angular ranges, a model has been developed. We obtain an upper limit for the HOC+ product isomer fraction of <2%. In theoretical calculations, we find the CO2-catalysed isomerisation channel to be energetically accessible. However, it may not have a strong impact on the isomer ratio. Chemical dynamics simulations are needed to shed more light on this question.

  9. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene.

  10. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  11. A Macroscopic Reaction: Direct Covalent Bond Formation between Materials Using a Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Cross-coupling reactions are important to form C–C covalent bonds using metal catalysts. Although many different cross-coupling reactions have been developed and applied to synthesize complex molecules or polymers (macromolecules), if cross-coupling reactions are realized in the macroscopic real world, the scope of materials should be dramatically broadened. Here, Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions are realized between macroscopic objects. When acrylamide gel modified with an iodophenyl group (I-gel) reacts with a gel possessing a phenylboronic group (PB-gel) using a palladium catalyst, the gels bond to form a single object. This concept can also be adapted for bonding between soft and hard materials. I-gel or PB-gel selectively bonds to the glass substrates whose surfaces are modified with an electrophile or nucleophile, respectively. PMID:25231557

  12. Modeling the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Valentine, Richard L

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents mechanistic studies on the formation of NDMA, a newly identified chloramination disinfection byproduct, from reactions of monochloramine with natural organic matter. A kinetic model was developed to validate proposed reactions and to predict NDMA formation in chloraminated water during the time frame of 1-5 days. This involved incorporating NDMA formation reactions into an established comprehensive model describing the oxidation of humic-type natural organic matter by monochloramine. A rate-limiting step involving the oxidation of NOM is theorized to control the rate of NDMA formation which is assumed to be proportional to the rate of NOM oxidized by monochloramine. The applicability of the model to describe NDMA formation in the presence of three NOM sources over a wide range in water quality (i.e., pH, DOC, and ammonia concentrations) was evaluated. Results show that with accurate measurement of monochloramine demand for a specific supply, NDMA formation could be modeled over an extended range of experimental conditions by considering a single NOM source-specific value of thetaNDMA, a stoichiometric coefficient relating the amount of NDMA produced to the amount of NOM oxidized, and several kinetic parameters describing NOM oxidation. Furthermore, the oxidation of NOM is the rate-limiting step governing NDMA formation. This suggests that NDMA formation over a 1-5 day time frame may be estimated from information on the chloramine or free chlorine demand of the NOM and the source-specific linear relationship between this demand and NDMA formation. Although the proposed model has not yet been validated for shorter time periods that may better characterize the residence time in some distribution systems, the improved understanding of the important reactions governing NDMA formation and the resulting model should benefit the water treatment industry as a tool in developing strategies that minimize NDMA formation.

  13. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  14. Efficient and directed peptide bond formation in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-01-28

    Amide linkages are among the most important chemical bonds in living systems, constituting the connections between amino acids in peptides and proteins. We demonstrate the controlled formation of amide bonds between amino acids or peptides in the gas phase using ion/ion reactions in a mass spectrometer. Individual amino acids or peptides can be prepared as reagents by (i) incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to silence otherwise reactive functional groups, such as the N terminus; (ii) converting the carboxyl groups to the active ester of N-hydroxysuccinimide; and (iii) incorporating a charge site. Protonation renders basic sites (nucleophiles) unreactive toward the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents, resulting in sites with the greatest gas phase basicities being, in large part, unreactive. The N-terminal amines of most naturally occurring amino acids have lower gas phase basicities than the side chains of the basic amino acids (i.e., those of histidine, lysine, or arginine). Therefore, reagents may be directed to the N terminus of an existing "anchor" peptide to form an amide bond by protonating the anchor peptide's basic residues, while leaving the N-terminal amine unprotonated and therefore reactive. Reaction efficiencies of greater than 30% have been observed. We propose this method as a step toward the controlled synthesis of peptides in the gas phase.

  15. Formation of Pd/Au Nanostructures from Pd Nanowires via Galvanic Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Teng,X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Han, W.; Frenkel, A.; Wen, W.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic nanostructures with non-random metal atoms distribution are very important for various applications. To synthesize such structures via benign wet chemistry approach remains challenging. This paper reports a synthesis of a Au/Pd alloy nanostructure through the galvanic replacement reaction between Pd ultrathin nanowires (2.4 {+-} 0.2 nm in width, over 30 nm in length) and AuCl3 in toluene. Both morphological and structural changes were monitored during the reaction up to 10 h. Continuous changes of chemical composition and crystalline structure from Pd nanowires to Pd68Au32 and Pd45Au55 alloys, and to Au nanoparticles were observed. More interestingly, by using combined techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we found the formation of Pd68Au32 non-random alloy with Au-rich core and Pd-rich shell, and random Pd45Au55 alloy with uniformly mixed Pd and Au atom inside the nanoparticles, respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that alkylamine will strongly stabilize Pd to the surface, resulting in diffusion of Au atoms into the core region to form a non-random alloy. We believe such benign synthetic techniques can also enable the large scale preparation of various types of non-random alloys for several technically important catalysis applications.

  16. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  17. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  18. Reaction pathways to CuInSe{sub 2} formation from electrodeposited precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, C.; Herrero, J.

    1995-06-01

    CuInSe{sub 2} thin films have been obtained from different precursors prepared by direct or sequential electrodeposition processes. The nature of the as-deposited layers and the evolution of the films during the heat-treatment in an inert (vacuum) or a reactive (elemental Se vapor) atmosphere have been studied by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The chemistry of the different phase transformations occurring as a function of the annealing temperature has been examined, and possible reaction pathways for the formation of CuInSe{sub 2} are presented. The results show that high crystalline chalcopyrite CuInSe{sub 2} films with the desired composition can be obtained after annealing either direct or sequentially electrodeposited precursors at 400 C. An improvement in film quality can be gained by using an electrodeposited Cu layer as growth surface for the CuInSe{sub 2} formation. If elemental Se is also added during the heat-treatment, then a higher recrystallization of the films is observed.

  19. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha}, {omega}- bis(triethoxy-silyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane (1) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (2) were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The ease with which these relatively unreactive cyclic monomers and dimers are formed (under acidic conditions) helps to explain the difficulties in forming gels from 1 and 2. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed withe the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

  20. Geodynamic formation conditions of Early Cambrian lavas in the Ozernaya zone of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, D. V.; Mongush, A. A.; Sath, H. N.

    2016-08-01

    Four types of pre-accretionary Early Cambrian lava sequences are distinguishable in the geological structure of the Ozernaya zone in western Mongolia: (I) close to N-MORB; (II) close to E-MORB; (III) enriched with trace elements and with HFSE minimums; (IV) depleted in trace elements and with HFSE minimums. All these lavas could have been formed in an island-arc‒back-arc basin system. N-MORB basalts were melted from depleted magma sources with c ɛNd( t) = 10.0-11.5. Plume melts originated from mantle sources with ɛNd( t) = 4.8-9.7. The sources of island arc lavas were characterized by ɛNd( t) = 7.3-9.9.

  1. Novel thermal effect at nanoshell heating by pulsed laser irradiation: hoop-shaped hot zone formation.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-10-01

    Photonic nanotechnologies have good perspectives to be widely used in biophotonics. In this study we have developed an approach for calculation of nanoparticle temperature field accounting for absorbed local intensity at pulse laser radiation of composite spherical nanoparticles (nanoshells). This approach allowed us to analyze spatial inhomogeneities of light field diffracted into a nanoshell and corresponding distribution of the absorption energy and to provide numerical solution of time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for corresponding spatially inhomogeneous distribution of heating sources. We were able to predict the appearance of a novel thermal effect - hoop-shaped hot zone on the nanoshell surface. The observed effect has potential applications in cell biology and medicine for controlled cell optoporation and nanosurgery, as well as cancer cell killing.

  2. Contrasts in Sea Ice Formation and Production in the Arctic Seasonal and Perennial Ice Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.

    2006-01-01

    Four years (1997-2000) of RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) data are used to contrast the sea ice deformation and production regionally, and in the seasonal (SIZ) and perennial (PIZ) ice zones. Ice production is of seasonal ice in openings during the winter. 3-day estimates of these quantities are provided within Lagrangian elements initially 10 km on a side. A distinct seasonal cycle is seen in both zones with these estimates highest in the late fall and with seasonal minimums in the mid-winter. Regional divergence over the winter could be up to 30%. Spatially, the highest deformation is in the SIZ north of coastal Alaska. Both ice deformation and production are higher in the SIZ: deformation-related ice production in the SIZ (approx.0.5 m) is 1.5-2.3 times that of the PIZ (approx.0.3 m) - this is connected to ice strength and thickness. Atmospheric forcing and boundary layer structure contribute to only the seasonal and interannual variability. Seasonal ice growth in ice fractures accounts for approx.25-40% of the total ice production of the Arctic Ocean. By itself, this deformation-ice production relationship could be considered a negative feedback when thickness is perturbed. However, the overall effect on ice production in the face of increasing seasonal and thinner/weaker ice coverage could be modified by: local destabilization of the water column promoting overturning of warmer water due to increased brine rejection; and, the upwelling of the pynocline associated with increased occurrence of large shear motion in sea ice.

  3. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotite and a peridotite-wehrlite-gabbro suite through melt-rock reaction: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saper, L.; Liang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Plagioclase-bearing peridotites are observed among abyssal peridotites, massif peridotites, and mantle sections of ophiolites of lherzolite subtype. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites is often attributed to basalt impregnation into host harzburgite or lherzolite in a thermal boundary layer. During transport through asthenospheric mantle, melt generated in the deep mantle will inevitably interact with the overlying mantle column through reactive dissolution and may leave geochemical imprints on plagioclase-bearing peridotites. To assess the role of melt-rock reaction on the formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites and its implications for lithosphere composition, we conducted dissolution experiments in which a 88% spinel lherzolite + 12% basalt starting mixture was juxtaposed against a primitive MORB in a graphite-lined molybdenum capsule. The reaction couples were run at 1300°C and 1 GPa for 1 or 24 hrs, and then stepped cooled to 1050°C and 0.7 GPa over the next several days. Cooling promotes in situ crystallization of interstitial melts, allowing us to better characterize the mineral compositional trends produced and observed by melt-rock reaction and crystallization. A gabbro and a plagioclase-bearing peridotite were observed in the two halves of the reaction couple after the experiments were completed. The peridotite from the 24 hr reaction experiment is mostly composed of subhedral to euhedral olivines (10-50 μm in size, Mg# 75-83), poikilitic clinopyroxene (~100 μm in size, Mg# 73-83) with olivine and spinel chadocrysts, and interstitial plagioclase (An# 68-78) and melt. In a control experiment quenched after a 24 hour reaction at 1300°C the basalt completely dissolved the pyroxenes and spinels leaving a residue of rounded olivine grains (10-100 μm in size) surrounded by a relatively large melt fraction. Textural results from the step-cooling experiments suggest the following crystallization sequence from the olivine+melt mush: olivine

  4. Aldimine Formation Reaction, the First Step of the Maillard Early-phase Reaction, Might be Enhanced in Variant Hemoglobin, Hb Himeji.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Shimizu, Sayoko; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Umayahara, Yutaka; Nishihara, Eijun

    2015-01-01

    Hb Himeji (β140Ala→Asp) is known as a variant hemoglobin in which glycation is enhanced and HbA1c measured by immunoassay shows a high value. The phenomenon of enhanced glycation in Hb Himeji is based on the fact that the glycation product of variant hemoglobin (HbX1c) shows a higher value than HbA1c. In this study, we investigated whether aldimine formation reaction, the first step of the Maillard early-phase reaction, is enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. Three non-diabetic subjects with Hb Himeji and four non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were enrolled. In order to examine aldimine formation reaction, whole blood cells were incubated with 500 mg/dl of glucose at 37°C for 1 hour and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both HbA1c and HbX1c were not increased in this condition. After incubation with glucose, labile HbA1c (LA1c) fraction increased in the controls (1.1±0.3%). In subjects with Hb Himeji increases in the labile HbX1c (LX1c) fraction as well as the LA1c fraction were observed, and the degree of increase in the LX1c fraction was significantly higher than that of the LA1c fraction (1.8±0.1% vs. 0.5±0.2%, P<0.01). We have shown for the first time that aldimine (LX1c) formation reaction might be enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. The 140th amino acid in β chain of hemoglobin is suggested to be involved in aldimine formation reaction.

  5. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: Mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getahun, A.; Reed, M.H.; Symonds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Intensely altered wall rock was collected from high-temperature (640??C) and low-temperature (375??C) vents at Augustine volcano in July 1989. The high-temperature altered rock exhibits distinct mineral zoning differentiated by color bands. In order of decreasing temperature, the color bands and their mineral assemblages are: (a) white to grey (tridymite-anhydrite); (b) pink to red (tridymite-hematite-Fe hydroxide-molysite (FeCl3) with minor amounts of anhydrite and halite); and (c) dark green to green (anhydrite-halite-sylvite-tridymite with minor amounts of molysite, soda and potash alum, and other sodium and potassium sulfates). The alteration products around the low-temperature vents are dominantly cristobalite and amorphous silica with minor potash and soda alum, aphthitalite, alunogen and anhydrite. Compared to fresh 1986 Augustine lava, the altered rocks exhibit enrichments in silica, base metals, halogens and sulfur and show very strong depletions in Al in all alteration zones and in iron, alkali and alkaline earth elements in some of the alteration zones. To help understand the origins of the mineral assemblages in altered Augustine rocks, we applied the thermochemical modeling program, GASWORKS, in calculations of: (a) reaction of the 1987 and 1989 gases with wall rock at 640 and 375??C; (b) cooling of the 1987 gas from 870 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; (c) cooling of the 1989 gas from 757 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; and (d) mixing of the 1987 and 1989 gases with air. The 640??C gas-rock reaction produces an assemblage consisting of silicates (tridymite, albite, diopside, sanidine and andalusite), oxides (magnetite and hercynite) and sulfides (bornite, chalcocite, molybdenite and sphalerite). The 375??C gas-rock reaction produces dominantly silicates (quartz, albite, andalusite, microcline, cordierite, anorthite and tremolite) and subordinate amounts of sulfides (pyrite, chalcocite and wurtzite), oxides (magnetite

  6. N-nitrosoamine and N-nitroamine formation: factors influencing the aqueous reactions of nitrogen dioxide with morpholine

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, R.V.; Ross, P.D.; Bartolini, G.L.; Ramseyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    The formation of nitrosamine and nitroamine from low levels of nitrogen dioxide (1-99 ppm) and morpholine in aqueous solution was examined. We have shown for the first time that significant quantities of N-nitromorpholine form at physiological pH; the rate of N-nitration was more than double that of N-nitrosation at 37/sup 0/C, pH 7.4. The effects of temperature, pH, reactant concentration, and various anions on both nitration and nitrosation reactions are presented. In addition to pH effects, a deuterium effect was observed for the nitration reaction, suggesting that hydrogen abstraction is a rate-limiting step in product formation. Possible reaction mechanisms are described, and the implications for carcinogen formation in vivo due to low-level NO/sub 2/ exposure are discussed. 16 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Reaction Rind Formation in Mèlange in the Catalina Schist, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, S. C.; Bebout, G. E.; Sorensen, S. S.; Piccoli, P. M.; Walker, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Reaction rinds between differing lithologies are commonly considered the result of fluid-assisted metasomatic alteration, however, enrichments in relatively fluid-immobile elements such as Cr and Ni seemingly reflect other processes such as volume strain or tectonic mixing. Eleven samples along a 30 cm traverse of an amphibolite grade block and its reaction rind adjacent to ultramafic-rich matrix, show dramatic change in mineral abundance and whole-rock major and trace element and Li isotope composition. Samples of the rind are enriched in whole-rock SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Li, MgO, Cr, Ni, and also Os, Ir and Ru relative to samples of the block core, and are depleted in FeO, Al2O3, TiO2, CaO, and Zr. δ7LiL-SVEC ranges from -3 to +1% and the distribution of Li concentrations and δ7Li is consistent with diffusion on the scale of nearly the entire profile. FeO content of garnets in the rind is lower than that of garnets in the block core, reflecting whole-rock FeO concentrations, and suggesting garnet growth after the depletion in whole-rock FeO. Garnets in the rind show extensive pseudomorphing by decussate chlorite, suggesting post-garnet growth infiltration by H2O-rich fluid. Rind concentrations of Cr, Ni, Zr, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, and possibly CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Sr can be most simply explained by mechanical mixing of mafic block with mèlange matrix. Such mixing cannot explain the increases in SiO2, K2O, Li, and Ba, and we propose that the concentrations of these elements in the rind reflect element mobility during relatively late-stage fluid infiltration. We propose an early episode of mechanical mixing during which mixing of material derived from the mafic block and mèlange matrix produced rind-like material which then accreted onto the basaltic block. Garnet growth in both the block core and the rind occurred after this mechanical mixing. Fluid infiltration in the rind occurred after peak metamorphism of the block, causing alteration of garnet to chlorite and the

  8. Carbon dioxide sequestration via olivine carbonation: Examining the formation of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, H. E.; Plümper, O.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its abundance and natural ability to sequester CO2, olivine has been proposed as one mineral that could be used in the control of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere (Metz, 2005). Large scale peridotite deposits found in locations such as the Western Gneiss Region in Norway could provide in-situ sites for sequestration or the raw materials for ex-situ mineral carbonation. Determining the conditions under which magnesite (MgCO3) forms most efficiently is crucial to conduct a cost effective process. Understanding the development of secondary minerals is particularly important for in-situ methods as these phases can form passivating layers and affect the host rock porosity. The final solution of flow-through experiments conducted at alkaline pH have been shown to be supersaturated with respect to talc and chrysotile (Giammer et al., 2005), although these phases were not found to have precipitated the formation of a passivating, amorphous silica layer has been observed on reacted olivine surfaces (Bearat et al., 2006). By studying magnesite and other products produced during the carbonation of olivine within Teflon lined steel autoclaves we have begun to form a more comprehensive understanding of how these reactions would proceed during sequestration processes. We have performed batch experiments using carbonated saline solutions in the presence of air or gaseous CO2 from 80 to 200 ˚ C. X-ray powder diffraction was used to identify magnesite within the reaction products. Crystals of magnesite up to 20 m in diameter can be observed on olivine grain surfaces with scanning electron microscopy. Secondary reaction products formed a platy layer on olivine surfaces in reactions above 160 ˚ C and below pH 12. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the platy layer revealed an increase in Fe concentration. The macroscopically observable red colouration of the reaction products and Raman spectroscopy indicate that hematite is present in these layers. For experiments with

  9. VALIDATION AND RESULTS OF A PSEUDO-MULTI-ZONE COMBUSTION TRAJECTORY PREDICTION MODEL FOR CAPTURING SOOT AND NOX FORMATION ON A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Bittle, Joshua A.; Gao, Zhiming; Jacobs, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudo-multi-zone phenomenological model has been created with the ultimate goal of supporting efforts to enable broader commercialization of low temperature combustion modes in diesel engines. The benefits of low temperature combustion are the simultaneous reduction in soot and nitric oxide emissions and increased engine efficiency if combustion is properly controlled. Determining what qualifies as low temperature combustion for any given engine can be difficult without expensive emissions analysis equipment. This determination can be made off-line using computer models or through factory calibration procedures. This process could potentially be simplified if a real-time prediction model could be implemented to run for any engine platform this is the motivation for this study. The major benefit of this model is the ability for it to predict the combustion trajectory, i.e. local temperature and equivalence ratio in the burning zones. The model successfully captures all the expected trends based on the experimental data and even highlights an opportunity for simply using the average reaction temperature and equivalence ratio as an indicator of emissions levels alone - without solving formation sub-models. This general type of modeling effort is not new, but a major effort was made to minimize the calculation duration to enable implementation as an input to real-time next-cycle engine controller Instead of simply using the predicted engine out soot and NOx levels, control decisions could be made based on the trajectory. This has the potential to save large amounts of calibration time because with minor tuning (the model has only one automatically determined constant) it is hoped that the control algorithm would be generally applicable.

  10. Chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids: privileged Brønsted acid organocatalysts for C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zamfir, Alexandru; Schenker, Sebastian; Freund, Matthias; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2010-12-07

    BINOL-derived phosphoric acids have emerged during the last five years as powerful chiral Brønsted acid catalysts in many enantioselective processes. The most successful transformations carried out with chiral BINOL phosphates include C-C bond formation reactions. The recent advances have been reviewed in this article with a focus being placed on hydrocyanations, aldol-type, Mannich, Friedel-Crafts, aza-ene-type, Diels-Alder, as well as cascade and multi-component reactions.

  11. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g., formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low and high NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after 4 days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to 8 days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields, i.e., ~15 % (low NOx) to ~45 % (high NOx) for α-pinene, ~15 % for toluene, ~25 % for C12 n-alkane, and ~10 % for C16 n-alkane. The small effect of gas-phase photolysis on low-volatility n-alkanes such as C16 n-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase, where they are protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass is increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an empirically estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA

  12. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g. formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low- and high-NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after four days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to eight days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields i.e ~15% (low-NOx) to ~45% (high-NOx) for α-pinene, ~15% for toluene, ~25% for C12-alkane, and ~10% for C16-alkane. The small effect on low volatility n-alkanes such as C16-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase where they are assumed to be protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass seems increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas-phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA=4 x 10-4JNO2. Modeling

  13. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement.

  14. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  15. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  16. Acrylamide formation from asparagine under low-moisture Maillard reaction conditions. 1. Physical and chemical aspects in crystalline model systems.

    PubMed

    Robert, Fabien; Vuataz, Gilles; Pollien, Philippe; Saucy, Françoise; Alonso, Maria-Isabelle; Bauwens, Isabelle; Blank, Imre

    2004-11-03

    The formation of acrylamide in crystalline model systems based on asparagine and reducing sugars was investigated under low-moisture reaction conditions. The acrylamide amounts were correlated with physical changes occurring during the reaction. Molecular mobility of the precursors turned out to be a critical parameter in solid systems, which is linked to the melting behavior and the release of crystallization water of the reaction sample. Heating binary mixtures of asparagine monohydrate and anhydrous reducing sugars led to higher acrylamide amounts in the presence of fructose compared to glucose. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements performed in open systems indicated melting of fructose at 126 degrees C, whereas glucose and galactose fused at 157 and 172 degrees C, respectively. However, glucose was the most reactive and fructose the least efficient sugar in anhydrous liquid systems, indicating that at given molecular mobility the chemical reactivity of the sugar was the major driver in acrylamide formation. Furthermore, reaction time and temperature were found to be covariant parameters: acrylamide was preferably formed by reacting glucose and asparagine at 120 degrees C for 60 min, whereas 160 degrees C was required at shorter reaction time (5 min). These results suggest that, in addition to the chemical reactivity of ingredients, their physical state as well as reaction temperature and time would influence the formation of acrylamide during food processing.

  17. Detecting transmissive bedrock fracture zones under cover of glacial formations using residential water-well production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Madan; Eckstein, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    Tracing fractures under glacial drift commonly involves costly and often unfeasible (in populated areas) geophysical methods or outcrop surveys, often far from the area of interest. A hypothesis is tested, that the specific capacity data for wells penetrating through glacial drift into a bedrock aquifer display two statistical populations: assuming uniform well construction, the wells with high specific capacity penetrate transmissive fracture zones, while those with low specific capacity encounter non-fractured rock characterized by primary porosity. The hypothesis was tested on 617 wells drilled into the Pennsylvanian Sharon Sandstone, Geauga County, Ohio (USA). Hydraulic conductivity, calculated using the Cooper and Jacob (1946) approximation to Theis' non-equilibrium radial flow equation, followed quasi-log-normal distribution (geometric mean 9.88 × 10-6 m/s). The lower values presumably correspond to primary porosity, and higher values correspond to bedrock fracture zones. The higher hydraulic conductivity followed two distinct orientations (N34°E, N44°W), corresponding with the regional fracture pattern of the Allegheny Plateau. A variogram showed that the wells within a kilometer of each other correlate and that wells penetrating the thicker glacial blanket have lower hydraulic conductivity and larger drawdown. Cooper and Jacob (1946) A generalized graphical method for evaluating formation constants and summarizing well-field history, Am. Geoph. Union Trans. 27/4:526-534.

  18. Late Hesperian plains formation and degradation in a low sedimentation zone of the northern lowlands of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, José Alexis Palmero; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Berman, Daniel C.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2010-11-01

    The plains materials that form the martian northern lowlands suggest large-scale sedimentation in this part of the planet. The general view is that these sedimentary materials were transported from zones of highland erosion via outflow channels and other fluvial systems. The study region, the northern circum-polar plains south of Gemini Scopuli on Planum Boreum, comprises the only extensive zone in the martian northern lowlands that does not include sub-basin floors nor is downstream from outflow channel systems. Therefore, within this zone, the ponding of fluids and fluidized sediments associated with outflow channel discharges is less likely to have taken place relative to sub-basin areas that form the other northern circum-polar plains surrounding Planum Boreum. Our findings indicate that during the Late Hesperian sedimentary deposits produced by the erosion of an ancient cratered landscape, as well as via sedimentary volcanism, were regionally emplaced to form extensive plains materials within the study region. The distribution and magnitude of surface degradation suggest that groundwater emergence from an aquifer that extended from the Arabia Terra cratered highlands to the northern lowlands took place non-catastrophically and regionally within the study region through faulted upper crustal materials. In our model the margin of the Utopia basin adjacent to the study region may have acted as a boundary to this aquifer. Partial destruction and dehydration of these Late Hesperian plains, perhaps induced by high thermal anomalies resulting from the low thermal conductivity of these materials, led to the formation of extensive knobby fields and pedestal craters. During the Early Amazonian, the rates of regional resurfacing within the study region decreased significantly; perhaps because the knobby ridges forming the eroded impact crater rims and contractional ridges consisted of thermally conductive indurated materials, thereby inducing freezing of the tectonically

  19. Late Hesperian plains formation and degradation in a low sedimentation zone of the northern lowlands of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Berman, D.C.; Kargel, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    The plains materials that form the martian northern lowlands suggest large-scale sedimentation in this part of the planet. The general view is that these sedimentary materials were transported from zones of highland erosion via outflow channels and other fluvial systems. The study region, the northern circum-polar plains south of Gemini Scopuli on Planum Boreum, comprises the only extensive zone in the martian northern lowlands that does not include sub-basin floors nor is downstream from outflow channel systems. Therefore, within this zone, the ponding of fluids and fluidized sediments associated with outflow channel discharges is less likely to have taken place relative to sub-basin areas that form the other northern circum-polar plains surrounding Planum Boreum. Our findings indicate that during the Late Hesperian sedimentary deposits produced by the erosion of an ancient cratered landscape, as well as via sedimentary volcanism, were regionally emplaced to form extensive plains materials within the study region. The distribution and magnitude of surface degradation suggest that groundwater emergence from an aquifer that extended from the Arabia Terra cratered highlands to the northern lowlands took place non-catastrophically and regionally within the study region through faulted upper crustal materials. In our model the margin of the Utopia basin adjacent to the study region may have acted as a boundary to this aquifer. Partial destruction and dehydration of these Late Hesperian plains, perhaps induced by high thermal anomalies resulting from the low thermal conductivity of these materials, led to the formation of extensive knobby fields and pedestal craters. During the Early Amazonian, the rates of regional resurfacing within the study region decreased significantly; perhaps because the knobby ridges forming the eroded impact crater rims and contractional ridges consisted of thermally conductive indurated materials, thereby inducing freezing of the tectonically

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from gasoline vehicle emissions in a new mobile environmental reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Zardini, A. A.; Clairotte, M.; Astorga, C.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Marchand, N.; Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; Möhler, O.; Richter, R.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-09-01

    We present a new mobile environmental reaction chamber for the simulation of the atmospheric aging of different emission sources without limitation from the instruments or facilities available at any single site. Photochemistry is simulated using a set of 40 UV lights (total power 4 KW). Characterisation of the emission spectrum of these lights shows that atmospheric aging of emissions may be simulated over a range of temperatures (-7 to 25 °C). A photolysis rate of NO2, JNO2, of (8.0 ± 0.7) × 10-3 s-1 was determined at 25 °C. We demonstrate the utility of this new system by presenting results on the aging (OH = 12 × 106 cm-3 h) of emissions from a modern (Euro 5) gasoline car operated during a driving cycle (New European Driving Cycle, NEDC) on a chassis dynamometer in a vehicle test cell. Emissions from the entire NEDC were sampled and aged in the chamber. Total organic aerosol (OA; primary organic aerosol (POA) emission + secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation) was (369.8-397.5)10-3 g kg-1 fuel, or (13.2-15.4) × 10-3 g km-1, after aging, with aged OA/POA in the range 9-15. A thorough investigation of the composition of the gas phase emissions suggests that the observed SOA is from previously unconsidered precursors and processes. This large enhancement in particulate matter mass from gasoline vehicle aerosol emissions due to SOA formation, if it occurs across a wider range of gasoline vehicles, would have significant implications for our understanding of the contribution of on-road gasoline vehicles to ambient aerosols.

  1. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Formation of the Stimson Sedimentary Unit and Altered Fracture Zones at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Ming, D. W.; Peretyazhko, T.; Rampe, E. B.

    2017-01-01

    Water flowing through sediments at Gale Crater, Mars created environments that were likely habitable, and sampled basin-wide hydrological systems. However, many questions remain about these environments and the fluids that generated them. Measurements taken by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity of multiple fracture zones can help constrain the environments that formed them because they can be compared to nearby associated parent material (Figure 1). For example, measurements of altered fracture zones from the target Greenhorn in the Stimson sandstone can be compared to parent material measured in the nearby Big Sky target, allowing constraints to be placed on the alteration conditions that formed the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target. Similarly, CheMin measurements of the powdered < 150 micron fraction from the drillhole at Big Sky and sample from the Rocknest eolian deposit indicate that the mineralogies are strikingly similar. The main differences are the presence of olivine in the Rocknest eolian deposit, which is absent in the Big Sky target, and the presence of far more abundant Fe oxides in the Big Sky target. Quantifying the changes between the Big Sky target and the Rocknest eolian deposit can therefore help us understand the diagenetic changes that occurred forming the Stimson sedimentary unit. In order to interpret these aqueous changes, we performed reactive transport modeling of 1) the formation of the Big Sky target from a Rocknest eolian deposit-like parent material, and 2) the formation of the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target. This work allows us to test the relationships between the targets and the characteristics of the aqueous conditions that formed the Greenhorn target from the Big Sky target, and the Big Sky target from a Rocknest eolian deposit-like parent material.

  2. Discrete approximations of detonation flows with structured detonation reaction zones by discontinuous front models: A program burn algorithm based on detonation shock dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, J.B.; Jackson, T.L.; Stewart, D.S.

    1999-02-02

    In the design of explosive systems the generic problem that one must consider is the propagation of a well-developed detonation wave sweeping through an explosive charge with a complex shape. At a given instant of time the lead detonation shock is a surface that occupies a region of the explosive and has a dimension that is characteristic of the explosive device, typically on the scale of meters. The detonation shock is powered by a detonation reaction zone, sitting immediately behind the shock, which is on the scale of 1 millimeter or less. Thus, the ratio of the reaction zone thickness to the device dimension is of the order of 1/1,000 or less. This scale disparity can lead to great difficulties in computing three-dimensional detonation dynamics. An attack on the dilemma for the computation of detonation systems has lead to the invention of sub-scale models for a propagating detonation front that they refer to herein as program burn models. The program burn model seeks not to resolve the fine scale of the reaction zone in the sense of a DNS simulation. The goal of a program burn simulation is to resolve the hydrodynamics in the inert product gases on a grid much coarser than that required to resolve a physical reaction zone. The authors first show that traditional program burn algorithms for detonation hydrocodes used for explosive design are inconsistent and yield incorrect shock dynamic behavior. To overcome these inconsistencies, they are developing a new class of program burn models based on detonation shock dynamic (DSD) theory. It is hoped that this new class will yield a consistent and robust algorithm which reflects the correct shock dynamic behavior.

  3. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  4. The effect of reactions on the formation and readout of the gradient of Bicoid.

    PubMed

    Ipiña, Emiliano Perez; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2017-02-08

    During early development, the establishment of gradients of transcriptional factors determines the patterning of cell fates. The case of Bicoid (Bcd) in Drosophila melanogaster embryos is well documented and studied. There are still controversies as to whether SDD models in which Bcd is Synthesized at one end, then Diffuses and is Degraded can explain the gradient formation within the timescale observed experimentally. The Bcd gradient is observed in embryos that express a Bicoid-eGFP fusion protein (Bcd-GFP) which cannot differentiate if Bcd is freely diffusing or bound to immobile sites. In this work we analyze an SDID model that includes the Interaction of Bcd with binding sites. We simulate numerically the resulting full reaction-diffusion system in a cylindrical domain using previously determined biophysical parameters and a simplified version of the Bcd source. In this way we obtain solutions that depend on the spatial location approximately as observed experimentally and that reach such dependence at a time that is also compatible with the experimental observations. Analyzing the differences between the free and bound Bcd distributions we observe that the latter spans over a longer lengthscale. We conclude that deriving the lengthscale from the distribution of Bcd-GFP can lead to an overestimation of the gradient lengthscale and of the Hill coefficient that relates the concentrations of Bcd and of the protein, Hunchback, whose production is regulated by Bcd.

  5. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  6. Formation of Vibrationally Excited OH by the Reaction H + O(3).

    PubMed

    Charters, P E; Macdonald, R G; Polanyi, J C

    1971-08-01

    An earlier study [Chem. Phys. Lett. 1, 619 (1968)] concluded that the reaction H + O(3) ? OH + O(2) forms OH predominantly in the highest accessible vibrational levels, upsilon = 8 and 9. We have extended this earlier work (1) by using fourier transform spectroscopy which is capable of giving more precise values for the relative vibrational populations at low intensities, (2) by recording emission down to lower background pressures (1 x 10(-4) Torr), and (3) by treating the vessel walls so as to remove OHdagger (vibrationally excited OH in it ground (2)II electronic state) more effectively. This involved using a room temperature vessel coated with silica gel. Under these conditions (provided that the values available for the radiational lifetime of OHdagger are correct) vibrational relaxation of OHdagger should have been largely arrested. We conclude that the relative rate constants for formation of OHdagger in levels upsilon are k(upsilon = 6) < 0.4, k(upsilon = 7) asymptotically equal to 0.4, k(upsilon = 8) asymptotically equal to 0.8, and k(upsilon = 9) = 1.00.

  7. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-09-04

    In this paper, we used mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy to discover that the length of the alkylene-bridging groups had a pronounced effect on the competition between cyclization and polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and on the formation of polymeric gels. While the intramolecular reaction clearly slows gelation, the cyclic disilsesquioxanes are still tetrafunctional monomers theoretically capable of forming polymeric gels. If the ring structures, which bear a striking resemblence to carbohydrates, are preserved through the polymerization, the resulting poly(cyclic disilsesquioxane) gels may have structural similarities to branched or cross-linked carbohydrates, such as cellulose or chitosan. Under base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization conditions, 3 and 4 (six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes, respectively) quickly reacted to give gels with significant ring opening as determined from the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts in solid-state (CP MAS) NMR spectra. However, gels prepared under acidic conditions reveal some or all of the cyclic disilsesquioxane functionality was preserved in the polymers. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Stochastic Modeling of CO2 Migrations and Chemical Reactions in Deep Saline Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.; Lee, I.; Lin, C.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been recognized the feasible technology that can significant reduce the anthropogenic CO2 emissions from large point sources. The CO2 injection in geological formations is one of the options to permanently store the captured CO2. Based on this concept a large number of target formations have been identified and intensively investigated with different types of techniques such as the hydrogeophysical experiments or numerical simulations. The numerical simulations of CO2 migrations in saline formations recently gather much attention because a number of models are available for this purpose and there are potential sites existing in many countries. The lower part of Cholan Formation (CF) near Changhua Coastal Industrial Park (CCIP) in west central Taiwan was identified the largest potential site for CO2 sequestration. The top elevations of the KF in this area varies from 1300 to 1700m below the sea level. Laboratory experiment showed that the permeability of CF is 10-14 to 10-12 m2. Over the years the offshore seismic survey and limited onshore borehole logs have provided information for the simulation of CO2 migration in the CF although the original investigations might not focus on the purpose of CO2 sequestration. In this study we modify the TOUGHREACT model to consider the small-scale heterogeneity in target formation and the cap rock of upper CF. A Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) approach based on the TOUGHREACT model is employed to quantify the effect of small-scale heterogeneity on the CO2 migrations and hydrochemical reactions in the CF. We assume that the small-scale variability of permeability in KF can be described with a known Gaussian distribution. Therefore, the Gaussian type random field generator such as Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGSIM) in Geostatistical Software Library (GSLIB) can be used to provide the random permeability realizations for the MCS. A variety of statistical parameters such as the variances and

  9. Massive Formation of Equiaxed Crystals by Avalanches of Mushy Zone Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A.; Stefan-Kharicha, M.; Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.

    2017-03-01

    It is well known that the growth and motion of equiaxed crystals govern important microstructural features, especially in larger castings such as heavy ingots. To determine the origin of the equiaxed crystals, heterogeneous nucleation, and/or fragmentation of dendrite arms from columnar regions are often discussed. In the present study, we demonstrate that under certain conditions relatively large areas of mushy regions slide downward and form spectacular crystal avalanches. These avalanches crumble into thousands of dendritic fragments, whereby the larger fragments immediately sediment and the smaller proceed to behave as equiaxed crystals. Traces of such crystal avalanches can be seen by conspicuous equiaxed layers in the lower part of the casting. From the arguments in the discussion, it is believed that such a phenomenon may occur in alloys which reveal an upward solutal buoyancy in the interdendritic mush. This would include certain steels and other alloys such as Cu-Al, Pb-Sn, or Ni-Al-alloys. Moreover, the occurrence of crystal avalanches contribute to the formation of V-segregations.

  10. THE GAS PHASE REACTION OF OZONE WITH 1,3-BUTADIENE: FORMATION YIELDS OF SOME TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product yields. In separa...

  11. Formation of Po isotopes in the reactions {sup 27}Al + {sup 175}Lu and {sup 31}P + {sup 169}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A.N.; Bogdanov, D.D.; Eremin, A.V.

    1995-05-01

    The excitation functions and the cross sections for the formation of {sup 192-198}Po isotopes in the reactions {sup 27}Al + {sup 175}Lu and {sup 31}P + {sup 169}Tm are measured. A comparison of the results obtained for these reactions with the data on the cross sections for the formation of Po isotopes in the reaction {sup 100}Mo + {sup 92-100}Mo leads to the conclusion that the characteristics of the evaporation channel do not depend on the mass of the bombarding ion up to the complete symmetry in the input channel. It is shown that the experimental data can be adequately described using the statistical approach to the deexcitation of a compound nucleus only under the assumption that the liquid-drop fission barrier is reduced significantly for neutron-deficient Po isotopes. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Formate-derived H2 , a driver of hydrogenotrophic processes in the root-zone of a methane-emitting fen.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Sindy; Schmidt, Oliver; Gößner, Anita S; Drake, Harold L

    2016-09-01

    Wetlands are important sources of globally emitted methane. Plants mediate much of that emission by releasing root-derived organic carbon, including formate, a direct precursor of methane. Thus, the objective of this study was to resolve formate-driven processes potentially linked to methanogenesis in the fen root-zone. Although, formate was anticipated to directly trigger methanogenesis, the rapid anaerobic consumption of formate by Carex roots unexpectedly yielded H2 and CO2 via enzymes such as formate-H2 -lyase (FHL), and likewise appeared to enhance the utilization of organic carbon. Collectively, 57 [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenase-containing family level phylotypes potentially linked to FHL activity were detected. Under anoxic conditions, root-derived fermentative Citrobacter and Hafnia isolates produced H2 from formate via FHL. Formate-derived H2 fueled methanogenesis and acetogenesis, and methanogenic (Methanoregula, Methanobacterium, Methanocella) and acetogenic (Acetonema, Clostridum, Sporomusa) genera potentially linked to these hydrogenotrophic activities were identified. The findings (i) provide novel insights on highly diverse root-associated FHL-containing taxa that can augment secondary hydrogenotrophic processes via the production of formate-derived H2 , (ii) demonstrate that formate can have a 'priming' effect on the utilization of organic carbon, and (iii) raise questions regarding the fate of formate-derived H2 when it diffuses away from the root-zone.

  13. Gas-phase enthalpies of formation and enthalpies of sublimation of amino acids based on isodesmic reaction calculations.

    PubMed

    Dorofeeva, Olga V; Ryzhova, Oxana N

    2014-05-15

    Accurate gas-phase enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°) of 20 common α-amino acids, seven uncommon amino acids, and three small peptides were calculated by combining G4 theory calculations with an isodesmic reaction approach. The internal consistency over a set of ΔfH298°(g) values was achieved by sequential adjustment of their values through the isodesmic reactions. Four amino acids, alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and glycine, with reliable internally self-consistent experimental data, were chosen as the key reference compounds. These amino acids together with about 100 compounds with reliable experimental data (their accuracy was supported by G4 calculations) were used to estimate the enthalpies of formation of remaining amino acids. All of the amino acids with the previously established enthalpies of formation were later used as the reference species in the isodesmic reactions for the other amino acids. A systematic comparison was made of 14 experimentally determined enthalpies of formation with the results of calculations. The experimental enthalpies of formation for 10 amino acids were reproduced with good accuracy, but the experimental and calculated values for 4 compounds differed by 11–21 kJ/mol. For these species, the theoretical ΔfH298°(g) values were suggested as more reliable than the experimental values. On the basis of theoretical results, the recommended values for the gas-phase enthalpies of formation were also provided for amino acids for which the experimental ΔfH298°(g) were not available. The enthalpies of sublimation were evaluated for all compounds by taking into account the literature data on the solid-phase enthalpies of formation and the ΔfH298°(g) values recommended in our work. A special attention was paid to the accurate prediction of enthalpies of formation of amino acids from the atomization reactions. The problems associated with conformational flexibility of these compounds and harmonic treatment of low frequency torsional

  14. Hydroxyl radical induced by lipid in Maillard reaction model system promotes diet-derived N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine formation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lipeng; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhao, Di; Li, Yuting; Xu, Zhenbo; Liu, Guoqin

    2013-10-01

    N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) is commonly found in food, and is considered as a potential hazard to human health. However, the effect of lipids on CML formation in Maillard reaction is still not clarified. In this study, the content of diet-derived CML and its key intermediates, epsilon-fructoselysine (FL) and glyoxal (GO), is determined with high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrum (HPLC-MS) in model system containing lipid compounds. According to the results, hydroxyl radical (OH) induced by Fenton reagent can promote the three pathways of CML formation. Moreover, in the Maillard reaction system, linoleic acid (Lin), oleic acid (Ole) and glycerol trioleate (Tri) can induce more OH·, which promotes CML formation. Their level of promoting CML formation is in the order of Ole>Lin>Tri. On the contrary, glycerol (Gly) can scavenge OH·, which inhibit the CML formation. Finally, it is proved that FL content and GO content decreases with heating time in model system, while CML content increases with heating time. Thus, it is concluded that in the Maillard reaction system lipids can induce more OH·, which promotes the conversion from FL and GO to CML. Our research may contribute to the development of inhibitory methods for diet-derived CML by scavenging OH·.

  15. Reaction pathways of glucose during esterification: effects of reaction parameters on the formation of humin type polymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xun; Lievens, Caroline; Larcher, Alfons; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2011-11-01

    The formation of humin-type polymers and other products during exposure of glucose to methanol/water mixtures with methanol/water mass ratios from 10 to 0.22 in the presence of the acid catalyst Amberlyst 70 was investigated. In water-rich medium (methanol/water mass ratio: 0.22), dehydration of glucose produced 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), furfural, and substantial amounts of polymer. In methanol-rich medium (methanol/water mass ratio: 10), the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups of glucose, HMF or furfural were protected via etherification and acetalisation. These protections stabilized these reactive compounds and significantly lowered the polymer formation (1.43% of the glucose loaded). The polymerization of glucose and HMF was also favored at high temperatures and long residence times. Conversely, high catalyst dosage mainly accelerated the conversion of glucose to methyl levulinate. Thus, the polymerization of glucose and HMF can be suppressed in methanol/water mixtures with high methanol ratios, at low temperatures and short residence times.

  16. Secondary organic aerosol formation from gasoline vehicle emissions in a new mobile environmental reaction chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Zardini, A. A.; Clairotte, M.; Astorga, C.; Wolf, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Marchand, N.; Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; Möhler, O.; Richter, R.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new mobile environmental reaction chamber for the simulation of the atmospheric aging of aerosols from different emissions sources without limitation from the instruments or facilities available at any single site. The chamber can be mounted on a trailer for transport to host facilities or for mobile measurements. Photochemistry is simulated using a set of 40 UV lights (total power 4 KW). Characterisation of the emission spectrum of these lights shows that atmospheric photochemistry can be accurately simulated over a range of temperatures from -7-25 °C. A photolysis rate of NO2, JNO2, of (8.0 ± 0.7) × 10-3 molecules cm-3 s-1 was determined at 25 °C. Further, we present the first application of the mobile chamber and demonstrate its utility by quantifying primary organic aerosol (POA) emission and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production from a Euro 5 light duty gasoline vehicle. Exhaust emissions were sampled during the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), the standard driving cycle for European regulatory purposes, and injected into the chamber. The relative concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and total hydrocarbon (THC) during the aging of emissions inside the chamber were controlled using an injection system developed as a part of the new mobile chamber set up. Total OA (POA + SOA) emission factors of (370 ± 18) × 10-3 g kg-1 fuel, or (14.6 ± 0.8) × 10-3 g km-1, after aging, were calculated from concentrations measured inside the smog chamber during two experiments. The average SOA/POA ratio for the two experiments was 15.1, a much larger increase than has previously been seen for diesel vehicles, where smog chamber studies have found SOA/POA ratios of 1.3-1.7. Due to this SOA formation, carbonaceous particulate matter (PM) emissions from a gasoline vehicle may approach those of a diesel vehicle of the same class. Furthermore, with the advent of emission controls requiring the use of diesel particle filters, gasoline vehicle emissions

  17. Ozone consumption and volatile byproduct formation from surface reactions with aircraft cabin materials and clothing fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Beverly K.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

    We measured ozone consumption and byproduct formation on materials commonly found in aircraft cabins at flight-relevant conditions. Two series of small-chamber experiments were conducted, with most runs at low relative humidity (10%) and high air-exchange rate (˜20 h -1). New and used cabin materials (seat fabric, carpet, and plastic) and laundered and worn clothing fabrics (cotton, polyester, and wool) were studied. We measured ozone deposition to many material samples, and we measured ozone uptake and primary and secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subset of samples. Deposition velocities ranged from 0.06 to 0.54 cm s -1. Emissions of VOCs were higher with ozone than without ozone in every case. The most commonly detected secondary emissions were C 1 through C 10 saturated aldehydes and the squalene oxidation products 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and acetone. For the compounds measured, summed VOC emission rates in the presence of 55-128 ppb (residual level) ozone ranged from 1.0 to 8.9 μmol h -1 m -2. Total byproduct yield ranged from 0.07 to 0.24 moles of product volatilized per mole of ozone consumed. Results were used to estimate the relative contribution of different materials to ozone deposition and byproduct emissions in a typical aircraft cabin. The dominant contributor to both was clothing fabrics, followed by seat fabric. Results indicate that ozone reactions with surfaces substantially reduce the ozone concentration in the cabin but also generate volatile byproducts of potential concern for the health and comfort of passengers and crew.

  18. Effects of the pouring temperature on the formation of the bonding zone between AZ91 and AlSi17 in the compound casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mola, R.; Bucki, T.; Dziadoń, A.

    2017-02-01

    The compound casting process was used to join AZ91 magnesium alloy to AlSi17 aluminium alloy. Liquid AZ91 was poured onto a solid AlSi17 insert placed in a steel mould heated to 370 °C. The experimental results showed that the temperature of the AZ91 melt affected the formation of the bonding zone between the two alloys. A continuous bonding zone was formed by applying a pouring temperature of 650 °C. The use of higher temperatures, i.e. 680 °C and 700 °C, did not lead to the formation of a continuous metallurgical transition zone at the AZ91/AlSi17 interface. The bonding zone was analysed using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) detector. The structural constituents of the bonding zone near the AlSi17 alloy were: an Al3Mg2 intermetallic phase, primary Si particles surrounded by a rim of an Mg2Si intermetallic phase and fine Mg2Si particles. The area of the bonding zone that was adjacent to the AZ91 alloy had a eutectic structure composed of an Mg17Al12 intermetallic phase and a solid solution of Al and Si in Mg.

  19. Electronic structure and formation of simple ferryloxo complexes: mechanism of the Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Petit, Alban S; Pennifold, Robert C R; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2014-07-07

    The Fenton reaction is a famous reaction in inorganic chemistry, with relevance to topics such as bioinorganic oxidation and fundamental redox chemistry of water and oxygen. It is also a reaction concerning which there has been very extensive mechanistic debate, with experimental and computational work leading to extensive evidence concerning its mechanism-not all of which is consistent. Here, we use this reaction as a challenge to modern electronic structure theory methods and show that density functional theory, when validated by accurate ab initio methods, can yield a picture of this reaction that is consistent with experiment. The article also highlights some of the challenges in accurate studies of reaction mechanisms of ionic species in water solution.

  20. Diamond formation in the deep lower mantle: a high-pressure reaction of MgCO3 and SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fumiya; Ohtani, Eiji; Kamada, Seiji; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Diamond is an evidence for carbon existing in the deep Earth. Some diamonds are considered to have originated at various depth ranges from the mantle transition zone to the lower mantle. These diamonds are expected to carry significant information about the deep Earth. Here, we determined the phase relations in the MgCO3-SiO2 system up to 152 GPa and 3,100 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. MgCO3 transforms from magnesite to the high-pressure polymorph of MgCO3, phase II, above 80 GPa. A reaction between MgCO3 phase II and SiO2 (CaCl2-type SiO2 or seifertite) to form diamond and MgSiO3 (bridgmanite or post-perovsktite) was identified in the deep lower mantle conditions. These observations suggested that the reaction of the MgCO3 phase II with SiO2 causes formation of super-deep diamond in cold slabs descending into the deep lower mantle. PMID:28084421

  1. Diamond formation in the deep lower mantle: a high-pressure reaction of MgCO3 and SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Fumiya; Ohtani, Eiji; Kamada, Seiji; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Diamond is an evidence for carbon existing in the deep Earth. Some diamonds are considered to have originated at various depth ranges from the mantle transition zone to the lower mantle. These diamonds are expected to carry significant information about the deep Earth. Here, we determined the phase relations in the MgCO3-SiO2 system up to 152 GPa and 3,100 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. MgCO3 transforms from magnesite to the high-pressure polymorph of MgCO3, phase II, above 80 GPa. A reaction between MgCO3 phase II and SiO2 (CaCl2-type SiO2 or seifertite) to form diamond and MgSiO3 (bridgmanite or post-perovsktite) was identified in the deep lower mantle conditions. These observations suggested that the reaction of the MgCO3 phase II with SiO2 causes formation of super-deep diamond in cold slabs descending into the deep lower mantle.

  2. Cellular Automata for Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation from Reaction-Diffusion Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shousuke; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Ultradiscrete equations are derived from a set of reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and cellular automaton rules are obtained on the basis of the ultradiscrete equations. Some rules reproduce the dynamical properties of the original reaction-diffusion equations, namely, bistability and pulse annihilation. Furthermore, other rules bring about soliton-like preservation and periodic pulse generation with a pacemaker, which are not obtained from the original reaction-diffusion equations.

  3. The C(3P) + NH3 Reaction in Interstellar Chemistry. I. Investigation of the Product Formation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgalais, Jérémy; Capron, Michael; Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar; Osborn, David L.; Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Goulay, Fabien; Le Picard, Sébastien D.

    2015-10-01

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzle technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. Kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.

  4. The C(3P) + NH3 reaction in interstellar chemistry. I. Investigation of the product formation channels

    DOE PAGES

    Bourgalais, Jeremy; Capron, Michael; Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam; ...

    2015-10-13

    The product formation channels of ground state carbon atoms, C(3P), reacting with ammonia, NH3, have been investigated using two complementary experiments and electronic structure calculations. Reaction products are detected in a gas flow tube experiment (330 K, 4 Torr) using tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry. Temporal profiles of the species formed and photoionization spectra are used to identify primary products of the C + NH3 reaction. In addition, H-atom formation is monitored by VUV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) from room temperature to 50 K in a supersonic gas flow generated by the Laval nozzlemore » technique. Electronic structure calculations are performed to derive intermediates, transition states, and complexes formed along the reaction coordinate. The combination of photoionization and LIF experiments supported by theoretical calculations indicate that in the temperature and pressure range investigated, the H + H2CN production channel represents 100% of the product yield for this reaction. As a result, kinetics measurements of the title reaction down to 50 K and the effect of the new rate constants on interstellar nitrogen hydride abundances using a model of dense interstellar clouds are reported in Paper II.« less

  5. Branching ratios in the N + CH3 reaction - Formation of the methylene amidogen (H2CN) radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, G.; Nesbitt, F. L.; Stief, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    The discharge-flow mass spectrometer system described by Brunning and Stief (1986) and Nejad et al. (1988) is used to determine the branching ratios for the reaction N + CH3. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail, and the implications for HCN formation in the atmosphere of Titan are considered. It is found that the main reaction channel at room temperature is H2CN + H, with about 10 percent giving HCN + H2; no isotope effects are seen when CH3 is replaced with CD3, and the branching ratios appear to be temperature-independent.

  6. Formation of novel nucleosides from free base and sugar phosphate: aqueous reaction of 2-aminopyrimidine and ribose-5-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Mace, D C

    1983-11-30

    The facile formation of glycosylamines suggests that a base liberated by depurination might react at the free C1 position of the sugar phosphate from which it had been hydrolyzed, effectively repurinating the site. Model experiments testing this hypothesis demonstrate that such a reaction does take place. The primary product of a reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine (a model for guanine) and ribose-5-phosphate is characterized by enzymatic and chemical degradation, and UV spectra. It is shown to be a novel nucleoside with the base attached via its exocyclic amino group to the C1 of the ribose-5-phosphate.

  7. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  8. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  9. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be repeated as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques developed at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that we have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time.

  10. A high affinity RIM-binding protein/Aplip1 interaction prevents the formation of ectopic axonal active zones

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Matthias; Böhme, Mathias A; Driller, Jan H; Babikir, Husam; Mampell, Malou M; Rey, Ulises; Ramesh, Niraja; Matkovic, Tanja; Holton, Nicole; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Göttfert, Fabian; Kamin, Dirk; Quentin, Christine; Klinedinst, Susan; Andlauer, Till FM; Hell, Stefan W; Collins, Catherine A; Wahl, Markus C; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) fuse at active zones (AZs) covered by a protein scaffold, at Drosophila synapses comprised of ELKS family member Bruchpilot (BRP) and RIM-binding protein (RBP). We here demonstrate axonal co-transport of BRP and RBP using intravital live imaging, with both proteins co-accumulating in axonal aggregates of several transport mutants. RBP, via its C-terminal Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains, binds Aplip1/JIP1, a transport adaptor involved in kinesin-dependent SV transport. We show in atomic detail that RBP C-terminal SH3 domains bind a proline-rich (PxxP) motif of Aplip1/JIP1 with submicromolar affinity. Pointmutating this PxxP motif provoked formation of ectopic AZ-like structures at axonal membranes. Direct interactions between AZ proteins and transport adaptors seem to provide complex avidity and shield synaptic interaction surfaces of pre-assembled scaffold protein transport complexes, thus, favouring physiological synaptic AZ assembly over premature assembly at axonal membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06935.001 PMID:26274777

  11. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  12. Opaque Mineral Assemblages at Chondrule Boundaries in the Vigarano CV Chondrite: Evidence for Gas-Solid Reactions Following Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of opaque minerals in primitive ordinary chondrites suggest that metal grains exposed at chondrule boundaries were corroded when volatile elements recondensed after the transient heating event responsible for chondrule formation. Metal grains at chondrule boundaries in the Bishunpur (LL3.1) chondrite are rimmed by troilite and fayalite. If these layers formed by gas solid reaction, then the composition of the corrosion products can provide information on the chondrule formation environment. Given the broad similarities among chondrules from different chondrite groups, similar scale layers should occur on chondrules in other primitive meteorite groups. Here I report on metal grains at chondrule boundaries in Vigarano (CV3).

  13. Studying Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone using 22 GHz Water and 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; SWAG

    2016-01-01

    The inner 400 pc of our Galaxy, or the so-called the central molecular zone (CMZ), has a unique environment with a large mass of dense, warm molecular gas. One of the premier questions is how star formation (SF) differs in this unique environment from elsewhere in the Galaxy. We intend to address this issue by identifying improved numbers and locations of early sites of SF. We have conducted high resolution surveys of the CMZ, looking for early SF indicators such as 22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol masers. We present the initial water maser results from the SWAG survey and methanol results from the first full VLA survey of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the CMZ. These surveys span beyond the inner 1.2ο x 0.5ο of the Galaxy, including Sgr B through Sgr C. The improved spatial and spectral resolutions (~26" and 2 km s-1) and sensitivity (RMS ~10 mJy beam-1) of our ATCA observations have allowed us to identify over 140 water maser candidates in the SWAG survey. This is a factor of 3 more than detected from prior surveys of the CMZ. The preliminary distribution of these candidates appears to be uniform along Galactic longitude. Should this distribution persist for water masers associated with star formation (as opposed to those produced by evolved stars), then this result would imply a more uniform distribution of recent SF activity in the CMZ. Prior works have shown that 2/3 of the molecular gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes, and young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by IR SEDs are located predominantly at negative Galactic longitudes. A combination of these results can provide insight on the evolution of SF within the CMZ. We are currently comparing the water maser positions to other catalogs (ex. OH/IR stars) in order to distinguish between the mechanisms producing these masers. We are also currently working on determining the distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. These masers do not contain the same ambiguity as water masers as to their source

  14. Michael-type addition reactions for the in situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol)-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Chiessi, Ester; Paradossi, Gaio

    2007-01-01

    Michael-type addition reactions offer the possibility to obtain in situ formation of polymeric hydrogels in the absence of a radical mechanism for the networking process. We explored such a synthetic route for obtaining a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-based hydrogel as a potential biomaterial for applications in vitro-retinal replacement surgery. The presence of radicals in the reaction medium can represent a risk for in situ surgical treatment. To circumvent this problem we have applied nucleophilic addition to ad hoc modified PVA macromers. The gel formation has been studied with respect to the timing required in this surgery and in terms of the structural characteristics of the obtained network.

  15. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  16. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U.; Lebiedz, D.; Diehl, M.; Sager, S.; Schlöder, J.

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  17. Rapid Association Reactions at Low Pressure: Impact on the Formation of Hydrocarbons on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  18. RAPID ASSOCIATION REACTIONS AT LOW PRESSURE: IMPACT ON THE FORMATION OF HYDROCARBONS ON TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Vuitton, V.; Klippenstein, S. J. E-mail: yelle@lpl.arizona.edu E-mail: sjk@anl.gov

    2012-01-01

    Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere predict that three-body association reactions are the main production route for several major hydrocarbons. The kinetic rate constants of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore only important in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions do not depend on pressure. The possible existence of large rates at low density suggests that association reactions could significantly affect the chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere and better constraints for them are required. The kinetic parameters of these reactions are extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. However, in the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable. We therefore calculated several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reaction rates using transition state theory. The calculations indicate that association reactions are fast even at low pressure for adducts having as few as four C atoms. These drastic changes have however only moderate consequences for Titan's composition. Locally, mole fractions can vary by as much as one order of magnitude but the column-integrated production and condensation rates of hydrocarbons change only by a factor of a few. We discuss the impact of these results for the organic chemistry. It would be very interesting to check the impact of these new rate constants on other environments, such as giant and extrasolar planets as well as the interstellar medium.

  19. Analysis of the internal structure of a carbonate damage zone: Implications for the mechanisms of fault breccia formation and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausegger, Stefan; Kurz, Walter; Rabitsch, Robert; Kiechl, Eva; Brosch, Franz-Josef

    2010-09-01

    A segment of the Salzach-Ennstal fault zone (Talhof fault, Eastern Alps) shows evidence for joint nucleation by layer-parallel shear, causing the formation of joint-bounded slices oriented at high angles (65-85°) with respect to the shear zone boundary (SZB). Subsequent slice rotation resulted in joint reactivation as antithetic shears, slice kinking, and breaking-up of the individual slices into smaller fragments. The latter process, due to the longitudinal constraint of slices with impeded shear zone widening, marked the transition to cataclasite formation and fault core evolution during shear localization. Cataclasites were subsequently cemented and underwent continuous shear deformation by re-fracturing. Cement precipitation from fluids therefore played a fundamental role in the evolution of the fault zone, with a cyclic change between an open and a closed permeability system during fault evolution. Stable isotope compositions (δ 13C, δ 18O) of fault rock cements indicate a continuous equilibration between protolith-derived fragments and cements precipitated from those fluids. This points to limited fluid amounts, only temporally replenished by meteoric water, and a hydraulic gradient that directed fluid flow from the damage zone towards the fault core.

  20. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  1. Reaction mechanisms in aromatic hydrocarbon formation involving the C{sub 5}H{sub 5} cyclopentadienyl moiety

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.; Colvin, M.E.; Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Senkan, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    The quantum chemical BAC-MP4 and BAC-MP2 methods have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ring formation. In particular the authors have determined the elementary reaction steps in the conversion of two cyclopentadienyl radicals to naphthalene. This reaction mechanism is shown to be an extension of the mechanism occurring in the H atom-assisted conversion of fulvene to benzene. The net reaction involves the formation of dihydrofulvalene, which eliminates a hydrogen atom and then rearranges to form naphthalene through a series of ring closures and openings. The importance of forming the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety, which can undergo rearrangement to form three-carbon-atom ring structures, is illustrated with the C{sub 4}H{sub 7} system. The ability of hydrogen atoms to migrate around the cyclopentadienyl moiety is illustrated both for methyl-cyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, and dihydrofulvalene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, as well as for their radical species, C{sub 6}H{sub 7} and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}. The mobility of hydrogen in the cyclopentadienyl moiety plays an important role both in providing resonance-stabilized radical products and in creating the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety for ring formation. The results illustrate the radical pathway for converting five-membered rings to aromatic six-membered rings. Furthermore, the results indicate the important catalytic role of H atoms in the aromatic ring formation process.

  2. Electromagnetic containerless reaction of samarium with cobalt for the formation of samarium-cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. W.; Das, D. K.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The electromagnetic levitation technique has been used to obtain nearly stoichiometric SmCo5, with the reaction temperature controlled by a gas jet. The results of several experiments carried out at a 450 kHz, 25 kw RF power levitation facility using different reaction times and cooling rates are presented. It is shown that reaction rates achieved with the levitation technique are larger than the expected diffusion rate in the system liquid samarium-solid cobalt. It is also shown that substantial mixing occurs in the RF-levitated melt.

  3. The Role of Inorganic Polyphosphates in the Formation of Bioengineered Cartilage Incorporating a Zone of Calcified Cartilage In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe

    The development of bioengineered cartilage for replacement of damaged articular cartilage has gained momentum in recent years. One such approach has been developed in the Kandel lab, whereby cartilage is formed by seeding primary articular chondrocytes on the top surface of a porous biodegradable calcium polyphosphate (CPP) bone substitute, permitting anchorage of the tissue within the pores of the substrate; however, the interfacial shear properties of the tissue-substrate interface of these biphasic constructs are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the native cartilage-subchondral bone interface. To overcome this limitation, a strategy was devised to generate a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC), thereby mimicking the native architecture of the osteochondral junction; however, the ZCC was located slightly above the cartilage-CPP interface. Thus, it was hypothesized that polyphosphate released from the CPP substrate and accumulating in the tissue inhibits the formation of the ZCC at the tissue-substrate interface. Based on this information, a strategy was devised to generate biphasic constructs incorporating a properly located ZCC. This approach involved the application of a thin calcium phosphate film to the surfaces of porous CPP via a sol-gel procedure, thereby limiting the accumulation of polyphosphate in the cartilaginous tissue. This modification to the substrate surface did not negatively impact the quality of the in vitro-formed cartilage tissue or the ZCC. Interfacial shear testing of biphasic constructs demonstrated significantly improved interfacial shear properties in the presence of a properly located ZCC. These studies also led to the observation that chondrocytes produce endogenous polyphosphate and that its levels in deep zone cartilage appear inversely related to mineral deposition within the tissue. Using an in vitro model of cartilage calcification, it was demonstrated that polyphosphate levels are modulated in part by the inhibitory effects

  4. N-carboxymethanofuran (carbamate) formation from methanofuran and CO2 in methanogenic archaea. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the spontaneous reaction.

    PubMed

    Bartoschek, S; Vorholt, J A; Thauer, R K; Geierstanger, B H; Griesinger, C

    2000-06-01

    N-carboxymethanofuran (carbamate) formation from unprotonated methanofuran (MFR) and CO2 is the first reaction in the reduction of CO2 to methane in methanogenic archaea. The reaction proceeds spontaneously. We address here the question whether the rate of spontaneous carbamate formation is high enough to account for the observed rate of methanogenesis from CO2. The rates of carbamate formation (v1) and cleavage (v2) were determined under equilibrium conditions via 2D proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). At pH 7.0 and 300 K the second order rate constant k1* of carbamate formation from 'MFR'(MFR + MFRH+) and 'CO2' (CO2 + H2CO3 + HCO3-+ CO32-) was found to be 7 M-1.s-1 (v1 = k1* ['MFR'] ['CO2']) while the pseudo first order rate constant k2* of carbamate cleavage was 12 s-1 (v2 = k2* [carbamate]). The equilibrium constant K* = k1*/k2* = [carbamate]/['MFR']['CO2'] was 0.6 M-1 at pH 7.0 corresponding to a free energy change DeltaG degrees ' of + 1.3 kJ.mol-1. The pH and temperature dependence of k1*, of k2* and of K* were determined. From the second order rate constant k1* it was calculated that under physiological conditions the rate of spontaneous carbamate formation is of the same order as the maximal rate of methane formation and as the rate of spontaneous CO2 formation from HCO3- in methanogenic archaea, the latter being important as CO2 is mainly present as HCO3- which has to be converted to CO2 before it can react with MFR. An enzyme catalyzed carbamate formation thus appears not to be required for methanogenesis from CO2. Consistent with this conclusion is our finding that the rate of carbamate formation was not enhanced by cell extracts of Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or by purified formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase which catalyzes the reduction of N-carboxymethanofuran to N-formylmethanofuran. From the concentrations of 'CO2' and of 'MFR' determined by 1D-NMR spectroscopy and the pKa of H2CO3 and of MFRH+ the

  5. Pattern formation of a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow in the amoeboid organism Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masami

    1999-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, moves by forming a spatiotemporal pattern of contraction oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system with spatial interaction via active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. We present a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow on the basis of the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction patterns in the plasmodium. Such a coupling of reaction, diffusion, and advection is characteristic of biological systems, and is expected to be related to control mechanisms of amoeboid behavior. Using weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the envelope dynamics obeys the complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation when a bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the CGL equation through the critical wave number squared. A physiological role of pattern formation with the flow is discussed.

  6. Transient and End Silicide Phase Formation in Thin Film Ni/polycrystalline-Si Reactions for Fully Silicided Gate Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kittl,J.; Pawlak, M.; Torregiani, C.; Lauwers, A.; Demeurisse, C.; Vrancken, C.; Absil, P.; Biesemans, S.; Coia, C.; et. al

    2007-01-01

    The Ni/polycrystalline-Si thin film reaction was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction during ramp annealings, obtaining a detailed view of the formation and evolution of silicide phases in stacks of interest for fully silicided gate applications. Samples consisted of Ni (30-170 nm)/polycrystalline-Si (100 nm)/SiO2 (10-30 nm) stacks deposited on (100) Si. The dominant end phase (after full silicidation) was found to be well controlled by the deposited Ni to polycrystalline-Si thickness ratio (tNi/tSi), with formation of NiSi2 ( {approx} 600 C), NiSi ( {approx} 400 C), Ni3Si2 ( {approx} 500 C), Ni2Si, Ni31Si12 ( {approx} 420 C), and Ni3Si ( {approx} 600 C) in stacks with tNi/tSi of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively. NiSi and Ni31Si12 were observed to precede formation of NiSi2 and Ni3Si, respectively, as expected for the phase sequence conventionally reported. Formation of Ni2Si was observed at early stages of the reaction. These studies revealed, in addition, the formation of transient phases that appeared and disappeared in narrow temperature ranges, competing with formation of the phases expected in the conventional phase sequence. These included the transient formation of NiSi and Ni31Si12 in stacks in which these phases are not expected to form (e.g., tNi/tSi of 1.7 and 0.9, respectively), at temperatures similar to those in which these phases normally grow.

  7. Reaction kinetics and isotope effect of water formation by the surface reaction of solid H2O2 with H atoms at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoki; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We performed laboratory experiments on the formation of water and its isotopologues by surface reactions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with hydrogen (H) atoms and their deuterated counterparts (D2O2, D) at 10-30 K. High-purity H2O2 (> 95%) was prepared in situ by the codeposition of molecular oxygen and H atoms at relatively high temperatures (45-50 K). We determined that the high-purity H2O2 solid reacts with both H and deuterium (D) atoms at 10-30 K despite the large activation barriers (-2000 K). Moreover, the reaction rate for H atoms is approximately 45 times faster than that for D atoms at 15 K. Thus, the observed large isotope effect indicates that these reactions occurred through quantum tunneling. We propose that the observed HDO/H2O ratio in molecular clouds might be a good tool for the estimation of the atomic D/H ratio in those environments.

  8. Reaction of water-saturated supercritical CO2 with forsterite: Evidence for magnesite formation at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary; Todd Schaef, H.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 °C and 50 °C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times (˜3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 °C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well-known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 °C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

  9. Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

  10. Water Mediated Wittig Reactions of Aldehydes in the Teaching Laboratory: Using Sodium Bicarbonate for the in Situ Formation of Stabilized Ylides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael J. B.; Fallot, Lucas B.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Bergdahl, B. Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of alkenes using the Wittig reaction is a traditional part of many undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory curricula. The aqueous medium version of the Wittig reaction presented is a reliable adaptation of this alkene formation reaction as a very safe alternative in the introductory organic chemistry laboratory. The…

  11. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  12. Mechanisms of branching reactions in melanin formation - Ab initio quantum engineering approach -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Ryo; Menez Aspera, Susan; Kasai, Hideaki

    Melanin, a pigment found in animals, consists of two types of oligomeric unit: eumelanin and pheomelanin. The color of the skin, the hair, and the eyes is controlled by the ratio of eumelanin/pheomelanin production. Especially, dopachrome and dopaquinone are the precursor molecules of melanin which directly affect the composition of melanin through their branching reactions. Dopachrome is converted into two possible monomers of eumelanin. Dopaquinone can undergo both eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. To understand the mechanisms and controlling factors that govern the conversions, reactions of the two molecules are investigated using density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. Our results deepen mechanistic understanding of the reactions and open possibilities to design properties and functions of melanin. In this talk, we will discuss about the competitions of the branching reactions.

  13. Atomic-scale insight into the formation, mobility and reaction of Ullmann coupling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Liriano, Melissa L; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-01-28

    The Ullmann reaction of bromobenzene, the simplest coupling reagent, to form biphenyl on a Cu surface proceeds via a highly mobile organometallic intermediate in which two phenyl groups extract and bind a single surface Cu atom.

  14. Catalysis by cytochrome P-450 of an oxidative reaction in xenobiotic aldehyde metabolism: deformylation with olefin formation.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E S; Vaz, A D; Coon, M J

    1991-01-01

    As we have briefly described elsewhere, cytochrome P-450 catalyzes the oxidative deformylation of cyclohexane carboxaldehyde to yield cyclohexene and formic acid in a reaction believed to involve a peroxyhemiacetal-like adduct formed between the substrate and molecular oxygen-derived hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is a useful model for the demethylation reactions catalyzed by the steroidogenic P-450s, aromatase, and lanosterol demethylase. In the present study, the cytochrome P-450-catalyzed formation of olefinic products from a series of xenobiotic aldehydes has been demonstrated. Isobutyraldehyde and trimethylacetaldehyde, but not propionaldehyde, are converted to the predicted olefinic products, suggesting a requirement for branching at the alpha carbon. In addition, the four C5 aldehydes of similar hydrophobicity were compared for their ability to undergo the reaction. The straight-chain valeraldehyde gave no olefinic products with five different rabbit liver microsomal P-450 isozymes. However, increasing activity was seen with the other isomers in the order of isovaleraldehyde, 2-methylbutyraldehyde, and trimethylacetaldehyde, with all of the P-450 cytochromes. The catalytic rate with trimethylacetaldehyde is highest with antibiotic-inducible P-450 form 3A6, followed by phenobarbital-inducible form 2B4 and ethanol-inducible form 2E1. Citronellal, a beta-branched aldehyde that is found in many essential oils and is widely used as an odorant and a flavorant, was found to undergo the oxidative deformylation reaction to yield 2,6-dimethyl-1,5-heptadiene, but only with P-450 2B4. The oxidative cleavage reaction with olefin formation appears to be widespread, as judged by the variety of aldehydes that serve as substrates and of P-450 cytochromes that serve as catalysts. PMID:1924356

  15. In-place oil shale resources of the Mahogany zone sorted by grade, overburden thickness and stripping ratio, Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado and Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    A range of geological parameters relevant to mining oil shale have been examined for the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, and Uinta Basin, Utah, using information available in the U.S. Geological Survey Oil Shale Assessment database. Basinwide discrete and cumulative distributions of resource in-place as a function of (1) oil shale grade, (2) Mahogany zone thickness, (3) overburden thickness, and (4) stripping ratio (overburden divided by zone thickness) were determined for both basins on a per-acre basis, and a resource map showing the areal distribution of these properties was generated. Estimates of how much of the Mahogany zone resource meets various combinations of these parameters were also determined. Of the 191.7 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place in the Piceance Basin, 32.3 percent (61.8 billion barrels) is associated with oil shale yielding at least 25 gallons of oil per ton (GPT) of rock processed, is covered by overburden 1,000 feet thick or less, and has a stripping ratio of less than 10. In the Uinta Basin, 14.0 percent (29.9 billion barrels) of the 214.5 billion barrels of Mahogany zone oil in-place meets the same overburden and stripping ratio criteria but only for the lower grade cutoff of 15 GPT.

  16. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions.

  17. Kinetic Modeling of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxin and Dibenzofuran Formation Based on Carbon Degradation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion experiments in a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor were performed to determine the role of temperature and time in PCDD/F formation allowing a global kinetic expression to be written for PCDD/F formation due to soot oxidation in fly ash deposits. Rate constants were c...

  18. Effects of fruit extracts on the formation of acrylamide in model reactions and fried potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka-Wing; Shi, Jian-Jun; Ou, Shi-Yi; Wang, Mingfu; Jiang, Yue

    2010-01-13

    Natural products extracted from plants and fruits have attracted increasing attention for the development of effective inhibitors against the formation of acrylamide during food processing. In this study, six fruit extracts (apple, blueberry, mangosteen, longan, dragon fruit with white flesh, and dragon fruit with red flesh) were compared for their activities against acrylamide formation in chemical models containing equal molar quantities of glucose and asparagine in distilled water (160 degrees C for 30 min). Apple extract demonstrated potent inhibition on acrylamide formation. Blueberry, mangosteen, and longan extracts did not have significant impact, whereas dragon fruit extracts enhanced acrylamide formation. Column chromatography guided by chemical model analysis showed that the proanthocyanidin-rich subfraction played a key role in mediating the inhibitory activity. The inhibitory activity was finally corroborated in fried potato crisps. The present study identified some natural products that might have important applications in the food industry to inhibit acrylamide formation.

  19. Kinetics of the gas phase reactions of chlorine atoms with a series of formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallington, T. J.; Hurley, M. D.; Haryanto, A.

    2006-12-01

    Relative rate techniques were used to study the reactivity of Cl atoms with a series of formates in 700 Torr of N 2 diluent at 296 K. Rate constants were determined for the following compounds: methyl formate, (1.30 ± 0.13) × 10 -12; ethyl formate, (9.57 ± 1.27) × 10 -12; n-propyl formate, (4.65 ± 0.47) × 10 -11; and n-butyl formate, (1.12 ± 0.14) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. These results are consistent with previous relative rate studies but are approximately 20-30% lower than the results from an absolute rate study of the reactivity of chlorine atoms towards esters. Likely explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  20. Hydrothermal quartz formation during fluctuations of brittle shear-zone activity and fluid flow: grain growth and deformation structures of the Pfahl shear zone (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, T.; Prosser, G.; Liotta, D.; Kruhl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Bavarian Pfahl shear zone is a WNW-ESE trending dextral strike-slip shear zone at the SW margin of the Bohemian Massif (Central Europe). It was discontinuously active during decreasing PT-conditions, i.e. from ductile to brittle, from the late-Carboniferous to the late-Cretaceous - Paleocene times. Triassic hydrothermal activity produced a 150 km long and 30-100 m wide quartz dyke along the main fault, surrounded by sheared basement rocks. Within a zone of >10 m metasomatism transformed the wall rocks to mostly kaolinite, chlorite and phyllosilicates. The quartz dyke exhibits a layered to lenticular and partly symmetric structure with different types of quartz masses, transected by a complex quartz vein network. This already indicates pulses of fluid flux and fragmentation during the lifetime of the shear zone. Analyses by optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) and SEM-EDX reveal at least four subsequent stages of quartz crystallization and fragmentation. (i) The oldest generation of quartz is represented by a homogeneous dark grey to reddish quartz mass made up by ~10-20 μm-sized crystals. It contains mm- to cm-sized angular wall-rock fragments, completely altered to kaolinite, indicating intense wall-rock alteration prior to the earliest event of silica precipitation. This rules out the possibility that the quartz mass developed from silicification of the wall rocks. This first type of quartz occurs as cm- to dm-large angular fragments in (ii) a light grey to pink quartz mass formed by ~10-50 μm-sized crystals. The different colours result from variable types and amounts of inclusions. Quartz of both generations shows random crystallographic orientations and complex inclusion structures. It probably developed during two fragmentation events and possibly from a silica gel precursor that crystallized after precipitation. (iii) The third quartz generation formed as a set of mm- to dm-wide veins roughly parallel to the trend of the Pfahl zone

  1. DFT studies on Schiff base formation of vitamin B6 analogues. Reaction between a pyridoxamine-analogue and carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Castro, J; Adrover, M; Frau, J; Salvà, A; Donoso, J; Muñoz, F

    2010-04-08

    A comprehensive theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06-2X functionals) of the formation of Schiff bases of pyridoxamine analogues with two different aldehydes was conducted. The reaction mechanism was found to involve two steps, namely: (1) formation of a carbinolamine and (2) dehydration of the carbinolamine to give the final imine. Also, consistent with available experimental evidence, the carbinolamine dehydration was the rate-determining step of the process determined by means of M06-2X functional. Using an appropriate solvation method and reactant conformation ensures that all proton transfers involved will be intramolecular, which substantially reduces energy barriers and facilitates reaction in all cases. The formation of a Schiff base between pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) and an amine or amino acid requires the contribution of an external water molecule in order to facilitate proton transfers. On the other hand, the formation of a Schiff base between pyridoxamine 5-phosphate (PMP) and a carbonyl compound requires no external aid since the spatial arrangement of the functional groups in PMP ensures that all proton transfers will be intramolecular.

  2. Major and trace elements in Mahogany zone oil shale in two cores from the Green River Formation, piceance basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.; Dean, W.E.; Parduhn, N.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Parachute Creek Member of the lacustrine Green River Formation contains thick sequences of rich oil-shale. The richest sequence and the richest oil-shale bed occurring in the member are called the Mahogany zone and the Mahogany bed, respectively, and were deposited in ancient Lake Uinta. The name "Mahogany" is derived from the red-brown color imparted to the rock by its rich-kerogen content. Geochemical abundance and distribution of eight major and 18 trace elements were determined in the Mahogany zone sampled from two cores, U. S. Geological Survey core hole CR-2 and U. S. Bureau of Mines core hole O1-A (Figure 1). The oil shale from core hole CR-2 was deposited nearer the margin of Lake Uinta than oil shale from core hole O1-A. The major- and trace-element chemistry of the Mahogany zone from each of these two cores is compared using elemental abundances and Q-mode factor modeling. The results of chemical analyses of 44 CR-2 Mahogany samples and 76 O1-A Mahogany samples are summarized in Figure 2. The average geochemical abundances for shale (1) and black shale (2) are also plotted on Figure 2 for comparison. The elemental abundances in the samples from the two cores are similar for the majority of elements. Differences at the 95% probability level are higher concentrations of Ca, Cu, La, Ni, Sc and Zr in the samples from core hole CR-2 compared to samples from core hole O1-A and higher concentrations of As and Sr in samples from core hole O1-A compared to samples from core hole CR-2. These differences presumably reflect slight differences in depositional conditions or source material at the two sites. The Mahogany oil shale from the two cores has lower concentrations of most trace metals and higher concentrations of carbonate-related elements (Ca, Mg, Sr and Na) compared to the average shale and black shale. During deposition of the Mahogany oil shale, large quantities of carbonates were precipitated resulting in the enrichment of carbonate-related elements

  3. Oligomerization reaction of the Criegee intermediate leads to secondary organic aerosol formation in ethylene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Inomata, Satoshi; Hirokawa, Jun

    2013-12-05

    Ethylene ozonolysis was investigated in laboratory experiments using a Teflon bag reactor. A negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (NI-CIMS) using SO2Cl(-) and Cl(-) as reagent ions was used for product analysis. In addition to the expected gas-phase products, such as formic acid and hydroperoxymethyl formate, oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of the Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) as a chain unit were observed. Furthermore, we observed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the ethylene ozonolysis, and the particle-phase products were also analyzed by NI-CIMS. The CH2OO oligomers were also observed as particle-phase components, suggesting that the oligomeric hydroperoxides formed in the gas phase partition into the particle phase. By adding methanol as a stabilized Criegee intermediate scavenger, both the gas-phase oligomer formation and SOA formation were strongly suppressed. This indicates that CH2OO plays a critical role in the formation of oligomeric hydroperoxides followed by SOA formation in ethylene ozonolysis. A new formation mechanism for the oligomeric hydroperoxides, which includes sequential addition of CH2OO to hydroperoxides, is proposed.

  4. Optimization of reaction parameters in hydrothermal synthesis: a strategy towards the formation of CuS hexagonal plates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For decades, copper sulphide has been renowned as the superior optical and semiconductor materials. Its potential applications can be ranged from solar cells, lithium-ion batteries, sensors, and catalyst systems. The synthesis methodologies of copper sulphide with different controlled morphology have been widely explored in the literature. Nevertheless, the understanding on the formation chemistry of CuS is still limited. The ultimate approach undertaking in this article is to investigate the formation of CuS hexagonal plates via the optimization of reaction parameters in hydrothermal reaction between copper (II) nitrate and sodium thiosulphate without appending any assistant agent. Results Covellite (CuS) hexagonal plates were formed at copper ion: thiosulphate ion (Cu2+:S2O32−) mole ratio of 1:2 under hydrothermal treatment of 155°C for 12 hours. For synthesis conducted at reaction temperature lower than 155°C, copper sulphate (CuSO4), krohnite (NaCu2(SO4)(H2O)2] and cyclooctasulphur (S8) were present as main impurities with covellite (CuS). When Cu2+:S2O32− mole ratio was varied to 1: 1 and 1: 1.5, phase pure plate-like natrochalcite [NaCu2(SO4)(H2O)] and digenite (Cu9S5) were produced respectively. Meanwhile, mixed phases of covellite (CuS) and cyclooctasulphur (S8) were both identified when Cu2+:S2O32− mole ratio was varied to 1: 2.5, 1: 3 and 1: 5 as well as when reaction time was shortened to 1 hour. Conclusions CuS hexagonal plates with a mean edge length of 1 μm, thickness of 100 nm and average crystallite size of approximately (45 ± 2) nm (Scherrer estimation) were successfully synthesized via assisting agent- free hydrothermal method. Under a suitable Cu2+:S2O32− mole ratio, we evidenced that the formation of covellite (CuS) is feasible regardless of the reaction temperature applied. However, a series of impurities were attested with CuS if reaction temperature was not elevated high enough for the additional crystallite

  5. Using Pore Water Chemistry to Understand Critical Zone Mineral Weathering Reactions: A Comparison of Three Tropical Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, H. L.; White, A. F.; Dessert, C.; Gaillardet, J.

    2007-12-01

    Geochemical, physical, biological, and hydrologic processes are tightly coupled within the critical zone and impact global and local water cycles, solute movement, weathering rates, and nutrient bioavailability. The weathering of primary minerals in regolith and at bedrock-regolith interfaces directly impacts the availability of many important soil nutrients including Mg, Ca, K, PO4, and Fe. However, surprisingly little biogeochemical data exists as a function of depth in terrestrial regolith below the rooting zone. This shortage of data hinders quantification of the coupled processes that control nutrient fluxes. Installation of nested suction soil water samplers enables multiple researchers to measure biogeochemical parameters as a function of depth. Nested suction water samplers have been installed in soil and regolith at 0.15 m to as deep as 16.0 m in two watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico and in a watershed on Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe, in the French Antilles. All three watersheds are steep, rugged, humid, and tropical, have similar vegetation and land- use, and contain thick saprolites developed on volcanic materials: a quartz diorite intrusion in the Rio Icacos watershed, Puerto Rico; marine bedded volcaniclastics in the Bisley watershed, Puerto Rico; and a volcanic debris flow in the Bras-David watershed, Guadeloupe. The two Puerto Rican watersheds are part of the USGS Water Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program and also constitute a Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN) seed site. The Bisley watershed is also part of the Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. The Guadeloupean watershed is a Critical Zone International Scholar seed site and the surface water chemistry is monitored by the Observatoire Volcanologique et Sismologique de Guadeloupe and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP). In the mid 1990's the Rio Icacos watershed was instrumented with regolith gas samplers, tensiometers, and nested

  6. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any

  7. Faraday efficiency and mechanism of electrochemical surface reactions: CO2 reduction and H2 formation on Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javed; Jónsson, Hannes; Skúlason, Egill

    2016-12-22

    An atomic scale model of the electrical double layer is used to calculate the mechanism and rate of electrochemical reduction of CO2 as well as H2 formation at a Pt(111) electrode. The water layer contains solvated protons and the electrode has excess electrons at the surface. Density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation is used to describe the electronic structure while the mechanism and activation energy of the various elementary reactions is obtained by calculating minimum energy paths using the nudged elastic band method. The applied electrical potential is deduced from the calculated work function. The optimal reaction mechanism for CO2 reduction to either methane or methanol is found and the estimated rate compared with that of the competing reaction, H2 formation. When the free energy of only the intermediates and reactants is taken into account, not the activation energy, Pt(111) would seem to be a good electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction, significantly better than Cu(111). This, however, contradicts experimental findings. Detailed calculations reported here show that the activation energy for CO2 reduction is high for both Heyrovsky and Tafel mechanisms on Pt(111) in the relevant range of applied potential. The rate-limiting step of the Heyrovsky mechanism, *COOH + H(+) + e(-) → *CO + H2O, is estimated to have an activation energy of 0.95 eV at -0.9 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode. Under the same conditions, the activation energy for H2 formation is estimated to be only 0.5 eV. This explains why attempts to reduce CO2 using platinum electrodes have produced only H2. A comparison is made with analogous results for Cu(111) [J. Hussain et al., Procedia Comput. Sci., 2015, 51, 1865] where a reaction mechanism with low activation energy for CO2 electroreduction to methane was identified. The difference between the two electrocatalysts is discussed.

  8. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  9. Reaction of plutonium dioxide with water: formation and properties of PuO(2+x)

    PubMed

    Haschke; Allen; Morales

    2000-01-14

    Results show that PuO(2+x), a high-composition (x reaction of dioxide with water and by water-catalyzed reaction of dioxide with oxygen. The PuO(2) + H(2)O reaction rate is 0.27 nanomoles per meter squared per hour at 25 degrees C; the activation energy at 25 degrees to 350 degrees C is 39 kilojoules per mole. Slow kinetics and a low lattice parameter-composition dependence for fluorite-related PuO(2+x) are consistent with a failure to observe the phase in earlier studies. Perplexing aspects of plutonium oxide chemistry can now be explained.

  10. Formation of diverse polycyclic spirooxindoles via three-component reaction of isoquinolinium salts, isatins and malononitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Shen, Guo-Liang; Huang, Ying; Yan, Chao-Guo

    2017-01-01

    The triethylamine promoted three-component reaction of N-(4-nitrobenzyl), N-ethoxycarbonylmethylisoquinolinium bromide, isatins and malononitrile in ethanol afforded spiro[indoline-3,2‧-pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines] in good yields and with high diastereoselectivity. The similar reaction of N-cyanomethylisoquinolinium chloride mainly gave complex indolo[2″,3″:2‧,3‧]pyrrolo[3‧,4‧:4,5]pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline derivatives. However, the three-component reaction of N-cyanomethylisoquinolinium chloride, isatins and ethyl cyanoacetate mainly resulted in functionalized spiro[indoline-3,8‧-pyrido[2‧,3‧:4,5]pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines].

  11. Formation of diverse polycyclic spirooxindoles via three-component reaction of isoquinolinium salts, isatins and malononitrile

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Shen, Guo-liang; Huang, Ying; Yan, Chao-Guo

    2017-01-01

    The triethylamine promoted three-component reaction of N-(4-nitrobenzyl), N-ethoxycarbonylmethylisoquinolinium bromide, isatins and malononitrile in ethanol afforded spiro[indoline-3,2′-pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines] in good yields and with high diastereoselectivity. The similar reaction of N-cyanomethylisoquinolinium chloride mainly gave complex indolo[2″,3″:2′,3′]pyrrolo[3′,4′:4,5]pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline derivatives. However, the three-component reaction of N-cyanomethylisoquinolinium chloride, isatins and ethyl cyanoacetate mainly resulted in functionalized spiro[indoline-3,8′-pyrido[2′,3′:4,5]pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines]. PMID:28106130

  12. Formation of hydrocarbons on Titan: Impact of rapid association reactions at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2011-10-01

    In the 1980's, Voyager revealed that complex organic molecules were present in Titan's atmosphere but the actual mechanisms leading to this rich chemistry were largely unknown. The recent Cassini results indicate that the chemistry ocurring in Titan's upper atmosphere is far more complex than anticipated. The detection of heavy positive and negative ions [13] reveals that much of the molecular growth occurs in the upper atmosphere rather than at lower altitudes [5, 12]. Photochemical models predict that three-body association reactions (A + B + M!AB + M) are the main production route for several hydrocarbons, including alkanes [2, 3]. The kinetic parameters of these reactions strongly depend on density and are therefore extremely difficult to constrain by experimental measurements as the low pressure of Titan's upper atmosphere cannot be reproduced in the laboratory. As a consequence, they have to be extrapolated outside the range of measurements, leading to high uncertainties. According to these extrapolations, three-body association reactions are only efficient in Titan's lower atmosphere. However, radiative association reactions (A + B ! AB + h) do not depend on pressure and can therefore still be efficient in the upper atmosphere. Unfortunately, they are largely uncharacterized and have consequently been neglected in photochemical models so far. Because of their potential importance at higher altitude, association reactions can have an important contribution to our understanding of molecular growth and better constraints for them are required. In the recent years, theoretical calculations of kinetics parameters have become more and more reliable [7]. We therefore performed ab initio transition state theory based master equation calculations for several radical-radical and radical-molecule association reactions. The computed kinetics parameters were included in our photochemical model of Titan. We present here the main results and discuss their impact for the

  13. Investigation of reaction kinetics and interfacial phase formation in Ti3Al + Nb composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Gundel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Titanium aluminide metal matrix composites are prominent materials systems being considered for high temperature aerospace applications. One of the major problems with this material is the reactivity between existing reinforcements and the matrix after prolonged thermal exposure. This paper presents results from an investigation of reaction kinetics between Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt pct) and SCS-6 fibers and SiC fibers with surface coatings of TiB2, TiC, TiN, W, and Si. Microstructural evaluation of the reaction layers as well as matrix regions around the fibers is presented.

  14. Reaction zone between pre-UHP titanite and host rock: insights into fluid-rock interaction and deformation mechanisms during exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust (Dabie Shan UHP unit, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzenitz, N.; Romer, R. L.; Grasemann, B.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2012-04-01

    titanite grains are patchy zoned and replace, along with rutile, calcite, quartz, and apatite, the old titanite megacryst. This reaction reflects the changing CO2 versus fluorine activity in the available fluid phase, rather than changing P-T conditions. The Sr isotope composition of the phases formed by these fluid-mediated reactions is variable and depends on the reaction-history and origin of the fluids. (iii) Brittle deformation of the titanite megacryst induced the formation of fractures, enhancing fluid transport and precipitation of new titanite, allanite, calcite ± rutile, and albite (locally anorthite), as well as Zn(Fe) - and Cu - sulphides along the vein walls. Dislocation creep is indicated by subgrains in local zones of high differential stress within the rim of the titanite megacryst. However, dissolution precipitation creep has been much more effective in changing the (isotope)chemical composition of titanite compared to dislocation creep. Romer, R.L., Wawrzenitz, N., Oberhänsli, R., 2003. Terra Nova 15, 5, 330-336. Wawrzenitz, N., Romer, R.L., Oberhänsli, R., Dong, S., 2006. Lithos 89, 1-2, 174-201.

  15. Acylsilanes in Iridium-Catalyzed Directed Amidation Reactions and Formation of Heterocycles via Siloxycarbenes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Peter; Pirwerdjan, Ramona; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-12-14

    Exposing ortho-amido aroylsilanes to visible light or heat leads to cyclization reactions that provide N-heterocyclic compounds via siloxycarbenes as key intermediates. The previously unreported starting materials have been prepared by directed amidations of aromatic acylsilanes in the presence of an iridium catalyst followed by N-alkylation.

  16. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  17. OZONE-ISOPRENE REACTION: RE-EXAMINATION OF THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of ozone and isoprene has been studied to examine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Using a scanning mobility particle sizer, the volume distribution of the aerosol was found in the range 0.05 - 0.2 µm. The aerosol yield w...

  18. The Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from the Isoprene + OH Reaction in the Absence of NOx

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of isoprene (C5H8) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the absence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to determine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Experiments were conducted using a smog ch...

  19. Role of choline and glycine betaine in the formation of N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Thomas; Tarres, Adrienne; Stadler, Richard H; Delatour, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the role of choline and glycine betaine, naturally present in some foods, in particular in cereal grains, to generate N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard conditions via transmethylation reactions involving the nucleophile piperidine. The formation of mepiquat and its intermediates piperidine - formed by cyclisation of free lysine in the presence of reducing sugars - and N-methylpiperidine were monitored over time (240°C, up to 180 min) using high-resolution mass spectrometry in a model system comprised of a ternary mixture of lysine/fructose/alkylating agent (choline or betaine). The reaction yield was compared with data recently determined for trigonelline, a known methylation agent present naturally in coffee beans. The role of choline and glycine betaine in nucleophilic displacement reactions was further supported by experiments carried out with stable isotope-labelled precursors (¹³C- and deuterium-labelled). The results unequivocally demonstrated that the piperidine ring of mepiquat originates from the carbon chain of lysine, and that either choline or glycine betaine furnishes the N-methyl groups. The kinetics of formation of the corresponding demethylated products of both choline and glycine betaine, N,N-demethyl-2-aminoethanol and N,N-dimethylglycine, respectively, were also determined using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  20. Deep-space glycine formation via Strecker-type reactions activated by ice water dust mantles. A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2010-01-01

    A Strecker-type synthesis of glycine by reacting NH(3), H(2)C=O and HCN in presence of ice water (H(2)O-ice) as a catalyst has been theoretically studied at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level within a cluster approach in order to mimic reactions occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar medium (ICM). Results indicate that, despite the exoergonic character of the considered reactions occurring at the H(2)O-ice surface, the kinetics are slow due to relatively high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=15-45 kcal mol(-1)). Reactions occurring within H(2)O-ice cavities, in which ice bulk effects have been modeled by assuming a dielectric continuum (ε=78), show energy barriers low enough to allow NH(2)CH(2)OH formation but not NH=CH2 (ΔU(0)(≠)= 2 and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively) thus hindering the NH(2)CH(2)CN formation, i.e. the precursor of glycine, through Strecker channels. Moreover, hydrolysis of NH(2)CH(2)CN to give glycine is characterized by high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=27-34 kcal mol(-1)) and cannot readily occur at cryogenic temperatures. Nevertheless, the facts that NH=CH(2) formation can readily be achieved through the radical-radical HCN+2H - NH−−>CH2 reaction [D. E. Woon, Astrophys. J., 2002, 571, L177-L180], and that present results indicate that the Strecker step of NH=CH(2)+HCN−−>NH(2)CH(2)CN exhibits a relative low energy barrier (ΔU(0)(≠)=8–9 kcal mol(-1)), suggest that a combination of these two mechanisms allows for the formation of NH(2)CH(2)CN in the ICM. These results strengthen the thesis that NH(2)CH(2)CN could have been formed and protected by icy dust particles, and then delivered through micro-bombardments onto the early Earth, leading to glycine formation upon contact with the primordial ocean.

  1. Arc magmatism at the incipient stage of formation of subduction zone: geochemistry of Eocene volcanic rocks from the Bonin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Ishizuka, O.

    2009-12-01

    Bonin Islands are known for the occurrence of boninite series and high-Mg arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rock series generated at the incipient stage of formation of subduction zone. We present new analysis of major and trace elements and petrogenetic processes of volcanic rocks of the Bonin Islands. Boninite series rocks in Chichijima and Mukojima Island Group represent the primitive arc magmatism in middle Eocene time, which gave way to arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rocks are in Hahajima Island Groups. Boninite series of the Maruberiwan and Asahiyama Formations indicates a differentiation trend that sharply increases in FeO*/MgO (0.47-32) with increasing SiO2 contents (53.8-78.2 wt %). FeO*/MgO ratios (0.74-4.19) of arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rocks of the Hahajima Island Group are slightly lower than those of the Izu-Bonin Quaternary volcanic front lavas. Boninite series samples of the Mikazukiyama Formation show a similar trend to the Maruberiwan-Asahiyama boninite series samples. However, the former has lower SiO2 contents (55.7-58.2 wt %), and higher FeO*/MgO ratios (1.05-1.98) than the latter. Most of the Maruberiwan and Mikazukiyama boninites belong to low-Ca type, while only a small number of Maruberiwan boninite samples belong to high-Ca type. Maruberiwan boninites (MgO>8 wt%) are the most depleted in REEs (Yb=0.36-1.01 ppm), which is only about 1/10 of N-MORBs, and the most enriched in LILEs (Rb=6-23, Ba=6-58 ppm) in the Bonin Islands. Low-Ca boninites indicate a distinct positive anomaly of Zr and negative anomalies of Sm and Ti ((Sm/Zr)n=0.45-0.78, (Ti/Zr)n=0.25-0.64), while high-Ca boninites indicate moderate anomalies of these elements ((Sm/Zr)n=0.79-1.29, (Ti/Zr)n=0.57-1.02). Basalts of the Hahajima Island Group are the most enriched in REEs (Yb=1.2-2.4 ppm) and HFSEs (Nb=0.47-1.75 ppm) in the Bonin Islands. Compared to the Hahajima basalts, the present Izu-Bonin front lavas are more depleted in LREEs and HFSE, and enriched in LILEs

  2. Modeling stopped-flow data for nucleic acid duplex formation reactions: the importance of off-path intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jacqueline R; Rauzan, Brittany; Stegemann, Rachel; Deckert, Alice

    2013-08-01

    Evidence for unexpected off-path intermediates to DNA duplex formation is presented. These off-path intermediates are shown to involve unimolecular and, in one case, bimolecular structure in one of the single strands of complementary DNA. Three models are developed to account for the observed single-stranded structures that are formed in parallel with duplex formation. These models are applied to the analysis of stopped-flow data for eight different nonself-complementary duplex formation reactions in order to extract the elementary rate constant for formation of the duplex from the complementary random coil single-stranded DNA. The free energy of activation (at 25 °C) for the denaturation of each duplex is calculated from these data and is shown to have a linear correlation to the overall standard free energy for duplex formation (also at 25 °C). Duplexes that contain mismatches obey a parallel linear free-energy (LFE) relationship with a y-intercept that is greater than that of duplexes without mismatches. Slopes near unity for the LFE relationships indicate that all duplexes go through an early, unstructured transition state.

  3. The reaction of 1-chloro-2-methyl-2-propanol on oxygen-covered Ag( 1 1 0 ): epoxide formation via a surface chlorohydrin reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medlin, J. Will; Barteau, Mark A.

    2002-05-01

    Temperature programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to study the reactions of 1-chloro-2-methyl-2-propanol (Cl tBuOH) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(1 1 0) surfaces. Cl tBuOH reacts on the oxygen-covered surface to produce chloro- tert-butoxy (Cl tBuO(a)) intermediates and water. Cl tBuO(a) subsequently reacts to produce isobutylene oxide (IBO) and surface chlorine. Small amounts of methyl ethyl ketone were also detected in some coverage regimes. Multiple desorption channels for Cl tBuOH and IBO were observed; the relative importance of each channel depends on surface coverage. These studies suggest that formation of the IBO product proceeds either through an oxametallacycle intermediate that is not stable under the reaction conditions, or via a concerted process analogous to the olefin chlorohydrin synthesis of epoxides. Theoretical models for oxametallacycle ring closure are presented, and the implications of these studies for the silver-catalyzed epoxidation of olefins are discussed.

  4. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Ross L.; Jang, Myoseon

    2016-05-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+], mol L-1) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of photooxidation products and sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (eight groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (six groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx (VOC - volatile organic compound). The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF APHOR) chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total organic mass formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H

  5. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. L.; Jang, M.

    2015-11-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+]) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of the photooxidation products and the sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (8 groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (6 groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx. The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor UF APHOR chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total OM formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC, and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H+] but is dynamically related to all three parameters. For VOC / NOx > 10, with increasing NOx both experimental and

  6. Protein-Templated Formation of an Inhibitor of the Blood Coagulation Factor Xa through a Background-Free Amidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, Mike; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Rademann, Jörg

    2017-03-20

    Protein-templated reactions enable the target-guided formation of protein ligands from reactive fragments, ideally with no background reaction. Herein, we investigate the templated formation of amides. A nucleophilic fragment that binds to the coagulation factor Xa was incubated with the protein and thirteen differentially activated dipeptides. The protein induced a non-catalytic templated reaction for the phenyl and trifluoroethyl esters; the latter was shown to be a completely background-free reaction. Starting from two fragments with millimolar affinity, a 29 nm superadditive inhibitor of factor Xa was obtained. The fragment ligation reaction was detected with high sensitivity by an enzyme activity assay and by mass spectrometry. The reaction progress and autoinhibition of the templated reaction by the formed ligation product were determined, and the structure of the protein-inhibitor complex was elucidated.

  7. Protein‐Templated Formation of an Inhibitor of the Blood Coagulation Factor Xa through a Background‐Free Amidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Jaegle, Mike; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein‐templated reactions enable the target‐guided formation of protein ligands from reactive fragments, ideally with no background reaction. Herein, we investigate the templated formation of amides. A nucleophilic fragment that binds to the coagulation factor Xa was incubated with the protein and thirteen differentially activated dipeptides. The protein induced a non‐catalytic templated reaction for the phenyl and trifluoroethyl esters; the latter was shown to be a completely background‐free reaction. Starting from two fragments with millimolar affinity, a 29 nm superadditive inhibitor of factor Xa was obtained. The fragment ligation reaction was detected with high sensitivity by an enzyme activity assay and by mass spectrometry. The reaction progress and autoinhibition of the templated reaction by the formed ligation product were determined, and the structure of the protein–inhibitor complex was elucidated. PMID:28199769

  8. Formation of a Syndiotactic Organic Polymer Inside a MOF by a [2+2] Photo-Polymerization Reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyeok; Medishetty, Raghavender; Lee, Hyeong-Hwan; Mulijanto, Caroline Evania; Quah, Hong Sheng; Lee, Shim Sung; Vittal, Jagadese J

    2015-06-15

    Getting suitable crystals for single-crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis still remains an art. Obtaining single crystals of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) containing organic polymers poses even greater challenges. Here we demonstrate the formation of a syndiotactic organic polymer ligand inside a MOF by quantitative [2+2] photopolymerization reaction in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner. The spacer ligands with trans,trans,trans-conformation in the pillared-layer MOF with guest water molecules in the channels, undergo pedal motion to trans,cis,trans-conformation prior to [2+2] photo-cycloaddition reaction and yield single crystals of MOF containing two-dimensional coordination polymers fused with the organic polymer ligands. We also show that the organic polymer in the single crystals can be depolymerized reversibly by cleaving the cyclobutane rings upon heating. These MOFs also show interesting photoluminescent properties and sensing of small organic molecules.

  9. Theoretical study on the formation of tetraoxygen conformational isomerism in the CO 2 with O 3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Moein; Piri, Farideh; Hajari, Nasim; Karimi, Leila

    2010-10-01

    The reaction mechanism of CO 2 with O 3 on the singlet potential energy surface has been investigated at the CBS-QB3//B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. The reactants are initially associated with adducts IN1 (OOO-OCO) and IN2 (OC-cyclic O 4) in a barrier-less process. Then, adducts undergo isomerization and dissociation processes to produce P 1 (CO + 2 3O 2) and P 2 (CO 3 + 3O 2) with two different mechanisms. The calculated results show that there is no favorable pathway for the formation of these two products in the atmospheric reaction of CO 2 with O 3.

  10. 'Would you eat cultured meat?': Consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by feelings of disgust and considerations of unnaturalness. Consumers saw few direct personal benefits but they were more open to perceiving global societal benefits relating to the environment and global food security. Both personal and societal risks were framed in terms of uncertainties about safety and health, and possible adverse societal consequences dealing with loss of farming and eating traditions and rural livelihoods. Further reflection pertained to skepticism about 'the inevitable' scientific progress, concern about risk governance and control, and need for regulation and proper labeling.

  11. Rate constant for formation of chlorine nitrate by the reaction ClO + NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. T.; Lin, C. L.; Demore, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudo-first-order decay of ClO in a large excess of NO2 was monitored in a discharge flow/mass-spectrometer apparatus in order to measure the rate constant of the reaction ClO + NO2 + M yields ClONO2 + M for M = He, Ar, and N2 over the temperature range from 248 to 417 K. Numerical results are given for He at 248, 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 9 torr); for Ar at 298 K (1 to 4 torr); and for N2 at 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 6 torr). Systematic errors are estimated, and identification of the reaction product is discussed. The results obtained are shown to be in excellent agreement with other recent measurements of the same rate constant.

  12. The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the isoprene + OH reaction in the absence of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Edney, E. O.

    2009-09-01

    The reaction of isoprene (C5H8) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the absence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to determine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Experiments were conducted using a smog chamber operated in a steady-state mode permitting measurements of moderately low aerosol levels. GC-MS analysis was conducted to measure methyl butenediols in the gas phase and polyols in the aerosol phase. Analyses were made to obtain several bulk aerosol parameters from the reaction including values for the organic mass to organic carbon ratio, the effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), organic peroxide fraction, and the aerosol yield. The gas phase analysis showed the presence of methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and four isomers of the methyl butenediols. These gas-phase compounds may serve as precursors for one or more of several compounds detected in the aerosol phase including 2-methylglyceric acid, three 2-methyl alkenetriols, and two 2-methyl tetrols. In contrast to most previous studies, the 2-methyl tetrols (and the 2-methyl alkenetriols) were found to form in the absence of acidic sulfate aerosol. However, reaction conditions did not favor the production of HO2 radicals, thus allowing RO2+RO2 reactions to proceed more readily than if higher HO2 levels had been generated. SOA/SOC (i.e. OM/OC) was found to average 1.9 in the absence of NOx. The effective enthalpy of vaporization was measured as 38.6 kJ mol-1, consistent with values used previously in modeling studies. The yields in this work (using an independent technique than used previously) are lower than those of Kroll et al. (2006) for similar aerosol masses. SOC yields reported in this work range from 0.5-1.4% for carbon masses between 17 and 49 μgC m-3.

  13. Condensation reactions of guanidines with bis-electrophiles: Formation of highly nitrogenous heterocyclesa

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, David M.; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Anderson, Shelby M.; Wipf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    2-Amino-1,4-dihydropyrimidines were reacted with bis-electrophiles to produce novel fused bi-pyrimidine, pyrimido-aminotriazine, and pyrimido-sulfonamide scaffolds. In addition, a quinazoline library was constructed using a guanidine Atwal-Biginelli reaction with 1-(quinazolin-2-yl)guanidines. The product heterocycles have novel constitutions with high nitrogen atom counts and represent valuable additions to screening libraries for the discovery of new modulators of biological targets. PMID:23976798

  14. Atmospheric fate of OH initiated oxidation of terpenes. Reaction mechanism of alpha-pinene degradation and secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Librando, Vito; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2005-05-01

    This paper studies the reaction products of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, sabinene, 3-carene and limonene with OH radicals and of alpha-pinene with ozone using FT-IR spectroscopy for measuring gas phase products and HPLC-MS-MS to measure products in the aerosol phase. These techniques were used to investigate the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the terpenes. The gas phase reaction products were all quantified using reference compounds. At low terpene concentrations (0.9-2.1 ppm), the molar yields of gas phase reaction products were: HCHO 16-92%, HCOOH 10-54% (OH source: H2O2, 6-25 ppm); HCHO 127-148%, HCOOH 4-6% (OH source: CH3ONO, 5-8 ppm). At high terpene concentrations (4.1-13.2 ppm) the results were: HCHO 9-27%, HCOOH 15-23%, CH3(CO)CH3 0-14%, CH3COOH 0-5%, nopinone 24% (only from beta-pinene oxidation), limona ketone 61% (only from limonene oxidation), pinonaldehyde was identified during alpha-pinene degradation (OH source H2O2, 23-30 ppm); HCHO 76-183%, HCOOH 12-15%, CH3(CO)CH3 0-12%, nopinone 17% (from beta-pinene oxidation), limona ketone 48% (from limonene oxidation), pinonaldehyde was identified during alpha-pinene degradation (OH source CH3ONO, 14-16 ppm). Pinic acid, pinonic acid, limonic acid, limoninic acid, 3-caric acid, 3-caronic acid and sabinic acid were identified in the aerosol phase. On the basis of these results, we propose a formation mechanism for pinonic and pinic acid in the aerosol phase explaining how degradation products could influence SOA formation and growth in the troposphere.

  15. Effect of temperature on the reaction pathway of calcium carbonate formation via precursor phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Konrad, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It has been earlier postulated that some biogenic and sedimentary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals (e.g. calcite and aragonite) are secondary in origin and have originally formed via a metastable calcium carbonate precursor phase (e.g. amorphous CaCO3, [1-2]). Such formation pathways are likely affected by various physicochemical parameters including aqueous Mg and temperature. In an effort to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of CaCO3 minerals, precipitation experiments were carried out by the addition of a 0.6 M (Ca,Mg)Cl2 solution at distinct Mg/Ca ratios (1/4 and 1/8) into a 1 M NaHCO3 solution under constant pH conditions(8.3 ±0.1). The formation of CaCO3 was systematically examined as a function of temperature (6, 12, 18 and 25 ±0.3° C). During the experimental runs mineral precipitation was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. The results revealed two pathways of CaCO3 formation depending on the initial Mg/Ca ratio and temperature: (i) In experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/4 at ≤ 12° C as well as in experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/8 at ≤ 18° C, ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) acts as a precursor phase for aragonite formation. (ii) In contrast higher temperatures induced the formation of Mg-rich amorphous CaCO3 (Mg-ACC) which was subsequently transformed to Mg-rich calcite. In situ Raman spectra showed that the transformation of Mg-ACC to Mg-calcite occurs at a higher rate (˜ 8 min) compared to that of ikaite to aragonite (> 2 h). Thus, the formation of aragonite rather than of Mg-calcite occurs due to the slower release of Ca2+and CO32- ions into the Mg-rich reactive solution during retarded ikaite dissolution. This behavior is generally consistent with the observation that calcite precipitation is inhibited at elevated aqueous Mg/Ca ratios. [1] Addadi L., Raz S. and Weiner S. (2003) Advanced Materials 15, 959-970. [2] Rodriguez-Blanco J. D

  16. Formation of left-lateral fractures within the Summit Ridge shear zone, 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.; Fleming, R.W. |

    1993-12-01

    The 1989 Loma Prieta, California, earthquake is characterized by the lack of major, throughgoing, coseismic, right-lateral faulting along strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the epicentral area. Instead, throughout the Summit Ridge area there are zones of tension cracks and left-lateral fracture zones oriented about N45 deg W, that is, roughly parallel to the San Andreas fault in this area. The left-lateral fractures zones are enigmatic because their left-lateral slip is opposite to the right-lateral sense of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. We suggest that the enigmatic fractures can be understood if we assume that coesiesmic deformation was by right-lateral shear across a broad zone, about 0.5 km wide and 4 km long, beneath Summit Ridge. Contrary to most previous reports on the Loma Prieta earthquake, which assert that coseismic, right-lateral ground rupture was restricted to considerable (greater than 4 km) depths in the epicentral area, we find that nearly all the right-lateral offset is represented at the ground surface by the Summit Ridge shear zone.

  17. Interfacial Reaction-Driven Formation of Silica Carbonate Biomorphs with Subcellular Topographical Features and Their Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Zhao, Xiaobing; Möller, Marco; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-10-28

    We report the interfacial reaction-driven formation of micro/nanostructured strontium carbonate (SrCO3) biomorphs with subcellular topographical features on strontium zinc silicate (Sr2ZnSi2O7) biomedical coatings and explore their potential use in bone tissue engineering. The resulting SrCO3 crystals build a well-integrated scaffold surface that not only prevents burst release of ions from the coating but also presents nanotopographical features similar to cellular filopodia. The surface with biomorphic crystals enhances osteoblast adhesion, upregulates the alkaline phosphatase activity, and increases collagen production, highlighting the potential of the silica carbonate biomorphs for tissue regeneration.

  18. Effect of roasting time of buckwheat groats on the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Małgorzata, Wronkowska; Konrad, Piskuła Mariusz; Zieliński, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity of buckwheat, induced by roasting at 160 °C for 30, 40 and 50 min, were evaluated in the study. Furozine, was detected after roasting, in all buckwheat samples. Increase of FIC, the presence of significant amounts of CML and enhanced browning were observed, along with increasing times of roasting. The formation of acrylamide in the obtained buckwheat products was also significantly connected with the time of roasting. A significant degradation was observed in natural antioxidants, as affected by heat treatment time. The colour parameter changed significantly with the increasing of roasting time. Overall, 30min of roasting was beneficial from a nutritional point of view for the obtained buckwheat product.

  19. Asymmetrical ClO3 - Its possible formation from ClO and O2 and its possible reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Adams, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of recent accurate experimental studies of Cl2-photosensitized O3 decomposition, in which O3 disappearance and OClO formation were directly monitored, suggests the possibility that the suppression of the quantum yield in the presence of O2 may be due to the formation of asymmetrical chlorine trioxide (ClO.O2). Other intermediaries, such as Cl2O2, which may also form in the system are not thought to explain the observations. In addition to its capacity to oxidize, which it shares with other peroxo compounds, asymmetrical ClO3 appears to undergo an interesting class of reactions in which the loosely bound O2 adduct is relatively easily displaced by reactive atoms and radicals such as chlorine.

  20. Influence of reaction time and temperature on product formation and characteristics associated with the hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaowei; Pellechia, Perry J; Flora, Joseph R V; Berge, Nicole D

    2013-06-01

    Studies have demonstrated that hydrothermal carbonization of biomass and waste streams results in the formation of beneficial materials/resources with minimal greenhouse gas production. Data necessary to understand how critical process conditions influence carbonization mechanisms, product formation, and associated environmental implications are currently lacking. The purpose of this work is to hydrothermally carbonize cellulose at different temperatures and to systematically sample over a 96-h period to determine how changes in reaction temperature influence product evolution. Understanding cellulose carbonization will provide insight to carbonization of cellulosic biomass and waste materials. Results from batch experiments indicate that the majority of cellulose conversion occurs between the first 0.5-4h, and faster conversion occurs at higher temperatures. Data collected over time suggest cellulose solubilization occurs prior to conversion. The composition of solids recovered after 96h is similar at all temperatures, consisting primarily of sp(2) carbons (furanic and aromatic groups) and alkyl groups.

  1. Formation of a necklike structure in 35Cl+12C and 197Au reactions at 43 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochelle, Y.; Gingras, L.; Beaulieu, L.; Qian, X.; Saddiki, Z.; Djerroud, B.; Doré, D.; Laforest, R.; Roy, R.; Samri, M.; St-Pierre, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bowman, D. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hagberg, E.; Horn, D.; López, J. A.; Robinson, T.

    1997-04-01

    The experimental signature of the formation of a necklike structure, with a velocity between that of the projectilelike emitter and that of the targetlike emitter, is investigated with the same beam and experimental setup for targets lighter and heavier than the projectile. The reactions are 35Cl on 12C and on 197Au at 43 MeV/nucleon. Particle velocity distributions are compared with two-source statistical simulations and the presence of a necklike structure is inferred from the data. In the second part of the paper, dynamical model simulations with the formation of a necklike structure are presented for the 35Cl+12C system at 43 MeV/nucleon.

  2. The first chiral diene-based metal-organic frameworks for highly enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawano, Takahiro; Ji, Pengfei; McIsaac, Alexandra R.; Lin, Zekai; Abney, Carter W.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-02-01

    We have designed the first chiral diene-based metal–organic framework (MOF), E₂-MOF, and postsynthetically metalated E₂-MOF with Rh(I) complexes to afford highly active and enantioselective single-site solid catalysts for C–C bond formation reactions. Treatment of E₂-MOF with [RhCl(C₂H₄)₂]₂ led to a highly enantioselective catalyst for 1,4-additions of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones, whereas treatment of E₂-MOF with Rh(acac)(C₂H₄)₂ afforded a highly efficient catalyst for the asymmetric 1,2-additions of arylboronic acids to aldimines. Interestingly, E₂-MOF·Rh(acac) showed higher activity and enantioselectivity than the homogeneous control catalyst, likely due to the formation of a true single-site catalyst in the MOF. E₂-MOF·Rh(acac) was also successfully recycled and reused at least seven times without loss of yield and enantioselectivity.

  3. Design requirements for ERD in diffusion-dominated media: how do injection interval, bioactive zones and reaction kinetics affect remediation performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J.; Lemming, G.; Manoli, G.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P.; Binning, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) has been successfully used in high permeability media, such as sand aquifers, and is considered to be a promising technology for low permeability settings. Pilot and full-scale applications of ERD at several sites in Denmark have shown that the main challenge is to get contact between the injected bacteria and electron donor and the contaminants trapped in the low-permeability matrix. Sampling of intact cores from the low-permeability matrix has shown that the bioactive zones (where degradation occurs) are limited in the matrix, due to the slow diffusion transport processes, and this affects the timeframes for the remediation. Due to the limited ERD applications and the complex transport and reactive processes occurring in low-permeability media, design guidelines are currently not available for ERD in such settings, and remediation performance assessments are limited. The objective of this study is to combine existing knowledge from several sites with numerical modeling to assess the effect of the injection interval, development of bioactive zones and reaction kinetics on the remediation efficiency for ERD in diffusion-dominated media. A numerical model is developed to simulate ERD at a contaminated site, where the source area (mainly TCE) is located in a clayey till with fractures and interbedded sand lenses. Such contaminated sites are common in North America and Europe. Hydro-geological characterization provided information on geological heterogeneities and hydraulic parameters, which are relevant for clay till sites in general. The numerical model couples flow and transport in the fracture network and low-permeability matrix. Sequential degradation of TCE to ethene is modeled using Monod kinetics, and the kinetic parameters are obtained from laboratory experiments. The influence of the reaction kinetics on remediation efficiency is assessed by varying the biomass concentration of the specific degraders. The injected

  4. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  5. Shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene - Sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism for soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Gardiner, W. C., Jr.; Stein, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of thermodynamic parameters on the sensitivity of model predictions of soot formation by shock-tube pyrolysis of acetylene were assessed analytically. The pyrolysis process was treated as having three components: initiation, the initial pyrolysis stages; cyclization, formation of larger molecules and radicals and small aromatic molecules; and polymerization, further growth of aromatic rings. Rate equations are reviewed for each component. Thermodynamic effects were assessed by varying the C2H-H and C2H3-H bond energies and the Ct-(Ct) group additivity value. Any change in the C2H-H bond energy had a significant impact on the temperature and the maximum amount of the soot yield. The findings underscore the necessity of using accurate thermodynamic data for modeling high-temperature chemical kinetics.

  6. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  7. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  8. Acetonitrile and N-Chloroacetamide Formation from the Reaction of Acetaldehyde and Monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Susana Y; Vu, Trang Nha; Komaki, Yukako; Plewa, Michael J; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-08-18

    Nitriles and amides are two classes of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with chloramination that are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than regulated DBPs. Monochloramine reacts with acetaldehyde, a common ozone and free chlorine disinfection byproduct, to form 1-(chloroamino)ethanol. Equilibrium (K1) and forward and reverse rate (k1,k-1) constants for the reaction between initial reactants and 1-(chloroamino)ethanol were determined between 2 and 30 °C. Activation energies for k1 and k-1 were 3.04 and 45.2 kJ·mol(-1), respectively, and enthalpy change for K1 was -42.1 kJ·mol(-1). In parallel reactions, 1-(chloroamino)ethanol (1) slowly dehydrated (k2) to (chloroimino)ethane that further decomposed to acetonitrile and (2) was oxidized (k3) by monochloramine to produce N-chloroacetamide. Both reactions were acid/base catalyzed, and rate constants were characterized at 10, 18, and 25 °C. Modeling for drinking water distribution system conditions showed that N-chloroacetamide and acetonitrile concentrations were 5-9 times higher at pH 9.0 compared to 7.8. Furthermore, acetonitrile concentration was found to form 7-10 times higher than N-chloroacetamide under typical monochloramine and acetaldehyde concentrations. N-chloroacetamide cytotoxicity (LC50 = 1.78 × 10(-3) M) was comparable to dichloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide, but less potent than N,2-dichloroacetamide and chloroacetamide. While N-chloroacetamide was not found to be genotoxic, N,2-dichloroacetamide genotoxic potency (5.19 × 10(-3) M) was on the same order of magnitude as chloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide.

  9. Antioxidants Inhibit Formation of 3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol Esters in Model Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang; Jia, Hanbing; Shen, Mingyue; Wang, Yuting; Nie, Shaoping; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Yongqiang; Wang, Yuanxing; Xie, Mingyong

    2015-11-11

    The capacities of six antioxidants to inhibit the formation of 3-monochloropropane-1,2 diol (3-MCPD) esters were examined in this study. Inhibitory capacities of the antioxidants were investigated both in chemical models containing the precursors (tripalmitoyl glycerol, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol, monopalmitoyl glycerol, and sodium chloride) of 3-MCPD esters and in oil models (rapeseed oil and sodium chloride). Six antioxidants, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA), tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), propyl gallate (PG), L-ascorbyl palmitate (AP), and α-tocopherol (VE), were found to exhibit inhibiting capacities on 3-MCPD ester formation both in chemical models and in oil models. TBHQ provided the highest inhibitory capacity both in chemical models and in oil models; 44% of 3-MCPD ester formation was inhibited in the presence of TBHQ (66 mg/kg of oil) after heating of rapeseed oil at 230 °C for 30 min, followed by PG and AP. BHT, BHA, and VE appeared to have weaker inhibitory abilities in both models. VE exhibited the lowest inhibition rate; 22% of 3-MCPD esters were inhibited in the presence of VE (172 mg/kg of oil) after heating of rapeseed oil at 230 °C for 30 min. In addition, the inhibition rates of PG and VE decreased dramatically with an increase in temperature or heating time. The results suggested that some antioxidants, such as TBHQ, PG, and AP, could be the potential inhibitors of 3-MCPD esters in practice.

  10. Formation of macrocyclic lactones in the Paternò-Büchi dimerization reaction.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Junya; Mizuta, Tsutomu; Hiraga, Yoshikazu; Abe, Manabu

    2011-02-28

    Furan-2-ylmethyl 2-oxoacetates 1a,b, in which the furan ring and the carbonyl moiety were embedded intramolecularly, were synthesized from commercially available furan-2-ylmethanol and their photochemical reaction (hν > 290 nm) was investigated. Twelve-membered macrocyclic lactones 2a,b with C(i) symmetry including two oxetane-rings, which are the Paternò-Büchi dimerization products, were isolated in ca. 20% yield. The intramolecular cyclization products, such as 3-alkoxyoxetane and 2,7-dioxabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene derivatives, were not detected in the photolysate.

  11. Wotherspoon criteria combined with B cell clonality analysis by advanced polymerase chain reaction technology discriminates covert gastric marginal zone lymphoma from chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, M; Oeschger, S; Barth, T F E; Loddenkemper, C; Cogliatti, S B; Marx, A; Wacker, H‐H; Feller, A C; Bernd, H‐W; Hansmann, M‐L; Stein, H; Möller, P

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is a well defined B cell lymphoma yet often impossible to distinguish from severe chronic gastritis on morphological grounds alone. Therefore, it was suggested to use the clonality of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (H) genes, as detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as a decisive criterion. However, there is controversy as to whether B cell clonality also exists in chronic gastritis, hence rendering this approach futile at present. Methods An expert panel re‐examined the histology and immunohistochemistry of a total of 97 cases of gastric biopsies, including clearcut marginal zone lymphoma, chronic gastritis, and ambiguous cases, applying the Wotherspoon criteria on the basis of haematoxylin‐eosin and CD20 immunostainings. In addition, a new and advanced PCR system for detection of clonal IgH gene rearrangements was independently applied in two institutions in each case. Results The overall IgH clonality assessments of both institutions were in total agreement. Overt lymphoma (Wotherspoon score 5) was clonal in 24/26 cases. Chronic gastritis (Wotherspoon scores 1 and 2) was not clonal in 52/53 cases; the clonal case being Wotherspoon score 2. Of 18 cases with ambiguous histology (Wotherspoon scores 3 and 4) four were clonal. Conclusions Using advanced PCR technology, clonal gastritis is extremely rare, if it exists at all. Thus B cell clonality in Wotherspoon 3 and 4 cases is regarded as suitable for definitively diagnosing gastric marginal zone lymphoma. PMID:16423889

  12. Preparation of salvianolic acid A by the degradation reaction of salvianolic acid B in subcritical water integrated with pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaizhi; Cheng, Yan; Dong, Hongjing; Wang, Xiao; Li, Jia; Gao, Qianshan

    2016-10-14

    Salvianolic acid A is the major bioactive compound in Danshen, however, due to the chemical instability and low content in Danshen, it is difficult to extract amount of salvianolic acid A. Therefore, this study was to establish an effective strategy for obtaining adequate amount of salvianolic acid A, subcritical water extraction was used to degrade salvianolic acid B and prepare salvianolic acid A. Different reaction conditions including temperature, time, concentration and pH value in subcritical water were investigated. Under 40mg/mL of reactant concentration, 180°C of temperature, 4.0 of pH value and 60min of reaction time, the highest yield rate of salvianolic acid A reached 34.86%. Then, the degradation products were successfully separated by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography with the solvent system Pet-EtAc-n-BuOH-H2O (2:3:1:9, v/v), where 10mM TFA was added in stationary phase and 10mM NH3·H2O in mobile phase. As a result, a total of 227.3mg of salvianolic acid A at 98.2% purity, 38.9mg of danshensu at 99.3% purity, 9.5mg of salvianolic acid D at 92.7% purity, and 32.8mg of protocatechuic aldehyde at 93.1% purity were obtained from 1.2g degradation products of salvianolic acid B by one-step purification. The results demonstrated that the combinative application of subcritical water and pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography is a potential technique for the preparative separation of salvianolic acid A from salvianolic acid B.

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography-fluorometric determination of selenium based on selenotrisulfide formation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, T.; Aoyama, E.; Hasegawa, N.; Kobayashi, N.; Tanaka, H.

    1989-02-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorometric method has been developed for selective determination of selenium(IV). The method involves precolumn reaction of selenium(IV) with penicillamine (Pen) to produce stable selenotrisulfide (Pen-SSeS-Pen) and subsequent derivatization to a fluorophore by reaction with 7-fluoro-4-nitrobenz-2,1,3-oxadiazole. The fluorophore was separated by reversed-phase HPLC and selenium content was determined by fluorometric detection. The calibration plots showed a linear relationship in the range of 10-2000 ppb of selenium(IV) with a detection limit of 5 ppb (signal to noise ratio (S/N) > 2). The method could determine total content of selenium in biological and environmental samples after digestion of the samples and reduction of selenium(VI) to selenium(IV). The results from standard samples indicated satisfactory agreement with those obtained by other established methods and certified values with good reproducibility. This method is as sensitive as, but simpler in operation than, conventional fluorometry using diaminonaphthalene.

  14. Development of a reduced model of formation reactions in Zr-Al nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Manav; Winokur, Justin; Overdeep, Kyle R.; Marcello, Paul; Weihs, Timothy P.; Knio, Omar M.

    2014-12-21

    A computational model of anaerobic reactions in metallic multilayered systems with an equimolar composition of zirconium and aluminum is developed. The reduced reaction formalism of M. Salloum and O. M. Knio, Combust. Flame 157(2): 288–295 (2010) is adopted. Attention is focused on quantifying intermixing rates based on experimental measurements of uniform ignition as well as measurements of self-propagating front velocities. Estimates of atomic diffusivity are first obtained based on a regression analysis. A more elaborate Bayesian inference formalism is then applied in order to assess the impact of uncertainties in the measurements, potential discrepancies between predictions and observations, as well as the sensitivity of predictions to inferred parameters. Intermixing rates are correlated in terms of a composite Arrhenius law, which exhibits a discontinuity around the Al melting temperature. Analysis of the predictions indicates that Arrhenius parameters inferred for the low-temperature branch lie within a tight range, whereas the parameters of the high-temperature branch are characterized by higher uncertainty. The latter is affected by scatter in the experimental measurements, and the limited range of bilayers where observations are available. For both branches, the predictions exhibit higher sensitivity to the activation energy than the pre-exponent, whose posteriors are highly correlated.

  15. Formation of Lunar Mg-Spinel Lithologies by Melt-Wallrock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganskow, G.; Parman, S. W.; Prissel, T. C.; Jackson, C.; Dhingra, D.; Cheek, L.; Liang, Y.; Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent remote mineralogical data acquired by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) has led to the identification of Mg-spinel-rich lithologies, likely associated with anorthosites [1,2]. This rock type has three notable petrologic characteristics: 1) a high fraction of spinel (~ 30%) 2) a low fraction of mafic minerals (less than 5% olivine or pyroxene) and 3) an unusual spinel composition (low-Fe (<5%), low-Cr and high Al). In contrast, most lunar spinels are Fe-rich ulvöspinels and chromites, which are the product of low pressure crystallization from Fe-rich lunar picritic basalts [3]. The Mg-rich spinels in the anorthosite are most similar to those found in pink spinel troctolites. The anorthosite differs from the spinel troctolite in having smaller amounts of mafic minerals and lower FeO contents in the spinel (5% versus 10% [4]). The high spinel mode, low Fe content of the spinel and lack of mafic minerals in the spinel anorthosite are not consistent with simple crystal fractionation of or crystal accumulation from basaltic lunar magma compositions [3]. However, Mg-rich spinel has been produced in experiments examining the compositions of lunar basalts which dissolved anorthosite [5]. This suggests a mechanism for forming spinel-bearing anorthosites by melt-wallrock reaction of lunar basaltic magmas with the anorthositic crust. Such reactive processes are well documented in terrestrial magmatic systems [6]. To test whether melt-wallrock reaction could have produced the spinel-anorthosite, we have conducted a set of experiments in which Apollo 15C green glass and pure anorthite glass were juxtaposed. Experiments at 1400-1450oC and 1-8 kbar produced an assemblage of anorthite, spinel (>10%) and minor mafics (<5%) in the reacted anorthite portion of the assembly. The experimental spinels are high-Mg, low-Cr and low-Fe (~10 wt%) spinels. The spinels are very similar to those found in the pink-spinel troctolites, but too high in Fe compared to the inferred composition

  16. The dynamics of serpentinite dehydration reactions in subduction zones: Constrains from the Cerro del Almirez ultramafic massif (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilissen, Nicole; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Arc volcanism, earthquakes and subduction dynamics are controlled by fluids from downgoing slabs and their effect on the melting and rheology of the overlying mantle wedge. High pressure dehydration of serpentinite in the slab and the subduction channel is considered as one of the main sources of fluids in subduction zones. Even though this metamorphic reaction is essential in subduction activities, the behavior of the fluids, the kinetics and thermodynamics during the breakdown reaction are still poorly understood. The Cerro del Almirez (Nevado-Filábride Complex, Betic Cordillera, SE Spain) uniquely preserves the dehydration front from antigorite serpentinite to chlorite-harzburgite and constitutes a unique natural laboratory to investigate high-pressure dehydration of serpentinite. This reaction occurred in a subduction setting releasing up to 13 wt% of water, contributing significantly to the supply of fluids to the overlying mantle wedge. A key to the understanding of the metamorphic conditions prevailing during serpentinite dehydration is to study the two prominent textures -granofels and spinifex-like chlorite harzburgite- occurring in this reaction product. The detailed texture differences in the Chl-harzburgite can provide insights into diverse kinetic and thermodynamic conditions of this dehydration reaction due to variations in effective pressure and drainage conditions. It has been proposed that difference in overpressure (P') and deviation from growth equilibrium, i.e. overstepping, is responsible for these two types of textures [Padrón-Navarta et al., 2011]. The magnitude and duration of P' is highly dependent on dehydration kinetics [Connolly, 1997]. The fast pressure drop, with spinifex-texture as a product, can be linked to draining events expected after hydrofracturing, which are recorded in grain size reduction zones in this massif. According to this hypothesis, mapping of textural variation in Chl-harzburgite might be used as a proxy to

  17. Chloroacetonitrile and n,2-dichloroacetamide formation from the reaction of chloroacetaldehyde and monochloramine in water.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Susana Y; Komaki, Yukako; Plewa, Michael J; Mariñas, Benito J

    2013-01-01

    Combined chlorine is increasingly being used as an alternative disinfectant to free chlorine to maintain a residual in drinking water distribution systems mainly because it would reduce the formation of regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. However, the use of combined chlorine could promote the formation of currently unregulated nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) such as haloacetonitriles and haloacetamides that are found to be more cyto- and genotoxic than regulated DBPs. Monochloramine quickly reacts with chloroacetaldehyde, a DBP formed during primary disinfection with free chlorine, forming and reaching pseudoequilibrium (equilibrium constant K1 = 1.87 × 10(3) M(-1)) with the carbinolamine 2-chloro-1-(chloroamino)ethanol. 2-Chloro-1-(chloroamino)ethanol undergoes slow dehydration to form the imine 1-chloro-2-(chloroimino)ethane that decomposes at a faster rate to chloroacetonitrile. 2-Chloro-1-(chloroamino)ethanol is also oxidized by monochloramine to produce the previously unreported DBP N,2-dichloroacetamide. The carbinolamine dehydration step was found to be acid/base catalyzed (k2(0) = 3.30 × 10(-6) s(-1), k2(H) = 2.43 M(-1) s(-1), k2(OH) = 3.90 M(-1) s(-1)). In contrast, N,2-dichloroacetamide formation was observed to be only base catalyzed (k3(OH) = 3.03 × 10(4) M(-2) s(-1)). N,2-dichloroacetamide cytotoxicity (LC50 = 2.56 × 10(-4) M) was found to be slightly lower compared to that reported for chloroacetamide but higher than those of di- and trichloroacetamide.

  18. Reaction between HN and SN: a possible channel for the interstellar formation of N2 and SH in the cold interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Bhasi, Priya; Nhlabatsi, Zanele P; Sitha, Sanyasi

    2015-12-28

    Using computational calculations the potential energy surface (PES) of the reaction between NH and NS has been analysed. The PES of the reaction shows the formation of two very stable species, HNSN and HNNS. Out of these two, HNNS which has the signature N-N linkage was found to be the most stable species in the PES. In view of the highly exothermic nature of the reaction surface, it has been proposed that these two species can possibly be detected in the interstellar space. For the first time it has also been shown that the reaction between the NH and NS can lead to the possible formation of N2via the isomer HNNS, and how the effect of tunnelling can make this reaction very much feasible, even under the extremely low temperature conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium. Based on the already reported results, a similar kind of behaviour for the NH + NO reaction surface has also been proposed. These dissociation reactions leading to the formation of N2 can be considered as potential secondary contributing channels while accounting for the total estimates of N2 in the interstellar medium, and thus HNNS as well as HNNO can be considered as stable reservoir molecules for interstellar N2. Besides the formation of N2, the formation of another astronomically important radical, SH in the cold interstellar clouds, has also been proposed.

  19. Thermal evolution of the Sisters shear zone, southern New Zealand; Formation of the Great South Basin and onset of Pacific-Antarctic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Joseph; Tulloch, Andy J.; Spell, Terry L.; Wells, Michael L.; Zanetti, Kathleen A.

    2009-10-01

    The separation of Zealandia from West Antarctica was the final stage in the Cretaceous breakup of the Gondwana Pacific margin. Continental extension resulting in formation of the Great South Basin and thinning of the Campbell Plateau leading to development of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge was partially accommodated along the Sisters shear zone. This east-northeast striking brittle-ductile structure exposed along the southeast coast of Stewart Island, New Zealand, is a greenschist facies extensional shear zone that separates a hanging wall of chloritic, brecciated granites, and undeformed conglomerate from a footwall of mylonitic Carboniferous and Early Cretaceous granites. This complex structure exhibits bivergent kinematics and can be subdivided into a northern and southern segment. The 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicates that cooling of the shear zone footwall began at ˜94 Ma with accelerated cooling over the interval ˜89-82 Ma. Structural and thermochronological data indicate a spatial and temporal link between the Sisters shear zone, initial sedimentation within the offshore Great South Basin, extension of the Campbell Plateau, and initiation of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge.

  20. Formation of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins in the transition zones of fire blight-infected stems of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference'.

    PubMed

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Beuerle, Till; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-05-01

    In the rosaceous subtribe Pyrinae (formerly subfamily Maloideae), pathogen attack leads to formation of biphenyls and dibenzofurans. Accumulation of these phytoalexins was studied in greenhouse-grown grafted shoots of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference' after inoculation with the fire blight bacterium, Erwinia amylovora. No phytoalexins were found in leaves. However, both classes of defence compounds were detected in the transition zone of stems. The flanking stem segments above and below this zone, which were necrotic and healthy, respectively, were devoid of detectable phytoalexins. The transition zone of apple stems contained the biphenyls 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyaucuparin, aucuparin, noraucuparin and 2'-hydroxyaucuparin and the dibenzofurans eriobofuran and noreriobofuran. In pear, aucuparin, 2'-hydroxyaucuparin, noreriobofuran and in addition 3,4,5-trimethoxybiphenyl were detected. The total phytoalexin content in the transition zone of pear was 25 times lower than that in apple. Leaves and stems of mock-inoculated apple and pear shoots lacked phytoalexins. A number of biphenyls and dibenzofurans were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against some Erwinia amylovora strains. The most efficient compound was 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl (MIC=115 μg/ml), the immediate product of biphenyl synthase which initiates phytoalexin biosynthesis.

  1. Supraglacial Lakes in the Percolation Zone of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet: Formation and Development using Operation IceBridge Snow Radar and ATM (2009-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Howat, I. M.; de la Peña, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface meltwater lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet have appeared at higher elevations, extending well into the percolation zone, under recent warming, with the largest expansion occurring in the western Greenland Ice Sheet. The conditions that allow lakes to form atop firn are poorly constrained, but the formation of new lakes imply changes in the permeability of the firn at high elevations, promoting meltwater runoff. We explore the formation and evolution of new surface lakes in this region above 1500 meters, using a combination of satellite imagery and repeat Snow (2-6.5 GHz) radar echograms and LIDAR measurements from NASA's Operation IceBridge of 2009-2014. We identify conditions for surface lake formation at their farthest inland extent and suggest behaviors of persistence and lake drainage are due to differences in regional ice dynamics.

  2. Formation of Zones of Plastic Strain in Quenched and Tempered Steel 09G2S During Dynamic Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, M. Yu.; Shaimanov, G. S.; Simonov, Yu. N.

    2016-03-01

    The shape and size parameters of zones of plastic strain under fracture surfaces of quenched and tempered steel 09G2S are estimated. The shapes of the zones of plastic strain (PSZ) are studied after all the tested modes of heat treatment. Maps of distribution of the microhardness are plotted for complete PSZ of specimens standardized by GOST 9454-78 with relative crack length 0.55 and for specially prepared specimens with additional side V-notches with relative crack length 0.5.

  3. Formation of indoor nitrous acid (HONO) by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions with white wall paint.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Vincent; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Alvarez, Elena Gómez; Gandolfo, Adrien; Strekowski, Rafal; Quivet, Etienne; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) represents an oxidant that is present in relatively high concentrations in various indoor settings. Remarkably increased NO2 levels up to 1.5 ppm are associated with homes using gas stoves. The heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with adsorbed water on surfaces lead to the generation of nitrous acid (HONO). Here, we present a HONO source induced by heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with selected indoor paint surfaces in the presence of light (300 nm<λ<400 nm). We demonstrate that the formation of HONO is much more pronounced at elevated relative humidity. In the presence of light (5.5 W m(-2)), an increase of HONO production rate of up to 8.6·10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) was observed at [NO2]=60 ppb and 50% relative humidity (RH). At higher light intensity of 10.6 (W m(-2)), the HONO production rate increased to 2.1·10(10) molecules cm(-2) s(-1). A high NO2 to HONO conversion yield of up to 84% was observed. This result strongly suggests that a light-driven process of indoor HONO production is operational. This work highlights the potential of paint surfaces to generate HONO within indoor environments by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions.

  4. Rhodium Complexes Promoting C-O Bond Formation in Reactions with Oxygen: The Role of Superoxo Species.

    PubMed

    Vilella-Arribas, Laia; García-Melchor, Max; Balcells, David; Lledós, Agustí; López, José A; Sancho, Sofía; Villarroya, B Eva; Del Río, M Pilar; Ciriano, Miguel A; Tejel, Cristina

    2017-01-28

    C-O bond formation in reactions of olefins with oxygen is a long standing challenge in chemistry for which the very complicated-sometimes controversial-mechanistic panorama slows down the design of catalysts for oxygenations. In this regard, the mechanistic details of the oxidation of the complex [Rh(cod)(Ph2 N3 )] (1) (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) with oxygen to the unique 2-rhodaoxetane compound [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(Ph2 N3 )}2 ] (2) has been investigated by DFT calculations. The results of this study provide evidences for a novel bimetallic mechanism in which two rhodium atoms redistribute the four electrons involved in the cleavage of the O=O bond. Furthermore, both oxygen atoms are used to create two new C-O bonds in a controlled fashion with 100 % atom economy. The key intermediates that we have found in this process are a mononuclear open-shell triplet superoxo compound, an open-shell singlet "μ-(peroxo)" derivative, and a closed-shell singlet "bis(μ-oxo)" complex. Some of the findings are used to predict the reactions of Rh(I) complexes with oxygen, exemplified by that of the complex [Rh(cod)(OnapyMe2 )] (3). Starting from 3, [{Rh(OC8 H12 )(OnapyMe2 )}2 ] (4) has been prepared and characterized, which represents the second example of a 2-rhodaoxetane compound coming from an oxygenation reaction with oxygen.

  5. Ammonia formation from NO reaction with surface hydroxyls on rutile TiO2 (110) - 1×1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Boseong; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2015-01-15

    The reaction of NO with hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110)-1×1 surface (h-TiO2) was investigated as a function of NO coverage using temperature-programmed desorption. Our results show that NO reaction with h-TiO2 leads to formation of NH3 which is observed to desorb at ~ 400 K. Interestingly, the amount of NH3 produced depends nonlinearly on the coverage of NO. The yield increases up to a saturation value of ~1.3×1013 NH3/cm2 at a NO dose of 5×1013 NO/cm2, but subsequently decreases at higher NO doses. Preadsorbed H2O is found to have a negligible effect on the NH3 desorption yield. Additionally, no NH3 is formed in the absence of surface hydroxyls (HOb’s) upon coadsorption of NO and H2O on a stoichiometric TiO2(110) (s-TiO2(110)). Based on these observations, we conclude that nitrogen from NO has a strong preference to react with HOb’s on the bridge-bonded oxygen rows (but not with H2O) to form NH3. The absolute NH3 yield is limited by competing reactions of HOb species with titanium-bound oxygen adatoms to form H2O. Our results provide new mechanistic insight about the interactions of NO with hydroxyl groups on TiO2(110) .

  6. The effect of reaction conditions on formation of wet precipitated calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen; Cao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    The precipitation process discussed in the present study involves the addition of alkaline solutions to an acidic calcium phosphate suspension. Several parameters (pH, pH buffer reagent, ageing and stirring) were investigated. The synthesized powders were calcined at 1000°C for 1 h in air, in order to study the thermal stability and crystalline phase compositions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ESEM analysis were used for sample characterization. It is found that all these processing parameters affect the crystalline phases evolved and resultant microstructures. Phase evolution occurred at an elevated pH level. The pH buffer reagent would affect both the phase composition and microstructure. Ageing was essential for the phase maturation. Stirring accelerated the reaction process by providing a homogeneous medium for precipitation.

  7. Formation of hyperdeformed states in capture reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, A. S.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Scheid, W.

    2010-09-15

    The high-spin hyperdeformed nuclear states treated as dinuclear or quasimolecular configurations are suggested to be directly populated in heavy ion collisions at sub-barrier energies. Tunneling through the Coulomb barrier is considered using the quantum diffusion approach based on the formalism of reduced density matrix. The reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 86}Kr,{sup 124}Sn,{sup 136}Xe,{sup 138}Ba,{sup 140}Ce, {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni, and {sup 40,48}Ca+{sup 40,48}Ca, are suggested for populating high-spin hyperdeformed states. The partial production and identification cross sections for the hyperdeformed states are calculated as the functions of bombarding energy.

  8. Reaction of dimethyl ether with hydroxyl radicals: kinetic isotope effect and prereactive complex formation.

    PubMed

    Bänsch, Cornelie; Kiecherer, Johannes; Szöri, Milan; Olzmann, Matthias

    2013-09-05

    The kinetic isotope effect of the reactions OH + CH3OCH3 (DME) and OH + CD3OCD3 (DME-d6) was experimentally and theoretically studied. Experiments were carried out in a slow-flow reactor at pressures between 5 and 21 bar (helium as bath gas) with production of OH by laser flash photolysis of HNO3 and time-resolved detection of OH by laser-induced fluorescence. The temperature dependences of the rate coefficients obtained can be described by the following modified Arrhenius expressions: k(OH+DME) = (4.5 ± 1.3) × 10(-16) (T/K)(1.48) exp(66.6 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 292-650 K, P = 5.9-20.9 bar) and k(OH+DME-d6) = (7.3 ± 2.2) × 10(-23) (T/K)(3.57) exp(759.8 K/T) cm(3) s(-1) (T = 387-554 K, P = 13.0-20.4 bar). A pressure dependence of the rate coefficients was not observed. The agreement of our experimental results for k(OH+DME) with values from other authors is very good, and from a fit to all available literature data, we derived the following modified Arrhenius expression, which reproduces the values obtained in the temperature range T = 230-1500 K at pressures between 30 mbar and 21 bar to better than within ±20%: k(OH+DME) = 8.45 × 10(-18) (T/K)(2.07) exp(262.2 K/T) cm(3) s(-1). For k(OH+DME-d6), to the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study. For the analysis of the reaction pathway and the kinetic isotope effect, potential energy diagrams were calculated by using three different quantum chemical methods: (I) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//MP2/6-311G(d,p), (II) CCSD(T)/cc-pV(T,Q)Z//CCSD/cc-pVDZ, and (III) CBS-QB3. In all three cases, the reaction is predicted to proceed via a prereaction OH-ether complex with subsequent intramolecular hydrogen abstraction and dissociation to give the methoxymethyl radical and water. Overall rate coefficients were calculated by assuming a thermal equilibrium between the reactants and the prereaction complex and by calculating the rate coefficients of the hydrogen abstraction step from canonical transition state theory

  9. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  10. The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the isoprene + OH reaction in the absence of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jaoui, M.; Edney, E. O.

    2009-04-01

    The reaction of isoprene (C5H8) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the absence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to determine physical and chemical characteristics of the secondary organic aerosol formed. Experiments were conducted using a smog chamber operated in a steady-state mode permitting measurements of moderately low aerosol levels. GC-MS analysis was conducted to measure methyl butenediols in the gas phase and polyols in the aerosol phase. Analyses were made to obtain several bulk aerosol parameters from the reaction including values for the organic mass to organic carbon ratio, the effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), the organic peroxide fraction, and the aerosol yield. The gas phase analysis showed the presence of methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and four isomers of the methyl butenediols. These gas-phase compounds may serve as precursors for one or more of several compounds detected in the aerosol phase including 2-methylglyceric acid, three 2-methyl alkenetriols, and two 2-methyl tetrols. In contrast to most previous studies, the 2-methyl tetrols (and the 2-methyl alkenetriols) were found to form in the absence of acidic sulfate aerosol. A re-evaluation of field samples in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, during the summers of 2000 and 2001 indicated in the presence of the methyl butenediols from gas-phase denuder samples taken at the time. SOA/SOC (i.e., OM/OC) was found to average 1.9 in the absence of NOx. The effective enthalpy of vaporization was measured as 38.6 kJ mol-1, consistent with values that have previously been used in modeling studies. The yields in this work (using an independent technique than that previous) are lower than those of Kroll et al. (2006) for similar aerosol masses. SOC yields reported in this work range from 0.5-1.4% for carbon masses between 17 and 49 μgC m-3.

  11. Formation of nitroarenes from the reaction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with dinitrogen pentaoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.N. Jr.; Sweetman, J.A.; Zielinska, B.; Atkinson, R.; Winer, A.M.; Harger, W.P.

    1985-11-01

    Reactions of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (fluoranthene (FL), pyrene (PY), benz(a)anthracene (BaA), chrysene (CHRY), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and perylene (PER)), deposited on glass-fiber filters, with gaseous N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ in air were investigated in an all-Teflon chamber. Pyrene, FL, BaP, and BaA gave significant yields of nitro derivatives after only a 30-min exposure. In control exposures to NO/sub 2/ plus HNO/sub 3/ mixtures or to HNO/sub 3/ alone, the yields of nitro derivatives of PY, FL, and BaA were very low relative to those in the N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ exposures. The reactivity ranking of these PAH toward gaseous N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ was PY > FL > BaP > BaA > PER > CHRY. This order is significantly different from that previously observed for nitration of PAH deposited on glass-fiber filters and exposed to a flow of gaseous NO/sub 2/ + HNO/sub 3/ or for nitration of PAH in solution by NO/sub 2//N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ mixtures. It also differs from the reactivity ranking determined in this study for the reaction of these PAH with N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ in CCl/sub 4/ solution of PER > BaP > BaAgreater than or equal to PY > FL greater than or equal to CHRY. Environmental implications are discussed.

  12. Reaction of peroxynitrite with HEPES or MOPS results in the formation of nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K; Pfeiffer, S; Mayer, B

    1998-03-15

    We investigated the effects of organic buffers on the NO-like biological activities of ONOO-. In HEPES buffer (50 mM), ONOO- (1 mM) induced a 20-fold increase in endothelial cGMP accumulation and the effect was comparable to that elicited by a maximally active concentration of the NO donor DEA/NO. ONOO- produced a 12-fold increase of cGMP in MOPS buffer (50 mM), but was virtually inactive in phosphate buffer (50 mM). Electrochemical detection of NO showed that the biological effects of ONOO- in HEPES or MOPS were due to accumulation of compounds that released NO in the presence of copper ions. CuCl2-induced formation of NO was completely blocked by the Cu(I) chelator neocuproine but unaffected by the Cu(II) chelator cuprizone, pointing to a Cu(I)-catalyzed decomposition pathway. Formation of NO from ONOO- was not detectable in phosphate buffer, in agreement with the lack of effect of ONOO- on cGMP accumulation in this buffer. These data demonstrate that certain buffer components present in cell culture media may yield artificial results in experiments with authentic ONOO-.

  13. Magma formation in hot-slab subduction zones: Insights from hydrogen isotopes in Cascade Arc melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Clynne, M. A.; Rea, J.; Rasmussen, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    In a comparison of arcs globally, primitive basaltic magmas in the Cascades have slightly lower H2O concentrations, consistent with the hotter nature of the young subducted plate [Ruscitto et al., 2012]. In addition, geodynamic models [Syracuse et al., 2010] and geochemical studies [Cooper et al., 2012] agree that slab surface temperatures beneath the Cascade arc axis are hotter, on average, than in many other arcs. Data on volatiles and their relationships to fluid mobile trace elements are key to understanding volatile recycling and the formation of arc magmas. Here, we present the first data on hydrogen isotopes (D/H) in basaltic melt inclusions (MI) from the Cascades, as measured by NanoSIMS, in conjunction with a complete dataset on volatile, major, and trace elements in the MI. Recent work on MI from the Marianas [Shaw et al., 2012] has shown the potential for using δD to understand the cycling of hydrous fluids through subduction zones. Our samples were collected from cinder cones in the Lassen region of the southern Cascades (6 calc-alkaline basalts [CAB] and 2 transitional between CAB and low-K tholeiite [LKT]), and 2 basaltic tephra units from Mount St. Helens (MSH) that have OIB-like trace element characteristics, which is common in the central part of the arc. Using the maximum volatile contents at each cone to represent the undegassed magma, we find values of 2.1-3.4 wt% H2O and 500-1200 ppm CO2 for CABs and 1.15-1.30 wt% H2O and 750-850 ppm CO2 for transitional LKTs (all corrected to be in eq. with Fo90 olivine) in the Lassen Region. At MSH, we find 1.7 wt% H2O and <300 ppm CO2 for the OIB samples. For CABs from the Lassen Region, (Sr/P)N correlates with slab fluid tracers such as H2O/Ce and Cl/Nb, indicating a link between volatile and trace element enrichment of the mantle wedge, but transitional LKTs deviate slightly from the overall pattern. At MSH, values of (Sr/P)N, H2O/Ce, and Cl/Nb are lower than those in the Lassen Region, and are more

  14. Spectral and kinetic studies on the formation of eosinophil peroxidase compound I and its reaction with halides and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Furtmüller, P G; Burner, U; Regelsberger, G; Obinger, C

    2000-12-19

    Compound I of peroxidases takes part in both the peroxidation and the halogenation reaction. This study for the first time presents transient kinetic measurements of the formation of compound I of human eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and its reaction with halides and thiocyanate, using the sequential-mixing stopped-flow technique. Addition of 1 equiv of hydrogen peroxide to native EPO leads to complete formation of compound I. At pH 7 and 15 degrees C, the apparent second-order rate constant is (4.3 +/- 0.4) x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The rate for compound I formation by hypochlorous acid is (5.6 +/- 0.7) x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). EPO compound I is unstable and decays to a stable intermediate with a compound II-like spectrum. At pH 7, the two-electron reduction of compound I to the native enzyme by thiocyanate has a second-order rate constant of (1.0 +/- 0. 5) x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). Iodide [(9.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)] is shown to be a better electron donor than bromide [(1.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)], whereas chloride oxidation by EPO compound I is extremely slow [(3.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)]. The pH dependence studies suggest that a protonated form of compound I is more competent in oxidizing the anions. The results are discussed in comparison with those of the homologous peroxidases myeloperoxidase and lactoperoxidase and with respect to the role of EPO in host defense and tissue injury.

  15. Flavor of oranges as impacted by abscission zone formation for trees affected by huanglongbing disease and Lasiodiploida infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trees affected by Huanglongbing (HLB) exhibit excessive fruit drop, which is exacerbated by secondary infection of the abscission zone by the fungus Lasiodiplodia. ‘Hamlin’ orange trees, both healthy and affected by HLB, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, determined by Polymerase chain reactio...

  16. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-04-01

    New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  17. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  18. Role of the propagation reactions on the hydroxyl radical formation in ozonation and peroxone (ozone/hydrogen peroxide) processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongze; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yi; Luo, Congwei; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Guo, Zhongkai

    2015-01-01

    To better predict the elimination of highly ozone-refractory organic micro-pollutants from wastewater in ozonation and peroxone (O₃/H₂O₂) processes, it is important to understand the OH• formation therein. Nevertheless, the contribution of the propagation reactions (in brief, OH• + DOM (Dissolved Organic Matter) + O₂ → O₂•⁻, O₃ + O₂•⁻ → O₃•⁻ → OH•) to the OH• yields (Ф) in these two processes has not received great attention so far. In this study, >25% of O₃ was estimated to be consumed via the propagation reactions in ozonation of wastewater effluents. The competition method (taking the OH• exposure and scavenging capacity of water matrix into account) was recommended to determine the Ф values, and thus the relatively higher values (i.e., 33–58% vs. 6–24%) in ozonation were obtained as compared with the "tert-Butanol (tBuOH) assay" (with excess tBuOH to scavenge OH• producing stoichiometric formaldehyde), where the contribution of the propagation reactions was otherwise neglected when excess tBuOH completely scavenged OH. In peroxone of wastewater effluents, the rate constant of O₃ consumption increased significantly with the increase of H₂O₂ concentration ([H₂O₂]:[O₃] = 0.1–0.35). However, compared to ozonation alone, the improvement of the Ф values was negligible over a wide range of [H₂O₂]:[O₃] = 0.1–2.0. This discrepancy was mainly ascribed to the fact that substantial O₃ consumption via the propagation reactions resulted in comparable Ф values in peroxone vs. ozonation processes.

  19. An extended multi-zone combustion model for PCI simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Keum, SeungHwan; Babajimopoulos, Aristotelis

    2011-12-01

    Novel combustion modes are becoming an important area of research with emission regulations more stringent than ever before, and with fuel economy being assigned greater importance every day. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and Premixed Compression Ignition (PCI) modes in particular promise better fuel economy and lower emissions in internal combustion engines. Multi-zone combustion models have been popular in modelling HCCI combustion. In this work, an improved multi-zone model is suggested for PCI combustion modelling. A new zoning scheme is suggested based on incorporating the internal energy of formation into an earlier conventional HCCI multi-zone approach, which considers a two-dimensional reaction space defined by equivalence ratio and temperature. It is shown that the added dimension improves zoning by creating more representative zones, and thus reducing errors compared to the conventional zoning approach, when applied to PCI simulation.

  20. Reaction of methyl formate with VC(1 0 0) and TiC(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantz, Peter; Kim, Hyun I.; Didziulis, Stephen V.; Li, Shuang; Chen, Zhiying; Perry, Scott S.

    2005-12-01

    The chemistry of the (1 0 0) surface of the tribologically important materials vanadium carbide (VC) and titanium carbide (TiC) with methyl formate (CH 3OCHO) has been studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The molecule reacts with each surface at temperatures below 150 K, although the extent of reaction is greater on the TiC surface. XPS and HREELS results indicate that the first step in this chemistry is the cleavage of the CH 3O-CHO bond, generating surface methoxy groups (CH 3O-) and either carbon monoxide on VC or a formyl (CHO) group on TiC. The methoxy group reacts further on both surfaces via pathways expected based on previous methanol adsorption studies, primarily decomposing through a formyl intermediate on VC to generate formaldehyde and evolving methanol on TiC. The formyl group formed directly from methyl formate on TiC enables the production and evolution of formaldehyde, and also appears to break down further to the elements. These results indicate a propensity for these carbides to react with esters, leading potentially to the beneficial formation of friction lowering surface films or the deleterious degradation of ester-based lubricants.

  1. Pathways of arachidonic acid peroxyl radical reactions and product formation with guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Crean, Conor; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-01

    Peroxyl radicals were derived from the one-electron oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by sulfate radicals that were generated by the photodissociation of peroxodisulfate anions in air-equilibrated aqueous solutions. Reactions of these peroxyl and neutral guanine radicals, also generated by oxidation with sulfate radicals, were investigated by laser kinetic spectroscopy, and the guanine oxidation products were identified by HPLC and mass spectrometry methods. Sulfate radicals rapidly oxidize arachidonic (ArAc), linoleic (LnAc), and palmitoleic (PmAc) acids with similar rate constants, (2-4) x 10 (9) M (-1) s (-1). The C-centered radicals derived from the oxidation of ArAc and LnAc include nonconjugated Rn(.) ( approximately 80%) and conjugated bis-allylic Rba(.) ( approximately 20%) radicals. The latter were detectable in the absence of oxygen by their prominent, narrow absorption band at 280 nm. The Rn(.) radicals of ArAc (containing three bis-allylic sites) transform to the Rba(.) radicals via an intramolecular H-atom abstraction [rate constant (7.5 +/- 0.7) x 10 (4) s (-1)]. In contrast, the Rn(.) radicals of LnAc that contain only one bis-allylic site do not transform intramolecularly to the Rba(.) radicals. In the case of PmAc, which contains only one double bond, the Rba(.) radicals are not observed. The Rn(.) radicals of PmAc rapidly combine with oxygen with a rate constant of (3.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The Rba(.) radicals of ArAc are less reactive and react with oxygen with a rate constant of (2.2 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) M (-1) s (-1). The ArAc peroxyl radicals formed spontaneously eliminate superoxide radical anions [rate constant = (3.4 +/- 0.3) x 10 (4) M (-1) s (-1)]. The stable oxidative lesions derived from the 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetylguanosine or 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetyl-8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine radicals and their subsequent reactions with ArAc peroxyl radicals were also investigated. The major products found were the 2,5-diamino-4 H

  2. Modeling of formation and prevention of a pure water zone in capillary isoelectric focusing with narrow pH range carrier ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Kilár, Ferenc; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    This paper comprises a continuation of computer simulation studies dealing with carrier ampholyte based CIEF in presence of narrow pH gradients. With this technique, amphoteric sample components with pI values outside the pH gradient are migrating isotachophoretically toward the cathode or anode whereas components with pI values within the gradient become focused. In order to understand the processes occurring in presence of the electric field, the behavior of both carrier ampholytes and amphoteric sample components is investigated by computer modeling. Characteristics of two pH unit gradients with end components having pI values at or around 7.00 and conditions that lead to the formation of a water zone at neutrality were investigated. Data obtained reveal that a zone of water is formed in focusing with carrier ampholytes when the applied pH range does not cover the neutral region, ends at pH 7.00 or begins at pH 7.00. The presence of additional amphoteric components that cover the neutrality region prevent water zone formation under current flow. This situation is met in experiments with narrow pH gradients that end or begin around neutrality. Simulation data reveal that no water zone evolves when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolved in the catholyte causes the migration of carbonic acid (in the form of carbonate and/or hydrogen carbonate ions) from the catholyte through the focusing structure. An electrolyte change in the electrode solution does not have an impact on the focusing part but does change the isotachophoretic pattern migrating behind the leading ion.

  3. Stochastic reaction and diffusion on growing domains: Understanding the breakdown of robust pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Maini, Philip K.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological patterns, from population densities to animal coat markings, can be thought of as heterogeneous spatiotemporal distributions of mobile agents. Many mathematical models have been proposed to account for the emergence of this complexity, but, in general, they have consisted of deterministic systems of differential equations, which do not take into account the stochastic nature of population interactions. One particular, pertinent criticism of these deterministic systems is that the exhibited patterns can often be highly sensitive to changes in initial conditions, domain geometry, parameter values, etc. Due to this sensitivity, we seek to understand the effects of stochasticity and growth on paradigm biological patterning models. In this paper, we extend spatial Fourier analysis and growing domain mapping techniques to encompass stochastic Turing systems. Through this we find that the stochastic systems are able to realize much richer dynamics than their deterministic counterparts, in that patterns are able to exist outside the standard Turing parameter range. Further, it is seen that the inherent stochasticity in the reactions appears to be more important than the noise generated by growth, when considering which wave modes are excited. Finally, although growth is able to generate robust pattern sequences in the deterministic case, we see that stochastic effects destroy this mechanism for conferring robustness. However, through Fourier analysis we are able to suggest a reason behind this lack of robustness and identify possible mechanisms by which to reclaim it.

  4. Reaction and barrier formation at metal-GaP(110) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyano, K. E.; Cao, R.; Kendelewicz, T.; Wahi, A. K.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W. E.

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Al, Ga, In, Sn, and Bi deposited on cleaved GaP(110) surfaces has been studied using soft-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Of the noble metals, Cu and Au tend to disassociate the GaP, whereas the Ag shows little sign of reactivity with the substrate. The transition metals Ni and Pd react strongly with the GaP to form phosphides in which Ga is segregated. Of the column-III overlayers, Ga and In display strong clustering and little reactivity with the substrate, but the interface with Al shows a cation replacement reaction similar to that seen at Al/GaAs(110). Sn and Bi exhibit Stranski-Krastanov growth, with the establishment of metallic islands on a laminar first monolayer. Despite the differences in reactivity, the barrier heights for all the metals but In are observed to stabilize in the range of 1.14 to 1.46 eV. Hence the n-type GaP barrier height shows a much weaker dependence on the overlayer work function than reported previously. As with GaAs(110) this Fermi-level stabilization position is in the range of both the defect levels as created by irradiation, and the theoretical charge neutrality level toward which metal-induced gap states should move the surface Fermi level. The influence of overlayer reactivity, morphology, and metallicity on the barrier development is discussed in relation to these two potential sources of interface states.

  5. The effect of reactions on the formation and readout of the gradient of Bicoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Ipiña, Emiliano; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2017-02-01

    During early development, the establishment of gradients of transcriptional factors determines the patterning of cell fates. The case of Bicoid (Bcd) in Drosophila melanogaster embryos is well documented and studied. There are still controversies as to whether SDD models in which Bcd is Synthesized at one end, then Diffuses and is Degraded can explain the gradient formation within the timescale observed experimentally. The Bcd gradient is observed in embryos that express a Bicoid-eGFP fusion protein (Bcd-GFP) which cannot differentiate if Bcd is freely diffusing or bound to immobile sites. In this work we analyze an SDID model that includes the Interaction of Bcd with binding sites. We simulate numerically the resulting full reaction–diffusion system in a cylindrical domain using previously determined biophysical parameters and a simplified version of the Bcd source. In this way we obtain solutions that depend on the spatial location approximately as observed experimentally and that reach such dependence at a time that is also compatible with the experimental observations. Analyzing the differences between the free and bound Bcd distributions we observe that the latter spans over a longer lengthscale. We conclude that deriving the lengthscale from the distribution of Bcd-GFP can lead to an overestimation of the gradient lengthscale and of the Hill coefficient that relates the concentrations of Bcd and of the protein, Hunchback, whose production is regulated by Bcd.

  6. Formation of Carbamate Anions by the Gas-phase Reaction of Anilide Ions with CO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongming; Nishshanka, Upul; Attygalle, Athula B

    2016-05-01

    The anilide anion (m/z 92) generated directly from aniline, or indirectly as a fragmentation product of deprotonated acetanilide, captures CO2 readily to form the carbamate anion (m/z 136) in the collision cell, when CO2 is used as the collision gas in a tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometer. The gas-phase affinity of the anilide ion to CO2 is significantly higher than that of the phenoxide anion (m/z 93), which adds to CO2 only very sluggishly. Our results suggest that the efficacy of CO2 capture depends on the natural charge density on the nitrogen atom, and relative nucleophilicity of the anilide anion. Generally, conjugate bases generated from aniline derivatives with proton affinities (PA) less than 350 kcal/mol do not tend to add CO2 to form gaseous carbamate ions. For example, the anion generated from p-methoxyaniline (PA = 367 kcal/mol) reacts significantly faster than that obtained from p-nitroaniline (PA = 343 kcal/mol). Although deprotonated p-aminobenzoic acid adds very poorly because the negative charge is now located primarily on the carboxylate group, it reacts more efficiently with CO2 if the carboxyl group is esterified. Moreover, mixture of CO2 and He as the collision gas was found to afford more efficient adduct formation than CO2 alone, or as mixtures made with nitrogen or argon, because helium acts as an effective "cooling" gas and reduces the internal energy of reactant ions.

  7. Formation of Carbamate Anions by the Gas-phase Reaction of Anilide Ions with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongming; Nishshanka, Upul; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-05-01

    The anilide anion ( m/z 92) generated directly from aniline, or indirectly as a fragmentation product of deprotonated acetanilide, captures CO2 readily to form the carbamate anion ( m/z 136) in the collision cell, when CO2 is used as the collision gas in a tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometer. The gas-phase affinity of the anilide ion to CO2 is significantly higher than that of the phenoxide anion ( m/z 93), which adds to CO2 only very sluggishly. Our results suggest that the efficacy of CO2 capture depends on the natural charge density on the nitrogen atom, and relative nucleophilicity of the anilide anion. Generally, conjugate bases generated from aniline derivatives with proton affinities (PA) less than 350 kcal/mol do not tend to add CO2 to form gaseous carbamate ions. For example, the anion generated from p-methoxyaniline (PA = 367 kcal/mol) reacts significantly faster than that obtained from p-nitroaniline (PA = 343 kcal/mol). Although deprotonated p-aminobenzoic acid adds very poorly because the negative charge is now located primarily on the carboxylate group, it reacts more efficiently with CO2 if the carboxyl group is esterified. Moreover, mixture of CO2 and He as the collision gas was found to afford more efficient adduct formation than CO2 alone, or as mixtures made with nitrogen or argon, because helium acts as an effective "cooling" gas and reduces the internal energy of reactant ions.

  8. Catastrophic Collisions in the Terrestrial Planet Zone and the Epoch of Terrestrial Planet Formation around Intermediate Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B.; Song, I.; Rhee, J. H.; Bessell, M. S.; Murphy, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have completed an extensive search for stars hosting terrestrial planet zone dust by cross-correlating the Tycho-2 and IRAS catalogs. Near-infrared to far-infrared excess emission has been discovered towards a 10-20 Myr old, A-type member of the Upper-Centaurus-Lupus association. The hot dust component ( 750 K) in combination with the high fractional infrared luminosity (0.4%) suggest a recent catastrophic collision between rocky bodies in this intermediate mass star's inner planetary system. Synthesis of all published incidences of intermediate mass stars with evidence for terrestrial planet zone dust suggests that catastrophic collisions analogous to the Moon-forming event in our Solar System occur around intermediate mass stars when the star is 10-30 Myr old. Funding for this research came from NASA grants and an LLNL-Minigrant to UCLA and from the Spitzer Visiting Graduate Student Program.

  9. The giant Shakhdara migmatitic gneiss dome, Pamir, India-Asia collision zone: 2. Timing of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Weise, Carsten; Chow, Judy; Hofmann, Jakob; Khan, Jahanzeb; Rutte, Daniel; Sperner, Blanka; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Hacker, Bradley R.; Dunkl, István.; Tichomirowa, Marion; Stearns, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Cenozoic gneiss domes—exposing middle-lower crustal rocks—cover ~30% of the surface exposure of the Pamir, western India-Asia collision zone; they allow an unparalleled view into the deep crust of the Asian plate. We use titanite, monazite, and zircon U/Th-Pb, mica Rb-Sr and 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite fission track, and zircon (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the exhumation history of the ~350 × 90 km Shakhdara-Alichur dome, southwestern Pamir. Doming started at 21-20 Ma along the Gunt top-to-N normal-shear zone of the northern Shakhdara dome. The bulk of the exhumation occurred by ~NNW-ward extrusion of the footwall of the crustal-scale South Pamir normal-shear zone along the southern Shakhdara dome boundary. Footwall extrusion was active from ~18-15 Ma to ~2 Ma at ~10 mm/yr slip and with vertical exhumation rates of 1-3 mm/yr; it resulted in up to 90 km ~N-S extension, coeval with ~N-S convergence between India and Asia. Erosion rates were 0.3-0.5 mm/yr within the domes and 0.1-0.3 mm/yr in the horst separating the Shakhdara and Alichur domes and in the southeastern Pamir plateau; rates were highest along the dome axis in the southern part of the Shakhdara dome. Incision along the major drainages was up to 1.0 mm/yr. Thermal modeling suggests geothermal gradients as high as 60°C/km along the trace of the South Pamir shear zone and their strong N-S variation across the dome; the gradients relaxed to ≤40-45°C/km since the end of doming.

  10. Dimesitylketone O-oxide: spectroscopic characterization, conformation, and reaction modes: OH formation and OH capture.

    PubMed

    Sander, W; Block, K; Kappert, W; Kirschfeld, A; Muthusamy, S; Schroeder, K; Sosa, C P; Kraka, E; Cremer, D

    2001-03-21

    Dimesitylketone O-oxide 1b was synthesized by photolysis of dimesityldiazomethane dissolved in an oxygen saturated CCl3F solution at 140 K. Conformation and geometry of 1b were determined by comparing measured NMR chemical shifts with the corresponding chemical shifts calculated at the DFT-IGLO level of theory where it had to be considered that the molecule exists in two enantiomeric forms. Measured and calculated 1H chemical shifts agree within 0.1 ppm while the calculated 13C shift of the COO carbon (210.6 ppm) differs by only 0.4 ppm from the measured shift of 211.0 ppm. The two mesityl rings are perpendicular to each other and enclose angles of 40 and 57 degrees with the COO plane. The preferred rearrangement process of 1b is an H migration from one of the ortho-methyl groups to the terminal O atom of the COO unit. The calculated activation enthalpy of this process is 12.7 kcal/mol (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ). In contrast, the activation enthalpy for isomerization to dioxirane is 5 kcal/mol higher. In CCl3F, the activation barrier for the thermal decay was determined to be 13.8 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol and in acetonitrile 13.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol. H migration initiates cleavage of the OO bond and the production of an OH and a benzyl radical. Recombination of the latter in the solvent cage leads to the formation of 2-methylhydroxy-pentamethylbenzophenone, while escape of the OH radical from the solvent cage yields a ketone. These results confirm the possibility of OH production from carbonyl oxides in the solution phase.

  11. A coumarin-specific prenyltransferase catalyzes the crucial biosynthetic reaction for furanocoumarin formation in parsley.

    PubMed

    Karamat, Fazeelat; Olry, Alexandre; Munakata, Ryosuke; Koeduka, Takao; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Paris, Cedric; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-02-01

    Furanocoumarins constitute a sub-family of coumarin compounds with important defense properties against pathogens and insects, as well as allelopathic functions in plants. Furanocoumarins are divided into two sub-groups according to the alignment of the furan ring with the lactone structure: linear psoralen and angular angelicin derivatives. Determination of furanocoumarin type is based on the prenylation position of the common precursor of all furanocoumarins, umbelliferone, at C6 or C8, which gives rise to the psoralen or angelicin derivatives, respectively. Here, we identified a membrane-bound prenyltransferase PcPT from parsley (Petroselinum crispum), and characterized the properties of the gene product. PcPT expression in various parsley tissues is increased by UV irradiation, with a concomitant increase in furanocoumarin production. This enzyme has strict substrate specificity towards umbelliferone and dimethylallyl diphosphate, and a strong preference for the C6 position of the prenylated product (demethylsuberosin), leading to linear furanocoumarins. The C8-prenylated derivative (osthenol) is also formed, but to a much lesser extent. The PcPT protein is targeted to the plastids in planta. Introduction of this PcPT into the coumarin-producing plant Ruta graveolens showed increased consumption of endogenous umbelliferone. Expression of PcPT and a 4-coumaroyl CoA 2'-hydroxylase gene in Nicotiana benthamiana, which does not produce furanocoumarins, resulted in formation of demethylsuberosin, indicating that furanocoumarin production may be reconstructed by a metabolic engineering approach. The results demonstrate that a single prenyltransferase, such as PcPT, opens the pathway to linear furanocoumarins in parsley, but may also catalyze the synthesis of osthenol, the first intermediate committed to the angular furanocoumarin pathway, in other plants.

  12. Formation of lead-aluminate ceramics: Reaction mechanisms in immobilizing the simulated lead sludge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingwen; Shih, Kaimin

    2015-11-01

    We investigated a strategy of blending lead-laden sludge and an aluminum-rich precursor to reduce the release of hazardous lead from the stabilized end products. To quantify lead transformation and determine its incorporation behavior, PbO was used to simulate the lead-laden sludge fired with γ-Al2O3 by Pb/Al molar ratios of 1/2 and 1/12 at 600-1000 °C for 0.25-10 h. The sintered products were identified and quantified using Rietveld refinement analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the products generated under different conditions. The results indicated that the different crystallochemical incorporations of hazardous lead occurred through the formation of PbAl2O4 and PbAl12O19 in systems with Pb/Al ratios of 1/2 and 1/12, respectively. PbAl2O4 was observed as the only product phase at temperature of 950 °C for 3h heating in Pb/Al of 1/2 system. For Pb/Al of 1/12 system, significant growth of the PbAl12O19 phase clearly occurred at 1000 °C for 3 h sintering. Different product microstructures were found in the sintered products between the systems with the Pb/Al ratios 1/2 and 1/12. The leaching performances of the PbO, Pb9Al8O21, PbAl2O4 and PbAl12O19 phases were compared using a constant pH 4.9 leaching test over 92 h. The leachability data indicated that the incorporation of lead into PbAl12O19 crystal is a preferred stabilization mechanism in aluminate-ceramics.

  13. Colloid formation and metal transport through two mixing zones affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stream discharges and concentrations of dissolved and colloidal metals (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn), SO4, and dissolved silica were measured to identify chemical transformations and determine mass transports through two mixing zones in the Animas River that receive the inflows from Cement and Mineral Creeks. The creeks were the dominant sources of Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb, whereas the upstream Animas River supplied about half of the Zn. With the exception of Fe, which was present in dissolved and colloidal forms, the metals were dissolved in the acidic, high-SO4 waters of Cement Creek (pH 3.8). Mixing of Cement Creek with the Animas River increased pH to near-neutral values and transformed Al and some additional Fe into colloids which also contained Cu and Pb. Aluminium and Fe colloids had already formed in the mildly acidic conditions in Mineral Creek (pH 6.6) upstream of the confluence with the Animas River. Colloidal Fe continued to form downstream of both mixing zones. The Fe- and Al-rich colloids were important for transport of Cu, Pb, and Zn, which appeared to have sorbed to them. Partitioning of Zn between dissolved and colloidal phases was dependent on pH and colloid concentration. Mass balances showed conservative transports for Ca, Mg, Mn, SO4, and dissolved silica through the two mixing zones and small losses (< 10%) of colloidal Al, Fe and Zn from the water column.

  14. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN determined within the dynamical cluster-decay model for various "hot" fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-08-01

    The compound nucleus (CN) fusion/formation probability PCN is defined and its detailed variations with the CN excitation energy E*, center-of-mass energy Ec .m., fissility parameter χ, CN mass number ACN, and Coulomb interaction parameter Z1Z2 are studied for the first time within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The model is a nonstatistical description of the decay of a CN to all possible processes. The (total) fusion cross section σfusion is the sum of the CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay cross sections, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of evaporation residues and fusion-fission, including intermediate-mass fragments, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process, where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance-channel nuclei. The DCM, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it, is used to study the PCN for about a dozen "hot" fusion reactions forming a CN of mass number A ˜100 to superheavy nuclei and for various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting results are that PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN<1 or PCN≪1 due to the nCN contribution, depending strongly on different parameters of the entrance-channel reaction but found to be independent of the nuclear interaction potentials used.

  15. Formation of submicron magnesite during reaction of natural forsterite in H2O-saturated supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jianzhi; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in bulk liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 saturated with water at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In liquid water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in scCO2 saturated with H2O magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35, 50, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 and 80 °C, but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under scCO2 saturated with H2O conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  16. Formation of Submicron Magnesite during Reaction of Natural Forsterite in H2O-Saturated Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Odeta; Hu, Jian Z.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hu, Mary Y.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Feng, Ju; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-06-01

    Natural forsterite was reacted in a) liquid water saturated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and in b) H2O-saturated scCO2 at 35-80 °C and 90 atm. The solid reaction products were analyzed with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Two carbonate phases, nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3), were identified with the proportions of the two phases depending on experimental conditions. In water saturated with scCO2, nesquehonite was the dominant carbonate phase at 35-80 °C with only a limited number of large, micron size magnesite particles forming at the highest temperature, 80 °C. In contrast, in H2O-saturated scCO2 magnesite formation was identified at all three temperatures: 35 °, 50 °, and 80 °C. Magnesite was the dominant carbonation reaction product at 50 ° and 80 °C; but nesquehonite was dominant at 35 °C. The magnesite particles formed under H2O-saturated scCO2 conditions exhibited an extremely uniform submicron grain-size and nearly identical rhombohedral morphologies at all temperatures. The distribution and form of the particles were not consistent with epitaxial nucleation and growth on the forsterite surface.

  17. Kinetics of the reactions of isoprene-derived hydroxynitrates: gas phase epoxide formation and solution phase hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Burke, W. J.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Isoprene, the most abundant non-methane volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted into the atmosphere, is known to undergo gas phase oxidation to form eight different hydroxynitrate isomers in "high-NOx" environments. These hydroxynitrates are known to affect the global and regional formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), as well as affect the distribution of nitrogen. In the present study, we have synthesized three of the eight possible hydroxynitrates: 4-hydroxy-3-nitroxy isoprene (4,3-HNI) and E / Z-1-hydroxy-4-nitroxy isoprene (1,4-HNI). Oxidation of the 4,3-HNI isomer by the OH radical was monitored using a flow tube chemical ionization mass spectrometer (FT-CIMS), and its OH rate constant was determined to be (3.64 ± 0.41) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The products of 4,3-HNI oxidation were monitored, and a mechanism to explain the products was developed. An isoprene epoxide (IEPOX) - a species important in SOA chemistry and thought to originate only from "low-NOx" isoprene oxidation - was found as a minor, but significant, product. Additionally, hydrolysis kinetics of the three synthesized isomers were monitored with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The bulk, neutral solution hydrolysis rate constants for 4,3-HNI and the 1,4-HNI isomers were (1.59 ± 0.03) × 10-5 s-1 and (6.76 ± 0.09) × 10-3 s-1, respectively. The hydrolysis reactions of each isomer were found to be general acid-catalyzed. The reaction pathways, product yields and atmospheric implications for both the gas phase and aerosol phase reactions are discussed.

  18. Kinetics of the reactions of isoprene-derived hydroxynitrates: gas phase epoxide formation and solution phase hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Burke, W. J.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    Isoprene, the most abundant non-methane volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted into the atmosphere, is known to undergo gas phase oxidation to form eight different hydroxynitrate isomers in "high NOx" environments. These hydroxynitrates are known to affect the global and regional formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), as well as affect the distribution of nitrogen. In the present study, we have synthesized three of the eight possible hydroxynitrates: 4-hydroxy-3-nitroxy isoprene (4,3-HNI) and E/Z-1-hydroxy-4-nitroxy isoprene (1,4-HNI). Oxidation of the 4,3-HNI isomer by the OH radical was monitored using a flow tube chemical ionization mass spectrometer (FT-CIMS), and its OH rate constant was determined to be (3.64 ± 0.41) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The products of 4,3-HNI oxidation were monitored, and a mechanism to explain the products was developed. An isoprene epoxide (IEPOX) - a species important in SOA chemistry and thought to originate only from "low NOx" isoprene oxidation - was found as a minor, but significant product. Additionally, hydrolysis kinetics of the three synthesized isomers were monitored with NMR. The bulk, neutral solution hydrolysis rate constants for 4,3-HNI and the 1,4-HNI isomers were (1.59±0.03 × 10-5 s-1 and (6.76 ± 0.09) × 10-3 s-1, respectively. The hydrolysis reactions of each isomer were found to be general acid-catalyzed. The reaction pathways, product yields and atmospheric implications for both the gas phase and aerosol-phase reactions are discussed.

  19. The formation of diethyl ether via the reaction of iodoethane with atomic oxygen on the Ag(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. Scott; Barteau, Mark A.; Vohs, John M.

    1999-01-01

    The reactions of iodoethane (ICH 2CH 3) on clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces were investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Iodoethane adsorbs dissociatively at 150 K to produce surface ethyl groups on both clean and oxygen-covered Ag(110) surfaces. The ethyl species couple to form butane on both surfaces, with the desorption peak maximum located between 218 and 238 K, depending on the ethyl coverage. In addition to butane, a number of oxidation products including diethyl ether, ethanol, acetaldehyde, surface acetate, ethylene, carbon dioxide and water were formed on the oxygen-dosed Ag(110) surface. Diethyl ether was the major oxygenate produced at all ethyl:oxygen ratios, and the peak temperature for ether evolution varied from 220 to 266 K depending on the relative coverages of these reactants. The total combustion products, CO 2 and H 2O, were primarily formed at low ethyl coverages in the presence of excess oxygen. The formation of ethylene near 240 K probably involves an oxygen-assisted dehydrogenation pathway since ethylene is not formed from ethyl groups on the clean surface. Acetaldehyde and ethanol evolve coincidentally with a peak centered at 270-280 K, and are attributed to the reactions of surface ethoxide species. The surface acetate which decomposes near 620 K is formed from subsequent reactions of acetaldehyde with oxygen atoms. The addition of ethyl to oxygen to form surface ethoxides was verified by HREELS results. The yields of all products exhibited a strong dependence on the relative coverages of ethyl and oxygen.

  20. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of zones with high heat fluxes and early transition in hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S. V.; Vaganov, A. V.; Shalaev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of vortex structures formation and they interactions with the boundary layer in the hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges are analyzed on the base of experimental investigations and numerical solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of abnormal zones with high heat fluxes and early laminar turbulent transition are studied. These phenomena were observed in many high-speed wind tunnel experiments; however they were understood only using the detailed analysis of numerical modeling results with the high resolution. Presented results allowed explaining experimental phenomena. ANSYS CFX code (the DAFE MIPT license) on the grid with 50 million nodes was used for the numerical modeling. The numerical method was verified by comparison calculated heat flux distributions on the wing surface with experimental data.

  1. Study of the Reaction Cl + Ethyl Formate at 700-950 Torr and 297 to 435 K: Product Distribution and the Kinetics of the Reaction C2H5OC(═O) → CO2 + C2H5.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E W

    2016-05-26

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of atomic chlorine with ethyl formate [Cl + CH3CH2O(C═O)H, reaction 1] have been examined. These experiments were performed at pressures of 760-950 Torr and temperatures from 297 to 435 K. Reactants and products were quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC/FID) analysis. The initial mixture contained ethyl formate, Cl2, and N2. Cl atoms were generated by UV photolysis of this initial mixture at 360 nm, which dissociates Cl2. The rate constant of reaction 1 was measured at 297 K relative to that of the reaction Cl + C2H5Cl (reaction 2), yielding the rate constant ratio k1/k2 = 1.09 ± 0.05. The final products formed from reaction 1 are ethyl chloroformate, 1-chloroethyl formate, and 2-chloroethyl formate. These products result from the reactions with Cl2 of the three free radicals formed by H atom abstraction from ethylformate in reaction 1. Based on the molar yields of these three chlorinated products, the yields of the three radicals formed from reaction 1 at 297 K are (25 ± 3) mole percent of CH3CH2O(C═O); (67 ± 5) mole percent of CH3CHO(C═O)H; and (8 ± 2) mole percent of CH2CH2O(C═O)H. A second phase of this experiment measured the rate constant of the decarboxylation of the ethoxy carbonyl radical [CH3CH2O(C═O) → CO2 + C2H5, reaction 4] relative to the rate constant of its reaction with Cl2 [CH3CH2O(C═O) + Cl2 → CH3CH2O(C═O)Cl + Cl, reaction 3a]. Over the temperature range 297 to 404 K at 1 atm total pressure, this ratio can be expressed by k4/k3a = 10(23.56±0.22) e(-(12700±375)/RT) molecules cm(-3). Estimating the value of k3a (which has not been measured) based on similar reactions, the expression k4 = 5.8 × 10(12) e(-(12700)/RT) s(-1) is obtained. The estimated error of this rate constant is ± a factor of 2 over the experimental temperature range. This rate expression is compared with recent ab initio calculations of the decarboxylation of the analogous methoxy

  2. Carbonate diagenesis and feldspar alteration in fracture-related bleaching zones (Buntsandstein, central Germany): possible link to CO2-influenced fluid-mineral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Jens; Köster, Jens; Götze, Jens; Kasch, Norbert; Zisser, Norbert; Kley, Jonas; Pudlo, Dieter; Nover, Georg; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Fracture-related bleaching of Lower Triassic Buntsandstein red beds of central Germany was related to significant carbonate diagenesis and feldspar alteration caused by CO2-rich fluids. Using cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy combined with electron microprobe analysis and stable carbon isotope study, two major fluid-mineral interactions were detected: (1) zoned, joint-filling calcites and zoned pore-filling calcite cements, the latter replacing an earlier dolomite, were formed during bleaching. During the calcite formation and dolomite-calcite transformation, iron was incorporated into the calcite cement crystal cores due to Fe availability from the coeval bleaching. The dedolomitisation was ultimately associated with a volume increase. The related permeability decrease implies a certain degree of sealing and increasing retention of CO2, and the volume increase offers a minor CO2 sink. Carbonate-rich sandstone, therefore, can provide advantages for underground CO2 storage especially when situated in the fringes of the reservoir. (2) Alkali-feldspar alteration due to the bleaching fluids is reflected in cathodoluminescence spectra predominantly by the modulation of a brown luminescence emission peak (~620 nm). This peak represents a newly discovered effect related to alkali-feldspar alteration not solely associated with bleaching. Its modulation by the bleaching is interpreted to be due to Na depletion or a lattice defect in the Si-O bonds of the SiO4-tetrahedron. Alteration reflected by this luminescence feature has a destructive effect on the feldspars implying the possibility of diminished rock integrity due to bleaching and, hence, CO2-rich fluids. Two further CL spectral changes related to bleaching occur, (a) decreased intensity between around 570 nm assigned to Mn-depletion, and (b) increased amplitude and wavelength shift of the red (~680 nm) band. Converging evidence from carbonate and feldspar diagenesis, stable carbon isotope data and

  3. Entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of compound nucleus formation time in light heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Szanto de Toledo, A.; Carlson, B.V.; Beck, C.

    1996-12-01

    The entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the compound nucleus