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Sample records for reactive gas solids

  1. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  2. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  3. Quantum State-Resolved Reactive and Inelastic Scattering at Gas-Liquid and Gas-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grütter, Monika; Nelson, Daniel J.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum state-resolved reactive and inelastic scattering at gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces has become a research field of considerable interest in recent years. The collision and reaction dynamics of internally cold gas beams from liquid or solid surfaces is governed by two main processes, impulsive scattering (IS), where the incident particles scatter in a few-collisions environment from the surface, and trapping-desorption (TD), where full equilibration to the surface temperature (T{TD}≈ T{s}) occurs prior to the particles' return to the gas phase. Impulsive scattering events, on the other hand, result in significant rotational, and to a lesser extent vibrational, excitation of the scattered molecules, which can be well-described by a Boltzmann-distribution at a temperature (T{IS}>>T{s}). The quantum-state resolved detection used here allows the disentanglement of the rotational, vibrational, and translational degrees of freedom of the scattered molecules. The two examples discussed are (i) reactive scattering of monoatomic fluorine from room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and (ii) inelastic scattering of benzene from a heated (˜500 K) gold surface. In the former experiment, rovibrational states of the nascent HF beam are detected using direct infrared absorption spectroscopy, and in the latter, a resonace-enhanced multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) scheme is employed in combination with a velocity-map imaging (VMI) device, which allows the detection of different vibrational states of benzene excited during the scattering process. M. E. Saecker, S. T. Govoni, D. V. Kowalski, M. E. King and G. M. Nathanson Science 252, 1421, 1991. A. M. Zolot, W. W. Harper, B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian and D. J. Nesbitt J. Chem. Phys 125, 021101, 2006. J. R. Roscioli and D. J. Nesbitt Faraday Disc. 150, 471, 2011.

  4. A PCP Pincer Ligand for Coordination Polymers with Versatile Chemical Reactivity: Selective Activation of CO2 Gas over CO Gas in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    He, Junpeng; Waggoner, Nolan W; Dunning, Samuel G; Steiner, Alexander; Lynch, Vincent M; Humphrey, Simon M

    2016-09-26

    A tetra(carboxylated) PCP pincer ligand has been synthesized as a building block for porous coordination polymers (PCPs). The air- and moisture-stable PCP metalloligands are rigid tetratopic linkers that are geometrically akin to ligands used in the synthesis of robust metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, the design principle is demonstrated by cyclometalation with Pd(II) Cl and subsequent use of the metalloligand to prepare a crystalline 3D MOF by direct reaction with Co(II) ions and structural resolution by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Pd-Cl groups inside the pores are accessible to post-synthetic modifications that facilitate chemical reactions previously unobserved in MOFs: a Pd-CH3 activated material undergoes rapid insertion of CO2 gas to give Pd-OC(O)CH3 at 1 atm and 298 K. However, since the material is highly selective for the adsorption of CO2 over CO, a Pd-N3 modified version resists CO insertion under the same conditions. PMID:27532740

  5. A PCP Pincer Ligand for Coordination Polymers with Versatile Chemical Reactivity: Selective Activation of CO2 Gas over CO Gas in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    He, Junpeng; Waggoner, Nolan W; Dunning, Samuel G; Steiner, Alexander; Lynch, Vincent M; Humphrey, Simon M

    2016-09-26

    A tetra(carboxylated) PCP pincer ligand has been synthesized as a building block for porous coordination polymers (PCPs). The air- and moisture-stable PCP metalloligands are rigid tetratopic linkers that are geometrically akin to ligands used in the synthesis of robust metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, the design principle is demonstrated by cyclometalation with Pd(II) Cl and subsequent use of the metalloligand to prepare a crystalline 3D MOF by direct reaction with Co(II) ions and structural resolution by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Pd-Cl groups inside the pores are accessible to post-synthetic modifications that facilitate chemical reactions previously unobserved in MOFs: a Pd-CH3 activated material undergoes rapid insertion of CO2 gas to give Pd-OC(O)CH3 at 1 atm and 298 K. However, since the material is highly selective for the adsorption of CO2 over CO, a Pd-N3 modified version resists CO insertion under the same conditions.

  6. Solid-gas critical flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.; Syamlal, M.

    1985-01-01

    Maximum solid-gas transport rates have been computed using several hydrodynamic models. In the limit of zero gas density, the critical velocity equals the square root of a compressibility modulus of the powder divided by its density. Compressibility waves move with this velocity through the powder. Part II of this paper deals with homogeneous critical powder flow for which a useful expression for maximum flow has been derived and compared to an experiment from the literature.

  7. Method For Reactivating Solid Catalysts Used For Alklation Reactions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  8. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  9. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  10. Flowmeter for gas-entrained solids flow

    DOEpatents

    Porges, Karl G.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of solids feedrate in a gas-entrained solids flow conveyance system. The apparatus and method of the present invention include a vertical duct connecting a source of solids to the gas-entrained flow conveyance system, a control valve positioned in the vertical duct, and a capacitive densitometer positioned along the duct at a location a known distance below the control valved so that the solid feedrate, Q, of the gas entrained flow can be determined by Q=S.rho..phi.V.sub.S where S is the cross sectional area of the duct, .rho. is the density of the solid, .phi. is the solid volume fraction determined by the capacitive densitometer, and v.sub.S is the local solid velocity which can be inferred from the konown distance of the capacitive densitometer below the control valve.

  11. Solids flow mapping in gas-solid risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhusarapu, Satish Babu

    Gas-solid risers are extensively used in many industrial processes for gas-solid reactions (e.g. coal combustion and gasification) and for solid catalyzed gas phase reactions (e.g. fluid catalytic cracking, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride). Ab initio prediction of the complex multiphase fluid dynamics in risers is not yet possible, which makes reactor modeling difficult. In particular, quantification of solids flow and mixing is important. Almost all the experimental techniques used to characterize solids flow lead to appreciable errors in measured variables in large scale, high mass flux systems. In addition, none of the experimental techniques provide all the relevant data required to develop a satisfactory solids flow model. In this study, non-invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) is employed to visualize and quantify the solids dynamics and mixing in the gas-solid riser of a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB). A single radioactive tracer particle is monitored during its multiple visits to the riser and with an assumption of ergodicity, the following flow parameters are estimated: (a) Overall solids mass flux in the CFB loop. (b) Solids residence time distribution in the riser and down-comer. (c) Lagrangian and Eulerian solids velocity fields in a fully-developed section of the riser. This includes velocity fluctuations and components of the diffusivity tensor. The existing CARPT technique is extended to large scale systems. A new algorithm, based on a cross-correlation search, is developed for position rendition from CARPT data. Two dimensional solids holdup profiles are estimated using gamma-ray computed tomography. The image quality from the tomography data is improved by implementing an alternating minimization algorithm. This work establishes for the first time a reliable database for local solids dynamic quantities such as time-averaged velocities, Reynolds stresses, eddy diffusivities and turbulent kinetic energy. In addition

  12. Influence of reactive gas admixture on transition metal cluster nucleation in a gas aggregation cluster source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Tilo; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Gojdka, Björn; Mohammad Ahadi, Amir; Strunskus, Thomas; Zaporojtchenko, Vladimir; Biederman, Hynek; Faupel, Franz

    2012-12-01

    We quantitatively assessed the influence of reactive gases on the formation processes of transition metal clusters in a gas aggregation cluster source. A cluster source based on a 2 in. magnetron is used to study the production rate of titanium and cobalt clusters. Argon served as working gas for the DC magnetron discharge, and a small amount of reactive gas (oxygen and nitrogen) is added to promote reactive cluster formation. We found that the cluster production rate depends strongly on the reactive gas concentration for very small amounts of reactive gas (less than 0.1% of total working gas), and no cluster formation takes place in the absence of reactive species. The influence of discharge power, reactive gas concentration, and working gas pressure are investigated using a quartz micro balance in a time resolved manner. The strong influence of reactive gas is explained by a more efficient formation of nucleation seeds for metal-oxide or nitride than for pure metal.

  13. Electrostatic interactions in gas-solid chromatography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, S. W.; King, J., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Electrostatic theory of physical adsorption applied to gas-solid chromatography, discussing chromatographic inseparability of argon and oxygen at room temperature, prediction of elution order of many gases, etc

  14. Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Peterson, Eric S.; Stewart, Frederick F.

    2000-01-01

    In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

  15. Enhanced electrodes for solid state gas sensors

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    2001-01-01

    A solid state gas sensor generates an electrical potential between an equilibrium electrode and a second electrode indicative of a gas to be sensed. A solid electrolyte substrate has the second electrode mounted on a first portion of the electrolyte substrate and a composite equilibrium electrode including conterminous transition metal oxide and Pt components mounted on a second portion of the electrolyte substrate. The composite equilibrium electrode and the second electrode are electrically connected to generate an electrical potential indicative of the gas that is being sensed. In a particular embodiment of the present invention, the second electrode is a reference electrode that is exposed to a reference oxygen gas mixture so that the electrical potential is indicative of the oxygen in a gas stream.

  16. Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

    2014-07-29

    A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  17. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  18. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  19. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  20. APPARATUS FOR SHORT TIME MEASUREMENTS IN A FIXED-BED, GAS/SOLID REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An apparatus for exposure of a solid to reactive process gas is described which makes possible short time (≥ 0.3 to 15 s) exposures in a fixed-bed reactor. Operating conditions for differential reaction with respect to the gas concentration and rapid quench for arresting hi...

  1. Exciton induced photodesorption in rare gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Takato; Arakawa, Ichiro

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews our progress on the desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) in rare gas solids by selective excitation of valence excitons. Observation of metastable atoms desorbed by excitonic excitation gives us direct information on the exciton-induced desorption processes in rare gas solids. The validity of three desorption mechanisms, cavity ejection, excimer dissociation, and internal sputtering, is demonstrated by systematic measurements of kinetic energies and angular distributions of desorbed particles. The absolute yield of total and partial desorption was measured, which can lead us to the quantitative understanding of exciton-induced desorption processes.

  2. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian,Youg-Sheng; Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the compressible flow equations is extended to chemical reactive flow. The mass fraction of the unburnt gas is implemented into the gas kinetic equation by assigning a new internal degree of freedom to the particle distribution function. The new variable can be also used to describe fluid trajectory for the nonreactive flows. Due to the gas-kinetic BGK model, the current scheme basically solves the Navier-Stokes chemical reactive flow equations. Numerical tests validate the accuracy and robustness of the current kinetic method.

  3. Assessment of solid reactive mixtures for the development of biological permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Pagnanelli, Francesca; Viggi, Carolina Cruz; Mainelli, Sara; Toro, Luigi

    2009-10-30

    Solid reactive mixtures were tested as filling material for the development of biological permeable reactive barriers for the treatment of heavy metals contaminated waters. Mixture selection was performed by taking into account the different mechanisms operating in sulphate and cadmium removal with particular attention to bioprecipitation and sorption onto the organic matrices in the mixtures. Suspensions of eight reactive mixtures were tested for sulphate removal (initial concentration 3 g L(-1)). Each mixture was made up of four main functional components: a mix of organic sources for bacterial growth, a neutralizing agent, a porous medium and zero-valent iron. The best mixture among the tested ones (M8: 6% leaves, 9% compost, 3% zero-valent iron, 30% silica sand, 30% perlite, 22% limestone) presented optimal conditions for SRB growth (pH 7.8 +/- 0.1; E(h)= -410 +/- 5 mV) and 83% sulphate removal in 22 days (25% due to bioreduction, 32% due to sorption onto compost and 20% onto leaves). M8 mixture allowed the complete abatement of cadmium with a significant contribution of sorption over bioprecipitation (6% Cd removal due to SRB activity). Sorption properties, characterised by potentiometric titrations and related modelling, were mainly due to carboxylic sites of organic components used in reactive mixtures.

  4. Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas

    DOEpatents

    Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy

    1982-01-01

    In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

  5. Preliminary Results of Solid Gas Generator Micropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wilhelmus A.; Reed, Brian D.; Brenizer, Marshall

    1999-01-01

    A decomposing solid thruster concept, which creates a more benign thermal and chemical environment than solid propellant combustion, while maintaining, performance similar to solid combustion, is described. A Micro-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) thruster concept with diode laser and fiber-optic initiation is proposed, and thruster components fabricated with MEMS technology are presented. A high nitrogen content solid gas generator compound is evaluated and tested in a conventional axisymmetric thrust chamber with nozzle throat area ratio of 100. Results show incomplete decomposition of this compound in both low pressure (1 kPa) and high pressure (1 MPa) environments, with decomposition of up to 80% of the original mass. Chamber pressures of 1.1 MPa were obtained, with maximum calculated thrust of approximately 2.7 N. Resistively heated wires and resistively heated walls were used to initiate decomposition. Initiation tests using available lasers were unsuccessful, but infrared spectra of the compound show that the laser initiation tests used inappropriate wavelengths for optimal propellant absorption. Optimal wavelengths for laser ignition were identified. Data presented are from tests currently in progress. Alternative solid gas generator compounds are being evaluated for future tests.

  6. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  7. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  8. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  9. Gas atomization synthesis of refractory or intermetallic compounds and supersaturated solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Ellis, Timothy W.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic melt is atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the composition of the atomizing gas are selected such that the gas and melt react in the atomization spray zone to form a refractory or intermetallic compound in the as-atomized powder particles. A metallic melt is also atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas mixture gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the ratio of a reactive gas to a carrier gas are selected to form powder particles comprising a supersaturated solid solution of the atomic species of the reactive gas in the particles. The powder particles are then heat treated to precipitate dispersoids in-situ therein to form a dispersion strengthened material.

  10. Gas atomization synthesis of refractory or intermetallic compounds and supersaturated solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Ellis, T.W.

    1994-11-29

    A metallic melt is atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the composition of the atomizing gas are selected such that the gas and melt react in the atomization spray zone to form a refractory or intermetallic compound in the as-atomized powder particles. A metallic melt is also atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas mixture gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the ratio of a reactive gas to a carrier gas are selected to form powder particles comprising a supersaturated solid solution of the atomic species of the reactive gas in the particles. The powder particles are then heat treated to precipitate dispersoids in-situ therein to form a dispersion strengthened material. 9 figures.

  11. Nanocrystalline films for gas-reactive applications

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Loren J.

    2004-02-17

    A gas sensor for detection of oxidizing and reducing gases, including O.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, and H.sub.2, monitors the partial pressure of a gas to be detected by measuring the temperature rise of an oxide-thin-film-coated metallic line in response to an applied electrical current. For a fixed input power, the temperature rise of the metallic line is inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity of the oxide coating. The oxide coating contains multi-valent cation species that change their valence, and hence the oxygen stoichiometry of the coating, in response to changes in the partial pressure of the detected gas. Since the thermal conductivity of the coating is dependent on its oxygen stoichiometry, the temperature rise of the metallic line depends on the partial pressure of the detected gas. Nanocrystalline (<100 nm grain size) oxide coatings yield faster sensor response times than conventional larger-grained coatings due to faster oxygen diffusion along grain boundaries rather than through grain interiors.

  12. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A research program is proposed for the investigation of the dependence of the sorptive capacity of metal/metal oxide desulfurization sorbents on their pore size distribution and their intraparticle diffusivity. Integrated reaction/adsorption systems, chromatographic and gravimetric, will be used for successive reactivity, adsorption, and well as diffusivity, measurements. Single particle models that have been developed by our research group for gas-solid reactions with solid product will be used as basis for experimental data analysis and development of a general mathematical model for fixed-bed desulfurization and sorbent regeneration.

  13. Dewatering of flue gas desulfurization sulfite solids

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, F.C.; Wells, W.L.

    1984-06-12

    The dewatering capabilities of sulfite sludges from flue gas desulfurization facilities are substantially improved by the addition of relatively small amounts of sodium thiosulfate additive, or additives derived from or related to sodium thiosulfate, into the scrubber slurry liquor. As an added embellishment, these predetermined amounts of said additives are greater than those required for effecting substantial scale inhibition in the scrubber innards. Subsequently, conventional dewatering of the sulfite sludge to about 80 to 90 percent solids directly produces a waste product disposable in both an economically and an environmentally acceptable manner, in that the thixotropic characteristics of such sludges which are associated therewith upwards to about 70 percent solids therein are completely eliminated.

  14. Reactive gas condensation synthesis of aluminum nitride nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baker, Colin C; Ceylan, Abdullah; Shah, S Ismat

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AIN) nanoparticles were synthesized using a Reactive Gas Condensation (RGC) technique in which a mixture of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen (N2) gases were used for the nitridation of aluminum. NH3 served as the reactive gas, while N2 served as both a carrier gas and the inert source for particle condensation. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that at reactive gas compositions greater than 10% NH3 in N2, samples were composed entirely of hexagonal AIN nanoparticles. Electron diffraction patterns showed single crystal hexagonal AIN structure. The particle size was controlled by varying the pressure of the gas mixture. AIN nanoparticles were dispersed in a liquid matrix to enhance thermal conductivity. Results showed that a minimal addition of AIN increased the thermal conductivity of hydrocarbon pump oil by approximately 27%. The thermal conductivity became constant after reaching a maximum above 0.01 wt% AIN. Temporal stability of AIN was studied by XRD. Samples exposed to air for extended periods of time and analyzed by XRD show no degradation of crystalline AIN nanoparticles.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of elastic joints on the auto-oscillation of spacecraft with gas-reactive direction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasin, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model was obtained, on the basis of the method of mixed coordinates, of a generalized flexible spacecraft at one end of which was appended the directive action of a system of gas reactive nozzles. Various structural forms were obtained functionally describing flexible spacecraft, as systems consisting of a solid central body with flexible structural elements joined to it.

  16. Experimental gas-solid vertical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kuo Ming

    1987-05-01

    Gas-solid transport in dilute and dense phase conveying is studied. A new experimental system for vertical pneumatic conveying incorporates a screw feeder for dilute transport and an L-valve for dense flow. For measuring solid volume fractions a novel method using an x-ray densitometer was developed. The pressure in the system was measured using a strip chart recorder (SCR) and a manometer. The solids flux was estimated by collecting the particles from the system for a known time. The porosity and pressure drop data in the fully developed region were translated into drag coefficients and friction factors. The drag coefficients are in reasonable agreement with literature values. The friction factors with the wall were sometimes negative, reflecting downward flow, as observed in two-dimensional studies. Four available hydrodynamic models for vertical pneumatic conveying were used to predict the porosity and the pressure for the experimental conditions. Experimental data for porosity and pressure agree well with theoretical predictions. However, the predictions from the relative velocity model were in the best agreement for pressure drop values.

  17. A Model for Solid-Solid drag in Bidisperse Gas-solid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-11-01

    Computational models for gas-solid mixtures often require closures for interphase momentum and energy transfer. One of the most important interactions for polydisperse systems is a so-called solid-solid drag, i.e. the momentum transfer between different particulate phases traveling at different mean velocities. Modeling of these, and additional terms has been a focus of the granular physics community for nearly three decades and is no easy task. Flows of bidisperse particles are often high Mach number, Ma >> 1. As a result, many theories developed for low Mach number applications using the Chapman-Enskog (CE) theory are not strictly applicable. Still, many other analytic moment methods did not properly couple granular temperature and slip between particulate phases. We have developed a moment theory for the slip and temperature evolution employing the pseudo-Liouville operator technique, which correctly accounts for the coupling between phasic slip and temperatures. The theory is compared with other existing moment models for solid-solid drag. It is found that the drag model is a weighted sum of terms arising in both (CE) and existing moment theories. Additionally, new phase specific temperature evolution terms are obtained that shed light on phenomena such as non-equipartition of energy in bidisperse granular gases. Lastly, we explore some of the segregation behavior implied by the model for homogeneous gas-solid flows with bidisperse particles. This work was supported through DOE award number DE-FE0007260 and NSF Grants CMMI 0927660 and CBET 1134500.

  18. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  19. Second sphere coordination of hybrid metal-organic materials: solid state reactivity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Martí-Rujas, Javier

    2016-09-21

    When compared to other hybrid metal organic materials such as metal-organic frameworks, hydrogen bonded materials self-assembled by metals and organic molecules using second sphere interactions have been poorly investigated. Consequently, their solid-sate properties are also scarce. In this perspective, earlier research mainly on host-guest chemistry and its evolution towards more extended structures by applying crystal engineering principles using second sphere coordination is described. Crystal-to-crystal guest exchange reactions, permanently porous hybrid metal organic materials, mechanochemical reactivity, thermally induced phase transformations as well as some examples of functional technological applications using second sphere adducts such as gas adsorption, separation and non-linear optical phenomena are also reported. Although some tutorial reviews on second sphere adducts have been conducted mainly in the solution state focusing on metal based anion receptors, to the best of our knowledge, an overview on relevant works that focus on the solid-state properties has not been carried out. The aim of this article is to highlight from some of the early fundamental work to the latest reports on hybrid metal-organic materials self-assembled via second sphere interactions with a focus on solid-state chemistry.

  20. Hydrodesulfurization reactivities of various sulfur compounds in vacuum gas oil

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I.

    1996-08-01

    The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of a vacuum gas oil (VGO) was performed at 360 C (6.9 MPa) over a commercial NiMo catalyst to examine the HDS reactivities of various sulfur compounds which exist in the VGO by means of quantitative pseudo-first-order kinetic analysis. Four representative types of aromatic-skeleton sulfur compounds were observed in the VGO: alkylbenzothiophenes (BTs), alkyldibenzothiophenes (DBTs), alkylphenanthro[4,5-b,c,d]thiophenes (PTs), and alkylbenzonaphthothiophenes (BNTs). Among these, alkyl-BTs exhibited the highest HDS reactivity, whereas alkyl-DBTs with alkyl substituents at the 4 and/or 6 positions appeared to have the least reactivity even though their aromatic-skeleton is smaller than those of both alkyl-PTs and -BNTs. Steric hindrance of alkyl groups at specific positions appears to be a major reason for the low reactivity. Quantum chemical calculations on representative sulfur compounds were carried out to compare molecular parameters with their different HDS reactivities.

  1. Visualizing Gas Adsorption on Porous Solids: Four Simple, Effective Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Ocean

    2014-01-01

    Gas adsorption on porous solids is a topic that is often discussed in an undergraduate chemistry or chemical engineering course. The idea of porosity and gas adsorption on a porous solid is usually discussed with adsorption isotherms recorded using commercially available equipment. This discussion can be rather abstract and can be difficult for…

  2. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  3. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  4. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  5. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  6. Testing and evaluation of solid lubricants for gas bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, P. R.; Fischer, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The testing and results of testing solid film lubricants for gas lubricated bearing applications are reported. The tests simulated operational hazards of tilting pad gas bearings. The presence of a low coefficient of friction and the endurance of the solid film lubricant were the criteria for judging superior performance. All solid lubricants tested were applied to a plasma sprayed chrome oxide surface. Molybdenum disulfide and graphite fluoride were the solid lubricants tested; other test parameters included the method of application of the solid lubricant and the surface finish of the plasma sprayed coating. In general, the application of a solid film lubricant was found to significantly improve the coefficient of friction of the rubbing surfaces.

  7. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  8. Disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and tritiated hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniazzi, A. B.; Morton, C. S.

    2008-07-15

    Kinectrics and its predecessor company Ontario Hydro Research Div. (a division of Ontario Hydro) had a fully operational tritium laboratory on site since the early 1980's. During those years numerous projects and experiments were undertaken using hydrogen and tritium for the most part. Metals with an affinity for hydrogen are commonly employed as scavengers of hydrogenic gases from process streams or as hydrogen storage mediums. The two most common of these metals used were depleted uranium and a zirconium-iron alloy (SAES St198). The break-up of Ontario Hydro through deregulation activities resulted in the building of a new, smaller, tritium laboratory and the decommissioning of the original tritium laboratory. Decommissioning activities resulted in the need to safely dispose of these reactive metals. Disposal of these metals is not straight forward. For safe, long term, disposal it has been decided to oxidize the metals in a controlled fashion. The oxidized beds, containing the metals, will be sent to a radioactive waste site for long term storage. Options for disposal of tritiated hydrogen gas are presented and discussed. This paper provides a disposal pathway for tritiated reactive metals and hydrogen thereby closing the loop in tritium handling. (authors)

  9. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Technical progress report, October--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A research program is proposed for the investigation of the dependence of the sorptive capacity of metal/metal oxide desulfurization sorbents on their pore size distribution and their intraparticle diffusivity. Integrated reaction/adsorption systems, chromatographic and gravimetric, will be used for successive reactivity, adsorption, and well as diffusivity, measurements. Single particle models that have been developed by our research group for gas-solid reactions with solid product will be used as basis for experimental data analysis and development of a general mathematical model for fixed-bed desulfurization and sorbent regeneration.

  10. Hybrid propulsion based on fluid-controlled solid gas generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Norman S.; Strand, Leon D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of fuel-rich solid (gas generator-type) propellants for hybrid propulsion affords some design and utilization efficiency advantages. Both forward and aft liquid injection control concepts are evaluated from the operational standpoints of ballistics, throttling, stability and extinguishment. Steady-state and non-steady ballistics analyses are employed for this evaluation. Stability of solid motor operation is enhanced by fluid injection with adequate injector pressure drop. Efficient throttling and reliable extinguishment are attained through a combination of solid propellant combustion tailoring, grain design, control valves and sensors. Initial results from a laboratory-scale slab combustor, combining a gas generator propellant with gaseous oxygen injection, are also presented.

  11. Gas sorption in solid surfaces: a computational study using rigid and Einstein-solid models.

    PubMed

    Lara-Peña, Mayra; Domínguez, Hector

    2015-11-01

    The reactive Monte Carlo (RxMC) method was proposed to describe the sorption of gases in solid materials due to the chemical reaction A + B ⇌ C. Two models were used to simulate the solid; the first model considered simulations with rigid particles in the solid whereas in the second model the particles were allowed to vibrate inside the solid with a given spring constant, i.e. an Einstein solid was used to simulate the substrate. In both models not only physisorption but also chemisorption of the fluid was observed. Sorption curves, at different spring constants, were simulated and it was noted that sorption was always enhanced with the Einstein solid model. Moreover, an inverse dependent function of the spring constant with the temperature was found. Finally, the second model might be used to explain the unusual sorption behavior observed in actual experimental reactions such as CO2 + Li2O ⇌ Li2CO3.

  12. Reactivity and Characterization of Solid State Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, James Henry

    1990-01-01

    The identification of the phase responsible for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity has been the subject of extensive research. In this study, model solid state catalysts prepared from elemental starting materials were synthesized, characterized, and then used to desulfurize thiophene at temperatures ranging from 200-400 ^circC and a pressure of one atmosphere. The results of this work indicate that an increased HDS activity can be correlated with the presence of a poorly crystalline molybdenum sulfide-like phase detected by XRD, HREM, or AEM. The formation of this sulfur-deficient, non-stoichiometric phase could be accomplished by either removing sulfur directly from the catalyst synthesis mixture to yield a non-stoichiometric MoS_{ rm 2-x} moiety, or by introducing a transition metal promoter such as Fe, Co, Ni, or Cu into the system. The promoter atoms induced structural changes in the molybdenum sulfide edge planes by effectively scavenging sulfur during catalyst synthesis to form promoter sulfide species, which enhanced the formation of a non-stoichiometric, highly active molybdenum sulfide. This morphological effect was the primary function of the promoter in this system. All model catalysts displayed similar structure in the (0002) basal plane of MoS_2; however, only the catalytically active samples showed a high concentration of defects and disorder in the (1010), (1011), and (1012) edge planes. The HREM images obtained from these edge planes and their correlation with HDS activity dramatically illustrated the importance of the often-discussed edge plane structure of MoS_2 and its significance on HDS catalysis. Normalization of the HDS activities for the solid state models and a commercial catalyst with O_2 or CO chemisorption uptakes suggested that a similarity may exist between the catalytically active sites of these materials. In-situ XPS revealed that increasing promoter atom concentrations resulted in a more complete reduction of the promoter atom; but

  13. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  14. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process. PMID:26292776

  15. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process.

  16. Venturi design for metering solids flow in gas-solids suspentions

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C T

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to study the use of the venturi to meter gas-solids at larger particle size the modifying the inlet geometry and using a laser-light attenuation system at the venturi throat. Three tasks are reported: (1) study of influence of venturi approach angle on meter sensitivity to solids loading; (2) use of a quasi one-dimensional numerical model to optimize the inlet geometry for limestone transport to a fluidized bed; and (3) study adequacy of annular venturi and a gas-solids flowmeter. (DLC)

  17. Detonation chemistry apparatus experiments with nonreactive liquids, reactive liquids, and a reactive solid

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.; Fry, H.; Breshears, D.; Romero, J.

    1996-05-01

    The detonation chemistry apparatus was designed to analyze the results of detonating small quantities of explosives or the results of rapidly mixing reactants. The diagnostics are rapid Schlieren photography of the emitted plume (up to 10 photographs per microsecond) and rapid mass spectroscopy (12 {micro}s per scan). The authors report here the results of a series of experiments with two liquids that do not react exothermically and another series with liquids that do react exothermically. They also report some experiments with a solid reactant, Teflon.

  18. A coupled model for solid deformation and gas leak flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peide; Wan, Huagen

    2004-09-01

    From the viewpoint of interaction mechanics of solid and gas, a coupled mathematical model is presented for solid coal/rock-mass deformation and gas leak flow in parallel deformable coal seams. Numerical solutions using the strong implicit procedure (SIP) method to the coupled mathematical model for double parallel coal seams are also developed in detail. Numerical simulations for the prediction of safety range using protection layer mining are performed with experimental data from a mine with potential danger of coal/gas outbursts. Analyses show that the numerical simulation results are consistent with the measured data on the spot. The coupled model shows a positive future for applications in a wide range of gas-leak-flow-related problems in mining engineering, gas drainage engineering and mining safety engineering. Copyright

  19. Measurements of solid concentration in a downward vertical gas-solid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schiewe, T.; Wirth, K.E.; Molerus, O.; Tuzla, K.; Sharma, A.K.; Chen, J.C.

    1999-05-01

    New results from experiments performed in a 15-cm-diameter downflow fast-fluidized bed are presented. Tests were conducted at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure, with 125-{micro}m glass beads. Superficial gas velocities range from 0 to 6.6 m/s. Two different measurement techniques--gamma-absorption tomography and capacitance sensing--were applied to the gas-solids flow in the downer tube. The average local solid fractions from both measurement techniques are compared for various operating conditions of the gas-solid flow. In general, good agreement was obtained between the solid concentration measurements from both measurement techniques. It is demonstrated that combined use of both measurement techniques offers the best change to get time-average information about the concentration distribution over the whole cross section.

  20. A Generalized Kinetic Model for Heterogeneous Gas-Solid Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-15

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  1. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-10-15

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

  2. Applications for Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der List, M.; van Vliet, L. D.; Sanders, H. M.; Put, P. A. G.; Elst, J. W. E. C.

    2004-10-01

    In 2002 and 2003, Bradford Engineering B.V. conducted, in corporation with the Dutch research institute TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory (PML) a SME study for ESA-ESTEC for the identification of spaceflight applications and on-ground demonstration of Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology. This innovative technology has been developed by TNO-PML while Bradford Engineering also brought in its experience in spaceflight hardware development and manufacturing. The Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology allows for pure gas generation at ambient temperatures, as opposed to conventional solid propellant gas generators. This makes the SPCGG technology interesting for a wide range of terrestrial spaceflight applications. During the first part of the study, a variety of potential applications have been identified and three applications were selected for a more detailed quantitative study. In the third phase a ground demonstration was performed successfully for a cold gas propulsion system application. During the actual demonstration test, 10 cool gas generators were mounted and all operated successfully in sequence, demonstrating good repeatability of the produced amount of gas and pressure.

  3. On the Superficial Gas Velocity in Deep Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Grace, John; Shadle, Lawrence; Guenther, Chris

    2011-11-15

    The superficial gas velocity is one of the key parameters used to determine the flow hydrodynamics in gas–solids fluidized beds. However, the superficial velocity varies with height in practice, and there is no consistent basis for its specification. Different approaches to determine the superficial gas velocity in a deep gas–solids system are shown to cause difficulties in developing models and in comparing predictions with experimental results. In addition, the reference conditions for superficial gas velocity are important in modeling of deep gas–solids systems where there is a considerable pressure drop.

  4. SOLID GAS SUSPENSION NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Schluderberg, D.C.; Ryon, J.W.

    1962-05-01

    A fuel assembly is designed for use in a gas-suspension cooled nuclear fuel reactor. The coolant fluid is an inert gas such as nitrogen or helium with particles such as carbon suspended therein. The fuel assembly is contained within an elongated pressure vessel extending down into the reactor. The fuel portion is at the lower end of the vessel and is constructed of cylindrical segments through which the coolant passes. Turbulence promotors within the passageways maintain the particles in agitation to increase its ability to transfer heat away from the outer walls. Shielding sections and alternating passageways above the fueled portion limit the escape of radiation out of the top of the vessel. (AEC)

  5. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin; Mongia, Hukam C.

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  6. Solid phase studies and geochemical modelling of low-cost permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Bartzas, Georgios; Komnitsas, Kostas

    2010-11-15

    A continuous column experiment was carried out under dynamic flow conditions in order to study the efficiency of low-cost permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove several inorganic contaminants from acidic solutions. A 50:50 w/w waste iron/sand mixture was used as candidate reactive media in order to activate precipitation and promote sorption and reduction-oxidation mechanisms. Solid phase studies of the exhausted reactive products after column shutdown, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), confirmed that the principal Fe corrosion products identified in the reactive zone are amorphous iron (hydr)oxides (maghemite/magnetite and goethite), intermediate products (sulfate green rust), and amorphous metal sulfides such as amFeS and/or mackinawite. Geochemical modelling of the metal removal processes, including interactions between reactive media, heavy metal ions and sulfates, and interpretation of the ionic profiles was also carried out by using the speciation/mass transfer computer code PHREEQC-2 and the WATEQ4F database. Mineralogical characterization studies as well as geochemical modelling calculations also indicate that the effect of sulfate and silica sand on the efficiency of the reactive zone should be considered carefully during design and operation of low-cost field PRBs. PMID:20678863

  7. Solid phase studies and geochemical modelling of low-cost permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Bartzas, Georgios; Komnitsas, Kostas

    2010-11-15

    A continuous column experiment was carried out under dynamic flow conditions in order to study the efficiency of low-cost permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove several inorganic contaminants from acidic solutions. A 50:50 w/w waste iron/sand mixture was used as candidate reactive media in order to activate precipitation and promote sorption and reduction-oxidation mechanisms. Solid phase studies of the exhausted reactive products after column shutdown, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), confirmed that the principal Fe corrosion products identified in the reactive zone are amorphous iron (hydr)oxides (maghemite/magnetite and goethite), intermediate products (sulfate green rust), and amorphous metal sulfides such as amFeS and/or mackinawite. Geochemical modelling of the metal removal processes, including interactions between reactive media, heavy metal ions and sulfates, and interpretation of the ionic profiles was also carried out by using the speciation/mass transfer computer code PHREEQC-2 and the WATEQ4F database. Mineralogical characterization studies as well as geochemical modelling calculations also indicate that the effect of sulfate and silica sand on the efficiency of the reactive zone should be considered carefully during design and operation of low-cost field PRBs.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Pppp... - Determination of Weight Volatile Matter Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives A Appendix A to Subpart PPPP of Part 63 Protection... Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Determination of Weight Volatile Matter Content and Weight Solids Content of... determination of weight volatile matter content and weight solids content for most one-part or...

  9. Natural synthesis of bioactive greigite by solid-gas reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Kensuke; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Kuwabara, Tomohiko

    2016-10-01

    Greigite, a ferrimagnetic iron sulfide Fe(II)Fe(III)2S4, is thought to have played an essential role in chemical evolution leading to the origin of life. Greigite contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster-like structure and has been synthesized in the laboratory by liquid-state reactions. However, it is unclear how greigite can be synthesized in nature. Herein, we show that greigite is synthesized by the solid-gas reaction of Fe(III)-oxide-hydroxides and H2S. We discovered that the hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii reduced elemental sulfur, and the resulting sulfide generated greigite from hematite. The time course and pH dependence of the reaction respectively indicated the involvement of amorphous FeS and H2S as reaction intermediates. An abiotic solid-gas reaction of hematite and H2S (g) under strictly anaerobic conditions was developed. The solid-gas reaction fully converted hematite to greigite/pyrite at 40-120 °C within 12 h and was unaffected by the bulk gas phase. Similar abiotic reactions occurred, but relatively slowly, with aqueous H2S in acidulous liquids using hematite, magnetite, or amorphous FeO(OH) as starting materials, suggesting that greigite was extensively produced in the Hadean Eon as these Fe(III)-oxide-hydroxides were shown to be present or routinely produced during that era. Surprisingly, the obtained greigite induced methanogenesis and growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, suggesting that the external greigite crystals enhanced reactions that would otherwise require enzymes, such as [4Fe-4S] cluster-harboring membrane-bound hydrogenases. These data suggested that the greigite produced by the solid-gas and solid-dissolved gas reactions was bioactive.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Gas-Solid Interfaces with Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O.Y.; Lomov, I.N.

    2000-02-01

    A method of treatment of multimaterial interfaces on Eulerian grids is developed which works well for mixtures of materials with diverse compressibilities and shear moduli. This makes it possible to use this method not only for problems of gas dynamics and solid mechanics but also to model fluid-structure interaction problems.

  11. Miniature solid-state gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawless, W.N.; Cross, L.E.; Steyert, W.A.

    1985-05-07

    A miniature apparatus for compressing gases is disclosed in which an elastomer disposed between two opposing electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic blocks, or between a single electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic block and a rigid surface, is caused to extrude into or recede from a channel defined adjacent to the elastomer in response to application or removal of an electric field from the blocks. Individual cells of blocks and elastomer are connected to effect a gas compression by peristaltic activation of the individual cells. The apparatus is self-valving in that the first and last cells operate as inlet and outlet valves, respectively. Preferred electrostrictive and piezoelectric ceramic materials are disclosed, and an alternative, non-peristaltic embodiment of the apparatus is described. 9 figs.

  12. Miniature solid-state gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawless, William N.; Cross, Leslie E.; Steyert, William A.

    1985-01-01

    A miniature apparatus for compressing gases is disclosed in which an elastomer disposed between two opposing electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic blocks, or between a single electrostrictive or piezoelectric ceramic block and a rigid surface, is caused to extrude into or recede from a channel defined adjacent to the elastomer in response to application or removal of an electric field from the blocks. Individual cells of blocks and elastomer are connected to effect a gas compression by peristaltic activation of the individual cells. The apparatus is self-valving in that the first and last cells operate as inlet and outlet valves, respectively. Preferred electrostrictive and piezoelectric ceramic materials are disclosed, and an alternative, non-peristaltic embodiment of the apparatus is described.

  13. NMR velocity mapping of gas flow around solid objects.

    PubMed

    Han, Song-I; Pierce, Kimberly L; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    We present experimental visualizations of gas flow around solid blunt bodies by NMR imaging. NMR velocimetry is a model-free and tracer-free experimental means for quantitative and multi-dimensional flow visualization. Hyperpolarization of (129)Xe provided sufficient NMR signal to overcome the low density of the dilute gas phase, and its long coherence time allows for true velocity vector mapping. In this study, the diverging gas flow around and wake patterns immediately behind a sphere could be vectorally visualized and quantified. In a similar experiment, the flow over an aerodynamic model airplane body revealed a less disrupted flow pattern.

  14. NMR velocity mapping of gas flow around solid objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song-I.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    We present experimental visualizations of gas flow around solid blunt bodies by NMR imaging. NMR velocimetry is a model-free and tracer-free experimental means for quantitative and multi-dimensional flow visualization. Hyperpolarization of Xe129 provided sufficient NMR signal to overcome the low density of the dilute gas phase, and its long coherence time allows for true velocity vector mapping. In this study, the diverging gas flow around and wake patterns immediately behind a sphere could be vectorally visualized and quantified. In a similar experiment, the flow over an aerodynamic model airplane body revealed a less disrupted flow pattern.

  15. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  16. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  17. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  18. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  19. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors. PMID:17117871

  20. Degassing, gas retention and release in Fe(0) permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Aki S; Jekel, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Corrosion of Fe(0) has been successfully utilized for the reductive treatment of multiple contaminants. Under anaerobic conditions, concurrent corrosion leads to the generation of hydrogen and its liberation as a gas. Gas bubbles are mobile or trapped within the irregular pore structure leading to a reduction of the water filled pore volume and thus decreased residence time and permeability (gas clogging). With regard to the contaminant transport to the reactive site, the estimation of surface properties of the reactive material indicated that individual gas bubbles only occupied minor contact areas of the reactive surface. Quantification of gas entrapment by both gravimetrical and tracer investigations revealed that development of preferential flow paths was not significant. A novel continuous gravimetrical method was implemented to record variations in gas entrapment and gas bubble releases from the reactive filling. Variation of grain size fractions revealed that the pore geometry had a significant impact on gas release. Large pores led to the release of comparably large gas amounts while smaller volumes were released from finer pores with a higher frequency. Relevant processes are explained with a simplified pictorial sequence that incorporates relevant mechanisms.

  1. Thermal chemical-mechanical reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, A L., III; Tarver, C M

    1998-08-26

    The three dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic computer code ALE3D with fully coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical material models provides the framework for the development of a physically realistic model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives. The processes of hot spot formation during shock compression, subsequent ignition of reaction or failure to react, growth of reaction in individual hot spots, and coalescence of reacting hot spots during the transition to detonation can now be modeled using Arrhenius chemical kinetic rate laws and heat transfer to propagate the reactive flow. This paper discusses the growth rates of reacting hot spots in HMX and TATB and their coalescence during shock to detonation transition. Hot spot deflagration rates are found to be fast enough to consume explosive particles less than 10 mm in diameter during typical shock duration times, but larger particles must fragment and create more reactive surface area in order to be rapidly consumed.

  2. Reactive transport in a partially molten system with binary solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Jacob S.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2015-12-01

    Melt extraction from the Earth's mantle through high-porosity channels is required to explain the composition of the oceanic crust. Feedbacks from reactive melt transport are thought to localize melt into a network of high-porosity channels. Recent studies invoke lithological heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle to seed the localization of partial melts. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the reaction fronts that form as melt flows across the lithological interface between the heterogeneity and the ambient mantle. Here we present a chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport across lithological boundaries, using the theory of hyperbolic conservation laws. This is an extension of linear trace element chromatography to the coupling of major elements and energy transport. Our analysis allows the prediction of the nonlinear feedbacks that arise in reactive melt transport due to changes in porosity. This study considers the special case of a partially molten porous medium with binary solid solution. As melt traverses a lithological contact, binary solid solution leads to the formation of a reacted zone between an advancing reaction front and the initial contact. The analysis also shows that the behavior of a fertile heterogeneity depends on its absolute concentration, in addition to compositional differences between itself and the refractory background. We present a regime diagram that predicts if melt emanating from a fertile heterogeneity localizes into high-porosity channels or develops a zero porosity shell. The theoretical framework presented here provides a useful tool for understanding nonlinear feedbacks in reactive melt transport, because it can be extended to more complex and realistic phase behaviors.

  3. Effects of various reactive gas atmospheres on the properties of bio-oil using microwave pyrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass produces organic liquids (bio-oil), bio-char, water, and non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gas component typically contains syngas (H2, CO and CO2) as well as small hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8). Tail Gas Reactive Pyrolysis (TGRP), a patent p...

  4. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  5. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  6. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction of Reactive Solids Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-06-01

    We present novel time-resolved (TR) x-ray diffraction and TR Raman spectroscopy capable of probing structural and chemical evolutions of solids undergoing chemical and phase transformations. These methods are applicable to a wide range of dynamic experiments to study both single event phenomena of solids under thermal, electric or mechanical impact conditions and non-single event phenomena under dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) and high frequency pulse (or ramp) laser-heated DAC. In this talk, relevant technology developments are described with several examples of our recent studies on reactive metals and dense molecular systems, which are synergistic to many proposed activities to develop dynamic synchrotron x-ray diffraction capabilities centered at advanced third and fourth generation light sources.

  7. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  8. Dynamics of inelastic and reactive gas-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smoliar, L.A.

    1995-04-01

    The dynamics of inelastic and reactive collisions in atomic beam-surface scattering are presented. The inelastic scattering of hyperthermal rare gaseous atoms from three alkali halide surfaces (LiF, NaCl, GI)was studied to understand mechanical energy transfer in unreactive systems. The dynamics of the chemical reaction in the scattering of H(D) atoms from the surfaces of LIF(001) and the basal plane of graphite were also studied.

  9. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  10. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  11. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO. PMID:27411370

  12. In Situ Control of Gas Flow by Modification of Gas-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dongjin; Ducker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    The boundary condition for gas flow at the solid-gas interface can be altered by in situ control of the state of a thin film adsorbed to the solid. A monolayer of ocatadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) reversibly undergoes a meltinglike transition. When the temperature of an OTS-coated particle and plate is moved through the range of OTS “melting” temperatures, there is a change in the lubrication force between the particle and plate in 1 atm of nitrogen gas. This change is interpreted in terms of a change in the flow of gas mediated by the slip length and tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC). There is a minimum in slip length (290 nm) at 18°C, which corresponds to a maximum in TMAC (0.44). The slip length increases to 590 nm at 40°C which corresponds to a TMAC of 0.25. We attribute the decrease in TMAC with increasing temperature to a decrease in roughness of the monolayer on melting, which allows a higher fraction of specular gas reflections, thereby conserving tangential gas momentum. The importance of this work is that it demonstrates the ability to control gas flow simply by altering the interface for fixed geometry and gas properties.

  13. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  14. Characterization of flue gas residues from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Forestier, L.L. |; Libourel, G. |

    1998-08-01

    Solid residues recovered from treatment of flue gas resulting from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are of particular concern because of ever-increasing worldwide production rates and their concentrations of potentially hazardous transition elements and heavy metals. Three main residue types have been studied in this study: electrostatic precipitator ashes, wet filter cakes, and semidry scrubber residues. Using a large number of residues from two French MSW combustion (MSWC) facilities, the aim of this work is to determine their chemistry and mineralogy in order to shed light on their potential toxicity. The authors find that pollutant concentrations are dependent not only on the composition of MSW but also on the size of particles and flue gas treatment process. Using a procedure based on leaching, grain-size, density, and magnetic separations, the authors present a detailed description of the mineralogy of MSWC solid residues. These residues consist of a very heterogeneous assemblage of glasses, metals, and other crystals in which polluting elements are distributed. The results of this characterization will therefore help to contribute to the development of adequate waste management strategies.

  15. Polar Effects Control the Gas-phase Reactivity of Charged para-Benzyne Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wittrig, Ashley M.; Archibold, Enada F.; Sheng, Huaming; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of charged para-benzynes is entirely unexplored as they and/or their precursors tend to undergo ring-opening upon their generation. We report here a gas-phase reactivity study of two such benzynes, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium and 5,8-didehydroisoquinolinium cations, generated in a modified dual-linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer. Both biradicals were found to form diagnostic products with organic molecules, indicating the presence of two radical sites. As opposed to earlier predictions that the singlet-triplet (S-T) splitting controls the radical reactivity of such species, the 2,5-didehydropyridinium cation reacts much faster in spite of its larger S-T splitting. Calculated vertical electron affinities of the radical sites of the para-benzynes, a parameter related to the polarity of the transition states of their reactions, appears to be the most important reactivity controlling factor. PMID:25838787

  16. Acoustic Probe for Solid-Gas-Liquid Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2003-09-14

    The primary objective of the research project during the first funding period was to develop an acoustic probe to measure volume percent solids in solid-liquid slurries in the presence of small amounts of gas bubbles. This problem was addressed because of the great need for a non-invasive, accurate and reliable method for solids monitoring in liquid slurries in the presence of radiolytically generated gases throughout the DOE complex. These measurements are necessary during mobilization of salts and sediments in tanks, transport of these slurries in transfer lines to processing facilities across a site, and, in some instances, during high level waste processing. Although acoustic probes have been commonly used for monitoring flows in single-phase fluids (McLeod, 1967), their application to monitor two-phase mixtures has not yet fully realized its potential. A number of investigators in recent years have therefore been involved in developing probes for measuring the volume fractions in liquid solid suspensions (Atkinson and Kytomaa, 1993; Greenwood et al., 1993; Martin et al., 1995) and in liquid-liquid suspensions (Bonnet and Tavlarides, 1987; Tavlarides and Bonnet, 1988, Yi and Tavlarides, 1990; Tsouris and Tavlarides, 1993, Tsouris et al., 1995). In particular, Atkinson and Kytomaa (1993) showed that the acoustic technique can be used to determine both the velocity and the volume fraction of solids while Martin et al. (1995) and Spelt et al. (1999) showed that the acoustic probe can also be used to obtain information on the size distribution of the particles. In a recent testing of in-line slurry monitors with radioactive slurries suspended with Pulsair Mixers (Hylton & Bayne, 1999), an acoustic probe did not compare well with other instruments most probably due to presence of entrained gases and improper acoustic frequency range of interrogation. The work of the investigators cited has established the potential of the acoustic probe for characterizing

  17. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  18. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; George, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  19. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Raptis, A. C.

    1984-05-01

    An apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe is described. It includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  20. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  1. Fluidization onset and expansion of gas-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.C.; Shin, T.S.

    1984-08-01

    A simple, mass conservation-based, kinematic model is presented for accurately predicting both the onset of fluidization and the degree of (limit of) bed expansion in bubbling gas-solid fluidized beds. The model is consistant with inception correlations exisiting in the literature. Since the method has a sound physical basis, it might be expected to provide scaling between laboratory-scale fluidized beds and large-scale systems. This scaling ability, however, remains to be demonstrated as does the application to pressurized systems and where the terminal Reynolds numbers exceed 1000, (Archimedes numbers over about 3.2 x 10/sup 5/).

  2. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals in response to said first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  3. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  4. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  5. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  6. Reactive solid-state dewetting of Cu-Ni films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clearfield, Raphael; Railsback, Justin G.; Pearce, Ryan C.; Hensley, Dale K.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Simpson, Michael L.; Rack, Philip D.; Melechko, Anatoli V.

    2010-12-01

    The behavior of a 50 nm Cu-Ni alloy film on Si in a process of reactive solid-state dewetting is presented. The films were annealed at a range of temperatures (300-700 °C) in 1% H2 99% N2 reducing atmosphere. The resulting alloy and silicide particles formed by film dewetting and film reaction with the substrate were distinguished by selective wet etching and examined by scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopy. After potassium hydroxide etch, regions that etch slower than silicon substrate have distribution statistics similar to the alloy and silicide particles prior to their removal, indicating strong coupling between mass transport across the interface and along the surface.

  7. Reactive solid-state dewetting of Cu-Ni films on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, Raphael; Railsback, Justin G.; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Pearce, Ryan C.; Hensley, Dale K.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Simpson, Michael L.; Rack, Philip D.

    2010-12-20

    The behavior of a 50 nm Cu-Ni alloy film on Si in a process of reactive solid-state dewetting is presented. The films were annealed at a range of temperatures (300-700 deg. C) in 1%H{sub 2} 99%N{sub 2} reducing atmosphere. The resulting alloy and silicide particles formed by film dewetting and film reaction with the substrate were distinguished by selective wet etching and examined by scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopy. After potassium hydroxide etch, regions that etch slower than silicon substrate have distribution statistics similar to the alloy and silicide particles prior to their removal, indicating strong coupling between mass transport across the interface and along the surface.

  8. An index for quantifying the aerobic reactivity of municipal solid wastes and derived waste products.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    The organic matter contained in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in the MSW fractions obtained by mechanical separation has strong environmental impact when the waste is used as landfill. This is partly due to the biological activity that occurs under anaerobic conditions. Negative effects on the environment include unpleasant odors, biogas, leachate and biomass self-heating. Measuring the biological reactivity of waste with the help of indicators is an important tool to prevent waste impact. The aim of this study was to develop an index capable of describing the aerobic reactivity of waste, using both biological and chemical indicators. To develop this index, 71 MSW and MSW-product samples, including biologically treated MSW and mechanically separated MSW fractions, were analyzed. Fifty of the 71 samples analyzed represented MSWs and their derived products collected from a number of Italian waste plants and sites. The remaining 21 were MSW samples collected at different times during 8 different full-scale aerobic biological processes in four treatment plants used to reduce the biological reactivity of wastes. Five of these processes used the entire (unsorted) MSW, while the remaining three used the organic fraction of the MSW obtained by mechanical pre-treatment (waste sieving). Respirometric activity (Dynamic Respiration Index, DRI) and eluates characterization (chemical oxygen demand--COD, and 5 days biological oxygen demand--BOD5) were used as indicators of waste strength, as they had previously been reported to be indirect measures of waste impact on landfill. Summarizing all studied indicators, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to develop the Putrescibility Index (Ip). The results revealed Ip index of 204+/-33 (mean+/-standard deviation) and 159+/-14 for the organic fraction of MSW and MSW untreated waste respectively, and of 106+/-16 and 101+/-22 for the corresponding biologically treated waste. PMID:18280541

  9. Water-Gas Shift and Methane Reactivity on Reducible Perovskite-Type Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Comparative (electro)catalytic, structural, and spectroscopic studies in hydrogen electro-oxidation, the (inverse) water-gas shift reaction, and methane conversion on two representative mixed ionic–electronic conducting perovskite-type materials La0.6Sr0.4FeO3−δ (LSF) and SrTi0.7Fe0.3O3−δ (STF) were performed with the aim of eventually correlating (electro)catalytic activity and associated structural changes and to highlight intrinsic reactivity characteristics as a function of the reduction state. Starting from a strongly prereduced (vacancy-rich) initial state, only (inverse) water-gas shift activity has been observed on both materials beyond ca. 450 °C but no catalytic methane reforming or methane decomposition reactivity up to 600 °C. In contrast, when starting from the fully oxidized state, total methane oxidation to CO2 was observed on both materials. The catalytic performance of both perovskite-type oxides is thus strongly dependent on the degree/depth of reduction, on the associated reactivity of the remaining lattice oxygen, and on the reduction-induced oxygen vacancies. The latter are clearly more reactive toward water on LSF, and this higher reactivity is linked to the superior electrocatalytic performance of LSF in hydrogen oxidation. Combined electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman measurements in turn also revealed altered surface and bulk structures and reactivities. PMID:26045733

  10. Gas-phase synthesis and reactivity of Cu(+)-benzyne complexes.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunfeng; Shen, Shanshan; Weng, Guofeng; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2014-10-11

    Cu(+)-benzyne complexes bearing bidentate nitrogen ligands were synthesized in the gas phase for the first time using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The addition reactivity of copper-stabilized benzyne with amines was studied in the ion trap analyzer. The structures of products were identified by comparing their MS(n) data with authentic compounds obtained from another generation route.

  11. Co-processing of agricultural plastic waste and switchgrass via tail gas reactive pyrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixtures of agricultural plastic waste in the form of polyethylene hay bale covers (PE) (4-37%) and switchgrass were investigated using the US Department of Agriculture’s tail gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) at different temperatures (400-570 deg C). TGRP of switchgrass and plastic mixtures significan...

  12. High pressure reactivity of solid furan probed by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Santoro, Mario; Bini, Robert; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of crystalline furan has been investigated, at room temperature, along the 0-47-0 GPa pressure cycle by using IR and Raman spectroscopy. These data, joint to high pressure low temperature IR data, allow the identification of two solid phases in the 1.2-12 GPa pressure range: the low-pressure orientationally disordered phase IV and the high-pressure ordered phase III. Above 10-12 GPa solid furan starts to chemically transform. The threshold pressure for the transformation is much lower than in benzene, as expected according to the minor stability of the heteroaromatic ring. The reaction proceeds continuously along the compression path, but it becomes complete only with releasing pressure, and a yellow-brownish sample is recovered. This compound was identified as an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) containing alkylpolyether type segments, alcoholic functions, and C=O bonds. The presence of these new chemical species attests to the opening of the original furan rings and to the transfer of hydrogen atoms. The reaction seems to be very similar to that induced in crystalline benzene. This comparison indicates a general behavior for the reactivity under ultrahigh pressures of the whole class of aromatic compounds.

  13. Characterization of zeolite structure and fluorocarbon reactivity using solid state NMR and x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Michael Frank

    The research presented in this thesis involves a combination of techniques used to study the structure and interactions zeolites adsorbed with fluorocarbons. This research is specifically aimed at understanding the processes of adsorption, binding, and reactivity of fluorocarbons on cation exchanged faujasite type zeolites. The solid state ion exchange process has also been studied since it is one way to obtain materials with higher exchange levels, which has been shown to effect adsorption and catalytic activity. To improve the understanding of the adsorption and separation processes a time resolved in-situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction study has been undertaken. Since faujasite type zeolites have been found to be effective in separating mixtures of HFC-134 (CF2HCF2H) and HFC-134a (CFH2CF3) isomers, the adsorption of these fluorocarbons on NaY have been studied. It has been shown that both the extent of loading and the kinetics of the sorption process in molecular sieves can be followed using this technique. A model for the binding of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 124a (CF 2HCF2Cl) adsorbed on NaX at 100K has been determined using a combination x-ray and neutron powder diffraction and solid state NMR. Using Rietveld refinement of the diffraction data, the HCFC molecule was found localized in the zeolite cavities bound on either end by sodium cations in the SII and SIII' positions. The model is consistent with hydrogen bonding between the proton of the HCFC and the framework oxygen. The NMR results further confirm the model and are consistent with Na-F binding and HCFC-framework interactions. Solid-state MAS NMR, synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph catalysis system have been used to study the reactivity of HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) on NaX, Zn 2+-exchanged NaX (ZnX) and Rb+-exchanged NaX (RbX). We have chosen to study HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) since HCFC-124a can undergo both dehydrofluorination and dehydrochlorination

  14. Iridium single atom tips fabricated by field assisted reactive gas etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John A.; Urban, Radovan; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple, reliable method to fabricate Ir single atom tips (SATs) from polycrystalline wire. An electrochemical etch in CaCl2 solution is followed by a field assisted reactive gas etch in vacuum at room temperature using oxygen as an etching gas and neon as an imaging gas. Once formed, SATs are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and their underlying structure is examined through evaporation of the apex atoms. Furthermore, a method is developed to repair Ir SATs at liquid nitrogen temperatures when apex atoms evaporate. This method may be used to fabricate Ir SAT ion sources.

  15. NiCr etching in a reactive gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.; Boucher, R.; Morgenroth, W.; Meyer, H. G.

    2007-05-15

    The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)

  16. Organometallic synthesis, reactivity and catalysis in the solid state using well-defined single-site species

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Sebastian D.; Weller, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Acting as a bridge between the heterogeneous and homogeneous realms, the use of discrete, well-defined, solid-state organometallic complexes for synthesis and catalysis is a remarkably undeveloped field. Here, we present a review of this topic, focusing on describing the key transformations that can be observed at a transition-metal centre, as well as the use of well-defined organometallic complexes in the solid state as catalysts. There is a particular focus upon gas–solid reactivity/catalysis and single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations. PMID:25666064

  17. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12 to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  18. A new model for gas/solid pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bangxian; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new model of particle turbulent dispersion in vertical gas/solid pipe flow is presented in this paper. The essence of the model is to pay more attention to the active and discrete behavior of particles in the dispersion process in non-homogeneous turbulent vertical pipe flows using two-fluid approaches. In the new model, a non-gradient type of diffusion term is included in the expression of radial particle dispersion flux; the transport equation for particle turbulent kinetic energy (PTKE) is developed and solved for its distribution; the effect of intra-particle collision is considered for the generation and dissipation of PTKE; turbulence modulation due to particle presence is taken into account. Preliminary numerical results based on this new model are also presented in this paper.

  19. Inhomogeneity of ventilatory unit volume and its effects on reactive gas uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, R.R.; Anjilvel, S.; Miller, F.J.; Crapo, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    This study addressed the question of whether variations in the volume of alveoli and alveolar ducts forming single units of ventilation can significantly influence the distribution and uptake of inspired reactive gases. Quantitative serial section analyses of vascular perfusion-fixed rat lungs were used to determine the anatomic dead space proximal to specific ventilatory units as well as the gas volume of these ventilatory units. Three reconstructions, each consisting of ventilatory units distal to a specific bronchus, were carried out. The number of ventilatory units for each reconstruction varied from 26 to 71. The average ventilatory unit volume for the three reconstructions (0.53 {plus minus} .03 (SE) mm3) was not significantly different from measurements based on random sampling. The distribution of ventilatory unit volume was diverse, with 15% of the population having a volume less than 0.3 mm3 and 9% of the population having a volume greater than 1.0 mm3. For a gas of relatively low reactivity (e.g., oxygen) the predicted oxygen uptake per unit surface area did not vary significantly between ventilatory units. The predicted oxygen uptake was approximately 92% of the uptake in the absence of gradients in oxygen concentration between ventilatory units. For a highly reactive gas (e.g., ozone), the predicted uptake per unit surface area in the proximal portions of larger ventilatory units was significantly greater than the average uptake. These results suggest that focal areas of injury likely result from exposure to inhaled reactive gases.

  20. Reactive sputtering of titanium in Ar/CH4 gas mixture: Target poisoning and film characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, O.A.; Rumaiz, A.; Shah, S.

    2009-03-01

    Reactive sputtering of titanium target in the presence of Ar/CH{sub 4} gas mixture has been investigated. With the addition of methane gas to above 1.5% of the process gas a transition from the metallic sputtering mode to the poison mode was observed as indicated by the change in cathode current. As the methane gas flow concentration increased up to 10%, the target was gradually poisoned. The hysteresis in the cathode current could be plotted by first increasing and then subsequently decreasing the methane concentration. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the deposited films confirmed the formation of carbide phases and the transition of the process from the metallic to compound sputtering mode as the methane concentration in the sputtering gas is increased. The paper discusses a sputtering model that gives a rational explanation of the target poisoning phenomenon and shows an agreement between the experimental observations and calculated results.

  1. Huge increase in gas phase nanoparticle generation by pulsed direct current sputtering in a reactive gas admixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Peter, Tilo; Mohammad Ahadi, Amir; Hinz, Alexander; Strunskus, Thomas; Zaporojtchenko, Vladimir; Biederman, Hynek; Faupel, Franz

    2013-07-01

    Using reactive DC sputtering in a gas aggregation cluster source, we show that pulsed discharge gives rise to a huge increase in deposition rate of nanoparticles by more than one order of magnitude compared to continuous operation. We suggest that this effect is caused by an equilibrium between slight target oxidation (during "time-off") and subsequent sputtering of Ti oxides (sub-oxides) at "time-on" with high power impulse.

  2. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  3. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can be further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set of

  4. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    DOE PAGES

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can bemore » further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set

  5. Greenhouse gas dynamics of municipal solid waste alternatives.

    PubMed

    Eschenroeder, A

    2001-10-01

    Previous greenhouse gas studies comparing landfilling with combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are limited to examinations of the emissions weighted by their relative radiative activity. This paper adds another dimension by analyzing the atmospheric response to these emissions. The heart of the analysis is a time-dependent model using a perturbation analysis of the IS92a results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Using as inputs the emissions from the two technologies, the model calculates atmospheric concentration histories. Scenarios for a landfill and a combustor envision each accepting 1000 Mg refuse/day for a 30-year operating period followed by a 70-year postclosure period. The baseline scenario examines the basic greenhouse impact of each technology. The other scenario adds active gas collection at the landfill and energy offset credits for avoided power plant carbon emissions. For both scenarios, CH4 and trace gases from the landfill persist in the atmosphere, and they are relatively potent at forcing IR heating. The combination of these features place the landfill much higher than previously expected on the greenhouse impact scale. For the baseline scenario, the time-integrated radiative forcing from landfilling is 115 times that of combustion, and this ratio is 45 for the second scenario. PMID:11686246

  6. Greenhouse gas dynamics of municipal solid waste alternatives.

    PubMed

    Eschenroeder, A

    2001-10-01

    Previous greenhouse gas studies comparing landfilling with combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are limited to examinations of the emissions weighted by their relative radiative activity. This paper adds another dimension by analyzing the atmospheric response to these emissions. The heart of the analysis is a time-dependent model using a perturbation analysis of the IS92a results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Using as inputs the emissions from the two technologies, the model calculates atmospheric concentration histories. Scenarios for a landfill and a combustor envision each accepting 1000 Mg refuse/day for a 30-year operating period followed by a 70-year postclosure period. The baseline scenario examines the basic greenhouse impact of each technology. The other scenario adds active gas collection at the landfill and energy offset credits for avoided power plant carbon emissions. For both scenarios, CH4 and trace gases from the landfill persist in the atmosphere, and they are relatively potent at forcing IR heating. The combination of these features place the landfill much higher than previously expected on the greenhouse impact scale. For the baseline scenario, the time-integrated radiative forcing from landfilling is 115 times that of combustion, and this ratio is 45 for the second scenario.

  7. Aerodynamic levitation of laser-heated solids in gas jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Atkins, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The aerodynamic levitation technique is developed for studies of high-temperature material properties and gas/condensed-phase reaction kinetics. Stable levitation is demonstrated in a supersonic jet from a 0.081 cm nozzle with 0.03-0.20 g 0.24-0.47 cm diameter solid spheres at a height between 0.7-2.0 cm above the nozzle and ambient pressures between 1.1-18 Torr. A model of supersonic jet levitation is developed which accurately predicts the values of height vs pressure over the full range of conditions investigated. It is found that the efficiency with which jet momentum is converted into levitation force decreases with the jet/specimen diameter ratio and the jet Reynolds number, and the rate of jet spreading with distance from the nozzle is found to agree with that measured by pitot tube traverses of the jet. In addition, laser heating is shown to reduce the jet momentum required for levitation at a given height and to increase levitation stability. Measurements of sphere levitation in subsonic gas jets show that the required jet momentum flow rate exceeds the specimen weight by about 2/the specimen drag coefficient at its terminal free-fall speed under ambient conditions.

  8. Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L.

    2008-12-15

    This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

  9. Reactive oxygen species regulate lovastatin biosynthesis in Aspergillus terreus during submerged and solid-state fermentations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Roxana U; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis E; Mendoza, Mariel; Pérez-Sánchez, Ailed; Fierro, Francisco; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-12-01

    In a previous work we detected an important increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations during idiophase in lovastatin fermentations. Hence, the objective of the present work was to determine if ROS contributes to the regulation of lovastatin biosynthesis. Exogenous antioxidants were used to reduce ROS accumulation. The addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) decreased ROS accumulation and concurrent lovastatin production. In solid-state fermentation (SSF), the addition of 100 mM of NAC lowered ROS accumulation by 53%, together with a 79% decrease in lovastatin biosynthesis. A similarly, situation was observed in submerged fermentation (SmF). Decreased lovastatin production was due to a lower expression of the regulatory gene lovE, and gene lovF. Moreover, the addition of H2O2 to the culture caused precocious gene expression and lovastatin biosynthesis. These results indicate that ROS accumulation in idiophase contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic genes. It was considered that Yap1 (Atyap1) could be a transcription factor linking ROS with lovastatin biosynthesis. In a Northern analysis, Aspergillus terreus yap1 gene (Atyap1) was highly expressed during trophophase but down regulated during idiophase. Conversely, expression pattern of srrA gene, suggested that SrrA could positively control lovastatin biosynthesis, and also explaining the characteristics of the biosynthesis in SSF.

  10. A Statistical Hot Spot Reactive Flow Model for Shock Initiation and Detonation of Solid High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2002-07-01

    A statistical hot spot reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid high explosives developed in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code is presented. This model is intended to evolve into a physically correct description of the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the onset of shock initiation via hotspot formation, the growth (01 failure to grow) of these hotspots into the surrounding explosive particles, the rapid transition to detonation, and self-sustaining detonation. Mesoscale modeling of the shock compression and temperature dependent chemical decomposition of individual explosive particles are currently yielding accurate predictions of hot spot formation and the subsequent growth (or failure) of these hotspot reactions in the surrounding grains. For two- and three-dimensional simulations of larger scale explosive charges, a statistical hotspot model that averages over thousands of individual hotspot dimensions and temperatures and then allows exothermic chemical reactions to grow (or fail to grow) due to thermal conduction is required. This paper outlines a first approach to constructing a probabilistic hot spot formulation based on the number density of potential hotspot sites. These hotspots can then either ignite or die out if they do not exceed certain ignition criteria, which are based on physical properties of the explosive particles. The growing hot spots spread at burn velocities given by experimentally determined deflagration velocity versus pressure relationships. The mathematics and assumptions involved in formulating the model and practical examples of its usefulness are given.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

  12. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  13. Anode materials for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, Nemanja

    Novel anode catalysts have been developed for sour natural gas solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Sour natural gas comprises light hydrocarbons, and typically also contains H2S. An alternative fuel SOFC that operates directly on sour natural gas would reduce the overall cost of plant construction and operation for fuel cell power generation. The anode for such a fuel cell must have good catalytic and electrocatalytic activity for hydrocarbon conversion, sulfur-tolerance, resistance to coking, and good electronic and ionic conductivity. The catalytic activity and stability of ABO3 (A= La, Ce and/or Sr, B=Cr and one or more of Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Mn, or Co) perovskites as SOFC anode materials depends on both A and B, and are modified by substituents. The materials have been prepared by both solid state and wet-chemical methods. The physical and chemical characteristics of the materials have been fully characterized using electron microscopy, XRD, calorimetry, dilatometry, particle size and area, using XPS and TGA-DSC-MS. Electrochemical performance was determined using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic cell testing, electrochemical impedance analysis, and conductivity measurements. Neither Ce0.9Sr0.1VO3 nor Ce0.9 Sr0.1Cr0.5V0.5O3 was an active anode for oxidation of H2 and CH4 fuels. However, active catalysts comprising Ce0:9Sr0:1V(O,S)3 and Ce0.9Sr 0.1Cr0.5V0.5(O,S)3 were formed when small concentrations of H2S were present in the fuels. The oxysulfides formed in-situ were very active for conversion of H2S. The maximum performance improved from 50 mW cm-2 to 85 mW cm -2 in 0.5% H2S/CH4 at 850°C with partial substitution of V by Cr in Ce0.9Sr0.1V(O,S)3. Selective conversion of H2S offers potential for sweetening of sour gas without affecting the hydrocarbons. Perovskites La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5X 0.5O3--delta, (henceforth referred to as LSCX, X=Ti, Mn, Fe, Co) are active for conversion of H2, CH4 and 0.5% H2S/CH4. The order of activity in the different fuels depends on

  14. Interaction of coal-derived synthesis gas impurities with solid oxide fuel cell metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Cramer, Carolyn N.

    Oxidation-resistant alloys find use as interconnect materials, heat exchangers, and gas supply tubing in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, especially when operated at temperatures below ∼800 °C. If fueled with synthesis gas derived from coal or biomass, such metallic components could be exposed to impurities contained in those fuel sources. In this study, coupons of ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and SS 441, austenitic nickel-chromium superalloy Inconel 600, and an alumina-forming high nickel alloy alumel were exposed to synthesis gas containing ≤2 ppm phosphorus, arsenic and antimony, and reaction products were tested. Crofer 22 APU coupons coated with a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protective layer were also evaluated. Phosphorus was found to be the most reactive. On Crofer 22 APU, the (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 passivation layer reacted to form an Mn-P-O product, predicted to be manganese phosphate from thermochemical calculations, and Cr 2O 3. On SS 441, reaction of phosphorus with (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 led to the formation of manganese phosphate as well as an Fe-P product, predicted from thermochemical calculations to be Fe 3P. Minimal interactions with antimony or arsenic in synthesis gas were limited to Fe-Sb and Fe-As solid solution formation. Though not intended for use on the anode side, a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel coating on Crofer 22 APU reacted with phosphorus in synthesis gas to produce products consistent with Mn 3(PO 4) 2 and Co 2P. A thin Cr 2O 3 passivation layer on Inconel 600 did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides and arsenides and of iron phosphides and arsenides, though no reaction with Cr 2O 3 was apparent. On alumel, an Al 2O 3 passivation layer rich in Ni did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides, arsenides, and antimonides, though no reaction with Al 2O 3 occurred. This work shows that unprotected metallic components of an SOFC stack and system can provide a sink for P, As and Sb impurities that may be present in fuel gases, and thus complicate

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS: MODELING AND TESTING FOR AIR AND WATER EXPOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, D.; James, C.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Tamburello, D.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2010-05-18

    To make commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using these materials. A rigorous set of environmental reactivity tests have been developed based on modified testing procedures codified by the United Nations for the transportation of dangerous goods. Potential hydrogen storage material, 2LiBH4{center_dot}MgH2 and NH3BH3, have been tested using these modified procedures to evaluate the relative risks of these materials coming in contact with the environment in hypothetical accident scenarios. It is apparent that an ignition event will only occur if both a flammable concentration of hydrogen and sufficient thermal energy were available to ignite the hydrogen gas mixture. In order to predict hydride behavior for hypothesized accident scenarios, an idealized finite element model was developed for dispersed hydride from a breached system. Empirical thermodynamic calculations based on precise calorimetric experiments were performed in order to quantify the energy and hydrogen release rates and to quantify the reaction products resulting from water and air exposure. Both thermal and compositional predictions were made with identification of potential ignition event scenarios.

  16. A new continuous device to perform S-L-G photocatalytic studies. [Solid-Liquid-Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, M.A.; Gimenez, J.; Simarro, R.; Cervera-March, S. )

    1992-07-01

    A new experimental device to carry out solid-liquid-gas photocatalytic studies is presented. It can operate as a continuous system with respect to both the gas and the liquid phase. The solid photocatalyst is held inside the system and is continuously recycled through it to enable the separation of the spent liquid. Steady values of liquid and gas composition as well as temperature and fluidodynamic variables can be set and controlled.

  17. Gas-solid alkali destruction of volatile chlorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Many chlorocarbons are environmental dangers and health hazards. The simplest perchlorinated hydrocarbon, carbon tetrachloride, is near the top of the list of hazardous compounds. Carbon tetrachloride was used as a cleaning fluid, solvent, and fire-extinguishing agent. The nuclear and defense complexes also employed great quantities of carbon tetrachloride and other chlorocarbons as cleaning and degreasing agents. Many sites nationwide have underground chlorocarbon contamination plumes. Bulk chlorocarbon inventories at many locations await treatment and disposal. Often the problem is compounded by the chlorocarbon being radioactively contaminated. Waste inventory and groundwater contamination problems exist for many other chlorocarbons, especially methylene chloride, chloroform, and tri- and tetrachloroethylene. In this work solid soda lime (a fused mixture of approximately 95% CaO and 5% NaOH in a coarse, granulated form) at 350 C to 400 C acts as the hydrolyzing degradation, and off-gas scrubbing medium. Within soda lime CO{sub 2} and HCl from hydrolysis and degradation convert immediately to calcium and sodium chlorides and carbonates, with water vapor as a volatile byproduct.

  18. ORIGIN OF THERMAL FLUIDS AT LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK: EVIDENCE FROM NOBLE AND REACTIVE GAS ABUNDANCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, Alfred H.; Mazor, Emanuel; Nehring, Nancy L.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal fluid discharges at Lassen are dominated by high-altitude fumaroles and acid-sulfate hot springs in the Park, and lower altitude, neutral, high-chloride hot springs in Mill Valley 7-10 km to the south. The interrelations of these fluids have been studied by noble and reactive gas analyses. Atmospheric noble gas (ANG) contents of superheated fumaroles are similar to those of air-saturated recharge water (ASW) at 5 degree C and 2500-m elevation. Low-elevation, high-chloride, hot-spring waters are highly depleted in ANG, relative to the ASW. The surface temperatures and gas chemistry of the fumaroles and hot springs suggest that steam originating from partial to near-complete vaporization of liquid from a boiling, high-chloride, hot water aquifer is decompressed adiabatically, and more or less mixed with shallow groundwater to form superheated and drowned fumaroles within the Park. Refs.

  19. Laboratory tests in support of the MSRE reactive gas removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, J.C.; Del Cul, G.D.; Caja, J.; Toth, L.M.; Williams, D.F.; Thomas, K.S.; Clark, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since December 1969, at which time the molten salt mixture of LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} (64.5-30.3-5.0-0.13 mol%) was transferred to fuel salt drain tanks for storage. In the late 1980s, increased radiation in one of the gas lines from the drain tank was attributed to {sup 233}UF{sub 6}. In 1994 two gas samples were withdraw (from a gas line in the Vent House connecting to the drain tanks) and analyzed. Surprisingly, 350 mm Hg of F{sub 2}, 70 mm Hg of UF{sub 6}, and smaller amounts of other gases were found in both of the samples. To remote this gas from above the drain tanks and all of the associated piping, the reactive gas removal system (RGRS) was designed. This report details the laboratory testing of the RGRS, using natural uranium, prior to its implementation at the MSRE facility. The testing was performed to ensure that the equipment functioned properly and was sufficient to perform the task while minimizing exposure to personnel. In addition, the laboratory work provided the research and development effort necessary to maximize the performance of the system. Throughout this work technicians and staff who were to be involved in RGRS operation at the MSRE site worked directly with the research staff in completing the laboratory testing phase. Consequently, at the end of the laboratory work, the personnel who were to be involved in the actual operations had acquired all of the training and experience necessary to continue with the process of reactive gas removal.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID-STATE HYDROGEN SYSTEMS: FUNDAMENTAL TESTING AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.; Cortes-Concepcion., J; Anton, D.; Tamburello, D.

    2010-12-13

    In order to enable the commercial acceptance of solid state hydrogen storage materials and systems it is important to understand the risks associated with the environmental exposure of various materials. In some instances, these materials are sensitive to the environment surrounding the material and the behavior is unique and independent to each material. The development of testing procedures to evaluate a material's behavior with different environmental exposures is a critical need. In some cases material modifications may be needed in order to reduce the risk of environmental exposure. We have redesigned two standardized UN tests for clarity and exactness; the burn rate and self-heating tests. The results of these and other UN tests are shown for ammonia borane, NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and alane, AlH{sub 3}. The burn rate test showed a strong dependence on the preparation method of aluminum hydride as the particle size and trace amounts of solvent greatly influence the test results. The self-heating test for ammonia borane showed a failed test as low as 70 C in a modified cylindrical form. Finally, gas phase calorimetry was performed and resulted in an exothermic behavior within an air and 30%RH environment.

  1. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    This technical report describes the experimental part of a program on thermal radiation properties of reactor materials. A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 ..mu.. to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  2. Reactive two-body and three-body collisions of Ba+ in an ultracold Rb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krükow, Artjom; Mohammadi, Amir; Härter, Arne; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    We analyze reactive collisions of a single Ba+ ion in contact with an ultracold gas of Rb atoms at low three-body collision energies of 2.2(9) mK ×kB . Mapping out the Ba+ loss rate dependence on the Rb atom density we can discern two-body reactive collisions from three-body ones and determine both rate coefficients, which are k2=3.1 (6 ) (6 ) ×10-13cm3s-1 and k3=1.04 (4 ) (45 ) ×10-24cm6s-1 , respectively (statistical and systematic errors in parentheses). Thus, the measured ternary recombination dominates over binary reactions even at moderate atom densities of n ≈1012cm-3 . The results for Ba+ and Rb are representative for a wide range of cold ion-atom systems and can serve as guidance for the future development of the field of hybrid atom-ion research.

  3. Communication: H-atom reactivity as a function of temperature in solid parahydrogen: The H + N2O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutunga, Fredrick M.; Follett, Shelby E.; Anderson, David T.

    2013-10-01

    We present low temperature kinetic measurements for the H + N2O association reaction in solid parahydrogen (pH2) at liquid helium temperatures (1-5 K). We synthesize 15N218O doped pH2 solids via rapid vapor deposition onto an optical substrate attached to the cold tip of a liquid helium bath cryostat. We then subject the solids to short duration 193 nm irradiations to generate H-atoms produced as byproducts of the in situ N2O photodissociation, and monitor the subsequent reaction kinetics using rapid scan FTIR. For reactions initiated in solid pH2 at 4.3 K we observe little to no reaction; however, if we then slowly reduce the temperature of the solid we observe an abrupt onset to the H + N2O → cis-HNNO reaction at temperatures below 2.4 K. This abrupt change in the reaction kinetics is fully reversible as the temperature of the solid pH2 is repeatedly cycled. We speculate that the observed non-Arrhenius behavior (negative activation energy) is related to the stability of the pre-reactive complex between the H-atom and 15N218O reagents.

  4. Reactive Transport Modeling of Vadose Zone Contamination: Feedback between Reactions and Gas-Phase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.

    2007-05-01

    The unsaturated zone acts as a buffer zone for contaminants on their way to the water table but can also attenuate the emission of contaminants leaving the subsurface environment through the gas phase. A reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport has been developed to investigate the processes that contribute to the generation and attenuation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. In particular, the model is suitable to study the feedback processes between advective-diffusive gas transport and geochemical reactions. The model is also able to estimate diffusive and advective contributions to gas transport in multicomponent systems. Two model applications are presented that investigate gas transport and reactions in mine tailings and at a site with organic contamination. In mine tailings, atmospheric oxygen transported into the sediment column is consumed in the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Gas volume loss caused by the consumption of atmospheric oxygen drives advective fluxes. In the absence of carbonate minerals, the advective component accounts for 16 % of the net oxygen flux into the column, while, in a carbonate-rich system, advection accounts for 10 % of the net oxygen flux. Dissolution of carbonate minerals has a moderating effect on advective gas transport since carbon dioxide can partially compensate for the depletion of oxygen. At an oil spill site, volatilization and degradation of organic contaminants cause advective and diffusive fluxes of organic vapors away from the source zone. At early stages, volatilization dominates and oxidation of these organic vapors attenuates the emission of contaminants to the atmosphere. The contribution of advection to organic vapor fluxes is significant initially but decreases with time. At later stages, the oil source becomes depleted of its most volatile fraction, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and heavier n-alkanes results in the production of methane. Up to 15 % of methane

  5. Model for high rate gas flows in deformable and reactive porous beds

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A M

    1985-01-08

    This report presents the development of a one dimensional planar Lagrange hydrodynamic computer model which describes the processes preceding detonation. The model treats gas flow, deflagration, and compaction in a porous bed of reactive material. The early part of deflagration to detonation experiment with porous HMX is simulated. Sensitivity of the simulation calculation to ignition and burn rate parameters is illustrated and discussed. The effects of changing the mean particle size of the porous material are investigated. There is widespread interest in runaway reaction hazards that may be associated with porosity in propellant and explosive materials. Experimentally, such reactions are initiated and observed in long, thick walled hollow tubes, filled with a granular porous bed of reactive material. We will present comparisons with an experiment on porous HMX to illustrate details of the model and to point out what we believe are important features of the observed phenomenon. A geometric finite element cell is devised that allows gas to flow through a compacting matrix. The experimental simulation considers the DDT process from initial squib burn through the onset of general matrix deflagration (convective burning), to the development of a fully dense compaction wave. While this simulation did not calculate turnover to detonation, it did illustrate that the transition occurred as soon as the compaction wave became fully dense. It is shown that deflagration and gas permeation lags compaction at the time of transition. This suggests that the actual transition involves an additional compaction dependent process. 18 references, 20 figures, 3 tables.

  6. The Scattering of Gas Atoms from Solid Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1977-01-01

    Traditional undergraduate courses in gas kinetic theory encourage the view that in all collisions between a gas atom and a surface, the angle of incidence of the gas atom equals its angle of reflection. This article illustrates and explains the incorrectness in assuming specular reflection and zero dwell time. (Author/MA)

  7. THE IMPACT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advancements in United States (U.S.) municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and a focus on the environmental advantages of integrated MSW management have greatly reduced the environmental impacts of MSW management, including greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study ...

  8. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  9. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  10. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces.

  11. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.; Greenwood, M.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and presence of gas. The goals are to commission and verify the probe components and system operation, develop theory for the forward and inverse problems for acoustic wave propagation through a three phase medium, and experimentally verify the theoretical analysis. The acoustic probe will permit measurement of solid content in gas-liquid-solid waste slurries in tanks across the DOE complex.'

  12. Predicting second gas-solid virial coefficients using calculated molecular properties on various carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Janeksela, Vanessa E; Hooper, Dana N; Thomas, Howard E; Carrington, Nathan A; Williamson, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to obtain values of the second gas-solid virial coefficient, B2s, in the temperature range from 343 to 493 K for seven adsorbate gases: methane, ethane, propane, chloromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, dimethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride. Carboxen-1000, a 1200 m2/g carbon molecular sieve (Supelco Inc.), was used as the adsorbent. These data were combined with earlier work to make a combined data set of 36 different adsorbate gases variously interacting with from one to four different carbon surfaces. All B2s values were extrapolated to 403 K to create a set of 65 different gas-solid B2s values at a fixed temperature. The B2s value for a given gas-solid system can be converted to a chromatographic retention time at any desired flow rate and can be converted to the amount of gas adsorbed at any pressure in the low-coverage, Henry's law region. Beginning with a theoretical equation for the second gas-solid virial coefficient, various quantitative structure retention relations (QSRR) were developed and used to correlate the B2s values for different gas adsorbates with different carbon surfaces. Two calculated adsorbate molecular parameters (molar refractivity and connectivity index), when combined with two adsorbent parameters (surface area and a surface energy contribution to the gas-solid interaction), provided an effective correlation (r2 = 0.952) of the 65 different B2s values. The two surface parameters provided a simple yet useful representation of the structure and energy of the carbon surfaces and thus our correlations considered variation in both the adsorbate gas and the adsorbent solid.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-DIFFUSION FLUX-SPLITTING METHODS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a class of low-diffusion upwinding methods for computing dense gas-solid flows is presented in this work. An artificial compressibility/low-Mach preconditioning strategy is developed for a hyperbolic two-phase flow equation system consisting of separate solids ...

  14. Fundamental equations of a mixture of gas and small spherical solid particles from simple kinetic theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental equations of a mixture of a gas and pseudofluid of small spherical solid particles are derived from the Boltzmann equation of two-fluid theory. The distribution function of the gas molecules is defined in the same manner as in the ordinary kinetic theory of gases, but the distribution function for the solid particles is different from that of the gas molecules, because it is necessary to take into account the different size and physical properties of solid particles. In the proposed simple kinetic theory, two additional parameters are introduced: one is the radius of the spheres and the other is the instantaneous temperature of the solid particles in the distribution of the solid particles. The Boltzmann equation for each species of the mixture is formally written, and the transfer equations of these Boltzmann equations are derived and compared to the well-known fundamental equations of the mixture of a gas and small solid particles from continuum theory. The equations obtained reveal some insight into various terms in the fundamental equations. For instance, the partial pressure of the pseudofluid of solid particles is not negligible if the volume fraction of solid particles is not negligible as in the case of lunar ash flow.

  15. Cluster Size Dependence of Etching by Reactive Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Iaso

    2008-11-03

    Mass-selected reactive gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) were formed using a permanent magnetic filter. Irradiations of CO{sub 2} GCIB on amorphous carbon films and irradiations of SF{sub 6} and SF{sub 6}/Ar mixed GCIB on Si surfaces were performed to study the cluster size dependence on etching yields by reactive GCIB. The reactive sputtering yield of carbon by CO{sub 2} GCIB was almost ten times higher than that by Ar GCIB. In the case of (CO{sub 2}){sub 20000} GCIB with energy of 20 keV (1 eV/atom), it showed the high sputtering yield of 200 atoms/ion, however, there was little crater formation on the carbon surface. It is thought that very soft etching without crater formation would take place in this condition. In the case of SF{sub 6} GCIB on Si, the etching depth of Si showed maximum value when the fraction of SF{sub 6} to Ar was around 50%. As the etching yield was higher than pure SF{sub 6} GCIB, there was a strong ion assisted etching effects in the case of Ar/SF{sub 6} mixed cluster ion irradiations.

  16. Hydrocarbon selectivity model for gas-solid Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on precipitated iron catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, G.P. van der; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of the gas-solid Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis over a commercial Fe-Cu-K-SiO{sub 2} catalyst was studied in a continuous spinning basket reactor. Experimental conditions were varied as follows: reactor pressure of 0.8--3.2 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio = 0.5--2.0, and a space velocity of 0.5--2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} Nm{sup 3}/kg{sub cat} s at a constant temperature of 523 K. A new product distribution model for linear hydrocarbons is proposed. Deviations from conventional Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution can be quantitatively described with an {alpha}-olefin readsorption product distribution model. The experimentally observed relatively high yield of methane, relatively low yield of ethene, and both the exponential decrease of the olefin-to-paraffin ratio and the change of the chain growth parameter with chain length can all be predicted from this new model. It combines a mechanistic model of olefin readsorption with kinetics of chain growth and termination on the same catalytic sites. The hydrocarbon formation is based on the surface carbide mechanism by CH{sub 2} insertion. The olefin readsorption rate depends on the chain length because of increasing physisorption strength on the catalyst surface and increasing solubility in FT wax with increasing chain length. Interfacial concentrations of reactive olefins near the gas-wax and wax-catalyst surface are used in the kinetic model. With optimization of three parameters per experimental product distribution, the olefin readsorption product distribution model proved to predict product selectivities accurately over the entire range of experimental conditions. The relative deviations are 10.1% and 9.1% for the selectivity to paraffins and olefins with n < 11, respectively.

  17. Gas chromatographic analysis of reactive carbonyl compounds formed from lipids upon UV-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, K.J.; Shibamoto, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Peroxidation of lipids produces carbonyl compounds; some of these, e.g., malonaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, are genotoxic because of their reactivity with biological nucleophiles. Analysis of the reactive carbonyl compounds is often difficult. The methylhydrazine method developed for malonaldehyde analysis was applied to simultaneously measure the products formed from linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and squalene upon ultraviolet-irradiation (UV-irradiation). The photoreaction products, saturated monocarbonyl, alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls, and beta-dicarbonyls, were derivatized with methylhydrazine to give hydrazones, pyrazolines, and pyrazoles, respectively. The derivatives were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Lipid peroxidation products identified included formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, malonaldehyde, n-hexanal, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. Malonaldehyde levels formed upon 4 hr of irradiation were 0.06 micrograms/mg from squalene, 2.4 micrograms/mg from linolenic acid, and 5.7 micrograms/mg from arachidonic acid. Significant levels of acrolein (2.5 micrograms/mg) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (0.17 micrograms/mg) were also produced from arachidonic acid upon 4 hr irradiation.

  18. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  19. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part I verification studies

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Li, Tingwen; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware, it is now possible to perform large simulations of granular flows using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). As a result, solids are increasingly treated in a discrete Lagrangian fashion in the gas solids flow community. In this paper, the open-source MFIX-DEM software is described that can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles. This method is referred to as the continuum discrete method (CDM) to clearly make a distinction between the ambiguity of using a Lagrangian or Eulerian reference for either continuum or discrete formulations. This freely available CDM code for gas solids flows can accelerate the research in computational gas solids flows and establish a baseline that can lead to better closures for the continuum modeling (or traditionally referred to as two fluid model) of gas solids flows. In this paper, a series of verification cases is employed which tests the different aspects of the code in a systematic fashion by exploring specific physics in gas solids flows before exercising the fully coupled solution on simple canonical problems. It is critical to have an extensively verified code as the physics is complex with highly-nonlinear coupling, and it is difficult to ascertain the accuracy of the results without rigorous verification. These series of verification tests set the stage not only for rigorous validation studies (performed in part II of this paper) but also serve as a procedure for testing any new developments that couple continuum and discrete formulations for gas solids flows.

  20. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  1. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30% of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50% of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that, 60% of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50% of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for but, very significant under-reporting of diesel related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~ 4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  2. Estimating production and consumption of solid reactive Fe phases in marine sediments from concentration profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    1D diffusion models may be used to estimate rates of production and consumption of dissolved metabolites in marine sediments, but are applied less often to the solid phase. Here we used a numerical inverse method to estimate solid phase Fe(III) and Fe(II) consumption and product...

  3. Greenhouse gas emission from soil amended with biochar made from hydrothermally carbonizing swine solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar made from hydrothermally carbonizing swine solids was mixed with a 50/50 mixture of Norfolk Ap and E horizon at a rate of 20 g/kg. During the incubation period of 54 days, greenhouse gas (CO2 and N2O) emission fluxes were calculated by nonlinearly regressing time-series headspace gas concent...

  4. CFD methods for the reduction of reactive gas emission from a paper laminating machine.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Andras; Jordan, Christian; Forstner, Gerhard; Altacher, Peter; Harasek, Michael

    2007-06-18

    In cooperation with the world's second largest manufacturer of beverage cartons (SIG Combibloc) for liquid foodstuffs an innovative off-take for neutralisation of reactive gas in a paper laminating machine was constructed. A great challenge during engineering work was ensuring a high concentration of the reactive gas where needed and at the same time minimising work place impact in a machine basically without housing. Preliminary 2D-models of the machine geometry proved to be insufficient in describing all the governing flow phenomena. A simplified 3D-geometry containing all important parts of the complex machinery was necessary for accurate predictions. It was found that the driving force of air movement and transport of reactive gas (which acts as an adhesive agent) from the reaction zone in the interior of the laminating machine to the outside is a boundary flow caused by the rapid movement of carton material and rotating cylinders. A physically correct simulation result of the boundary flow is a premise for correct prediction of air flow in and around the machinery. Lacking experimental data (due to an inaccessible geometry) a worst case scenario was constructed by generating a grid and using turbulence models that maximised mass transport in the boundary layer region and thus emission of (tracer)gas from the machine. CFD simulations were done using the geometry preprocessor Gambit, and the finite volume solver Fluent. The results of the analysis of the emission paths from the machine were surprising and led to the construction of an effective off-take relatively far away from the emission source. The chosen position ensures low disturbance of highly sensitive flow patterns inside the machine and diffusive mixing, dilution and contamination of the surroundings. The effect of the new off-take is an immediate and significant rise in air quality in the vicinity of the laminating machine and ensures maximum allowed concentration in the plant area. The product

  5. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  6. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  7. Method and apparatus for the separation of a gas-solids mixture in a circulating fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang

    2010-08-10

    The system of the present invention includes a centripetal cyclone for separating particulate material from a particulate laden gas solids stream. The cyclone includes a housing defining a conduit extending between an upstream inlet and a downstream outlet. In operation, when a particulate laden gas-solids stream passes through the upstream housing inlet, the particulate laden gas-solids stream is directed through the conduit and at least a portion of the solids in the particulate laden gas-solids stream are subjected to a centripetal force within the conduit.

  8. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems. PMID:27095585

  9. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems.

  10. Evolution of gas-filled nanocracks in crystalline solids.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, M; Trinkaus, H

    2002-02-01

    In this work, the evolution of gas-filled cracks under gas implantation and subsequent annealing is studied on the basis of an elastic continuum approach. The observed growth limitation of He-filled nanocracks in SiC is attributed to their stabilization by the formation of circular dislocation dipoles. The formation and Ostwald ripening of bubble-loop complexes at elevated temperatures is modeled in terms of gas atom exchange between such complexes coupled with local matrix atom exchange between bubbles and loops of the same complex. The scaling laws derived for the time dependence of bubble and loop sizes are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Vapor-liquid-solid epitaxial growth of Si1-xGex alloy nanowires. Composition dependence on precursor reactivity and morphology control for vertical forests

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, S. G.; Manandhar, P.; Picraux, S. T.

    2015-07-07

    The growth of high-density group IV alloy nanowire forests is critical for exploiting their unique functionalities in many applications. Here, the compositional dependence on precursor reactivity and optimized conditions for vertical growth are studied for Si1- x Ge x alloy nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method. The nanowire composition versus gas partial-pressure ratio for germane-silane and germane-disilane precursor combinations is obtained at 350°C over a wide composition range (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.98) and a generalized model to predict composition for alloy nanowires is developed based on the relative precursor partial pressures and reactivity ratio. In combination with germane, silanemore » provides more precise compositional control at high Ge concentrations (x > 0.7), whereas disilane greatly increases the Si concentration for a given gas ratio and enables more precise alloy compositional control at small Ge concentrations (x < 0.3). Vertically oriented, non-kinking nanowire forest growth on Si (111) substrates is then discussed for silane/germane over a wide range of compositions, with temperature and precursor partial pressure optimized by monitoring the nanowire growth front using in-situ optical reflectance. For high Ge compositions (x ≈ 0.9), a “two-step” growth approach with nucleation at higher temperatures results in nanowires with high-density and uniform vertical orientation. Furthermore, increasing Si content (x ≈ 0.8), the optimal growth window is shifted to higher temperatures, which minimizes nanowire kinking morphologies. For Si-rich Si1- x Ge x alloys (x ≈ 0.25), vertical nanowire growth is enhanced by single-step, higher-temperature growth at reduced pressures.« less

  12. Accommodative Behavior of Non-porous Molecular crystal at Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mande, Hemant M.; Ghalsasi, Prasanna S.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular crystals demonstrate drastically different behavior in solid and liquid state, mainly due to their difference in structural frameworks. Therefore, designing of unique structured molecular compound which can work at both these interfaces has been a challenge. Here, we present remarkable ‘molecular’ property by non-porous molecular solid crystal, dinuclear copper complex (C6H5CH(X)NH2)2CuCl2, to reversibly ‘adsorb’ HCl gas at solid-gas interface as well as ‘accommodate’ azide anion at solid-liquid interface with crystal to crystal transformation. The latter process is driven by molecular recognition, self-assembly, and anchimeric assistance. The observed transformations are feasible due to breathing of inner and outer coordination sphere around metal center resulting in change in metal polyhedra for ‘accommodating’ guest molecule. These transformations cause changes in optical, magnetic, and/or ferroelectric property offering diversity in ‘sensing’ application. With the proposed underlying principles in these exceptional reversible and cyclic transformations, we prepared a series of compounds, can facilitate designing of novel multifunctional molecular materials.

  13. Accommodative Behavior of Non-porous Molecular crystal at Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Hemant M.; Ghalsasi, Prasanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular crystals demonstrate drastically different behavior in solid and liquid state, mainly due to their difference in structural frameworks. Therefore, designing of unique structured molecular compound which can work at both these interfaces has been a challenge. Here, we present remarkable ‘molecular’ property by non-porous molecular solid crystal, dinuclear copper complex (C6H5CH(X)NH2)2CuCl2, to reversibly ‘adsorb’ HCl gas at solid-gas interface as well as ‘accommodate’ azide anion at solid-liquid interface with crystal to crystal transformation. The latter process is driven by molecular recognition, self-assembly, and anchimeric assistance. The observed transformations are feasible due to breathing of inner and outer coordination sphere around metal center resulting in change in metal polyhedra for ‘accommodating’ guest molecule. These transformations cause changes in optical, magnetic, and/or ferroelectric property offering diversity in ‘sensing’ application. With the proposed underlying principles in these exceptional reversible and cyclic transformations, we prepared a series of compounds, can facilitate designing of novel multifunctional molecular materials. PMID:26411980

  14. Influence of dissolved inorganic carbon and calcium on gas formation and accumulation in iron permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Aki S; Weber, Anne; Jekel, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Uncertainties in long-term reactivity and gas accumulation in Fe(0) permeable reactive barriers still hinder a broad application of this groundwater remediation technology. In this study long-term column experiments were conducted under varying geochemical conditions. Generation of hydrogen by anaerobic corrosion in Fe(0) reactive filters was mainly influenced by the mass flux of dissolved inorganic carbon. Both increased concentrations and volume flows led to a substantial rise in gas generation but only to slight differences of gas accumulation within the pores of the reactive filter. Comparisons of columns with different lengths showed higher averaged corrosion rates in the shorter and lower corrosion rates in the longer columns. Calcium in conjunction with dissolved inorganic carbon formed compact and localized aragonite minerals, while in the absence of calcium chukanovite dominated, which covered and passivated the reactive surface to a higher extent. Magnetite was the major crystalline corrosion product in the absence of carbonate and no decline in long term corrosion rates was observed within up to 700 days of operation. Total gas yields of columns were restricted by passivation and approached a volume of approximately 13.5 mL/g granulated cast iron.

  15. Rapid carbonation for calcite from a solid-liquid-gas system with an imidazolium-based ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdul-Rauf; Vuningoma, Jean Bosco; Huang, Yan; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun

    2014-06-25

    Aqueous carbonation of Ca(OH)2 is a complex process that produces calcite with scalenohedral calcite phases and characterized by inadequate carbonate species for effective carbonation due to the poor dissolution of CO2 in water. Consequently, we report a solid-liquid-gas carbonation system with an ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, in view of enhancing the reaction of CO2 with Ca(OH)2. The use of the IL increased the solubility of CO2 in the aqueous environment and enhanced the transport of the reactive species (Ca2+ and CO32-) and products. The presence of the IL also avoided the formation of the CaCO3 protective and passivation layer and ensured high carbonation yields, as well as the production of stoichiometric rhombohedral calcite phases in a short time.

  16. Rapid Carbonation for Calcite from a Solid-Liquid-Gas System with an Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdul-Rauf; Vuningoma, Jean Bosco; Huang, Yan; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous carbonation of Ca(OH)2 is a complex process that produces calcite with scalenohedral calcite phases and characterized by inadequate carbonate species for effective carbonation due to the poor dissolution of CO2 in water. Consequently, we report a solid-liquid-gas carbonation system with an ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, in view of enhancing the reaction of CO2 with Ca(OH)2. The use of the IL increased the solubility of CO2 in the aqueous environment and enhanced the transport of the reactive species (Ca2+ and CO32−) and products. The presence of the IL also avoided the formation of the CaCO3 protective and passivation layer and ensured high carbonation yields, as well as the production of stoichiometric rhombohedral calcite phases in a short time. PMID:24968273

  17. Assessment of alternative disposal methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste in India.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Sindhu, N T

    2016-06-01

    Open dumping, the most commonly practiced method of solid waste disposal in Indian cities, creates serious environment and economic challenges, and also contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The present article attempts to analyse and identify economically effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. The article looks at the selection of appropriate methods for the control of methane emissions. Multivariate functional models are presented, based on theoretical considerations as well as the field measurements to forecast the greenhouse gas mitigation potential for all the methodologies under consideration. Economic feasibility is tested by calculating the unit cost of waste disposal for the respective disposal process. The purpose-built landfill system proposed by Yedla and Parikh has shown promise in controlling greenhouse gas and saving land. However, these studies show that aerobic composting offers the optimal method, both in terms of controlling greenhouse gas emissions and reducing costs, mainly by requiring less land than other methods. PMID:27118738

  18. Assessment of alternative disposal methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste in India.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Sindhu, N T

    2016-06-01

    Open dumping, the most commonly practiced method of solid waste disposal in Indian cities, creates serious environment and economic challenges, and also contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The present article attempts to analyse and identify economically effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. The article looks at the selection of appropriate methods for the control of methane emissions. Multivariate functional models are presented, based on theoretical considerations as well as the field measurements to forecast the greenhouse gas mitigation potential for all the methodologies under consideration. Economic feasibility is tested by calculating the unit cost of waste disposal for the respective disposal process. The purpose-built landfill system proposed by Yedla and Parikh has shown promise in controlling greenhouse gas and saving land. However, these studies show that aerobic composting offers the optimal method, both in terms of controlling greenhouse gas emissions and reducing costs, mainly by requiring less land than other methods.

  19. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling.

    PubMed

    Amos, Richard T; Ulrich Mayer, K

    2006-09-10

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O(2) to waters otherwise depleted in O(2). Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  20. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  1. Cytochromes c': Structure, Reactivity and Relevance to Haem-Based Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hough, Michael A; Andrew, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c' are a group of class IIa cytochromes with pentacoordinate haem centres and are found in photosynthetic, denitrifying and methanotrophic bacteria. Their function remains unclear, although roles in nitric oxide (NO) trafficking during denitrification or in cellular defence against nitrosoative stress have been proposed. Cytochromes c' are typically dimeric with each c-type haem-containing monomer folding as a four-α-helix bundle. Their hydrophobic and crowded distal sites impose severe restrictions on the binding of distal ligands, including diatomic gases. By contrast, NO binds to the proximal haem face in a similar manner to that of the eukaryotic NO sensor, soluble guanylate cyclase and bacterial analogues. In this review, we focus on how structural features of cytochromes c' influence haem spectroscopy and reactivity with NO, CO and O2. We also discuss the relevance of cytochrome c' to understanding the mechanisms of gas binding to haem-based sensor proteins.

  2. Suppression of tritium retention in remote areas of ITER by nonperturbative reactive gas injection.

    PubMed

    Tabarés, F L; Ferreira, J A; Ramos, A; van Rooij, G; Westerhout, J; Al, R; Rapp, J; Drenik, A; Mozetic, M

    2010-10-22

    A technique based on reactive gas injection in the afterglow region of the divertor plasma is proposed for the suppression of tritium-carbon codeposits in remote areas of ITER when operated with carbon-based divertor targets. Experiments in a divertor simulator plasma device indicate that a 4  nm/min deposition can be suppressed by addition of 1  Pa·m³ s⁻¹ ammonia flow at 10 cm from the plasma. These results bolster the concept of nonperturbative scavenger injection for tritium inventory control in carbon-based fusion plasma devices, thus paving the way for ITER operation in the active phase under a carbon-dominated, plasma facing component background.

  3. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-10-01

    Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

  4. Fictitious domain method for fully resolved reacting gas-solid flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Liu, Kai; You, Changfu

    2015-10-01

    Fully resolved simulation (FRS) for gas-solid multiphase flow considers solid objects as finite sized regions in flow fields and their behaviours are predicted by solving equations in both fluid and solid regions directly. Fixed mesh numerical methods, such as fictitious domain method, are preferred in solving FRS problems and have been widely researched. However, for reacting gas-solid flows no suitable fictitious domain numerical method has been developed. This work presents a new fictitious domain finite element method for FRS of reacting particulate flows. Low Mach number reacting flow governing equations are solved sequentially on a regular background mesh. Particles are immersed in the mesh and driven by their surface forces and torques integrated on immersed interfaces. Additional treatments on energy and surface reactions are developed. Several numerical test cases validated the method and a burning carbon particles array falling simulation proved the capability for solving moving reacting particle cluster problems.

  5. Minimum liquid fluidization velocity in gas-liquid-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Briens, L.A.; Briens, C.L.; Margaritis, A.; Hay, J.

    1997-05-01

    Accurate detection of minimum liquid fluidization is essential to the successful operation of gas-liquid-solid fluidized beds, especially when particle or liquid properties evolve. A gas-liquid-solid system of 3-mm glass beads exhibits three distinct flow regimes as the liquid velocity is increased: compacted, agitated and fluidized-bed regimes. Measurements showed that the bed is not fluidized in the agitated bed regime. Pressure gradient and bed height measurements do not provide the minimum liquid fluidization velocity; instead, they offer the velocity between the compacted and agitated bed regimes. Time-averaged signals are not reliable for determining the minimum liquid fluidization velocity. It can be obtained from the standard deviation, the average frequency, the Hurst exponent and the V statistic of the cross-sectional average conductivity, which can be measured under many industrial conditions. Examples of applications of gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactors include coal liquefaction and petroleum hydrotreating.

  6. Gas dispersion and immobile gas volume in solid and porous particle biofilter materials at low air flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2010-07-01

    Gas-phase dispersion in granular biofilter materials with a wide range of particle sizes was investigated using atmospheric air and nitrogen as tracer gases. Two types of materials were used: (1) light extended clay aggregates (LECA), consisting of highly porous particles, and (2) gravel, consisting of solid particles. LECA is a commercial material that is used for insulation, as a soil conditioner, and as a carrier material in biofilters for air cleaning. These two materials were selected to have approximately the same particle shape. Column gas transport experiments were conducted for both materials using different mean particle diameters, different particle size ranges, and different gas flow velocities. Measured breakthrough curves were modeled using the advection-dispersion equation modified for mass transfer between mobile and immobile gas phases. The results showed that gas dispersivity increased with increasing mean particle diameter for LECA but was independent of mean particle diameter for gravel. Gas dispersivity also increased with increasing particle size range for both media. Dispersivities in LECA were generally higher than for gravel. The mobile gas content in both materials increased with increasing gas flow velocity but it did not show any strong dependency on mean particle diameter or particle size range. The relative fraction of mobile gas compared with total porosity was highest for gravel and lowest for LECA likely because of its high internal porosity. PMID:20681430

  7. Gas dispersion and immobile gas volume in solid and porous particle biofilter materials at low air flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2010-07-01

    Gas-phase dispersion in granular biofilter materials with a wide range of particle sizes was investigated using atmospheric air and nitrogen as tracer gases. Two types of materials were used: (1) light extended clay aggregates (LECA), consisting of highly porous particles, and (2) gravel, consisting of solid particles. LECA is a commercial material that is used for insulation, as a soil conditioner, and as a carrier material in biofilters for air cleaning. These two materials were selected to have approximately the same particle shape. Column gas transport experiments were conducted for both materials using different mean particle diameters, different particle size ranges, and different gas flow velocities. Measured breakthrough curves were modeled using the advection-dispersion equation modified for mass transfer between mobile and immobile gas phases. The results showed that gas dispersivity increased with increasing mean particle diameter for LECA but was independent of mean particle diameter for gravel. Gas dispersivity also increased with increasing particle size range for both media. Dispersivities in LECA were generally higher than for gravel. The mobile gas content in both materials increased with increasing gas flow velocity but it did not show any strong dependency on mean particle diameter or particle size range. The relative fraction of mobile gas compared with total porosity was highest for gravel and lowest for LECA likely because of its high internal porosity.

  8. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG˙(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ion–molecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG˙(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  9. Estimating service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges for reactive gas removal.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to estimate service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges that remove gases reactively from flowing air. Most gases, because of their high volatility and low polarizability, are not effectively removed by physical adsorption on activated carbon. Models previously developed for toxic organic vapors cannot estimate service lives of cartridges for toxic gases. Often, an activated carbon is impregnated with a chemical to enhance gas removal by chemical reaction(s). The kinds of reactions, types and amounts of impregnants, and effects of the presence of water vary; therefore, the model requires user inputs of gas capacity and water effect parameters. Ideally, these should be available from manufacturers of the cartridges. If they are not, they can be extracted from measured breakthrough times using this model. The key to this model is the observation that adsorption rates of gases can be adequately quantified by the same correlations that have been reported for organic vapors. The resulting model has been used to correlate and predict breakthrough times for several common toxic gases. PMID:16012083

  10. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, C.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G.

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  11. Fault reactivation and seismicity risk from CO2 sequestration in the Chinshui gas field, NW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Chia-Yu; Hung, Jih-Hao

    2015-04-01

    The Chinshui gas field located in the fold-thrust belt of western Taiwan was a depleted reservoir. Recently, CO2 sequestration has been planned at shallower depths of this structure. CO2 injection into reservoir will generate high fluid pressure and trigger slip on reservoir-bounding faults. We present detailed in-situ stresses from deep wells in the Chinshui gas field and evaluated the risk of fault reactivation for underground CO2 injection. The magnitudes of vertical stress (Sv), formation pore pressure (Pf) and minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) were obtained from formation density logs, repeat formation tests, sonic logs, mud weight, and hydraulic fracturing including leak-off tests and hydraulic fracturing. The magnitude of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) was constrained by frictional limit of critically stressed faults. Results show that vertical stress gradient is about 23.02 MPa/km (1.02 psi/ft), and minimum horizontal stress gradient is 18.05 MPa/km (0.80 psi/ft). Formation pore pressures were hydrostatic at depths 2 km, and increase with a gradient of 16.62 MPa/km (0.73 psi/ft). The ratio of fluid pressure and overburden pressure (λp) is 0.65. The upper bound of maximum horizontal stress constrained by strike-slip fault stress regime (SHmax>Sv>Shmin) and coefficient of friction (μ=0.6) is about 18.55 MPa/km (0.82 psi/ft). The orientation of maximum horizontal stresses was calculated from four-arm caliper tools through the methodology suggested by World Stress Map (WMS). The mean azimuth of preferred orientation of borehole breakouts are in ~65。N. Consequently, the maximum horizontal stress axis trends in 155。N and sub-parallel to the far-field plate-convergence direction. Geomechanical analyses of the reactivation of pre-existing faults was assessed using 3DStress and Traptester software. Under current in-situ stress, the middle block fault has higher slip tendency, but still less than frictional coefficient of 0.6 a common threshold value for

  12. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model and a solution algorithm is developed to study the physics of high temperature heat transfer and material ablation and identify the problems associated with the flow of hydrogen gas at very high temperatures and velocities through pipes and various components of Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motors. Ablation and melting can be experienced when the inner solid surface of the cooling channels and the diverging-converging nozzle of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) motor is exposed to hydrogen gas flow at temperatures around 2500 degrees Kelvin and pressures around 3.4 MPa. In the experiments conducted on typical NTR motors developed in 1960s, degradation of the cooling channel material (cracking in the nuclear fuel element cladding) and in some instances melting of the core was observed. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study based on two types of physics based mathematical models that were developed to simulate the thermal-hydrodynamic conditions that lead to ablation of the solid surface of a stainless steel pipe exposed to high temperature hydrogen gas near sonic velocities. One of the proposed models is one-dimensional and assumes the gas flow to be unsteady, compressible and viscous. An in-house computer code was developed to solve the conservations equations of this model using a second-order accurate finite-difference technique. The second model assumes the flow to be three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible and viscous. A commercial CFD code (Fluent) was used to solve the later model equations. Both models assume the thermodynamic and transport properties of the hydrogen gas to be temperature dependent. In the solution algorithm developed for this study, the unsteady temperature of the pipe is determined from the heat equation for the solid. The solid-gas interface temperature is determined from an energy balance at the interface which includes heat transfer from or to the interface by conduction, convection, radiation, and

  13. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage.

  14. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  15. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmark, H.; Holmestad, R.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-15

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi{sub 2} particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H{sub 2} flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi{sub 2} particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiH{sub x} species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi{sub 2} particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi{sub 2} particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  16. Pulsed flashover of solid dielectric materials in compressed gas environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Somesh Vinayak E-mail: svtewari@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.

    2015-06-24

    An experimental investigation of surface flashover characteristics of PMMA and POM is studied in compressed nitrogen gas environment with nitrogen as the background gas. The operating pressure range is from 1kg/cm{sup 2} to 4kg/cm{sup 2}. It is observed that the breakdown voltage of PMMA is higher than POM owing to a higher permittivity mismatch between POM- nitrogen interface as compared to the PMMA- nitrogen interface. The reduction in spacer efficiency with pressure for PMMA is 11% as compared to POM which shows a higher reduction of 18%. This paper further emphasizes on the role of energy level and density of charge carrier trapping centers for a reduced breakdown voltage in POM as compared to PMMA.

  17. Sputter process with time-variant reactive gas mixture for the deposition of optical multilayer and gradient layer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzsch, H.; Weber, J.; Lau, K.; Glöß, D.; Frach, P.

    2008-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering of a silicon target in a time-variant mixture of the reactive gases oxygen and nitrogen allows the deposition of optical multilayer and gradient layer systems of silicon oxinitride at one stationary sputtering station. In this paper the processes within the sputter discharge and the properties of the growing film during the change of the reactive gas composition are investigated using optical in-situ monitoring, optical plasma emission spectroscopy and plasma impedance monitoring. A time delay between the change to the reactive gas composition and the resulting change to the film composition was observed. The time delay is longer for the transition from oxide to nitride deposition then vice versa. This asymmetry is attributed to the different affinity of nitrogen and oxygen to the silicon target. Examples of deposited antireflective coatings as well as rugate filters based on silicon oxinitride multilayer and gradient layer designs are given.

  18. High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  19. A second-order Godunov method for wave problems in coupled solid-water-gas systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    1999-05-20

    Wave problems in solid-water-gas systems with distinct phase interfaces are commonly encountered in practice, such as in water entry of a recovered body, reservoir-dam interaction during earthquakes, and spallation of steel plates caused by blast waves. Here, the authors present a second-order Godunov method for computing unsteady, one-dimensional wave problems with a fracture and cavitation in coupled solid-water-gas systems. The method employs a hydro-elasto-plastic body, the Tait equation, and the ideal gas law for solid, water, and gaseous phases, respectively, and models both fractures and cavities as vacuum zones with distinct borders. The numerical approach utilizes a Lagrangian formulation in conjunction with local solid-water-gas-vacuum Riemann problems, which have unique solutions and can be solved efficiently. The various phases are treated in a unified manner and no supplementary interface conditions are necessary for tracking material boundaries. Calculations are carried out for Riemann problems, wave propagation and reflection in a water-rock-air system, and spallation and cavitation in an explosion-steel-water-gas system. It is shown that the Godunov method has high resolution for shocks and phase interfaces, clearly resolves elastic and plastic waves, and successfully describes onset and propagation of fracture and cavitation zones.

  20. Aqueous extractive upgrading of bio-oils created by tail-gas reactive pyrolysis to produce pure hydrocarbons and phenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) of biomass produces bio-oil that is lower in oxygen (~15 wt% total) and significantly more hydrocarbon-rich than traditional bio-oils or even catalytic fast pyrolysis. TGRP bio-oils lend themselves toward mild and inexpensive upgrading procedures. We isolated oxyge...

  1. Distillation and isolation of commodity chemicals from Bio-oil made by tail-gas reactive prolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to instabilities, very little has been accomplished with regards to simple cost-effective separations of fast-pyrolysis bio-oil. However, recent developments in the use of tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) (Mullen and Boateng 2013) provide higher quality bio-oils that are thermally stable. We...

  2. Electrophilic acid gas-reactive fluid, proppant, and process for enhanced fracturing and recovery of energy producing materials

    DOEpatents

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Heldebrant, David J.; Bonneville, Alain H. R.; Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, Kenneth

    2016-09-20

    An electrophilic acid gas-reactive fracturing and recovery fluid, proppant, and process are detailed. The fluid expands in volume to provide rapid and controlled increases in pressure that enhances fracturing in subterranean bedrock for recovery of energy-producing materials. Proppants stabilize openings in fractures and fissures following fracturing.

  3. Reactive ion-etching-induced damage in silicon using SF/sub 6/ gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, B.M.; Pinto, R.; Sachidananda Babu, R.

    1987-07-01

    Damage introduced in silicon during reactive-ion etching (RIE) in SI/sub 6/ gas containing 10 Vol % of H/sub 2/, He, N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, or Ar has been investigated using Schottky barrier measurements and Rutherford backscattering. RIE was performed at 0.1 Watt cm/sup -2/ power density with the radio frequancy (rf) cathode covered with a quartz plate. The annealing effect on damage was studied at various temperatures up to 800 /sup 0/C in dry N/sub 2/. The results indicate that the damage has two components namely, a shallow near-surface region with lattice damage and a deep layer containing discrete defect centers which act as donors. The extent of the deep damage layer is the net balance between two competing processes: (a) the etch rate, and (b) the rate of damage migration into silicon. However, the damage has been found to reach a saturation level after RIE for 1 min in all the gas mixtures studied. The results also suggest that RIE in SF/sub 6/+10% H/sub 2/ gas mixture causes a deep damage layer which could, however, be annealed at 150 /sup 0/C aided significantly by the passivation of defect centers by hydrogen permeated during RIE. On the other hand, the damage induced in SF/sub 6/+10% Ar-etched samples has been found to anneal at 800 /sup 0/C indicating there by a higher level of lattice damage or amorphization of the near-surface layer of silicon. Therefore, the mass of the bombarding ion significantly affects the nature of the damage layers.

  4. Structured grid generation using a CAD solid model for an aero-gas turbine combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, N.C.; Manners, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    An aero-gas turbine combustion system was used to demonstrate the problems of creating a single block structured grid suitable for CFD predictions from a designer`s parametric solid model. The solid model had to be filtered of sub-grid detail and computational fluid volumes generated from the solid model of the metal. Alternative methods of transferring the geometry from the CAD package to the grid generator were considered. The type and method of grid generation was found to influence all stages in manipulating the geometry.

  5. Formation of the Giant Planets by Concurrent Accretion of Solids and Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubickyj, Olenka

    1997-01-01

    Models were developed to simulate planet formation. Three major phases are characterized in the simulations: (1) planetesimal accretion rate, which dominates that of gas, rapidly increases owing to runaway accretion, then decreases as the planet's feeding zone is depleted; (2) occurs when both solid and gas accretion rates are small and nearly independent of time; and (3) starts when the solid and gas masses are about equal and is marked by runaway gas accretion. The models applicability to planets in our Solar System are judged using two basic "yardsticks". The results suggest that the solar nebula dissipated while Uranus and Neptune were in the second phase, during which, for a relatively long time, the masses of their gaseous envelopes were small but not negligible compared to the total masses. Background information, results and a published article are included in the report.

  6. Solid State Structure-Reactivity Studies on Bixbyites, Fluorites and Perovskites Belonging to the Vanadate, Titanate and Cerate Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Shahid P.

    This thesis primarily focuses on the systematic understanding of structure-reactivity relationships in two representative systems: bixbyite and related structures as well as indium doped CeO2. Topotactic reaction routes have gained significant attention over the past two decades due to their potential to access kinetically controlled metastable materials. This has contributed substantially to the understanding of solid state reaction pathways and provided first insights into mechanisms. Contrary to the widely used ex-situ methods, in-situ techniques including powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis have been employed extensively throughout this work in order to follow the reaction pathways in real time. Detailed analysis of the AVO3 (A = In, Sc) bixbyite reactivity under oxidative conditions has been carried out and a variety of novel metastable oxygen defect phases have been identified and characterized. The novel metastable materials have oxygen deficient fluorite structures and consequently are potential ion conductors. Structural aspects of the topotactic vs. reconstructive transformations are illustrated with this model system. The structure-reactivity study of AVO3 phases was extended to AVO3 perovskite family. Based on the research methodologies and results from AVO3 bixbyite reactivity studies a generalized mechanistic oxidation pathway has been established with a non-vanadium phase, ScTiO3 bixbyite. However, there is stark contrast in terms of structural stability and features beyond this stability limit during AVO3 and ScTiO3 bixbyite reaction pathways. A series of complex reaction sequences including phase separation and phase transitions were identified during the investigation of ScTiO3 reactivity. The two-step formation pathway for the fluorite-type oxide ion conductor Ce1-xInxO2-delta (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) is being reported. The formation of the BaCe1-xInxO 3-delta perovskites and the subsequent CO2-capture reaction

  7. Vapor-liquid-solid growth of GaN nanowires by reactive sputtering of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, P.; Chaturvedi, P.; Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2013-02-01

    Uniformly distributed nanosized Au-Ga alloy particles were formed on ultrathin Au coated quartz substrate by sputtering of GaAs with argon at 700 °C. Subsequent deposition of GaN by reactive sputtering of GaAs in 100 % nitrogen results in the growth of GaN nanowires. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of hexagonal GaN. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy studies show that the nanowires are of average length 400±50 nm and average diameter 40±5 nm. The presence of spherical Au-Ga nanoparticles of diameter ˜ 50 nm at the top of the nanowires suggests that the growth takes place by vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  8. Acoustic probe for solid-gas-liquid suspensions. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Sangani, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Acoustic probes have shown promise to be quite effective in determining the solid content in solid-liquid suspensions. However, the presence of small amounts of gas in the waste slurries stored in tanks across the DOE complex prevents straightforward application for characterization of these slurries. The proposed research will develop an acoustic probe for monitoring particle size and volume fraction in slurries in the absence and the presence of gas bubbles. Theoretical Analysis Accomplished: Attenuation of sound waves depends on the size distribution of the solids and the volume fraction of solids. These can in principle be calculated from attenuation measured over a range of frequencies. However, small amounts of bubbles distort the measured attenuation. A typical result from theoretical analysis for the attenuation of solid- gas-liquid systems is given in Figure 1. The total attenuation of a sound wave v(o) equals the sum of contributions by a large number of ''bins'' of particle sizes. This notion yields the following equation for the (hitherto) unknown number density of solid particles as a function of particle radius N(a): j k(o,a)N(a)da = v(o), where the kernel k(o,a) is obtained from analysis. If N(a) is given, the above equation is used to calculate the attenuation v(o). This is referred to as solving the ''forward problem''. Solving for N(a) with v(o) given is the ''inverse problem''. A complication that one faces when trying to solve the inverse problem is that the stated problem is mathematically ill-posed, i.e., small fluctuations in v(o) cause large fluctuations in the result for the number density. Therefore the problem needs to be ''regularized'', i.e., the stated problem needs to be changed slightly such as to make it well-posed. This has been done by others for gas-liquid systems in the past. This approach is currently being applied in the present project to solid-liquid systems. As is shown in Figure 2, it successfully recovers the number

  9. Improve your solids control. [Management of solids during oil and gas well drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.S. ); Love, W.W. )

    1993-10-01

    With today's emphasis on the environmental impact of drilling operations, minimization of drilling fluid and drill cuttings waste is critical. This can be achieved using proper solids removal equipment -- such as high performance shale shakers, hydrocyclones, and centrifuges -- and proper pre-well planning. The method described here is founded in decision matrix theory and focuses on several key variables. These include well parameters, the drilling program, logistics, environmental issues, rig selection, expert advice and cost.

  10. Analysis of the gas states at a liquid/solid interface based on interactions at the microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Lijuan; Zeng, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2007-08-01

    The states of gas accumulated at the liquid/solid interface are analyzed on the basis of the continuum theory, in which the Hamaker constant is used to describe the long-range interaction at the microscopic scale. The Hamaker constant is always negative, whereas the "gas" spreading coefficient can be either negative or positive. Despite the complexity of gas, including that the density profile may not be uniform due to absorption on both solid and liquid surfaces, we predict three possible gas states at the liquid/solid interface, that is, complete "wetting", partial "wetting", and pseudopartial "wetting". These possible gas states correspond, respectively, to a gas pancake (or film) surrounded by a wet solid, a gas bubble with a finite contact angle, and a gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas pancake. The typical thickness of the gas pancakes is at the nano scale within the force range of the long-range interaction, whereas the radius of the gas bubbles can be large. The state of a gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas film is predicted theoretically for the first time. Our theoretical results can contribute to the development of a unified picture of gas nucleation at the liquid/solid interface.

  11. Solid waste generation from oil and gas industries in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Elshorbagy, Walid; Alkamali, Abdulqader

    2005-04-11

    Solid wastes generated from oil and gas industrial activities are very diverse in their characteristics, large in their amounts and many of which are hazardous in nature. Thus, quantifying and characterizing the generated amounts in association with their types, classes, sources, industrial activities, and their chemical and biological characteristics is an obvious mandate when evaluating the possible management practices. This paper discusses the types, amounts, generation units, and the factors related to solid waste generation from a major oil and gas field in the United Arab Emirates (Asab Field). The generated amounts are calculated based on a 1-year data collection survey and using a database software specially developed and customized for the current study. The average annual amount of total solid waste generated in the studied field is estimated at 4061 t. Such amount is found equivalent to 650 kg/capita, 0.37 kg/barrel oil, and 1.6 kg/m3 of extracted gas. The average annual amount of hazardous solid waste is estimated at 55 t and most of which (73%) is found to be generated from gas extraction-related activities. The majority of other industrial non-hazardous solid waste is generated from oil production-related activities (41%), The present analysis does also provide the estimated generation amounts per waste type and class, amounts of combustible, recyclable, and compostable wastes, and the amounts dumped in uncontrolled way as well as disposed into special hazardous landfill facilities. The results should help the decision makers in evaluating the best alternatives available to manage the solid wastes generated from the oil and gas industries. PMID:15811669

  12. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  13. pH-Responsive Gas-Water-Solid Interface for Multiphase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianping; Cheng, Fangqin; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite their wide utility in laboratory synthesis and industrial fabrication, gas-water-solid multiphase catalysis reactions often suffer from low reaction efficiency because of the low solubility of gases in water. Using a surface-modification protocol, interface-active silica nanoparticles were synthesized. Such nanoparticles can assemble at the gas-water interface, stabilizing micrometer-sized gas bubbles in water, and disassemble by tuning of the aqueous phase pH. The ability to stabilize gas microbubbles can be finely tuned through variation of the surface-modification protocol. As proof of this concept, Pd and Au were deposited on these silica nanoparticles, leading to interface-active catalysts for aqueous hydrogenation and oxidation, respectively. With such catalysts, conventional gas-water-solid multiphase reactions can be transformed to H2 or O2 microbubble reaction systems. The resultant microbubble reaction systems exhibit significant catalysis efficiency enhancement effects compared with conventional multiphase reactions. The significant improvement is attributed to the pronounced increase in reaction interface area that allows for the direct contact of gas, water, and solid phases. At the end of reaction, the microbubbles can be removed from the reaction systems through changing the pH, allowing product separation and catalyst recycling. Interestingly, the alcohol oxidation activation energy for the microbubble systems is much lower than that for the conventional multiphase reaction, also indicating that the developed microbubble system may be a valuable platform to design innovative multiphase catalysis reactions. PMID:26524337

  14. Heat transfer coefficients of dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients of air-glass, argon-glass, and argon-aluminum suspensions were measured in horizontal and vertical tubes. The glass, 21.6 and 36.0 micron diameter particles, was suspended at gas Reynolds numbers between 11,000 and 21,000 and loading ratios between 0 and 2.5. The presence of particles generally reduced the heat transfer coefficient. The circulation of aluminum powder in the 0.870 inch diameter closed loop system produced tenacious deposits on protuberances into the stream. In the vertical test section, the Nusselt number reduction was attributed to viscous sublayer thickening; in the horizontal test section to particle deposition.

  15. Detection of drug-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies by solid-phase red cell adherence assays.

    PubMed

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; AuBuchon, J P

    1997-06-01

    We developed a simple modification of the solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay system that can be used to identify drug-dependent platelet antibodies (DDPAs) reactive by either the hapten or immune complex reaction mechanisms. Between January 1994 and August 1996 we tested sera from 173 patients [123 (71%) with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 50 (29%) because of poor responses to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation] for DDPAs possibly associated with the receipt of 61 different drugs. We correlated positive results with patients' clinical courses. DDPAs were identified in samples from 138 (80%) of the patients tested. Antibodies reactive only by the hapten mechanism were identified in 51 (37%) of those sera exhibiting positive reactions. The clinical courses of 108 (78%) patients were evaluable. Discontinuation of the implicated drug(s) resulted in prompt (<5 d) resolution of the thrombocytopenia or improvement in response to transfusion in all of these patients. In four cases thrombocytopenia returned upon re-exposure to the implicated drug. This adaptation of SPRCA provides a simple means of investigating the possibility of DDPAs and documents a higher frequency of these antibodies than has previously been suspected.

  16. Phase and strain distributions associated with reactive contaminants inside a solid oxide fuel cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.

    2009-01-01

    A microfocused synchrotron x-ray diffraction method was used to reveal the quantitative distributions of phase fractions, internal strains, and their interdependences at different layer depths inside of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, which was deactivated by chromium contamination through direct contact with the metallic interconnect under typical operating conditions. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of Cr poisoning. The method can serve as a versatile tool for studying the electrochemical devices with thin-layered construction such as batteries and fuel cells under static or in situ conditions.

  17. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  18. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  19. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  20. Decorative black TiCxOy film fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering without importing oxygen reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Katsushi; Wakabayashi, Masao; Tsukakoshi, Yukio; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Decorative black TiCxOy films were fabricated by dc (direct current) magnetron sputtering without importing the oxygen reactive gas into the sputtering chamber. Using a ceramic target of titanium oxycarbide (TiC1.59O0.31), the oxygen content in the films could be easily controlled by adjustment of total sputtering gas pressure without remarkable change of the carbon content. The films deposited at 2.0 and 4.0 Pa, those are higher pressure when compared with that in conventional magnetron sputtering, showed an attractive black color. In particular, the film at 4.0 Pa had the composition of TiC1.03O1.10, exhibited the L* of 41.5, a* of 0.2 and b* of 0.6 in CIELAB color space. These values were smaller than those in the TiC0.29O1.38 films (L* of 45.8, a* of 1.2 and b* of 1.2) fabricated by conventional reactive sputtering method from the same target under the conditions of gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and optimized oxygen reactive gas concentration of 2.5 vol.% in sputtering gas. Analysis of XRD and XPS revealed that the black film deposited at 4.0 Pa was the amorphous film composed of TiC, TiO and C. The adhesion property and the heat resisting property were enough for decorative uses. This sputtering process has an industrial advantage that the decorative black coating with color uniformity in large area can be easily obtained by plain operation because of unnecessary of the oxygen reactive gas importing which is difficult to be controlled uniformly in the sputtering chamber.

  1. Adsorption energies for a nanoporous carbon from gas-solid chromatography and molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Ziegler, Katherine A; Thomas, Howard E; Boyd, Jennifer L; Ridgeway, Mark E

    2006-04-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to obtain second gas-solid virial coefficients, B2s, in the temperature range 342-613 K for methane, ethane, propane, butane, 2-methylpropane, chloromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, dichloromethane, and dichlorodifluoromethane. The adsorbent used was Carbosieve S-III (Supelco), a carbon powder with fairly uniform, predominately 0.55 nm slit width pores and a N2 BET surface area of 995 m2/g. The temperature dependence of B2s was used to determine experimental values of the gas-solid interaction energy, E*, for each of these molecular adsorbates. MM2 and MM3 molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the gas-solid interaction energy, E*(cal), for each of the molecules on various flat and nanoporous model surfaces. The flat model consisted of three parallel graphene layers with each graphene layer containing 127 interconnected benzene rings. The nanoporous model consisted of two sets of three parallel graphene layers adjacent to one another but separated to represent the pore diameter. A variety of calculated adsorption energies, E*(cal), were compared and correlated to the experimental E* values. It was determined that simple molecular mechanics could be used to calculate an attraction energy parameter between an adsorbed molecule and the carbon surface. The best correlation between the E*(cal) and E* values was provided by a 0.50 nm nanoporous model using MM2 parameters.

  2. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  3. Greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of soils amended with raw and carbonized swine solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to study the greenhouse gas emission and groundwater pollution potentials of the soils amended with raw swine solids and swine biochars made from different thermochemical conditions. Triplicate sets of small pots were designed: 1) control soil with a 50/50 mixture o...

  4. Analysis of Indirect Emissions Benefits of Wind, Landfill Gas, and Municipal Solid Waste Generation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Techniques are introduced to calculate the hourly indirect emissions benefits of three types of green power resources: wind energy, municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion, and landfill gas (LFG) combustion. These techniques are applied to each of the U.S. EPA's eGRID subregions i...

  5. ASEF solid-waste-to-methane gas, Pompano Beach, Florida, refCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooij, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    Five graphs are presented to document solid waste to methane experiments. The first simply shows the number of hours spent running in relation to the number of tons of material fed into the digester. The second shows the relationship between tonnage fed and subsequent gas production. Tonnage is further broken down into moisture, dry, and volatile fractions. The third graph shows the relationship between methane and carbon dioxide in the off gas. The fourth graph shows the pH, alkalinity, and volatile acids in the digester slurry environment, Nutrient levels of the effluent are shown in the fifth graph. Finally, materials analysis and gas production data are tabulated.

  6. A solid ceramic electrolyte system for measuring redox conditions in high temperature gas mixing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The details of the construction and operation of a gas mixing furnace are presented. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a standard vertical-quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the highinput impedance electronics necessary for measurements and a simplified version of standard gas mixing apparatus. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  7. Proton conductive tantalum oxide thin film deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering for all-solid-state switchable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, K.; Yamada, Y.; Bao, S.; Okada, M.; Yoshimura, K.

    2008-03-01

    Our developed all-solid-state switchable mirror as a smart window is consisted in multi-layer of Mg4Ni/Pd/Ta2O5/WO3/ITO/glass and can switch reversibly from the reflective state to the transparent one. The development of high performance solid electrolyte thin film of Ta2O5 is important for fast speed switching and high durability of the device. In this work, we have investigated the electrochemical property of Ta2O5 thin film deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The effect of thickness on electrochemical and proton conductivities of Ta2O5 thin film was investigated. The Ta2O5 thin film with a thickness of 400 nm had better proton conductivity of 1.5×10-9 S/cm measured by AC impedance method. The transmittance at wavelength of 670 nm of the device with 400 nm thick Ta2O5 thin film was changed from 0.1% (reflective state) to 51% (transparent state) within 10 s by applying voltage of 5 V. The device showed high durability up to two-thousand switching cycles.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  10. Inert gas purgebox for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael A.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1994-03-01

    A sealed rigid ``purgebox'' makes it possible to load air- and/or moisture-sensitive solids into the solids probe inlet of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer. A pelletized sample is transferred (in a sealed canister) from a commercial drybox to a Lucite(R) purgebox. After the box is purged with inert gas, an attached glove manipulator is used to transfer the sample from the canister to the solids probe of the mass spectrometer. Once sealed inside the inlet, the sample is pre-evacuated and then passed into the high vacuum region of the instrument at ˜10-7 Torr. The purgebox is transparent, portable, and readily assembled/disassembled. Laser desorption FT/ICR mass spectra of the air- and moisture-sensitive solids, NbCl5. NbCl2(C5H5)2, and Zr(CH3)2(C5H5)2 are obtained without significant oxidation. The residual water vapor concentration inside the purgebox was measured as 100±20 ppm after a 90-min purge with dry nitrogen gas. High-resolution laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids becomes feasible with the present purgebox interface. With minor modification of the purgebox geometry, the present method could be adapted to any mass spectrometer equipped with a solid sample inlet.

  11. Optimum design of the constant-volume gas pycnometer for determining the volume of solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamari, S.

    2004-03-01

    Gas pycnometry is based on Boyle-Mariotte's law of volume-pressure relationships. This method has been widely used to determine the volume (and thus the density) of rock fragments, soluble powders, light objects and even living beings. Surprisingly, little is known about the optimum design of gas pycnometers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimum design of a gas pycnometer, so that it can determine the volume of solid particles with the greatest accuracy. The 'constant-volume' gas pycnometer was considered because of its widespread use. The law of propagation of uncertainty was used to derive a theoretical formula that relates the pycnometer's accuracy to the main sources of random error (gas-pressure measurements, pycnometer temperature and sample-chamber volume). The consequences of this formula in terms of optimizing the geometry and working conditions of the pycnometer are discussed. It was found that some gas pycnometers described in the literature may have not been used under the best conditions. Guidelines are given to design a gas pycnometer that can theoretically determine the volume of solid particles with a relative standard uncertainty smaller than 0.2%.

  12. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%.

  13. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  14. A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch Jr, R. D.; Mahony, J. D.

    2008-07-15

    It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

  15. Reactivity of Ozone with Solid Potassium Iodide Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mulleregan, Alice; Brown, Matthew A.; Ashby, Paul D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-04-14

    The reaction of ozone with the (100) plane of solid potassium iodide (KI) was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reaction forming potassium iodate (KIO{sub 3}) initiates at step edges prior to reacting on the flat terraces. Small domains of KIO{sub 3}, initially 3.8 {angstrom} in height are formed on the top of step edges. Following reaction at the step edge, domains of KIO{sub 3} are formed across the terraces. With prolonged exposure to ozone, KIO{sub 3} domains nucleate further growth until the surface is evenly covered with KIO{sub 3} particles that are 4-6 nm in height, at which point the surface is passivated and the reaction terminates.

  16. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  17. Solid-state gas sensors developed from functional difluoroboradiazaindacene dyes.

    PubMed

    Ziessel, Raymond; Ulrich, Gilles; Harriman, Anthony; Alamiry, Mohammed A H; Stewart, Beverly; Retailleau, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the synthesis and characterization of several new difluoroboradiazaindacene (BODIPY) dyes functionalized at the central 8-position by a phenyliodo, phenylheptynoate or phenylheptynoic fragment and at the 3- or 3/5-position(s) by 4-dimethylaminophenylstyryl residue(s). Single-crystal structural determinations confirm the planarity of the dyes, while the absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic properties are highly sensitive to the state of protonation (or alkylation) of the terminal anilino donor group(s). Reversible color tuning from green to blue for absorption and from colorless (i.e., near-IR region) to red for fluorescence is obtained on successive addition of acid and base. The difunctionalized derivative is especially interesting in this respect and shows two well-resolved pK(a) values of 5.10 and 3.04 in acetonitrile. Addition of the first proton causes only small spectral changes and deactivates the molecule towards addition of the second proton. It is this latter step that accommodates the large change in absorption and emission properties, due to the reversible extinction of the intramolecular charge-transfer character inherent to this type of dye. The main focus of the work is the covalent anchoring of the dyes to inert, porous polyacrylate beads so as to form a solid-state sensor suitable for analysis of gases or flowing liquids. The final material is highly stable--its performance is undiminished after more than one year--and fully reversible over many cycles. The sensitivity is such that reactions can be followed by the naked eye and the detection limit is about 600 ppb for HCl and about 80 ppb for ammonia. Trace amounts of diphosgene can be detected, as can alkylating agents. The sensing action is indiscriminate and also operates when the beads are dispersed in aqueous media.

  18. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Cesium-Containing Species by Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Šulková, Katarína; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of cesium species reactions have been studied by using high-level quantum chemical tools. A systematic theoretical study has been done to find suitable methodology for calculation of reliable thermodynamic properties, allowing us to determine bimolecular rate constants with appropriate kinetic theories of gas-phase reactions. Four different reactions have been studied in this work: CsO + H2 = CsOH + H (R1), Cs + HI = CsI + H (R2), CsI + H2O = CsOH + HI (R3), and CsI + OH = CsOH + I (R4). All reactions involve steam, hydrogen, and iodine in addition of cesium. Most of the reactions are fast and (R3) and (R4) proceed even without energetic barrier. In terms of chemical reactivity in the reactor coolant system (RCS) in the case of severe accident, it can be expected that there will be no kinetic limitations for main cesium species (CsOH and CsI) transported along the RCS. Cs chemical speciation inside the RCS should be governed by the thermodynamics.

  19. Noble-transition metal nanoparticle breathing in a reactive gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Shan, Shiyao; Chupas, Peter; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-08-21

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis is used to obtain fundamental insight into the effect of the reactive gas environment on the atomic-scale structure of metallic particles less than 10 nm in size. To substantiate our recent discovery we investigate a wide range of noble-transition metal nanoparticles and confirm that they expand and contract radially when treated in oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) atmospheres, respectively. The results are confirmed by supplementary XAFS experiments. Using computer simulations guided by the experimental diffraction data we quantify the effect in terms of both relative lattice strain and absolute atomic displacements. In particular, we show that the effect leads to a small percent of extra surface strain corresponding to several tenths of Ångström displacements of the atoms at the outmost layer of the particles. The effect then gradually decays to zero within 4 atomic layers inside the particles. We also show that, reminiscent of a breathing type structural transformation, the effect is reproducible and reversible. We argue that because of its significance and widespread occurrence the effect should be taken into account in nanoparticle research.

  20. Modeling of dilute two-phase multispecies solid/gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Raptis, A.C.

    1986-06-01

    The report gives a detailed description of the analytical modeling that underlies the numerical code for predicting the flow of dilute solid/gas flows in pipes. The model is two-phase multispecies. Particles of one size are treated as one species and the equations of particle dynamics include terms to account for momentum transfer between species and the wall friction on each species of particles. New expressions for particle/particle interaction and wall friction for multispecies flow are derived. Results of parametric studies based on the new expressions are described. The predictions of this model for gas/powder flow through a venturi are compared with experimental measurements. The model's capability for predicting the flow in Argonne's Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility will be the subject of a companion report. 26 refs., 16 figs.

  1. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    SciTech Connect

    Paumel, K.; Baque, F.; Moysan, J.; Corneloup, G.; Chatain, D.

    2011-08-15

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  2. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media.

  3. Modeling of ultrasound transmission through a solid-liquid interface comprising a network of gas pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paumel, K.; Moysan, J.; Chatain, D.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F.

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of sodium-cooled fast reactor requires a good acoustic coupling between the transducer and the liquid sodium. Ultrasonic transmission through a solid surface in contact with liquid sodium can be complex due to the presence of microscopic gas pockets entrapped by the surface roughness. Experiments are run using substrates with controlled roughness consisting of a network of holes and a modeling approach is then developed. In this model, a gas pocket stiffness at a partially solid-liquid interface is defined. This stiffness is then used to calculate the transmission coefficient of ultrasound at the entire interface. The gas pocket stiffness has a static, as well as an inertial component, which depends on the ultrasonic frequency and the radiative mass.

  4. Coal/biomass fuels and the gas turbine: Utilization of solid fuels and their derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    DeCorso, M.; Newby, R.; Anson, D.; Wenglarz, R.; Wright, I.

    1996-06-01

    This paper discusses key design and development issues in utilizing coal and other solid fuels in gas turbines. These fuels may be burned in raw form or processed to produce liquids or gases in more or less refined forms. The use of such fuels in gas turbines requires resolution of technology issues which are of little or no consequence for conventional natural gas and refined oil fuels. For coal, these issues are primarily related to the solid form in which coal is naturally found and its high ash and contaminant levels. Biomass presents another set of issues similar to those of coal. Among the key areas discussed are effects of ash and contaminant level on deposition, corrosion, and erosion of turbine hot parts, with particular emphasis on deposition effects.

  5. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    PubMed Central

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  6. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes' law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  7. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-09-06

    According to Stokes' law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media.

  8. A simple gas-solid route to functionalize ordered carbon.

    PubMed

    Variava, Meherzad F; Church, Tamara L; Husin, Agus; Harris, Andrew T; Minett, Andrew I

    2014-02-26

    The reaction of nitric oxide (NO) and carbonaceous materials generates nitrogen functionalities on and in graphitic carbons and oxidizes some of the carbon. Here, we have exploited these phenomena to provide a novel route to surface-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We investigated the impacts of NO on the physical and chemical properties of industrially synthesized multiwalled carbon nanotubes to find a facile treatment that increased the specific surface area (SBET) of the MWCNTs by ∼20%, with only a minimal effect on their degree of graphitization. The technique caused less material loss (∼12 wt %) than traditional gas-based activation techniques and grafted some nitrogen functional groups (1.1 at. %) on the MWCNTs. Moreover, we found that Ni nanoparticles deposited on NO-treated MWCNTs had a crystallite size of dNi = 13.1 nm, similar to those deposited on acid-treated MWCNTs (dNi = 14.2 nm), and clearly much smaller than those deposited under the same conditions on untreated MWCNTs (dNi = 18.3 nm). PMID:24495019

  9. Particle-wave duality and coherent instability control in dense gas-solid flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, Y. Y.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-01

    The collective effect of transport behaviors in a multibody system can either drastically enhance or deteriorate system performance depending on the nature of the internal interactions (i.e., constructive or deconstructive) and the structure established. For most powder processes, flow instability leads to poor performance. Control strategies have been attempted previously, but with limited success. The ability to drive such a system that is far from equilibrium into its 'ordered' state by tuning the interactions can effectively reduce internal energy dissipation, which may lead to a technological breakthrough. By using a hybrid dynamics simulation and multiphase flow experiments, we will first elucidate two fundamental mechanisms underlying flow instabilities in a dense gas-solid flow: nonlinear drag and collisional dissipation. Then we clarify how gas-fluidized particles exhibit 'particle-wave' duality (e.g., exhibit standing waves in a thin layer of granular bed that are driven by superimposed oscillating air, when the exciting frequencies of the oscillating air match the system's natural frequency). On this basis, we show experimentally that dense gas-fluidized granules can be synchronized into 'ordered' structures by developing an adaptively exciting fluid wave. The introduction of an additional fluid wave enables the flow structures to be fine-tuned. Our method results in remarkably improved fluidization: highly expanded particulate beds with significantly suppressed gas bubble formation (for coarse particles) and channel formation (for ultra-fine powders), as has always prevailed in conventional dense gas-particle systems. By applying our methodology to several systems that are normally difficult to fluidize, we achieve unprecedented, well-controlled suspension of solids in gas flow. A scientific understanding of complex, dense gas-solid flows should enable the dispersion of solids in the gas flow to be controlled effectively. This work contributes to the

  10. Performance of a Zerovalent Iron Reactive Barrier for the Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical Modeling and Solid Phase Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic plays a key role in directing arsenic...

  11. Pozzolanic reactivity of the synthetic slag from municipal solid waste incinerator cyclone ash and scrubber ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kae-Long; Lin, Deng-Fong

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the pozzolanic reactions and compressive strength of the blended cement manufactured using synthetic slag obtained from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) cyclone ash and scrubber ash as partial replacement of portland cement. The synthetic slag was made by co-melting the MSWI scrubber ash and cyclone ash mixtures at 1400 degrees C for 30 min. Following pulverization, the different types of slag were blended with cement as cement replacement at ratios ranging from 10 to 40 wt %. The synthetic slag thus obtained was quantified, and the characteristics of the slag-blended cement pastes were examined. These characteristics included the pozzolanic activity, compressive strength, hydration activity, crystal phases, species, and microstructure at various ages. The 90-day compressive strength developed by slag-blended cement pastes with 10 and 20 wt % of the cement replaced by the synthetic slag outperformed ordinary portland cement by 1-7 MPa. X-ray diffraction species analyses indicated that the hydrates in the slag-blended cement pastes were mainly portlandite, the calcium silicate hydrate gels, and calcium aluminate hydrate salts, similar to those found in ordinary portland cement paste. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis also indicated that the slag reacted with portlandite to form calcium silicate hydrate gels.

  12. A study of pneumatic conveying of gas-solid flow for industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khateeb, Khalid A. S.; Tasnim, Rumana; Khan, Sheroz; Mohammod, Musse; Arshad, Atika; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Haider, Samnan; Saquib, Nazmus; Rahman, Tawfilur

    2013-12-01

    The complicated nature of gas-solids' physical properties have challenged the researchers over past decades who have led their efforts in developing its' flow sensing and measurement methods. The term 'gas-solid flow' signifies dilute- or dense-phase flow with a very little concentration of solids. For conducting such flow measurement, generally velocity profile and volumetric concentration of the flow particles being conveyed are needed to be measured. An important application of gas-solid flow has taken root in the form of biomass flow in pneumatic conveying systems, and its' online measurement has proven to be an exigent research pursuit. Additionally the other applications have been explored in power plants, food, chemical and automobiles industries as well. This paper aims at exploring the evolution of flow measurement methods along with a brief explanation on existing fundamental sensing techniques. Furthermore, the most recent patents developed for such measurements in pneumatic conveying pipelines are scrutinized along with their concomitant pros and cons.

  13. Partitioning gas tracer tests for measurement of water in municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Paul T; Jakubowitch, Andrew; Briening, Michele L; Chiu, Pei C

    2003-11-01

    A key component in the operation of almost all bioreactor landfills is the addition of water to maintain optimal moisture conditions. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, in situ methods are required to measure water within solid waste. Existing technologies often result in measurements of unknown accuracy, because of the variability of solid waste materials and time-dependent changes in packing density, both of which influence most measurement methods. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone--the partitioning gas tracer test--was tested. In this technology, the transport behavior of two gas tracers within solid waste is used to measure the fraction of the void space filled with water. One tracer is conservative and does not react with solids or liquids, while a second tracer partitions into the water and is separated from the conservative tracer during transport. This technology was tested in four different solid waste packings and was capable of determining the volumetric water content to within 48% of actual values, with most measurement errors less than 15%. This technology and the factors that affect its applicability to landfills are discussed in this paper. PMID:14649759

  14. Solid-phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination of aerosol-borne reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Gundel, Lara A

    2013-11-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals play important roles in the chemical transformation and adverse health effects of environmental aerosols. This work presents a simple and sensitive method for sampling and analysis of ROS using a packed column coated with a profluorescent nitroxide scavenger, proxyl fluorescamine (PF). Quantification was performed by extraction and analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. For comparison, the conventional method of collecting aerosols into dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) aqueous solution was used as a reference. The method was successfully applied to the determination of ROS in a model secondary organic aerosol (SOA) system generated by ozonolysis of nicotine, as well as in secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS). ROS concentrations between 50-565 nmol m(-3) were detected in fresh SOA and SHS samples. After SHS aging for 22 h, 13-18% of the initial ROS mass remained, suggesting the presence of persistent ROS. The new method offers better stability and reproducibility along with sensitivity comparable to that of DCFH (method detection limit of 3.2 and 1.4 nmol m(-3) of equivalent H2O2 for PF and DCFH respectively). The PF probe was stable during storage at room temperature and not reactive with ozone or NOx, whereas DCFH in the particle-collecting liquid system was strongly influenced by ozone and NOx interferences. This case study provides a good basis for employing solid-phase supported PF for field measurement of specific ROS in other combustion systems (i.e. biomass burning, candles, and diesel exhaust) and environmental aerosols. PMID:24148512

  15. Landfill gas effects on groundwater samples at a municipal solid waste facility.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, H B

    1994-11-01

    A study was performed to determine the source of low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) detected in groundwater samples at a solid waste management facility. The affected wells were identified as hydraulically upgradient of an old unlined facility, but downgradient of a new clay-lined landfill. These monitoring wells are close to both sites. Subsurface landfill gas migration was identified after a low permeability cap was installed on the older site. Subsurface gas pressure was monitored to identify horizontal landfill gas migration. Monitoring well headspace gases were evaluated to identify depressed oxygen concentrations and methane because of landfill gas migration into the well. Monitoring well headspace gas VOC concentrations were compared to groundwater VOC concentrations to determine the direction of phase transfer. A ratio above 1.0 of the observed well headspace gas concentration of a VOC to the concentration that would be in equilibrium with the groundwater concentration indicates gas-to-water phase transfer within the well. For the major gas-phase and aqueous-phase VOC, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, gas-to-water phase transfer is clearly indicated from the data for two of the four wells. Fifteen other VOCs were detected in monitoring well headspace gases but not in groundwater samples from the four wells studied. Only one compound in one well was detected in the groundwater sample but not in the headspace gases, and only one compound in one well was detected in both matrices at concentrations that suggested water-to-gas phase transfer. This study suggests that if landfill gas is suspected as the source of detected VOCs, monitoring well construction and stratigraphy are important considerations when attempting to differentiate between groundwater contamination by landfill gas and contamination from other sources.

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions from solid waste in Beijing: The rising trend and the mitigation effects by management improvements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Disposal of solid waste poses great challenges to city managements. Changes in solid waste composition and disposal methods, along with urbanisation, can certainly affect greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. In this study, we analysed the changes in the generation, composition and management of municipal solid waste in Beijing. The changes of greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste management were thereafter calculated. The impacts of municipal solid waste management improvements on greenhouse gas emissions and the mitigation effects of treatment techniques of greenhouse gas were also analysed. Municipal solid waste generation in Beijing has increased, and food waste has constituted the most substantial component of municipal solid waste over the past decade. Since the first half of 1950s, greenhouse gas emission has increased from 6 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)to approximately 200 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)in the early 1990s and 2145 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)in 2013. Landfill gas flaring, landfill gas utilisation and energy recovery in incineration are three techniques of the after-emission treatments in municipal solid waste management. The scenario analysis showed that three techniques might reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 22.7%, 4.5% and 9.8%, respectively. In the future, if waste disposal can achieve a ratio of 4:3:3 by landfill, composting and incineration with the proposed after-emission treatments, as stipulated by the Beijing Municipal Waste Management Act, greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste will decrease by 41%.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from solid waste in Beijing: The rising trend and the mitigation effects by management improvements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Disposal of solid waste poses great challenges to city managements. Changes in solid waste composition and disposal methods, along with urbanisation, can certainly affect greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. In this study, we analysed the changes in the generation, composition and management of municipal solid waste in Beijing. The changes of greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste management were thereafter calculated. The impacts of municipal solid waste management improvements on greenhouse gas emissions and the mitigation effects of treatment techniques of greenhouse gas were also analysed. Municipal solid waste generation in Beijing has increased, and food waste has constituted the most substantial component of municipal solid waste over the past decade. Since the first half of 1950s, greenhouse gas emission has increased from 6 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)to approximately 200 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)in the early 1990s and 2145 CO2-eq Gg y(-1)in 2013. Landfill gas flaring, landfill gas utilisation and energy recovery in incineration are three techniques of the after-emission treatments in municipal solid waste management. The scenario analysis showed that three techniques might reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 22.7%, 4.5% and 9.8%, respectively. In the future, if waste disposal can achieve a ratio of 4:3:3 by landfill, composting and incineration with the proposed after-emission treatments, as stipulated by the Beijing Municipal Waste Management Act, greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste will decrease by 41%. PMID:26873911

  18. Charge partitioning at gas-solid interfaces: humidity causes electricity buildup on metals.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Telma R D; Simões, Luís H; Galembeck, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Isolated metals within Faraday cages spontaneously acquire charge at relative humidity above 50%: aluminum and chrome-plated brass become negative, stainless steel is rendered positive, and copper remains almost neutral. Isolated metal charging within shielded and grounded containers confirms that the atmosphere is an electric charge reservoir where OH(-) and H(+) ions transfer to gas-solid interfaces, producing net current. The electricity buildup dependence on humidity, or hygroelectricity, acts simultaneously but in opposition to the well-known charge dissipation due to the increase in surface conductance of solids under high humidity. Acknowledging this dual role of humidity improves the reproducibility of electrostatic experiments.

  19. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  20. Dispersed bubble reactor for enhanced gas-liquid-solids contact and mass transfer

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang; Bonsu, Alexander

    2016-01-26

    An apparatus to promote gas-liquid contact and facilitate enhanced mass transfer. The dispersed bubble reactor (DBR) operates in the dispersed bubble flow regime to selectively absorb gas phase constituents into the liquid phase. The dispersion is achieved by shearing the large inlet gas bubbles into fine bubbles with circulating liquid and additional pumped liquid solvent when necessary. The DBR is capable of handling precipitates that may form during absorption or fine catalysts that may be necessary to promote liquid phase reactions. The DBR can be configured with multistage counter current flow sections by inserting concentric cylindrical sections into the riser to facilitate annular flow. While the DBR can absorb CO.sub.2 in liquid solvents that may lead to precipitates at high loadings, it is equally capable of handling many different types of chemical processes involving solids (precipitates/catalysts) along with gas and liquid phases.

  1. Gas-phase reactivity of metavanadate [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Waters, Tom; Wedd, Anthony G; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of the metavanadate anion [VO3]- towards methanol and ethanol was examined by a combination of ion-molecule reaction and isotope labelling experiments in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations. [VO3]- dehydrated methanol to eliminate water and form [VO2(eta2-OCH2)]-, which features an [eta2-C,O-OCH2]2- ligand formed by formal removal of two protons from methanol and which is isoelectronic with peroxide. [VO3]- reacted with ethanol in an analogous manner to form [VO2(eta2-OCHCH3)]-, as well as by loss of ethene to form [VO2(OH)2]-. The calculations predicted that important intermediates in these reactions were the hydroxo alkoxo anions [VO2(OH)(OCH2R)]- (R: H, CH3). These were predicted to undergo intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer to form [VO(OH)2(eta1-OCHR)]- followed by eta1-O-->eta2-C,O rearrangements to form [VO(OH)2(eta2-OCHR)]-. The latter reacted further to eliminate water and generate the product [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-. This major product observed for [VO3]- is markedly different from that observed previously for [NbO3]- containing the heavier Group 5 congener niobium. In that case, the major product of the reaction was an ion of stoichiometry [Nb, O3, H2]- arising from the formal dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde. The origin of this difference was examined theoretically and attributed to the intermediate alkoxo anion [NbO2(OH)(OCH3)]- preferring hydride transfer to form [HNbO2(OH)]- with loss of formaldehyde. This contrasts with the hydrogen-atom-transfer pathway observed for [VO2(OH)(OCH3)]-. PMID:17661322

  2. FIELD TEST MEASUREMENTS AT FIVE MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS WITH LANDFILL GAS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY--FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to evaluate landfill gas emissions at five municipal solid waste landfills which have modern control technology for landfill gas emissions. Comprehensive testing was conducted on the raw landfill gas and the combustion outlet exhaust. The project had two ...

  3. Power and temperature control of fluctuating biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    This paper addresses how the power and temperature are controlled in a biomass gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and micro gas turbine (MGT) hybrid system. A SOFC and MGT dynamic model are developed and used to simulate the hybrid system performance operating on biomass gas. The transient behavior of both the SOFC and MGT are discussed in detail. An unstable power output is observed when the system is fed biomass gas. This instability is due to the fluctuation of gas composition in the fuel. A specially designed fuel controller succeeded not only in allowing the hybrid system to follow a step change of power demand from 32 to 35 kW, but also stably maintained the system power output at 35 kW. In addition to power control, fuel cell temperature is controlled by introduction and use of a bypass valve around the recuperator. By releasing excess heat to the exhaust, the bypass valve provided the control means to avoid the self-exciting behavior of system temperature and stabilized the temperature of SOFC at 850 °C.

  4. Solar-wind krypton and solid/gas fractionation in the early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, D. S.; Neugebauer, M.; Pepin, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    The solar-system Kr abundance is calculated from solar-wind noble-gas ratios, determined previously by low-temperature oxidations of lunar ilmenite grains, normalized to Si by spacecraft solar-wind measurements. The estimated Kr-83 abundance of 4.1 + or - 1.5 per million Si atoms is within uncertainty of estimates assuming no fractionation, determined from CI-chondrite abundances of surrounding elements. This is significant because it is the first such constraint on solid/gas fractionation, though the large uncertainty only confines it to somewhat less than a factor of two.

  5. Pore Scale Modeling of the Reactive Transport of Chromium in the Cathode of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Amon, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We present a pore scale model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode. Volatile chromium species are known to migrate from the current collector of the SOFC into the cathode where over time they decrease the voltage output of the fuel cell. A pore scale model is used to investigate the reactive transport of chromium species in the cathode and to study the driving forces of chromium poisoning. A multi-scale modeling approach is proposed which uses a cell level model of the cathode, air channel and current collector to determine the boundary conditions for a pore scale model of a section of the cathode. The pore scale model uses a discrete representation of the cathode to explicitly model the surface reactions of oxygen and chromium with a cathode material. The pore scale model is used to study the reaction mechanisms of chromium by considering the effects of reaction rates, diffusion coefficients, chromium vaporization, and oxygen consumption on chromium’s deposition in the cathode. The study shows that chromium poisoning is most significantly affected by the chromium reaction rates in the cathode and that the reaction rates are a function of the local current density in the cathode.

  6. Dramatically different kinetics and mechanism at solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces for catalytic isopropanol oxidation over size-controlled platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailiang; Sapi, Andras; Thompson, Christopher M; Liu, Fudong; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Krier, James M; Carl, Lindsay M; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Lin-Wang; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-07-23

    We synthesize platinum nanoparticles with controlled average sizes of 2, 4, 6, and 8 nm and use them as model catalysts to study isopropanol oxidation to acetone in both the liquid and gas phases at 60 °C. The reaction at the solid/liquid interface is 2 orders of magnitude slower than that at the solid/gas interface, while catalytic activity increases with the size of platinum nanoparticles for both the liquid-phase and gas-phase reactions. The activation energy of the gas-phase reaction decreases with the platinum nanoparticle size and is in general much higher than that of the liquid-phase reaction which is largely insensitive to the size of catalyst nanoparticles. Water substantially promotes isopropanol oxidation in the liquid phase. However, it inhibits the reaction in the gas phase. The kinetic results suggest different mechanisms between the liquid-phase and gas-phase reactions, correlating well with different orientations of IPA species at the solid/liquid interface vs the solid/gas interface as probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions and simulated by computational calculations.

  7. Comparing the catalytic oxidation of ethanol at the solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces over size-controlled Pt nanoparticles: striking differences in kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sapi, Andras; Liu, Fudong; Cai, Xiaojun; Thompson, Christopher M; Wang, Hailiang; An, Kwangjin; Krier, James M; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-12

    Pt nanoparticles with controlled size (2, 4, and 6 nm) are synthesized and tested in ethanol oxidation by molecular oxygen at 60 °C to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide both in the gas and liquid phases. The turnover frequency of the reaction is ∼80 times faster, and the activation energy is ∼5 times higher at the gas-solid interface compared to the liquid-solid interface. The catalytic activity is highly dependent on the size of the Pt nanoparticles; however, the selectivity is not size sensitive. Acetaldehyde is the main product in both media, while twice as much carbon dioxide was observed in the gas phase compared to the liquid phase. Added water boosts the reaction in the liquid phase; however, it acts as an inhibitor in the gas phase. The more water vapor was added, the more carbon dioxide was formed in the gas phase, while the selectivity was not affected by the concentration of the water in the liquid phase. The differences in the reaction kinetics of the solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces can be attributed to the molecular orientation deviation of the ethanol molecules on the Pt surface in the gas and liquid phases as evidenced by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

  8. Explorations into thermodynamics analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new. The idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport cases are also known. Experimental data from several investigators where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow and voidage. Using the van der Waals format phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems which have been scrutinized. From this information the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced properties plot has been constructed and has been shown to be unique in representing all the data. Exploration into the pressure drop domain has shown a relationship between the phase diagrams by an analytical approach. 9 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  9. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tuba, S.T.; Wildman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubi van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data.

  10. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.J.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-11-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  12. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  13. Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

  14. A pyrolysis/gas chromatographic method for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. H.; Bustin, R.; Gibson, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of hydrogen in solid samples. The sample is heated under vacuum after which the evolved gases are separated by gas chromatography with a helium ionization detector. The system is calibrated by injecting known amounts of hydrogen, as determined manometrically. The method, which is rapid and reliable, was checked for a variety of lunar soils; the limit of detection is about 10 ng of hydrogen.

  15. Formation routes of interstellar glycine involving carboxylic acids: possible favoritism between gas and solid phase.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Baptista, Leonardo; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M; Andrade, Diana P P

    2011-11-01

    Despite the extensive search for glycine (NH₂CH₂COOH) and other amino acids in molecular clouds associated with star-forming regions, only upper limits have been derived from radio observations. Nevertheless, two of glycine's precursors, formic acid and acetic acid, have been abundantly detected. Although both precursors may lead to glycine formation, the efficiency of reaction depends on their abundance and survival in the presence of a radiation field. These facts could promote some favoritism in the reaction pathways in the gas phase and solid phase (ice). Glycine and these two simplest carboxylic acids are found in many meteorites. Recently, glycine was also observed in cometary samples returned by the Stardust space probe. The goal of this work was to perform theoretical calculations for several interstellar reactions involving the simplest carboxylic acids as well as the carboxyl radical (COOH) in both gas and solid (ice) phase to understand which reactions could be the most favorable to produce glycine in interstellar regions fully illuminated by soft X-rays and UV, such as star-forming regions. The calculations were performed at four different levels for the gas phase (B3LYP/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, MP2/6-31G*, and MP2/6-31++G**) and at MP2/6-31++G** level for the solid phase (ice). The current two-body reactions (thermochemical calculation) were combined with previous experimental data on the photodissociation of carboxylic acids to promote possible favoritism for glycine formation in the scenario involving formic and acetic acid in both gas and solid phase. Given that formic acid is destroyed more in the gas phase by soft X-rays than acetic acid is, we suggest that in the gas phase the most favorable reactions are acetic acid with NH or NH₂OH. Another possible reaction involves NH₂CH₂ and COOH, one of the most-produced radicals from the photodissociation of acetic acid. In the solid phase, we suggest that the reactions of formic acid with NH

  16. Measurement of Gas Velocities in the Presence of Solids in the Riser of a Cold Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Spenik, J.; Ludlow, J.C.; Compston, R.; Breault, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The local gas velocity and the intensity of the gas turbulence in a gas/solid flow are a required measurement in validating the gas and solids flow structure predicted by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models in fluid bed and transport reactors. The high concentration and velocities of solids, however, make the use of traditional gas velocity measurement devices such as pitot tubes, hot wire anemometers and other such devices difficult. A method of determining these velocities has been devised at the National Energy Technology Laboratory employing tracer gas. The technique developed measures the time average local axial velocity gas component of a gas/solid flow using an injected tracer gas which induces changes in the heat transfer characteristics of the gas mixture. A small amount of helium is injected upstream a known distance from a self-heated thermistor. The thermistor, protected from the solids by means of a filter, is exposed to gases that are continuously extracted from the flow. Changes in the convective heat transfer characteristics of the gas are indicated by voltage variations across a Wheatstone bridge. When pulsed injections of helium are introduced to the riser flow the change in convective heat transfer coefficient of the gas can be rapidly and accurately determined with this instrument. By knowing the separation distance between the helium injection point and the thermistor extraction location as well as the time delay between injection and detection, the gas velocity can easily be calculated. Variations in the measured gas velocities also allow the turbulence intensity of the gas to be estimated.

  17. Methanesulfonyl Azide: Molecular Structure and Photolysis in Solid Noble Gas Matrices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guohai; Li, Dingqing; Wu, Zhuang; Li, Hongmin; Bernhardt, Eduard; Zeng, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-21

    The parent sulfonyl azide CH3SO2N3 has been characterized in a neat form by IR (gas, matrix-isolation) and Raman (solid) spectroscopy, and its structure has been established by X-ray crystallography. In both gas phase and solid state, the azide exhibits single conformation with the azido ligand being synperiplanar to one of the two S═O groups. In the crystal molecules of CH3SO2N3 are interconnected through three-dimensional O···H-C-H···O hydrogen bonds. Upon an ArF laser (193 nm) photolysis, the azide in solid noble gas matrices splits off N2 and yields the sulfonyl nitrene CH3SO2N in the triplet ground state. Subsequent photolysis with UV light (266 nm) causes the transformation from the nitrene to the pseudo-Curtius rearrangement product CH3NSO2. The identification of the photolysis intermediates by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy is supported by quantum chemical calculations with DFT methods. PMID:27383463

  18. Non-intrusive measurement and hydrodynamics characterization of gas-solid fluidized beds: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingyuan; Yan, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Gas-solid fluidization is a well-established technique to suspend or transport particles and has been applied in a variety of industrial processes. Nevertheless, our knowledge of fluidization hydrodynamics is still limited for the design, scale-up and operation optimization of fluidized bed reactors. It is, therefore, essential to characterize the two-phase flow behaviours in gas-solid fluidized beds and monitor the fluidization processes for control and optimization. A range of non-intrusive techniques have been developed or proposed for measuring the fluidization dynamic parameters and monitoring the flow status without disturbing or distorting the flow fields. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the non-intrusive measurement techniques and the current state of knowledge and experience in the characterization and monitoring of gas-solid fluidized beds. These techniques are classified into six main categories as per sensing principles, electrostatic, acoustic emission and vibration, visualization, particle tracking, laser Doppler anemometry and phase Doppler anemometry as well as pressure-fluctuation methods. Trends and future developments in this field are also discussed.

  19. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  20. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from two-stage landfilling of municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-08-01

    Simulations were conducted to investigate greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic pretreatment and subsequent landfilling. The flows in carbon balance, such as gas, leachate, and solid phases, were considered in the simulations. The total amount of CO2 eq. decreased as organic removal efficiency (ORE) increased. At ORE values of 0, 0.30, 0.41, and 0.54, the total amounts of CO2 eq. were 2614, 2326, 2075, and 1572 kg CO2 eq. per one ton dry matter, respectively; gas accounted for the main contribution to the total amount. The reduction in CO2 eq. from leachate was the primary positive contribution, accounting for 356%, 174%, and 100% of total reduction at ORE values of 0.30, 0.41, and 0.54, respectively. The CO2 eq. from energy consumption was the negative contribution to total reduction, but this contribution is considerably lower than that from gas. Aerobic pretreatment shortened the lag time of biogas production by 74.1-97.0%, and facilitated the transfer of organic carbon in solid waste from uncontrolled biogas and highly polluting leachate to aerobically generated CO2.

  2. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  3. Numerical Computation of Flame Spread over a Thin Solid in Forced Concurrent Flow with Gas-phase Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Ching-Biau; T'ien, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Excerpts from a paper describing the numerical examination of concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid in purely forced flow with gas-phase radiation are presented. The computational model solves the two-dimensional, elliptic, steady, and laminar conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species. Gas-phase combustion is modeled via a one-step, second order finite rate Arrhenius reaction. Gas-phase radiation considering gray non-scattering medium is solved by a S-N discrete ordinates method. A simplified solid phase treatment assumes a zeroth order pyrolysis relation and includes radiative interaction between the surface and the gas phase.

  4. Data on the Velocity Slip and Temperature Jump on a Gas-Solid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Felix

    2011-06-01

    The present review is dedicated to the velocity slip and temperature jump coefficients applied to modeling of gas flows. Such coefficients are used when a moderate gas rarefaction must be taken into account. In this case, calculations of gas flows can be performed on the basis of continuum mechanics equations applying the velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions. Thus, the velocity slip and temperature jump coefficients have the same importance in gas dynamics as the transport coefficients such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficients. A critical analysis of theoretical and experimental data on the slip and jump coefficients available in the open literature is presented in an accessible form so that it can be easily understandable for nonspecialists in rarefied gas dynamics. The most reliable results are selected and tabulated. The results cover a single gas with the complete and noncomplete accommodation on a solid surface, gaseous mixtures, and polyatomic gases. Many examples of applications of the slip and jump boundary conditions are given. The review will be useful as a reference for mathematicians, physicists, and engineers dealing with flows of moderately rarefied gases.

  5. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace. PMID:26718189

  6. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace.

  7. Development of acoustic flow instruments for solid/gas pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1986-05-01

    Two nonintrusive acoustic flow sensing techniques are reported. One technique, passive in nature, simply measures the bandpassed acoustic noise level produced by particle/particle and particle/wall collisions. The noise levels, given in true RMS voltages or in autocorrelations, show a linear relationship to particle velocity but increase with solid concentration. Therefore, the passive technique requires calibration and a separate measure of solid concentration before it can be used to monitor the particle velocity. The second technique is based on the active cross-correlation principle. It measures particle velocity directly by correlating flow-related signatures at two sensing stations. The velocity data obtained by this technique are compared with measurements by a radioactive-particle time-of-flight (TOF) method. A multiplier of 1.53 is required to bring the acoustic data into agreement with the radioactive TOF result. The difference may originate from the difference in flow fields where particles are detected. The radioactive method senses particles mainly in the turbulent region and essentially measures average particle velocity across the pipe, while the acoustic technique detects particles near the pipe wall, and so measures the particle velocity in the viscous sublayer. Both techniques were tested in flows of limestone and air and 1-mm glass beads and air at the Argonne National Laboratory Solid/Gas Test Facility (SGFTF). The test matrix covered solid velocities of 20 to 30 m/s in a 2-in. pipe and solid-to-gas loading ratios of 6 to 22. 37 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Localization and reactivity of a hydrophobic solute in lecithin and caseinate stabilized solid lipid nanoparticles and nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Elias, Ryan J; Coupland, John N

    2013-03-15

    The distribution and reactivity of the lipophilic spin probe 4-phenyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-imidazoline-1-oxyl nitroxide (PTMIO) in tetradecane (C14)- and eicosane (C20)-in-water emulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) respectively, were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The lipid phase (10 wt% C14 or C20) was emulsified into either caseinate solutions (1 wt%) or lecithin+bile salt dispersions (2.4 wt%+0.6 wt%) at 70-75 °C. In C14 emulsions stabilized with lecithin+bile salt, three populations of PTMIO were observed: a population in the lipid phase (~60%, a(N)~13.9 G), an aqueous phase population (~20%, a(N)~15.4 G) with high mobility, and an immobilized surface layer population (~20%, a(N)~14.2 G) with low mobility. However, in C14 emulsions stabilized by caseinate, only two distinct populations of PTMIO were seen: a lipid phase population (~70%, a(N)~13.8 G) and an aqueous phase population (~30%, a(N)~15.5 G) with high mobility. In C20 SLN stabilized with either lecithin+bile salt or caseinate, PTMIO was excluded from the lipid phase. In lecithin+bile salt-stabilized C20 SLN, the majority of the probe (~77%) was in the interfacial layer. For both surfactant systems the rate of PTMIO reduction by aqueous iron/ascorbate was greater for C20 SLN than C14 emulsions. Lecithin affects the properties of emulsions and SLN as delivery systems by providing a distinct environment for small molecules. PMID:23352869

  9. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2014-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d = 6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q = J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the ‘every day thermodynamics’ of simple substances. For q = 0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0 < q ≪ 1 we find an analogue of a ‘solid/liquid’ phase transition. Furthermore, for q ∈ (0.00905, 0.0985) the system displays the presence of a large/intermediate/small black hole phase transition with two critical and one triple (or tricritical) points. This behavior is reminiscent of the solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q > 0.0985 we observe the ‘standard liquid/gas behavior’ of the Van der Waals fluid.

  10. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Lipopolysaccharides with Gas-Phase Nitric Acid: Reactive Sites and Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jonathan V; Estillore, Armando D; Lee, Christopher; Dowling, Jacqueline A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-08-18

    Recent studies have shown that sea spray aerosol (SSA) has a size-dependent, complex composition consisting of biomolecules and biologically derived organic compounds in addition to salts. This additional chemical complexity most likely influences the heterogeneous reactivity of SSA, as these other components will have different reactive sites and reaction pathways. In this study, we focus on the reactivity of a class of particles derived from some of the biological components of sea spray aerosol including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that undergo heterogeneous chemistry within the reactive sites of the biological molecule. Examples of these reactions and the relevant reactive sites are proposed as follows: R-COONa(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-COOH and R-HPO4Na(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-H2PO4. These reactions may be a heterogeneous pathway not only for sea spray aerosol but also for a variety of other types of atmospheric aerosol as well.

  11. Spontaneous concentrations of solids through two-way drag forces between gas and sedimenting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Capelo, H. L.; Blum, J.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2016-06-01

    The behaviour of sedimenting particles depends on the dust-to-gas ratio of the fluid. Linear stability analysis shows that solids settling in the Epstein drag regime would remain homogeneously distributed in non-rotating incompressible fluids, even when dust-to-gas ratios reach unity. However, the nonlinear evolution has not been probed before. Here, we present numerical calculations indicating that, in a particle-dense mixture, solids spontaneously mix out of the fluid and form swarms that are overdense in particles by at least a factor 10. The instability is caused by mass-loaded regions locally breaking the equilibrium background stratification. The driving mechanism depends on nonlinear perturbations of the background flow and shares some similarity to the streaming instability in accretion discs. The resulting particle-rich swarms may stimulate particle growth by coagulation. In the context of protoplanetary discs, the instability could be relevant for aiding small particles to settle to the midplane in the outer disc. Inside the gas envelopes of protoplanets, enhanced settling may lead to a reduced dust opacity, which facilitates the contraction of the envelope. We show that the relevant physical set up can be recreated in a laboratory setting. This will allow our numerical calculations to be investigated experimentally in the future.

  12. Gas chromatographic analysis of organic marker compounds in fine particulate matter using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Lee, Milton L; Eatough, Delbert J

    2007-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method that uses solid-phase microextraction for analysis of organic marker compounds in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is reported. The target marker compounds were selected for specificity toward emission from wood smoke, diesel or gasoline combustion, or meat cooking. Temperature-programmed volatilization analysis was used to characterize the thermal stabilities and volatile properties of the compounds of interest. The compounds were thermally evaporated from a quartz filter, sorbed to a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, and thermally desorbed at 280 degrees C in a gas chromatograph injection port connected via a DB 1701 capillary separating column. Various experimental parameters (fiber type, time, and temperature of sorption) were optimized. It was found that high extraction yield could be achieved using a polyacrylate fiber for polar substances, such as levoglucosan, and a 7-microm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated fiber for nonpolar compounds, such as hopanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbon. A compromise was made by selecting a carboxen/PDMS fiber, which can simultaneously extract all of the analytes of interest with moderate-to-high efficiency at 180 degrees C within a 30-min accumulation period. The optimized method was applied to the determination of levoglucosan in pine wood combustion emissions. The simplicity, rapidity, and selectivity of sample collection with a polymer-coated SPME coupled to capillary gas chromatography (GC) made this method potentially useful for atmospheric chemistry studies.

  13. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: An MWCNT-doped SNO2 thin film NO2 gas sensor by RF reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lin; Shizhen, Huang; Wenzhe, Chen

    2010-02-01

    An MWCNT-doped (multi-walled carbon nanotube) SnO2 thin film NO2 gas sensor, prepared by radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering, showed a high sensitivity to ultra-low concentrations of NO2 in the parts per billion range. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterizations indicated that the MWCNTs were affected by the morphology of the SnO2 thin film and the particle size. The properties of the MWCNT-doped SnO2 sensor, such as sensitivity, selectivity, and response-recovery time, were investigated. Experimental results revealed that the MWCNT-doped SnO2 thin film sensor response to NO2 gas depended on the operating temperature, NO2 gas concentration, thermal treatment conditions, film thickness, and so on. The mechanism of the gas-sensing property of the MWCNT-doped Sn22 thin film sensor was investigated and showed that the improved gas-sensing performance should be attributed to the effects between MWCNTs (p-type) and SnO2 (n-type) semiconductors.

  14. Spectroscopic Characterization and Reactivity of Triplet and Quintet Iron(IV) Oxo Complexes in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gómez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Closely structurally related triplet and quintet iron(IV) oxo complexes with a tetradentate aminopyridine ligand were generated in the gas phase, spectroscopically characterized, and their reactivities in hydrogen‐transfer and oxygen‐transfer reactions were compared. The spin states were unambiguously assigned based on helium tagging infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of the mass‐selected iron complexes. It is shown that the stretching vibrations of the nitrate counterion can be used as a spectral marker of the central iron spin state. PMID:26878833

  15. Global Existence and Exponential Stability of Spherically Symmetric Solutions to a Compressible Combustion Radiative and Reactive Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuming; Zhang, Jianlin; Su, Xing; Cao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we establish the global existence and exponential stability of spherically symmetric solutions in {H^i× H^i× H^i× H^i (i=1,2,4)} for a multi-dimensional compressible viscous radiative and reactive gas. Our global existence results improve those known results. Moreover, we establish the asymptotic behavior and exponential stability of global solutions on {H^i× H^i× H^i× H^i (i=1,2,4)}. This result is obtained for this problem in the literature for the first time.

  16. Ozone uptake and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols (Abbatt, Lee and Thornton, 2012). The effects of particle phase state on the reaction kinetics are still not fully elucidated and cannot be described by classical models assuming a homogeneous condensed phase (Berkemeier et al., 2013). We apply a kinetic multi-layer model, explicitly resolving gas adsorption, condensed phase diffusion and condensed phase chemistry (Shiraiwa et al., 2010), to systematic measurements of ozone uptake onto proxies for secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our findings show how moisture-induced phase changes affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter through change in the physicochemical properties of the substrate: the diffusion coefficients are found to be low under dry conditions, but increase by several orders of magnitude toward higher relative humidity (RH). The solubility of ozone in the dry organic matrix is found to be one order of magnitude higher than in the dilute aqueous solution. The model simulations reveal that at high RH, ozone uptake is mainly controlled by reaction throughout the particle bulk, whereas at low RH, bulk diffusion is retarded severely and reaction at the surface becomes the dominant pathway, with ozone uptake being limited by replenishment of unreacted organic molecules from the bulk phase. The experimental results can only be reconciled including a pathway for ozone self-reaction, which becomes especially important under dry and polluted conditions. Ozone self-reaction can be interpreted as formation and recombination of long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates at the aerosol surface, which could also explain several kinetic parameters and has implications for the health effects of organic aerosol particles. This study hence outlines how kinetic modelling can be used to gain mechanistic insight into the coupling of mass transport, phase changes, and chemical

  17. Conversion of tomato, peach and honeydew solid waste into methane gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, D.J.; Roberts, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Results from a laboratory investigation on the title conversion and seasonal operation of a pilot-plant size digester are presented. For 4-L laboratory digesters operating at 35 degrees, the respective optimal loading rates and retention times for tomato, honeydew, and peach residues, were 5, 3, and 1 kg volatile solids (VS)/cubic meter-day and 25, 20, and 15 days. Under these operating conditions 33, 83, and 86% of VS were destroyed for tomato, honeydew and peach residues, respectively, and the corresponding gas productions at 0 degrees and 1 atm. were 0.43, 2.45, and 1.15 vol./digester vol-day. Operation of the 22-cubic meter pilot plant generally confirmed the laboratory data for tomato solid waste.

  18. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  19. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  20. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  1. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Comparative modeling of fault reactivation and seismicity in geologic carbon storage and shale-gas reservoir stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio; Cappa, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The potential for fault reactivation and induced seismicity are issues of concern related to both geologic CO2 sequestration and stimulation of shale-gas reservoirs. It is well known that underground injection may cause induced seismicity depending on site-specific conditions, such a stress and rock properties and injection parameters. To date no sizeable seismic event that could be felt by the local population has been documented associated with CO2 sequestration activities. In the case of shale-gas fracturing, only a few cases of felt seismicity have been documented out of hundreds of thousands of hydraulic fracturing stimulation stages. In this paper we summarize and review numerical simulations of injection-induced fault reactivation and induced seismicity associated with both underground CO2 injection and hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs. The simulations were conducted with TOUGH-FLAC, a simulator for coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical modeling. In this case we employed both 2D and 3D models with an explicit representation of a fault. A strain softening Mohr-Coulomb model was used to model a slip-weakening fault slip behavior, enabling modeling of sudden slip that was interpreted as a seismic event, with a moment magnitude evaluated using formulas from seismology. In the case of CO2 sequestration, injection rates corresponding to expected industrial scale CO2 storage operations were used, raising the reservoir pressure until the fault was reactivated. For the assumed model settings, it took a few months of continuous injection to increase the reservoir pressure sufficiently to cause the fault to reactivate. In the case of shale-gas fracturing we considered that the injection fluid during one typical 3-hour fracturing stage was channelized into a fault along with the hydraulic fracturing process. Overall, the analysis shows that while the CO2 geologic sequestration in deep sedimentary formations are capable of producing notable events (e

  3. An extended soft-cube model for the thermal accommodation of gas atoms on solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. R.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical soft cube model was developed for calculating thermal accommodation coefficients alpha and trapping fractions f sub t for the interaction of gases incident upon solid surfaces. A semiempirical correction factor c which allows the calculation of alpha and f sub t when the collision times are long compared to the surface oscillator period were introduced. The processes of trapping, evaporation, and detailed balancing were discussed. The numerical method was designed to treat economically and with moderate (+ or - 20 percent) accuracy the dependence of alpha and f sub t on finite and different surface and gas temperatures for a large number of gas/surface combinations. Comparison was made with experiments of rare gases on tungsten and on alkalis, as well as one astrophysical case of H2 on graphite. The dependence of alpha on the soft cube dimensionless parameters is presented graphically.

  4. THEORY OF A QUODON GAS WITH APPLICATION TO PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN SOLIDS UNDER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinko, Volodymyr; Shapovalov, Roman V.

    2014-06-17

    Rate theory of the radiation-induced precipitation in solids is modified with account of non-equilibrium fluctuations driven by the “gas” of lattice solitons (a.k.a. “quodons”) produced by irradiation. According to quantitative estimations, a steady-state density of the quodon gas under sufficiently intense irradiation can be comparable to the density of classical phonon gas. The modified rate theory is applied to modelling of copper precipitation in FeCu binary alloys under electron irradiation. In contrast to the classical rate theory, which disagrees strongly with experimental data on all precipitation parameters, the modified rate theory describes quite well both the evolution of precipitates and the matrix concentration of copper measured by different methods.

  5. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  6. Study of solid/gas phase photocatalytic reactions by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nuño, Manuel; Ball, Richard J; Bowen, Chris R

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the real-time study of solid-gas phase photocatalytic reactions in situ. A novel reaction chamber has been designed and developed to facilitate the investigation of photoactive materials under different gas compositions. UV irradiation in the wavelength of ranges 376-387 and 381-392 nm was provided using specially designed high efficiency light emitting diode arrays. The experiments used air containing 190 ppm NO2 in a moist environment with a relative humidity of 0.1%. Photocatalytic samples consisting of pressed pellets of rutile and anatase crystalline forms of TiO2 were monitored over a period of 150 min. An ultra-high vacuum right angled bleed valve allowed a controlled flow of gas from the main reaction chamber at atmospheric pressure to a residual gas analyser operating at a vacuum of 10(-5)  mbar. The apparatus and methodology have been demonstrated to provide high sensitivity (ppb). The rate of degradation of NO2 attributed to reaction at the TiO2 surface was sensitive to both crystal structures (anatase or rutile) and wavelength of irradiation.

  7. Anode-pore tortuosity in solid oxide fuel cells found from gas and current flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V. Hugo; Tsai, Chih-Long

    The effect of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode thickness, porosity, pore size, and pore tortuosity on fuel and exhaust gas flow is calculated. Also determined is the concentration of these gases and of diluent gases as a function of position across the anode. The calculation is based on the dusty-gas model which includes a Knudsen (molecule-wall) collision term in the Stefan-Maxwell equation which is based on unlike-molecule collisions. Commonly made approximations are avoided in order to obtain more exact results. One such approximation is the assumption of uniform total gas pressure across the anode. Another such approximation is the assumption of zero fuel gas concentration at the anode-electrolyte interface under the anode saturation condition for which the SOFC output voltage goes to zero. Elimination of this approximation requires use of a model we developed (published elsewhere) for terminal voltage V as a function of electrolyte current density i. Key formulae from this model are presented. The formulae developed herein for gas flow and tortuosity are applied to the results of a series of careful experiments performed by another group, who used binary and ternary gas mixtures on the anode side of an SOFC. Our values for tortuosity are in a physically reasonable low range, from 1.7 to 3.3. They are in fair agreement with those obtained by the other group, once a difference in nomenclature is taken into account. This difference consists in their definition of tortuosity being what some call tortuosity factor, which is the square of what we and some others call tortuosity. The results emphasize the need for careful design of anode pore structures, especially in anode-supported SOFCs which require thicker anodes.

  8. Electrochemical study of natural gas fueled electrodes for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. Jafar; Raza, Rizwan; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Ali, Akbar; Ahmad, Imran; Syed, Waqar A. A.; Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Anis-Ur-Rehman, M.; Khan, M. Ajmal; Shahid, Shaukat A.; Abbas, Ghazanfar

    2016-07-01

    Fuel cell is undoubtedly widespread energy conversion technology, which can convert fuel (biogas) energy into electricity. Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the best choices among the fuel cell’s family due to high efficiency and fuel flexibility. In this study, zinc-based nanostructured Mn0.20FexZn0.80-xOδ electrode materials were successfully developed by solid state reaction. The proposed materials have been characterized by XRD and SEM. The electrical conductivities have been examined by four-probe DC method in the temperature range of 300-600∘C, the maximum values were recorded and found to be 12.019 and 5.106 S/cm at natural gas and air atmosphere, respectively. The electrochemical performance has been measured employing NK-SDC electrolyte material and their current density versus voltage and current density versus power density (I-V and I-P characteristics) have been drawn. The maximum power density was found to be 170 mW/cm2 using natural gas as a bio-fuel over a temperature of 600∘C.

  9. FORCE2: A multidimensional flow program for gas solids flow theory guide

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S.W.

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the theory and structure of the FORCE2 flow program. The manual describes the governing model equations, solution procedure and their implementation in the computer program. FORCE2 is an extension of an existing B&V multidimensional, two-phase flow program. FORCE2 was developed for application to fluid beds by flow implementing a gas-solids modeling technology derived, in part, during a joint government -- industry research program, ``Erosion of FBC Heat Transfer Tubes,`` coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The development of FORCE2 was sponsored by ASEA-Babcock, an industry participant in this program. This manual is the principal documentation for the program theory and organization. Program usage and post-processing of code predictions with the FORCE2 post-processor are described in a companion report, FORCE2 -- A Multidimensional Flow Program for Fluid Beds, User`s Guide. This manual is segmented into sections to facilitate its usage. In section 2.0, the mass and momentum conservation principles, the basis for the code, are presented. In section 3.0, the constitutive relations used in modeling gas-solids hydrodynamics are given. The finite-difference model equations are derived in section 4.0 and the solution procedures described in sections 5.0 and 6.0. Finally, the implementation of the model equations and solution procedure in FORCE2 is described in section 7.0.

  10. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part II Validation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  11. Quantitative prediction of clustering instabilities in gas-solid homogeneous cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrenya, Christine; Mitrano, Peter; Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic particle clusters are widely documented in gas-solid flow systems, including gasification units for coal or biomass, gravity-driven flow over an array of tubes, pneumatic transport lines, etc. Continuum descriptions based on kinetic theory have been known for over a decade to qualitatively predict the presence of such clustering instabilities. The quantitative ability of such continuum descriptions is relatively unexplored, however, and remains unclear given the low-Knudsen assumption upon which the descriptions are based. In particular, the concentration gradient is relatively large across the boundary between the cluster and the surrounding dilute region, which is counter to the small-gradient assumption inherent in the low-Knudsen-number expansion. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a gas-solid homogeneous cooling system to determine the critical system size needed for the clustering instability to develop. We then compare the results to the same quantity predicted by a continuum description based on kinetic theory. The agreement is quite good over a wide range of parameters. This finding is reminiscent of molecular fluids, namely the ability of the Navier-Stokes equations to predict well outside the expected range of Knudsen numbers.

  12. Unified phonon-based approach to the thermodynamics of solid, liquid and gas states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zav'yalov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Musaev, Edvard T.; Cai, Yong Q.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a unified approach to states of matter (solid, liquid and gas) and describe the thermodynamics of the pressure-temperature phase diagram in terms of phonon excitations. We derive the effective Hamiltonian with low-energy cutoff in two transverse phonon polarizations (phononic band gaps) by breaking the symmetry in phonon interactions. Further, we construct the statistical mechanics of states of aggregation employing the Debye approximation. The introduced formalism covers the Debye theory of solids, the phonon theory of liquids, and thermodynamic limits such as the Dulong-Petit thermodynamic limit (cV = 3kB), the ideal gas limit (cV =3/2 kB) and the new thermodynamic limit (cV = 2kB), dubbed here the Frenkel line thermodynamic limit. We discuss the phonon propagation and localization effects in liquids above and below the Frenkel line, and explain the "fast sound" phenomenon. As a test for our theory we calculate velocity-velocity autocorrelation and pair distribution functions within the Green-Kubo formalism. We show the consistency between dynamics of phonons and pair correlations in the framework of the unified approach. New directions towards advancements in phononic band gaps engineering, hypersound manipulation technologies and exploration of exotic behaviour of fluids relevant to geo- and planetary sciences are discussed. The presented results are equally important both for practical implications and for fundamental research.

  13. A New Paradigm of Computer Graphics by Universal Solver for Solid, Liquid and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Takizawa, Kenji; Xiao, Feng; Aoki, Takayuki; Himeno, Takehiro; Takahashi, Tsunemi; Kunimatsu, Atsushi

    We propose a new algorithm for producing computer graphics of melting and evaporation process of matter. Such a computation becomes possible by a universal solver for solid, liquid and gas based on the CIP (Cubic-Interpolated Propagation / Constrained Interpolation Profile) method proposed by one of the authors. This method can also be applied to the movement, deformation and even break up of solid, liquid and gas in one simple algorithm. Therefore seamless computation of all the phases of matter becomes possible. This enables us to reproduce natural phenomena in some instances by computation. In order to demonstrate this reality, we show how precisely the computational result replicates the movies of real phenomena. The flattering motions of metal disk in water and thin name card in air are treated showing accuracy of force calculation on the surface of sub-grid scale. Although the CIP uses semi-Lagrangian form algorithm, the exact mass conservation is guaranteed by additional tool. By using this scheme, separation of a bubble in bifurcation tube and splashing of water surface are successfully simulated.

  14. Effect of solids concentration distribution on the flue gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Haiying Qi; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu

    2006-06-15

    A dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process at 600-800{sup o}C was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. Various fresh sorbent distribution types and internal structures were modeled numerically to investigate their effect on the gas-solid flow and sulfate reaction characteristics. Experimental results show that, after the fresh sorbent supply was stopped, the desulfurization efficiency declined rapidly even though the sorbent recirculation was maintained. Therefore, the fresh sorbent is the main contributor to the desulfurization process and the primary effect of the recirculated sorbent was to evenly distribute the fresh sorbent and to prolong the sorbent particle residence time. The numerical results demonstrate that the desulfurization efficiency varied greatly for the various fresh sorbent bottom injection methods. The desulfurization efficiency of the bottom-even injection method was 1.5 times that of the bottom two-sided injection method. Internal structures effectively improved the fresh sorbent solids concentration distribution and the desulfurization efficiency. Optimized internal structures increased the desulfurization efficiency of the bottom two-sided injection method by 46%, so that it was very close to that of the bottom-even injection method with only a 4.6% difference. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High pressure operation of tubular solid oxide fuel cells and their intergration with gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.; Wepfer, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fossil fuels continue to be used at a rate greater than that of their natural formation, and the current byproducts from their use are believed to have a detrimental effect on the environment (e.g. global warming). There is thus a significant impetus to have cleaner, more efficient fuel consumption alternatives. Recent progress has led to renewed vigor in the development of fuel cell technology, which has been shown to be capable of producing high efficiencies with relatively benign exhaust products. The tubular solid oxide fuel cell developed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation has shown significant promise. Modeling efforts have been and are underway to optimize and better understand this fuel cell technology. Thus far, the bulk of modeling efforts has been for operation at atmospheric pressure. There is now interest in developing high-efficiency integrated gas turbine/solid oxide fuel cell systems. Such operation of fuel cells would obviously occur at higher pressures. The fuel cells have been successfully modeled under high pressure operation and further investigated as integrated components of an open loop gas turbine cycle.

  16. [Characteristics and mechanism of sodium removal by the synergistic action of flue gas and waste solid].

    PubMed

    Yi, Yuan-Rong; Han, Min-Fang

    2012-07-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) in flue gas was used to remove the sodium in the red mud (RM) , a kind of alkaline solid waste generated during alumina production. The reaction characteristics and mechanism of sodium removal by the synergistic action of CO2 and RM were studied with different medium pH, reaction time and temperature. It was demonstrated that the remove of sodium by RM was actually the result of the synergistic action of sodium-based solid waste in RM with the CO2-H2O and OH(-)-CO2 systems. The sodium removal efficiency was correlated with pH, reaction temperature and time. The characteristics of RM before and after sodium removal were analyzed using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results showed that the alkaline materials in the red mud reacted with CO2 and the sodium content in solid phases decreased significantly after reaction. The sodium removal efficiency could reach up to 70% with scientific procedure. The results of this research will offer an efficient way for low-cost sodium removal.

  17. Advanced system experimental facility: solid waste to methane gas. Background and process description

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, R.; Pfeffer, J.

    1981-03-01

    The Refuse Conversion to Methane Facility in Pompano Beach, Florida, a 100-ton/day experimental plant to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to methane for fuel, has been built and is being tested. The facility has been designed to assess the technical merit of anaerobic digestion of the MSW process. Approximately 40 ton/day of volatile solids are fed to the digesters; of this, about 25 ton/day will be converted to gases. For each pound of volatile solids destroyed, 6.6 std. ft/sup 3/ of methane gas and 6.6 std. ft/sup 3/ of CO/sub 2/ will be produced. Thus, the plant will yield approximately 330,000 std. ft/sup 3//day each of methane and CO/sub 2/. This project provides a critical test of the most important process variables, thus allowing judgments to be made on scale-up considerations. The successful operation of this facility will yield information with a significant impact on potential commercial-scale plant developments. The background and theory involved in applying this technology to MSW, as well as details of the specific process line, are presented.

  18. Solids precipitation in crude oils, gas-to-liquids and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Karthik

    Gas-to-liquids (GTL) liquids are obtained from syngas by the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The blending of GTL liquids produced from natural gas/coal reserves and crude oils is a possibility in the near future for multiple reasons. Solids precipitation is a major problem in pipelines and refineries leading to significant additional operating costs. The effect of the addition of a paraffinic GTL liquid to crude oils on solids precipitation was investigated in this study. A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique was used to obtain solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) data for the various samples. The SLE of multiple systems of model oils composed of n-alkanes was investigated preliminarily. Blends of a model oil simulating a GTL liquid composition and a crude oil showed that the wax precipitation temperature (WPT) decreased upon blending. Three crude oils from different geographic regions (Alaskan North Slope, Colorado and Venezuela) and a laboratory-produced GTL liquid were used in the preparation of blends with five different concentrations of the GTL liquid. The wax precipitation temperatures of the blends were found to decrease with the increasing addition of the GTL liquid for all the oils. This effect was attributed to the solvent effect of the low molecular weight-paraffinic GTL liquid on the crude oils. The weight percent solid precipitated that was estimated as a function of temperature did not show a uniform trend for the set of crude oils. The asphaltene onset studies done on the blends with near-infrared spectroscopy indicated that the addition of GTL liquid could have a stabilizing effect on the asphaltenes in some oils. Analytical techniques such as distillation, solvent separation, HPLC, GC, and GPC were used to obtain detailed composition data on the samples. Two sets of compositional data with 49 and 86 pseudo-components were used to describe the three crude oils used in the blending work. The wax precipitation was calculated using a

  19. Novel mixing tank for improved gas-liquid mass transfer and solids suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.J.; Hughes, C.M.C.; Lessen, M.; Geenleaf, J.; Buehler, K.L.; Villalobos, C.

    1999-10-01

    A novel, baffleless, mixing tank configuration presented provides greater mixing efficiency than conventional technologies under a wide variety of operating conditions. The concept uses a cylindrical tank with a contoured bottom and a shroud that surrounds an axial flow impeller and supports a set of stationary antiswirl fins positioned in close proximity to the impeller blades. The angle and pitch of the fins impart an angular component to the flow that is equal and opposite to the swirl induced by impeller rotation, thereby eliminating the need for wall baffles. The contoured bottom eliminates dead space beneath the impeller and n the corners of flat-bottom mixing tanks. This alternative mixing system, named the ASSET system, is compared to conventional mixing configurations through experiments of power consumption, gas-liquid mass transfer, and solids suspension. Measurements of Power number vs. Reynolds number reveal that it has power requirements similar to those of high-efficiency axial-flow turbines in a conventional tank geometry. Unsteady-state oxygen absorption and stripping experiments are used to determine the interphase mass-transfer coefficient as a function of power input for each configuration at superficial gas feed velocities of 0.057 to 0.17 cm/s. With this system, K{sub L}a values are on average 30 to 50% greater than those obtained in a conventional mixing tank at the same power input. Measurements of the height of the well-mixed region of suspended solids in a 15 wt. % mixture of 0.1-cm-dia. glass beads in water indicate that the ASSET system requires {approximately} 30% less power to achieve equivalent extents of solids suspension than the conventional setup.

  20. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  1. Numeric Design and Performance Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell -- Gas Turbine Hybrids on Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Gevorg

    The aircraft industry benefits greatly from small improvements in aircraft component design. One possible area of improvement is in the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Modern aircraft APUs are gas turbines located in the tail section of the aircraft that generate additional power when needed. Unfortunately the efficiency of modern aircraft APUs is low. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrids are one possible alternative for replacing modern gas turbine APUs. This thesis investigates the feasibility of replacing conventional gas turbine APUs with SOFC/GT APUs on aircraft. An SOFC/GT design algorithm was created in order to determine the specifications of an SOFC/GT APU. The design algorithm is comprised of several integrated modules which together model the characteristics of each component of the SOFC/GT system. Given certain overall inputs, through numerical analysis, the algorithm produces an SOFC/GT APU, optimized for specific power and efficiency, capable of performing to the required specifications. The SOFC/GT design is then input into a previously developed quasi-dynamic SOFC/GT model to determine its load following capabilities over an aircraft flight cycle. Finally an aircraft range study is conducted to determine the feasibility of the SOFC/GT APU as a replacement for the conventional gas turbine APU. The design results show that SOFC/GT APUs have lower specific power than GT systems, but have much higher efficiencies. Moreover, the dynamic simulation results show that SOFC/GT APUs are capable of following modern flight loads. Finally, the range study determined that SOFC/GT APUs are more attractive over conventional APUs for longer range aircraft.

  2. Prediction of turbulent gas-solids flow in curved ducts using the Eulerian-Lagrangian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, S.; Bryden, I. G.

    1999-10-01

    The flow of particulate two-phase flow mixtures occur in several components of solid fuel combustion systems, such as the pressurised fluidised bed combustors (PFBC) and suspension-fired coal boilers. A detailed understanding of the mixture characteristics in the conveying component can aid in refining and optimising its design. In this study, the flow of an isothermal, dilute two-phase particulate mixture has been examined in a high curvature duct, which can be representative of that transporting the gas-solid mixture from the hot clean-up section to the gas turbine combustor in a PFBC plant. The numerical study has been approached by utilising the Eulerian-Lagrangian methodology for describing the characteristics of the fluid and particulate phases. By assuming that the mixture is dilute and the particles are spherical, the governing particle momentum equations have been solved with appropriately prescribed boundary conditions. Turbulence effects on the particle dispersion were represented by a statistical model that accounts for both the turbulent eddy lifetime and the particle transit time scales. For the turbulent flow condition examined it was observed that mixtures with small particle diameters had low interphase slip velocities and low impaction probability with the pipe walls. Increasing the particle diameters (>50 m) resulted in higher interphase slip velocities and, as expected, their impaction probability with the pipe walls was significantly increased. The particle dispersion is significant for the smaller sizes, whereas the larger particles are relatively insensitive to the gas turbulence. The main particle impaction region, and locations most prone to erosion damage, is estimated to be within an outer duct length of two to six times the duct diameter, when the duct radius of curvature to the duct diameter ratio is equal to unity. Copyright

  3. Study of coal reactivities. Final report, June 1, 1976-September 30, 1979. [Entire reactor is weighed; gas lines are thin walled and flexible; 5 to 30 atmospheres; 800/sup 0/C to 930/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. C.; Gardner, N. C.; Kocjancic, Jr, F. J.; Lee, S.; Leto, J. J.; Shine, S. M.; Tien, C. K.; Williams, R. J.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of contract No. E(49-18)2368 (EX-76-S-01-2368) was to develop a means for measuring coal reactivities at practical gasification conditions, to make measurements of coal reactivities on several coal chars, and to develop correlations relating coal gasification rates to measurable parameters. These goals have been achieved. A novel Hanging Reactor Thermobalance was developed under the present contract. This unique instrument provides a completely new method for measurement of gas/solid reaction rate data at practical process conditions of temperature, pressure, gas phase composition and fluid mechanical regime. In addition to coal gasification studies the new device will be useful in other energy related studies, i.e., shale oil pyrolysis and hot stack gas cleanup. The instrument was used to study the CO/sub 2/ gasification of Montana Rosebud char and Illinois No. 6 coal. A careful modelling study was made. The observed reaction rate vs. time (and conversion) data were correlated with a physically realistic model using only measurable parameters.

  4. Planetesimal Growth through the Accretion of Small Solids: Hydrodynamics Simulations with Gas-Particle Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna; Boley, Aaron C.

    2016-10-01

    The growth and migration of planetesimals in young protoplanetary disks are fundamental to the planet formation process. A number of mechanisms seemingly inhibit small grains from growing to sizes much larger than a centimeter, limiting planetesimal growth. In spite of this, the meteoritic record, abundance of exoplanets, and the lifetimes of disks considered altogether indicate that growth must be rapid and common. If a small number of 100-km sized planetesimals do form by some method such as the streaming instability, then gas drag effects could enable those objects to accrete small solids efficiently. In particular, accretion rates for such planetesimals could be higher or lower than rates based on the geometric cross-section and gravitational focusing alone. The local gas conditions and properties of accreting bodies select a locally optimal accretion size for the pebbles. As planetesimals accrete pebbles, they feel an additional angular momentum exchange - causing the planetesimal to slowly drift inward, which becomes significant at short orbital periods. We present self-consistent hydrodynamic simulations with direct particle integration and gas-drag coupling to evaluate the rate of planetesimal growth due to pebble accretion. We explore a range of particle sizes, planetesimal properties, and disk conditions using wind tunnel simulations. These results are followed by numerical analysis of planetesimal drift rates at a variety of stellar distances.

  5. Characterization of gas produced by the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, H.P.; Daly, E.L.; Lascarro, J.F.; Nemerow, N.; Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.

    1980-12-01

    A large-scale proof-of-concept facility has been constructed in Pompano, Florida, to evaluate the feasibility of producing methane-rich gas from the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. The University of Miami together with the AMES Research Laboratory are participating in the environmental source assessment of that technology. The ultimate goal is to determine if the products are environmentally acceptable or are of less environmental consequence (with or without controls) than if generated in an unprocessed landfill. This paper describes the gas analysis procedure and the gas composition as determined to date for unstable, lower mesophilic (30/sup 0/-40/sup 0/C) digester conditions and with the plant operating at only 15% of its design capacity. It is observed that the composition of the biogas from the large-scale facility is quite similar, with the possible exception of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/, to that produced by small-scale digesters and in landfills. The CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ levels varied significantly about mean values of 55% and 45% respectively. At this stage of the evaluation, it appears that the potential environmental concern might be from the odorous components of the biogas.

  6. The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2008-10-15

    Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic

  7. Effects of Ti addiction in WO 3 thin film ammonia gas sensor prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming; Yong, Cholyun; Feng, Youcai; Lv, Yuqiang; Han, Lei; Liang, Jiran; Wang, Haopeng

    2006-11-01

    WO 3 sensing films (1500 Å) were deposited using dc reactive magnetron sputtering method on alumina substrate on which patterned interdigital Pt electrodes were previously formed. The additive Ti was sputtered with different thickness (100-500 Å) onto WO 3 thin films and then the films as-deposited were annealed at 400°C in air for 3h. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the films were characterized by XRD and XPS analysis. The effect of Ti addition on sensitive properties of WO 3 thin film to the NH 3 gas was then discussed. WO 3 thin films added Ti revealed excellent sensitivity and response characteristics in the presence of low concentration of NH 3 (5-400 ppm) gas in air at 200°C operating temperature. Especially,in case 300 Å thickness of additive Ti, WO 3 thin films have a promotional effect on the response speed to NH 3 and selectivity enhanced with respect to other gases (CO, C IIH 5OH, CH 4). The influence of different substrates, including alumina, silicon and glass, on sensitivity to NH 3 gas has also been investigated.

  8. Reversible Poisoning of the Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen Chloride in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Yoon, Kyung J.

    2010-10-15

    The performance of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was evaluated in synthetic coal gas containing HCl in the temperature range 650 to 850oC. Exposure to up to 800 ppm HCl resulted in reversible poisoning of the Ni/zirconia anode by chlorine species adsorption, the magnitude of which decreased with increased temperature. Performance losses increased with the concentration of HCl to ~100 ppm, above which losses were insensitive to HCl concentration. Cell voltage had no effect on poisoning. No evidence was found for long-term degradation that can be attributed to HCl exposure. Similarly, no evidence of microstructural changes or formation of new solid phases as a result of HCl exposure was found. From thermodynamic calculations, solid nickel chloride phase formation was shown to be highly unlikely in coal gas. Further, the presence of HCl at even the highest anticipated concentrations in coal gas would minimally increase the volatility of nickel.

  9. Investigation on dynamic calibration for an optical-fiber solids concentration probe in gas-solid two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity.

  10. Investigation on Dynamic Calibration for an Optical-Fiber Solids Concentration Probe in Gas-Solid Two-Phase Flows

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity. PMID:23867745

  11. Analysis of lipid components in zooplankter individuals by reactive pyrolysis-gas chromatography in the presence of organic alkali.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Ohtani, H; Tsuge, S; Sekino, T; Nakanishi, M; Kimoto, T

    1998-06-01

    It has been eagerly requested to develop a highly-sensitive method to characterize extremely minute amounts of natural organic materials occluded in meteorites and/or space dusts in order to confirm the existence of life in the extraterrestrial space. In this article, the reactive pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) applied to the analysis of the lipid components contained in every zooplankter individual is introduced for the sake of its potential extension to the characterization of trace amounts of the extraterrestrial organic materials. Here, Py-GC was applied to 1) the discriminative analysis among zooplankter individuals cultured in different food concentrations, and 2) the correlation analysis between the distributions of fatty acid components in the lipids of zooplankter individuals and ingested algae phytoplankton. PMID:11541881

  12. Experimental Study on Gas-Solid Flow Charcteristics in a CFB Riser Of 54M in Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, N.; Yang, H. R.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, R. Q.; Cao, J. N.; Liu, Q.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    Understanding the height effect on the gas-solid flow characteristics in a CFB riser is important as more and more large capacity CFB boilers are used and to be developed. In this study, a cold CFB test rig with a riser of 240mm in LD. and 38m and 54m in height was built. The influences of operating conditions, such as solid inventory and fluidizing gas velocity, on the axial voidage profile along the riser were assessed. When the gas velocity exceeds the transport velocity, the S-shaped profile of voidage in the riser was established. At the same time, the voidage in top-dilute section reached the saturation carrying capacity, and the solids circulation rate did not vary with the height of the riser nor the solids inventory. It was also found the critical solids inventory for the saturation carrying capacity increases as the riser height increases. When the height was changed from 38m to 54m, the critical solids inventory increased about 25% from about 40kg to about 50kg, and pressure drop in the furnace also increased about 25%.

  13. Influence of the N2 gas flow on optical and structural properties of reactively sputtered ZrN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleussner, S.; Törndahl, T.; Edoff, M.

    2008-03-01

    We present optical and structural properties of reactively sputtered zirconium nitride (ZrN) films for application as back reflectors in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells with sub-micrometer absorbers. In this study, ZrN films were deposited by reactive DC sputtering on blank, Mo-coated and Zr-coated soda-lime glass at two different process pressures and various ratios of nitrogen mixed in the argon working gas. When characterised by x-ray diffraction (XRD), the majority of the films were found to consist of single-phase cubic ZrN. All peaks corresponding to the ZrN phase were present in the diffractograms with intensities similar to those obtained from bulk ZrN, indicating that the films were randomly oriented. No significant differences were found between films grown on different substrate types. Films sputtered with lower nitrogen partial pressures displayed a spectral optical reflectance similar to metallic Zr, while films prepared with higher N2 flows showed the pronounced Drude-like reflectance characteristic of the nitride. The best ZrN films were achieved with a process pressure of 2.5 mTorr and a N2/(Ar+N2) flow ratio of 26.5%. At a wavelength of 800 nm the reflectance of these reached 85%, as compared to a typical value of 58% in the case of molybdenum.

  14. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  15. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  16. Study of Fuel Ratios on the Fusion Reactivity in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device Using a Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupakar Murali, S.; Santarius, John F.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2009-09-01

    Gridded Inertial Electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices are of interest due to their flexibility in burning advanced fuels, their tuning ability of the applied voltage to the reaction cross-section. Although this device is not suitable for power production in its present form, it does have several near term applications. The number of applications of this device increases with increasing fusion reactivity. These devices are simple to operate but are inherently complicated to understand and an effort to incrementally understand the device to improve its operational efficiency is underway at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Of all the parameters under study we are focusing on the effects of flow rate and flow ratio on the fusion reactivity in the present paper. Experiments were conducted to understand the influence of fuel flow ratio on the fusion reactions. The residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to study the impurity concentration as the flow ratio was changed. It was observed that the higher flow rate resulted in reduced impurity levels and hence an increase in fusion rate. Several different species of gases were detected, some of these molecules formed inside the RGA analyzer. The flow ratio scan revealed that the optimum mixture of D2 with 3He to be D2:3He::1:2 for maximum D-3He fusion rate.

  17. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O'Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  18. Emergence of a Metallic Quantum Solid Phase in a Rydberg-Dressed Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Han; Hsieh, Tzu-Chi; Mou, Chung-Yu; Wang, Daw-Wei

    2016-07-01

    We examine possible low-temperature phases of a repulsively Rydberg-dressed Fermi gas in a three-dimensional free space. It is shown that the collective density excitations develop a roton minimum, which is softened at a wave vector smaller than the Fermi wave vector when the particle density is above a critical value. The mean field calculation shows that, unlike the insulating density wave states often observed in conventional condensed matters, a self-assembled metallic density wave state emerges at low temperatures. In particular, the density wave state supports a Fermi surface and a body-centered-cubic crystal order at the same time with the estimated critical temperature being about one tenth of the noninteracting Fermi energy. Our results suggest the emergence of a fermionic quantum solid that should be observable in the current experimental setup.

  19. Energy recuperation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    A combined power generation system consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine (GT) with steam and heat recuperation (HR) was evaluated using a commercial process simulation tool, ASPEN Plus. The effect of steam recuperation (SR) on the overall efficiency of the combined system was investigated by comparing the SOFC-GT during heat and steam recuperation (HSR) against the system during only heat recuperation. At low turbine inlet temperatures (TITs), the overall efficiency of the SOFC-GT combined system with heat and steam recuperation improved by showing an increase in TIT and a reduction in pressure ratio (PR). On the other hand, at high TITs, the opposite trend was observed. The integration of steam recuperation was found to improve the overall efficiency and specific power of SOFC-GT combined systems with a relatively compact SOFC component.

  20. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  1. Effects of gas or vapor adsorption on adhesion, friction, and wear of solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Anthony J; Al-Azizi, Ala'; Surdyka, Nicholas D; Kim, Seong H

    2014-03-25

    The adsorption of vapor molecules plays an important role in countless fields and is increasingly realized to be critical in tribology, which encompasses adhesion, friction, and wear of surfaces. This feature article reviews experimental methods for quantifying gas and vapor adsorption on flat solid surfaces under equilibrium conditions (ambient pressure and temperature) as well as the effects of these adsorbates on the adhesion, friction, and wear of various materials. Particular attention is given to species that are present in the ambient environment such as water (humidity) and organic vapors. These adsorbed species can have drastic yet varied influences on tribology depending on the surface chemistry of materials. Despite prolonged and ubiquitous observations in a broad range of materials and vapors, a fundamental understanding of the effect of adsorbed gases and vapors on the adhesion, friction, and wear of surfaces has begun only recently through surface-sensitive characterization. PMID:24180252

  2. Nonlocal van der Waals functionals: the case of rare-gas dimers and solids.

    PubMed

    Tran, Fabien; Hutter, Jürg

    2013-05-28

    Recently, the nonlocal van der Waals (vdW) density functionals [M. Dion, H. Rydberg, E. Schröder, D. C. Langreth, and B. I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] have attracted considerable attention due to their good performance for systems where weak interactions are important. Since the physics of dispersion is included in these functionals, they are usually more accurate and show less erratic behavior than the semilocal and hybrid methods. In this work, several variants of the vdW functionals have been tested on rare-gas dimers (from He2 to Kr2) and solids (Ne, Ar, and Kr) and their accuracy compared to standard semilocal approximations, supplemented or not by an atom-pairwise dispersion correction [S. Grimme, J. Antony, S. Ehrlich, and H. Krieg, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. An analysis of the results in terms of energy decomposition is also provided.

  3. Toluene vapor capture by activated carbon particles in a dual gas-solid cyclone system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Hui; Ngo, Khanh Quoc; Park, Young Koo; Jo, Young Min

    2012-08-01

    Capturing of odorous compounds such as toluene vapor by a particulate-activated carbon adsorbent was investigated in a gas-solid cyclone, which is one type of mobile beds. The test cyclone was early modified with the post cyclone (PoC) and a spiral flow guide to the vortex finder. The proposed process may contribute to the reduction of gases and dust from industrial exhausts, especially when dealing with a low concentration of odorous elements and a large volume ofdust flow. In this device, the toluene capturing efficiency at a 400 ppm concentration rose up to 77.4% when using activated carbon (AC) particles with a median size of 27.03 microm. A maximum 96% of AC particles could be collected for reuse depending on the size and flow rate. The AC regenerated via thermal treatment showed an adsorption potential up to 66.7% throughout repeated tests.

  4. Carbonyl Diisocyanate CO(NCO)2: Synthesis and Structures in Solid State and Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Rest, Sebastian; Scharf, Regina; Schwabedissen, Jan; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2016-07-01

    A modified synthesis for carbonyl diisocyanate, CO(NCO)2, starting from trichloroisocyanuric acid and diphosgene is described. In addition to the previously reported (13)C NMR resonances, the (15)N NMR shift is determined for the first time. The structure in the solid state was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on in situ grown crystals, that in the gas phase was experimentally determined by electron diffraction (GED) and for single molecules theoretically by quantum-chemical calculations. The structures are compared and discussed with related systems. Quantum-chemical calculations as well as GED and XRD prove syn-syn to be the conformation of lowest energy. In quantum-chemical calculations and GED the presence of a syn-anti conformer was confirmed and the structure of this conformer was determined.

  5. Emergence of a Metallic Quantum Solid Phase in a Rydberg-Dressed Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Han; Hsieh, Tzu-Chi; Mou, Chung-Yu; Wang, Daw-Wei

    2016-07-15

    We examine possible low-temperature phases of a repulsively Rydberg-dressed Fermi gas in a three-dimensional free space. It is shown that the collective density excitations develop a roton minimum, which is softened at a wave vector smaller than the Fermi wave vector when the particle density is above a critical value. The mean field calculation shows that, unlike the insulating density wave states often observed in conventional condensed matters, a self-assembled metallic density wave state emerges at low temperatures. In particular, the density wave state supports a Fermi surface and a body-centered-cubic crystal order at the same time with the estimated critical temperature being about one tenth of the noninteracting Fermi energy. Our results suggest the emergence of a fermionic quantum solid that should be observable in the current experimental setup. PMID:27472121

  6. Direct-contact heat exchanger for swirling countercurrent flow of hot gas and finely divided solids: A parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. J.; Arman, B.

    1991-06-01

    A vertically oriented solid-to-gas direct-contact heat exchanger (DCHX) has been proposed for heat recovery in high temperature plants that process finely divided solids. The flows are countercurrent, with the inlet gas flow entering on the centerline and swirling strongly. Swirling enhances heat transfer and centrifuges the solid particles from the center to the wall in order to minimize entrainment and permit gravity separation. A computer program was written to calculate particle trajectories and heat transfer rates (and, therefore, temperature profiles) for gas and solid phases. The flow model considers interactions between the particles and the flow field of the gas. The results of the computer program showed that the introduction of swirl significantly reduced the vertical distance required to achieve a given thermal efficiency. The countercurrent flow arrangement achieves high thermal efficiency in one contacting stage, unlike existing cocurrent suspension preheater systems, which require four or five stages. The practical application of this design to the cement industry appears unlikely, because very low gas velocities and correspondingly large areas of cross-sectional flow are required to prevent elutriation of the 74 micron particles required for the chemical reactions. The computer program can be modified for spray-dryer applications by the addition of mass transfer terms and a spray-formation model. In addition, the concept of a swirling flow heat exchanger may be applicable to other processes in which larger and heavier particles are used.

  7. A conservative multi-group approach to the Boltzmann equations for reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M.; Rossani, A.; Spiga, G.

    2015-11-01

    Starting from a simple kinetic model for a quaternary mixture of gases undergoing a bimolecular chemical reaction, multi-group integro-differential equations are derived for the particle distribution functions of all species. The procedure takes advantage of a suitable probabilistic formulation, based on the underlying collision frequencies and transition probabilities, of the relevant reactive kinetic equations of Boltzmann type. Owing to an appropriate choice of a sufficiently large number of weight functions, it is shown that the proposed multi-group equations are able to fulfil exactly, at any order of approximation, the correct conservation laws that must be inherited from the original kinetic equations, where speed was a continuous variable. Future developments are also discussed.

  8. Molecular perspectives on solid-state phase transformation and chemical reactivity of drugs: metoclopramide as an example.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Here, I provide an overview of the solid-state characteristics, phase transformations and chemical reactions of metoclopramide hydrochloride monohydrate (MCP HCl H2O). Three unique techniques, including thermoanalytical methods, one-step simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, and hot-stage microscopic (HSM) imaging, have been applied to study the solid-state phase transitions of MCP HCl H2O in continuous dehydration, amorphization and recrystallization processes. I also review the effects of grinding or heating on ion-exchange reactions, milling, compression or colyophilization on Maillard reactions, and γ-ray irradiation or electron beams on radiolysis in the solid state. I also report the exposure of MCP HCl H2O in solution to light, irradiation, oxidants or π-acceptors. This review will serve as a useful keynote for the evolving realm of solid-state chemistry research.

  9. Numerical simulation of gas diffusion effects on charge/discharge characteristics of a solid oxide redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Uratani, Syoichi; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Fundamental characteristics of a solid oxide redox flow battery consisting of solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOEC) and redox metal were studied by a gas-diffusion based time-dependent 1-D numerical simulation taking both the electrochemical and redox reactions into account. Close attention was paid to the distributions of the participating gas species and their effects on the charge/discharge performance. The volume expansion/reduction of the porous metal associated with the redox reaction was modeled as decrease/increase in local porosity. The numerical results for charge/discharge operation qualitatively showed the time-dependent distributions of the related physical quantities such as the gas concentrations, the active reaction region in the redox metal, and its local porosity. It was found that, to ensure effective redox reaction throughout the operation, the gas diffusion in the redox metal should be carefully designed.

  10. A planar anode-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell model with internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinda, P.; Chanchaona, S.; Brault, P.; Wechsatol, W.

    2011-05-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest due to their high energy efficiency, low emission level, and multiple fuel utilization. SOFC can operate with various kinds of fuels such as natural gas, carbon monoxide, methanol, ethanol, and hydrocarbon compounds, and they are becoming one of the main competitors among environmentally friendly energy sources for the future. In this study, a mathematical model of a co-flow planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with internal reforming of natural gas has been developed. The model simultaneously solves mass, energy transport equations, and chemical as well as electrochemical reactions. The model can effectively predict the compound species distributions as well as the cell performance under specific operating conditions. The main result is a rather small temperature gradient obtained at 800 °C with S/C = 1 in classical operating conditions. The cell performance is reported for several operating temperatures and pressures. The cell performance is specified in terms of cell voltage and power density at any specific current density. The influence of electrode microstructure on cell performance was investigated. The simulation results show that the steady state performance is almost insensitive to microstructure of cells such as porosity and tortuosity unlike the operating pressure and temperature. However, for SOFC power output enhancement, the power output could be maximized by adjusting the pore size to an optimal value, similarly to porosity and tortuosity. At standard operating pressure (1 atm) and 800 °C with 48% fuel utilization, when an output cell voltage was 0.73 V, a current density of 0.38 A cm-2 with a power density of 0.28 W cm-2 was predicted. The accuracy of the model was validated by comparing with existing experimental results from the available literature.

  11. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry.

  12. Vapor-liquid-solid epitaxial growth of Si1-xGex alloy nanowires. Composition dependence on precursor reactivity and morphology control for vertical forests

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S. G.; Manandhar, P.; Picraux, S. T.

    2015-07-07

    The growth of high-density group IV alloy nanowire forests is critical for exploiting their unique functionalities in many applications. Here, the compositional dependence on precursor reactivity and optimized conditions for vertical growth are studied for Si1- x Ge x alloy nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method. The nanowire composition versus gas partial-pressure ratio for germane-silane and germane-disilane precursor combinations is obtained at 350°C over a wide composition range (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.98) and a generalized model to predict composition for alloy nanowires is developed based on the relative precursor partial pressures and reactivity ratio. In combination with germane, silane provides more precise compositional control at high Ge concentrations (x > 0.7), whereas disilane greatly increases the Si concentration for a given gas ratio and enables more precise alloy compositional control at small Ge concentrations (x < 0.3). Vertically oriented, non-kinking nanowire forest growth on Si (111) substrates is then discussed for silane/germane over a wide range of compositions, with temperature and precursor partial pressure optimized by monitoring the nanowire growth front using in-situ optical reflectance. For high Ge compositions (x ≈ 0.9), a “two-step” growth approach with nucleation at higher temperatures results in nanowires with high-density and uniform vertical orientation. Furthermore, increasing Si content (x ≈ 0.8), the optimal growth window is shifted to higher temperatures, which minimizes nanowire kinking morphologies. For Si-rich Si1- x Ge x alloys (x ≈ 0.25), vertical nanowire growth is enhanced by single-step, higher-temperature growth at reduced pressures.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  14. Municipal solid waste management scenarios for Attica and their greenhouse gas emission impact.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Asterios; Karagiannidis, Avraam; Barton, John R; Kalogirou, Efstratios

    2009-11-01

    Disposal of municipal solid waste in sanitary landfills is still the main waste management method in the Attica region, as in most regions of Greece. Nevertheless, diversion from landfilling is being promoted by regional plans, in which the perspectives of new waste treatment technologies are being evaluated. The present study aimed to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions impact of different municipal solid waste treatment technologies currently under assessment in the new regional plan for Attica. These technologies are mechanical-biological treatment, mass-burn incineration and mechanical treatment and have been assessed in the context of different scenarios. The present study utilized existing methodologies and emission factors for the quantification of GHG emissions from the waste management process and found that all technologies under assessment could provide GHG emission savings. However, the performance and ranking of these technologies is strongly dependent on the existence of end markets for the waste-derived fuels produced by the mechanical-biological treatment processes. In the absence of these markets the disposal of these fuels would be necessary and thus significant GHG savings would be lost. PMID:19837710

  15. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ˜0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  16. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point. PMID:26203042

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  18. Probing Molecular Recognition at the Solid-Gas Interface by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Arianna; Ciuchi, Federica; Pinalli, Roberta; Dalcanale, Enrico; Pagliusi, Pasquale

    2016-08-01

    Molecular recognition is among the most important chemical events in living systems and has been emulated in supramolecular chemistry, driven by chemical and biochemical sensing potential. Identifying host-guest association in situ at the interface, between the substrate-bound receptors and the analyte-containing media, is essential to predict complexation performances in term of the receptor conformation, orientation and organization. Herein, we report the first sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy study of molecular recognition at the solid-gas interface. The binding capability of tetraquinoxaline cavitands toward volatile aromatic and aliphatic compounds, namely benzonitrile and acetonitrile, is investigated as test system. We prove the selective complexation of the receptors, organized in a solid-supported hybrid bilayer, toward aromatic compounds. Quantitative analysis allows to correlate the average orientations of the guest molecules and the host binding pockets, establishing "on-axis" complexation of benzonitrile within the cavitand cavity. The study is readily applicable to other receptors, molecular architectures, interfaces and analytes. PMID:27438350

  19. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  20. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    SciTech Connect

    Morishige, Kunimitsu Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  1. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N′-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT). Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities. PMID:23208744

  2. Simultaneous, noninvasive measurements of convective heat transfer and solid volume fraction at the wall of an entrained gas-solid suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A. Elizabeth; Louge, Michel; Mohd-Yusof, Jamaludin

    2000-07-01

    We describe an instrument for local, instantaneous, noninvasive, simultaneous measurements of solid volume fraction and convective heat transfer at the wall of a vertical tube containing a relatively dense, entrained suspension of gas and fine solids. The instrument combines a small platinum coil and a guarded capacitance sensor. The capacitance sensor records instantaneous solid volume fraction in the near vicinity of the wall. The coil is maintained at constant temperature by a rapid anemometer bridge circuit. The vessel is wrapped in electric heaters to avoid artificially high rates associated with developing heat transfer and to minimize conduction losses from the coil. Using a model capturing these losses, convective heat transfer rates are inferred from the power input to the coil. The instrument is tested in a cold circulating fluidized bed riser. The temporal response of the thermal sensor is faster than 30 ms. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Intramolecular Gas Phase Reactions of Synthetic Non-heme Oxoiron(IV) Ions: Proximity and Spin-State Reactivity Rules

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; McDonald, Aidan R.; Reed, Dana; Usharani, Dandamudi; Schyman, Patric; Milko, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The intramolecular gas phase reactivity of four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate N4 ligands (L) has been studied by means of tandem mass spectrometry measurements where the gas-phase ions [FeIV(O)(L)(OTf)]+ and [FeIV(O)(L)]2+ were isolated and then allowed to fragment by collision-induced decay (CID). CID fragmentation of cations derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of TMC (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) and L8Py2 (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctane) afforded the same predominant products irrespective of whether they were hexacoordinate or pentacoordinate. These products resulted from the loss of water by dehydrogenation of ethylene or propylene linkers on the tetradentate ligand. In contrast, CID fragmentation of ions derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of linear tetradentate ligands BPMEN (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane) and BPMPN (N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane) showed predominant oxidative N-dealkylation for the hexacoordinate [FeIV(O)(L)(OTf)]+ cations and predominant dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane/propane backbone for the pentacoordinate [FeIV(O)(L)]2+ cations. DFT calculations on [FeIV(O)(BPMEN)] ions showed that the experimentally observed preference for oxidative N-dealkylation versus dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane linker for the hexa- and pentacoordinate ions, respectively, is dictated by the proximity of the target C–H bond to the oxoiron(IV) moiety and the reactive spin state. Therefore, there must be a difference in ligand topology between the two ions. More importantly, despite the constraints on the geometries of the TSs that prohibit the usual upright σ-trajectory and prevent optimal σCH-σ*z2 overlap, all the reactions still proceed preferentially on the quintet (S = 2) state surface, which increases the number of exchange interactions in the d-block of iron and leads thereby to exchange enhanced reactivity (EER). As such, EER is responsible for the

  4. Intramolecular gas-phase reactions of synthetic nonheme oxoiron(IV) ions: proximity and spin-state reactivity rules.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; McDonald, Aidan R; Reed, Dana; Usharani, Dandamudi; Schyman, Patric; Milko, Petr; Shaik, Sason; Que, Lawrence

    2012-09-10

    The intramolecular gas-phase reactivity of four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate N(4) ligands (L) has been studied by means of tandem mass spectrometry measurements in which the gas-phase ions [Fe(IV)(O)(L)(OTf)](+) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [Fe(IV) (O)(L)](2+) were isolated and then allowed to fragment by collision-induced decay (CID). CID fragmentation of cations derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tmc) and N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctane (L(8)Py(2)) afforded the same predominant products irrespective of whether they were hexacoordinate or pentacoordinate. These products resulted from the loss of water by dehydrogenation of ethylene or propylene linkers on the tetradentate ligand. In contrast, CID fragmentation of ions derived from oxoiron(IV) complexes of linear tetradentate ligands N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane (bpmen) and N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (bpmpn) showed predominant oxidative N-dealkylation for the hexacoordinate [Fe(IV)(O)(L)(OTf)](+) cations and predominant dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane/propane backbone for the pentacoordinate [Fe(IV)(O)(L)](2+) cations. DFT calculations on [Fe(IV)(O)(bpmen)] ions showed that the experimentally observed preference for oxidative N-dealkylation versus dehydrogenation of the diaminoethane linker for the hexa- and pentacoordinate ions, respectively, is dictated by the proximity of the target C-H bond to the oxoiron(IV) moiety and the reactive spin state. Therefore, there must be a difference in ligand topology between the two ions. More importantly, despite the constraints on the geometries of the TS that prohibit the usual upright σ trajectory and prevent optimal σ(CH)-σ*(z2) overlap, all the reactions still proceed preferentially on the quintet (S = 2) state surface, which increases the number of exchange interactions in the d block of iron and leads thereby to exchange enhanced

  5. The Case for Natural Gas Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Weimar, Mark R.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Natural-gas-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (NGSOFC) power systems yield electrical conversion efficiencies exceeding 60% and may become a viable alternative for distributed generation (DG) if stack life and manufacturing economies of scale can be realized. Currently, stacks last approximately 2 years and few systems are produced each year because of the relatively high cost of electricity from the systems. If mass manufacturing (10,000 units per year) and a stack life of 15 years can be reached, the cost of electricity from an NGSOFC system is estimated to be about 7.7 ¢/kWh, well within the price of commercial and residential retail prices at the national level (9.9-10¢/kWh and 11-12 ¢/kWh, respectively). With an additional 5 ¢/kWh in estimated additional benefits from DG, NGSOFC could be well positioned to replace the forecasted 59-77 gigawatts of capacity loss resulting from coal plant closures due to stricter emissions regulations and low natural gas prices.

  6. Nickel oxide nanowires: vapor liquid solid synthesis and integration into a gas sensing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, N.; Comini, E.; Zappa, D.; Poli, N.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of advanced sensor technology, metal oxide nanostructures are promising materials due to their high charge carrier mobility, easy fabrication and excellent stability. Among all the metal oxide semiconductors, nickel oxide (NiO) is a p-type semiconductor with a wide band gap and excellent optical, electrical and magnetic properties, which has not been much investigated. Herein, we report the growth of NiO nanowires by using the vapor liquid solid (VLS) technique for gas sensing applications. Platinum, palladium and gold have been used as a catalyst for the growth of NiO nanowires. The surface morphology of the nanowires was investigated through scanning electron microscopy to find out which catalyst and growth conditions are best for the growth of nanowires. GI-XRD and Raman spectroscopies were used to confirm the crystalline structure of the material. Different batches of sensors have been prepared, and their sensing performances towards different gas species such as carbon monoxide, ethanol, acetone and hydrogen have been explored. NiO nanowire sensors show interesting and promising performances towards hydrogen.

  7. A one-dimensional model for gas-solid heat transfer in pneumatic conveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajstrla, Kody Wayne

    A one-dimensional ODE model reduced from a two-fluid model of a higher dimensional order is developed to study dilute, two-phase (air and solid particles) flows with heat transfer in a horizontal pneumatic conveying pipe. Instead of using constant air properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity) evaluated at the initial flow temperature and pressure, this model uses an iteration approach to couple the air properties with flow pressure and temperature. Multiple studies comparing the use of constant or variable air density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are conducted to study the impact of the changing properties to system performance. The results show that the fully constant property calculation will overestimate the results of the fully variable calculation by 11.4%, while the constant density with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity calculation resulted in an 8.7% overestimation, the constant viscosity with variable density and thermal conductivity overestimated by 2.7%, and the constant thermal conductivity with variable density and viscosity calculation resulted in a 1.2% underestimation. These results demonstrate that gas properties varying with gas temperature can have a significant impact on a conveying system and that the varying density accounts for the majority of that impact. The accuracy of the model is also validated by comparing the simulation results to the experimental values found in the literature.

  8. Kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions important in the Venus sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The thermochemical net reaction CaCO3 + SO2 yields CaSO4 + CO is predicted to be an important sink for incorporation of SO2 into the Venus crust. The reaction rate law was established to understand the dependence of rate on experimental variables such as temperature and partial pressure of SO2, CO2, and O2. The experimental approach was a variant of the thermogravimetric method often employed to study the kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions. Clear calcite crystals were heated at constant temperature in SO2-bearing gas streams for varying time periods. Reaction rate was determined by three independent methods. A weighted linear least squares fit to all rate data yielded a rate equation. Based on the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 observations of CaO content of the Venus atmosphere, SO2 at the calculated rate would be removed from the Venus atmosphere in about 1,900,00 years. The most plausible endogenic source of the sulfur needed to replenish atmospheric SO2 is volcanism. The annual amount of erupted material needed for the replenishment depends on sulfur content; three ratios are used to calculate rates ranging from 0.4 to 11 cu km/year. This geochemically derived volcanism rate can be used to test if geophysically derived rates are correct. The work also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth.

  9. Lattice model theory of the equation of state covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.; Chan, E. M.; Horiguchi, T.; Foreman, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The three stable states of matter and the corresponding phase transitions were obtained with a single model. Patterned after Lennard-Jones and Devonshires's theory, a simple cubic lattice model containing two fcc sublattices (alpha and beta) is adopted. The interatomic potential is taken to be the Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential. Employing the cluster variation method, the Weiss and the pair approximations on the lattice gas failed to give the correct phase diagrams. Hybrid approximations were devised to describe the lattice term in the free energy. A lattice vibration term corresponding to a free volume correction is included semi-phenomenologically. The combinations of the lattice part and the free volume part yield the three states and the proper phase diagrams. To determine the coexistence regions, the equalities of the pressure and Gibbs free energy per molecule of the coexisting phases were utilized. The ordered branch of the free energy gives rise to the solid phase while the disordered branch yields the gas and liquid phases. It is observed that the triple point and the critical point quantities, the phase diagrams and the coexistence regions plotted are in good agreement with the experimental values and graphs for argon.

  10. Venus volcanism: Rate estimates from laboratory studies of sulfur gas-solid reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases in the atmosphere of Venus and calcium-, iron-, magnesium-, and sulfur-bearing minerals on the surface of Venus are an integral part of a hypothesized cycle of thermochemical and photochemical reactions responsible for the maintenance of the global sulfuric acid cloud cover on Venus. SO2 is continually removed from the Venus atmosphere by reaction with calcium bearing minerals on the planet's surface. The rate of volcanism required to balance SO2 depletion by reactions with calcium bearing minerals on the Venus surface can therefore be deduced from a knowledge of the relevant gas-solid reaction rates combined with reasonable assumptions about the sulfur content of the erupted material (gas + magma). A laboratory program was carried out to measure the rates of reaction between SO2 and possible crustal minerals on Venus. The reaction of CaCO3(calcite) + SO2 yields CaSO4 (anhydrite) + CO was studied. Brief results are given.

  11. Model of a novel pressurized solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine hybrid engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, Winston; Witmer, Dennis, , Dr.; Holcomb, Frank

    Solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid systems for producing electricity have received much attention due to high-predicted efficiencies, low pollution and availability of natural gas. Due to the higher value of peak power, a system able to meet fluctuating power demands while retaining high efficiencies is strongly preferable to base load operation. SOFC systems and hybrid variants designed to date have had narrow operating ranges due largely to the necessity of heat management within the fuel cell. Such systems have a single degree of freedom controlled and limited by the fuel cell. This study will introduce a new SOFC-GT hybrid configuration designed to operate over a 5:1 turndown ratio, while maintaining the SOFC stack exit temperature at a constant 1000 °C. The proposed system introduces two new degrees of freedom through the use of a variable-geometry nozzle turbine to directly influence system airflow, and an auxiliary combustor to control the thermal and power needs of the turbomachinery.

  12. Gas chromatographic determination of N-nitrosamines in beverages following automatic solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes

    2007-11-28

    A semiautomatic method for the determination of seven N-nitrosamines in beverages by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection is proposed. Beverage samples are aspirated into a solid-phase extraction module for preconcentration and cleanup. The influence of the experimental conditions was examined by using various sorbents among which LiChrolut EN was found to provide quantitative elution and the highest preconcentration factors of all. The proposed method is sensitive, with limits of detection between 7 and 33 ng/kg, and precise, with relative standard deviations from 4.3% to 6.0%. The recoveries of N-nitrosamines from beverage samples spiked with 0.5 or 1 microg/kg concentrations of these compounds ranged from 95% to 102%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of residues of the studied N-nitrosamines in beverages including beer, wine, liquor, whisky, cognac, rum, vodka, grape juice, cider, tonic water, and soft drinks. The analytes were only detected in beer samples, positives being confirmed by gas chromatography coupled with impact ionization mass spectrometry.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Cycle Technology for Auxiliary Aerospace Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    A notional 440 kW auxiliary power unit has been developed for 300 passenger commercial transport aircraft in 2015AD. A hybrid engine using solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and a gas turbine bottoming cycle has been considered. Steady-state performance analysis during cruise operation has been presented. Trades between performance efficiency and system mass were conducted with system specific energy as the discriminator. Fuel cell performance was examined with an area specific resistance. The ratio of fuel cell versus turbine power was explored through variable fuel utilization. Area specific resistance, fuel utilization, and mission length had interacting effects upon system specific energy. During cruise operation, the simple cycle fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid was not able to outperform current turbine-driven generators for system specific energy, despite a significant improvement in system efficiency. This was due in part to the increased mass of the hybrid engine, and the increased water flow required for on-board fuel reformation. Two planar, anode-supported cell design concepts were considered. Designs that seek to minimize the metallic interconnect layer mass were seen to have a large effect upon the system mass estimates.

  14. Greenhouse gas emission potential of the municipal solid waste disposal sites in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, Chart; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2008-05-01

    Open dumping and landfilling are the prevalent solid waste disposal practices in Thailand. Surveys on the disposal sites revealed the presence of 95 landfills and 330 open dumps. Methane emission potential at these sites was estimated by three methods. Results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) method, Landfill Gas Emission model (LandGEM), and closed flux chamber technique were compared. The methane emission potential of 366 Gg/yr using the IPCC method was higher than the estimations of the LandGEM and closed flux chamber method of 115 Gg/yr and 103 Gg/yr, respectively. An understanding of the methane emission potential initiated the analysis of upgrading the open dumps into landfills, adding landfills to meet the future needs and utilization of landfill gases. Upgrading the open dumps to landfills increased the methane emission rates and their utilization potential. Approximately 20 additional landfills may be required to meet future demands. Landfill gas (LFG) utilization appears to be feasible in the large-scale landfills.

  15. Estimates of solid waste disposal rates and reduction targets for landfill gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jon T.; Townsend, Timothy G.; Zimmerman, Julie B.

    2016-02-01

    Landfill disposal of municipal solid waste represents one of the largest anthropogenic global methane emission sources, and recent policy approaches have targeted significant reductions of these emissions to combat climate change in the US (ref. ). The efficacy of active gas collection systems in the US was examined by analysing performance data, including fire occurrence, from more than 850 landfills. A generalized linear model showed that the operating status of a landfill--open and actively receiving waste or closed--was the most significant predictor of collection system performance. Gas collection systems at closed landfills were statistically significantly more efficient (p < 0.001) and on average 17 percentage points more efficient than those at open landfills, but open landfills were found to represent 91% of all landfill methane emissions. These results demonstrate the clear need to target open landfills to achieve significant near-term methane emission reductions. This observation is underscored by landfill disposal rates in the US significantly exceeding previously reported national estimates, with this study reporting 262 million tonnes in the year 2012 compared with 122 million tonnes in 2012 as estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  16. The impact of municipal solid waste management on greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Keith A; Thorneloe, Susan A; Nishtala, Subba R; Yarkosky, Sherry; Zannes, Maria

    2002-09-01

    Technological advancements, environmental regulations, and emphasis on resource conservation and recovery have greatly reduced the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste (MSW) management, including emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This study was conducted using a life-cycle methodology to track changes in GHG emissions during the past 25 years from the management of MSW in the United States. For the baseline year of 1974, MSW management consisted of limited recycling, combustion without energy recovery, and landfilling without gas collection or control. This was compared with data for 1980, 1990, and 1997, accounting for changes in MSW quantity, composition, management practices, and technology. Over time, the United States has moved toward increased recycling, composting, combustion (with energy recovery) and landfilling with gas recovery, control, and utilization. These changes were accounted for with historical data on MSW composition, quantities, management practices, and technological changes. Included in the analysis were the benefits of materials recycling and energy recovery to the extent that these displace virgin raw materials and fossil fuel electricity production, respectively. Carbon sinks associated with MSW management also were addressed. The results indicate that the MSW management actions taken by U.S. communities have significantly reduced potential GHG emissions despite an almost 2-fold increase in waste generation. GHG emissions from MSW management were estimated to be 36 million metric tons carbon equivalents (MMTCE) in 1974 and 8 MMTCE in 1997. If MSW were being managed today as it was in 1974, GHG emissions would be approximately 60 MMTCE.

  17. Nickel oxide nanowires: vapor liquid solid synthesis and integration into a gas sensing device.

    PubMed

    Kaur, N; Comini, E; Zappa, D; Poli, N; Sberveglieri, G

    2016-05-20

    In the field of advanced sensor technology, metal oxide nanostructures are promising materials due to their high charge carrier mobility, easy fabrication and excellent stability. Among all the metal oxide semiconductors, nickel oxide (NiO) is a p-type semiconductor with a wide band gap and excellent optical, electrical and magnetic properties, which has not been much investigated. Herein, we report the growth of NiO nanowires by using the vapor liquid solid (VLS) technique for gas sensing applications. Platinum, palladium and gold have been used as a catalyst for the growth of NiO nanowires. The surface morphology of the nanowires was investigated through scanning electron microscopy to find out which catalyst and growth conditions are best for the growth of nanowires. GI-XRD and Raman spectroscopies were used to confirm the crystalline structure of the material. Different batches of sensors have been prepared, and their sensing performances towards different gas species such as carbon monoxide, ethanol, acetone and hydrogen have been explored. NiO nanowire sensors show interesting and promising performances towards hydrogen.

  18. Inhaled hydrogen gas therapy for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through reducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that form in the inner ear play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Recent studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has great potential for reducing ROS. In this study, we examined the potential of hydrogen gas to protect against NIHL. We tested this hypothesis in guinea pigs with 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% H2 inhalation in air for 5h a day after noise exposure, for five consecutive days. All animals underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response after the noise exposure; the results revealed that there was a better improvement in the threshold shift for the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated groups than the non-treated group. Furthermore, outer hair cell (OHC) loss was examined 7 days after noise exposure. A significantly higher survival rate of OHCs was observed in the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated group as compared to that of the non-treated group in the basal turn. Immunohistochemical analyses for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were performed to examine the amount of oxidative DNA damage. While strong immunoreactivities against 8-OHdG were observed of the non-treated group, the H2-treated group showed decreased immunoreactivity for 8-OHdG. These findings strongly suggest that inhaled hydrogen gas protects against NIHL.

  19. Reactive carbon from life support wastes for incinerator flue gas cleanup-System Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark J.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Xu, X.H.; Shi, Yao; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2002-05-14

    This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO{sub x} to nitrogen has also been observed.

  20. Reactive Carbon from Life Support Wastes for Incinerator Flue Gas Cleanup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, J. W.; Pisharody, S.; Moran, M. J.; Wignarajah, K.; Shi, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO(sub x) to nitrogen has also been observed.

  1. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  2. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-01

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O2 neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O2-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  3. On inelastic reactive collisions in kinetic theory of chemically reacting gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Silva, Adriano W.; Alves, Giselle M.

    2010-07-01

    A kinetic theory for a simple reversible reaction-characterized by a binary mixture of ideal gases whose constituents denoted by A and B undergo a reaction of the type A+A⇌B+B-is developed by considering the reactive collisions as inelastic ones. The geometry of the collision is taken into account in the line-of-centers differential cross section by allowing that a chemical reaction may occur only when the energy of the relative velocity in the direction of the line which joins the centers of the molecules at collision is larger than the activation energy. It is shown that the restitution coefficients: (i) depend explicitly on the reaction heat and on the relative translational energy in the direction of the line which joins the centers of the molecules during an inelastic collision; (ii) vanish when the reaction heat is zero; (iii) are larger or smaller than one depending on the direction of the reaction and on the sign of the reaction heat. First approximations to the distribution functions are determined from the system of Boltzmann equations for the last stage of a chemical reaction. It is shown that the deviations from the Maxwellian distribution functions and the production terms of the particle number densities: (i) vanish when the reaction heat is zero provided that the affinity is close to zero and (ii) are negative or positive depending on the sign of the reaction heat and on the direction of the reaction.

  4. Post-Transition State Dynamics in Gas Phase Reactivity: Importance of Bifurcations and Rotational Activation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sómer, Ana; Yáñez, Manuel; Hase, William L; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Beyond the established use of thermodynamic vs kinetic control to explain chemical reaction selectivity, the concept of bifurcations on a potential energy surface (PES) is proving to be of pivotal importance with regard to selectivity. In this article, we studied by means of post-transition state (TS) direct dynamics simulations the effect that vibrational and rotational excitation at the TS may have on selectivity on a bifurcating PES. With this aim, we studied the post-TS unimolecular reactivity of the [Ca(formamide)](2+) ion, for which Coulomb explosion and neutral loss reactions compete. The PES exhibits different kinds of nonintrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) dynamics, among them PES bifurcations, which direct the trajectories to multiple reaction paths after passing the TS. Direct dynamics simulations were used to distinguish between the bifurcation non-IRC dynamics and non-IRC dynamics arising from atomistic motions directing the trajectories away from the IRC. Overall, we corroborated the idea that kinetic selectivity often does not reduce to a simple choice between paths with different barrier heights and instead dynamical behavior after passing the TS may be crucial. Importantly, rotational excitation may play a pivotal role on the reaction selectivity favoring nonthermodynamic products.

  5. Measurements of gas phase reactive nitrogen during two wildfires in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prenni, A. J.; Chen, X.; Hecobian, A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning represents an important source of particles and trace gases to the global atmosphere. In addition to carbon species, nitrogen compounds are abundant in biomass burning emissions, with NOx, N2O, and N2 released primarily during flaming combustion, and NH3, amines and nitriles associated with smoldering combustion. Although nitrogen emissions from fires have been documented from laboratory and satellite measurements, and during prescribed burns, few direct measurements have been made during major wildfires. In this presentation, we summarize measurements of gas-phase nitrogen species observed during two wildfires in northern Colorado in 2012: the Hewlett Gulch Fire and High Park Fire. The Hewlett Gulch Fire was directly northwest of Fort Collins, CO and covered 3,100 hectares, while the High Park fire was significantly larger (35,300 hectares), encompassing the Hewlett Gulch Fire and coming within 3-4 km of our laboratory at Colorado State University. Emissions from both fires reached our laboratory, where measurements were made of NOx, NOy, NH3, and additional, unspeciated gas-phase nitrogen compounds. Smoke impacts at our facility ranged from background conditions to periods with very heavy smoke, depending on the local meteorology. We observed dramatic increases in measured concentrations during periods influenced by the fires.

  6. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  7. Performance of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier for the treatment of arsenic in groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical modeling and solid phase studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beak, Douglas G.; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2009-06-12

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic is expected to play a key role in directing arsenic uptake processes. Geochemical modeling reveals contrasting pH-dependencies for As(III) and As(V) precipitation. At the moderately alkaline pH conditions typically encountered in zerovalent iron reactive barriers, As(III) is unlikely to precipitate as an oxide or a sulfide phase. Conversely, increasing pH is expected to drive precipitation of metal arsenates including ferrous arsenate. Bacterially mediated sulfate reduction plays an important role in field installations of granular iron. Neoformed iron sulfides provide surfaces for adsorption of oxyanion and thioarsenic species of As(III) and As(V) and are expected to provide enhanced arsenic removal capacity. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate that arsenic is sequestered in the solid phase as both As(III) and As(V) in coordination environments with O and S. Arsenic removal in the PRB probably results from several pathways, including adsorption to iron oxide and iron sulfide surfaces, and possible precipitation of ferrous arsenate. Corrosion of granular iron appears to result in some As(III) oxidation to As(V) as the proportion of As(V) to As(III) in the solid phase is greater compared to influent groundwater. As(0) was not detected in the PRB materials. These results are broadly comparable to laboratory based studies of arsenic removal by zerovalent iron, but additional complexity is revealed in the field environment, which is largely due to the influence of subsurface microbiota.

  8. Performance of a zerovalent iron reactive barrier for the treatment of arsenic in groundwater: Part 2. Geochemical modeling and solid phase studies.

    PubMed

    Beak, Douglas G; Wilkin, Richard T

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic uptake processes were evaluated in a zerovalent iron reactive barrier installed at a lead smelting facility using geochemical modeling, solid-phase analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. Aqueous speciation of arsenic is expected to play a key role in directing arsenic uptake processes. Geochemical modeling reveals contrasting pH-dependencies for As(III) and As(V) precipitation. At the moderately alkaline pH conditions typically encountered in zerovalent iron reactive barriers, As(III) is unlikely to precipitate as an oxide or a sulfide phase. Conversely, increasing pH is expected to drive precipitation of metal arsenates including ferrous arsenate. Bacterially mediated sulfate reduction plays an important role in field installations of granular iron. Neoformed iron sulfides provide surfaces for adsorption of oxyanion and thioarsenic species of As(III) and As(V) and are expected to provide enhanced arsenic removal capacity. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate that arsenic is sequestered in the solid phase as both As(III) and As(V) in coordination environments with O and S. Arsenic removal in the PRB probably results from several pathways, including adsorption to iron oxide and iron sulfide surfaces, and possible precipitation of ferrous arsenate. Corrosion of granular iron appears to result in some As(III) oxidation to As(V) as the proportion of As(V) to As(III) in the solid phase is greater compared to influent groundwater. As(0) was not detected in the PRB materials. These results are broadly comparable to laboratory based studies of arsenic removal by zerovalent iron, but additional complexity is revealed in the field environment, which is largely due to the influence of subsurface microbiota.

  9. Extension of Toth function from gas-solid to liquid-solid equilibria and application to reversed-phase liquid chromatography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The extension of the {Psi} function developed by Toth from equilibria taking place at gas-solid interfaces to those taking place at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated. The results were applied to conventional liquid-solid systems used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The adsorbents in these systems are made of porous silica having a hydrophobic solid surface obtained by chemically bonding C{sub 18} alkyl chains to a porous silica gel then endcapping the surface with trimethylsilyl groups. The liquid is an aqueous solution of an organic solvent, most often methanol or acetonitrile. The probe compound used here is phenol. Adsorption data of phenol were measured using the dynamic frontal analysis (FA) method. The excess adsorption of the organic solvent was measured using the minor disturbance (MD) method. Activity coefficients in the bulk were estimated through the UNIFAC group contributions. The results show that the {Psi} function predicts 90% of the total free energy of immersion, {Delta}F, of the solid when the concentration of phenol is moderate (typically less than 10 g/L). At higher concentrations, the nonideal behavior of the bulk liquid phase becomes significant and it may contribute up to about 30% of {Delta}F. The high concentration of adsorbed molecules of phenol at the interface decreases the interfacial tension, {sigma}, by about 18 mN/m, independently of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the nature of the organic solvent.

  10. Microsolvation of reactive systems in the gas phase via Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn Sue

    Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy has been used to study a number of reactive systems, with the primary goal of probing the effects of solvent on a molecule or a weakly bound acid-base system at the small cluster level. Because these systems are particularly sensitive to their first, nearest neighbors, the studies focus on examining structural changes and electronic rearrangement that occurs with the addition of a single solvent molecule, or microsolvent. The structural effects of microsolvation were examined on two prototypical acid-base systems. The first sought to ascertain the effect of microsolvent polarity by microsolvating HCN-SO3 with Ar and CO, forming the complexes HCN-SO3···Ar and HCN-SO 3···CO. Dipole moments and ab initio calculations also are reported. The second examined the effect of microsolvation on the primary hydrogen bond distance of (CH3)3N···HF, by adding a single HF molecule, forming the complex (CH3) 3N···HF···HF. The Stark effect was measured on a series of hydrogen halide complexes. These systems are prototypical complexes with which to study proton transfer across a hydrogen bond. The resulting dipole moments are discussed in terms of the degree of proton transfer. The dipole moment also was determined for the H2SO4···H 2O complex, which provides an important model system for understanding rates of binary homogeneous nucleation, and a series of ab initio calculations were performed in support of the results. Finally, the microwave spectrum of the radical complex OH-H2O was observed and analyzed using a two-state model which accounts for nuclear motion on the 2A' and 2A" potential surfaces. The results provide insights into the effects of the partial quenching of orbital angular momentum.

  11. The Effect of Operational Parameters on the Characteristics of Gas-Solid Flow Inside the COREX Shaft Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Mingyin; Wu, Shengli; Du, Kaiping; Shen, Wei; Ma, Xiaodong; Chen, Mao; Zhao, Baojun

    2015-02-01

    The COREX shaft furnace is of great importance to the whole C-3000 process. There are many problems with the operation of the COREX shaft furnace, especially with gas and burden distribution, that have as yet been little studied. The present work establishes a three-dimensional quarter model. After validation by operating data in Baosteel, the model is used to investigate the gas utilization rate and the metallization rate of the COREX shaft furnace. The parameters, including the reducing gas flow, the volume fraction of gas phase, and the multilayered burden, are systematically investigated. The results show that the reducing gas flow has a great influence on the gas utilization rate and the metallization rate, while the volume fraction of gas phase has a more significant effect on the metallization rate than on the gas utilization rate. In order to obtain a higher metallization rate, the reducing gas flow needs to be adjusted step by step and the volume fraction of gas phase needs to be increased. In addition, ore and coke need to be discharged separately in order to increase the solid metallization rate.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Pppp... - Determination of Weight Volatile Matter Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... react during the adhesive curing reaction, and, as a result, do not volatilize. The monomers become integral parts of the cured adhesive through chemical reaction. At least 70 weight percent of the system... solids. If left uncovered, as in a Method 24 (ASTM D2369) test, the reaction is inhibited by the...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Pppp... - Determination of Weight Volatile Matter Content and Weight Solids Content of Reactive Adhesives

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... react during the adhesive curing reaction, and, as a result, do not volatilize. The monomers become integral parts of the cured adhesive through chemical reaction. At least 70 weight percent of the system... solids. If left uncovered, as in a Method 24 (ASTM D2369) test, the reaction is inhibited by the...

  14. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  15. Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; You, Changfu; Zhao, Suwei; Chen, Changhe; Qi, Haiying

    2008-03-01

    Semidry flue gas desulfurization with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH)2 content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH)2 particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH)2 particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH)2 particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray.

  16. Deposition of high quality TiN films by excimer laser ablation in reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, I. N.; Chitica, N.; Nistor, L. C.; Popescu, M.; Teodorescu, V. S.; Ursu, I.; Andrei, A.; Barborica, A.; Luches, A.; De Giorgi, M. Luisa; Perrone, A.; Dubreuil, B.; Hermann, J.

    1993-11-01

    A new laser method is proposed for the deposition of high purity, hard fcc TiN layers of unlimited thickness. The film thickness can be very finely controlled mainly through the intermediary of the number of applied laser pulses as the deposition rate is of only 0.02-0.05 nm/pulse. The ablation is promoted from a Ti target by high intensity multipulse excimer laser irradiation in a low pressure N2 ambient gas while the forming compound is collected on a Si single-crystalline wafer. The best results have been obtained for an ambient pressure of p=10-30 mTorr and a distance between the target and support of d=10 mm. It is shown that the formation of a liquid phase within the irradiated zone, maintained even after the end of a laser pulse, is the most important requisite for TiN formation. TiN is then ablated as a stoichio- metric phase.

  17. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Praveen Kumar; Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas is discussed under the action of monochromatic radiation into stellar atmosphere with a constant intensity on unit area. The gas is assumed to be grey and opaque and shock to be transparent. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. To obtain some essential features of the shock propagation, small solid particles are taken as pseudo-fluid and it is assumed that the equilibrium flow condition is maintained in the flow-field. The effects of variation of the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas and the radiation parameter are investigated. It is shown that an increase in the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas and the radiation parameter have decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas the shock strength increases. It is found that an increase in the parameter non-idealness of the gas and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas have opposite behaviour on fluid velocity, pressure and shock strength. Also, it is shown that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables and the shock strength.

  18. Reactive transport modeling of the long-term effects of CO2 storage in the P18 depleted gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambach, T. J.; Koenen, M.; Wasch, L. J.; Loeve, D.; Maas, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Depleted gas fields are an import CO2 storage sink for The Netherlands, with a total storage capacity of more than 3 Gtonne. The CO2 sources are located at relatively short distances from potential storage reservoirs and an infrastructure for (cross-border) gas transport over large distances already exists. Several depleted gas fields in the subsurface of the Netherlands have yet been evaluated as potential locations for CO2 storage (for example the K12-B field). The P18 gas field is located in the offshore of The Netherlands and is currently evaluated as potential CO2 storage reservoir. The aim of this study is to predict the long-term effects of CO2 injection into the P18 field using reactive transport modeling (TOUGHREACT). The storage reservoir is described using the mineralogy and petrophysical characteristics of three geological layers in a radial (R,Z) reservoir model with top depth of 3456 m, a thickness of 98 m, and 3300 grid cells. The initial reservoir temperature was defined as 90 degrees C with an initial (depletion) pressure of 20.0 bars. Capillary pressure curves are based on empirical relations. The CO2 is injected uniformly distributed over the model height, at a constant rate of 35 kg/s (1.1 Mton/year), and a temperature of 40 degrees C for 30 years. The well is then shut-in with a reservoir pressure of approximately 375 bar. The simulations are continued up to 10,000 years for computing the long-term effects in the reservoir. The results show that the near-well area is dried out during injection, leading to salt precipitation and reduced permeability during injection. Condensation of the evaporated water occurs outside the near-well area. Water imbibition is modelled after shut in of the well, leading to rewetting of the near-well area and redissolution of the salt. Most geochemical reactions need water to occur, including well-cement minerals, and therefore predictions of water flow after well shut-ins are important to take into account

  19. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF SOLIDS ASSISTED BY GAS DRAG: SLOWING BY TURBULENT MASS DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Shariff, Karim; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2011-09-01

    The Goldreich and Ward (axisymmetric) gravitational instability of a razor thin particle layer occurs when the Toomre parameter Q{sub T} {identical_to} c{sub p}{Omega}{sub 0}/{pi}G{Sigma}{sub p} < 1 (c{sub p} being the particle dispersion velocity). Ward extended this analysis by adding the effect of gas drag upon particles and found that even when Q{sub T} > 1, sufficiently long waves were always unstable. Youdin carried out a detailed analysis and showed that the instability allows chondrule-sized ({approx}1 mm) particles to undergo radial clumping with reasonable growth times even in the presence of a moderate amount of turbulent stirring. The analysis of Youdin includes the role of turbulence in setting the thickness of the dust layer and in creating a turbulent particle pressure in the momentum equation. However, he ignores the effect of turbulent mass diffusivity on the disturbance wave. Here, we show that including this effect reduces the growth rate significantly, by an amount that depends on the level of turbulence, and reduces the maximum intensity of turbulence the instability can withstand by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The instability is viable only when turbulence is extremely weak and the solid to gas surface density of the particle layer is considerably enhanced over minimum-mass-nebula values. A simple mechanistic explanation of the instability shows how the azimuthal component of drag promotes instability while the radial component hinders it. A gravito-diffusive overstability is also possible but never realized in the nebula models.

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste management in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Vilaysouk, Xaysackda

    2016-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the major environmental problems throughout the world including in Lao PDR. In Vientiane, due to the lack of a collection service, open burning and illegal dumping are commonly practised. This study aims to estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from the current situation of MSW management (MSWM) in Vientiane and proposes an alternative solution to reduce the GHG emission and environmental impacts. The 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (IPCC 2006 model) are used for the estimation of GHG emission from landfill and composting. For the estimation of GHG emission from open burning, the Atmospheric Brown Clouds Emission Inventory Manual (ABC EIM) is used. In Vientiane, a total of 232, 505 tonnes year(-1) of MSW was generated in 2011. Waste generation in Vientiane is 0.69 kg per capita per day, and about 31% of the total MSW generated was directly sent to landfill (71,162 tonnes year(-1)). The total potential GHG emission from the baseline scenario in 2011 was 110,182 tonnes year(-1) CO2-eq, which is 0.15 tonne year(-1) CO2-eq per capita. From the three MSWM scenarios proposed, scenario S3, which includes recycling, composting and landfilling, seems to be an effective solution for dealing with MSW in Vientiane with less air pollution, and is environmentally friendly. The total GHG emission in scenario S3 is reduced to 91,920 tonnes year(-1) CO2-eq (47% reduction), compared with the S1 scenario where all uncollected waste is diverted to landfill.

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste management in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Vilaysouk, Xaysackda

    2016-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the major environmental problems throughout the world including in Lao PDR. In Vientiane, due to the lack of a collection service, open burning and illegal dumping are commonly practised. This study aims to estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from the current situation of MSW management (MSWM) in Vientiane and proposes an alternative solution to reduce the GHG emission and environmental impacts. The 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (IPCC 2006 model) are used for the estimation of GHG emission from landfill and composting. For the estimation of GHG emission from open burning, the Atmospheric Brown Clouds Emission Inventory Manual (ABC EIM) is used. In Vientiane, a total of 232, 505 tonnes year(-1) of MSW was generated in 2011. Waste generation in Vientiane is 0.69 kg per capita per day, and about 31% of the total MSW generated was directly sent to landfill (71,162 tonnes year(-1)). The total potential GHG emission from the baseline scenario in 2011 was 110,182 tonnes year(-1) CO2-eq, which is 0.15 tonne year(-1) CO2-eq per capita. From the three MSWM scenarios proposed, scenario S3, which includes recycling, composting and landfilling, seems to be an effective solution for dealing with MSW in Vientiane with less air pollution, and is environmentally friendly. The total GHG emission in scenario S3 is reduced to 91,920 tonnes year(-1) CO2-eq (47% reduction), compared with the S1 scenario where all uncollected waste is diverted to landfill. PMID:26608899

  2. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. Methods MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores <50% were excluded. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) methodology was utilized for this review (S1 PRISMA Checklist). Results 271 articles were identified for final review. There were 45% prospective studies and 52% retrospective. 264 had intermediate QA score (≥50% but <80%); Seven were adequate (80% -100%); A high CRP was predictive of prognosis in 90% (245/271) of studies—80% of the 245 studies by multivariate analysis, 20% by univariate analysis. Many (52%) of the articles were about gastrointestinal malignancies (GI) or kidney malignancies. A high CRP was prognostic in 90% (127 of 141) of the reports in those groups of tumors. CRP was also prognostic in most reports in other solid tumors primary sites. Conclusions A high CRP was associated with higher mortality in 90% of reports in people with solid tumors primary sites. This was particularly notable in GI malignancies and kidney malignancies. In other solid tumors (lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively. PMID:26717416

  3. Solid Phase Peat and Dissolved Organic Matter Composition and Reactivity as a Function of Surface Vegetation in Northern Minnesota Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfaily, M. M.; Hamdan, R.; Jaffe, R.; Cawley, K.; Cooper, W. T.; Chanton, J.

    2012-12-01

    Peatlands are unusual in greenhouse scenarios because on the one hand they sequester carbon from the atmosphere as peat, while on the other hand they re-emit it in large quantities as methane. Little is known, however, about the chemical processes that link solid phase peat and dissolved organic matter (DOM) within its porewaters. In this work we have applied FT-IR and 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize the solid phase peat at varying depths from different sites at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) where the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun the Spruce and Peatland Response Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) project. Parallel Factor analyzed Excitation/Emission Matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (PARAFAC-EEMS) and ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) were used to characterize the molecular composition of peat porewaters. Analyses of the solid phase and the porewater suggested the presence of different zones of varying degrees of humification in the peat core. FT-IR and NMR data indicated that the relative abundances of alipahtics and aromatics increased with depth to about 100 cm, then remained relatively constant. This increase was accompanied with a concomitant decrease in the relative abundance of carbohydrates. FT-ICR MS data showed a large abundance of compounds with high O/C ratios at the surface (acrotelm) that tend to disappear with depth (catotelm), with accumulation of refractory aliphatic compounds characterized by low O/C and high H/C ratios.

  4. Gas phase synthesis and reactivity of Agn+ and Ag(n-1)H+ cluster cations.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2005-08-21

    Multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn) on [(M + Ag - H)x + Ag]+ precursor ions (where M = an amino acid such as glycine or N,N-dimethylglycine) results in the formation of stable silver (Ag3+, Ag5+ and Ag7+) and silver hydride (Ag2H+, Ag4H+ and Ag6H+) cluster cations in the gas phase. Deuterium labelling studies reveal that the source of the hydride can be either from the alpha carbon or from one of the heteroatoms. When M = glycine, the silver cyanide clusters Ag4CN+ and Ag5(H,C,N)+ are also observed. Collision induced dissociation (CID) and DFT calculations were carried out on each of these clusters to shed some light on their possible structures. CID of the Agn+ and Ag(n-1)H+ clusters generally results in the formation of the same Ag(n-2)+ product ions via the loss of Ag2 and AgH respectively. DFT calculations also reveal that the Agn+ and Ag(n-1)H+ clusters have similar structural features and that the Ag(n-1)H+ clusters are only slightly less stable than their all silver counterparts. In addition, Agn+ and Ag(n-1)H+ clusters react with 2-propanol and 2-butylamine via similar pathways, with multiple ligand addition occurring and a coupled deamination-dehydration reaction occurring upon condensation of a third (for Ag2H+) or a fourth (for all other silver clusters) 2-butylamine molecule onto the clusters. Taken together, these results suggest that the Agn+ and Ag(n-1)H+ clusters are structurally related via the replacement of a silver atom with a hydrogen atom. This replacement does not dramatically alter the cluster stability or its unimolecular or bimolecular chemistry with the 2-propanol and 2-butylamine reagents.

  5. Characteristics and reactivity of rapidly hydrated sorbent for semidry flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Zhang; Changfu You; Suwei Zhao; Changhe Chen; Haiying Qi

    2008-03-01

    The semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process has many advantages over the wet FGD process for moving sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired power plants. Semidry FGD with a rapidly hydrated sorbent was studied in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental facility. The sorbent was made from lumps of lime and coal fly ash. The desulfurization efficiency was measured for various operating parameters, including the sorbent recirculation rate and the water spray method. The experimental results show that the desulfurization efficiencies of the rapidly hydrated sorbent were 1.5-3.0 times higher than a commonly used industrial sorbent for calcium to sulfur molar ratios from 1.2 to 3.0, mainly due to the higher specific surface area and pore volume. The Ca(OH){sub 2} content in the cyclone separator ash was about 2.9% for the rapidly hydrated sorbent and was about 0.1% for the commonly used industrial sorbent, due to the different adhesion between the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles and the fly ash particles, and the low cyclone separation efficiency for the fine Ca(OH){sub 2} particles that fell off the sorbent particles. Therefore the actual recirculation rates of the active sorbent with Ca(OH){sub 2} particles were higher for the rapidly hydrated sorbent, which also contributed to the higher desulfurization efficiency. The high fly ash content in the rapidly hydrated sorbent resulted in good operating stability. The desulfurization efficiency with upstream water spray was 10-15% higher than that with downstream water spray. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Dehydration and Stabilization of a Reactive Tertiary Hydroxyl Group in Solid Oral Dosage Forms of BMS-779788.

    PubMed

    Adams, Monica L; Sharma, Vijayata; Gokhale, Madhushree; Huang, Yande; Stefanski, Kevin; Su, Ching; Hussain, Munir A

    2016-04-01

    BMS-779788 contains a reactive tertiary hydroxyl attached to a weakly basic imidazole ring. Propensity of the carbinol toward dehydration to yield the corresponding alkene, BMS-779788-ALK, was evaluated. Elevated levels of BMS-779788-ALK were observed in excipient compatibility samples. Stability studies revealed that BMS-779788 degrades to BMS-779788-ALK in capsules and tablets prepared by both dry and wet granulation processes. An acid-catalyzed dehydration mechanism, in which the heterocyclic core contributes resonance stability to the cationic intermediate via charge transfer to the imidazole ring, was proposed. Therefore, neutralization via a buffered (pH 7.0) granulating solution was used to mitigate dehydration. Solution studies revealed degradation of BMS-779788 to BMS-779788-ALK over the pH range of 1-7.5. Reversibility was confirmed by initiating reactions with BMS-779788-ALK over the same pH range. Accordingly, a simple reversible scheme can be used to describe reactions initiated with either BMS-779788 or BMS-779788-ALK. To eliminate potential for charge delocalization across the heterocycle and probe the degradation mechanism, the imidazole ring of BMS-779788 was methylated (BMS-779788-Me). The propensity for acid-catalyzed dehydration was then evaluated. The acid stability of BMS-779788-Me confirmed that the heterocyclic core contributes to reactivity liability of the tertiary hydroxyl. PMID:26921118

  7. Dehydration and Stabilization of a Reactive Tertiary Hydroxyl Group in Solid Oral Dosage Forms of BMS-779788.

    PubMed

    Adams, Monica L; Sharma, Vijayata; Gokhale, Madhushree; Huang, Yande; Stefanski, Kevin; Su, Ching; Hussain, Munir A

    2016-04-01

    BMS-779788 contains a reactive tertiary hydroxyl attached to a weakly basic imidazole ring. Propensity of the carbinol toward dehydration to yield the corresponding alkene, BMS-779788-ALK, was evaluated. Elevated levels of BMS-779788-ALK were observed in excipient compatibility samples. Stability studies revealed that BMS-779788 degrades to BMS-779788-ALK in capsules and tablets prepared by both dry and wet granulation processes. An acid-catalyzed dehydration mechanism, in which the heterocyclic core contributes resonance stability to the cationic intermediate via charge transfer to the imidazole ring, was proposed. Therefore, neutralization via a buffered (pH 7.0) granulating solution was used to mitigate dehydration. Solution studies revealed degradation of BMS-779788 to BMS-779788-ALK over the pH range of 1-7.5. Reversibility was confirmed by initiating reactions with BMS-779788-ALK over the same pH range. Accordingly, a simple reversible scheme can be used to describe reactions initiated with either BMS-779788 or BMS-779788-ALK. To eliminate potential for charge delocalization across the heterocycle and probe the degradation mechanism, the imidazole ring of BMS-779788 was methylated (BMS-779788-Me). The propensity for acid-catalyzed dehydration was then evaluated. The acid stability of BMS-779788-Me confirmed that the heterocyclic core contributes to reactivity liability of the tertiary hydroxyl.

  8. ReaxFF Reactive Force-Field Modeling of the Triple-Phase Boundary in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Merinov, Boris V; Mueller, Jonathan E; van Duin, Adri C T; An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-11-20

    In our study, the Ni/YSZ ReaxFF reactive force field was developed by combining the YSZ and Ni/C/H descriptions. ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) were applied to model chemical reactions, diffusion, and other physicochemical processes at the fuel/Ni/YSZ interface. The ReaxFF RMD simulations were performed on the H2/Ni/YSZ and C4H10/Ni/YSZ triple-phase boundary (TPB) systems at 1250 and 2000 K, respectively. The simulations indicate amorphization of the Ni surface, partial decohesion (delamination) at the interface, and coking, which have indeed all been observed experimentally. They also allowed us to derive the mechanism of the butane conversion at the Ni/YSZ interface. Many steps of this mechanism are similar to the pyrolysis of butane. The products obtained in our simulations are the same as those in experiment, which indicates that the developed ReaxFF potential properly describes complex physicochemical processes, such as the oxide-ion diffusion, fuel conversion, water formation reaction, coking, and delamination, occurring at the TPB and can be recommended for further computational studies of the fuel/electrode/electrolyte interfaces in a SOFC.

  9. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    promoting the formation of the organometallic ion. Where isomeric organometallic ions are generated and normal MS approaches cannot distinguish them, we describe approaches to elucidate the decarboxylation mechanism via determination of their structure. These "unmasked" organometallic ions, [RM(L)n](x), can also be structurally interrogated spectroscopically or via CID. We have thus compared the gas-phase structures and decomposition of several highly reactive and synthetically important organometallic ions for the first time. Perhaps the most significant aspect of this work is the study of bimolecular reactions, which provides experimental information on mechanistically obscure bond-formation and cross-coupling steps and the intrinsic reactivity of ions. We have sought to understand transformations of substrates including acid-base and hydrolysis reactions, along with reactions resulting in C-C bond formation. Our studies also allow a direct comparison of the performance of different metal catalysts in the individual elementary steps associated with protodecarboxylation and decarboxylative alkylation cycles. Electronic structure (DFT and ab initio) and dynamics (RRKM) calculations provide further mechanistic insights into these reactions. The broad implications of this research are that new reactions can be discovered and that the performance of metal catalysts can be evaluated in terms of each of their elementary steps. This has been particularly useful for the study of metal-mediated decarboxylation reactions.

  10. Gas phase studies of the Pesci decarboxylation reaction: synthesis, structure, and unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity of organometallic ions.

    PubMed

    O'Hair, Richard A J; Rijs, Nicole J

    2015-02-17

    promoting the formation of the organometallic ion. Where isomeric organometallic ions are generated and normal MS approaches cannot distinguish them, we describe approaches to elucidate the decarboxylation mechanism via determination of their structure. These "unmasked" organometallic ions, [RM(L)n](x), can also be structurally interrogated spectroscopically or via CID. We have thus compared the gas-phase structures and decomposition of several highly reactive and synthetically important organometallic ions for the first time. Perhaps the most significant aspect of this work is the study of bimolecular reactions, which provides experimental information on mechanistically obscure bond-formation and cross-coupling steps and the intrinsic reactivity of ions. We have sought to understand transformations of substrates including acid-base and hydrolysis reactions, along with reactions resulting in C-C bond formation. Our studies also allow a direct comparison of the performance of different metal catalysts in the individual elementary steps associated with protodecarboxylation and decarboxylative alkylation cycles. Electronic structure (DFT and ab initio) and dynamics (RRKM) calculations provide further mechanistic insights into these reactions. The broad implications of this research are that new reactions can be discovered and that the performance of metal catalysts can be evaluated in terms of each of their elementary steps. This has been particularly useful for the study of metal-mediated decarboxylation reactions. PMID:25594228

  11. Investigation of gas-solids flow in a circulating fluidized bed using 3D electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Mingxu; Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2016-09-01

    The hydrodynamics of gas-solids flow in the bottom of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) are complicated. Three-dimensional (3D) electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used to investigate the hydrodynamics in risers of different shapes. Four different ECT sensors with 12 electrodes each are designed according to the dimension of risers, including two circular ECT sensors, a square ECT sensor and a rectangular ECT sensor. The electrodes are evenly arranged in three planes to obtain capacitance in different heights and to reconstruct the 3D images by linear back projection (LBP) algorithm. Experiments were carried out on the four risers using sands as the solids material. The capacitance and differential pressure are measured under the gas superficial velocity from 0.6 m s-1 to 3.0 m s-1 with a step of 0.2 m s-1. The flow regime is investigated according to the solids concentration and differential pressure. The dynamic property of bubbling flows is analyzed theoretically and the performance of the 3D ECT sensors is evaluated. The experimental results show that 3D ECT can be used in the CFB with different risers to predict the hydrodynamics of gas-solids bubbling flows.

  12. Comparison of enzymatic reactivity of corn stover solids prepared by dilute acid, AFEX™, and ionic liquid pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is essential to realize high product yields from biological conversion of naturally recalcitrant cellulosic biomass, with thermochemical pretreatments often favored for cost and performance. In this study, enzymatic digestion of solids from dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™), and ionic liquid (IL) thermochemical pretreatments of corn stover were followed over time for the same range of total enzyme protein loadings to provide comparative data on glucose and xylose yields of monomers and oligomers from the pretreated solids. The composition of pretreated solids and enzyme adsorption on each substrate were also measured to determine. The extent glucose release could be related to these features. Results Corn stover solids from pretreatment by DA, AFEX, and IL were enzymatically digested over a range of low to moderate loadings of commercial cellulase, xylanase, and pectinase enzyme mixtures, the proportions of which had been previously optimized for each pretreatment. Avicel® cellulose, regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), and beechwood xylan were also subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis as controls. Yields of glucose and xylose and their oligomers were followed for times up to 120 hours, and enzyme adsorption was measured. IL pretreated corn stover displayed the highest initial glucose yields at all enzyme loadings and the highest final yield for a low enzyme loading of 3 mg protein/g glucan in the raw material. However, increasing the enzyme loading to 12 mg/g glucan or more resulted in DA pretreated corn stover attaining the highest longer-term glucose yields. Hydrolyzate from AFEX pretreated corn stover had the highest proportion of xylooligomers, while IL produced the most glucooligomers. However, the amounts of both oligomers dropped with increasing enzyme loadings and hydrolysis times. IL pretreated corn stover had the highest enzyme adsorption capacity. Conclusions Initial hydrolysis yields were highest

  13. Batch separation of shredded bulky waste by gas-solid fluidized bed at laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Tomoo; Tanaka, Nobutoshi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    A gas-solid fluidized bed separator using various bed materials was used to separate shredded municipal bulky waste (SBW). Using 290 microm glass beads as the bed material, the apparent density of the fluidized bed was 1.5 g/cm(3) and the SBW could be separated into combustibles such as wood, paper and plastics and incombustibles such as metals and glass. The overall efficiency (Newton's efficiency) of the separation was calculated to be 0.93. In order to obtain high efficiency, the superficial velocity must be adjusted so that the fluidized bed is agitated moderately and at the same time there is no weak fluidized region. Using a mixture of particles of nylon shot and 68 microm glass beads, the apparent density of the fluidized mixture bed could be varied between 0.63 and 0.99 g/cm(3) by changing the mixing ratio of the two materials. In the case of a mixing ratio of 20% for glass beads, an apparent density of 0.65 g/cm(3) was produced, in which wood and paper components were recovered while plastics remained in the bed to give a final overall efficiency of 0.88.

  14. Determination of terpenes in tequila by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; Capella, Santiago; Juárez, Rocío; Labastida, Carmen

    2006-11-17

    Solid phase microextraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for the determination of seven terpenes in tequila. The method was selected based on the following parameters: coating selection (PA, PDMS, CW/DVB, and PDMS/DVB), extraction temperature, addition of salt, and extraction time profile. The extraction conditions were: PDMS/DVB fiber, Headspace, 100% NaCl, 25 degrees C extraction temperature, 30 min extraction time and stirring at 1200 rpm. The calibration curves (50-1000 ng/ml) for the terpenes followed linear relationships with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.99, except for trans,trans-farnesol (r = 0.98). RSD values were smaller than 10% confirmed that the technique was precise. Samples from 18 different trade brands of "Aged" tequila analyzed with the developed method showed the same terpenes in different concentrations. The analytical procedure used is selective, robust (more than 100 analyses with the same fiber), fast and of low-cost.

  15. Greenhouse gas emission mitigation relevant to changes in municipal solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Pikoń, Krzysztof; Gaska, Krzysztof

    2010-07-01

    Standard methods for assessing the environmental impact of waste management systems are needed to underpin the development and implementation of sustainable waste management practice. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool for comprehensively ensuring such assessment and covers all impacts associated with waste management. LCA is often called "from cradle to grave" analysis. This paper integrates information on the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of various management options for some of the most common materials in municipal solid waste (MSW). Different waste treatment options for MSW were studied in a system analysis. Different combinations of recycling (cardboard, plastics, glass, metals), biological treatment (composting), and incineration as well as land-filling were studied. The index of environmental burden in the global warming impact category was calculated. The calculations are based on LCA methodology. All emissions taking place in the whole life cycle system were taken into account. The analysis included "own emissions," or emissions from the system at all stages of the life cycle, and "linked emissions," or emissions from other sources linked with the system in an indirect way. Avoided emissions caused by recycling and energy recovery were included in the analysis. Displaced emissions of GHGs originate from the substitution of energy or materials derived from waste for alternative sources. The complex analysis of the environmental impact of municipal waste management systems before and after application of changes in MSW systems according to European Union regulations is presented in this paper. The evaluation is made for MSW systems in Poland. PMID:20681425

  16. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2003-01-01

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  17. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of fragrance allergens in baby bathwater.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2009-07-01

    A method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of fragrance allergens in water samples. This is the first study devoted to this family of cosmetic ingredients performed by SPME. The influence of parameters such as fibre coating, extraction and desorption temperatures, salting-out effect and sampling mode on the extraction efficiency has been studied by means of a mixed-level factorial design, which allowed the study of the main effects as well as two-factor interactions. Excluding desorption temperature, the other parameters were, in general, very important for the achievement of high response. The final procedure was based on headspace sampling at 100 degrees C, using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres. The method showed good linearity and precision for all compounds, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Reliability was demonstrated through the evaluation of the recoveries in different real water samples, including baby bathwater and swimming pool water. The absence of matrix effects allowed the use of external standard calibration to quantify the target compounds in the samples. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of allergens in several real samples. All the target compounds were found in the samples, and, in some cases, at quite high concentrations. The presence and the levels of these chemicals in baby bathwater should be a matter of concern.

  18. Estimation of the main dill seeds odorant carvone by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zawirska-Wojtasiak, Renata; Wasowicz, Erwin

    2002-10-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was examined for its suitability for isolation of volatiles from seeds of dill in comparison with the traditional steam distillation procedure. Two main dill seeds volatiles, carvone and limonene, were taken into consideration. Two Supelco SPME fibers were used for the extraction: polyacrylic (PAc) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The time required to saturate the fibers was 3 min, while distillation took 3 h. Gas chromatography (GC) separation was reduced to 5 min by use of microcapillary column HP-5 cross-linked 5% Ph Me Siloxane. The standards of limonene and carvone were used to prepare calibration curves. PAc fiber responses were described by quadratic curves while PDMS responded linearly. Six varieties of dill were examined by distillation and SPME with both fibers. The good results were achieved for carvone by SPME-PDMS with significant regression between distillation and SPME. This compound can be measured in dill seeds samples within 10 min. The SPME-PDMS were also tested for its application to chiral resolution of carvone and limonene enantiomers in dill seeds oil. The enantiomeric separation was done with two chiral columns. The enantiomeric ratios measured by SPME were just the same as with distillation.

  19. Characteristics of grid zone heat transfer in a gas-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Wang, R.C.; Hopper, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The grid zone in a gas-solid fluidized bed reactor has been observed to play a critical role in governing the reactor performance, particularly in shallow and large beds with fast reactions. However, despite its importance the grid zone behavior is far from completely understood, due mainly to its complexity and the few efforts to study it. One of the important aspects on the grid zone behavior is the heat transfer between the bed and immersed horizontal tubes. Although this subject has been under intensive study in the bubbling zone and freeboard area, no systematic work has been performed in the grid zone. Others examined the phenomenon and concluded that the existing heat transfer correlations for the bubbling zone give erroneous results when applied to the grid zone, especially at high velocities. The finding is expected since the two zones are significantly different in their hydrodynamic characteristics. An example of a process involving grid zone heat transfer is the shallow fluidized bed heat exchanger. The exchanger is operated at an extremely low bed height (6-10 cm) with horizontal fin tubes in the grid region. The authors reported a higher than expected heat transfer rate (compared to the bubbling bed heat transfer rate).

  20. Durable solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings to 315 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The durability and friction characteristics of bonded solid lubricant films on compliant gas bearings were measured. Coating compositions, which were judged to be suitable for use to at least 315 C, were selected for this study. Most of the data were obtained with polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride coatings and with silicate-bonded graphite coatings. These coatings were applied to the bore of Inconel 750 foil bearings. The journals were A286 stainless steel, with a rms surface finish of 0.2 microns. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14 kPa (2 psi) bearing unit load. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coast down at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rpm). Testing continued until 9000 cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated that the coating had failed. The coatings were evaluated in the temperature range from 25 C to 315 C. Comparisons in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  1. Nonlocal van der Waals functionals: The case of rare-gas dimers and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Fabien; Hutter, Jürg

    2013-05-01

    Recently, the nonlocal van der Waals (vdW) density functionals [M. Dion, H. Rydberg, E. Schröder, D. C. Langreth, and B. I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.246401] have attracted considerable attention due to their good performance for systems where weak interactions are important. Since the physics of dispersion is included in these functionals, they are usually more accurate and show less erratic behavior than the semilocal and hybrid methods. In this work, several variants of the vdW functionals have been tested on rare-gas dimers (from He2 to Kr2) and solids (Ne, Ar, and Kr) and their accuracy compared to standard semilocal approximations, supplemented or not by an atom-pairwise dispersion correction [S. Grimme, J. Antony, S. Ehrlich, and H. Krieg, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010), 10.1063/1.3382344]. An analysis of the results in terms of energy decomposition is also provided.

  2. Characterisation of whiskeys using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G; James, K J; MacNamara, K; Stack, M A

    2000-10-27

    The application of solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the detection of flavour volatiles present in Irish and Scottish whiskeys was investigated. A method was developed to characterise these volatiles which included the extraction, identification and quantification of 17 congeners which included fusel alcohols, acetates and esters. The method validation produced the optimum fibre [85 microm poly(acrylate)], extraction time (35 min), sample volume size (3 ml) and desorption time (5 min). The impact of salt on the absorption process was also studied. Characteristic profiles were determined for each whiskey and the flavour congeners were quantified using 4-methyl-2-pentanol as the internal standard. Calibration ranges were determined for each of the congeners with coefficients of linearity ranging from 0.993 (butan-1-ol) to 0.999 (ethyl laurate) and relative standard deviations ranging from 2.5% (2-methylbutan-1-ol) to 21% (furfural) at a concentration of 18.2 mg/l. Detection limits ranged from 0.1 mg/l (ethyl caprate) to 21 mg/l (butan-2-ol). PMID:11093670

  3. Determination of the structural relaxation at the surface of amorphous solid dispersion using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Susumu; Ke, Peng; Buckton, Graham

    2009-06-01

    Amorphous dispersions provide an excellent way of increasing dissolution rates of poorly soluble drugs, but there may be concerns about stability. One way of assessing the stability of amorphous is the study of relaxation. In this study the relaxation at the surface of amorphous solid dispersions (SDs) was evaluated using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). A SD containing 70% indometacin and 30% PVP K30 was prepared by melt-quenching. The SD was put into the IGC and heated to 17 degrees C below T(g) for aging, during which time decane was injected repeatedly. The retention volume of decane decreased with aging time, indicating that the sample relaxed at the surface. During this storage no crystallization was observed by PXRD and DSC. Therefore, it is obvious that the change in this retention volume is due to the structural relaxation of the amorphous SD. The data of retention volume showed a good fit on a Kohlraush-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation and the indicator of the relaxation, tau(beta), was estimated. It was much lower than that of bulk relaxation estimated by DSC. Therefore, it can be concluded that the structural relaxation at the surface happens faster than that of the bulk. The potential significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:18837010

  4. Gas-phase synthesis of Mg-Ti nanoparticles for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Calizzi, M; Venturi, F; Ponthieu, M; Cuevas, F; Morandi, V; Perkisas, T; Bals, S; Pasquini, L

    2016-01-01

    Mg-Ti nanostructured samples with different Ti contents were prepared via compaction of nanoparticles grown by inert gas condensation with independent Mg and Ti vapour sources. The growth set-up offered the option to perform in situ hydrogen absorption before compaction. Structural and morphological characterisation was carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of an extended metastable solid solution of Ti in hcp Mg was detected up to 15 at% Ti in the as-grown nanoparticles, while after in situ hydrogen absorption, phase separation between MgH2 and TiH2 was observed. At a Ti content of 22 at%, a metastable Mg-Ti-H fcc phase was observed after in situ hydrogen absorption. The co-evaporation of Mg and Ti inhibited nanoparticle coalescence and crystallite growth in comparison with the evaporation of Mg only. In situ hydrogen absorption was beneficial to subsequent hydrogen behaviour, studied by high pressure differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal kinetics. A transformed fraction of 90% was reached within 100 s at 300 °C during both hydrogen absorption and desorption. The enthalpy of hydride formation was not observed to differ from bulk MgH2.

  5. [Determination of phthalate esters in Baiyangdian Lake by solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyan; Gao, Li; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Cai, Lipeng

    2010-05-01

    A simple method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was developed for the determination of trace amounts of phthalate esters (PAEs) in environment water samples. In this method, polydimethylsilane (PDMS) fiber was chosen to enrich the PAEs. The PAEs were extracted for 60 min using the PDMS fiber under stirring with a magnetic stir bar, after that the fiber was introduced into the GC injector port and the extract was desorbed at 250 degrees C for 4 min. Under the optimized conditions, 13 PAEs can be extracted completely and separated well. The limits of detection (LOD) were from 0.02 to 0. 83 microg/L (S/N = 3). The water samples collected from Baiyangdian lake were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, phthalic acid, bis-isobutyl ester (DIBP), phthalic acid, bis-butyl ester (DBP) and phthalic acid, bis-2-ethylhexyl ester (DEHP) were detected in all the samples. The spiked (2.5 microg/L and 5.0 microg/L) recoveries were in the range of 75.3-111.0% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 2.1% and 8.0% (n=3). The results showed that this would be a valuable method for PAEs analysis in environmental water samples. PMID:20812632

  6. Determination of fipronil by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, J L; Prieto, A; Araujo, L; Navalón, A

    2001-06-01

    A method for the determination of trace amounts of the insecticide fipronil was developed using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and selected ion monitoring. Fipronil was extracted with a fused-silica fiber coated with 85 microm polyacrylate. The effects of pH, ionic strength, sample volume, extraction and desorption times as well as the extraction temperature were studied. Lindane was used as an internal standard. The linear concentration range of application was 0.3-100 ng ml(-1) of fipronil, with a relative standard deviation of 9.5% (for a level of 50 ng ml(-1)) and a detection limit of 0.08 ng ml(-1). The method was applied to check the eventual existence of fipronil above this limit in water and soil samples from Granada (Spain) as well as in human urine samples. The method validation was completed with spiked matrix samples. The method can be applied as a monitoring tool for water, soil and urine, in the investigation of environmental and occupational exposure to fipronil.

  7. Electron emission in slow collisions of inert gas and reactive ions with W(110) partially covered by alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Hausmann, R.; Brenten, H.; Kempter, V.

    1993-05-01

    Electron energy spectra from slow (50 to 1000 eV) collisions of inert gas (He +, He 2+ and Ar +) and reactive (H +, N +) ions colliding under grazing incidence with W(110) surfaces are reported. The surface work function is varied by the exposure of the W(110) surface to alkali atoms. For clean W(110) the sequence of electronic transitions during a slow (50 eV, typically) collision is similar as reported for other clean metals: Auger capture processes involving two electrons from the surface dominate for all projectiles. For sufficiently large coverages by alkali atoms resonant capture of one or two surface electrons by the projectiles leads to the formation of excited states of the projectiles with one or two electrons occupying valence orbitals. These states decay by Auger deexcitation (Penning ionization) and intra-atomic Auger processes (autoionization and autodetachment), respectively. For the case of Ar + ions colliding with W(110) partially covered by potassium it is demonstrated that core vacancies (Ar3p -1) are created during the collision provided the kinetic energy of the projectile surmounts about 300 eV. Contributions from both potential and kinetic emission can then be seen in the spectra of the emitted electrons.

  8. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor short-term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The research reported here has been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These transients include loss of forced circulation without scram, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, moisture ingress, control rod and control rod group ejections, and a rapid core cooling event. For each event analyzed, an event description, a discussion of the analysis approach and assumptions, and results are presented. When possible, results of these analyses are compared with those presented by the designers in the MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document and in the MHTGR Probabilistic Risk Assessment. The importance of inherent safety features is illustrated, and conclusions are presented regarding the safety performance of the MHTGR. Recommendations are made for a more in-depth examination of MHTGR response for some of the analyzed transients. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is described in detail in Appendix A.

  9. Characterization of the Mobility and Reactivity of Water Molecules on TiO2 Nanoparticles by 1H Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Lili; Sun, Pingchuan; Zhou, Dongshan; Xue, Gi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding interfacial water behavior is essential to improving our understanding of the surface chemistry and interfacial properties of nanomaterials. Here using 1H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (1H SSNMR), we successfully monitored ligand exchange reaction between oleylamine (OLA) and adsorbed water on titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs). Three different types of interfacial waters with different reactivities were distinguished. The mobility of the adsorbed water molecules was characterized by dipolar filtered 1H SSNMR. Our experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water can be categorized into three different layers: rigid water species with restricted mobility closest to the surface of TiO2 NPs; less mobile water species weakly confined on TiO2 NPs; and water molecules with high mobility. Water in the third layer could be replaced by OLA, while water in the first and second layers remained intact. The finding that the interfacial water with the highest mobility has the strongest reactivity has guiding significance for tailoring the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of TiO2 NPs. We gratefully acknowledge support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21174062).

  10. Kinetics of gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-solid transfer of particles in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Rana, F.; Moitra, A.; Kacar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical models for transfer of particles from gas to liquid and from liquid to solid are introduced. The model for calculation of the pushing/engulfment transition in directionally solidified particulate metal matrix composites, considers process thermodynamics, process kinetics, thermophysical properties and buoyant forces. Based on processing variables (solidification velocity and direction) and on material variables (interface energies, particle size, particle and liquid density, volume fraction of particles and particle/liquid thermal conductivity ratio) four types of behavior were predicted. Also, two numerical models for liquid-to-solid transfer are discussed, as well as the limitations of presently available models.

  11. Measurement of solids motion in gas-fluidized beds. Technical progress report, 1 October 1982-31 December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.M.; Chao, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    This technical progress report covers the progress made during the fifth quarter of the project entitled Measurements of Solids Motion in Gas Fluidized Beds under Grant No. DOE-F22-81PC40804 during the period 1 October through 31 December 1982. The research concerns the measurement of solids particle velocity distribution and residence time distribution using the Computer-Aided Particle Tracking Facility (CAPTF) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The experimental equipment and measuring methods used to determine particle size distribution and particle motion and the results obtained are presented.

  12. Origin of interfacial nanoscopic gaseous domains and formation of dense gas layer at hydrophobic solid-water interface.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Birkett, Greg R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2013-12-10

    Interfacial gas enrichment (IGE) covering the entire area of hydrophobic solid-water interface has recently been detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hypothesized to be responsible for the unexpected stability and anomalous contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles and the significant change from DLVO to non-DLVO forces. In this paper, we provide further proof of the existence of IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) by molecular dynamic simulation. Nitrogen gas adsorption at the water-graphite interface is investigated using molecular dynamic simulation at 300 K and 1 atm normal pressure. The results show that a DGL with a density equivalent to a gas at pressure of 500 atm is formed and equilibrated with a normal pressure of 1 atm. By varying the number of gas molecules in the system, we observe several types of dense gas domains: aggregates, cylindrical caps, and DGLs. Spherical cap gas domains form during the simulation but are unstable and always revert to another type of gas domain. Furthermore, the calculated surface potential of the DGL-water interface, -17.5 mV, is significantly closer to 0 than the surface potential, -65 mV, of normal gas bubble-water interface. This result supports our previously stated hypothesis that the change in surface potential causes the switch from repulsion to attraction for an AFM tip when the graphite surface is covered by an IGE layer. The change in surface potential comes from the structure change of water molecules at the DGL-water interface as compared with the normal gas-water interface. In addition, the contact angle of the cylindrical cap high density nitrogen gas domains is 141°. This contact angle is far greater than 85° observed for water on graphite at ambient conditions and much closer to the 150° contact angle observed for nanobubbles in experiments.

  13. Field evaluation of a solid-based H2S scavenger for treating sour natural gas. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.S.; Shires, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is sponsoring an evaluation program for H2S scavenging technologies as part of an overall sulfur removal/recovery research program. The evaluation of a solid-based scavenger (Sulfa Treat) is the second in a series of full-scale field evaluations. The report presents the results of the evaluation conducted at a production plant in central Texas treating approximately 17 MMscfd of natural gas with 7 to 9 ppmv of H2S and 2.8% CO2 at 500 to 900 psig.

  14. The ratio of solid to gas phase CO in the line of sight to W33A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Allen, Mark; Maillard, Jean-Pierre

    1988-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the IR source W33A, obtained in the M band (4.6 microns) at resolution 0.057/cm using the Fourier-transform spectrometer at the Cassegrain focus of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on July 12-13, 1987, are reported. The spectrum is shown, and equivalent widths and CO column densities are presented in tables. The absorption lines detected indicate the presence of gas at both 23 and 120 K, attributed to the molecular-cloud core and gas near the source, respectively, but very little solid-phase CO.

  15. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  16. JSC systems using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacites in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1981-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 KN/sq meter (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change of temperature. A thermogravimetric analysis system employing these techniques of redox control and measurement is also described. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  17. Development of a Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid System Model for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeh, Joshua E.; Pratt, Joseph W.; Brouwer, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Recent interest in fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid applications for the aerospace industry has led to the need for accurate computer simulation models to aid in system design and performance evaluation. To meet this requirement, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and fuel processor models have been developed and incorporated into the Numerical Propulsion Systems Simulation (NPSS) software package. The SOFC and reformer models solve systems of equations governing steady-state performance using common theoretical and semi-empirical terms. An example hybrid configuration is presented that demonstrates the new capability as well as the interaction with pre-existing gas turbine and heat exchanger models. Finally, a comparison of calculated SOFC performance with experimental data is presented to demonstrate model validity. Keywords: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, Reformer, System Model, Aerospace, Hybrid System, NPSS

  18. Analysis of pressure drop characteristics and methods for calculating gas and gas-solid flow in horizontal pipes for dilute coal conveying system

    SciTech Connect

    Weiguo Pan; Zuohe Chi; Yongjing Liao

    1997-07-01

    This article reported pressure drop characteristics and methods for calculating friction factors {lambda} 0 and {lambda}{sub {mu}} for gas and gas-solids flows, respectively, in straight horizontal pipes are summarized advantages seed. The and disadvantages of calculating friction factor {lambda}{sub {mu}} through dimensional analysis in comparison with model simulation are analyzed. It is pointed out that model simulation is more suitable to engineering use than dimensional analysis. According to experimental results of dilute gas-coal powder flow in straight horizontal pipes of the coal pulverization system in a power plant; an empirical formula and a theoretical formula for calculating friction factor {lambda}{sub {mu}} in straight horizontal pipes transporting dilute coal powder are obtained.

  19. Low-temperature interface between the gas and solid phases of hard spheres with a short-ranged attraction.

    PubMed

    Sear, R P

    1999-06-01

    At low temperature, spheres with a very short-ranged attraction exist as a near-close-packed solid coexisting with an almost infinitely dilute gas. We find that the ratio of the interfacial tension between these two phases to the thermal energy diverges as the range of the attraction tends to zero. The large tensions when the interparticle attractions are short ranged may be why globular proteins only crystallize over a narrow range of conditions. PMID:11969672

  20. Modeling of gas turbine - solid oxide fuel cell systems for combined propulsion and power on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel Francis

    This dissertation investigates the use of gas turbine (GT) engine integrated solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in aircraft with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The concept offers a number of advantages: the GT absorbs many SOFC balance of plant functions (supplying fuel, air, and heat to the fuel cell) thereby reducing the number of components in the system; the GT supplies fuel and pressurized air that significantly increases SOFC performance; heat and unreacted fuel from the SOFC are recaptured by the GT cycle offsetting system-level losses; good transient response of the GT cycle compensates for poor transient response of the SOFC. The net result is a system that can supply more electrical power more efficiently than comparable engine-generator systems with only modest (<10%) decrease in power density. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors, and three GT engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed that account for equilibrium gas phase and electrochemical reaction, pressure losses, and heat losses in ways that capture `down-the-channel' effects (a level of fidelity necessary for making meaningful performance, mass, and volume estimates). Models are created in a NASA-developed environment called Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). A sensitivity analysis identifies important design parameters and translates uncertainties in model parameters into uncertainties in overall performance. GT-SOFC integrations reduce fuel burn 3-4% in 50 kW systems on 35 kN rated engines (all types) with overall uncertainty <1%. Reductions of 15-20% are possible at the 200 kW power level. GT-SOFCs are also able to provide more electric power (factors >3 in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. Aerodynamic drag effects of engine-airframe integration are by far the most important

  1. A gas-diffusion flow injection method coupled with online solid-liquid extraction for the determination of ammonium in solid samples.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Irina I; Bulatov, Andrey V; Moskvin, Aleksey L; Kolev, Spas D

    2015-09-01

    A simple, rapid and reliable gas-diffusion flow injection (GD-FI) method for ammonium determination in building materials has been developed. It is based on leaching ammonium from a ground solid sample into an alkaline solution with subsequent ammonia gas generation. Ammonia is then transported in a nitrogen stream to the GD cell of the FI system where it is absorbed into its acceptor solution containing a mixture of the acid-base indicators cresol red and thymol blue. The maximum increase in the absorbance of the acceptor solution at 580 nm is related to the ammonium concentration in the solid sample. The proposed method is characterized by a linear concentration range of 0.1-5.0 mg NH4(+) kg(-1), a limit of detection of 8 μg NH4(+) kg(-1) and a sample throughput of 10h(-1). A successful application of this method for the determination of ammonium in building materials such as concrete, cement and sand is reported.

  2. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S∧4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S∧4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively.

  3. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S and 4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respect0011ive.

  4. Unsteady Euler/Lagrange simulation of a confined bluff-body gas-solid turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrigui, Mouldi; Hidouri, Ammar; Sadiki, Amsini; Janicka, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    An unsteady Euler-Lagrangian approach is adopted to predict the gaseous carrier and disperse phases flow dynamics. The turbulence is captured using two different methods, i.e. the unsteady Reynolds averaging based numerical simulation (URANS) and the large eddy simulation (LES). In the latter one, the dynamic Smagorinsky approach is used to model the sub-grid scale stresses. The time-dependent solid particle and gas phase flow properties of a confined bluff-body turbulent flow including two-way coupling effects are evaluated through comparisons with experimental data. The configuration under study features an important recirculation zone and has a mass loading of 22%. So, collision effects are not considered while tracking the disperse phase that consists of glass beads. A thermodynamically consistent turbulence modulation approach is applied for the determination of the source terms that account for the effect of particles on the turbulence level of the carrier phase. Within the URANS technique the dispersion of particles is captured by the Markov sequence approach; this model is modified by integrating a drift factor term while modeling the pressure gradient. A particular emphasis is put on the disperse phase feedback on the carrier phase and coupling procedure within each Eulerian time step along with an unsteady coupling of both codes, the (Eulerian) FASTEST3D and the (Lagrangian) LAG3D codes. Quantitative results of the disperse phase properties as well as those of the carrier phase are presented at different positions around the recirculation zone. The numerical results using both, the LES and/or the URANS delivered comparable results that agree reasonably with experimental data. However, a slight advantage of LES over URANS could be observed.

  5. CO{sub 2} Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Fillerup, Eric; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Wang, Dongxiang; Guo, Jiahua; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2012-08-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of solid, regenerable polymeric molecular basket sorbent (MBS) for more cost-efficient capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective MBS sorbent with better thermal stability. To improve the cost-effectiveness of MBS, we have explored commercially available and inexpensive support to replace the more expensive mesoporous molecular sieves like MCM-41 and SBA- 15. In addition, we have developed some advanced sorbent materials with 3D pore structure such as hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) to improve the CO{sub 2} working capacity of MBS, which can also reduce the cost for the whole CO{sub 2} capture process. During the project duration, the concern regarding the desorption rate of MBS sorbents has been raised, because lower desorption rate increases the desorption time for complete regeneration of the sorbent which in turn leads to a lower working capacity if the regeneration time is limited. Thus, the improvement in the thermal stability of MBS became a vital task for later part of this project. The improvement in the thermal stability was performed via increasing the polymer density either using higher molecular weight PEI or PEI cross-linking with an organic compound. Moreover, we have used the computational approach to estimate the interaction of CO{sub 2} with different MBSs for the fundamental understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption, which may benefit the development, design and modification of the sorbents and the process.

  6. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Nemes, László; Keszler, Anna M; Hornkohl, James O; Parigger, Christian G

    2005-06-20

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (Hbeta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 10(16) cm(-3) range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma.

  7. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Laszlo; Keszler, Anna M.; Hornkohl, James O.; Parigger, Christian

    2005-06-20

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (H{sub b}eta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 1016 cm{sup -3} range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma.

  8. A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Greg, G.

    2007-03-31

    A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

  9. Gas-solid flows - 1986; Proceedings of the Fourth Fluid Mechanics, Plasma Dynamics, and Lasers Conference, Atlanta, GA, May 11-14, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurewicz, J. T.

    Papers are presented on deposition and resuspension of gas-borne particles in recirculating turbulent flows, particle dispersion in decaying isotropic homogeneous turbulence, turbulent dispersion of droplets for air flow in a pipe, a comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian model approaches to turbulent particle dispersion, and the effect of turbulent electrohydrodynamics on electrostatic precipitator efficiency. Also considered are errors due to turbidity in particle sizing using laser Doppler velocimetry, particle motion in a fluidically oscillating jet, high pressure steam/water jet measurements using a portable particle sizing laser Doppler system, the effect of particle shape on pressure drop in a turbulent gas/solid suspension, and the experimental study of gas solid flows in pneumatic conveying. Other topics include entropy production and pressure loss in gas-solid flows, a computational study of turbulent gas-particle flow in a Venturi, a numerical analysis of confined recirculating gas-solid turbulent flows, nozzle and free jet flows of gas particle mixtures, and particle separation in pulsed airflow. Papers are also presented on sampling of solid particles in clouds, particle motion near the inlet of a sampling probe, the effects of slot injection on blade erosion in direct coal-fueled gas turbines, bed diameter effects and incipient slugging in gas fluidized beds, and sedimentation of air fluidized fine graphite particles by methanol vapor.

  10. Development of modified flyash as a permeable reactive barrier medium for a former manufactured gas plant site, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Phillips, D. H.; McGeough, K. L.; Walsh, K. P.; Kalin, R. M.

    2006-05-01

    A sequential biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was determined to be the best option for remediating groundwater that has become contaminated with a wide range of organic contaminants (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons), heavy metals (i.e., lead and arsenic), and cyanide at a former manufactured gas plant after 150 years of operation in Portadown, Northern Ireland. The objective of this study was to develop a modified flyash that could be used in the initial cell within a sequential biological PRB to filter complex contaminated groundwater containing ammonium. Flyash modified with lime (CaOH) and alum was subjected to a series of batch tests which investigated the modified cation exchange capacity (CEC) and rate of removal of anions and cations from the solution. These tests showed that a high flyash composition medium (80%) could remove 8.65 mol of ammonium contaminant for every kilogram of medium. The modified CEC procedure ruled out the possibility of cation exchange as the major removal mechanism. The medium could also adsorb anions as well as cations (i.e., Pb and Cr), but not with the same capacity. The initial mechanism for Pb and Cr removal is probably precipitation. This is followed by sorption, which is possibly the only mechanism for the removal of dichromate anions. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed very small (<1 μm) cubic highly crystalline precipitates on the flyash, although this new crystalline zeolite growth did not occur rapidly enough to enable productive zeolite formation. Surface area measurements showed that biofilm growth on the medium could be a major factor in the comparative reduction of surface area between real and synthetic contaminant groundwaters. The modified flyash was found to be a highly sorptive granular material that did not inhibit microbiological activity, however, leaching tests revealed that the medium would fail as a long-term barrier material.

  11. Land, irrigation water, greenhouse gas, and reactive nitrogen burdens of meat, eggs, and dairy production in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Gidon; Shepon, Alon; Makov, Tamar; Milo, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Livestock production impacts air and water quality, ocean health, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on regional to global scales and it is the largest use of land globally. Quantifying the environmental impacts of the various livestock categories, mostly arising from feed production, is thus a grand challenge of sustainability science. Here, we quantify land, irrigation water, and reactive nitrogen (Nr) impacts due to feed production, and recast published full life cycle GHG emission estimates, for each of the major animal-based categories in the US diet. Our calculations reveal that the environmental costs per consumed calorie of dairy, poultry, pork, and eggs are mutually comparable (to within a factor of 2), but strikingly lower than the impacts of beef. Beef production requires 28, 11, 5, and 6 times more land, irrigation water, GHG, and Nr, respectively, than the average of the other livestock categories. Preliminary analysis of three staple plant foods shows two- to sixfold lower land, GHG, and Nr requirements than those of the nonbeef animal-derived calories, whereas irrigation requirements are comparable. Our analysis is based on the best data currently available, but follow-up studies are necessary to improve parameter estimates and fill remaining knowledge gaps. Data imperfections notwithstanding, the key conclusion—that beef production demands about 1 order of magnitude more resources than alternative livestock categories—is robust under existing uncertainties. The study thus elucidates the multiple environmental benefits of potential, easy-to-implement dietary changes, and highlights the uniquely high resource demands of beef. PMID:25049416

  12. Land, irrigation water, greenhouse gas, and reactive nitrogen burdens of meat, eggs, and dairy production in the United States.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Gidon; Shepon, Alon; Makov, Tamar; Milo, Ron

    2014-08-19

    Livestock production impacts air and water quality, ocean health, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on regional to global scales and it is the largest use of land globally. Quantifying the environmental impacts of the various livestock categories, mostly arising from feed production, is thus a grand challenge of sustainability science. Here, we quantify land, irrigation water, and reactive nitrogen (Nr) impacts due to feed production, and recast published full life cycle GHG emission estimates, for each of the major animal-based categories in the US diet. Our calculations reveal that the environmental costs per consumed calorie of dairy, poultry, pork, and eggs are mutually comparable (to within a factor of 2), but strikingly lower than the impacts of beef. Beef production requires 28, 11, 5, and 6 times more land, irrigation water, GHG, and Nr, respectively, than the average of the other livestock categories. Preliminary analysis of three staple plant foods shows two- to sixfold lower land, GHG, and Nr requirements than those of the nonbeef animal-derived calories, whereas irrigation requirements are comparable. Our analysis is based on the best data currently available, but follow-up studies are necessary to improve parameter estimates and fill remaining knowledge gaps. Data imperfections notwithstanding, the key conclusion--that beef production demands about 1 order of magnitude more resources than alternative livestock categories--is robust under existing uncertainties. The study thus elucidates the multiple environmental benefits of potential, easy-to-implement dietary changes, and highlights the uniquely high resource demands of beef. PMID:25049416

  13. Improving the chemical compatibility of sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells: Blocking the reactive species by controlled crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng; Zou, Qi; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Tang, Dian; Yang, Hiswen

    2012-10-01

    The chemical compatibility of sealing glass is of great importance for Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this work, the interfacial reaction between sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloy is characterized by reacting Cr2O3 powders with a representative SrO-containing glass crystallized by different heat-treatment schedules. The crystalline structure and crystalline content of sealing glass are determined by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the fraction of Cr6+ decreases from 39.8 ± 1.9% for quenched glass to 8.2 ± 0.4% for glass crystallized at 900 °C for 2 h. In addition, the interfacial reaction can be further reduced with increasing crystallization temperature and time as well as the addition of nucleation agent (TiO2). The formation of some Sr-containing crystalline phases, Sr2SiO4 and Sr(TiO3), contributes to the improvement of chemical compatibility of sealing glass, in agreement with the results of thermodynamic calculations.

  14. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  15. Stack configurations for tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Timothy R.; Trammell, Michael P.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    2010-08-31

    A fuel cell unit includes an array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes having porous metallic exterior surfaces, interior fuel cell layers, and interior surfaces, each of the tubes having at least one open end; and, at least one header in operable communication with the array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes for directing a first reactive gas into contact with the porous metallic exterior surfaces and for directing a second reactive gas into contact with the interior surfaces, the header further including at least one busbar disposed in electrical contact with at least one surface selected from the group consisting of the porous metallic exterior surfaces and the interior surfaces.

  16. Effects of Gas-Phase Radiation and Detailed Kinetics on the Burning and Extinction of a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first attempt to analyze both radiation and detailed kinetics on the burning and extinction of a solid fuel in a stagnation-point diffusion flame. We present a detailed and comparatively accurate computational model of a solid fuel flame along with a quantitative study of the kinetics mechanism, radiation interactions, and the extinction limits of the flame. A detailed kinetics model for the burning of solid trioxane (a trimer of formaldehyde) is coupled with a narrowband radiation model, with carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and water vapor as the gas-phase participating media. The solution of the solid trioxane diffusion flame over the flammable regime is presented in some detail, as this is the first solution of a heterogeneous trioxane flame. We identify high-temperature and low-temperature reaction paths for the heterogeneous trioxane flame. We then compare the adiabatic solution to solutions that include Surface radiation only and gas-phase and surface radiation using a black surface model. The analysis includes discussion of detailed flame chemistry over the flammable regime and, in particular, at the low stretch extinction limit. We emphasize the low stretch regime of the radiatively participating flame, since this is the region representative of microgravity flames. When only surface radiation is included, two extinction limits exist (the blow-off limit, and the low stretch radiative limit), and the burning rate and maximum flame temperatures are lower, as expected. With the inclusion of surface and gas-phase radiation, results show that, while flame temperatures are lower, the burning rate of the trioxane diffusion flame may actually increase at low stretch rate due to radiative feedback from the flame to the surface.

  17. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  18. Steam-gas installations with closed-cycle gasification of solid fuels under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, N. M.; Prutkovskii, E. N.; Korsov, Iu. G.; Bachilo, L. L.

    1980-12-01

    The practicality of constructing steam-gas installations with closed-cycle coal gasification using pressurized steam-blast is discussed. A comparative analysis of steam-gas plants of various designs is performed; an installation which provides maximum efficiency with 'wet' cleaning of gas is presented. The design parameters of 250 and 100 MWt installations are specified.

  19. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  20. The COSmIC/THS experiment: gas and solid phase studies of Titan aerosol simulants produced at cold temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-OBrien, E. M.; Upton, K.; Beauchamp, J. L.; Salama, F.

    2013-12-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, a complex chemistry between N2 and CH4 occurs at temperatures lower than 200K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature, and in particular to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs), potential precursors to Titan's solid aerosols. In the COSmIC/THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K measured by optical emission spectroscopy). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of trace elements present on Titan. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) for the gas phase; Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Infrared (IR) spectroscopy for the solid phase. Previous TOF-MS mass spectrometry analyses of the gas phase have demonstrated that the COSmIC/THS experiment can be used to study the first and intermediate steps as well as specific chemical pathways of Titan's atmospheric chemistry. The more complex chemistry, observed in the gas phase when adding trace elements to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, has been confirmed by an extensive study of the

  1. New alternative for electricity production. Part 3: Electricity production from biomass and natural gas by a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekinen, Tuula; Leppaelahti, Jukka; Kurkela, Esa; Solantausta, Yrjoe

    1992-09-01

    Solid oxide cells of different kinds are being tested primarily on a laboratory scale. A tube cell has already been tested and the experience obtained has been promising. The efficiency of the equipment used in the tests was 3 kW. The aim is to construct plants of 100 to 200 kW by the year 1996. These plants could be used as a basis for future power plant concepts. In planar cells and in a monolithic cell the losses can be significantly lower and the power density higher than in a tube cell construction. The efficiencies of these cells have so far been only 100 to 200 W in laboratory tests. The development of solid oxide cells to a power plant size class requires materials superior to the present cell materials and the development of the manufacturing technology of cell components. Efficiency assessments of three power plant processes based on the solid oxide fuel cell were carried out. Two of the processes are based on fluidized bed air gasification of wood and one on the use of natural gas. A combined cycle process based on pressurized fluidized bed air gasification of wood and a natural gas combined cycle process were used as references. The effect of two fuel cell parameters, the utilization ratio of fuel and the voltage of the cell, on the operation of the processes was studied. By connecting the fuel cell as a part to the combined cycle power plant process the electric efficiency and construction degree of the power plant processes was increased significantly. The efficiency of the fuel cell process based on pressurized gasification of wood was about 10 percentage units higher than that without the fuel cell. The improvement in the efficiency of the natural gas process was more than 20 percentage units. The electric efficiency of the natural gas process was about 70%.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring the gas permeability of a solid sample

    DOEpatents

    Carstens, D.H.W.

    1984-01-27

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the permeability of a gas in a sample. The gas is allowed to reach a steady flow rate through the sample. A measurable amount of the gas is collected during a given time period and then delivered to a sensitive quadrupole. The quadrupole signal, adjusted for background, is proportional to the amount of gas collected during the time period. The quadrupole can be calibrated with a standard helium leak. The gas can be deuterium and the sample can be polyvinyl alcohol.

  3. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  4. The design of stationary and mobile solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    A general thermodynamic model has shown that combined fuel cell cycles may reach an electric-efficiency of more than 80%. This value is one of the targets of the Department of Energy (DOE) solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) program. The combination of a SOFC and GT connects the air flow of the heat engine and the cell cooling. The principle strategy in order to reach high electrical-efficiencies is to avoid a high excess air for the cell cooling and heat losses. Simple combined SOFC-GT cycles show an efficiency between 60 and 72%. The combination of the SOFC and the GT can be done by using an external cooling or by dividing the stack into multiple sub-stacks with a GT behind each sub-stack as the necessary heat sink. The heat exchangers (HEXs) of a system with an external cooling have the benefit of a pressurization on both sides and therefore, have a high heat exchange coefficient. The pressurization on both sides delivers a low stress to the HEX material. The combination of both principles leads to a reheat (RH)-SOFC-GT cycle that can be improved by a steam turbine (ST) cycle. The first results of a study of such a RH-SOFC-GT-ST cycle indicate that a cycle design with an efficiency of more than 80% is possible and confirm the predictions by the theoretical thermodynamic model mentioned above. The extremely short heat-up time of a thin tubular SOFC and the market entrance of the micro-turbines give the option of using these SOFC-GT designs for mobile applications. The possible use of hydrocarbons such as diesel oil is an important benefit of the SOFC. The micro-turbine and the SOFC stack will be matched depending on the start-up requirements of the mobile system. The minimization of the volume needed is a key issue. The efficiency of small GTs is lower than the efficiency of large GTs due to the influence of the leakage within the stages of GTs increasing with a decreasing size of the GT. Thus, the SOFC module pressure must be lower than in larger

  5. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  6. On vertical variations of gas flow in protoplanetary disks and their impact on the transport of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, E.

    2013-03-01

    A major uncertainty in accretion disk theory is the nature and properties of gas turbulence, which drives transport in protoplanetary disks. The commonly used viscous prescription for the Maxwell-Reynolds stress tensor gives rise to a meridional circulation where flow is outward near the midplane and inward away from it. This meridional circulation has been proposed as an explanation for the presence of high-temperature minerals (believed to be of inner solar system provenance) in comets. However, it has not been observed in simulations of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence so far. In this study, we evaluate the extent to which the net transport of solids can be diagnostic of the existence of meridional circulation. To that end, we propose and motivate a prescription for MHD turbulence which has the same free parameters as the viscous one. We compare the effects of both prescriptions on the radial transport of small solid particles and find that their net, vertically integrated radial flux is actually quite insensitive to the flow structure for a given vertical average of the turbulence parameter α, which we explain. Given current uncertainties on disk turbulence, one-dimensional models are thus most appropriate to investigate radial transport of solids. A corollary is that the presence of high-temperature material in comets cannot be considered an unequivocal diagnostic of meridional circulation. In fact, we argue that outward transport in viscous disk models with inward net accretion is more properly attributed to turbulent diffusion rather than to the mean flows of the gas.

  7. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO. (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma.

  8. Responses of solid tumor cells in DMEM to reactive oxygen species generated by non-thermal plasma and chemically induced ROS systems.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydroxyl radical (HO·), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO· (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma. PMID:25715710

  9. Study of solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces in Cu-isoleucine complex by surface X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Pilar; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-02-01

    The enzymes could be understood like structures formed by amino acids bonded with metals, which act as active sites. The research on the coordination of metal-amino acid complexes will bring light on the behavior of metal enzymes, due to the close relation existing between the atomic structure and the functionality. The Cu-isoleucine bond is considered as a good model system to attain a better insight into the characteristics of naturally occurring copper metalloproteins. The surface structure of metal-amino acid complex could be considered as a more realistic model for real systems under biologic working conditions, since the molecular packing is decreased. In the surface, the structural constrains are reduced, keeping the structural capability of surface complex to change as a function of the surrounding environment. In this work, we present a surface X-ray diffraction study on Cu-isoleucine complex under different ambient conditions. Cu(Ile)2 crystals of about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm have been growth, by seeding method in a supersaturated solution, presenting a surface of high quality. The sample for the surface diffraction study was mounted on a cell specially designed for solid/liquid or solid/gas interface analysis. The Cu-isoleucine crystal was measured under a protective dry N2 gas flow and in contact with a saturated metal amino acid solution. The bulk and the surface signals were compared, showing different atomic structures. In both cases, from surface diffraction data, it is observed that the atomic structure of the top layer undergoes a clear structural deformation. A non-uniform surface relaxation is observed producing an inhomogeneous displacement of the surface atoms towards the surface normal.

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases from rice production with simultaneous incorporation of wheat straw and nitrogen fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Longlong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ma, Shutan; Wang, Jinyang; Wang, Shuwei; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Impacts of simultaneous inputs of crop straw and nitrogen (N) fertilizer on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and N losses from rice production are not well understood. A 2-year field experiment was established in a rice-wheat cropping system in the Taihu Lake region (TLR) of China to evaluate the GHG intensity (GHGI) as well as reactive N intensity (NrI) of rice production with inputs of wheat straw and N fertilizer. The field experiment included five treatments of different N fertilization rates for rice production: 0 (RN0), 120 (RN120), 180 (RN180), 240 (RN240), and 300 kg N ha-1 (RN300, traditional N application rate in the TLR). Wheat straws were fully incorporated into soil before rice transplantation. The meta-analytic technique was employed to evaluate various Nr losses. Results showed that the response of rice yield to N rate successfully fitted a quadratic model, while N fertilization promoted Nr discharges exponentially (nitrous oxide emission, N leaching, and runoff) or linearly (ammonia volatilization). The GHGI of rice production ranged from 1.20 (RN240) to 1.61 kg CO2 equivalent (CO2 eq) kg-1 (RN0), while NrI varied from 2.14 (RN0) to 10.92 g N kg-1 (RN300). Methane (CH4) emission dominated the GHGI with a proportion of 70.2-88.6 % due to direct straw incorporation, while ammonia (NH3) volatilization dominated the NrI with proportion of 53.5-57.4 %. Damage costs to environment incurred by GHG and Nr releases from current rice production (RN300) accounted for 8.8 and 4.9 % of farmers' incomes, respectively. Cutting N application rate from 300 (traditional N rate) to 240 kg N ha-1 could improve rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency by 2.14 and 10.30 %, respectively, while simultaneously reducing GHGI by 13 %, NrI by 23 %, and total environmental costs by 16 %. Moreover, the reduction of 60 kg N ha-1 improved farmers' income by CNY 639 ha-1, which would provide them with an incentive to change the current N application rate. Our study suggests that GHG

  11. Efficiency analysis of a hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Roland; Deja, Robert; Engelbracht, Maximilian; Frank, Matthias; Nguyen, Van Nhu; Blum, Ludger; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes different hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system layouts. It begins with a simple system layout without any anode off-gas recirculation, continues with a configuration equipped with off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation and then considers a layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop. Operational parameters such as stack fuel utilization, as well as the recirculation rate, are modified, with the aim of achieving the highest efficiency values. Drawing on experiments and the accumulated experience of the SOFC group at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, a set of operational parameters were defined and applied to the simulations. It was found that anode off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation, improves electrical efficiency by up to 11.9 percentage-points compared to a layout without recirculation of the same stack fuel utilization. A system layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop was also found to be capable of reaching electrical efficiencies of more than 61%.

  12. A DMPA Langmuir monolayer study: from gas to solid phase. An atomistic description by molecular dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Giner-Casares, J J; Camacho, L; Martín-Romero, M T; Cascales, J J López

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a DMPA Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, an atomistic picture of a Langmuir monolayer was drawn from its expanded gas phase to its final solid condensed one. In this sense, some properties of monolayers that were traditionally poorly or even not reproduced in computer simulations, such as lipid domain formation or pressure-area per lipid isotherm, were properly reproduced in this work. Thus, the physical laws that control the lipid domain formation in the gas phase and the structure of lipid monolayers from the gas to solid condensed phase were studied. Thanks to the atomistic information provided by the molecular dynamics simulations, we were able to add valuable information to the experimental description of these processes and to access experimental data related to the lipid monolayers in their expanded phase, which is difficult or inaccessible to study by experimental techniques. In this sense, properties such as lipids head hydration and lipid structure were studied.

  13. A DMPA Langmuir monolayer study: from gas to solid phase. An atomistic description by molecular dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Giner-Casares, J J; Camacho, L; Martín-Romero, M T; Cascales, J J López

    2008-03-01

    In this work, a DMPA Langmuir monolayer at the air/water interface was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, an atomistic picture of a Langmuir monolayer was drawn from its expanded gas phase to its final solid condensed one. In this sense, some properties of monolayers that were traditionally poorly or even not reproduced in computer simulations, such as lipid domain formation or pressure-area per lipid isotherm, were properly reproduced in this work. Thus, the physical laws that control the lipid domain formation in the gas phase and the structure of lipid monolayers from the gas to solid condensed phase were studied. Thanks to the atomistic information provided by the molecular dynamics simulations, we were able to add valuable information to the experimental description of these processes and to access experimental data related to the lipid monolayers in their expanded phase, which is difficult or inaccessible to study by experimental techniques. In this sense, properties such as lipids head hydration and lipid structure were studied. PMID:18225932

  14. MODULAR APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF INHALED REACTIVE GAS DOSIMETRY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATORY TRACT TOXICITY: CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled reactive gases typically cause respiratory tract toxicity with a prominent proximal to distal lesion pattern. This pattern is largely driven by airflow and interspecies differences between rodents and humans result from factors such as airway architecture, ventilation ra...

  15. Reactive landing of gas-phase ions as a tool for the fabrication of metal oxide surfaces for in situ phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Blacken, Grady R; Volný, Michael; Diener, Matthew; Jackson, Karl E; Ranjitkar, Pratistha; Maly, Dustin J; Turecek, Frantisek

    2009-06-01

    Zirconium, titanium, and hafnium oxide-coated stainless steel surfaces are fabricated by reactive landing of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization of group IVB metal alkoxides. The surfaces are used for in situ enrichment of phosphopeptides before analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. To evaluate this method we characterized ZrO(2) (zirconia) surfaces by (1) comparison with the other group IVB metal oxides of TiO(2) (titania) and HfO(2) (hafnia), (2) morphological characterization by SEM image analysis, and (3) dependence of phosphopeptide enrichment on the metal oxide layer thickness. Furthermore, we evaluated the necessity of the reactive landing process for the construction of useful metal oxide surfaces by preparing surfaces by electrospray deposition of Zr, Ti, and Hf alkoxides directly onto polished metal surfaces at atmospheric pressure. Although all three metal oxide surfaces evaluated were capable of phosphopeptide enrichment from complex peptide mixtures, zirconia performed better than hafnia or titania as a result of morphological characteristics illustrated by the SEM analysis. Metal oxide coatings that were fabricated by atmospheric pressure deposition were still capable of in situ phosphopeptide enrichment, although with inferior efficiency and surface durability. We show that zirconia surfaces prepared by reactive landing of gas-phase ions can be a useful tool for high throughput screening of novel phosphorylation sites and quantitation of phosphorylation kinetics.

  16. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  17. A gas-tight Cu Kα x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H.

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF4(g)/SiO2(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 °C) from a condensed source (TiF4 powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 μm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 μm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO2 specimens (diatom frustules or Stöber spheres) above TiF4 powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 °C to allow for internal generation of TiF4(g). The TiF4(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO2 specimen to yield a TiOF2(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu Kα x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO2 consumption and/or TiOF2 formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF4(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  18. Reactivity of oxygen radical anions bound to scandia nanoparticles in the gas phase: C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Hua; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ma, Tong-Mei

    2014-01-20

    The activation of C-H bonds in alkanes is currently a hot research topic in chemistry. The atomic oxygen radical anion (O(-·)) is an important species in C-H activation. The mechanistic details of C-H activation by O(-·) radicals can be well understood by studying the reactions between O(-·) containing transition metal oxide clusters and alkanes. Here the reactivity of scandium oxide cluster anions toward n-butane was studied by using a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a fast flow reactor. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from n-butane by (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters was observed. The reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters is significantly sizedependent and the highest reactivity was observed for N=4 (Sc8O13(-)) and 12 (Sc24O37(-)). Larger (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) clusters generally have higher reactivity than the smaller ones. Density functional theory calculations were performed to interpret the reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-5) clusters, which were found to contain the O(-·) radicals as the active sites. The local charge environment around the O(-·) radicals was demonstrated to control the experimentally observed size-dependent reactivity. This work is among the first to report HAA reactivity of cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize toward alkane molecules. The anionic O(-·) containing scandium oxide clusters are found to be more reactive than the corresponding cationic ones in the C-H bond activation. PMID:24338790

  19. Solid-, solution-, and gas-state NMR monitoring of ¹³C-cellulose degradation in an anaerobic microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Shino, Amiu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-07-29

    Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. ¹³C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and ¹³C-¹³C/¹³C-¹²C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of ¹³C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  20. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    *160*400 mm), light (8 kg) and provides a good time resolution (50-60 sec). The method is able to operate in ambient conditions, requires no external carrier gas, and an internal battery provides power for ca. 12 hours which makes the instrument suitable for outdoor field campaigns. The GC-PID detection limit for pyrrole is 3 ppb, which is adequate for this application and total OH reactivity can be measured under optimum conditions down to 4 sec-1. The new set-up has been tested in parallel to previously validated PTR-MS measurements for CRM in laboratory experiments, a plant chamber, and boreal forest field studies. Advantages and drawbacks of the new technique are discussed. Although the polymerization of pyrrole on the detector window remains a weakness in the present version of the system, in general the GC-PID produces acceptable results. [1] Calpini et al, 1999, Analusis, 27, 328 [2] Kovacs and Brune. 2001, Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 39, 105-122 [3] V. Sinha et al, 2008, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 2213-2227 [4] http://www.environics-iut.de/

  1. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part 1 - Verification studies

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Li, Tingwen; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-04-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware, it is now possible to perform large simulations of granular flows using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). As a result, solids are increasingly treated in a discrete Lagrangian fashion in the gas–solids flow community. In this paper, the open-source MFIX-DEM software is described that can be used for simulating the gas–solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles. This method is referred to as the continuum discrete method (CDM) to clearly make a distinction between the ambiguity of using a Lagrangian or Eulerian reference for either continuum or discrete formulations. This freely available CDM code for gas–solids flows can accelerate the research in computational gas–solids flows and establish a baseline that can lead to better closures for the continuum modeling (or traditionally referred to as two fluid model) of gas–solids flows. In this paper, a series of verification cases is employed which tests the different aspects of the code in a systematic fashion by exploring specific physics in gas–solids flows before exercising the fully coupled solution on simple canonical problems. It is critical to have an extensively verified code as the physics is complex with highly-nonlinear coupling, and it is difficult to ascertain the accuracy of the results without rigorous verification. These series of verification tests set the stage not only for rigorous validation studies (performed in part II of this paper) but also serve as a procedure for testing any new developments that couple continuum and discrete formulations for gas–solids flows.

  2. Open Source MFIX-DEM Software for Gas-Solids Flows: Part 1 - Verification Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Li, Tingwen; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-04-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware, it is now possible to perform large simulations of granular flows using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). As a result, solids are increasingly treated in a discrete Lagrangian fashion in the gas–solids flow community. In this paper, the open-source MFIX-DEM software is described that can be used for simulating the gas–solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles. This method is referred to as the continuum discrete method (CDM) to clearly make a distinction between the ambiguity of using a Lagrangian or Eulerian reference for either continuum or discrete formulations. This freely available CDM code for gas–solids flows can accelerate the research in computational gas–solids flows and establish a baseline that can lead to better closures for the continuum modeling (or traditionally referred to as two fluid model) of gas–solids flows. In this paper, a series of verification cases is employed which tests the different aspects of the code in a systematic fashion by exploring specific physics in gas–solids flows before exercising the fully coupled solution on simple canonical problems. It is critical to have an extensively verified code as the physics is complex with highly-nonlinear coupling, and it is difficult to ascertain the accuracy of the results without rigorous verification. These series of verification tests set the stage not only for rigorous validation studies (performed in part II of this paper) but also serve as a procedure for testing any new developments that couple continuum and discrete formulations for gas–solids flows.

  3. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2015-10-14

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability.

  4. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Sung Kim, Dong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability.

  5. Gas-phase reactions of cationic vanadium-phosphorus oxide clusters with C2H(x) (x=4, 6): a DFT-based analysis of reactivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinhao; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-02-25

    The reactivities of the adamantane-like heteronuclear vanadium-phosphorus oxygen cluster ions [V(x)P(4-x)O(10)](.+) (x=0, 2-4) towards hydrocarbons strongly depend on the V/P ratio of the clusters. Possible mechanisms for the gas-phase reactions of these heteronuclear cations with ethene and ethane have been elucidated by means of DFT-based calculations; homolytic C-H bond activation constitutes the initial step, and for all systems the P-O(.) unit of the clusters serves as the reactive site. More complex oxidation processes, such as oxygen-atom transfer to, or oxidative dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbons require the presence of a vanadium atom to provide the electronic prerequisites which are necessary to bring about the 2e(-) reduction of the cationic clusters.

  6. Gas-Phase Reactions of Cationic Vanadium-Phosphorus Oxide Clusters with C2Hx (x=4, 6): A DFT-Based Analysis of Reactivity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dietl, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinhao; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The reactivities of the adamantane-like heteronuclear vanadium-phosphorus oxygen cluster ions [VxP4−xO10].+ (x=0, 2–4) towards hydrocarbons strongly depend on the V/P ratio of the clusters. Possible mechanisms for the gas-phase reactions of these heteronuclear cations with ethene and ethane have been elucidated by means of DFT-based calculations; homolytic C–H bond activation constitutes the initial step, and for all systems the P–O. unit of the clusters serves as the reactive site. More complex oxidation processes, such as oxygen-atom transfer to, or oxidative dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbons require the presence of a vanadium atom to provide the electronic prerequisites which are necessary to bring about the 2e− reduction of the cationic clusters. PMID:23322620

  7. Room temperature gas-solid reaction of titanium on glass surfaces forming a very low resistivity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Hugo; Clark, Neville; Azofeifa, Daniel; Avendano, E.

    2016-09-01

    Titanium films were deposited on quartz, glass, polyamide and PET substrates in a high vacuum system at room temperature and their electrical resistance monitored in vacuo as a function of thickness. These measurements indicate that a low electrical resistance layer is formed in a gas-solid reaction during the condensation of the initial layers of Ti on glass and quartz substrates. Layers begin to show relative low electrical resistance at around 21 nm for glass and 9nm for quartz. Samples deposited on polyamide and PET do not show this low resistance feature.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Gas-Fluid and Fluid-Solid Phase Instability for Restricted Primitive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2009-08-01

    By considering the fluctuation of grand potential Ω around equilibrium with respect to small one-particle density fluctuations δρα(vec r), the phase instability of restricted primitive model (RPM) of ionic systems is investigated. We use the integral equation theory to calculate the direct correlation functions in the reference hypernetted chain approximation and obtain the spinodal line of RPM. Our analysis explicitly indicates that the gas-fluid phase instability is induced by k = 0 fluctuation mode, while the fluid-solid phase instability is related to k ≠ 0 fluctuation modes. The spinodal line is qualitatively consistent with the result of computer simulations by others.

  9. Investigation by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of trail pheromones in ants.

    PubMed

    Tullio, Alessandra Di; Angelis, Francesco De; Reale, Samantha; Grasso, Donato A; Visicchio, Roberto; Castracani, Cristina; Mori, Alessandra; Moli, Francesco Le

    2003-01-01

    The Dufour's gland content of workers of two ant species of the genus Messor has been analyzed by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The structures of the compounds in the pheromonal mixtures have been determined. In both cases only one intact gland, inserted in a properly dimensioned capillary vial, is sufficient to produce a clean and fully interpretable GC/MS profile. It is worth noting that, for the first time in Messor ants, farnesol has been detected as a minor component of glandular secretion in Messor capitatus. PMID:12955735

  10. Determination of furan levels in coffee using automated solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ho, I-Pin; Yoo, Seong-Jae; Tefera, Sebhat

    2005-01-01

    Furan is a 5-member ring chemical with high volatility. Because it is highly volatile, furan levels in foods are not easily determined with accuracy. In this study, an analytical method for furan analysis using an automated solid-phase microextraction system in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy is described. The performance of the method was demonstrated by the results obtained from a variety of coffees. Furan was detected at part-per-billion levels in coffee. The limit of detection was 0.3 ng/g and limit of quantitation, 0.8 ng/g. The percent recoveries were between 92 and 102. PMID:15859085

  11. Opaque Mineral Assemblages at Chondrule Boundaries in the Vigarano CV Chondrite: Evidence for Gas-Solid Reactions Following Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, Dante S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies of opaque minerals in primitive ordinary chondrites suggest that metal grains exposed at chondrule boundaries were corroded when volatile elements recondensed after the transient heating event responsible for chondrule formation. Metal grains at chondrule boundaries in the Bishunpur (LL3.1) chondrite are rimmed by troilite and fayalite. If these layers formed by gas solid reaction, then the composition of the corrosion products can provide information on the chondrule formation environment. Given the broad similarities among chondrules from different chondrite groups, similar scale layers should occur on chondrules in other primitive meteorite groups. Here I report on metal grains at chondrule boundaries in Vigarano (CV3).

  12. Technical bases for the use of CIF{sub 3} in the MSRE reactive gas removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1997-06-01

    Nearly impermeable, non-volatile deposits in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) off-gas piping are impeding the removal of reactive gases from that system. The deposits almost certainly consist of reduced uranium fluorides or of uranium oxyfluorides. Treatment with ClF{sub 3} is a non-intrusive method capable of chemically converting these compounds back to UF{sub 6}, which can then be removed as a gas. This report discusses the technical bases for the use of ClF{sub 3} treatments in this system. A variety of issues are examined, and where the necessary information exists or has been developed, the resolution discussed. The more important of these issues include the efficacy of ClF{sub 3} at deposit removal under the conditions imposed by the MSRE system, materials compatibility of ClF{sub 3} and its reaction products, and operational differences in the Reactive Gas Removal System imposed by the presence of ClF{sub 3} and its products.

  13. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  14. Anode gas recirculation for improving the performance and cost of a 5-kW solid oxide fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryohei; Tachikawa, Yuya; Sasaki, Kazunari; Ito, Kohei

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have the potential to efficiently convert chemical energy into electricity and heat and are expected to be implemented in stationary combined heat and power (CHP) systems. This paper presents the heat balance analysis for a 5-kW medium-sized integrated SOFC system and the evaluation of the effect of anode gas recirculation on the system performance. The risk of carbon deposition on an SOFC anode due to anode gas recirculation is also assessed using the C-H-O diagram obtained from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. These results suggest that a higher recirculation ratio increases net fuel utilization and improves the electrical efficiency of the SOFC system. Furthermore, cost simulation of the SOFC system and comparison with the cost of electricity supply by a power grid indicates that the capital cost is sufficiently low to popularize the SOFC system in terms of the total cost over one decade.

  15. Analysis of a landfill gas to energy system at the municipal solid waste landfill in Gaziantep, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tercan, Safak Hengirmen; Cabalar, Ali Firat; Yaman, Gokhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW), via landfill gas valorization technology, at the landfill of Gaziantep City, Turkey. Rapid increase in population, and industrial developments, throughout the world including Turkey results in larger amount of waste materials generated, increased need for energy, and adverse affects on the environment and human health. Turkey plans to produce 1/3 of its electricity demand using renewable energy sources by the year of 2023. It is recommended to use each year around 25 million tonnes of the MSW generated nationwide for a renewable energy supply. In this study, a concise summary of current status of electricity generation from a MSW landfill gas plant (via biogas harnessing) located in Gaziantep City was analyzed as a case study.

  16. Iodide sorption and partitioning in solid, liquid and gas phases in soil samples collected from Japanese paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Nao K; Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko

    2011-07-01

    Sorption kinetics of iodide (I(-)), which is one of the major inorganic chemical forms of iodine in soil environments, were studied under four sets of experimental conditions characterised by temperature or biological activity. We compared partitioning ratios in solid, liquid and gas phases in soils as well as soil-soil solution distribution coefficients (K(d)s) at two different temperatures 4 and 23 °C, for 63 paddy soil samples collected throughout Japan. Interestingly, (125)I emission from soil was observed; the partitioning ratios in gas phase ranged from 0 to 27 % at 4 °C and from 0 to 42 % at 23 °C. In addition, the authors found that K(d) values at 23 °C had good correlation with pH though there was no correlation between K(d) values at 4 °C and pH because of the difference in biological activity.

  17. Durability Prediction of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Material under Thermo-Mechanical and Fuel Gas Contaminants Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Gulfam; Guo, Hua; Kang , Bruce S.; Marina, Olga A.

    2011-01-10

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operate under harsh environments, which cause deterioration of anode material properties and service life. In addition to electrochemical performance, structural integrity of the SOFC anode is essential for successful long-term operation. The SOFC anode is subjected to stresses at high temperature, thermal/redox cycles, and fuel gas contaminants effects during long-term operation. These mechanisms can alter the anode microstructure and affect its electrochemical and structural properties. In this research, anode material degradation mechanisms are briefly reviewed and an anode material durability model is developed and implemented in finite element analysis. The model takes into account thermo-mechanical and fuel gas contaminants degradation mechanisms for prediction of long-term structural integrity of the SOFC anode. The proposed model is validated experimentally using a NexTech ProbostatTM SOFC button cell test apparatus integrated with a Sagnac optical setup for simultaneously measuring electrochemical performance and in-situ anode surface deformation.

  18. A novel solid state fermentation coupled with gas stripping enhancing the sweet sorghum stalk conversion performance for bioethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol production from biomass is becoming a hot topic internationally. Traditional static solid state fermentation (TS-SSF) for bioethanol production is similar to the traditional method of intermittent operation. The main problems of its large-scale intensive production are the low efficiency of mass and heat transfer and the high ethanol inhibition effect. In order to achieve continuous production and high conversion efficiency, gas stripping solid state fermentation (GS-SSF) for bioethanol production from sweet sorghum stalk (SSS) was systematically investigated in the present study. Results TS-SSF and GS-SSF were conducted and evaluated based on different SSS particle thicknesses under identical conditions. The ethanol yield reached 22.7 g/100 g dry SSS during GS-SSF, which was obviously higher than that during TS-SSF. The optimal initial gas stripping time, gas stripping temperature, fermentation time, and particle thickness of GS-SSF were 10 h, 35°C, 28 h, and 0.15 cm, respectively, and the corresponding ethanol stripping efficiency was 77.5%. The ethanol yield apparently increased by 30% with the particle thickness decreasing from 0.4 cm to 0.05 cm during GS-SSF. Meanwhile, the ethanol yield increased by 6% to 10% during GS-SSF compared with that during TS-SSF under the same particle thickness. The results revealed that gas stripping removed the ethanol inhibition effect and improved the mass and heat transfer efficiency, and hence strongly enhanced the solid state fermentation (SSF) performance of SSS. GS-SSF also eliminated the need for separate reactors and further simplified the bioethanol production process from SSS. As a result, a continuous conversion process of SSS and online separation of bioethanol were achieved by GS-SSF. Conclusions SSF coupled with gas stripping meet the requirements of high yield and efficient industrial bioethanol production. It should be a novel bioconversion process for bioethanol production from SSS

  19. Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

    2012-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

  20. Comparison between pressurized design and ambient pressure design of hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.; Kim, T. S.

    Design performances of the hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)-gas turbine (GT) system have been investigated. A pressurized system and an indirectly heated ambient pressure system were analyzed and their performances were compared. In the baseline layout, the basic performance characteristics of the two system configurations were analyzed, with the cell operation temperature and the pressure ratio as the main design parameters. The pressurized system exhibits a better efficiency owing to not only the higher cell voltage but also more effective utilization of gas turbine, i.e., a larger GT power contribution due to a higher turbine inlet temperature. Independent setting of the turbine inlet temperature was simulated by using the additional fuel supply as well as the air bypass. Increasing the pressure ratio of the gas turbine hardly improves the system efficiency, but the efficiency becomes less sensitive to the turbine inlet temperature. In the ambient pressure system, the available design parameter range is much reduced due to the limit on the recuperator temperature. In particular, design of the ambient pressure hybrid system with a gas turbine of a high pressure ratio does not seem quite feasible because the system efficiency that can be achieved at the possible design conditions is even lower than the efficiency of the SOFC only system.