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Sample records for reactive highly fluorescent

  1. Biological detection and tagging using tailorable, reactive, highly fluorescent chemosensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Zifer, Thomas; McElhanon, James Ross; Rahn, Larry A.

    2006-11-01

    This program was focused on the development of a fluorogenic chemosensor family that could tuned for reaction with electrophilic (e.g. chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (e.g. proteins and other biological molecules) species. Our chemosensor approach utilized the fluorescent properties of well-known berberine-type alkaloids. In situ chemosensor reaction with a target species transformed two out-of-plane, weakly conjugated, short-wavelength chromophores into one rigid, planar, conjugated, chromophore with strong long wavelength fluorescence (530-560 nm,) and large Stokes shift (100-180 nm). The chemosensor was activated with an isourea group which allowed for reaction with carboxylic acid moieties found in amino acids.

  2. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time.

  3. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-12-01

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization, integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to replace conventional animal tests. Chemical methods are intended to characterize the potential of a sensitizer to induce earlier molecular initiating events. The presence of an electrophilic mechanistic domain is considered one of the essential chemical features to covalently bind to the biological target and induce further haptenation processes. Current in chemico assays rely on the quantification of unreacted model nucleophiles after incubation with the candidate sensitizer. In the current study, a new fluorescence-based method, 'HTS-DCYA assay', is proposed. The assay aims at the identification of reactive electrophiles based on their chemical reactivity toward a model fluorescent thiol. The reaction workflow enabled the development of a High Throughput Screening (HTS) method to directly quantify the reaction adducts. The reaction conditions have been optimized to minimize solubility issues, oxidative side reactions and increase the throughput of the assay while minimizing the reaction time, which are common issues with existing methods. Thirty-six chemicals previously classified with LLNA, DPRA or KeratinoSens™ were tested as a proof of concept. Preliminary results gave an estimated 82% accuracy, 78% sensitivity, 90% specificity, comparable to other in chemico methods such as Cys-DPRA. In addition to validated chemicals, six natural products were analyzed and a prediction of their sensitization potential is presented for the first time. PMID:26455772

  4. CdS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the sensitive and selective detection of highly reactive HSe- ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan-Liu; Zhao, Yi-Bing

    2007-06-01

    Water-soluble cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) capped by mercaptoacetic acid were synthesized by aqueous-phase arrested precipitation, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, spectrofluorometry, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The prepared luminescent water-soluble CdS QDs were evaluated as fluorescence probes for the detection of highly reactive hydrogen selenide ions (HSe(-) ions). The quenching of the fluorescence emission of CdS QDs with the addition of HSe(-) ions is due to the elimination of the S(2-) vacancies which are luminescence centers. Quantitative analysis based on chemical interaction between HSe(-) ions and the surface of CdS QDs is very simple, easy to develop, and has demonstrated very high sensitivity and selectivity features. The effect of foreign ions (common anions and biologically relevant cations) on the fluorescence of the CdS QDs was examined to evaluate the selectivity. Only Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions exhibit significant effects on the fluorescence of CdS QDs. With the developed method, we are able to determine the concentration of HSe(-) ions in the range from 0.10 to 4.80 micromol L(-1), and the limit of detection is 0.087 micromol L(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to monitor the obtained HSe(-) ions from the reaction of glutathione with selenite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on fluorescence analysis of HSe(-) ions in aqueous solution.

  5. Determination of intracellular reactive oxygen species and high mitochondrial membrane potential in Percoll-treated viable boar sperm using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2006-08-01

    The use of frozen semen in the swine industry is limited by problems with viability and fertility compared with liquid semen. Part of the reduction in sperm motility and fertility associated with cryopreservation may be due to oxidative damage from excessive or inappropriate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chemiluminescence measurements of ROS are not possible in live cells and are problematic because of poor specificity. An alternative approach, flow cytometry, was developed to identify viable boar sperm containing ROS utilizing the dyes hydroethidine and 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as oxidizable substrates and impermeant DNA dyes to exclude dead sperm. The percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial transmembrane potential was determined by flow cytometry using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide with propidium iodide staining to exclude nonviable cells. Sperm were incubated with and without ROS generators and free radical scavengers. Basal ROS formation was low (less than 4%) and did not differ (P = 0.26) between viable fresh and frozen-thawed boar sperm. In addition, fresh and frozen-thawed viable sperm were equally susceptible (P = 0.20) to intracellular formation of ROS produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (94.4 and 87.9% of sperm, respectively). Menadione increased (P < 0.05) ROS formation, decreased (P < 0.05) JC-1-aggregate fluorescence intensity, and decreased (P < 0.05) motion variables by 25 to 60%. The mechanism of inhibition of motility by ROS formation may be related to a decrease in mitochondrial charge potential below a critical threshold. Catalase and superoxide dismutase treatment in the presence of xanthine/xanthine oxidase indicated that hydrogen peroxide was the primary intracellular ROS measured. Further, catalase, but not superoxide dismutase, was capable of attenuating ROS-induced inhibition of motility. Whereas basal intracellular hydrogen

  6. Reactive Fluorescent Dyes For Urethane Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Molecules of fluorescent dyes chemically bound in urethane conformal-coating materials to enable nondestructive detection of flaws in coats through inspection under ultraviolet light, according to proposal. Dye-bonding technique prevents outgassing of dyes, making coating materials suitable for use where flaw-free coats must be assured in instrumentation or other applications in which contamination by outgassing must be minimized.

  7. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  8. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  12. Amine-Reactive Fluorene Probes: Synthesis, Optical Characterization, Bioconjugation, and Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demand for confocal and two-photon fluorescence imaging, the availability of reactive probes that possess high two-photon absorptivity, high fluorescence quantum yield, and high photostability is of paramount importance. To address the demand for better-performing probes, we prepared two-photon absorbing amine-reactive fluorenyl-based probes 2-(9,9-bis(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-2-isothiocyanato-9H-fluoren-7-yl)benzothiazole (1) and 2-(4-(2-(9,9-bis(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethyl)-2-isothiocyanato-9H-fluoren-7-yl)vinyl)phenyl)benzothiazole (2), incorporating the isothiocyanate as a reactive linker. Probe design was augmented by integrating high optical nonlinearities, increased hydrophilicity, and coupling with reactive functional groups for specific targeting of biomolecules, assuring a better impact on two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging. The isothiocyanate (NCS) derivatives were conjugated with cyclic peptide RGDfK and Reelin protein. The study of the chemical and photophysical properties of the new labeling reagents, as well as the conjugates, is described. The conjugates displayed high chemical stability and photostability. The NCS derivatives had low fluorescence quantum yields, while their bioconjugates exhibited high fluorescence quantum yields, essentially “lighting up” after conjugation. Conventional and 2PFM imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of HeLa, NT2, and H1299 cells, incubated with two-photon absorbing amine-reactive probe (1), RGDfK-dye conjugate (7), and Reelin-dye conjugate (6), was demonstrated. PMID:19090700

  13. Detection of reactive oxygen species in mainstream cigarette smoke by a fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Shi-jie; Li, Song-zhan

    2009-07-01

    A mass of reactive oxygen species(ROS) are produced in the process of smoking. Superfluous ROS can induce the oxidative stress in organism, which will cause irreversible damage to cells. Fluorescent probe is taken as a marker of oxidative stress in biology and has been applied to ROS detection in the field of biology and chemistry for high sensitivity, high simplicity of data collection and high resolution. As one type of fluorescent probe, dihydrorhodamine 6G (dR6G) will be oxidized to the fluorescent rhodamine 6G, which could be used to detect ROS in mainstream cigarette smoke. We investigated the action mechanism of ROS on dR6G, built up the standard curve of R6G fluorescence intensity with its content, achieved the variation pattern of R6G fluorescence intensity with ROS content in mainstream cigarette smoke and detected the contents of ROS from the 4 types of cigarettes purchased in market. The result shows that the amount of ROS has close relationship with the types of tobacco and cigarette production technology. Compared with other detecting methods such as electronic spin resonance(ESR), chromatography and mass spectrometry, this detection method by the fluorescent probe has higher efficiency and sensitivity and will have wide applications in the ROS detection field.

  14. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  15. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  16. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  17. Imaging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species with fluorescent probes: current applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Gao, F

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key element in the regulation of several physiological functions and in the development or progression of multiple pathological events. A key task in the study of mitochondrial ROS is to establish reliable methods for measuring the ROS level in mitochondria with high selectivity, sensitivity, and spatiotemporal resolution. Over the last decade, imaging tools with fluorescent indicators from either small-molecule dyes or genetically encoded probes that can be targeted to mitochondria have been developed, which provide a powerful method to visualize and even quantify mitochondrial ROS level not only in live cells, but also in live animals. These innovative tools that have bestowed exciting new insights in mitochondrial ROS biology have been further promoted with the invention of new techniques in indicator design and fluorescent detection. However, these probes present some limitations in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and kinetics; failure to recognize these limitations often results in inappropriate interpretations of data. This review evaluates the recent advances in mitochondrial ROS imaging approaches with emphasis on their proper application and limitations, and highlights the future perspectives in the development of novel fluorescent probes for visualizing all species of ROS.

  18. Enantioselective fluorescent recognition in the fluorous phase: enhanced reactivity and expanded chiral recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wu, Elaine; Wu, Xuedan; Xu, Xiangchuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Pu, Lin

    2015-03-25

    A novel perfluoroalkyl-BINOL-based chiral diketone is found to be the first highly enantioselective fluorescent sensor in the fluorous phase. One enantiomer of a chiral amino alcohol or diamine at a concentration greater than 1 mM can cause an up to 1200-2000-fold fluorescent enhancement of the sensor (0.08 mM), while the other enantiomer gives only a 10-50-fold enhancement. The fluorous-phase-based sensor is found to enhance the reactivity of the previously reported fluorous insoluble sensor with amino alcohols and expand its chiral recognition ability. Dynamic light scattering studies show the formation of aggregates of very different particle sizes when two enantiomers of a substrate interact with the sensor in perfluorohexane (FC-12). This substantial difference enables easy discrimination of the enantiomers with UV-lamps or even the naked eye. NMR, IR, and mass spectroscopic studies indicate that the fluorescent enhancement and enantioselectivity should originate from the fluorous solvent-promoted nucleophilic addition of the amino alcohols to the carbonyl groups of the sensor.

  19. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties. PMID:19451687

  20. An Aza-Cope Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Formaldehyde in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Thomas F; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a reactive carbonyl species (RCS) produced in living systems that has been implicated in epigenetics as well as in the pathologies of various cancers, diabetes, and heart, liver, and neurodegenerative diseases. Traditional methods for biological FA detection rely on sample destruction and/or extensive processing, resulting in a loss of spatiotemporal information. To help address this technological gap, we present the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a fluorescent probe for live-cell FA imaging that relies on a FA-induced aza-Cope rearrangement. Formaldehyde probe-1 (FAP-1) is capable of detecting physiologically relevant concentrations of FA in aqueous buffer and in live cells with high selectivity over potentially competing biological analytes. Moreover, FAP-1 can visualize endogenous FA produced by lysine-specific demethylase 1 in a breast cancer cell model, presaging the potential utility of this chemical approach to probe RCS biology.

  1. A fluorescence high-temperature sensor based on fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinling; Wang, Yutian; Wang, Xinian

    2006-11-01

    A kind of fluorescence optic-fiber temperature sensor is devised based on the alexandrite crystal. In this system, a new optic- fiber probe fabrication techniques is proposed. This system is particularly adapted to the temperature measurement in the range of room temperature to 650°C. During the cause of experimentation, using the PLD-PMTR (termed the Pulse Modulated Phase-locked detection with Two References) signal processing scheme. This temperature measurement method is proved to be effective and useful for its highly resolution and precision. It ensured the detected fluorescence signal to noise ratio was high enough to be measurable when the temperature is raised to 650°C.

  2. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  3. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  4. In vivo imaging of Ca2+, pH, and reactive oxygen species using fluorescent probes in plants.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Sarah J; Choi, Won-Gyu; Chanoca, Alexandra; Gilroy, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the levels of Ca(2+), pH, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as key cellular regulators involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes in plants. Critical to understanding how they exert such widespread control is an appreciation of their spatial and temporal dynamics at levels from organ to organelle and from seconds to many hours. With appropriate controls, fluorescent sensors can provide a robust approach with which to quantify such changes in Ca(2+), pH, and ROS in real time, in vivo. The fluorescent cellular probes available for visualization split into two broad classes: (a) dyes and (b) an increasingly diverse set of genetically encoded sensors based around green fluorescent proteins (GFPs). The GFP probes in particular can be targeted to well-defined subcellular locales, offering the possibility of high-resolution mapping of these signals within the cell.

  5. Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, V; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

  6. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  7. Fluorescent Sulfur-Tagged Europium(III) Coordination Polymers for Monitoring Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huai-Song; Bao, Wen-Jing; Ren, Shi-Bin; Chen, Ming; Wang, Kang; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is harmful to biological systems and implicated in various diseases. A variety of selective fluorescent probes have been developed for detecting ROS to uncover their biological functions. Generally, the preparation of the fluorescent probes usually undergoes multiple synthetic steps, and the successful fluorescent sensing usually relies on trial-and-error tests. Herein we present a simple way to prepare fluorescent ROS probes that can be used both in biological and environmental systems. The fluorescent europium(III) coordination polymers (CPs) are prepared by simply mixing the precursors [2,2'-thiodiacetic acid and Eu(NO3)3·6H2O] in ethanol. Interestingly, with the increase of reaction temperature, the product undergoes a morphological transformation from microcrystal to nanoparticle while the structure and fluorescent properties retain. The fluorescence of the sulfur-tagged europium(III) CPs can be selectively quenched by ROS, and thus, sensitive and selective monitoring of ROS in aerosols by the microcrystals and in live cells by the nanoparticles has been achieved. The results reveal that the sulfur-tagged europium(III) CPs provide a novel sensor for imaging ROS in biological and environmental systems.

  8. Solvent-Free Synthesis and Fluorescence of a Thiol-Reactive Sensor for Undergraduate Organic Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Anastasia L.; May, Mary D.; Visser, Bryan J.; Kislukhin, Alexander A.; Vosburg, David A.

    2013-01-01

    A green organic laboratory experiment was developed in which students synthesize a sensor for thiols using a microscale, solventless Diels–Alder reaction at room temperature or 37 °C. The molecular probe is easily purified by column chromatography in a Pasteur pipet and characterized by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. The thiol-reactive sensor becomes intensely fluorescent upon exposure to thiols from N-acetylcysteine, bovine serum albumin, or human hair (pretreated with a reducing agent to reveal cysteine thiols in α-keratin). This fluorescence is observable even with micrograms of probe. PMID:24415795

  9. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  10. Ultraviolet Irradiation-Dependent Fluorescence Enhancement of Hemoglobin Catalyzed by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leiting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Yang, Shuying; Wu, Xian; Lee, Imshik; Zhang, Xinzheng; Rupp, Romano A.; Xu, Jingjun

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has a potent effect on biological organisms. Hemoglobin, an oxygen-transport protein, plays an irreplaceable role in sustaining life of all vertebrates. In this study we scrutinize the effects of ultraviolet irradiation (UVI) as well as visible irradiation on the fluorescence characteristics of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) in vitro. Data show that UVI results in fluorescence enhancement of BHb in a dose-dependant manner. Furthermore, UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement is significantly increased when BHb is pretreated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Meanwhile, The water-soluble antioxidant vitamin C suppresses this UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement. In contrast, green light irradiation does not lead to fluorescence enhancement of BHb no matter whether H2O2 is acting on the BHb solution or not. Taken together, these results indicate that catalysis of ROS and UVI-dependent irradiation play two key roles in the process of UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement of BHb. PMID:22952902

  11. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  12. A fluorescent immunoassay for the determination of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Bolzoni, L.; Giannetti, A.; Porro, G.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2009-05-01

    The discrimination of viral and bacterial sepsis is an important issue in intensive care patients. For this purpose, the simultaneous measurements of different analytes such as C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), myeloperoxidase, interleukines and neopterin, are necessary. A novel optical platform was designed and realised for the implementation of fluorescence-based immunoassays. The core of the optical platform is a plastic biochip, formed by a series of microchannels each of them devoted to the determination of a single analyte. Sandwich assays for CRP and PCT spiked in serum were performed in order to demonstrate the reliability of a multi-array device.

  13. Vertical nanopillars for highly localized fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Hanson, Lindsey; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2011-01-01

    Observing individual molecules in a complex environment by fluorescence microscopy is becoming increasingly important in biological and medical research, for which critical reduction of observation volume is required. Here, we demonstrate the use of vertically aligned silicon dioxide nanopillars to achieve below-the-diffraction-limit observation volume in vitro and inside live cells. With a diameter much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, a transparent silicon dioxide nanopillar embedded in a nontransparent substrate restricts the propagation of light and affords evanescence wave excitation along its vertical surface. This effect creates highly confined illumination volume that selectively excites fluorescence molecules in the vicinity of the nanopillar. We show that this nanopillar illumination can be used for in vitro single-molecule detection at high fluorophore concentrations. In addition, we demonstrate that vertical nanopillars interface tightly with live cells and function as highly localized light sources inside the cell. Furthermore, specific chemical modification of the nanopillar surface makes it possible to locally recruit proteins of interest and simultaneously observe their behavior within the complex, crowded environment of the cell. PMID:21368157

  14. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivatava

    2007-03-31

    This is the Final Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet (UV) emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. Our work started by investigating through modeling calculations the requirement for the particle size of the NCP. Our work to develop suitable nanocrystalline phosphors started with the known oxide quantum splitting and UV emitting phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the production of high quality nanocrystalline materials that crystallizes in the desired phase and with the desired particle size. In collaboration with our subcontractor we demonstrated the feasibility for the manufacture of NC phosphors. We also demonstrated novel techniques of coating the NCP on the surface of micron sized phosphors. Our chief achievement pertains to the successful testing of the coated hybrid phosphor systems in linear fluorescent lamps. In linear fluorescent lamp tests, we have demonstrated up to 7% increase in the efficacy of hybrid phosphors over the conventional (uncoated) phosphors. We have also demonstrated the improvement in the lumen maintenance of the coated phosphors. A hybrid phosphor system based on the commercial red emitting phosphor, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} did not show the anticipated improvement in lamp efficacy. We explored the reasons for this observation

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  16. High-resolution probing of local conformational changes in proteins by the use of multiple labeling: unfolding and self-assembly of human carbonic anhydrase II monitored by spin, fluorescent, and chemical reactivity probes.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, P; Owenius, R; Mårtensson, L G; Carlsson, U; Lindgren, M

    2001-06-01

    Two different spin labels, N-(1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolidinyl)iodoacetamide (IPSL) and (1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrroline-3-methyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSSL), and two different fluorescent labels 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)-ethyl)amino)naphtalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimetylaminonaphtalene (BADAN), were attached to the introduced C79 in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA II) to probe local structural changes upon unfolding and aggregation. HCA II unfolds in a multi-step manner with an intermediate state populated between the native and unfolded states. The spin label IPSL and the fluorescent label IAEDANS reported on a substantial change in mobility and polarity at both unfolding transitions at a distance of 7.4-11.2 A from the backbone of position 79. The shorter and less flexible labels BADAN and MTSSL revealed less pronounced spectroscopic changes in the native-to-intermediate transition, 6.6-9.0 A from the backbone. At intermediate guanidine (Gu)-HCl concentrations the occurrence of soluble but irreversibly aggregated oligomeric protein was identified from refolding experiments. At approximately 1 M Gu-HCl the aggregation was found to be essentially complete. The size and structure of the aggregates could be varied by changing the protein concentration. EPR measurements and line-shape simulations together with fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy measurements provided a picture of the self-assembled protein as a disordered protein structure with a representation of both compact as well as dynamic and polar environments at the site of the molecular labels. This suggests that a partially folded intermediate of HCA II self-assembles by both local unfolding and intermolecular docking of the intermediates vicinal to position 79. The aggregates were determined to be 40-90 A in diameter depending on the experimental conditions and spectroscopic technique used.

  17. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok M. Srivastava

    2005-09-30

    This is the Yearly Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. Our chief achievement, during the current contract period, pertains to the successful synthesis and characterization of coated phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the coating of micron sized commercial phosphors with quantum-splitting and UV emitting nanophosphors. We have also continued our fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum efficiency of the nanophosphors and this has further helped codify a set of rules for the host lattice that support efficient quantum splitting and UV emission at room temperature. In this report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

  18. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-03-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient.

  19. Saturated laser fluorescence in turbulent sooting flames at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. B.; Carter, C. D.; Laurendeau, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective was to develop a quantitative, single pulse, laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) technique for measurement of radical species concentrations in practical flames. The species of immediate interest was the hydroxyl radical. Measurements were made in both turbulent premixed diffusion flames at pressures between 1 and 20 atm. Interferences from Mie scattering were assessed by doping with particles or by controlling soot loading through variation of equivalence ratio and fuel type. The efficacy of the LSF method at high pressure was addressed by comparing fluorescence and adsorption measurements in a premixed, laminar flat flame at 1-20 atm. Signal-averaging over many laser shots is sufficient to determine the local concentration of radical species in laminar flames. However, for turbulent flames, single pulse measurements are more appropriate since a statistically significant number of laser pulses is needed to determine the probability function (PDF). PDFs can be analyzed to give true average properties and true local kinetics in turbulent, chemically reactive flows.

  20. A cross-reactive sensor array for the fluorescence qualitative analysis of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Lin, Liping; Rong, Mingcong; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    A cross-reactive sensor array using mercaptopropionic acid modified cadmium telluride (CdTe), glutathione modified CdTe, poly(methacrylic acid) modified silver nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin modified gold nanoclusters, rhodamine derivative and calcein blue as fluorescent indicators has been designed for the detection of seven heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+)). The discriminatory capacity of the sensor array to different heavy metal ions in different pH solutions has been tested and the results have been analyzed with linear discriminant analysis. Results showed that the sensor array could be used to qualitatively analyze the selected heavy metal ions. The array performance was also evaluated in the identification of known and unknown samples and the preliminary results suggested the promising practicability of the designed sensor assay.

  1. High-throughput imaging of adult fluorescent zebrafish with an LED fluorescence macroscope

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S; Liu, Sali; Raimondi, Aubrey R; Ignatius, Myron S; Salthouse, Christopher D; Langenau, David M

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are a useful vertebrate model for the study of development, behavior, disease and cancer. A major advantage of zebrafish is that large numbers of animals can be economically used for experimentation; however, high-throughput methods for imaging live adult zebrafish had not been developed. Here, we describe protocols for building a light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence macroscope and for using it to simultaneously image up to 30 adult animals that transgenically express a fluorescent protein, are transplanted with fluorescently labeled tumor cells or are tagged with fluorescent elastomers. These protocols show that the LED fluorescence macroscope is capable of distinguishing five fluorescent proteins and can image unanesthetized swimming adult zebrafish in multiple fluorescent channels simultaneously. The macroscope can be built and used for imaging within 1 day, whereas creating fluorescently labeled adult zebrafish requires 1 hour to several months, depending on the method chosen. The LED fluorescence macroscope provides a low-cost, high-throughput method to rapidly screen adult fluorescent zebrafish and it will be useful for imaging transgenic animals, screening for tumor engraftment, and tagging individual fish for long-term analysis. PMID:21293462

  2. Monitoring Cr Intermediates and Reactive Oxygen Species with Fluorescent Probes during Chromate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cr(VI) genotoxicity is caused by products of its reductive metabolism inside the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cr(V,IV) intermediates are potential sources of oxidative damage by Cr(VI). Here, we investigated seven fluorescent probes for the detection of ROS and non-ROS oxidants in Cr(VI) reactions with its main reducers. We found that Cr(V)-skipping metabolism of Cr(VI) by ascorbate in vitro gave no responses with all tested dyes, indicating nonreactivity of Cr(IV) and absence of ROS. Cr(VI) reduction with glutathione (GSH) or Cys strongly enhanced the fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein (DCF) and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123) but produced minimal fluorescence with dihydroethidium and no increases with aminophenylfluorescein and CellRox Green, Orange, and Red. Several tests showed that Cr(VI)-thiol reactions lacked ROS and that Cr(V) caused oxidation of DCF and DHR123. DCF reacted only with free Cr(V), whereas DHR123 detected both the free Cr(V) and Cr(V)-GSH complex. We estimated that Cr(VI)-GSH reactions generated approximately 75% Cr(V)-GSH and 25% free Cr(V), whereas Cys reactions appeared to produce only free Cr(V). DHR123 measurements in H460 cells showed that reduction of Cr(VI) was complete within 20 min postexposure, but it lasted at least 1 h without GSH. Cells with restored ascorbate levels exhibited no DCF or DHR123 oxidation by Cr(VI). Overall, our results demonstrated that Cr(VI) metabolism with its biological reducers lacked ROS and that DHR123 and DCF responses were indicators of total and free Cr(V), respectively. CellRox dyes, dihydroethidium and aminophenylfluorescein, are insensitive to Cr(V,IV) and can be used for monitoring ROS during coexposure to Cr(VI) and oxidants. PMID:24646070

  3. Facile synthesis of fluorescent polymer nanoparticles by covalent modification-nanoprecipitation of amine-reactive ester polymers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonju; Hanif, Sadaf; Theato, Patrick; Zentel, Rudolf; Lim, Jeewoo; Char, Kookheon

    2015-06-01

    Emission wavelength control in fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial for their applications. In the case of inorganic quantum dots or dye-impregnated silica NPs, such a control is readily achieved by changing the size of the particles or choosing appropriate fluorescent dyes, respectively. A similar modular approach for controlling the emission wavelength of fluo-rescent polymer NPs, however, is difficult. This article reports on fluorescent polymer NPs, the synthesis of which provides a platform for a modular approach towards the preparation of fluorescent NPs of desired emission wavelength. Atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is employed to synthesize reactive ester polymers, which are then easily modified with a commercially available dye and subsequently subjected to nanoprecipitation. The resulting NPs, with low size polydispersity, show an enhanced emission quantum yield when compared with the same dye molecules in solution.

  4. Riboflavin enhanced fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliut, Maria; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Leordean, Cosmin; Simon, Timea; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Astilean, Simion

    2013-10-01

    The improvement of graphene derivates' fluorescence properties is a challenging topic and very few ways were reported up to now. In this Letter we propose an easy method to enhance the fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through non-covalent binding to a molecular fluorophore, namely the riboflavin (Rb). While the fluorescence of Rb is quenched, the Rb - decorated rGO exhibits strong blue fluorescence and significantly increased fluorescence lifetime, as compared to its pristine form. The data reported here represent a promising start towards tailoring the optical properties of rGOs, having utmost importance in optical applications.

  5. Taming the highly reactive oxonium ion.

    PubMed

    Haley, Michael M

    2009-01-01

    'Onium rings: Incorporation of the trivalent oxygen atom as a structural element within the tricyclic core of 1-3 imparts unprecedented stability to this "extraordinary" class of tertiary oxonium ions. Cation 1 is the least reactive and can be refluxed in water for 72 hours with no noticeable decomposition.

  6. High expression of green fluorescent protein in Pichia pastoris leads to formation of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Lenassi Zupan, Ana; Trobec, Sonja; Gaberc-Porekar, Vladka; Menart, Viktor

    2004-04-01

    Wild type gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was stably integrated into the Pichia pastoris genome and yielded an expression level of over 40% of total cellular protein. The high cytoplasmic concentration of fluorescent (properly folded and processed) GFP caused the formation of fluorescent spherical structures, which could be observed by fluorescence or confocal microscopy after controlled permeabilization of the yeast cells with 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine (NLS). Fluorescent GFP particles were also isolated after removal of the cell wall and found to be quite resistant to 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine. SDS-PAGE analysis of the isolated fluorescent particles revealed the presence of an 80 kDa protein (alcohol oxidase) and GFP (30%). We conclude that GFP is able to enter spontaneously into the peroxisomes and is inserted into densely packed layers of alcohol oxidase. Consequently, the formation of similar fluorescent particles can also be expected in other organisms when using high-level expression systems. As GFP is widely used in fusion with other proteins as a reporter for protein localization and for many other applications in biotechnology, care must be taken to avoid false interpretations of targeting or trafficking mechanisms inside the cells. In addition, when whole cells or cytoplasmic fractions are used for the quantitative determination of GFP levels, incorrect and misleading values of GFP could be obtained due to the formation of fluorescent particles containing material inside which is not available for fluorescence measurements.

  7. Fluorescent-conjugated polymer superquenching facilitates highly sensitive detection of proteases.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Sriram; Bergstedt, Troy; Shi, Xiaobo; Rininsland, Frauke; Kushon, Stuart; Xia, Wensheng; Ley, Kevin; Achyuthan, Komandoor; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2004-05-18

    Sensor formats have been developed for detecting the activity of proteolytic enzymes based on fluorescent conjugated polymer superquenching. These sensors employ a reactive peptide sequence within a tether linking a quencher to a biotin. The peptide binds to sensors containing colocated biotin-binding protein and fluorescent polymer by means of biotin-biotin binding protein interactions, resulting in a strong quenching of polymer fluorescence. Enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide results in a reversal of the fluorescence quenching. These assays for protease activity are simple, sensitive, fast, and have the specificity required for screening chemical libraries for novel protease inhibitors in a high-throughput screening assay environment. These assays have been demonstrated for enterokinase, caspase-3/7, and beta-secretase.

  8. Fluorescent-conjugated polymer superquenching facilitates highly sensitive detection of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraswamy, Sriram; Bergstedt, Troy; Shi, Xiaobo; Rininsland, Frauke; Kushon, Stuart; Xia, Wensheng; Ley, Kevin; Achyuthan, Komandoor; McBranch, Duncan; Whitten, David

    2004-01-01

    Sensor formats have been developed for detecting the activity of proteolytic enzymes based on fluorescent conjugated polymer superquenching. These sensors employ a reactive peptide sequence within a tether linking a quencher to a biotin. The peptide binds to sensors containing colocated biotin-binding protein and fluorescent polymer by means of biotin–biotin binding protein interactions, resulting in a strong quenching of polymer fluorescence. Enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide results in a reversal of the fluorescence quenching. These assays for protease activity are simple, sensitive, fast, and have the specificity required for screening chemical libraries for novel protease inhibitors in a high-throughput screening assay environment. These assays have been demonstrated for enterokinase, caspase-3/7, and β-secretase. PMID:15136731

  9. Development of Highly Fluorescent Materials Based on Thiophenylimidazole Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.; Meador, Michael A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Organic fluorescent materials are expected to find many potential applications in optical devices and photo-functionalized materials. Although many investigations have been focused on heterocyclic compounds such as coumarins, bipyridines, rhodamines, and pyrrole derivatives, little is known for fluorescent imidazole materials. We discovered that one particular class of imidazole derivatives is highly fluorescent. A series of monomeric and polymeric based fluorescent dyes were prepared containing a thiophene unit at the second position of the imidazole ring. Dependence of fluorescence efficiency on parameters such as solvent polarity and substituent groups has been investigated. It was found that a formyl group at the 2-position of the thiophene ring dramatically enhance fluorescence properties. Ion recognition probes indicated their potential as sensor materials. These fluorophores have flexibility for introduction of versatile substituent groups that could improve the fluorescence efficiency and sensor properties.

  10. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Amiruddha

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1 %, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  11. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically can not reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "hits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low

  12. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, 51%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear hits. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment using relatively low cost optics

  13. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minamitani, Elizabeth Forsythe; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the primary method for determining the structure of macromolecules. The first requirement is to have crystals, and obtaining them is often the rate-limiting step. The numbers of crystallization trials that are set up for any one protein for structural genomics, and the rate at which they are being set up, now overwhelm the ability for strictly human analysis of the results. Automated analysis methods are now being implemented with varying degrees of success, but these typically cannot reliably extract intermediate results. By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or = 1%, of a macromolecule solution with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of a macromolecules purification. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination the crystals will show up as bright objects against a dark background. As crystalline packing is more dense than amorphous precipitate, the fluorescence intensity can be used as a guide in distinguishing different types of precipitated phases, even in the absence of obvious crystalline features, widening the available potential lead conditions in the absence of clear "bits." Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Also, brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less fluorescent precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may serve to obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries and by having the protein or protein structures all that show up. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also emit with sufficient intensity to aid in the automation of crystal alignment

  14. High-Collection-Efficiency Fluorescence Detection Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, Thomas; Cazorla, Maria; Swanson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A new fluorescence cell has been developed for the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of formaldehyde. The cell is used to sample a flow of air that contains trace concentrations of formaldehyde. The cell provides a hermetically sealed volume in which a flow of air containing formaldehyde can be illuminated by a laser. The cell includes the optics for transmitting the laser beam that is used to excite the formaldehyde and for collecting the resulting fluorescence. The novelty of the cell is its small size and simple design that provides a more robust and cheaper alternative to the state of the art. Despite its simplicity, the cell provides the same sensitivity to detection as larger, more complicated cells.

  15. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  16. Highly efficient fluorescence of a fluorescing nanoparticle with a silver shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Choy, Wallace C.; He, Sailing; Chui, P. C.

    2007-05-01

    Spontaneous emission (SE) rate and the fluorescence efficiency of a bare fluorescing nanoparticle and the nanoparticle with a silver nanoshell are analyzed rigorously by using a classical electromagnetic approach with the consideration of the nonlocal effect of the silver nano-shell. The dependences of the SE rate and the fluorescence efficiency on the core-shell structure are carefully studied and the physical interpretations of the results are addressed. The results show that the SE rate of a bare nanoparticle is much slower than that in the infinite medium by almost an order of magnitude and consequently the fluorescence efficiency is usually low. However, by encapsulating the nanoparticle with a silver shell, highly efficient fluorescence can be achieved as a result of a large Purcell enhancement and high out-coupling efficiency for a well-designed core-shell structure. We also show that a higher SE rate may not offer a larger fluorescence efficiency since the fluorescence efficiency not only depends on the internal quantum yield but also the out-coupling efficiency.

  17. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-08-14

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. PMID:27426926

  18. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast.

  19. Highly Fluorescent dye-nanoclay Hybrid Materials Made from Different Dye Classes.

    PubMed

    Grabolle, Markus; Starke, Marian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2016-04-12

    Nanoclays like laponites, which are commercially avaible in large quantities for a very moderate price, provide a facile solubilization strategy for hydrophobic dyes without the need for chemical functionalization and can act as a carrier for a high number of dye molecules. This does not require reactive dyes, amplifies fluorescence signals from individual emitters due to the high number of dyes molecules per laponite disk, and renders hydrophobic emitters applicable in aqueous environments. Aiming at the rational design of bright dye-loaded nanoclays as a new class of fluorescent reporters for bioanalysis and material sciences and the identification of dye structure-property relationships, we screened a series of commercial fluorescent dyes, differing in dye class, charge, and character of the optical transitions involved, and studied the changes of their optical properties caused by clay adsorption at different dye loading concentrations. Upon the basis of our dye loading density-dependent absorption and fluorescence measurements with S2105 and Lumogen F Yellow 083, we could identify two promising dye-nanoclay hybrid materials that reveal high fluorescence quantum yields of the nanoclay-adsorbed dyes of at least 0.20 and low dye self-quenching even at high dye-loading densities of up to 50 dye molecules per laponite platelet. PMID:27007448

  20. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications.In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00451b

  1. Optical spectroscopy of a highly fluorescent aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Cheng, P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and a similar model compound, Mg-methyl bacteriopheophorbide d, form several types of aggregates in nonpolar solvents. One of these aggregates is highly fluorescent, with a quantum yield higher than that of the monomer. This aggregate is also unusual in that it shows a rise time in its fluorescence emission decay at certain wavelengths, which is ascribed to a change in conformation of the aggregate. An analysis of fluorescence depolarization data is consistent with either a linear aggregate of four or five monomers or preferably a cyclic arrangement of three dimers.

  2. A nano-selenium reactive barrier approach for managing mercury over the life-cycle of compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Sarin, Love; Johnson, Natalie C; Hurt, Robert H

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluorescent lamps contain small quantities of mercury, release of which can lead to human exposures of potential concern in special cases involving multiple lamps, confined spaces, or young children. The exposure scenarios typically involve solid lamp debris that slowly releases elemental mercury vapor to indoor spaces. Here we propose and demonstrate a reactive barrier approach for the suppression of that mercury release, and demonstrate the concept using uncoated amorphous nanoselenium as the reactive component. Multilayer structures containing an impregnated reactive layer and a mercury vapor barrier are fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in three exposure prevention scenarios: carpeted break sites, disposal/recycling bags, and boxes as used for retail sales, shipping, and collection. The reactive barriers achieve significant suppression of mercury release to indoor spaces in each of thethree scenarios. The nanoselenium barriers also exhibit a unique indicator function that can reveal the location of Hg contamination by local reaction-induced change in optical properties. The article also presents results on equilibrium Hg vapor pressure above lamp debris, mathematical modeling of reaction and transport processes within reactive barriers, and landfill stability of nanoselenium and its reaction products.

  3. A Nano-Selenium Reactive Barrier Approach for Managing Mercury over the Life-Cycle of Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian; Sarin, Love; Johnson, Natalie C.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Compact fluorescent lamps contain small quantities of mercury, whose release can lead to human exposures of potential concern in special cases involving multiple lamps, confined spaces, or young children. The exposure scenarios typically involve solid lamp debris that slowly releases elemental mercury vapor to indoor spaces. Here we propose and demonstrate a reactive barrier approach for the suppression of that mercury release, and demonstrate the concept using uncoated amorphous nano-selenium as the reactive component. Multi-layer structures containing an impregnated reactive layer and a mercury vapor barrier are fabricated, characterized, and evaluated in three exposure prevention scenarios: carpeted break sites, disposal/recycling bags, and boxes as used for retail sales, shipping and collection. The reactive barriers achieve significant suppression of mercury release to indoor spaces in each of the three scenarios. The nano-selenium barriers also exhibit a unique indicator function that can reveal the location of Hg-contamination by local reaction-induced change in optical properties. The article also presents results on equilibrium Hg vapor pressure above lamp debris, mathematical modeling of reaction and transport processes within reactive barriers, and landfill stability of nano-selenium and its reaction products. PMID:19731697

  4. A highly fluorescent simultaneous azo dye technique for demonstration of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, C A; Lepire, M L; Torres, I

    1990-03-01

    We describe a fluorescent histochemical technique for detection of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (APase) in cells. The technique utilizes standard azo dye chemistry with naphthol AS-MX phosphate as substrate and fast red TR as the diazonium salt. The reaction product is a highly fluorescent red precipitate. Pre-implantation mouse embryos were used to establish optimal fixation and staining protocols and the specificity and sensitivity of the method. Fixation was in 4% paraformaldehyde for 1 hr, as glutaraldehyde induced autofluorescence of the cells. Maximal discriminable staining was detected after 15-20 min in the stain solution. The stain solution itself proved to be non-fluorescent, thus allowing visual observation of the progress of the staining reaction by fluorescence microscopy in its presence. To test the specificity of this fluorescent APase stain, a variety of cell types of known APase reactivity were stained by this protocol. Mouse lymphocytes and STO fibroblasts were negative, whereas F9 teratocarcinoma cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and rat fetal primordial germ cells were all found to be highly positive for APase activity, in agreement with published results on APase localization in these cells.

  5. A highly specific ferrocene-based fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid and its application to cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suming; Lu, Jinxin; Sun, Chengdong; Ma, Huimin

    2010-03-01

    A highly specific ferrocene-based fluorescent probe, (9-anthryl)ethenylferrocene, has been designed, synthesized and characterized for fluorescence imaging of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in live cells. The design strategy for the probe is based on the strong quenching effect of electron-donor ferrocene on anthracene fluorescence via an intramolecular charge transfer process, and is accomplished through constructing the conjugated molecule by using a cleavable double bond as a linker. The double bond in the probe reacts selectively with HOCl rather than the other reactive oxygen species (e.g., *OH, *O(2)(-), (1)O(2), and H(2)O(2)) in pH 7.4, accompanied by more than 100-fold fluorescence enhancement. Moreover, the probe is cell membrane permeable, and its applicability has been successfully demonstrated for fluorescence imaging of HOCl in HeLa cells.

  6. A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for ratiometric detection of gold ions: utilization of Z-enynol as the reactive unit.

    PubMed

    Üçüncü, Muhammed; Karakuş, Erman; Emrullahoğlu, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Using an irreversible intramolecular cyclisation pathway triggered by gold ions, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) based fluorescent probe integrated with a reactive Z-enynol motif responds selectively to gold ions. With the addition of gold(iii), the probe displays ratiometric fluorescence behaviour clearly observable to the naked eye under both visible and UV light. PMID:27284598

  7. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (<1% of live sperm) in fresh semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  8. Development of Thermally Stable and Highly Fluorescent IR Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bu, Xiu R.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorophores are the core component in various optical applications such as sensors and probes. Fluorphores with low-energy or long wavelength emission, in particular, in NIR region, possess advantages of low interference and high sensitivity. In this study, we has explored several classes of imidazole-based compounds for NIR fluorescent properties and concluded: (1) thiazole-based imidazole compounds are fluorescent; (2) emission energy is tunable by additional donor groups; (3) they also possess impressive two- photon absorption properties; and (4) fluorescence emission can be induced by two- photon input. This report summarizes (1) synthesis of new series of fluorophore; (2) impact of electron-withdrawing groups on fluorescent property; (3) unique property of two-photon absorption; and (4) on-going development.

  9. Optically Modulated Fluorescence Bioimaging: Visualizing Obscured Fluorophores in High Background

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Fluorescence microscopy and detection have become indispensible for understanding organization and dynamics in biological systems. Novel fluorophores with improved brightness, photostability, and biocompatibility continue to fuel further advances but often rely on having minimal background. The visualization of interactions in very high biological background, especially for proteins or bound complexes at very low copy numbers, remains a primary challenge. Instead of focusing on molecular brightness of fluorophores, we have adapted the principles of high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy to improve the sensitivity and signal discrimination in fluorescence bioimaging. Utilizing very long wavelength transient absorptions of kinetically trapped dark states, we employ molecular modulation schemes that do not simultaneously modulate the background fluorescence. This improves the sensitivity and ease of implementation over high-energy photoswitch-based recovery schemes, as no internal dye reference or nanoparticle-based fluorophores are needed to separate the desired signals from background. In this Account, we describe the selection process for and identification of fluorophores that enable optically modulated fluorescence to decrease obscuring background. Differing from thermally stable photoswitches using higher-energy secondary lasers, coillumination at very low energies depopulates transient dark states, dynamically altering the fluorescence and giving characteristic modulation time scales for each modulatable emitter. This process is termed synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) microscopy. By understanding and optically controlling the dye photophysics, we selectively modulate desired fluorophore signals independent of all autofluorescent background. This shifts the fluorescence of interest to unique detection frequencies with nearly shot-noise-limited detection, as no background signals are collected. Although the fluorescence

  10. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  11. Metal–Dielectric Waveguides for High Efficiency Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangfu; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Du, Luping; Yuan, Xiaocong; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that Metal–Dielectric Waveguide structures (MDWs) with high efficiency of fluorescence coupling can be suitable as substrates for fluorescence imaging. This hybrid MDWs consists of a continuous metal film and a dielectric top layer. The optical modes sustaining inside this structure can be excited with a high numerical aperture (N.A) objective, and then focused into a virtual optical probe with high intensity, leading to efficient excitation of fluorophores deposited on top of the MDWs. The emitted fluorophores couple with the optical modes thus enabling the directional emission, which is verified by the back focal plane (BFP) imaging. These unique properties of MDWs have been adopted in a scanning laser confocal optical microscopy, and show the merit of high efficiency fluorescence imaging. MDWs can be easily fabricated by vapor deposition and/or spin coating, the silica surface of the MDWs is suitable for biomolecule tethering, and will offer new opportunities for cell biology and biophysics research. PMID:26525494

  12. The Hazards of Reactive Chemicals in High School Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Peter

    Chemical reactivity is a major area of risk in high school laboratories. This paper reports on a study that has provided a research-based framework for risk management in Australian chemical education. The chemical practice model of risk management is considered with respect to kinetic factors; catalysts; concentrations and proportions;…

  13. Analyses of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency and reactivation at the single cell level using fluorescent reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Proença, J T; Nelson, D; Nicoll, M P; Connor, V; Efstathiou, S

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a latent infection in sensory neurons from which the virus can periodically reactivate. Whilst latency establishment is thought to result from a failure to express immediate-early genes, we have previously shown that subpopulations of the latent neuronal reservoir have undergone lytic promoter activation prior to latency establishment. In the present study, we have investigated the biological properties of such latently infected neuronal subpopulations using Ai6 fluorescent reporter mice. Using this system we have determined that prior ICP0 or TK promoter activation does not correlate with increased latent virus DNA loads within individual cells and that neurons with evidence of historical lytic cycle promoter activity exhibit a comparable frequency of reactivation to that of the general latent cell population. Comparison of viral DNA content within cells harbouring latent HSV-1 genomes and those undergoing the earliest stages of reactivation has revealed that reactivation can initiate from cells harbouring a wide range of HSV-1 genome copies, but that exiting latency is biased towards cells bearing higher latent virus DNA loads. PMID:26694770

  14. Detection of C-reactive protein based on magnetic nanoparticles and capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jyun; Yang, Jian-Ying; Shu, Ting-Yu; Lin, Ting-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Su, Mei-Yu; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2013-11-01

    A simple and fast method based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). To optimize the CZE conditions, several factors including buffer compositions, buffer ionic strength, buffer pH, applied voltage and capillary temperature have been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a 30 mM sodium phosphate (PB) buffer, pH 8.0. The optimal CE applied voltage and temperature selected were 20 kV and 35°C, respectively. The CZE profile of the MNP-1°Ab-CRP-2°Ab/FITC bioconjugates showed good reproducibility. One major peak was observed for the MNP bioconjugates. The quantitative analysis also showed good results. The coefficient of variation (CV%) for the major peak area was 8.7%, and the CV% for the major peak migration time was 2.5%. The linear range for CRP analysis was 10-150 μg/mL, and the concentration limit of detection (LOD) was 9.2 μg/mL. Non-specific interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the system can be prevented by including 10% (v/v) of human plasma in the binding buffers. The CE/LIF method might be helpful for analyzing high concentrations of CRP in a patient's plasma after an acute-phase inflammation. This new method demonstrated the possibility of using MNPs and CE/LIF for the detection of proteins, and provided information for the establishment of appropriate CE conditions.

  15. Synthesis of belite cement clinker of high hydraulic reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kacimi, Larbi Simon-Masseron, Angelique Salem, Souria Ghomari, Abdelhamid Derriche, Zoubir

    2009-07-15

    This study is concerned with the increase of the cooling rate of belite clinker, by using the water quenching for the chemical stabilization of reactive belite, which improves the hydraulic properties of this clinker. The addition of adequate mineralizers, as NaF and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, contributes to the improvement of the clinker properties obtained at low burning temperature. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of this clinker. The samples were analyzed by means of a scanning electronic microscope connected with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer to detect the composition of the belite phase and its morphology. Physical and mechanical properties of this clinker cement were determined. The results show that the belite clinker obtained at 1150 {sup o}C, with lime saturation factor 0.67, is characterized by a great hydraulic reactivity, similar to that of the ordinary alite clinker. The addition of 2% of NaF and the water quenching improved the chemical, mineralogical and structural properties, while improving the cement hydraulic properties.

  16. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  17. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  18. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  19. Preparation of highly reactive metal powders. A new procedure for the preparation of highly reactive zinc and magnesium metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, R.D.; Li, P.T.J.; Burns, T.P.; Uhm, S.T.

    1981-10-09

    Highly reactive zinc and magnesium metal powders can be prepared by the lithium reduction of the corresponding metal salt with a catalytic amount of naphthalene as an electron carrier. Applications to the Reformatsky reaction, the Grignard reaction, and cyclopropanation (with dibromomethane) are described.

  20. High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2002-08-30

    For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

  1. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  2. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  3. Reactive oxygen species in photochemistry of the red fluorescent protein "Killer Red".

    PubMed

    Vegh, Russell B; Solntsev, Kyril M; Kuimova, Marina K; Cho, Soohee; Liang, Yue; Loo, Bernard L W; Tolbert, Laren M; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2011-05-01

    The fluorescent protein aptly named "Killer Red" (KRed) is capable of killing transfected cells and inactivating fused proteins upon exposure to visible light in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated the source of the bioactive species through a variety of photophysical and photochemical techniques. Our results indicate a Type I (electron transfer mediated) photosensitizing mechanism.

  4. Feasibility of preparing nanodrugs by high-gravity reactive precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Min-Yi; Shao, Lei; Wang, Yu-Yong; Yun, Jimmy; Chew, Nora Y K; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2004-01-01

    To study the feasibility of producing nanoparticles of organic pharmaceuticals using a novel high-gravity reactive precipitation (HGRP) technique, reactive precipitation of benzoic acid as a model compound was carried out in a rotating packed bed under high gravity. The main factors such as the rotating bed speed, concentration and volume flow rate of the reactants (sodium benzoate and HCl) affecting the particle size of the precipitate were studied. Particle size was measured by transmission electron microscopy. Benzoic acid was precipitated as nanoparticles as fine as 10nm. The particle size was decreased with increasing rotating bed speed, concentration and volume flow rate of the reactants. The formation of ultrafine particles was due to intensified micro-mixing of reactants in the rotating bed to enhance nucleation while suppressing crystal growth. The results have demonstrated the feasibility to produce nanodrugs by the principle of acid-base precipitating reaction using HGRP.

  5. Structure-reactivity relationships between fluorescent chromophores and antioxidant activity of grain and sweet sorghum seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenolic structures, such as tannins, are the putative cause of a variety of seed functions including bird/insect resistance and antioxidant activity. Structure-reactivity relationships are necessary to understand the influence of polyphenolic chromophore structures on the tannin content and fr...

  6. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  7. [Physical state of adolescents with the high stress reactivity].

    PubMed

    Krivolapchuk, I A

    2012-01-01

    Research objective was studying of features of a physical state (PS) adolescents of 13-14 years with high (n = 97) and low (n = 85) level of stress reactivity. The obtained data testify that in puberty formation of mechanisms of energy supply for muscle activity at adolescents with various level of stress reactivity occurs heterochronic and nonlinearly. Thus hyperreactivity boys of 13-14 years are characterised concerning high anaerobic alactic and the low aerobic productivity of the organism raised by physiological working costs and slowed down restoration after loadings of the big and submaximum capacity. Specificity of physical readiness of hyperreactivity teenagers consists that at them the high level of development of speed and force is combined with rather low level of development of the general endurance. Intergroup distinctions concerning muscular working capacity and the impellent readiness, caused by stress reactivity, are shown at adolescents of 13-14 years at different stages of puberty (SP). Thus and hyper--and hyporeactivity boys with II and III SP, are characterised in comparison with children with IV SP higher indicators of aerobic productivity of an organism, against rather small anaerobic possibilities. Results of research give the basis to believe, that at hyporeactivity adolescents efficiency of functioning of mechanisms of antihypoxic protection is lowered. PMID:23393780

  8. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T. J. Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D.

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  9. High spectral resolution imager for solar induced fluorescence observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Marcoionni, P.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.; Raimondi, V.; Sandri, P.

    2011-11-01

    The use of high-resolution imagers for determination of solar-induced fluorescence of natural bodies by observing the infilling of Fraunhofer lines has been frequently adopted as a tool for vegetation characterization. The option to perform those measurements from airborne platforms was addressed in the past. In-field observations gave evidence of the main requirements for an imaging spectrometer to be used for Sun-induced fluorescence measurements such as high spectral resolution and fine radiometric accuracy needed to resolve the shape of observed Fraunhofer lines with a high level of accuracy. In this paper, some solutions for the design of a high spectral resolution push-broom imaging spectrometer for Sun-induced fluorescence measurements are analysed. The main constraints for the optical design are a spectral resolution better than 0.01 nm and a wide field of view. Due to the fine instrumental spectral resolution, bidimensional focal plane arrays characterized by high quantum efficiency, low read-out noise, and high sensitivity are requested. The development of a lightweight instrument is a benefit for aerospace implementations of this technology. First results coming from laboratory measurements and optical simulations are presented and discussed taking into account their feasibility.

  10. Cross-Reactive Sensor Array for Metal Ion Sensing Based on Fluorescent SAMs

    PubMed Central

    Basabe-Desmonts, Lourdes; van der Baan, Frederieke; Zimmerman, Rebecca S.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass were previously developed in our group as new sensing materials for metal ions. These fluorescent SAMs are comprised by fluorophores and small molecules sequentially deposited on a monolayer on glass. The preorganization provided by the surface avoids the need for complex receptor design, allowing for a combinatorial approach to sensing systems based on small molecules. Now we show the fabrication of an effective microarray for the screening of metal ions and the properties of the sensing SAMs. A collection of fluorescent sensing SAMs was generated by combinatorial methods and immobilized on the glass surfaces of a custom-made 140 well microtiter-plate. The resulting libraries are easily measured and show varied responses to a series cations such as Cu2+, Co2+, Pb2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+. These surfaces are not designed to complex selectively a unique analyte but rather they are intended to produce fingerprint type responses to a range of analytes by less specific interactions. The unselective responses of the library to the presence of different cations generate a characteristic pattern for each analyte, a “finger print” response.

  11. Superresolution fluorescence mapping of single-nanoparticle catalysts reveals spatiotemporal variations in surface reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; Lucas, J. Matthew; Song, Ping; Beberwyck, Brandon; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Weilin; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-01-01

    For the practical application of nanocatalysts, it is desirable to understand the spatiotemporal fluctuations of nanocatalytic activity at the single-nanoparticle level. Here we use time-lapsed superresolution mapping of single-molecule catalysis events on individual nanoparticles to observe time-varying changes in the spatial distribution of catalysis events on Sb-doped TiO2 nanorods and Au triangle nanoplates. Compared with the active sites on well-defined surface facets, the defects of the nanoparticle catalysts possess higher intrinsic reactivity but lower stability. Corners and ends are more reactive but also less stable than flat surfaces. Averaged over time, the most stable sites dominate the total apparent activity of single nanocatalysts. However, the active sites with higher intrinsic activity but lower stability show activity at earlier time points before deactivating. Unexpectedly, some active sites are found to recover their activity (“self-healing”) after deactivation, which is probably due to desorption of the adsorbate. Our superresolution measurement of different types of active catalytic sites, over both space and time, leads to a more comprehensive understanding of reactivity patterns and may enable the design of new and more productive heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:26150516

  12. High-resolution fluorescence microscopy of myelin without exogenous probes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Brideau, Craig; Poon, Kelvin W C; Döring, Axinia; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter K

    2014-02-15

    Myelin is a critical element of the central and peripheral nervous systems of all higher vertebrates. Any disturbance in the integrity of the myelin sheath interferes with the axon's ability to conduct action potentials. Thus, the study of myelin structure and biochemistry is critically important. Accurate and even staining of myelin is often difficult because of its lipid-rich nature and multiple tight membrane wraps, hindering penetration of immunoprobes. Here we show a method of visualizing myelin that is fast, inexpensive and reliable using the cross-linking fixative glutaraldehyde that produces strong, broad-spectrum auto-fluorescence in fixed tissue. Traditionally, effort is generally aimed at eliminating this auto-fluorescence. However, we show that this intrinsic signal, which is very photostable and particularly strong in glutaraldehyde-fixed myelin, can be exploited to visualize this structure to produce very detailed images of myelin morphology. We imaged fixed rodent tissues from the central and peripheral nervous systems using spectral confocal microscopy to acquire high-resolution 3-dimensional images spanning the visual range of wavelengths (400-750 nm). Mathematical post-processing allows accurate and unequivocal separation of broadband auto-fluorescence from exogenous fluorescent probes such as DAPI and fluorescently-tagged secondary antibodies. We additionally show the feasibility of immunohistochemistry with antigen retrieval, which allows co-localization of proteins of interest together with detailed myelin morphology. The lysolecithin model of de- and remyelination is shown as an example of a practical application of this technique, which can be routinely applied when high-resolution microscopy of central or peripheral myelinated tracts is required.

  13. Investigation of reactive transport with closed-flow column experiments and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The sorption of solutes and colloids to immobile sorbents results in the phenomenon of retardation. Besides the interactions at the sorbent-solution-interface, the sorption rate depends also on the spatial structure of the pore network (size distribution, connectivity, topology). Column experiments allow for the consideration of the structure and thus for a quantification of possible rate limitations. We focus on column experiments run in closed-flow mode. There, a typical oscillation in the "breakthrough" of solute concentration, which conveys additional information about the flow regime (dispersivity, water content, immobile water) as well as the effective interaction kinetics, can be observed. Another major feature of the closed flow design is the conservation of tracer mass inside the column setup. Therefore, the investigation of sorption characteristics can be simplified by using mass balances. Our objective is to study the interaction between different solutes (conservative tracers, e.g., NaCl or LiBr and reactive tracers, e.g., acetate, oxalate and phenanthrene) and artificial porous media (composed of quartz, illite, goethite and charcoal in a well defined grain size distribution). The concentration-time profile of solutes is measured with non-consuming techniques (fluorescence spectroscopy or electrical conductivity measurements). PARAFAC analysis of fluorescence data is used for the quantification of aromatic compounds in complex background solutions. Interaction parameters obtained from breakthrough data are then used to quantify the availability of reactive mineral surfaces and effective rates of physical and chemical non-equilibrium processes. After the column experiments, the effect on the microtopology and mineral surfaces is investigated by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Recent multi-step tracer experiments allowed for the reconstruction of adsorption isotherms of oxalate and acetate on goethite.

  14. A scanning fluorescence spectroscopy of decorin under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoda, Takahito; Kim, Yun-Jung; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishiumi, Tadayuki

    2013-06-01

    High pressure processing is able to tenderize not only meat but also intramuscular connective tissue, which is mainly composed of collagen. Decorin, one of the proteoglycans, binds to and stabilizes collagen fibrils. It has been suggested that structural weakening of intramuscular connective tissue may result from the disappearance of the decorin-collagen interaction. In this study, the fluorescence spectra and the surface hydrophobicity of decorin molecules were measured under high pressure in order to examine the resulting change in the tertiary structure. The fluorescence intensity and the surface hydrophobicity of decorin molecules both decreased with increasing applied pressure and with applied time at the constant applied pressure, respectively. The observations indicate that the native structure of decorin is maintained during 200 MPa pressurization for less than 30 min.

  15. Collisional quenching dynamics and reactivity of highly vibrationally excited molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingnan

    Highly excited molecules are of great importance in many areas of chemistry including photochemistry. The dynamics of highly excited molecules are affected by the intermolecular and intramolecular energy flow between many different kinds of motions. This thesis reports investigations of the collisional quenching and reactivity of highly excited molecules aimed at understanding the dynamics of highly excited molecules. There are several important questions that are addressed. How do molecules behave in collisions with a bath gas? How do the energy distributions evolve in time? How is the energy partitioned for both the donor and bath molecules after collisions? How do molecule structure, molecule state density and intermolecular potential play the role during collisional energy transfer? To answer these questions, collisional quenching dynamics and reactivity of highly vibrationally excited azabenzene molecules have been studied using high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy. The first study shows that the alkylated pyridine molecules that have been excited with Evib˜38,800 cm-1 impart less rotational and translational energy to CO2 than pyridine does. Comparison between the alkylated donors shows that the strong collisions are reduced for donors with longer alkyl chains by lowering the average energy per mode but longer alkyl chain have increased flexibility and higher state densities that enhance energy loss via strong collisions. In the second study, the role of hydrogen bonding interactions is explored in collision of vibrationally excited pyridines with H2O. Substantial difference in the rotational energy of H 2O is correlated with the structure of the global energy minimum. A torque-inducing mechanism is proposed that involves directed movement of H 2O between sigma and pi-hydrogen bonding interactions with the pyridine donors. In the third study the dynamics of strong and weak collisions for highly vibrationally excited methylated pyridine

  16. Fluorescent foci quantitation for high-throughput analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    A number of cellular proteins localize to discrete foci within cells, for example DNA repair proteins, microtubule organizing centers, P bodies or kinetochores. It is often possible to measure the fluorescence emission from tagged proteins within these foci as a surrogate for the concentration of that specific protein. We wished to develop tools that would allow quantitation of fluorescence foci intensities in high-throughput studies. As proof of principle we have examined the kinetochore, a large multi-subunit complex that is critical for the accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division. Kinetochore perturbations lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Hence, understanding kinetochore homeostasis and regulation are important for a global understanding of cell division and genome integrity. The 16 budding yeast kinetochores colocalize within the nucleus to form a single focus. Here we have created a set of freely-available tools to allow high-throughput quantitation of kinetochore foci fluorescence. We use this ‘FociQuant’ tool to compare methods of kinetochore quantitation and we show proof of principle that FociQuant can be used to identify changes in kinetochore protein levels in a mutant that affects kinetochore function. This analysis can be applied to any protein that forms discrete foci in cells. PMID:26290880

  17. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R James; Whelan, Eoin C; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-19

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 10(9) M(-1) cm(-1) and 1.5 × 10(8) M(-1) cm(-1) respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract.

  18. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R James; Whelan, Eoin C; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-19

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 10(9) M(-1) cm(-1) and 1.5 × 10(8) M(-1) cm(-1) respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract. PMID:27378394

  19. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R. James; Whelan, Eoin C.; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-01

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 109 M‑1 cm‑1 and 1.5 × 108 M‑1 cm‑1 respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract.

  20. Fluorescence and image guided resection in high grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Fontanella, Marco; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Garbossa, Diego; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The extent of resection in high grade glioma is increasingly been shown to positively effect survival. Nevertheless, heterogeneity and migratory behavior of glioma cells make gross total resection very challenging. Several techniques were used in order to improve the detection of residual tumor. Aim of this study was to analyze advantages and limitations of fluorescence and image guided resection. A multicentric prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of each method. Furthermore, the role of 5-aminolevulinc acid and neuronavigation were reviewed. Twenty-three patients harboring suspected high grade glioma, amenable to complete resection, were enrolled. Fluorescence and image guides were used to perform surgery. Multiple samples were obtained from the resection cavity of each lesion according to 5-ALA staining positivity and boundaries as delineated by neuronavigation. All samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to the intra-operative labeling. Decision-making based on fluorescence showed a sensitivity of 91.1% and a specificity of 89.4% (p<0.001). On the other hand, the image-guided resection accuracy was low (sensitivity: 57.8%; specificity: 57.4%; p=0.346). We observed that the sensitivity of 5-ALA can be improved by the combined use of neuronavigation, but this leads to a significant reduction in specificity. Thus, the use of auxiliary techniques should always be subject to critical skills of the surgeon. We advocate a large-scale study to further improve the assessment of multimodal approaches.

  1. Highly fluorescent resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules with efficient renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Kalpana; Patthipati, Venkata Suresh; Han, Sangbum; Swanson, R. James; Whelan, Eoin C.; Osgood, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Ramjee

    2016-08-01

    Nanomaterial based imaging approaches hold substantial promise in addressing current diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. One of the key requirements for the successful clinical translation of nanomaterials is their complete clearance from the body within a reasonable time period preferably via the renal filtration route. This article describes the synthesis of highly fluorescent, water soluble, resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules and demonstrates their effective renal clearance in mice. The synthesis and functionalization of nanocapsules was accomplished in a one-pot operation via thiol-ene reactions without involving self-assembly, sacrificial templates or emulsions. Water soluble resorcinarene cavitand nanocapsules obtained by this approach were covalently functionalized with Alexa Fluor 750. Highly fluorescent nanocapsules with hydrodynamic diameters of 122 nm and 68 nm and extinction coefficients of 1.3 × 109 M-1 cm-1 and 1.5 × 108 M-1 cm-1 respectively were prepared by varying the reaction conditions. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these nanocapsules in mice followed by whole-body fluorescence imaging showed that they were both cleared renally within a few hours. Given the inherent encapsulation capabilities of nanocapsules, the renal clearance demonstrated in this work opens up new opportunities for their theranostic applications especially for targeting and treating the urinary tract.

  2. X‐ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal: Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    PubMed Central

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P.; Richard, Marie‐Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A.; Schülli, Tobias U.; Meirer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Structure–activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single‐particle level. For the first time, one X‐ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm‐resolved X‐ray diffraction (μ‐XRD) and X‐ray excited optical fluorescence (μ‐XEOF) maps of the crystallinity and Brønsted reactivity of a zeolite crystal previously reacted with a styrene probe molecule. The local gradients in chemical reactivity (derived from μ‐XEOF) were correlated with local crystallinity and framework Al content, determined by μ‐XRD. Two distinctly different types of fluorescent species formed selectively, depending on the local zeolite crystallinity. The results illustrate the potential of this approach to resolve the crystallographic structure of a porous material and its reactivity in one experiment via X‐ray induced fluorescence of organic molecules formed at the reactive centers. PMID:27478278

  3. X‐ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal: Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    PubMed Central

    Ristanović, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P.; Richard, Marie‐Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A.; Schülli, Tobias U.; Meirer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Structure–activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single‐particle level. For the first time, one X‐ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm‐resolved X‐ray diffraction (μ‐XRD) and X‐ray excited optical fluorescence (μ‐XEOF) maps of the crystallinity and Brønsted reactivity of a zeolite crystal previously reacted with a styrene probe molecule. The local gradients in chemical reactivity (derived from μ‐XEOF) were correlated with local crystallinity and framework Al content, determined by μ‐XRD. Two distinctly different types of fluorescent species formed selectively, depending on the local zeolite crystallinity. The results illustrate the potential of this approach to resolve the crystallographic structure of a porous material and its reactivity in one experiment via X‐ray induced fluorescence of organic molecules formed at the reactive centers. PMID:27145171

  4. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  5. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The use of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties is studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in Earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. The work to date includes development of an apparatus and its use in studies of chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, and tungsten specimens, novel methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, and levitation jet properties. Brief summaries of these studies are given. The apparatus is described and detailed results for the current reporting period are presented.

  6. High-Contrast Fluorescence Imaging in Fixed and Living Cells Using Optimized Optical Switches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liangxing; Dai, Yingrui; Jiang, Xiaoli; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Lee, Jessie E.; Jiang, Tao; Yan, Yuling; Marriott, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    We present the design, synthesis and characterization of new functionalized fluorescent optical switches for rapid, all-visible light-mediated manipulation of fluorescence signals from labelled structures within living cells, and as probes for high-contrast optical lock-in detection (OLID) imaging microscopy. A triazole-substituted BIPS (TzBIPS) is identified from a rational synthetic design strategy that undergoes robust, rapid and reversible, visible light-driven transitions between a colorless spiro- (SP) and a far-red absorbing merocyanine (MC) state within living cells. The excited MC-state of TzBIPS may also decay to the MC-ground state emitting near infra-red fluorescence, which is used as a sensitive and quantitative read-out of the state of the optical switch in living cells. The SP to MC transition for a membrane-targeted TzBIPS probe (C12-TzBIPS) is triggered at 405 nm at an energy level compatible with studies in living cells, while the action spectrum of the reverse transition (MC to SP) has a maximum at 650 nm. The SP to MC transition is complete within the 790 ns pixel dwell time of the confocal microscope, while a single cycle of optical switching between the SP and MC states in a region of interest is complete within 8 ms (125 Hz) within living cells, the fastest rate attained for any optical switch probe in a biological sample. This property can be exploited for real-time correction of background signals in living cells. A reactive form of TzBIPS is linked to secondary antibodies and used, in conjunction with an enhanced scope-based analysis of the modulated MC-fluorescence in immuno-stained cells, for high-contrast immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23755140

  7. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  8. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  9. Highly chemical reactive ion etching of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Karouta, F.; Jacobs, B.; Moerman, I.; Jacobs, K.; Weyher, J.L.; Porowski, S.; Crane, R.; Hageman, P.R.

    2000-07-01

    A highly chemical reactive ion etching process has been developed for MOVPE-grown GaN on sapphire. The key element for the enhancement of the chemical property during etching is the use of a fluorine containing gas in a chlorine based chemistry. In the perspective of using GaN substrates for homo-epitaxy of high quality GaN/AlGaN structures they have used the above described RIE process to smoothen Ga-polar GaN substrates. The RMS value, measured by AFM, went from 20 {angstrom} (after mechanical polishing) down to 4 {angstrom} after 6 minutes of RIE. Etching N-polar GaN resulted in a higher etch rate than Ga-polar materials (165 vs. 110 nm/min) but the resulting surface was quite rough and suffers from instability problems. Heat treatment and HCl dip showed a partial recovery of Schottky characteristics after RIE.

  10. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  11. Implementation of a new scanning method for high-resolution fluorescence tomography using thermo-sensitive fluorescent agents.

    PubMed

    Nouizi, Farouk; Kwong, Tiffany C; Cho, Jaedu; Lin, Yuting; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-11-01

    Conventional fluorescence tomography provides images of the distribution of fluorescent agents within highly scattering media, but suffers from poor spatial resolution. Previously, we introduced a new method termed "temperature-modulated fluorescence tomography" (TM-FT) that generates fluorescence images with high spatial resolution. TM-FT first uses focused ultrasound to locate the distribution of temperature-sensitive fluorescence probes. Afterward, this a priori information is utilized to improve the performance of the inverse solver for conventional fluorescence tomography and reveal quantitatively accurate fluorophore concentration maps. However, the disadvantage of this novel method is the long data acquisition time as the ultrasound beam was scanned in a step-and-shoot mode. In this Letter, we present a new, fast scanning method that reduces the imaging time 40 fold. By continuously scanning the ultrasound beam over a 50 mm by 25 mm field-of-view, high-resolution fluorescence images are obtained in less than 29 min, which is critical for in vivo small animal imaging. PMID:26512501

  12. Highly reactive free radicals in electronic cigarette aerosols.

    PubMed

    Goel, Reema; Durand, Erwann; Trushin, Neil; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Foulds, Jonathan; Elias, Ryan J; Richie, John P

    2015-09-21

    Electronic cigarette (EC) usage has increased exponentially, but limited data are available on its potential harmful effects. We tested for the presence of reactive, short-lived free radicals in EC aerosols by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) using the spin-trap phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Radicals were detected in aerosols from all ECs and eliquids tested (2.5 × 10(13) to 10.3 × 10(13) radicals per puff at 3.3 V) and from eliquid solvents propylene glycol and glycerol and from "dry puffing". These results demonstrate, for the first time, the production of highly oxidizing free radicals from ECs which may present a potential toxicological risk to EC users.

  13. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  14. Reactive oxygen species in the presence of high glucose alter ureteric bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chen, Yun-Wen; Tran, Stella; Chenier, Isabelle; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Ingelfinger, Julie R

    2007-07-01

    Renal malformations are a major cause of childhood renal failure. During the development of the kidney, ureteric bud (UB) branching morphogenesis is critical for normal nephrogenesis. These studies investigated whether renal UB branching morphogenesis is altered by a high ambient glucose environment and studied underlying mechanism(s). Kidney explants that were isolated from different periods of gestation (embryonic days 12 to 18) from Hoxb7-green fluorescence protein mice were cultured for 24 h in either normal d-glucose (5 mM) or high d-glucose (25 mM) medium with or without various inhibitors. Alterations in renal morphogenesis were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Paired-homeobox 2 (Pax-2) gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistology. The results revealed that high d-glucose (25 mM) specifically stimulates UB branching morphogenesis via Pax-2 gene expression, whereas other glucose analogs, such as d-mannitol, l-glucose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose, had no effect. The stimulatory effect of high glucose on UB branching was blocked in the presence of catalase and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I, and Akt signaling. Moreover, in in vivo studies, it seems that high glucose induces, via Pax-2 (mainly localized in UB), acceleration of UB branching but not nephron formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that high glucose alters UB branching morphogenesis. This occurs, at least in part, via reactive oxygen species generation, activation of Akt signaling, and upregulation of Pax-2 gene expression.

  15. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dickson; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have gained interest during the recent years because of their low toxicity and finer size for the bioimaging and biolabeling applications in comparison to the semiconductor quantum dot analogues. Diverse materials such as sulfur compounds, peptides, dendrimers, proteins, etc., are exploited for the preparation of AuNCs. Henceforth, highly fluorescent, water-soluble, and few atom-containing gold nanoclusters are created using a rapid, straightforward, and green method. In this regard for the first time chicken egg white (CEW), one of the most unique materials, is utilized in an aqueous solution under basic conditions at physiological temperature for the preparation of AuNCs. Tyrosine and tryptophan amino acid residues are responsible for the conversion of Au ions to Au(0) under alkaline condtions. CEW contains four major proteins of which the main constituent protein, ovalbumin also leads to the formation of the AuNCs with a higher fluorescence emission compared to the CEW. The ratios between the different reaction partners are very crucial, along with temperature and time for the preparation of AuNCs with high photoluminescence emission. The limited vibrational motion of the proteins under alkaline condition and the bulkiness of the proteins help in the formation of AuNCs.

  16. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach.

  17. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view.

  18. Standard Fluorescent Imaging of Live Cells is Highly Genotoxic

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jing; Wood, David K.; Weingeist, David M.; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Navasumrit, Panida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is commonly used for imaging live mammalian cells. Here, we describe studies aimed at revealing the potential genotoxic effects of standard fluorescence microscopy. To assess DNA damage, a high throughput platform for single cell gel electrophoresis is used (e.g., the CometChip). Light emitted by three standard filters was studied: a) violet light [340–380 nm], used to excite DAPI and other blue fluorophores, b) blue light [460–500 nm] commonly used to image GFP and Calcein AM, and c) green light [528–553], useful for imaging red fluorophores. Results show that exposure of samples to light during imaging is indeed genotoxic even when the selected wavelengths are outside the range known to induce significant levels. Shorter excitation wavelengths and longer irradiation times lead to higher levels of DNA damage. We have also measured DNA damage in cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) or stained with Calcein AM, a widely used green fluorophore. Data show that Calcein AM leads to a synergistic increase in the levels of DNA damage and that even cells that are not being directly imaged sustain significant DNA damage from exposure to indirect light. The nature of light-induced DNA damage during imaging was assessed using the Fpg glycosylase, an enzyme that enables quantification of oxidative DNA damage. Oxidative damage was evident in cells exposed to violet light. Furthermore the Fpg glycosylase revealed the presence of oxidative DNA damage in blue-light exposed cells for which DNA damage was not detected using standard analysis conditions. Taken together, the results of these studies call attention to the potential confounding effects of DNA damage induced by standard imaging conditions, and identify wavelength, exposure time and fluorophore as parameters that can be modulated to reduce light-induced DNA damage. PMID:23650257

  19. Rapidly responsive and highly selective fluorescent probe for sulfite detection in real samples and living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongda

    2015-10-15

    Sulfites (HSO3(-) or SO3(-)) have very significant toxicity in the environment and in the system. However, developing specific identification of sulfite probes is still very important. In this paper, a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescent probe (HHC) was synthesized to detect HSO3(-) in real samples and living cells. Sensing performance and preponderance are listed as follows. First, probe HHC showed remarkable selectivity for HSO3(-) over varieties of other species, including cysteine, glutathione, S(2-), CN(-), and reactive oxygen species, mainly because of the introduction of the electron-poor C=C double bond for HSO3(-). Second, probe HHC has great molar absorptivity, allowing it to act as a visual detection of probe for HSO3(-). Third, the fluorescence intensities of HHC linearly correlate with the concentration of HSO3(-), with a detection limit of 6.8 nm. Finally, our proposed probe can be applied to the visually determination of trace HSO3(-) in real samples and living HeLa cells with high precision. We hope that our proposed probe will greatly benefit biological sciences when biological researchers survey the role of HSO3(-) in biological systems. PMID:26515011

  20. Rapidly responsive and highly selective fluorescent probe for sulfite detection in real samples and living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongda

    2015-10-15

    Sulfites (HSO3(-) or SO3(-)) have very significant toxicity in the environment and in the system. However, developing specific identification of sulfite probes is still very important. In this paper, a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescent probe (HHC) was synthesized to detect HSO3(-) in real samples and living cells. Sensing performance and preponderance are listed as follows. First, probe HHC showed remarkable selectivity for HSO3(-) over varieties of other species, including cysteine, glutathione, S(2-), CN(-), and reactive oxygen species, mainly because of the introduction of the electron-poor C=C double bond for HSO3(-). Second, probe HHC has great molar absorptivity, allowing it to act as a visual detection of probe for HSO3(-). Third, the fluorescence intensities of HHC linearly correlate with the concentration of HSO3(-), with a detection limit of 6.8 nm. Finally, our proposed probe can be applied to the visually determination of trace HSO3(-) in real samples and living HeLa cells with high precision. We hope that our proposed probe will greatly benefit biological sciences when biological researchers survey the role of HSO3(-) in biological systems.

  1. Water requirements in monomer folding and dimerization of triosephosphate isomerase in reverse micelles. Intrinsic fluorescence of conformers related to reactivation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Velasco, D A; Sepúlveda-Becerra, M; Galina, A; Darszon, A; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1995-01-10

    The possibility of using reverse micelles to stabilize monomers prior to formation of dimeric triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) from rabbit muscle was studied. TPI denatured with guanidine hydrochloride undergoes reactivation in reverse micelles formed with n-octane, hexanol, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and water. Reactivation of around 80% is observed at TPI concentrations of about 2 micrograms/mL of reverse micelles and water concentrations above 4.0%. With 3.0% water, reactivation is about 10%. If denatured TPI is incubated for a few seconds in reverse micelles with 5.0% water (or higher) followed by incubation in 3.0% water, reactivation is between 35% and 50%. That is, a brief exposure of denatured TPI to reverse micelles with a relatively high water concentration yielded a significant amount of structures competent for formation of catalytically active dimers. As evidenced by kinetic data, these structures correspond to monomers of TPI [Garza-Ramos, G. Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M., Gómez-Puyou, A., & Gracy R. W. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 208, 389-395]. After a 5-2.0% water transition, competent monomers were stabilized for at least 30 min; a subsequent rise in water concentration led to dimerization and appearance of activity. By changes in the amount of water, it was possible to determine in reverse micelles the amount of water required for monomer folding and dimerization; i.e., less water was required in the dimerization step. Experiments with a model system, trypsin and the soybean inhibitor, showed that, in reverse micelles with 2.0% water, protein-protein interactions readily take place.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Fluorescent nanodiamonds as highly stable biomarker for endotoxin verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Burg, Jan Michael; Lilholt, Maria; Maeder, Ulf; Beer, Sebastian; Salzig, Denise; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (ND) provide advantageous properties as a fluorescent biomarker for in vitro and in vivo studies. The maximum fluorescence occurs around 700 nm, they do not show photobleaching or blinking and seem to be nontoxic. After a pretreatment with strong acid fluorescent ND can be functionalized and coupled to endotoxin. Endotoxin is a decay product of bacteria and causes strong immune reactions. Therefore endotoxin has to be removed for most applications. An effective removal procedure is membrane filtration. The endotoxin, coupled to fluorescent ND can be visualized by using confocal microscopy which allows the investigation of the separation mechanisms of the filtration process within the membranes.

  3. Red phosphors for use in high CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Vankatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-11-15

    Novel red emitting phosphors for use in fluorescent lamps resulting in superior color rendering index values compared to conventional red phosphors. Also disclosed is a fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer comprising blends of one or more of a blue phosphor, a blue-green phosphor, a green phosphor and a red a phosphor selected from the group consisting of SrY.sub.2 O.sub.4 :Eu.sup.3+, (Y,Gd)Al.sub.3 B.sub.4 O.sub.12 :Eu.sup.3+, and [(Y.sub.1-x-y-m La.sub.y)Gd.sub.x ]BO.sub.3 :Eu.sub.m wherein y<0.50 and m=0.001-0.3. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of the disclosed red phosphors in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over the course of the lamp life.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Highly Charged Green Fluorescent Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Phillips, J L; Colvin, M E

    2009-03-26

    A recent experimental study showed that green fluorescent protein (GFP) that has been mutated to have ultra-high positive or negative net charges, retain their native structure and fluorescent properties while gaining resistance to aggregation under denaturing conditions. These proteins also provide an ideal test case for studying the effects of surface charge on protein structure and dynamics. They have performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the near-neutral wildtype GFP and mutants with net charges of -29 and +35. They analyzed the resulting trajectories to quantify differences in structure and dynamics between the three GFPs. This analyses shows that all three proteins are stable over the MD trajectory, with the near-neutral wild type GFP exhibiting somewhat more flexibility than the positive or negative GFP mutants, as measured by the order parameter and changes in phi-psi angles. There are more dramatic differences in the properties of the water and counter ions surrounding the proteins. The water diffusion constant near the protein surface is closer to the value for bulk water in the positively charged GFP than in the other two proteins. Additionally, the positively charged GFP shows a much greater clustering of the counter ions (CL-) near its surface than corresponding counter ions (Na+) near the negatively charged mutant.

  5. Substrate degradation in high-Rayleigh-number reactive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. J.; Jensen, O. E.; Power, H.; Riley, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study buoyancy-induced convection of a solute in an ideal two-dimensional fluid-saturated porous medium, where the solute undergoes a second-order reaction with a chemical substrate that is fixed in the underlying matrix. Numerical simulations at high Rayleigh number show how a flow is established in which a thin dynamic boundary layer beneath the solute source feeds slender vertical plumes beneath. We examine how the substrate is reactively degraded, at a rate enhanced by convective mixing. For the case when the substrate is abundant, we derive a reduced-order model describing the slow degradation of the substrate, which is formulated as a novel one-dimensional free-boundary problem. Numerical simulations and the reduced model reveal how, when the reaction is rapid compared to the convective time scale, the plumes propagate deep into the flow domain with reaction confined to a narrow region at their base. In contrast, slow reaction allows plumes to fill the domain before degradation of the substrate proceeds homogeneously. An alternative model with a thin reaction front captures the rapid degradation of the substrate when the solute concentration is relatively high.

  6. Molecular aggregation characterized by high order autocorrelation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A G; Thompson, N L

    1987-01-01

    The use of high order autocorrelation in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for investigating aggregation in a sample that contains fluorescent molecules is described. Theoretical expressions for the fluorescence fluctuation autocorrelation functions defined by gm,n(tau) = [(delta fm(t + tau)delta fm(t] - (delta Fm(t] (delta Fn(t

  7. Real-time Monitoring of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) Amount, Composition, Source and Reactivity Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Applications for Drinking Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, T. E.; Saraceno, J.; Downing, B. D.; Goldman, J. H.; Carpenter, K. D.; McGhee, G.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of in situ, continuous fluorescence spectroscopy as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. To date, in situ fluorometers designed to estimate DOC concentration are single wavelength sensors centered near the excitation/emission (ex/em) pair 370/460 nm. Additional information about dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition has only been obtainable from benchtop fluorometers that provide multi-spectral data. Changes in DOM composition are important as they provide insight into DOM source (e.g. terrestrial, algal, wastewater) and reactivity. Recent advances in sensor technology make it possible to build in situ instruments for measuring multiple fluorescence ex/em pairs, including pairs with excitations in the lower “deep UV” region (e.g. 270/340 nm) associated with fresher and more labile DOM pools. The deployment of multi-spectral sensors will provide real-time continuous data showing not only changes in DOM concentration, but also changes in composition. This information is particularly pertinent to drinking water utilities because a fraction of DOM reacts upon disinfection (e.g. chlorination and ozonation) to form toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) which are regulated by the EPA. To test this application, we designed a multi-wavelength sensor that will measure three ex/em pairs (370/470, 370/520 and 270/340 nm) for deployment near a drinking water intake on the Clackamas River in Oregon. Comparison of the continuous data with discrete sample data indicates these tools can track both quantitative and qualitative changes in the DOM pool. The availability of this type of continuous data in real time could enable utilities to minimize the formation of DBPs by continuously optimizing treatment plant operations in response to changes in source water. In addition, collection of high-frequency data will improve understanding of watershed DOM dynamics and help identify sources of DOM and DBP precursors, thereby

  8. High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnik, Paul J.; Graham, Michael E.; Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    High rate reactive sputtering of MoN(x) films was performed using feedback control of the nitorgen partial pressure. Coatings were made at four different target powers: 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 kW. No hysteresis was observed in the nitrogen partial pressure vs. flow plot, as is typically seen for the Ti-N system. Four phases were determined by X-ray diffraction: molybdenum, Mo-N solid solution, Beta-Mo2N and gamma-Mo2N. The hardness of the coatings depended upon composition, substrate bias, and target power. The phases present in the hardest films differed depending upon deposition parameters. For example, the Beta-Mo2N phase was hardest (load 25 gf) at 5.0 kW with a value of 3200 kgf/sq mm, whereas the hardest coatings at 10 kW were the gamma-Mo2N phase (3000 kgf/sq mm). The deposition rate generally decreased with increasing nitrogen partial pressure, but there was a range of partial pressures where the rate was relatively constant. At a target power of 5.0 kW, for example, the deposition rates were 3300 A/min for a N2 partial pressure of 0.05 - 1.0 mTorr.

  9. Strategies for the analysis of highly reactive pinacolboronate esters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qiqing; Ngim, Kenley K; Sun, Megan; Li, Jane; Deese, Alan; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2012-03-16

    Pinacolboronate esters (or boronic acid, pinacol esters) are widely used in the Suzuki coupling reaction to connect organic building blocks for the total synthesis of complex molecules. The 2-aminopyrimidine-5-pinacolboronate ester was used as a starting material in the synthesis of a development compound, necessitating a chromatographic purity method to assess its quality. This aryl pinacolboronate ester posed unique analytical challenges due to its facile hydrolysis to the corresponding boronic acid, which is nonvolatile and poorly soluble in organic solvents. This made GC and normal-phase HPLC analysis unsuitable. In reversed-phase mode, typical sample preparation and analysis conditions promoted rapid sample degradation to the boronic acid. To overcome these challenges, unconventional approaches were necessary in order to stabilize 2-aminopyrimidine-5-pinacolboronate ester, adequately solubilize its boronic acid, and produce acceptable separation and retention. The final method employed non-aqueous and aprotic diluent, and a reversed-phase separation using highly basic mobile phases (pH 12.4) with an ion pairing reagent. These strategies were successfully applied to several other reactive pinacolboronate esters for purity analysis, demonstrating broad applicability to this unique class of compounds. PMID:22321949

  10. Physical activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Grandjean, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed countries around the world despite the documented success of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions. This illustrates the multifactorial nature of atherosclerosis and the use of novel inflammatory markers as an adjunct to risk factor reduction strategies. As evidence continues to accumulate that inflammation is involved in all stages of the development and progression of atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) may provide additional information regarding the biological status of the atherosclerotic lesion. Recent investigations suggest that physical activity reduces CRP levels. Higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are consistently associated with 6-35% lower CRP levels. Longitudinal training studies that have demonstrated reductions in CRP concentrations range from 16% to 41%, an effect that may be independent of baseline levels of CRP, body composition or weight loss. The average change in CRP associated with physical activity appears to be at least as good, if not better, than currently prescribed pharmacological interventions in similar populations. The primary purpose of this review will be to present evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations that physical activity lowers CRP levels in a dose-response manner. Finally, this review will examine factors such as body composition, sex, blood sample timing, diet and smoking, which may influence the CRP response to physical activity. PMID:16646631

  11. Low Dissipative High Order Numerical Simulations of Supersonic Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of a newly developed low dissipative sixth-order spatial and fourth-order temporal scheme for viscous reactive flows interacting with shock waves that contain fine scale flow structures. The accuracy and efficiency of the scheme, and to what degree the scheme can capture the correct physical wave speeds of stiff reactive flows will be included.

  12. Assessment of reactivity transient experiments with high burnup fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, O.; Yang, R.L.; Rashid, Y.R.; Montgomery, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    A few recent experiments aimed at determining the response of high-burnup LWR fuel during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) have raised concerns that existing failure criteria may be inappropriate for such fuel. In particular, three experiments (SPERT CDC-859, NSRR HBO-1 and CABRI REP Na-1) appear to have resulted in fuel failures at only a fraction of the anticipated enthalpy levels. In evaluating the results of such RIA simulation experiments, however, it is necessary that the following two key considerations be taken into account: (1) Are the experiments representative of conditions that LWR fuel would experience during an in-reactor RIA event? (2) Is the fuel that is being utilized in the tests representative of the present (or anticipated) population of LWR fuel? Conducting experiments under conditions that can not occur in-reactor can trigger response modes that could not take place during in-reactor operation. Similarly, using unrepresentative fuel samples for the tests will produce failure information that is of limited relevance to commercial LWR fuel. This is particularly important for high-burnup fuel since the manner under which the test samples are base-irradiated prior to the test will impact the mechanical properties of the cladding and will therefore affect the RIA response. A good example of this effect can be seen in the results of the SPERT CDC-859 test and in the NSRR JM-4 and JM-5 tests. The conditions under which the fuel used for these tests was fabricated and/or base-irradiated prior to the RIA pulse resulted in the formation of multiple cladding defects in the form of hydride blisters. When this fuel was subjected to the RIA power pulse, it failed by developing multiple cracks that were closely correlated with the locations of the pre-existing hydride blisters. In the case of the JM tests, many of the cracks formed within the blisters themselves and did not propagate beyond the heavily hydrided regions.

  13. High reactivity of ancient permafrost carbon upon hydrological release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Davydov, S.; Davydova, A.; Sobczak, W. V.; Schade, J.; Bulygina, E.; Zimov, S.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Half of the global stock of soil organic carbon (OC) is stored in Arctic permafrost. About one third of this pool consists of so-called yedoma, organic-rich deposits that were formed during the Pleistocene. Previous studies show rapid respiration of yedoma upon thawing, with the potential release of large quantities of relict OC into the contemporary C cycle. The fluvial and coastal reactivity and fate of this OC, however, remain unclear. Duvannyi Yar is a well-studied yedoma exposure on the banks of Kolyma River in Northeastern Siberia. It can serve as a model for the >7000 km long East Siberian Arctic coastline that is dominated by similarly exposed yedoma cliffs, and is increasingly vulnerable to erosion with climate warming-induced decreases in sea-ice, and increases in storms and wave-fetch. Permafrost thaw on the Duvannyi Yar exposure produces thaw streams that are heavily loaded with freshly thawed yedoma sediments (suspended load ca. 650 g/L; particulate OC ca. 8-10 g/L; dissolved OC ca. 150-300 mg/L). We traced organic carbon loss and oxygen utilisation during incubations of Duvannyi Yar stream water, and a series of dilutions of Duvannyi Yar water and Kolyma River and East Siberian Sea water. Concurrent measurements of enzyme activities were taken to investigate the processes limitating degradation. The overall goal of the study was to investigate the relative bioavailability of contemporary versus ancient organic carbon pools over short time scales (days-weeks). Radiocarbon ages of the dissolved OC in the thaw streams were 19-29 ky BP, and particulate OC 19-38 ky BP. These ages are far older than any previously published values and clearly illustrate the mobilization of ancient permafrost organic matter into the contemporary carbon cycle. Incubation experiments showed that the ancient dissolved OC was highly susceptible to degradation, losing 34% of its carbon in 14 days (and 41% in 28 days). River and ocean water samples spiked with ancient carbon

  14. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner.

  15. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-01-01

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent “on” to “off” state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm2) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  16. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  17. High-resolution single-molecule fluorescence imaging of zeolite aggregates within real-life fluid catalytic cracking particles.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50-150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity.

  18. Comparison of fluorescence reagents for simultaneous determination of hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Mochizuki, Keisuke; Nakano, Yuki; Maruya, Natsumi; Goto, Masato; Maruyama, Yosuke; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are well-known and important contributors to oxidative and nitrosative stress in several diseases. Hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine products appear to be particularly susceptible targets of oxidative and nitrosative stress. We compared fluorescence reagents for their potential use in the analysis of hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine products with a high-sensitivity and high-specificity HPLC-UV-FL technique. The analytes were extracted from serum via solid-phase extraction on Waters Oasis MCX cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an ODS column (Capcell Pak MG II; 150 × 2.0 mm) using a gradient mobile phase consisting of 20 mm sodium phosphate buffer (adjusted to pH 3.0) and acetonitrile. The method quantification limit for 4-nitrophenylalanine, m-tyrosine, and 3-nitrotyrosine was 0.1 μm. The relative standard deviation of the precision and accuracy was acceptable at the spiked concentration of 0.1 μm for 4-nitrophenylalanine, m-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine. The method could be used for the in vitro analysis of serum samples.

  19. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  20. Peer Relations and Peer Deviance as Predictors of Reactive and Proactive Aggression among High School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uz Bas, Asli; Öz Soysal, Fatma Selda

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between reactive and proactive aggression and peer relations and peer deviance among high school girls. A total of 442 high school students participated in this study. Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire, the Peer Relations Scale, and the Peer Deviance Scale were used to collect data. Results…

  1. High-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Higuchi, Takahiro; Furukawa, Taro; Masui, Kensuke; Morimoto, Kei; Numata, Masaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sagara, Yuta; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes have continued to attract interest because of their long operational lifetimes, high colour purity of electroluminescence and potential to be manufactured at low cost in next-generation full-colour display and lighting applications. In fluorescent molecules, however, the exciton production efficiency is limited to 25% due to the deactivation of triplet excitons. Here we report fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes that realize external quantum efficiencies as high as 13.4-18% for blue, green, yellow and red emission, indicating that the exciton production efficiency reached nearly 100%. The high performance is enabled by utilization of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as assistant dopants that permit efficient transfer of all electrically generated singlet and triplet excitons from the assistant dopants to the fluorescent emitters. Organic light-emitting diodes employing this exciton harvesting process provide freedom for the selection of emitters from a wide variety of conventional fluorescent molecules.

  2. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence towards high-sensitivity optical sensing.

    PubMed

    Ray, K; Chowdhury, M H; Zhang, J; Fu, Y; Szmacinski, H; Nowaczyk, K; Lakowicz, J R

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biological research. Until recently most of the fluorescence experiments have been performed in the far-field regime. By far-field we imply at least several wavelengths from the fluorescent probe molecule. In recent years there has been growing interest in the interactions of fluorophores with metallic surfaces or particles. Near-field interactions are those occurring within a wavelength distance of an excited fluorophore. The spectral properties of fluorophores can dramatically be altered by near-field interactions with the electron clouds present in metals. These interactions modify the emission in ways not seen in classical fluorescence experiments. Fluorophores in the excited state can create plasmons that radiate into the far-field and fluorophores in the ground state can interact with and be excited by surface plasmons. These reciprocal interactions suggest that the novel optical absorption and scattering properties of metallic nanostructures can be used to control the decay rates, location, and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to these phenomena as plasmon-controlled fluorescence (PCF). An overview of the recent work on metal-fluorophore interactions is presented. Recent research combining plasmonics and fluorescence suggest that PCF could lead to new classes of experimental procedures, novel probes, bioassays, and devices.

  3. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  4. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  5. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, N; Cavaille, J P; Graziani, F; Robin, M; Ouari, O; Pietri, S; Stocker, P

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  6. Concerns in the application of fluorescent probes DCDHF-DA, DHR 123 and DHE to measure reactive oxygen species in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Mazyar

    2015-12-25

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in biological systems by partial reduction of molecular oxygen. The essential role of ROS in maintaining physiological health may be corrupted into oxidative stress by their overproduction or the exhaustion of antioxidant mechanisms. Many studies covering a broad range of methodologies have investigated ROS production and their toxic mechanisms of action. Of these methodologies, fluorometry has been among the preferred techniques. Three frequently used fluorescent probes for in vitro studies are 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF-DA), Dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) and Dihydroethidium (DHE). Apart from the unavoidable limitations of auto-oxidation, photo-oxidation and photo-conversion, there are also concerns relating to protocol modification for the improved monitoring of ROS. This paper aims to highlight such contributing factors, including cell culture conditions and the characteristics of individual fluorescent probes in the utilization of these selected probes in in vitro systems.

  7. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. S.; Debefve, L. M.; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A.; Ouldchikh, S.; Bare, Simon R.; Basset, J.-M.; Gates, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  8. Highly Fluorescent Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues Made by Decorating the Imidazolone Ring.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sara; Martínez-López, David; Morón, María; Sucunza, David; Sampedro, Diego; Domingo, Alberto; Salgado, Antonio; Vaquero, Juan J

    2015-12-14

    The synthesis and photophysical behavior of an unexplored family of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophore analogues is reported. The compound (Z)-4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1-propyl-2-(propylamino)-1H-imidazol-5(4 H)-one (p-HBDNI, 2 a) exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence properties relative to the parent compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (p-HBDI, 1). p-HBDNI was considered as a model system and the photophysical properties of other novel 2-amino-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one derivatives were evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations were carried out to rationalize the results. The analogue AIDNI (2 c), in which the 4-hydroxybenzyl group of p-HBDNI was replaced by an azaindole group, showed improved photophysical properties and potential for cell staining. The uptake and intracellular distribution of 2 c in living cells was investigated by confocal microscopy imaging.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  10. Cytogenetic analysis using quantitative, high-sensitivity, fluorescence hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkel, D; Straume, T; Gray, J W

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosome classification and detection of chromosome aberrations. Biotin-labeled DNA was hybridized to target chromosomes and subsequently rendered fluorescent by successive treatments with fluorescein-labeled avidin and biotinylated anti-avidin antibody. Human chromosomes in human-hamster hybrid cell lines were intensely and uniformly stained in metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei when human genomic DNA was used as a probe. Interspecies translocations were detected easily at metaphase. The human-specific fluorescence intensity from cell nuclei and chromosomes was proportional to the amount of target human DNA. Human Y chromosomes were fluorescently stained in metaphase and interphase nuclei by using a 0.8-kilobase DNA probe specific for the Y chromosome. Cells from males were 40 times brighter than those from females. Both Y chromosomal domains were visible in most interphase nuclei of XYY amniocytes. Human 28S ribosomal RNA genes on metaphase chromosomes were distinctly stained by using a 1.5-kilobase DNA probe. Images PMID:3458254

  11. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  12. Room-temperature near IR fluorescence of high optical quality KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, S. M.; Schepler, K. L.; Peterson, R. D.; Zelmon, D. E.

    2007-04-01

    We have investigated room temperature fluorescence in the 500-900nm spectral region from high optical quality, polished and uncoated KTP crystals from three different commercial vendors. The crystals were all cut into 5mm x 5mm x 5mm cubes with their dielectric axes along the cube edges. The pump source was a tripled Nd:YAG laser operating at 355nm and 7mJ energy having 3ns pulse width and 100Hz pulse repetition rate. Samples from two vendors showed low fluorescence of similar magnitude while samples from the third vendor showed nearly two orders of magnitude higher value in the peak fluorescence near 800nm. In addition, all samples showed a weaker secondary fluorescence band peaking near 600nm. A low fluorescence sample from one of the vendors also showed typical "gray tracking" at these pump radiation conditions. We have also measured lifetimes of 2.9+/-0.7 µs and 4.9+/-0.1 µs for the centers responsible for fluorescence near 845nm and 595nm respectively in the KTP sample showing highest fluorescence and "gray tracking" in this group of samples. The manufacturing processes used to produce high optical quality and low fluorescence KTP materials are proprietary to the commercial vendors and were not provided. Possible origin and sources of fluorescence in these materials are discussed consistent with those published in the literature.

  13. Distinct tubulin dynamics in cancer cells explored using a highly tubulin-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuige; Zuo, Yinglin; Liang, Baoxia; Yue, Hong; Yue, Xin; Wen, Gesi; Wang, Ruimin; Quan, Junmin; Du, Jun; Bu, Xianzhang

    2015-09-01

    A highly specific fluorescent probe (OC9) was discovered exhibiting tubulin-specific affinity fluorescence, which allowed selective labeling of cellular tubulin in microtubules. Moreover, distinct tubulin dynamics in various cellular bio-settings such as drug resistant or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cancer cells were directly observed for the first time via OC9 staining.

  14. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A G

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals.

  15. Characteristics of high quality sorbent for fluidized bed combustion and problems of maintaining uniform reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, R.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of coal is considered one of the more promising clean coal technologies for the future. While much research has gone into the design and operation of FBC units, there is little concern for what characterizes a high quality sorbent and the source of such a sorbent. Carbonate rocks, limestone and dolomite, have been tested extensively as sorbents and primarily two rock characteristics appear to significantly control reactivity: composition and texture. Calcium carbonate is more reactive than magnesium carbonate where all other rock characteristics are the same. In considering texture, highest reactivity is measured for carbonate rocks which consist of homogeneous, euhedral crystals ranging in size from .05 to .2 mm and which possess uniform intercrystalline porosity. The most reactive material possesses both high calcium content, uniform microcrystalline texture and intercrystalline porosity, however, such material is not very abundant in nature and is not locally available to midcontinent facilities. Sucrosic dolomite, which possesses uniform microcrystalline texture and intercrystalline porosity has high rank reactivity. While this rock is quite common, it occurs as beds, generally less than twenty feet thick, interlayered with less reactive dolomite types. Therefore, without selective quarrying methods, production of sorbent with uniformly high reactivity will be impossible.

  16. Birth Weight, Current Anthropometric Markers, and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Brazilian School Children

    PubMed Central

    Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown associations of birth weight with increased concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein. This study assessed the relationship between birth weight, anthropometric and metabolic parameters during childhood, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. A total of 612 Brazilian school children aged 5–13 years were included in the study. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry. Nutritional status was assessed by body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, and glucose were measured by enzymatic methods. Insulin sensitivity was determined by the homeostasis model assessment method. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, General Linear Model, and General Linear Model for Gamma Distribution. Body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds were directly associated with birth weight (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.015, resp.). Large for gestational age children showed higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001) than small for gestational age. High birth weight is associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Large for gestational age altered high sensitivity C-reactive protein and promoted additional risk factor for atherosclerosis in these school children, independent of current nutritional status. PMID:25874126

  17. High spatial resolution in x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zahrt, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The design of diffracting crystals for use in x-ray fluorescence spectrometers is discussed. Characteristics of the Johan and Johansson geometries are discussed and intensity profiles are developed. If the diffraction line has a finite width, concentration gradients will not be faithfully reproduced by gradients in the signal as the sample is scanned. Boundary effects for four types of concentration gradient are presented; as step function, linear gradients, exponential gradient, and Gaussian gradient. (DWL) 13 refs., 8 figs.

  18. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  19. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoyu Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu

    2014-05-07

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ρ, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ρ and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2 nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6 nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  20. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  1. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  2. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations.

  3. Fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp use in chambers and greenhouses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhans, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent and High Intensity Discharge lamps have opened up great opportunities for researchers to study plant growth under controlled environment conditions and for commercial growers to increase plant production during low/light periods. Specific technical qualities of fluorescent and HID lamps have been critically reviewed. I will direct my remarks to fluorescent and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps in growth chambers, growth rooms, and greenhouses. I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using each lamp in growth chambers, growth rooms and greenhouses.

  4. Deposition of highly textured AlN thin films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Milena A.; Törndahl, Tobias; Katardjiev, Ilia; Kubart, Tomas

    2015-03-15

    Aluminum nitride thin films were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and pulsed direct-current on Si (100) and textured Mo substrates, where the same deposition conditions were used for both techniques. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results show a pronounced improvement in the AlN crystalline texture for all films deposited by HiPIMS on Si. Already at room temperature, the HiPIMS films exhibited a strong preferred (002) orientation and at 400 °C, no contributions from other orientations were detected. Despite the low film thickness of only 200 nm, an ω-scan full width at half maximum value of 5.1° was achieved on Si. The results are attributed to the high ionization of sputtered material achieved in HiPIMS. On textured Mo, there was no significant difference between the deposition techniques.

  5. Sensitive and selective tumor imaging with novel and highly activatable fluorescence strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-02-01

    Nowadays, several tumor imaging modalities such as MRI, PET and fluorescence imaging techniques have been extensively investigated. One of the central problems associated with these conventional tumor-targeted imaging methods, however, is the fact that the signal contrast between tumor and surrounding tissues relies on the efficient targeting to the tumor and the rapid sequestration or excretion of unbound agent. Among these modalities, only fluorescence imaging technique has a significant feature, in that great signal activation could be achieved which potentially leads to the selective imaging of cancer with higher tumor-to-background ratio. In this symposium, I will present some examples of fluorescence cancer imaging based on highly activatable strategies with using precisely designed novel fluorescence probes. Recently, we developed highly sensitive fluorescence probes for β-galactosidase which is applicable for living cell system. By utilizing these probes, we could establish a novel and highly activatable strategy for sensitive and selective optical imaging of imbedded tumor in the peritoneum. We took a two step procedure in that a lectin is used to localize β-galactosidase to cancer cells as an activating enzyme, and subsequent administration of a highly-sensitive fluorescence probe for the enzyme have afforded remarkable fluorescence activation selectively in tumor mass. Since the tumor-targeted enzyme can catalyze numerous substrate turnovers, a great number of fluorescent molecules could be produced and hence the rapid and sensitive detection of tumor in vivo with high tumor-to-background ratio could be achieved. Moreover, the consequent close-up investigation using fluorescence microscopy revealed that cancer microfoci as small as 200 μm could be successfully visualized.

  6. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  7. Development and biological applications of high-resolution ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaohong, Mi

    High-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in both biological and biomedical sciences, to directly visualize biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels through specific fluorescence labeling. Among the fluorescence microscopy techniques, mega-electron-volt (MeV) ion-induced fluorescence microscopy has unique advantages because MeV ions can penetrate through biological cells with little deflection in their trajectories. The state-of-the-art bioimaging facility in the Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore can achieve sub-30 nm spatial resolutions for structural imaging of biological cells, which is well below the diffraction limits imposed by optical microscopy. Our aim is to achieve similar spatial resolutions for Ion Beam Induced Fluorescence Imaging. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  8. Pin-Hole Array Correlation Imaging: Highly Parallel Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Daniel J.; Xu, Yangqing; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we describe pin-hole array correlation imaging, a multipoint version of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, based upon a stationary Nipkow disk and a high-speed electron multiplying charged coupled detector. We characterize the system and test its performance on a variety of samples, including 40 nm colloids, a fluorescent protein complex, a membrane dye, and a fluorescence fusion protein. Our results demonstrate that pin-hole array correlation imaging is capable of simultaneously performing tens or hundreds of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-style measurements in cells, with sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to study the behaviors of membrane-bound and soluble molecules labeled with conventional chemical dyes or fluorescent proteins. PMID:19527665

  9. A High-Speed Detector System for X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddons,P.D.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, g.; Kuczewski, A.; Kuczewski, J.; O

    2006-10-29

    We have developed a high-speed system for collecting x-ray fluorescence microprobe data, based on ASICs developed at BNL and high-speed processors developed by CSIRO. The system can collect fluorescence data in a continuous raster scan mode, and present elemental images in real time using Ryan's Dynamic Analysis algorithm. We will present results from a 32-element prototype array illustrating the concept. The final instrument will have 384 elements arranged in a square array around a central hole.

  10. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  11. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  12. Development of chiral metal amides as highly reactive catalysts for asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Yoshimoto, Susumu; Dutton, Mark J; Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient catalytic asymmetric [3 + 2] cycloadditions using a chiral copper amide are reported. Compared with the chiral CuOTf/Et3N system, the CuHMDS system showed higher reactivity, and the desired reactions proceeded in high yields and high selectivities with catalyst loadings as low as 0.01 mol %. PMID:27559396

  13. Synthesis of a highly HOCl-selective fluorescent probe and its use for imaging HOCl in cells and organisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Lee, Kyung-Ah; Ren, Xintong; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kim, Gyungmi; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-07-01

    During infection, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase of innate immune cells generates important microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) to kill the invading pathogens. However, excess amounts of HOCl induce oxidative damage of functional biomolecules such as DNA and proteins, which may cause chronic inflammatory diseases. Herein, we outline protocols for the preparation of a rhodamine-based HOCl probe, as well as applications thereof, with which to detect HOCl in living cells and organisms. The probe (R19S) can be prepared from a commercially available rhodamine, rhodamine 6G, in two steps. When R19S is treated with HOCl, the sulfur atom is replaced by an oxygen atom, resulting in opening of the lactone ring; thus, nonfluorescent R19S is converted to highly fluorescent rhodamine 19 (R19). R19S exhibits high selectivity for HOCl over other ROS and high sensitivity in a weakly acidic environment. In addition, we describe fluorescence imaging assays of HOCl in mouse neutrophils and Drosophila targeted using this probe. The approximate amount of time required to synthesize the probe is 2-3 d, after which it can be used for up to 5 h in the bioimaging of living cells. PMID:27281649

  14. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries. PMID:22569431

  15. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  16. Highly selective fluorescence imaging of zinc distribution in HeLa cells and Arabidopsis using a naphthalene-based fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ha; Lee, Jin Hyeok; Jung, Sung Ho; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Feng, Mingxiao; Kim, Jae-Yean; Lee, Jae-Hong; Lee, Hoyeon; Kim, Jong Seung; Kang, Chulhun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2015-05-01

    2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)naphthalene-based probe 1 was found to exhibit a dramatic enhancement in fluorescence upon addition of Zn(2+), but not with any other metal ions. Probe 1 as a chemoprobe enabled high-resolution fluorescence imaging of zinc ions in HeLa cells and Arabidopsis.

  17. Very high average power solid-state lasers pumped by remotely located nuclear-driven fluorescers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, F. P.; Prelas, M. A.

    A total system efficiency of 3 percent is calculated for very high average power active mirror solid-state laser amplifiers of Nd,Cr:GSGG, pumped by remotely generated visible nuclear-driven alkali metal excimer fluorescence. The fluorescence is transported around a radiation shield, separating the fluorescer and the laser, by a large diameter-to-length ratio hollow lightpipe. Parameters are presented for a system producing 1-ms-long 12 MW pulses at 1 Hz, for an average power output of 12 kW.

  18. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  19. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  20. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  1. One-pot synthesis of highly greenish-yellow fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots for pyrophosphate sensing via competitive coordination with Eu(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Zhao, Tingting; Jiang, Yaqi; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) with greenish-yellow emission and quantum yield of 13.2% have been synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method. The obtained N-GQDs displayed excellent optical properties, high photostability and resistance to strong ion strength. Based on the higher affinity of pyrophosphate (PPi) than carboxyl and amido groups on the surface of the N-GQDs to Eu(3+), a Eu(3+)-modulated N-GQD off-on fluorescent probe for PPi detection was constructed with a detection limit of 0.074 μM. The detection process was simple in design, easy to operate, and showed a highly selective response to PPi in the presence of co-existing anions. This work widens the applications of N-GQDs with versatile functionality and reactivity in clinical diagnostics and as biosensors.

  2. Molecular imprinting ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Jialuo; Kang, Qi; Shen, Dazhong; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-03-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare molecular imprinting ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of phycocyanin (PC) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), via a sol-gel polymerization process using nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) as fluorescent signal source. The ratio of two fluorescence peak emission intensities of NBD and PC was utilized to determine the concentration of PC, which could effectively reduce the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. As a result, this sensor obtained high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 0.14 nM within 6 min, and excellent recognition specificity for PC over its analogues with a high imprinting factor of 9.1. Furthermore, the sensor attained high recoveries in the range of 93.8-110.2% at three spiking levels of PC, with precisions below 4.7% in seawater and lake water samples. The developed sensor strategy demonstrated simplicity, reliability, rapidity, high selectivity and high sensitivity, proving to be a feasible way to develop high efficient fluorescence sensors and thus potentially applicable for ultratrace analysis of complicated matrices. PMID:26485176

  3. Highly Selective Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Sensing and Imaging Cysteine in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weifen; Guo, Lei; Li, Yinhui; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Wong, Man Shing

    2016-02-01

    A novel ratiometric mitochondrial cysteine (Cys)-selective two-photon fluorescence probe has been developed on the basis of a merocyanine as the fluorophore and an acrylate moiety as the biothiol reaction site. The biocompatible and photostable acrylate-functionalized merocyanine probe shows not only a mitochondria-targeting property but also highly selective detection and monitoring of Cys over other biothiols such as homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. In addition, this probe exhibits ratiometric fluorescence emission characteristics (F518/F452), which are linearly proportional to Cys concentrations in the range of 0.5-40 μM. More importantly, the probe and its released fluorophore, merocyanine, exhibit strong two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) with two-photon action cross-section (Φσmax) of 65.2 GM at 740 nm and 72.6 GM at 760 nm in aqueous medium, respectively, which is highly desirable for high contrast and brightness ratiometric two-photon fluorescence imaging of the living samples. The probe has been successfully applied to ratiometrically image and detect mitochondrial Cys in live cells and intact tissues down to a depth of 150 μm by two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Thus, this ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe is practically useful for an investigation of Cys in living biological systems. PMID:26717855

  4. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: resolution and precision meet high-throughput.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl J; Peterson, Kurt C; Muretta, Joseph M; Higgins, Sutton E; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2014-11-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5-10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications.

  5. Separating Reflective and Fluorescent Components Using High Frequency Illumination in the Spectral Domain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lam, Antony; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is beneficial to many applications but most traditional methods do not consider fluorescent effects which are present in everyday items ranging from paper to even our food. Furthermore, everyday fluorescent items exhibit a mix of reflection and fluorescence so proper separation of these components is necessary for analyzing them. In recent years, effective imaging methods have been proposed but most require capturing the scene under multiple illuminants. In this paper, we demonstrate efficient separation and recovery of reflectance and fluorescence emission spectra through the use of two high frequency illuminations in the spectral domain. With the obtained fluorescence emission spectra from our high frequency illuminants, we then describe how to estimate the fluorescence absorption spectrum of a material given its emission spectrum. In addition, we provide an in depth analysis of our method and also show that filters can be used in conjunction with standard light sources to generate the required high frequency illuminants. We also test our method under ambient light and demonstrate an application of our method to synthetic relighting of real scenes. PMID:26336113

  6. Highly Selective Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Sensing and Imaging Cysteine in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weifen; Guo, Lei; Li, Yinhui; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Wong, Man Shing

    2016-02-01

    A novel ratiometric mitochondrial cysteine (Cys)-selective two-photon fluorescence probe has been developed on the basis of a merocyanine as the fluorophore and an acrylate moiety as the biothiol reaction site. The biocompatible and photostable acrylate-functionalized merocyanine probe shows not only a mitochondria-targeting property but also highly selective detection and monitoring of Cys over other biothiols such as homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. In addition, this probe exhibits ratiometric fluorescence emission characteristics (F518/F452), which are linearly proportional to Cys concentrations in the range of 0.5-40 μM. More importantly, the probe and its released fluorophore, merocyanine, exhibit strong two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) with two-photon action cross-section (Φσmax) of 65.2 GM at 740 nm and 72.6 GM at 760 nm in aqueous medium, respectively, which is highly desirable for high contrast and brightness ratiometric two-photon fluorescence imaging of the living samples. The probe has been successfully applied to ratiometrically image and detect mitochondrial Cys in live cells and intact tissues down to a depth of 150 μm by two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Thus, this ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe is practically useful for an investigation of Cys in living biological systems.

  7. Reactive sulfhydryl groups of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. II. Site of labeling with iodoacetamide and its fluorescent derivative.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Kawakita, M

    1987-02-01

    Iodoacetamide (IAA) and its fluorescent derivative, 5-(2-iodoacetamidoethyl) amino-naphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) specifically bind to a site on the C-terminal half of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase. The location of this specific binding site was identified. SR membranes were treated with 150 microM [14C]IAA at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. One mole of IAA per mole of ATPase was bound in 6 h without affecting the Ca2+-transport activity. [14C]IAA-labeled SR membranes were cleaved with BrCN, and 14C-labeled peptide fragments were separated by Sephadex LH-60 chromatography and then digested further with trypsin. A radioactive peptide (Ala-Cys 674-Cys-Phe-Ala-Arg) was purified by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and C18 reversed phase HPLC (Cys denotes the [14C]IAA-binding site). IAEDANS-labeling was carried out by reacting SR membranes with 50 microM IAEDANS for 5 h, at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. A fluorescent peptide was successfully purified by the same procedures as for the IAA-labeled peptide, and the amino acid sequence analysis of this peptide revealed that the IAEDANS labeling site was identical with the IAA binding site.

  8. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated toxicity in nonneuronal cell lines: characterization using fluorescent measures of cell viability and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Anegawa, N J; Guttmann, R P; Grant, E R; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J; Lynch, D R

    2000-05-01

    Cells transfected with specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes undergo cell death that mimics glutamate-induced excitotoxicity pharmacologically. We have further characterized the mechanisms of cell death resulting from NMDA receptor activation in such cells through development of cell counting methods based on co-transfection with green fluorescent protein. When co-transfected with NMDA receptors, GFP expression was limited to live cells as indicated by the observation that GFP was only detected in cells which were positive for markers of live cells, and was found in no cells which were trypan blue or propidium iodide positive. Using co-transfection with green fluorescent protein and cell counting of viable cells with a fluorescence activated cells sorter, we confirmed the subunit-specific profile of NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in cells transfected with NMDA receptors. Toxicity was greatest in the NR1A/2A receptor, less in the NR1A/2B receptor, and least in NR1A/2C receptors. Cell death also differed pharmacologically between subunit combinations. Cell death in cells transfected with NR 1A/2A was blocked by amino-phosphonovaleric acid at lower concentrations than in cells transfected with NR 1A/2B. In cells transfected with the NR1A/2A or NR1A/2B combinations but not NR1A/2C, cell death was also associated with production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, removal of the final 400 amino acids of the C-terminal region of NR2A decreased cell death. The use of GFP based cell counting provides a sensitive mechanism for assessing the mechanism of excitotoxicity in transfected cell models.

  9. Highly Fluorescent Gene Carrier Based on Ag-Au Alloy Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Lin, Lin; Guo, Zhaopei; Chen, Jie; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi; Yang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    For systemic delivery of gene, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been exploited as novel gene carriers because of the excellent characteristics for "visible" in intracellular trafficking. Herein, a highly fluorescent gene carrier was prepared by conjugating polyethylenimines on Ag-Au alloy nanoclusters. This carrier exhibited remarkable high gene transfection efficiencies and relatively low cytotoxicity toward B16F10, HeLa, and CHO cells. More interestingly, the high fluorescent Ag-Au-PEI conjugates showed high quantum yield of 14.56%, which is much higher than most of the reported gold nanocluster-based quantum dots and Ag-Au-PEI possessed bioimaging capacity both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Fluorescent boronate-based polymer nanoparticles with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cargo release for drug-delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Eliézer; Höcherl, Anita; Janoušková, Olga; Jäger, Alessandro; Hrubý, Martin; Konefał, Rafał; Netopilik, Miloš; Pánek, Jiří; Šlouf, Miroslav; Ulbrich, Karel; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-03-01

    A new drug-delivery system of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) bearing pinacol-type boronic ester and alkyne moieties displaying triggered self-immolative polymer degradation in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the capability of cellular imaging is presented. The NPs specifically release their drug cargo under concentrations of ROS that are commonly found in the intracellular environment of certain tumors and of inflamed tissues and exhibit significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells compared to their non-ROS-responsive counterparts.A new drug-delivery system of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) bearing pinacol-type boronic ester and alkyne moieties displaying triggered self-immolative polymer degradation in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the capability of cellular imaging is presented. The NPs specifically release their drug cargo under concentrations of ROS that are commonly found in the intracellular environment of certain tumors and of inflamed tissues and exhibit significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells compared to their non-ROS-responsive counterparts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00791k

  11. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  12. Impact reactivity of materials at very high oxygen pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, H. W.; Minchey, J. G.; Crowder, R.; Davidson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The requirements for impact testing of materials in an oxygen atmosphere at pressures from 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) to 172 MPa (25,000 psi) were evaluated. The impact tester system was evaluated for potential pressure increases from 69 MPa (10,000 psi) to 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi). The low pressure oxygen and nitrogen systems, the impact tower, the impact test cell, and the high pressure oxygen system were evaluated individually. Although the structural integrity of the impact test cell and the compressor were sufficient for operation at 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), studies revealed possible material incompatibility at that pressure and above. It was recommended that if a component should be replaced for 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) operation the replacement should meet the final objectives of 172 MPa (25,000 psi). Recommended changes in the system include; use of Monel 400 for pressures above 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), use of bellows to replace the seal in the impact tester, use of a sapphire window attached to a fiber optic for event sensing, and use of a three diaphragm compressor.

  13. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  14. Preparation and characterization of fluorescent microtubes with high length/diameter ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Maoquan; Huang, Jiasheng

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescent microtubes were prepared by self-assembly of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) following calcination at 500 °C using silkworm silks as templates. The obtained microtubes exhibited high length/diameter ratios. The cross-sectional dimension of the microtubes was no more than 10 µm, but the length could be up to several millimeters. The microtube wall was mainly composed of CdO, Cd3TeO6, and CdCO3 nanocrystals. Compared with the original red fluorescent CdTe QDs and the silk/QD core-shell structures, the microtubes exhibited a bright green-yellow fluorescence. The approach reported in this work opens the possibility of the large-scale preparation of fluorescent microtubes for both fundamental research and applications.

  15. Fluorescent Protein Nanowire-Mediated Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed and Highly Sensitive Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Men, Dong; Zhou, Juan; Li, Wei; Leng, Yan; Chen, Xinwen; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Xian-En

    2016-07-13

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools for high-throughput and simultaneous detection of different target molecules in complex biological samples. However, the sensitivity of conventional fluorescence-labeling protein detection methods is limited by the availability of signal molecules for binding to the target molecule. Here, we built a multifunctional fluorescent protein nanowire (FNw) by harnessing self-assembly of yeast amyloid protein. The FNw integrated a large number of fluorescent molecules, thereby enhancing the fluorescent signal output in target detection. The FNw was then combined with protein microarray technology to detect proteins derived from two pathogens, including influenza virus (hemagglutinin 1, HA1) and human immunodeficiency virus (p24 and gp120). The resulting detection sensitivity achieved a 100-fold improvement over a commercially available detection reagent. PMID:27315221

  16. High-quality substrate for fluorescence enhancement using agarose-coated silica opal film.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Li, Juan; Sun, Liguo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Lv, Linli; Zhao, Xiangwei; Xiao, Pengfeng; Hu, Jing; Lv, Mei; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-08-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in biochip, a new kind of substrates was developed by agarose coating on silica opal film. In this study, silica opal film was fabricated on glass substrate using the vertical deposition technique. It can provide stronger fluorescence signals and thus improve the detection sensitivity. After coating with agarose, the hybrid film could provide a 3D support for immobilizing sample. Comparing with agarose-coated glass substrate, the agarose-coated opal substrates could selectively enhance particular fluorescence signals with high sensitivity when the stop band of the silica opal film in the agarose-coated opal substrate overlapped the fluorescence emission wavelength. A DNA hybridization experiment demonstrated that fluorescence intensity of special type of agarose-coated opal substrates was about four times that of agarose-coated glass substrate. These results indicate that the optimized agarose-coated opal substrate can be used for improving the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with high quality and selectivity.

  17. Protein-Reactive, Thermoresponsive Copolymers with High Flexibility and Biodegradability

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jianjun; Hong, Yi; Ma, Zuwei; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A family of injectable, biodegradable, and thermosensitive copolymers based on N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylic acid, N-acryloxysuccinimide, and a macromer polylactide–hydroxyethyl methacrylate were synthesized by free radical polymerization. Copolymers were injectable at or below room temperature and formed robust hydrogels at 37 °C. The effects of monomer ratio, polylactide length, and AAc content on the chemical and physical properties of the hydrogel were investigated. Copolymers exhibited lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) from 18 to 26 °C. After complete hydrolysis, hydrogels were soluble in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C with LCSTs above 40.8 °C. Incorporation of type I collagen at varying mass fractions by covalent reaction with the copolymer backbone slightly increased LCSTs. Water content was 32–80% without collagen and increased to 230% with collagen at 37 °C. Hydrogels were highly flexible and relatively strong at 37 °C, with tensile strengths from 0.3 to 1.1 MPa and elongations at break from 344 to 1841% depending on NIPAAm/HEMAPLA ratio, AAc content, and polylactide length. Increasing the collagen content decreased both elongation at break and tensile strength. Hydrogel weight loss at 37 °C was 85–96% over 21 days and varied with polylactide content. Hydrogel weight loss at 37 °C was 85–96% over 21 days and varied with polylactide content. Degradation products were shown to be noncytotoxic. Cell adhesion on the hydrogels was 30% of that for tissue culture polystyrene but increased to statistically approximate this control surface after collagen incorporation. These newly described thermoresponsive copolymers demonstrated attractive properties to serve as cell or pharmaceutical delivery vehicles for a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:18324775

  18. Three dimensional microfluidics with embedded microball lenses for parallel and high throughput multicolor fluorescence detection

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Y. J.; Wu, Y. C.; Chen, Y.; Kung, Y. C.; Wu, T. H.; Huang, K. W.; Sheen, H. J.; Chiou, P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    We report a 3D microfluidic device with 32 detection channels and 64 sheath flow channels and embedded microball lens array for high throughput multicolor fluorescence detection. A throughput of 358 400 cells/s has been accomplished. This device is realized by utilizing solid immersion micro ball lens arrays for high sensitivity and parallel fluorescence detection. High refractive index micro ball lenses (n = 2.1) are embedded underneath PDMS channels close to cell detection zones in channels. This design permits patterning high N.A. micro ball lenses in a compact fashion for parallel fluorescence detection on a small footprint device. This device also utilizes 3D microfluidic fabrication to address fluid routing issues in two-dimensional parallel sheath focusing and allows simultaneous pumping of 32 sample channels and 64 sheath flow channels with only two inlets. PMID:24404054

  19. THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF LI2O

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, G.; Missimer, D.

    2009-11-13

    ) It is likely that some or all of the past high temperature phase behavior and vaporization experiments involving Li{sub 2}O(s) at temperatures above 1250 C have actually involved Li{sub 2}O(l). If these past measurements were actually measurements performed on Li{sub 2}O(l) instead of the solid, the thermochemical data for phases and species in the Li-O system will require reevaluation.

  20. A virus-MIPs fluorescent sensor based on FRET for highly sensitive detection of JEV.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caishuang; Wang, Huan; He, Kui; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang; Cai, Changqun

    2016-11-01

    Major stumbling blocks in the recognition and detection of virus are the unstable biological recognition element or the complex detection means. Here a fluorescent sensor based on virus-molecular imprinted polymers (virus-MIPs) was designed for specific recognition and highly sensitive detection of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). The virus-MIPs were anchored on the surface of silica microspheres modified by fluorescent dye, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde (PC). The fluorescence intensity of PC can be enhanced by the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), where virus acted as energy donor and PC acted as energy acceptor. The enhanced fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of virus in the range of 24-960pM, with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 9.6pM, and the relative standard deviation was 1.99%. In additional, the specificity study confirmed the resultant MIPs has high-selectivity for JEV. This sensor would become a new key for the detection of virus because of its high sensitive, simple operation, high stability and low cost. PMID:27591625

  1. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to r...

  2. FRET-based kinetic analysis of highly reactive heterochiral DNA toward EcoRI endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Urata, Hidehito; Tamaki, Chihiro; Matsuno, Miki; Wada, Shun-ichi; Akagi, Masao

    2009-12-11

    We found unusual reactivity of a heterochiral dodecadeoxynucleotide toward EcoRI that contains an unnatural l-nucleotide residue at the 3'-flanking site of the hexameric EcoRI recognition sequence. In this study, the kinetic parameters for the reaction were determined by means of a heterochiral molecular beacon that contains the EcoRI recognition sequence in the stem region and possesses the fluorescent and quenching dyes at the 5'- and 3'-termini, respectively. We found that the heterochiral molecular beacon showed large V(max) and small K(m) values compared to the corresponding homochiral one. This chiral modification is expected to induce a preferable conformational change for binding and catalysis by EcoRI.

  3. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 1 - DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses recent work addressing lime enhancement by slurrying with siliceous materials and testing in a laboratory packed-bed reactor, as part of EPA's efforts to develop low cost, retrofit flue gas cleaning technology, including the development of highly reactive sor...

  4. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in players on a major league baseball team.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, John D

    2003-08-15

    We performed a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein test in major league baseball players. This test was of limited usefulness on preseason physical examination of 50 major league baseball players. The test is more likely to be of greater value performed on those whose 10-year risk of coronary heart disease is in the 10% to 20% range.

  5. Fluorescence Evaluation of Antigen-Antibody Reactivity on Surface of Proteinaceous Occlusion Body: Toward Application in Reusable Protein Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Suzuki, Kenji; Ikeda, Keiko; Mori, Hajime; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A proteinaceous occlusion body, which is produced by insect viruses and consists of polyhedrin protein, has attracted much attention as a capsule for occluding an antigen protein. The occlusion body is called polyhedron. Its shape is cubic and its size is a few μm. Because several antigen proteins will be on the surface of polyhedra and several chemically active sites will be exposed, the polyhedra can be used as elements of protein chips to monitor antigen-antibody reactions. This idea is demonstrated by fixing a single polyhedron on a glass substrate and inducing an antigen-antibody reaction individually, and confirmed using relevant fluorescence microscopic images. Furthermore, a technique of cleaning the reacted surface is developed on the basis of the solubility of the polyhedrin matrix in an alkaline solution. The antigen-antibody complex on the surface can be removed by washing with the alkaline solution, and the antigen inside the polyhedron is exposed to the surface. On the basis of these results, the possibility of developing a “reusable protein chip” using the polyhedron is proposed.

  6. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis.

  7. Hybridization chain reaction amplification for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA with dextran coated microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hongzhen; Su, Shao; Li, Qian; Zhu, Changfeng; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Wang, Lihua

    2016-07-15

    Microarrays of biomolecules hold great promise in the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays on account of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. However, the fluorescence detection used in most conventional DNA microarrays is still limited by sensitivity. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel universal and highly sensitive platform for fluorescent detection of sequence specific DNA at the femtomolar level by combining dextran-coated microarrays with hybridization chain reaction (HCR) signal amplification. Three-dimensional dextran matrix was covalently coated on glass surface as the scaffold to immobilize DNA recognition probes to increase the surface binding capacity and accessibility. DNA nanowire tentacles were formed on the matrix surface for efficient signal amplification by capturing multiple fluorescent molecules in a highly ordered way. By quantifying microscopic fluorescent signals, the synergetic effects of dextran and HCR greatly improved sensitivity of DNA microarrays, with a detection limit of 10fM (1×10(5) molecules). This detection assay could recognize one-base mismatch with fluorescence signals dropped down to ~20%. This cost-effective microarray platform also worked well with samples in serum and thus shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26922047

  8. Design and synthesis of highly reactive dienophiles for the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael T; Blackman, Melissa L; Dmitrenko, Olga; Fox, Joseph M

    2011-06-29

    Computation was used to design a trans-cyclooctene derivative that displays enhanced reactivity in the tetrazine-trans-cycloctene ligation. The optimized derivative is an (E)-bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-ene with a cis-ring fusion, in which the eight-membered ring is forced to adopt a highly strained 'half-chair' conformation. Toward 3,6-dipyridyl-s-tetrazine in MeOH at 25 °C, the strained derivative is 19 and 27 times more reactive than the parent trans-cyclooctene and 4E-cyclooct-4-enol, respectively. Toward 3,6-diphenyl-s-tetrazine in MeOH at 25 °C, the strained derivative is 160 times more reactive than the parent trans-cyclooctene.

  9. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  10. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-12-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells. PMID:27299653

  11. Life of fluorescent lamps operated at high frequencies with solid-state ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderber, R. R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F. M.

    1985-07-01

    Standard 40-watt, F-40, rapid-start, fluorescent lamps were operated with solid-state ballasts following the standard life-testing cycle of 3 hours on and 20 minutes off for more than 20,000 hours at high frequency. Lamp operating characteristics (starting voltage, filament voltage, arc current, and current-crest factor) were studied as factors affecting lamp life. Measurements show that fluorescent lamps can attain rated life at high frequency using solid-state ballasts. When lamps are operated in the dimmed mode, full filament power is required to sustain lamplife. The rate of lamp lumen depreciation is dependent on the lamp loading and not the operating frequency.

  12. Unusual high fluorescence of two nitro-distyrylbenzene-like compounds induced by CT processes affecting the fluorescence/intersystem-crossing competition.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Elisei, F; Mazzucato, U; Spalletti, A

    2015-06-14

    Two nitro-substituted 1,4-distyrylbenzene-like compounds have been investigated using stationary and time-resolved (ns/fs) spectrometric techniques as a function of solvent polarity. In the two compounds the central benzene ring is substituted with a p-nitrostyryl group at one side while, at the other side, compound 1 (asymmetric) bears a pyrid-4-ylethenyl group and compound 2 (symmetric) another p-nitrostyryl group. The solvent dependent intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the singlet manifold was found to strongly affect the competition among fluorescence, intersystem crossing and trans-cis photoisomerization. The presence of nitro-groups in the 1,4-distyrylbenzene skeleton causes the usual strong decrease of fluorescence in favour of intersystem crossing to a reactive triplet state. However, the favoured formation of the ICT state in polar solvents induces an unexpected important increase of the fluorescence quantum yield (three/two order of magnitude for the nitro and dinitro derivatives, respectively). The ultrafast spectral transients helped to understand the solvent effects measured by stationary techniques and gave information on the dynamics of the locally excited singlet state ((1)LE*) and the (1)ICT* state, fast produced in polar solvents. Evidence of dual fluorescence in a limited range of solvent polarity, particularly for compound 1, is also reported. The role of an upper triplet state in a non-polar solvent is discussed also based on quantum-mechanical calculations (TD-DFT method) and temperature effects on the photophysical parameters. PMID:25975235

  13. Unusual high fluorescence of two nitro-distyrylbenzene-like compounds induced by CT processes affecting the fluorescence/intersystem-crossing competition.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Elisei, F; Mazzucato, U; Spalletti, A

    2015-06-14

    Two nitro-substituted 1,4-distyrylbenzene-like compounds have been investigated using stationary and time-resolved (ns/fs) spectrometric techniques as a function of solvent polarity. In the two compounds the central benzene ring is substituted with a p-nitrostyryl group at one side while, at the other side, compound 1 (asymmetric) bears a pyrid-4-ylethenyl group and compound 2 (symmetric) another p-nitrostyryl group. The solvent dependent intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the singlet manifold was found to strongly affect the competition among fluorescence, intersystem crossing and trans-cis photoisomerization. The presence of nitro-groups in the 1,4-distyrylbenzene skeleton causes the usual strong decrease of fluorescence in favour of intersystem crossing to a reactive triplet state. However, the favoured formation of the ICT state in polar solvents induces an unexpected important increase of the fluorescence quantum yield (three/two order of magnitude for the nitro and dinitro derivatives, respectively). The ultrafast spectral transients helped to understand the solvent effects measured by stationary techniques and gave information on the dynamics of the locally excited singlet state ((1)LE*) and the (1)ICT* state, fast produced in polar solvents. Evidence of dual fluorescence in a limited range of solvent polarity, particularly for compound 1, is also reported. The role of an upper triplet state in a non-polar solvent is discussed also based on quantum-mechanical calculations (TD-DFT method) and temperature effects on the photophysical parameters.

  14. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  15. Fluorescence quantum yield of carbon dioxide for quantitative UV laser-induced fluorescence in high-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Bessler, W. G.; Yoo, J.; Schulz, C.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield for ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of CO2 is determined for selected excitation wavelengths in the range 215-250 nm. Wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of CO2, NO, and O2 are measured in the burned gases of a laminar CH4/air flame ( φ=0.9 and 1.1) at 20 bar with additional NO seeded into the flow. The fluorescence spectra are fit to determine the relative contribution of the three species to infer an estimate of fluorescence quantum yield for CO2 that ranges from 2-8×10-6 depending on temperature and excitation wavelength with an estimated uncertainty of ±0.5×10-6. The CO2 fluorescence signal increases linearly with gas pressure for flames with constant CO2 mole fraction for the 10 to 60 bar range, indicating that collisional quenching is not an important contributor to the CO2 fluorescence quantum yield. Spectral simulation calculations are used to choose two wavelengths for excitation of CO2, 239.34 and 242.14 nm, which minimize interference from LIF of NO and O2. Quantitative LIF images of CO2 are demonstrated using these two excitation wavelengths and the measured fluorescence quantum yield.

  16. Facile synthesis of N, S-codoped fluorescent carbon nanodots for fluorescent resonance energy transfer recognition of methotrexate with high sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiping; Lu, Ya-Chun; Huang, Hong; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-02-15

    In this report, N, S-codoped fluorescent carbon nanodots (NSCDs) were prepared by a facile, simple, low-cost, and green thermal treatment of ammonium persulfate, glucose, and ethylenediamine. The as-prepared NSCDs displayed bright blue emission with a relatively high fluorescent quantum yield of 21.6%, good water solubility, uniform morphology, and excellent chemical stability, compared to pure CDs. The fluorescence of NSCDs can be significantly quenched by methotrexate (MTX) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between NSCDs and MTX, which was used for highly selective and sensitive detection of MTX with a wide linear range up to 50.0 μM and a low detection limit of 0.33 nM (S/N = 3). Moreover, this method was explored for practical detection of MTX in human serum with satisfied results. PMID:25310482

  17. Relationship between size and thiazole orange fluorescence of platelets in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balduini, C L; Noris, P; Spedini, P; Belletti, S; Zambelli, A; Da Prada, G A

    1999-07-01

    The reticulated platelet count relies upon the assumption that newly formed platelets contain a residual amount of RNA which selectively binds the dye thiazole orange (TO) and greatly enhances its fluorescence signal. It has, however, recently been shown that almost half of the platelet TO-signal is derived from the labelling of dense-granule nucleotides. It is therefore possible that the higher TO fluorescence of young platelets partially derives from the higher granule content due to their larger volume. To investigate the relationship between platelet size and TO fluorescence we studied 13 patients with high-risk breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, platelet-large cell ratio, membrane content of glycoprotein Ib and IIb-IIIa and platelet aggregation were significantly greater during resolution than during development of thrombocytopenia, suggesting a prevalence of young and old platelets respectively. Mean TO fluorescence per cell was higher in the platelet population enriched in young cells than in that enriched in old cells, but this difference was no longer observed when the ratio TO signal/platelet size was examined. Moreover, RNase treatment and platelet degranulation reduced TO fluorescence to a similar extent in platelet populations enriched in young or old cells. Therefore our data suggest that the higher TO signal of young platelets is derived, to a significant extent, from their larger volume and granule content.

  18. A Dual-Fluorescence High-Throughput Cell Line System for Probing Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Hall, Matthew D.; Auld, Douglas S.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Fung, King-Leung

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efflux pump P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1, multidrug resistance [MDR] 1, P-gp) has long been known to contribute to MDR against cancer chemotherapeutics. We describe the development of a dual-fluorescent cell line system to allow multiplexing of drug-sensitive and P-gp-mediated MDR cell lines. The parental OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cell line and the isogenic MDR NCI/ADR-RES subline, which stably expresses high levels of endogenous P-gp, were transfected to express the fluorescent proteins Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein DsRed2 and enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively. Co-culture conditions were defined, and fluorescent barcoding of each cell line allowed for the direct, simultaneous comparison of resistance to cytotoxic compounds in sensitive and MDR cell lines. We show that this assay system retains the phenotypes of the original lines and is suitable for multiplexing using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, or laser scanning microplate cytometry in 1,536-well plates, enabling the high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries. PMID:19548831

  19. Development of a High-performance Optical System and Fluorescent Converters for High-resolution Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    Two novel devices for use in neutron imaging technique are introduced. The first one is a high-performance optical lens for video camera systems. The lens system has a magnification of 1:1 and an F value of 3. The optical resolution is less than 5 μm. The second device is a high-resolution fluorescent plate that converts neutrons into visible light. The fluorescent converter material consists of a mixture of 6LiF and ZnS(Ag) fine powder, and the thickness of the converter is material is as little as 15 μm. The surface of the plate is coated with a 1 μm-thick gadolinium oxide layer. This layer is optically transparent and acts as an electron emitter for neutron detection. Our preliminary results show that the developed optical lens and fluorescent converter plates are very promising for high-resolution neutron imaging.

  20. Fluorescence thermometry for advanced high-temperature materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.; Beshears, D.L.; Allison, S.W.

    1996-05-01

    Advanced high-temperature materials, such as ceramics, metals, and composites, are of critical importance to the development of new and improved technologies worldwide. For aircraft, automobiles, or other combustion-engine powered systems, major efficiency improvements depend on the ability to operate at temperatures closer to the adiabatic limit of the chemical processes involved. Materials able to function at higher temperatures must therefore be introduced into improved designs. Jet turbine engines, for example, already require air cooled rotors and stators in order that the nickel alloys used will not deteriorate and fail from overheating. In the case of ceramics, optimum temperature usage will often cause the refractory surfaces to glow red hot and the material itself to become partially translucent. For composites, especially where structural integrity, vibration resistance, and strength are concerned, the temperature behavior of dissimilar components must be well known and well understood before appropriate designs can be effected. As the need for higher temperature materials becomes increasingly more important, so does the requirement to properly measure the temperatures involved. Phosphor thermometry offers measurement solutions at very high temperatures that often cannot be achieved by more conventional methods. In this paper we discuss the phosphor technique and several examples of its application to high-temperature measurement.

  1. A new fluorescent probe for gasotransmitter H₂S: high sensitivity, excellent selectivity, and a significant fluorescence off-on response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Guo, Wei

    2014-04-25

    A fluorescent off-on probe for H2S was exploited by coupling the azide-based strategy with the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) sensing mechanism, which exhibits a considerably high fluorescence enhancement (1150-fold), an extremely low detection limit (0.78 nM), and a relatively fast response time (3-10 min) as well as excellent selectivity.

  2. Highly selective and sensitive near-infrared-fluorescent probes for the detection of cellular hydrogen sulfide and the imaging of H2S in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haixia; Krishnakumar, Saarangan; Yu, Jie; Liang, Dong; Qi, Hongyi; Lee, Zheng-Wei; Deng, Lih-Wen; Huang, Dejian

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report the development of two fluorescent probes for the highly selective and sensitive detection of H2S. The probes take advantage of a Cu(II)-cyclen complex, which acts as a reaction center for H2S and as a quencher of BODIPY (boron-dipyrromethene)-based fluorophores with emissions at 765 and 680 nm, respectively. These non-fluorescent probes could only be turned on by the addition of H2 S, and not by other potentially interfering biomolecules, including reactive oxygen species, cysteine, and glutathione. In a chemical system, both probes detected H2S with a detection limit of 80 nM. The probes were successfully used for the endogenous detection of H2S in HEK 293 cells, for measuring the H2S-release activity of dietary organosulfides in MCF-7 cells, and for the in vivo imaging of H2S in mice. PMID:25263845

  3. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Beers, William Winder; Toth, Katalin; Balazs, Laszlo D.

    2008-06-24

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  4. A parametric model for reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    We present a time-dependent parametric model for reactive HiPIMS deposition of films. Specific features of HiPIMS discharges and a possible increase in the density of the reactive gas in front of the reactive gas inlets placed between the target and the substrate are considered in the model. The model makes it possible to calculate the compound fractions in two target layers and in one substrate layer, and the deposition rate of films at fixed partial pressures of the reactive and inert gas. A simplified relation for the deposition rate of films prepared using a reactive HiPIMS is presented. We used the model to simulate controlled reactive HiPIMS depositions of stoichiometric \\text{Zr}{{\\text{O}}2} films, which were recently carried out in our laboratories with two different configurations of the {{\\text{O}}2} inlets in front of the sputtered target. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 5 Wcm-2and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse durations were 50 μs and 200 μs. Our model calculations show that the to-substrate {{\\text{O}}2} inlet provides systematically lower compound fractions in the target surface layer and higher compound fractions in the substrate surface layer, compared with the to-target {{\\text{O}}2} inlet. The low compound fractions in the target surface layer (being approximately 10% at the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2 and the pulse duration of 200 μs) result in high deposition rates of the films produced, which are in agreement with experimental values.

  5. High-yield reactivation of anionic tobacco peroxidase overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, G S; Poloznikov, A A; Chubar, T A; Gazaryan, I G; Tishkov, V I

    2015-09-01

    Anionic tobacco peroxidase (TOP) is extremely active in chemiluminescence reaction of luminol oxidation without addition of enhancers and more stable than horseradish peroxidase under antibody conjugation conditions. In addition, recombinant TOP (rTOP) produced in Escherichia coli is known to be a perfect direct electron transfer catalyst on electrodes of various origin. These features make the task of development of a high-yield reactivation protocol for rTOP practically important. Previous attempts to reactivate the enzyme from E. coli inclusion bodies were successful, but the reported reactivation yield was only 14%. In this work, we thoroughly screened the refolding conditions for dilution protocol and compared it with gel-filtration chromatography. The impressive reactivation yield in the dilution protocol (85%) was achieved for 8 μg/mL solubilized rTOP protein and the refolding medium containing 0.3 mM oxidized glutathione, 0.05 mM dithiothreitol, 5 mM CaCl2, 5% glycerol in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 9.6, with 1 μM hemin added at the 24th hour of incubation. A practically important discovery was a 30-40% increase in the reactivation yield upon delayed addition of hemin. The reactivation yield achieved is one of the highest reported in the literature on protein refolding by dilution. The final yield of purified active non-glycosylated rTOP was ca. 60 mg per L of E. coli culture, close to the yield reported before for tomato and tobacco plants overexpressing glycosylated TOP (60 mg/kg biomass) and much higher than for the previously reported refolding protocol (2.6 mg per L of E. coli culture).

  6. Antidepressant treatment differentially affects the phenotype of high and low stress reactive mice.

    PubMed

    Surget, Alexandre; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Heinzmann, Jan-Michael; Knapman, Alana; McIlwrick, Silja; Westphal, Willy-Paul; Touma, Chadi; Belzung, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Modelling key endophenotypes can be a powerful approach to gain insight into mechanisms underlying the aetiology and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on evidence of stress hormone system dysregulations in depression, the Stress Reactivity (SR) mouse model has been generated by a selective breeding approach for extremes in HPA axis reactivity, resulting in high (HR), intermediate (IR) and low (LR) reactive mice. The characterisation of their phenotypic alterations has highlighted many similarities of HR and LR mice with the melancholic and atypical depression, respectively. We therefore aimed to examine whether the antidepressant fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day i.p., 4-5 weeks) can ameliorate the phenotypic characteristics of HR and LR mice in neuroendocrine functions (HPA axis basal activity, stress reactivity, negative feedback), emotional reactivity/coping-strategy (open field, forced swim tests), spatial learning/memory (Morris water-maze) and hippocampal neurogenesis. Line differences in HPA axis reactivity were maintained under fluoxetine treatment. However, we observed fluoxetine effects on glucocorticoid-induced negative feedback, stress-coping behaviours, cognitive functions and neurogenesis. Specifically, our results revealed line-dependent consequences of fluoxetine treatment: (1) an amelioration of the 'melancholic-like' features of HR mice (reversing the negative feedback resistance, the hyperactive coping style and the memory deficits; increasing hippocampal neurogenesis); (2) an exacerbation of the phenotypic deviations of LR mice (increasing their pronounced negative feedback and passive coping style). Thus, these findings support the predictive validity of antidepressant treatment in the HR mouse line and emphasize the translational value of the SR mouse model for the development of therapeutic strategies based on endophenotype-driven classifications.

  7. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition ismore » modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.« less

  8. Preparation of inhalable salbutamol sulphate using reactive high gravity controlled precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingting; Chiou, Herbert; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chen, Jian-Feng; Yun, Jimmy

    2008-02-01

    Reactive high gravity controlled precipitation (HGCP) was carried out to produce salbutamol sulphate (SS) particles suitable for inhalation. Aqueous solutions of free salbutamol base and sulphuric acid were mixed intensely inside a HGCP reactor to form the particles. Spray drying was employed to obtain dry powders. Physical properties of the powders were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis and dynamic water vapour sorption. Aerosol performance of the powders was measured using an Aeroliser connected to a multiple stage liquid impinger operating at 60 L/min. The results showed that the reactive HGCP powder, comprising primary SS sub-micron particles (approximately 100 nm in width and approximately 500 nm in length) packed into loose spherical agglomerates of about 2 microm in diameter, is of the same polymorphic form as the raw crystalline material, has a high specific surface area (24.7 +/- 0.1 m(2)/g), but a low moisture content (0.2%) and low moisture uptake (1.4% at RH 90%). The aerosol performance of the reactive HGCP powder is excellent, showing FPF(loaded) and FPF(emitted) of 76 +/- 5% and 83 +/- 7%, respectively, with low capsule and device retention. In conclusion, reactive HGCP followed by spray drying is suitable to produce stable crystalline powders of salbutamol with enhanced inhalation properties.

  9. A manganese catalyst for highly reactive yet chemoselective intramolecular C(sp(3))-H amination.

    PubMed

    Paradine, Shauna M; Griffin, Jennifer R; Zhao, Jinpeng; Petronico, Aaron L; Miller, Shannon M; Christina White, M

    2015-12-01

    C-H bond oxidation reactions underscore the existing paradigm wherein high reactivity and high selectivity are inversely correlated. The development of catalysts capable of oxidizing strong aliphatic C(sp(3))-H bonds while displaying chemoselectivity (that is, tolerance of more oxidizable functionality) remains an unsolved problem. Here, we describe a catalyst, manganese tert-butylphthalocyanine [Mn((t)BuPc)], that is an outlier to the reactivity-selectivity paradigm. It is unique in its capacity to functionalize all types of C(sp(3))-H bond intramolecularly, while displaying excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of π functionality. Mechanistic studies indicate that [Mn((t)BuPc)] transfers bound nitrenes to C(sp(3))-H bonds via a pathway that lies between concerted C-H insertion, observed with reactive noble metals such as rhodium, and stepwise radical C-H abstraction/rebound, as observed with chemoselective base metals such as iron. Rather than achieving a blending of effects, [Mn((t)BuPc)] aminates even 1° aliphatic and propargylic C-H bonds, demonstrating reactivity and selectivity unusual for previously known catalysts. PMID:26587714

  10. Amino-terminated biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers as highly reactive molecular templates

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerbroeker, N.; Waske, P.; Zharnikov, M.

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with amino tail groups are of interest due to their ability of coupling further compounds. Such groups can be, in particular, created by electron irradiation of nitro- or nitrile-substituted aromatic SAMs, which provide a basis for chemical nanolithography and the fabrication of functionalized nanomembranes. An estimate of reactivity of the created amino groups requires a reference system of homogeneous, amino-terminated aromatic SAMs, which can also be used as a highly reactive molecular template. Here, we describe the synthesis of 4′-aminobiphenyl-4-thiol (ABPT) and SAMs prepared from this precursor on Au(111). The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, which revealed that they are well defined, chemically uniform, densely packed, and highly ordered. To examine the influence of electron irradiation on the reactivity of the terminal amino groups, ABPT SAMs were exposed to low energy (50 eV) electrons up to a dose of 40 mC/cm{sup 2} and, subsequently, immersed in either trifluoroacetic, pentafluoropropionic, or heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysing the amount of the attached anhydride species made it possible to determine the percentage of reactive amino groups as well as the effect of steric hindrance upon the coupling reaction. The above results are compared with those obtained for the well-established nitro-substituted biphenylthiol monolayers.

  11. Preparation of inhalable salbutamol sulphate using reactive high gravity controlled precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingting; Chiou, Herbert; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chen, Jian-Feng; Yun, Jimmy

    2008-02-01

    Reactive high gravity controlled precipitation (HGCP) was carried out to produce salbutamol sulphate (SS) particles suitable for inhalation. Aqueous solutions of free salbutamol base and sulphuric acid were mixed intensely inside a HGCP reactor to form the particles. Spray drying was employed to obtain dry powders. Physical properties of the powders were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis and dynamic water vapour sorption. Aerosol performance of the powders was measured using an Aeroliser connected to a multiple stage liquid impinger operating at 60 L/min. The results showed that the reactive HGCP powder, comprising primary SS sub-micron particles (approximately 100 nm in width and approximately 500 nm in length) packed into loose spherical agglomerates of about 2 microm in diameter, is of the same polymorphic form as the raw crystalline material, has a high specific surface area (24.7 +/- 0.1 m(2)/g), but a low moisture content (0.2%) and low moisture uptake (1.4% at RH 90%). The aerosol performance of the reactive HGCP powder is excellent, showing FPF(loaded) and FPF(emitted) of 76 +/- 5% and 83 +/- 7%, respectively, with low capsule and device retention. In conclusion, reactive HGCP followed by spray drying is suitable to produce stable crystalline powders of salbutamol with enhanced inhalation properties. PMID:17722000

  12. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition is modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.

  13. Amino-terminated biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers as highly reactive molecular templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerbroeker, N.; Waske, P.; Zharnikov, M.

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with amino tail groups are of interest due to their ability of coupling further compounds. Such groups can be, in particular, created by electron irradiation of nitro- or nitrile-substituted aromatic SAMs, which provide a basis for chemical nanolithography and the fabrication of functionalized nanomembranes. An estimate of reactivity of the created amino groups requires a reference system of homogeneous, amino-terminated aromatic SAMs, which can also be used as a highly reactive molecular template. Here, we describe the synthesis of 4'-aminobiphenyl-4-thiol (ABPT) and SAMs prepared from this precursor on Au(111). The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, which revealed that they are well defined, chemically uniform, densely packed, and highly ordered. To examine the influence of electron irradiation on the reactivity of the terminal amino groups, ABPT SAMs were exposed to low energy (50 eV) electrons up to a dose of 40 mC/cm2 and, subsequently, immersed in either trifluoroacetic, pentafluoropropionic, or heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysing the amount of the attached anhydride species made it possible to determine the percentage of reactive amino groups as well as the effect of steric hindrance upon the coupling reaction. The above results are compared with those obtained for the well-established nitro-substituted biphenylthiol monolayers.

  14. Amino-terminated biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers as highly reactive molecular templates.

    PubMed

    Meyerbroeker, N; Waske, P; Zharnikov, M

    2015-03-14

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with amino tail groups are of interest due to their ability of coupling further compounds. Such groups can be, in particular, created by electron irradiation of nitro- or nitrile-substituted aromatic SAMs, which provide a basis for chemical nanolithography and the fabrication of functionalized nanomembranes. An estimate of reactivity of the created amino groups requires a reference system of homogeneous, amino-terminated aromatic SAMs, which can also be used as a highly reactive molecular template. Here, we describe the synthesis of 4'-aminobiphenyl-4-thiol (ABPT) and SAMs prepared from this precursor on Au(111). The monolayers were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, which revealed that they are well defined, chemically uniform, densely packed, and highly ordered. To examine the influence of electron irradiation on the reactivity of the terminal amino groups, ABPT SAMs were exposed to low energy (50 eV) electrons up to a dose of 40 mC/cm(2) and, subsequently, immersed in either trifluoroacetic, pentafluoropropionic, or heptafluorobutyric anhydride. Analysing the amount of the attached anhydride species made it possible to determine the percentage of reactive amino groups as well as the effect of steric hindrance upon the coupling reaction. The above results are compared with those obtained for the well-established nitro-substituted biphenylthiol monolayers. PMID:25770508

  15. Quantitative Fluorescence Sensing Through Highly Autofluorescent, Scattering, and Absorbing Media Using Mobile Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Rivenson, Yair; Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Tseng, Derek; Troy, Tamara L; Demas, Vasiliki; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-09-27

    Compact and cost-effective systems for in vivo fluorescence and near-infrared imaging in combination with activatable reporters embedded inside the skin to sample interstitial fluid or blood can enable a variety of biomedical applications. However, the strong autofluorescence of human skin creates an obstacle for fluorescence-based sensing. Here we introduce a method for quantitative fluorescence sensing through highly autofluorescent, scattering, and absorbing media. For this, we created a compact and cost-effective fluorescence microscope weighing <40 g and used it to measure various concentrations of a fluorescent dye embedded inside a tissue phantom, which was designed to mimic the optical characteristics of human skin. We used an elliptical Gaussian beam excitation to digitally separate tissue autofluorescence from target fluorescence, although they severely overlap in both space and optical spectrum. Using ∼10-fold less excitation intensity than the safety limit for skin radiation exposure, we successfully quantified the density of the embedded fluorophores by imaging the skin phantom surface and achieved a detection limit of ∼5 × 10(5) and ∼2.5 × 10(7) fluorophores within ∼0.01 μL sample volume that is positioned 0.5 and 2 mm below the phantom surface, corresponding to a concentration of 105.9 pg/mL and 5.3 ng/mL, respectively. We also confirmed that this approach can track the spatial misalignments of the mobile microscope with respect to the embedded target fluorescent volume. This wearable microscopy platform might be useful for designing implantable biochemical sensors with the capability of spatial multiplexing to continuously monitor a panel of biomarkers and chronic conditions even at patients' home. PMID:27622866

  16. Linear ruby scale and one megabar. [high pressure fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    The accuracy and validity of certain techniques used in studying high-pressure transitions have been investigated. Experiments which place upper limits of about 20 GPa and about 50 GPa on pressures practically attainable using uniaxial supported opposed anvil devices with tungsten carbide pistons and uniaxial opposed flat anvil diamond devices, respectively, are reported. Direct static determinations of the transition pressures of GaP by two different methods are described. The values obtained indicate that the linear ruby scale increasingly overestimates the transition pressure as the pressure rises above 10 GPa. It is further shown that the use of shock-based marker materials, such as silver, as the basis of pressure measurement in X-ray diffraction studies leads to bulk moduli of cubic carbides which are in extreme disagreement with expected values.

  17. Micromixing visualization and quantification in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor using confocal-based reactive micro laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanxiang; Fox, Rodney O; Olsen, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    A technique for visualizing and quantifying reactive mixing for laminar and turbulent flow in a microscale chemical reactor using confocal-based microscopic laser induced fluorescence (confocal μ-LIF) was demonstrated in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor. Unlike passive scalar μ-LIF, the reactive μ-LIF technique is able to visualize and quantify micromixing effects. The confocal imaging results indicated that the flow in the reactor was laminar and steady for inlet Reynolds numbers of 10, 53, and 93. Mixing and reaction were incomplete at each of these Reynolds numbers. The results also suggested that although mixing by diffusion was enhanced near the midplane of the reactor at Rej = 53 and 93 due to very thin bands of acidic and basic fluid forming as the fluid spiraled towards the center of the reactor, near the top, and bottom walls of the reactor, the lower velocities due to fluid friction with the walls hindered the formation of these thin bands, and, thus, resulted in large regions of unmixed and unreacted fluid. At Rej = 240, the flow was turbulent and unsteady. The mixing and reaction processes were still found to be incomplete even at this highest Reynolds number. At the reactor midplane, the flow images at Rej = 240 showed unmixed base fluid near the center of the reactor, suggesting that just as in the Rej = 53 and 93 cases, lower velocities near the top and bottom walls of the reactor hinder the mixing and rection of the acidic and basic streams. Ensemble averages of line-scan profiles for the Rej = 240 were then calculated to provide statistical quantification of the microscale mixing in the reactor. These results further demonstrate that even at this highest Reynolds number investigated, mixing and reaction are incomplete. Visualization and quantification of micromixing using this reactive μ-LIF technique can prove useful in the validation of computational fluid dynamics models of micromixing within

  18. Micromixing visualization and quantification in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor using confocal-based reactive micro laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanxiang; Fox, Rodney O.; Olsen, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A technique for visualizing and quantifying reactive mixing for laminar and turbulent flow in a microscale chemical reactor using confocal-based microscopic laser induced fluorescence (confocal μ-LIF) was demonstrated in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor. Unlike passive scalar μ-LIF, the reactive μ-LIF technique is able to visualize and quantify micromixing effects. The confocal imaging results indicated that the flow in the reactor was laminar and steady for inlet Reynolds numbers of 10, 53, and 93. Mixing and reaction were incomplete at each of these Reynolds numbers. The results also suggested that although mixing by diffusion was enhanced near the midplane of the reactor at Rej = 53 and 93 due to very thin bands of acidic and basic fluid forming as the fluid spiraled towards the center of the reactor, near the top, and bottom walls of the reactor, the lower velocities due to fluid friction with the walls hindered the formation of these thin bands, and, thus, resulted in large regions of unmixed and unreacted fluid. At Rej = 240, the flow was turbulent and unsteady. The mixing and reaction processes were still found to be incomplete even at this highest Reynolds number. At the reactor midplane, the flow images at Rej = 240 showed unmixed base fluid near the center of the reactor, suggesting that just as in the Rej = 53 and 93 cases, lower velocities near the top and bottom walls of the reactor hinder the mixing and rection of the acidic and basic streams. Ensemble averages of line-scan profiles for the Rej = 240 were then calculated to provide statistical quantification of the microscale mixing in the reactor. These results further demonstrate that even at this highest Reynolds number investigated, mixing and reaction are incomplete. Visualization and quantification of micromixing using this reactive μ-LIF technique can prove useful in the validation of computational fluid dynamics models of micromixing within

  19. High pressure liquid chromatography of cannabinoids as their fluorescent dansyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abbott, S R; Abu-Shumays, A

    1975-01-01

    Four different cannabinoids were converted to their 1-dimethyl-aminonaphthalene-5-sulfonate (dansyl) derivatives. Standards mixtures were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography and detected with an experimental filter fluorometer with sub-nanogram sensitivity. The effect of solvent properties on fluorescence spectra and quantum yields was also studied.

  20. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  1. Fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp recycling and disposal in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report outlines some of the regulatory issues and problems associated with used fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamps that are processed or disposed of as part of mixed solid waste. It includes recommendations for encouraging the creation of recycling facilities in Illinois as well as appendices listing the current known recycling facilities in the United States, and a fact sheet on how to handle the lamps in the business and residential sectors. The report also outlines the Agency`s efforts to inform the public and industry about the environmentally friendly disposal of fluorescent and HID lamps.

  2. A high performance fluorescence switching system triggered electrochemically by Prussian blue with upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yiwen; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Lingling; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-05-01

    A high performance fluorescence switching system triggered electrochemically by Prussian blue with upconversion nanoparticles was proposed. We synthesized a kind of hexagonal monodisperse β-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+,Tm3+ upconversion nanoparticle and manipulated the intensity ratio of red emission (at 653 nm) and green emission at (523 and 541 nm) around 2 : 1, in order to match well with the absorption spectrum of Prussian blue. Based on the efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer and inner-filter effect of the as-synthesized upconversion nanoparticles and Prussian blue, the present fluorescence switching system shows obvious behavior with high fluorescence contrast and good stability. To further extend the application of this system in analysis, sulfite, a kind of important anion in environmental and physiological systems, which could also reduce Prussian blue to Prussian white nanoparticles leading to a decrease of the absorption spectrum, was chosen as the target. And we were able to determine the concentration of sulfite in aqueous solution with a low detection limit and a broad linear relationship.A high performance fluorescence switching system triggered electrochemically by Prussian blue with upconversion nanoparticles was proposed. We synthesized a kind of hexagonal monodisperse β-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+,Tm3+ upconversion nanoparticle and manipulated the intensity ratio of red emission (at 653 nm) and green emission at (523 and 541 nm) around 2 : 1, in order to match well with the absorption spectrum of Prussian blue. Based on the efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer and inner-filter effect of the as-synthesized upconversion nanoparticles and Prussian blue, the present fluorescence switching system shows obvious behavior with high fluorescence contrast and good stability. To further extend the application of this system in analysis, sulfite, a kind of important anion in environmental and physiological systems, which could also reduce Prussian blue to

  3. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  4. Optimizing the operation of a high resolution vertical Johann spectrometer using a high energy fluorescer x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, Michael; Stewart, Richard

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the operation and testing for a vertical Johann spectrometer (VJS) operating in the 13 keV range. The spectrometer is designed to use thin curved mica crystals or thick germanium crystals. The VJS must have a resolution of E/{Delta}E=3000 or better to measure the Doppler broadening of highly ionized krypton and operate at a small x-ray angle in order to be used as a diagnostic in a laser plasma target chamber. The VJS was aligned, tested, and optimized using a fluorescer type high energy x-ray (HEX) source located at National Security Technologies (NSTec), LLC, in Livermore, CA. The HEX uses a 160 kV x-ray tube to excite fluorescence from various targets. Both rubidium and bismuth fluorescers were used for this effort. This presentation describes the NSTec HEX system and the methods used to optimize and characterize the VJS performance.

  5. Highly selective and sensitive nanoprobes for cyanide based on gold nanoclusters with red fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guomei; Qiao, Yunyun; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Caihong; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lihong; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel and environmentally friendly fluorescent probe for detecting the cyanide ion (CN-) using l-amino acid oxidase (LAAOx)-protected Au nanoclusters (LAAOx@AuNCs) with red emission. The fluorescence-based sensing behaviour of LAAOx@AuNCs towards anions was investigated in buffered aqueous media. Among the anions studied, CN- was found to effectively quench the fluorescence emission of AuNCs based on CN- induced Au core decomposition. Excellent sensitivity and selectivity toward the detection of CN- in aqueous solution were observed. The CN- detection limit was determined to be approximately 180 nM, which is 15 times lower than the maximum level (2700 nM) of CN- in drinking water permitted by the World Health Organization (WHO). A linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and CN- concentration was observed in two ranges of CN- concentration, including 3.2 × 10-6 to 3.4 × 10-5 mol L-1 and 3.81 × 10-5 to 1.04 × 10-4 mol L-1. The high sensitivity and selectivity to CN- among the 17 types of anions make the AuNCs good candidates for use in fluorescent nanoprobes of CN-.

  6. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  7. Highly fluorescent peptide nanoribbon impregnated with Sn-porphyrin as a potent DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Parayil, Sreenivasan Koliyat; Lee, Jooran; Yoon, Minjoong

    2013-05-01

    Highly fluorescent and thermo-stable peptide nanoribbons (PNRs) were fabricated by solvothermal self-assembly of a single peptide (D,D-diphenyl alanine peptides) with Sn-porphyrin (trans-dihydroxo[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-tolyl)porphyrinato] Sn(IV) (SnTTP(OH)2)). The structural characterization of the as-prepared nanoribbons was performed by transmitting electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, indicating that the lipophilic Sn-porphyrins are impregnated into the porous surface formed in the process of nanoribbon formation through intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the peptide main chains. Consequently the Sn-porphyrin-impregnated peptide nanoribbons (Sn-porphyrin-PNRs) exhibited typical UV-visible absorption spectrum of the monomer porphyrin with a red shifted Q-band, and their fluorescence quantum yield was observed to be enhanced compared to that of free Sn-porphyrin. Interestingly the fluorescence intensity and lifetimes of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs were selectively affected upon interaction with nucleotide base sequences of DNA while those of free Sn-porphyrins were not affected by binding with any of the DNA studied, indicating that DNA-induced changes in the fluorescence properties of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs are due to interaction between DNA and the PNR scaffold. These results imply that Sn-porphyrin-PNR will be useful as a potent fluorescent protein analogue and as a biocompatible DNA sensor.

  8. A Low-Cost, High-Performance System for Fluorescence Lateral Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda G.; Nordman, Eric S.; Johnson, Martin D.; Oldham, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a fluorescence lateral flow system that has excellent sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The illumination system utilizes an LED, plastic lenses and plastic and colored glass filters for the excitation and emission light. Images are collected on an iPhone 4. Several fluorescent dyes with long Stokes shifts were evaluated for their signal and nonspecific binding in lateral flow. A wide range of values for the ratio of signal to nonspecific binding was found, from 50 for R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) to 0.15 for Brilliant Violet 605. The long Stokes shift of R-PE allowed the use of inexpensive plastic filters rather than costly interference filters to block the LED light. Fluorescence detection with R-PE and absorbance detection with colloidal gold were directly compared in lateral flow using biotinylated bovine serum albumen (BSA) as the analyte. Fluorescence provided linear data over a range of 0.4–4,000 ng/mL with a 1,000-fold signal change while colloidal gold provided non-linear data over a range of 16–4,000 ng/mL with a 10-fold signal change. A comparison using human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as the analyte showed a similar advantage in the fluorescent system. We believe our inexpensive yet high-performance platform will be useful for providing quantitative and sensitive detection in a point-of-care setting. PMID:25586412

  9. A novel high-sensitive miniaturized optical system for fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mingjin; Fang, Ji

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel, high sensitive and miniaturized fluorescence detection system which integrated a LED light source, all necessary optical components and a photodiode with preamplifier into one package about 2 cm x 2 cm x 2 cm especially for the applications of lab-on-a-chip, portable bio-detection system and point-of-care diagnostic system. The prototype has been tested using the fluorescence dye 5-Carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM) dissolved into solvent DMSO (Dimethyl Sulfoxide) and diluted with DI water as the testing solution samples. Resolution approximation method is accepted to evaluate the sensitivity. The testing results prove a remarkable sensitivity at pico-scale molar, around 1.08 pM/L, which should meet the most of bio-detection requirements. This cost-effective detection system can be widely integrated to the portable device and system for fluorescent detection in biological, chemical, medical, point-of-care applications.

  10. Stem-directed growth of highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters for versatile logic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jia, Xiaofang; Li, Dongyue; Ren, Jiangtao; Han, Yanchao; Xia, Yong; Wang, Erkang

    2013-07-01

    This work described for the first time the stem-directed growth of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) with high brightness using the well-chosen hairpin DNA structure. In comparison with the corresponding double-stranded (ds) DNA capped AgNCs, the fluorescence emission of hairpin DNA structure templated AgNCs were lighted up with 12.5-fold enhancement fluorescent intensity by sequence modification with T-loop. It provided a new prospect for precise placement of nanoscale optical elements onto DNA scaffolds. And these DNA protected AgNCs exhibited the base sequence, strand length and microenvironment-dependent fluorescent properties. Benefiting from these properties, versatile logic gates (or, not, inhibit, XNOR, implication) were constructed using different ions as inputs with AgNCs as signal transducer. PMID:23728712

  11. Quantitative fluorescence measurements of the OH radical in high pressure methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, B.E.; Hanson, R.K. )

    1992-07-01

    A method for quantifying laser-induced fluorescence signals from the OH radical in high-pressure flames is presented. The fluorescence signal per unit OH mole fraction is modeled as a function of temperature, pressure, and overall flame stoichiometry. Known values of the collisional quenching cross sections as a function of temperature are used to model the electronic quench rate. The reverse A - X (1.0) Q15 transition is used with broadband collection to measure single-point fluorescence produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG-pumped, frequency-doubled dye laser. Laser absorption and thermocouples are used to measure absolute OH concentration and temperature, respectively, which are used to confirm the validity of the model. Measurements are made in CH4/O2/N2 flames up to 10 atm. 13 refs.

  12. Quantitative fluorescence measurements of the OH radical in high pressure methane flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, B. E.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for quantifying laser-induced fluorescence signals from the OH radical in high-pressure flames is presented. The fluorescence signal per unit OH mole fraction is modeled as a function of temperature, pressure, and overall flame stoichiometry. Known values of the collisional quenching cross sections as a function of temperature are used to model the electronic quench rate. The reverse A - X (1.0) Q15 transition is used with broadband collection to measure single-point fluorescence produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG-pumped, frequency-doubled dye laser. Laser absorption and thermocouples are used to measure absolute OH concentration and temperature, respectively, which are used to confirm the validity of the model. Measurements are made in CH4/O2/N2 flames up to 10 atm.

  13. High-throughput single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy using parallel detection

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Kim, T.; Levi, Moran; Aharoni, Daniel; Cheng, Adrian; Guerrieri, F.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Millaud, Jacques; Rech, I.; Resnati, D.; Marangoni, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Cova, S.; Weiss, S.

    2011-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful new experimental approach with applications in all fields of natural sciences. The basic concept of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume (typically femtoliter) and work in a concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single-molecule. Those events are accumulated over time to achieve proper statistical accuracy. Therefore the advantage of extreme sensitivity is somewhat counterbalanced by a very long acquisition time. One way to speed up data acquisition is parallelization. Here we will discuss a general approach to address this issue, using a multispot excitation and detection geometry that can accommodate different types of novel highly-parallel detector arrays. We will illustrate the potential of this approach with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule fluorescence measurements obtained with different novel multipixel single-photon counting detectors. PMID:21625288

  14. Image reconstruction enables high resolution imaging at large penetration depths in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilipkumar, Shilpa; Montalescot, Sandra; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2013-10-01

    Imaging thick specimen at a large penetration depth is a challenge in biophysics and material science. Refractive index mismatch results in spherical aberration that is responsible for streaking artifacts, while Poissonian nature of photon emission and scattering introduces noise in the acquired three-dimensional image. To overcome these unwanted artifacts, we introduced a two-fold approach: first, point-spread function modeling with correction for spherical aberration and second, employing maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique to eliminate noise. Experimental results on fluorescent nano-beads and fluorescently coated yeast cells (encaged in Agarose gel) shows substantial minimization of artifacts. The noise is substantially suppressed, whereas the side-lobes (generated by streaking effect) drops by 48.6% as compared to raw data at a depth of 150 μm. Proposed imaging technique can be integrated to sophisticated fluorescence imaging techniques for rendering high resolution beyond 150 μm mark.

  15. High-contrast visualization of graphene oxide on dye-sensitized glass, quartz, and silicon by fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Treossi, Emanuele; Melucci, Manuela; Liscio, Andrea; Gazzano, Massimo; Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2009-11-01

    We present a novel approach for detecting and visualizing graphene oxide (GO) with high contrast on different substrates, including glass, quartz, and silicon. Visualization of GO sheets is accomplished through quenching the fluorescence of a thiophene dye, giving high optical contrast without the need to use interference methods. A comparison of fluorescence, AFM, and XRD measurements confirmed that even a single GO sheet can completely quench the fluorescence and thus be quickly visualized.

  16. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  17. Low-picomolar limits of detection using high-power light-emitting diodes for fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ebbing P; Lucy, Charles A

    2006-05-01

    Fluorescence detectors are ever more frequently being used with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light source. Technological advances in the solid-state lighting industry have produced LEDs which are also suitable tools in analytical measurements. LEDs are now available which deliver 700 mW of radiometric power. While this greater light power can increase the fluorescence signal, it is not trivial to make proper use of this light. This new generation of LEDs has a large emitting area and a highly divergent beam. This presents a classic problem in optics where one must choose between either a small focused light spot, or high light collection efficiency. We have selected for light collection efficiency, which yields a light spot somewhat larger than the emitting area of the LED. This light is focused onto a flow cell. Increasing the detector cell internal diameter (i.d.) produces gains in (sensitivity)3. However, since the detector cell i.d. is smaller than the LED spot size, scattering of excitation light towards the detector remains a significant source of background signal. This can be minimized through the use of spectral filters and spatial filters in the form of pinholes. The detector produced a limit of detection (LOD) of 3 pM, which is roughly three orders of magnitude lower than other reports of LED-based fluorescence detectors. Furthermore, this LOD comes within a factor of six of much more expensive laser-based fluorescence systems. This detector has been used to monitor a separation from a gel filtration column of fluorescently labeled BSA from residual labeling reagent. The LOD of fluorescently labeled BSA is 25 pM.

  18. Moving Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Speed Reactive and Non-reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D; Schwendeman, D W

    2005-08-30

    We consider the solution of the reactive and non-reactive Euler equations on two-dimensional domains that evolve in time. The domains are discretized using moving overlapping grids. In a typical grid construction, boundary-fitted grids are used to represent moving boundaries, and these grids overlap with stationary background Cartesian grids. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to resolve fine-scale features in the flow such as shocks and detonations. Refinement grids are added to base-level grids according to an estimate of the error, and these refinement grids move with their corresponding base-level grids. The numerical approximation of the governing equations takes place in the parameter space of each component grid which is defined by a mapping from (fixed) parameter space to (moving) physical space. The mapped equations are solved numerically using a second-order extension of Godunov's method. The stiff source term in the reactive case is handled using a Runge-Kutta error-control scheme. We consider cases when the boundaries move according to a prescribed function of time and when the boundaries of embedded bodies move according to the surface stress exerted by the fluid. In the latter case, the Newton-Euler equations describe the motion of the center of mass of the each body and the rotation about it, and these equations are integrated numerically using a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. Numerical boundary conditions at slip walls are described, and numerical results are presented for both reactive and non-reactive flows in order to demonstrate the use and accuracy of the numerical approach.

  19. Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Sule, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

  20. Understanding the Reactivity of Lunar Dust for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, W. T.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Taylor, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence and EPR can be used to measure the reactivity of lunar soil. Lunar soil is highly activated by grinding. Reactivity is dependent upon soil maturity and locale. Maturity is based on the amount of nanophase iron (np-Fe) in a soil relative to the total iron (FeO). Lunar soil activity ia a direct function of the amount of np-Fe present. Reactive soil can be "deactivated" by humid atmosphere.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  2. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection.

  3. High-performance fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads as microfluidic protein chip supports for AFP detection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqun; Yan, Huan; Yang, Jiumin; Wu, Yudong; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Yingyi; Liu, Ping; Wang, Huiquan; Hu, Zhidong; Chang, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Fluorescence-encoded magnetic microbeads (FEMMs), with the fluorescence encoding ability of quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic enrichment and separation functions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, have been widely used for multiple biomolecular detection as microfluidic protein chip supports. However, the preparation of FEMMs with long-term fluorescent encoding and immunodetection stability is still a challenge. In this work, we designed a novel high-temperature chemical swelling strategy. The QDs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were effectively packaged into microbeads via the thermal motion of the polymer chains and the hydrophobic interaction between the nanoparticles and microbeads. The FEMMs obtained a highly uniform fluorescent property and long-term encoding and immunodetection stability and could be quickly magnetically separated and enriched. Then, the QD-encoded magnetic microbeads were applied to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) detection via sandwich immunoreaction. The properties of the encoded microspheres were characterized using a self-designed detecting apparatus, and the target molecular concentration in the sample was also quantified. The results suggested that the high-performance FEMMs have great potential in the field of biomolecular detection. PMID:27639146

  4. C-H bond activation by metal-superoxo species: what drives high reactivity?

    PubMed

    Ansari, Azaj; Jayapal, Prabha; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-01-01

    Metal-superoxo species are ubiquitous in metalloenzymes and bioinorganic chemistry and are known for their high reactivity and their ability to activate inert C-H bonds. The comparative oxidative abilities of M-O2(.-) species (M = Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III), and Cu(II)) towards C-H bond activation reaction are presented. These superoxo species generated by oxygen activation are found to be aggressive oxidants compared to their high-valent metal-oxo counterparts generated by O⋅⋅⋅O bond cleavage. Our calculations illustrate the superior oxidative abilities of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-superoxo species compared to the others and suggest that the reactivity may be correlated to the magnetic exchange parameter.

  5. Highly Fluorescent Gene Carrier Based on Ag-Au Alloy Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Lin, Lin; Guo, Zhaopei; Chen, Jie; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi; Yang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    For systemic delivery of gene, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been exploited as novel gene carriers because of the excellent characteristics for "visible" in intracellular trafficking. Herein, a highly fluorescent gene carrier was prepared by conjugating polyethylenimines on Ag-Au alloy nanoclusters. This carrier exhibited remarkable high gene transfection efficiencies and relatively low cytotoxicity toward B16F10, HeLa, and CHO cells. More interestingly, the high fluorescent Ag-Au-PEI conjugates showed high quantum yield of 14.56%, which is much higher than most of the reported gold nanocluster-based quantum dots and Ag-Au-PEI possessed bioimaging capacity both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26287567

  6. 3D pulsed laser-triggered high-speed microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Yu-Chun; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-11-12

    We report a 3D microfluidic pulsed laser-triggered fluorescence-activated cell sorter capable of sorting at a throughput of 23 000 cells per s with 90% purity in high-purity mode and at a throughput of 45 000 cells per s with 45% purity in enrichment mode in one stage and in a single channel. This performance is realized by exciting laser-induced cavitation bubbles in a 3D PDMS microfluidic channel to generate high-speed liquid jets that deflect detected fluorescent cells and particles focused by 3D sheath flows. The ultrafast switching mechanism (20 μs complete on-off cycle), small liquid jet perturbation volume, and three-dimensional sheath flow focusing for accurate timing control of fast (1.5 m s(-1)) passing cells and particles are three critical factors enabling high-purity sorting at high-throughput in this sorter. PMID:23844418

  7. High throughput and high yield nanofabrication of precisely designed gold nanohole arrays for fluorescence enhanced detection of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ten It; Han, Shan; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yi; Deng, Jie; Tan, Christina Yuan Ling; Bai, Ping; Loke, Yee Chong; Yang, Xin Da; Tse, Man Siu; Ng, Sum Huan; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2013-06-21

    Fluorescence excitation enhancement by plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanohole arrays has been a hot topic in biosensing and bioimaging in recent years. However, the high throughput and high yield fabrication of precisely designed metal nanostructures for optimized fluorescence excitation remains a challenge. Our work is the first report combining nanopattern nickel mould fabrication and UV imprinting for gold nanostructure mass fabrication in high yield. We report our successful gold nanohole array mass fabrication on a 4'' glass wafer, by first fabricating a high fidelity nickel mould, then using the mould for UV nanoimprinting on a polymer coated on the glass, evaporating the gold film on the glass wafer, and lifting off the polymer to obtain a gold nanohole array on the glass. Our optimized process for wafer fabrication can achieve almost 100% yield from nanoimprinting to gold lift-off, while the fabricated nickel mould has >70% defect-free area with the rest having a few scattered defects. In our work, the size and pitch of the gold nanohole array are designed to enhance the fluorescent dye Alexa 647. When the fabricated gold nanohole array is used for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection by establishing a sandwiched fluorescence assay on the gold surface, a detection limit of 100 pg ml(-1) is achieved, while with a same thickness of gold film, only 1 ng ml(-1) is detected. PMID:23645079

  8. Cosputtered composition-spread reproducibility established by high-throughput x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Dover, R. Bruce van

    2010-09-15

    We describe the characterization of sputtered yttria-zirconia composition spread thin films by x-ray fluorescence (XRF). We also discuss our automated analysis of the XRF data, which was collected in a high throughput experiment at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. The results indicate that both the composition reproducibility of the library deposition and the composition measurements have a precision of better than 1 atomic percent.

  9. The artificial control of enhanced optical processes in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons in plasmon-semiconductor hybrid systems, plasmon-molecule hybrid systems have remained to be a conventional scheme, mainly assuming electric-field enhancement. This was because it was difficult to control the plasmon-molecule interface in a well-controlled manner. We here experimentally substantiate an obvious change in artificially enhanced optical processes of fluorescence/Raman scattering in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance plasmo-photonic metasurfaces with/without a self-assembled monolayer of sub-nm thickness. These results indicate that the enhanced optical processes were successfully selected under artificial configurations without any additional chemical treatment that modifies the molecules themselves. Although Raman-scattering efficiency is generally weak in high-fluorescence-yield molecules, it was found that Raman scattering becomes prominent around the molecular fingerprint range on the metasurfaces, being enhanced by more than 2000 fold at the maximum for reference signals. In addition, the highly and uniformly enhancing metasurfaces are able to serve as two-way functional, reproducible, and wavelength-tunable platforms to detect molecules at very low densities, being distinct from other platforms reported so far. The change in the enhanced signals suggests that energy diagrams in fluorescent molecules are changed in the configuration that includes the metal-molecule interface, meaning that plasmon-molecule hybrid systems are rich in the phenomena beyond the conventional scheme.Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons

  10. A Concept for a Sensitive Micro Total Analysis System for High Throughput Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rabner, Arthur; Shacham, Yosi

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses possible methods for on-chip fluorescent imaging for integrated bio-sensors. The integration of optical and electro-optical accessories, according to suggested methods, can improve the performance of fluorescence imaging. It can boost the signal to background ratio by a few orders of magnitudes in comparison to conventional discrete setups. The methods that are present in this paper are oriented towards building reproducible arrays for high-throughput micro total analysis systems (μTAS). The first method relates to side illumination of the fluorescent material placed into micro-compartments of the lab-on-chip. Its significance is in high utilization of excitation energy for low concentration of fluorescent material. The utilization of a transparent μLED chip, for the second method, allows the placement of the excitation light sources on the same optical axis with emission detector, such that the excitation and emission rays are directed controversly. The third method presents a spatial filtering of the excitation background.

  11. A high-resolution, fluorescence-based method for localization of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W G; Singer, V L

    1999-11-01

    We describe a high-resolution, fluorescence-based method for localizing endogenous alkaline phosphatase in tissues and cultured cells. This method utilizes ELF (Enzyme-Labeled Fluorescence)-97 phosphate, which yields an intensely fluorescent yellow-green precipitate at the site of enzymatic activity. We compared zebrafish intestine, ovary, and kidney cryosections stained for endogenous alkaline phosphatase using four histochemical techniques: ELF-97 phosphate, Gomori method, BCIP/NBT, and naphthol AS-MX phosphate coupled with Fast Blue BB (colored) and Fast Red TR (fluorescent) diazonium salts. Each method localized endogenous alkaline phosphatase to the same specific sample regions. However, we found that sections labeled using ELF-97 phosphate exhibited significantly better resolution than the other samples. The enzymatic product remained highly localized to the site of enzymatic activity, whereas signals generated using the other methods diffused. We found that the ELF-97 precipitate was more photostable than the Fast Red TR azo dye adduct. Using ELF-97 phosphate in cultured cells, we detected an intracellular activity that was only weakly labeled with the other methods, but co-localized with an antibody against alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that the ELF-97 phosphate provided greater sensitivity. Finally, we found that detecting endogenous alkaline phosphatase with ELF-97 phosphate was compatible with the use of antibodies and lectins. (J Histochem Cytochem 47:1443-1455, 1999)

  12. A galvanic replacement route to prepare strongly fluorescent and highly stable gold nanodots for cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanxi; Wang, Yu; Xu, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Xiangwei; Xu, Xiaowei; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai; Lin, Quan

    2013-02-11

    Fluorescent gold nanodots (GNDs) are an important kind of nanoprobes. Herein, the application of galvanic replacement for the preparation of fluorescent GNDs is reported. Using presynthesized and size-controlled Ag nanodots (Ag NDs) as templates, the as-prepared GNDs have strong fluorescence (quantum yields ~10%) with high stability and surface bioactivity. The resultant GNDs show excellent photoluminescence properties with high photo-, time-, metal-, and pH-stability, which are attributed to the protective surface layer of glutathione (GSH) and the presence of Au(I)-S complexes on the surface of the gold core. GSH, a naturally occurring and readily available tripeptide with carboxyl and amino functional groups, allows good dispersion of the as-prepared GNDs in aqueous solution and favorable biocompatibility. These advantages, combined with their small size, mean that the as-prepared GNDs have potential application in biological labeling, especially as a DNA probe for the specific detection of nucleic acids. In this study, the CAL-27 cells are used as a model to evaluate the fluorescence imaging of GNDs.

  13. The artificial control of enhanced optical processes in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok; Miyazaki, Hideki T; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-06-01

    Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons in plasmon-semiconductor hybrid systems, plasmon-molecule hybrid systems have remained to be a conventional scheme, mainly assuming electric-field enhancement. This was because it was difficult to control the plasmon-molecule interface in a well-controlled manner. We here experimentally substantiate an obvious change in artificially enhanced optical processes of fluorescence/Raman scattering in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance plasmo-photonic metasurfaces with/without a self-assembled monolayer of sub-nm thickness. These results indicate that the enhanced optical processes were successfully selected under artificial configurations without any additional chemical treatment that modifies the molecules themselves. Although Raman-scattering efficiency is generally weak in high-fluorescence-yield molecules, it was found that Raman scattering becomes prominent around the molecular fingerprint range on the metasurfaces, being enhanced by more than 2000 fold at the maximum for reference signals. In addition, the highly and uniformly enhancing metasurfaces are able to serve as two-way functional, reproducible, and wavelength-tunable platforms to detect molecules at very low densities, being distinct from other platforms reported so far. The change in the enhanced signals suggests that energy diagrams in fluorescent molecules are changed in the configuration that includes the metal-molecule interface, meaning that plasmon-molecule hybrid systems are rich in the phenomena beyond the conventional scheme. PMID:27227964

  14. High-sensitivity DNA detection with a laser-excited confocal fluorescence gel scanner.

    PubMed

    Quesada, M A; Rye, H S; Gingrich, J C; Glazer, A N; Mathies, R A

    1991-05-01

    A high-sensitivity, laser-excited confocal fluorescence gel scanner has been developed and applied to the detection of fluorescently labeled DNA. An argon ion laser (1-10 mW at 488 nm) is focused in the gel with a high-numerical aperture microscope objective. The laser-excited fluorescence is gathered by the objective and focused on a confocal spatial filter, followed by a spectral filter and photodetector. The gel is placed on a computer-controlled scan stage, and the scanned image of the gel fluorescence is stored and analyzed in a computer. This scanner has been used to detect DNA separated on sequencing gels, agarose mapping gels and pulsed field gels. Sanger sequencing gels were run on M13mp18 DNA using a fluoresceinated primer. The 400-microns-thick gels, loaded with 30 fmol of DNA fragments in 3-mm lanes, were scanned at 78-microns resolution. The high resolution of our scanner coupled with image processing allows us to read up to approximately 300 bases in four adjacent sequencing lanes. The minimum band size that could be detected and read was approximately 200 microns. This instrument has a limiting detection sensitivity of approximately 10 amol of fluorescein-labeled DNA in a 1 x 3-mm band. In applications to agarose mapping gels, we have exploited the fact that DNA can be prestained with ethidium homodimer, followed by electrophoresis and fluorescence detection to achieve picogram sensitivity. We have also developed methods using both ethidium homodimer and thiazole orange staining which permit two-color detection of DNA in one lane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy: behavior of biological specimens under high-intensity illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ping C.; Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2000-07-01

    Recent development in multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy (SHG and THG) and CARS open new dimensions in biological studies. Not only the technologies allow probing the biological specimen both functionally and structurally with increasing spatial and temporal resolution, but also raise the interest in how biological specimens respond to high intensity illumination commonly used in these types of microscopy. We have used maize leaf protoplast as a model system to evaluate the photo-induced response of living sample under high intensity illumination. It was found that cells can be seriously damaged by high intensity NIR irradiation even the linear absorption coefficient in low in these wavelengths. Micro-spectroscopy of single chloroplast also allows us to gain insight on the possible photo-damage mechanism. In addition to fluorescence emission, second harmonic generation was observed in the maize protoplasts.

  16. High Throughput Fluorescent Screening of Membrane Potential under Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, F. P. M.

    2013-02-01

    In bilayer and patch-clamp experiments it was shown that the electrophysiological parameters of neuronal cells, as there are ion channel activity, intracellular ion concentrations and membrane potential, respond to gravity changes. Due to technical limitations (e.g. time-consuming manual operations) of electrophysiological techniques the amount of acquired data is limited. Optical techniques as fluorescence and fluorometric measurements can also be used to investigate electrophysiological properties of cells as sensitive fluorescent probes for these properties have been developed. On ground various high-throughput fluorometric systems are commercially available. Such a high throughput system would significantly increase the possible data yield and facilitate a lot of future experiments in micro- and hypergravity research. Therefore a FlexStation® 1 from Molecular Devices, a high-throughput multiwell reader, was adapted to parabolic flight conditions. In a first series of experiments the membrane potential of neuronal cells was investigated to verify the system.

  17. Real-time super-resolution imaging by high-speed fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zihao; Li, Shuai; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2014-09-01

    The recently proposed fluorescence emission difference (FED) microscopy has been demonstrated to be capable of breaking the diffraction barrier, which restricts the spatial resolution of far-field fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we report a novel high-speed FED system that can realize real-time super-resolution imaging. By replacing the conventional nanopositioning stage with a galvo mirror, the temporal resolution of FED is improved to nearly one frame per second, which is 100 times faster than that of best existing FED, while the system maintains a super-high spatial resolution of 150 nm, which is far beyond the diffraction barrier. Therefore, the high-speed FED is suitable for large-area observations while avoiding photobleaching. Detailed theoretical analysis, simulations, and experimental real-time resolution tests on 100 nm nanoparticles and biological cells are reported.

  18. Guidelines for application of fluorescent lamps in high-performance avionic backlight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.

    1997-07-01

    Fluorescent lamps have proven to be well suited for use in high performance avionic backlight systems as demonstrated by numerous production applications for both commercial and military cockpit displays. Cockpit display applications include: Boeing 777, new 737s, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-22, C- 130, Navy P3, NASA Space Shuttle and many others. Fluorescent lamp based backlights provide high luminance, high lumen efficiency, precision chromaticity and long life for avionic active matrix liquid crystal display applications. Lamps have been produced in many sizes and shapes. Lamp diameters range from 2.6 mm to over 20 mm and lengths for the larger diameter lamps range to over one meter. Highly convoluted serpentine lamp configurations are common as are both hot and cold cathode electrode designs. This paper will review fluorescent lamp operating principles, discuss typical requirements for avionic grade lamps, compare avionic and laptop backlight designs and provide guidelines for the proper application of lamps and performance choices that must be made to attain optimum system performance considering high luminance output, system efficiency, dimming range and cost.

  19. Duty cycle control in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium and niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Murdoch, B.; Xie, D.; Ross, A. E.; Partridge, J. G.; Falconer, I. S.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Instabilities in reactive sputtering have technological consequences and have been attributed to the formation of a compound layer on the target surface (‘poisoning’). Here we demonstrate how the duty cycle of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) can be used to control the surface conditions of Hf and Nb targets. Variations in the time resolved target current characteristics as a function of duty cycle were attributed to gas rarefaction and to the degree of poisoning of the target surface. As the operation transitions from Ar driven sputtering to metal driven sputtering, the secondary electron emission changes and reduces the target current. The target surface transitions smoothly from a poisoned state at low duty cycles to a quasi-metallic state at high duty cycles. Appropriate selection of duty cycle increases the deposition rate, eliminates the need for active regulation of oxygen flow and enables stable reactive deposition of stoichiometric metal oxide films. A model is presented for the reactive HIPIMS process in which the target operates in a partially poisoned mode with different degrees of oxide layer distribution on its surface that depends on the duty cycle. Finally, we show that by tuning the pulse characteristics, the refractive indices of the metal oxides can be controlled without increasing the absorption coefficients, a result important for the fabrication of optical multilayer stacks.

  20. Heterogeneous reactivity effects in medium- and high-enriched uranium metal-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenwalter, J.J.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of heterogeneity on reactivity of low-, medium-, and high-enriched, water-moderated uranium metal systems has been examined for various hydrogen-to-fissile (H/X) ratios using the CSAS1X sequence in SCALE and MCNP. For the calculations, an infinite array of close-packed unit cells was modeled which consisted of centered uranium metal spheres surrounded by water. The enrichments used correspond to the average enrichments of fragmented fuel plates in three proposed waste shipments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The analysis performed to obtain peak reactivity for each enrichment as a function of particle size and H/X ratio led to the development of the topic discussed in this paper.

  1. Reactive Hot Pressing and Oxidation Behavior of Hf-BASED Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Kang, Eul Son; Baek, Seung Su; Kim, Do Kyung

    A HfB2-SiC ceramics were fabricated via a reactive hot pressing using Hf, B4C, and Si as precursors. The reaction temperature for the reactive hot pressing between 1800 and 1900°C was determined by reaction of the precursor at different temperatures from 900 to 1800°C. The effective size reduction of precursors was investigated by vibration milling, which exhibited a critical role to achieve high densification and uniform microstructure. Also, it has affected the oxidation behavior of HfB2-SiC in air. Vibration milled sample showed uniform surface of SiO2 layer, but sample which was fabricated by as-received powder exhibited non-uniform oxidation behavior. Examination of the mechanical properties showed that particle size reduction via vibration also led to improved flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness.

  2. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronection coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4 fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet

  3. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  4. In vivo and in situ tracking cancer chemotherapy by highly photostable NIR fluorescent theranostic prodrug.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xumeng; Sun, Xuanrong; Guo, Zhiqian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing; James, Tony D; Tian, He; Zhu, Weihong

    2014-03-01

    In vivo monitoring of the biodistribution and activation of prodrugs is urgently required. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence-active fluorophores with excellent photostability are preferable for tracking drug release in vivo. Herein, we describe a NIR prodrug DCM-S-CPT and its polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) loaded nanoparticles as a potent cancer therapy. We have conjugated a dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran derivative as the NIR fluorophore with camptothecin (CPT) as the anticancer drug using a disulfide linker. In vitro experiments verify that the high intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations in tumor cells cause cleavage of the disulfide linker, resulting in concomitantly the active drug CPT release and significant NIR fluorescence turn-on with large Stokes shift (200 nm). The NIR fluorescence of DCM-S-CPT at 665 nm with fast response to GSH can act as a direct off-on signal reporter for the GSH-activatable prodrug. Particularly, DCM-S-CPT possesses much better photostability than ICG, which is highly desirable for in situ fluorescence-tracking of cancer chemotherapy. DCM-S-CPT has been successfully utilized for in vivo and in situ tracking of drug release and cancer therapeutic efficacy in living animals by NIR fluorescence. DCM-S-CPT exhibits excellent tumor-activatable performance when intravenously injected into tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as specific cancer therapy with few side effects. DCM-S-CPT loaded in PEG-PLA nanoparticles shows even higher antitumor activity than free CPT, and is also retained longer in the plasma. The tumor-targeting ability and the specific drug release in tumors make DCM-S-CPT as a promising prodrug, providing significant advances toward deeper understanding and exploration of theranostic drug-delivery systems.

  5. Effect of High Temperature on Photosynthesis in Beans (I. Oxygen Evolution and Chlorophyll Fluorescence).

    PubMed Central

    Pastenes, C.; Horton, P.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effect of increasing temperature on photosynthesis in two bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) varieties known to differ in their resistance to extreme high temperatures, Blue Lake (BL), commercially available in the United Kingdom, and Barbucho (BA), noncommercially bred in Chile. We paid particular attention to the energy-transducing mechanisms and structural responses inferred from fluorescence kinetics. The study was conducted in non-photorespiratory conditions. Increases in temperature resulted in changes in the fluorescence parameters nonphotochemical quenching (qN) and photochemical quenching (qP) in both varieties, but to a different extent. In BL and BA the increase in qP and the decrease in qN were either completed at 30[deg]C or slightly changed following increases from 30 to 35[deg]C. No indication of photoinhibition was detected at any temperature, and the ratio of the quantum efficiencies of photosystem II (PSII) and O2 evolution remained constant from 20 to 35[deg]C. Measurements of 77-K fluorescence showed an increase in the photosystem I (PSI)/PSII ratio with temperature, suggesting an increase in the state transitions. In addition, measurements of fast-induction fluorescence revealed that the proportion of PSII[beta] centers increased with increasing temperatures. The extent of both changes were maximum at 30 to 35[deg]C, coinciding with the ratio of rates at temperatures differing by 10[deg]C for oxygen evolution. PMID:12226442

  6. High Fluorescence Anisotropy of Thioflavin T in Aqueous Solution Resulting from Its Molecular Rotor Nature.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Maskevich, Alexander A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    Thioflavin T (ThT) is widely used to study amyloid fibrils while its properties are still debated in the literature. By steady-state and femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence we showed that, unlike small sized rigid molecules, the fluorescence anisotropy value of the free ThT in aqueous solutions is very high, close to the limiting value. This is determined by the molecular rotor nature of ThT, where the direction of the ThT transition dipole moment S₀ → S₁* is not changed either by the internal rotation of the ThT benzothiazole and aminobenzene rings relative to each other in the excited state, because the axis of this rotation coincides with the direction of the transition dipole moment, or by the rotation of the ThT molecule as a whole, because the rate of this process is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the rate of the internal rotation which leads to the fluorescence quenching. Consequently, ThT fluorescence anisotropy cannot be directly used to study amyloid fibrils formation, as it was proposed by some authors.

  7. A Highly Sensitive ESIPT-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence Sensor for Selective Detection of Al(3.).

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanghamitra; Chowdhury, Bijit; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-09-19

    An excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT)-based highly sensitive ratiometric fluorescence sensor, 1H was developed for selective detection of aluminum (Al(3+)) in acetonitrile as well as in 90% aqueous system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals almost planar and conjugated structure of 1H. Photophysical properties of the sensor as well as its selectivity toward Al(3+) are explored using UV-visible, steady-state, and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The bright cyan (λem = 445 nm) fluorescence of 1H in acetonitrile turns into deep blue (λem = 412 nm) with ∼2.3-fold enhancement in emission intensity, in the presence of parts per billion level Al(3+) (detection limit = 0.5 nM). Interestingly, the probe 1H exhibits increased selectivity toward Al(3+) in H2O/acetonitrile (9:1 v/v) solvent system with a change in fluorescence color from pale green to deep blue associated with ca. sixfold enhancement in emission intensity. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations provide the ground- and excited-state energy optimized structures and properties of the proposed aluminum complex [Al(1) (OH)]2(2+), which is in harmony with the solution-state experimental findings and also supports the occurrence of ESIPT process in 1H. The ESIPT mechanism was also ascertained by comparing the basic photophysical properties of 1H with a similar O-methylated analogue, 1'Me. PMID:27571218

  8. Masked illumination scheme for a galvanometer scanning high-speed confocal fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Uk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2011-01-01

    High-speed beam scanning and data acquisition in a laser scanning confocal microscope system are normally implemented with a resonant galvanometer scanner and a frame grabber. However, the nonlinear scanning speed of a resonant galvanometer can generate nonuniform photobleaching in a fluorescence sample as well as image distortion near the edges of a galvanometer scanned fluorescence image. Besides, incompatibility of signal format between a frame grabber and a point detector can lead to digitization error during data acquisition. In this article, we introduce a masked illumination scheme which can effectively decrease drawbacks in fluorescence images taken by a laser scanning confocal microscope with a resonant galvanometer and a frame grabber. We have demonstrated that the difference of photobleaching between the center and the edge of a fluorescence image can be reduced from 26 to 5% in our confocal laser scanning microscope with a square illumination mask. Another advantage of our masked illumination scheme is that the zero level or the lowest input level of an analog signal in a frame grabber can be accurately set by the dark area of a mask in our masked illumination scheme. We have experimentally demonstrated the advantages of our masked illumination method in detail.

  9. Pilot Clinical Trial of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence-Augmented Colonoscopy in High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Rahul A; Heidari, Pedram; Woods, Kevin; Chung, Daniel; Chan, Andrew T; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    White light colonoscopy is the current gold standard for early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer, but emerging data suggest that this approach is inherently limited. Even the most experienced colonoscopists, under optimal conditions, miss at least 15-25% of adenomas. There is an unmet clinical need for an adjunctive modality to white light colonoscopy with improved lesion detection and characterization. Optical molecular imaging with exogenously administered organic fluorochromes is a burgeoning imaging modality poised to advance the capabilities of colonoscopy. In this proof-of-principle clinical trial, we investigated the ability of a custom-designed fluorescent colonoscope and indocyanine green, a clinically approved fluorescent blood pool imaging agent, to visualize polyps in high risk patients with polyposis syndromes or known distal colonic masses. We demonstrate (1) the successful performance of real-time, wide-field fluorescence endoscopy using off-the-shelf equipment, (2) the ability of this system to identify polyps as small as 1 mm, and (3) the potential for fluorescence imaging signal intensity to differentiate between neoplastic and benign polyps. PMID:26989406

  10. Masked illumination scheme for a galvanometer scanning high-speed confocal fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Uk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2011-01-01

    High-speed beam scanning and data acquisition in a laser scanning confocal microscope system are normally implemented with a resonant galvanometer scanner and a frame grabber. However, the nonlinear scanning speed of a resonant galvanometer can generate nonuniform photobleaching in a fluorescence sample as well as image distortion near the edges of a galvanometer scanned fluorescence image. Besides, incompatibility of signal format between a frame grabber and a point detector can lead to digitization error during data acquisition. In this article, we introduce a masked illumination scheme which can effectively decrease drawbacks in fluorescence images taken by a laser scanning confocal microscope with a resonant galvanometer and a frame grabber. We have demonstrated that the difference of photobleaching between the center and the edge of a fluorescence image can be reduced from 26 to 5% in our confocal laser scanning microscope with a square illumination mask. Another advantage of our masked illumination scheme is that the zero level or the lowest input level of an analog signal in a frame grabber can be accurately set by the dark area of a mask in our masked illumination scheme. We have experimentally demonstrated the advantages of our masked illumination method in detail. PMID:21809349

  11. Effect of high temperature on photosynthesis in beans. I. Oxygen evolution and chlorophyll fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Pastenes, C.; Horton, P.

    1996-11-01

    We studied the effect of increasing temperature on photosynthesis in two bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) varieties known to differ in their resistance to extreme high temperatures, Blue Lake (BL), commercially available in the United Kingdom, and Barbucho (BA), noncommercially bred in Chile. We paid particular attention to the energy-transducing mechanisms and structural responses inferred from fluorescence kinetics. The study was conducted in non-photorespiratory conditions. Increases in temperature resulted in changes in the fluorescence parameters nonphotochemical quenching (qN) and photochemical quenching (qP) in both varieties, but to a different extent. In BL and BA the increase in qP and the decrease in qN were either completed at 30{degrees}C. No indication of photoinhibition was detected at any temperature, and the ratio of the quantum efficiencies of photosystem II (PSII) and O{sub 2} evolution remained constant from 20 to 35{degrees}C. Measurements of 77-K fluorescence showed an increase in the photosystem I (PSI)/PSII ratio with temperature, suggesting an increase in the state transitions. In addition, measurements of fast-induction fluorescence revealed that the proportion of PSII{sub {beta}} centers increased with increasing temperatures. The extent of both changes were maximum at 30 to 35{degrees}C, coinciding with the ratio of rates at temperatures differing by 10{degrees}C for oxygen evolution. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  12. A new chiral binaphthalene-based fluorescence polymer sensor for the highly enantioselective recognition of phenylalaninol.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo; Zhang, Shuwei; Dai, Chunhui; Quan, Yiwu; Cheng, Yixiang; Zhu, Chengjian

    2013-11-18

    A new (S)-binaphthalene-based polymer (P-1) was synthesized by the polymerization of 5,5'-((2,5-dibutoxy-1,4-phenylene)bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl))bis(2-hydroxy-3-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl) benzaldehyde (M-1) with (S)-2,2'-dimethoxy-(1,1'-binaphthalene)-3,3'-diamine (M-2) through the formation of a Schiff base; the corresponding chiral polymer (P-2) could be obtained by the reduction of polymer P-1 with NaBH4 . Chiral polymer P-1 exhibited a remarkable "turn-on" fluorescence-enhancement response towards (D)-phenylalaninol and excellent enantioselective recognition behavior with enantiomeric fluorescence difference ratios (ef) as high as 8.99. More importantly, chiral polymer P-1 displays a bright blue fluorescence color change upon the addition of (D)-phenylalaninol under a commercially available UV lamp, which can be clearly observed by the naked eye. On the contrary, chiral polymer P-2 showed weaker enantioselective fluorescence ability towards the enantiomers of phenylalaninol. PMID:24123510

  13. Human electroretinogram responses to video displays, fluorescent lighting, and other high frequency sources.

    PubMed

    Berman, S M; Greenhouse, D S; Bailey, I L; Clear, R D; Raasch, T W

    1991-08-01

    Time-averaged human electroretinogram (ERG) responses were determined for several workplace visual stimuli which are temporally modulated at rates exceeding the perceptual critical fusion frequency (CFF). A clearly identifiable synchronous response was in evidence for a video display terminal (VDT) stimulus operating with a refresh rate as high as 76 Hz. A directly viewed fluorescent luminaire with controllable driving frequency elicited a synchronous response at rates as high as 145 Hz. In addition, an intense stimulus created by modulating the light from a slide projector produced responses at least as high as 162 Hz. The implications of these high-frequency responses are representing a potential basis for visual symptoms are discussed.

  14. Observations of fluorescent and biological aerosol at a high-altitude site in central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A. M.; Vaitilingom, M.; Freney, E.; Boulon, J.; Sellegri, K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crawford, I. P.; Robinson, N. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Kaye, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Aerodyne Inc.) suggests that aerosol reaching the site at night was more aged than that during the day, indicative of sampling the residual layer at night. Supplementary meteorological data and previous work also show that PdD lies in the residual layer/free troposphere at night, and this is thought to cause the observed diurnal cycles in organic-type and fluorescent aerosol particles. Based on the observed disparity between bacteria and fluorescent particle concentrations, fluorescent non-PBA is likely to be important in the WIBS-3 data and the surprisingly high fluorescent concentration in the residual layer/free troposphere raises questions about a ubiquitous background in continental air during the summer.

  15. Observations of fluorescent and biological aerosol at a high-altitude site in Central France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A. M.; Vaitilingom, M.; Freney, E.; Boulon, J.; Sellegri, K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Crawford, I. P.; Robinson, N. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Kaye, P. H.

    2013-01-01

    more aged than that during the day, indicative of sampling the residual layer at night. Supplementary meteorological data and previous work also show that pdD lies in the residual layer/free troposphere at night, and this is thought to cause the observed diurnal cycles in organic-type and fluorescent aerosol particles. Based on the observed disparity between bacteria and fluorescent particle concentrations, fluorescent non-PBA is likely to be important in the WIBS-3 data and the surprisingly high fluorescent concentration in the residual layer/free troposphere raises questions about a ubiquitous background in continental air during the summer.

  16. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  17. Mesoporous structured MIPs@CDs fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shoufang; Lu, Hongzhi

    2016-11-15

    A facile strategy was developed to prepare mesoporous structured molecularly imprinted polymers capped carbon dots (M-MIPs@CDs) fluorescence sensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of TNT. The strategy using amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer" for imprinting simplify the imprinting process and provide well recognition sites accessibility. The as-prepared M-MIPs@CDs sensor, using periodic mesoporous silica as imprinting matrix, and amino-CDs directly as "functional monomer", exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward TNT with detection limit of 17nM. The recycling process was sustainable for 10 times without obvious efficiency decrease. The feasibility of the developed method in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of TNT in soil and water samples with satisfactory recoveries of 88.6-95.7%. The method proposed in this work was proved to be a convenient and practical way to prepare high sensitive and selective fluorescence MIPs@CDs sensors. PMID:27315521

  18. Highly efficient red OLEDs using DCJTB as the dopant and delayed fluorescent exciplex as the host

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Tianyou; Chu, Bei; Li, Wenlian; Su, Zisheng; Wu, Hairuo; Yan, Xingwu; Jin, Fangming; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Chengyuan

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we demonstrated a highly efficient DCJTB emission with delayed fluorescent exciplex TCTA:3P-T2T as the host. For the 1.0% DCJTB doped concentration, a maximum luminance, current efficiency, power efficiency and EQE of 22,767 cd m−2, 22.7 cd A−1, 21.5 lm W−1 and 10.15% were achieved, respectively. The device performance is the best compared to either red OLEDs with traditional fluorescent emitter or traditional red phosphor of Ir(piq)3 doped into CBP host. The extraction of so high efficiency can be explained as the efficient triplet excitons up-conversion of TCTA:3P-T2T and the energy transfer from exciplex host singlet state to DCJTB singlet state. PMID:26023882

  19. Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of high-enthalpy free jet flow with nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Jennifer L.; Mcmillin, Brian K.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of property fields in a high-enthalpy, supersonic, underexpanded free jet generated in a reflection-type shock tunnel are reported. PLIF images showing velocity and temperature sensitivity are presented. The inferred radial velocity and relative rotational temperature fields are found to be in agreement with those predicted by a numerical simulation of the flowfield using the method of characteristics.

  20. Designing the nanobiointerface of fluorescent nanodiamonds: highly selective targeting of glioma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Slegerova, Jitka; Hajek, Miroslav; Rehor, Ivan; Sedlak, Frantisek; Stursa, Jan; Hruby, Martin; Cigler, Petr

    2015-01-14

    Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy. PMID:25132312

  1. Determination of dihydroergotamine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Murday, M; McLean, A M; Slaughter, E; Couch, R A

    1999-12-10

    Dihydroergotamine, a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist, is used for the treatment of vascular headaches. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay with fluorescence detection is described for the determination of dihydroergotamine in plasma. The assay was validated over the concentration range 0.1-10 ng/ml plasma and applied to the analysis of plasma samples from subjects treated intramuscularly and intranasally with 2 mg of dihydroergotamine. PMID:10670731

  2. Mice selected for high versus low stress reactivity: a new animal model for affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Touma, Chadi; Bunck, Mirjam; Glasl, Lisa; Nussbaumer, Markus; Palme, Rupert; Stein, Hendrik; Wolferstätter, Michael; Zeh, Ramona; Zimbelmann, Marina; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer

    2008-07-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression are among the most prevalent and costly diseases of the central nervous system, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In recent years, it has become evident that alterations of the stress hormone system, in particular dysfunctions (hyper- or hypo-activity) of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, play a prominent role in the development of major depressive disorders. Therefore, we aimed to generate a new animal model comprising these neuroendocrine core symptoms in order to unravel parameters underlying increased or decreased stress reactivity. Starting from a population of outbred mice (parental generation: 100 males and 100 females of the CD-1 strain), two breeding lines were established according to the outcome of a 'stress reactivity test' (SRT), consisting of a 15-min restraint period and tail blood samplings immediately before and after exposure to the stressor. Mice showing a very high or a very low secretion of corticosterone in the SRT, i.e. animals expressing a hyper- or a hypo-reactivity of the HPA axis, were selected for the 'high reactivity' (HR) and the 'low reactivity' (LR) breeding line, respectively. Additionally, a third breeding line was established consisting of animals with an 'intermediate reactivity' (IR) in the SRT. Already in the first generation, i.e. animals derived from breeding pairs selected from the parental generation, significant differences in the reactivity of the HPA axis between HR, IR, and LR mice were observed. Moreover, these differences were found across all subsequent generations and could be increased by selective breeding, which indicates a genetic basis of the respective phenotype. Repeated testing of individuals in the SRT furthermore proved that the observed differences in stress responsiveness are present already early in life and can be regarded as a robust genetic predisposition. Tests investigating the animal's emotionality including anxiety

  3. Understanding the Composition and Reactivity of Au/Cu Electrocatalyst Nanoparticles in Solution Using Highly Accurate Reactive Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artrith, Nongnuch; Kolpak, Alexie

    2014-03-01

    The shape, size, and composition of catalyst nanoparticles can have a significant influence on their catalytic activity. Understanding such structure-reactivity relationships is crucial for the optimization of industrial catalysts and the design of novel catalysts with enhanced properties. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium shape and surface structure/composition of Au/Cu nanoparticles in solution, which have recently been shown to be stable and efficient catalysts for CO2 reduction. Using a combination of density functional theory calculations and large-scale Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations with reactive atomistic potentials, we determine how the nanoparticle shape, surface structure, and surface stoichiometry (i.e., fraction of Au at the surface relative to overall composition), evolve as a function of varying catalytic conditions. We discuss the effects of these changes on the surface electronic structure and binding energies of CO2, H2, and CH3OH. Our results emphasize the important relationships between catalytic environment (e.g., solvent effects), catalyst structure, and catalytic activity. We thank the Schlumberger Foundation Faculty for the Future for financial support. Computing time at XSEDE and NERSC clusters are gratefully acknowledged.

  4. THC-MP: High performance numerical simulation of reactive transport and multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Weishan; Tian, Hailong; Li, Hongliang; Xu, Haixiao; Xu, Tianfu

    2015-07-01

    The numerical simulation of multiphase flow and reactive transport in the porous media on complex subsurface problem is a computationally intensive application. To meet the increasingly computational requirements, this paper presents a parallel computing method and architecture. Derived from TOUGHREACT that is a well-established code for simulating subsurface multi-phase flow and reactive transport problems, we developed a high performance computing THC-MP based on massive parallel computer, which extends greatly on the computational capability for the original code. The domain decomposition method was applied to the coupled numerical computing procedure in the THC-MP. We designed the distributed data structure, implemented the data initialization and exchange between the computing nodes and the core solving module using the hybrid parallel iterative and direct solver. Numerical accuracy of the THC-MP was verified through a CO2 injection-induced reactive transport problem by comparing the results obtained from the parallel computing and sequential computing (original code). Execution efficiency and code scalability were examined through field scale carbon sequestration applications on the multicore cluster. The results demonstrate successfully the enhanced performance using the THC-MP on parallel computing facilities.

  5. Simultaneous determination of airborne carbamates in workplace by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Ping; Li, Jen-Hou; Li, Gwo-Chen; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2004-06-17

    A high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence (HPLC-F) detector was examined to simultaneous determination of airborne carbamates in the workplace of manufactory. The OVS-2 air sampling tube filled with glass fiber filter or quartz fiber and combined filter/XAD-2 were evaluated to collect nine commonly used carbamates (Carbofuran, Isoprocarb, Methomyl, Metolcarb, Thiodicarb, Carbaryl, Oxamyl, Methiocarb, and Prpoxur) from the air of manufactory in high humidity country. After being extracted with acetonitrile from sampling tubes, the carbamates were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection posterior to on-line derivatization. The collection of carbamates and the recovery of extraction from glass wool fiber in several concentration levels, and from quartz filter were evaluated. The storage stability of carbamates was also tested. Results indicated that the HPLC-fluorescence method offers satisfactory resolution and sensitivity in carbamate analysis. With the glass fiber filter and combined filter/XAD-2, the Carbofuran, Isoprocarb, Methomyl, Metolcarb, and Thiodicarb were stable for a 28-day storage test, Carbaryl and Oxamyl for 14 days, and Methiocarb and Prpoxur for 7 days. All of these pesticides were with detection limit of 3mugm(-3). It is suited for environmental monitoring. The airborne carbamates in different areas of the manufactory were measured.

  6. Achieving a balance between small singlet-triplet energy splitting and high fluorescence radiative rate in a quinoxaline-based orange-red thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Wu, Zhongbin; Xie, Guohua; Zhong, Cheng; Zhu, Zece; Cong, Hengjiang; Ma, Dongge; Yang, Chuluo

    2016-09-21

    A new orange-red thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter is designed and synthesized by incorporating a fluorine-substituted quinoxaline as an electron-acceptor and a phenoxazine as an electron-donor. The rational molecular design enables small singlet-triplet energy splitting (ΔEST) and high fluorescence radiative rate (k) for long-wavelength TADF emitters. The organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing the new TADF emitter achieve maximum external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of 13.9% and 9.0% for the vacuum- and solution-processed OLEDs, respectively.

  7. Neither perceived job stress nor individual cardiovascular reactivity predict high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fauvel, Jean Pierre; M'Pio, Ignasse; Quelin, Pierre; Rigaud, Jean-Pierre; Laville, Maurice; Ducher, Michel

    2003-12-01

    We have reported that high job strain was associated with a significantly higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 4.5 mm Hg during the working hours, irrespective of BP reactivity to a stress test. We report the final results of the first 5-year follow-up study, which aimed to assess the respective influences of perception of professional strain and cardiovascular reactivity to a mental stress test on BP. A cohort of 292 healthy subjects (mean+/-SEM age, 38+/-1 years) was followed up for progression to hypertension outcome, which was defined as an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) or DBP >7 mm Hg or a DBP >95 mm Hg during follow-up. None of the subjects was lost to follow-up, and 209 subjects completed the study. The high-strain (HS) group, representing 20.9% of the subjects, was compared with the remaining subjects (non-high-strain [NHS]). Similarly, the subjects with the highest BP stress reactivity (HR; 20.9% of subjects) were compared with the remaining subjects (NHR). Progression to hypertension was reached by 93 subjects (31.8%). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates revealed that neither HS nor HR increased the incidence of progression to hypertension. End-of-follow-up 24-hour ambulatory BPs that were similar in HS and NHS (120+/-2 vs 120+/-1 mm Hg, respectively) and in HR and NHR (122+/-2 vs 120+/-1 mm Hg, respectively) confirmed our findings. Age, alcohol, salt diet, body mass index, and occupation did not interfere with our results. In conclusion, cardiovascular HR and HS do not appear to be major risk markers for future high BP in healthy, young adults.

  8. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  9. A ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe based on terbium functionalized carbon dots for highly sensitive detection of an anthrax biomarker.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Xie, Yujie; Kirillov, Alexander M; Liu, Liangliang; Yu, Minghui; Liu, Weisheng; Tang, Yu

    2015-03-25

    A ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe based on terbium functionalized carbon dots (CDs) was designed to detect dipicolinic acid (DPA) as an anthrax biomarker with high selectivity and sensitivity. CDs were generated by one-step synthesis using an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid precursor, and served as a scaffold for coordination with Tb(3+) and a fluorescence reference.

  10. Ratiometric fluorescent ion detection in water with high sensitivity via aggregation-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer using a conjugated polyelectrolyte as an optical platform.

    PubMed

    Le, Van Sang; Kim, Boram; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Yang, Renqiang; Woo, Han Young

    2013-05-14

    A cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte was designed and synthesized based on poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) containing 5 mol% benzothiadiazole (BT) as a low energy trap and 15-crown-5 as a recognizing group for potassium ions. A potassium ion can form a sandwich-type 2:1 Lewis acid-based complex with 15-crown-5, to cause the intermolecular aggregation of polymers. This facilitates inter-chain fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a low-energy BT segment, resulting in fluorescent signal amplification, even at dilute analyte concentrations. Highly sensitive and selective detection of K(+) ions was demonstrated in water. The linear response of ratiometric fluorescent signal as a function of [K(+) ] allows K(+) quantification in a range of nanomolar concentrations with a detection limit of ≈0.7 × 10(-9) M. PMID:23417971

  11. Highly Efficient Sky-Blue Fluorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Based on Mixed Cohost System for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter (2CzPN).

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin Won; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-04-20

    The mixed cohosts of 1,3-bis(N-carbazolyl)benzene and 2,8-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene have been developed for a highly efficient blue fluorescent oragnic light emitting diode (OLED) doped with a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter [4,5-di (9H-carbazol-9-yl) phthalonitrile (2CzPN)]. We have demonstrated one of the highest external quantum efficiency of 21.8% in blue fluorescent OLEDs, which is identical to the theoretically achievable maximum electroluminescence efficiency using the emitter. Interestingly, the efficiency roll-off is large even under the excellent charge balance in the device and almost the same as the single host based devices, indicating that the efficiency roll-off in 2CzPN based TADF host is related to the material characteristics, such as low reverse intesystem crossing rate rather than charge imbalance. PMID:27019330

  12. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  13. Tunable design strategy for fluorescence probes based on 4-substituted BODIPY chromophore: improvement of highly sensitive fluorescence probe for nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Gabe, Yu; Ueno, Tasuku; Urano, Yasuteru; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2006-10-01

    4,4-Difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) is a well-known fluorophore, with a high molar extinction coefficient and high fluorescence quantum efficiency (Phi(fl)). Furthermore, its structure can be modified to change its excitation and emission wavelengths. However, little work has been done on the structural modification of fluorines at the B-4 position with other functional groups. We synthesized 4-methoxy-substituted BODIPY derivatives in satisfactory yields, and found that they exhibited improved solubility in aqueous solution. Moreover, their oxidation and reduction potentials were greatly decreased without any change in their absorbance and fluorescence properties. These features of 4-substituted BODIPYs may be useful for developing novel fluorescence probes based on the intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) mechanism, because it is possible to optimize the PeT process precisely by modulating the electrochemical properties of the fluorophore. The value of this approach is exemplified by its application to the development of a highly sensitive and pH-independent fluorescence probe for nitric oxide.

  14. Bodilisant—A Novel Fluorescent, Highly Affine Histamine H3 Receptor Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (Ki hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R. PMID:24900647

  15. Highly selective, sensitive and fast-responsive fluorescent sensor for Hg2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qingfen; Wu, Xingxing; Li, Tianduo; Cui, Yuezhi; Zhang, Shanshan; Li, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    A phenylamine-oligothiophene-based fluorescent sensor 2TBEA was reported. This sensor exhibited highly selective, sensitive and rapid detection of Hg2 + ion in THF/H2O (7/3, v/v) solution through fluorescence quenching. The detection was unaffected by the coexistence of other competitive metal cations including Na+, K+, Ag+, Ca2 +, Fe3 +, Al3 +, Co2 +, Cu2 +, Ni2 +, Zn2 +, Pb2 +, Cd2 +, Fe2 + and Cr3 +. A1:1 binding ratio for 2TBEA - Hg2 + was demonstrated by Job's plot and mole-ratio curves. The coordination process was chemically reversible with EDTA. The detection limit was evaluated to be as low as 6.164 × 10- 8 M.

  16. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1993-01-01

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  17. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1993-10-19

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 [mu]m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO[sub 3]; and then indurating it at 800 to 900 C for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  18. Water-free synthesis of polyurethane foams using highly reactive diisocyanates derived from 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Christopher N D; Bulach, Winfried D; Rehahn, Matthias; Klein, Roland

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of a new highly reactive diisocyanate monomer based on hydroxymethylfurfural. It further describes its catalyst-free conversion to linear-chain thermoplastic polyurethanes as well as to cross-linked polyurethane foams. In addition, a novel strategy for the synthesis of polyurethane foams without the necessity of using water is developed. Nitrogen is utilized herein as blowing agent which is formed during Curtius rearrangement of a new furan based carboxylic azide into its corresponding diisocyanate. PMID:21842508

  19. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  20. High-pressure ruby and diamond fluorescence - Observations at 0.21 to 0.55 terapascal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J. A.; Mao, H. K.; Bell, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    A diamond-anvil, high-pressure apparatus was used to extend the upper pressure limit of static laboratory experiments. Shifts of the R1 strong fluorescent line of ruby were observed that correspond to static pressures of 0.21 to 0.55 terapascal (2.1 to 5.5 megabars) at 25 C. Sensitive spectroscopic techniques in the pressure range 0.15 to 0.28 terapascal were used to observe ruby and diamond fluorescence separately; these two fluorescent emissions overlap strongly at high pressures. At pressures greater than approximately 0.28 terapascal, the diamond fluorescence diminished and the ruby fluorescence reappeared strongly. Pressure was determined by extrapolation of the calibrated shift of the ruby R1 line.

  1. Highly mobile and reactive state of hydrogen in metal oxide semiconductors at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan Ping; He, Ke Feng; Wang, Yu; Chan, Helen Lai Wah; Yan, Zijie

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen in metal oxides usually strongly associates with a neighboring oxygen ion through an O-H bond and thus displays a high stability. Here we report a novel state of hydrogen with unusually high mobility and reactivity in metal oxides at room temperature. We show that freshly doped hydrogen in Nb₂O₅ and WO₃ polycrystals via electrochemical hydrogenation can reduce Cu²⁺ ions into Cu⁰ if the polycrystals are immersed in a CuSO₄ solution, while this would not happen if the hydrogenated polycrystals have been placed in air for several hours before the immersion. Time-dependent studies of electrochemically hydrogenated rutile single crystals reveal two distinct states of hydrogen: one as protons covalently bonded to oxygen ions, while the other one is highly unstable with a lifetime of just a few hours. Observation of this mobile and reactive state of hydrogen will provide new insight into numerous moderate and low temperature interactions between metal oxides and hydrogen.

  2. Highly mobile and reactive state of hydrogen in metal oxide semiconductors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wan Ping; He, Ke Feng; Wang, Yu; Chan, Helen Lai Wah; Yan, Zijie

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen in metal oxides usually strongly associates with a neighboring oxygen ion through an O-H bond and thus displays a high stability. Here we report a novel state of hydrogen with unusually high mobility and reactivity in metal oxides at room temperature. We show that freshly doped hydrogen in Nb2O5 and WO3 polycrystals via electrochemical hydrogenation can reduce Cu2+ ions into Cu0 if the polycrystals are immersed in a CuSO4 solution, while this would not happen if the hydrogenated polycrystals have been placed in air for several hours before the immersion. Time-dependent studies of electrochemically hydrogenated rutile single crystals reveal two distinct states of hydrogen: one as protons covalently bonded to oxygen ions, while the other one is highly unstable with a lifetime of just a few hours. Observation of this mobile and reactive state of hydrogen will provide new insight into numerous moderate and low temperature interactions between metal oxides and hydrogen.

  3. A CHANDRA SURVEY OF FLUORESCENCE Fe LINES IN X-RAY BINARIES AT HIGH RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Torrejon, J. M.; Schulz, N. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2010-06-01

    Fe K line fluorescence is commonly observed in the X-ray spectra of many X-ray binaries (XRBs) and represents a fundamental tool to investigate the material surrounding the X-ray source. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of 41 XRBs (10 HMXBs and 31 LMXBs) with Chandra with specific emphasis on the Fe K region and the narrow Fe K{alpha} line, at the highest resolution possible. We find that (1) the Fe K{alpha} line is always centered at {lambda} = 1.9387 {+-} 0.0016 A, compatible with Fe I up to Fe X; we detect no shifts to higher ionization states nor any difference between high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). (2) The line is very narrow, with FWHM {<=} 5 mA, normally not resolved by Chandra which means that the reprocessing material is not rotating at high speeds. (3) Fe K{alpha} fluorescence is present in all the HMXBs in the survey. In contrast, such emissions are astonishingly rare ({approx}10%) among LMXBs where only a few out of a large number showed Fe K fluorescence. However, the line and edge properties of these few are very similar to their high mass cousins. (4) The lack of Fe line emission is always accompanied by the lack of any detectable K edge. (5) We obtain the empirical curve of growth of the equivalent width of the Fe K{alpha} line versus the density column of the reprocessing material, i.e., EW{sub K{alpha}} versus N {sub H}, and show that it is consistent with a reprocessing region spherically distributed around the compact object. (6) We show that fluorescence in XRBs follows the X-ray Baldwin effect as previously only found in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei. We interpret this finding as evidence of decreasing neutral Fe abundance with increasing X-ray illumination and use it to explain some spectral states of Cyg X-1 as a possible cause of the lack of narrow Fe line emission in LMXBs. (7) Finally, we study anomalous morphologies such as Compton shoulders and asymmetric line profiles

  4. Observations of fluorescent aerosol-cloud interactions in the free troposphere at the Sphinx high Alpine research station, Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, I.; Lloyd, G.; Bower, K. N.; Connolly, P. J.; Flynn, M. J.; Kaye, P. H.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.

    2015-09-01

    The fluorescent nature of aerosol at a high Alpine site was studied using a wide-band integrated bioaerosol (WIBS-4) single particle multi-channel ultra violet-light induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectrometer. This was supported by comprehensive cloud microphysics and meteorological measurements with the aims of cataloguing concentrations of bio-fluorescent aerosols at this high altitude site and also investigating possible influences of UV-fluorescent particle types on cloud-aerosol processes. Analysis of background free tropospheric air masses, using a total aerosol inlet, showed there to be a minor but statistically insignificant increase in the fluorescent aerosol fraction during in-cloud cases compared to out of cloud cases. The size dependence of the fluorescent aerosol fraction showed the larger aerosol to be more likely to be fluorescent with 80 % of 10 μm particles being fluorescent. Whilst the fluorescent particles were in the minority (NFl/NAll = 0.27±0.19), a new hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis approach, Crawford et al. (2015) revealed the majority of the fluorescent aerosol were likely to be representative of fluorescent mineral dust. A minor episodic contribution from a cluster likely to be representative of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) was also observed with a wintertime baseline concentration of 0.1±0.4 L-1. Given the low concentration of this cluster and the typically low ice active fraction of studied PBAP (e.g. pseudomonas syringae) we suggest that the contribution to the observed ice crystal concentration at this location is not significant during the wintertime.

  5. A highly selective fluorescent probe for direct detection and isolation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Yogeswari; Kang, Nam-Young; Park, Sung-Jin; Alamudi, Samira Husen; Kim, Jun-Young; Sahu, Srikanta; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Vendrell, Marc; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell research has gathered immense attention in the past decade due to the remarkable ability of stem cells for self-renewal and tissue-specific differentiation. Despite having numerous advancements in stem cell isolation and manipulation techniques, there is a need for highly reliable probes for the specific detection of live stem cells. Herein we developed a new fluorescence probe (CDy9) with high selectivity for mouse embryonic stem cells. CDy9 allows the detection and isolation of intact stem cells with marginal impact on their function and capabilities. PMID:26115574

  6. Subjective and physiological reactivity to chocolate images in high and low chocolate cravers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, María Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    2005-09-01

    Cue-reactivity to chocolate images was assessed using self-report and physiological measures. From a pre-screening sample of 454, young women were selected and assigned to high and low chocolate craving groups (N = 36/group). The experimental procedure consisted in the elicitation and measurement of the cardiac defense and startle reflexes while viewing chocolate and standard affective images selected from the International Affective Picture System. In response to chocolate images, high cravers reported more pleasure and arousal but less control than low cravers. In high cravers, viewing chocolate images inhibited the cardiac defense but potentiated the startle reflex, as compared to low cravers. The results confirmed at the physiological level that the motivational state that underlies the experience of chocolate craving include both appetitive (inhibition of the defense reflex) and aversive (potentiation of the startle response) components. The findings supported a motivational conflict theory of chocolate craving. PMID:16038770

  7. Deposition of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings by pulsed high-current reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskomov, K. V.; Zakharov, A. N.; Rabotkin, S. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the results of investigation of properties of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings deposited by pulsed high-current magnetron reactive sputtering (discharge pulse voltage is 300-900 V, discharge pulse current is up to 200 A, pulse duration is 10-100 μs, and pulse repetition rate is 20-2000 Hz). It is shown that for a short sputtering pulse (25 μs) and a high discharge current (160 A), the films exhibit high hardness (66 GPa), wear resistance, better adhesion, and a lower sliding friction coefficient. The reason is an enhancement of ion bombardment of the growing coating due to higher plasma density in the substrate region (1013 cm-3) and a manifold increase in the degree of ionization of the plasma with increasing peak discharge current (mainly due to the material being sputtered).

  8. Dynamic Solvent Control of a Reaction in Ionic Deep Eutectic Solvents: Time-Resolved Fluorescence Measurements of Reactive and Nonreactive Dynamics in (Choline Chloride + Urea) Melts.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic fluorescence anisotropy and Stokes shift measurements of [f choline chloride + (1 - f) urea)] deep eutectic solvents at f = 0.33 and 0.40 have been carried out using a dipolar solute, coumarin 153 (C153), in the temperature range 298 ≤ T ≤ 333 K. Subsequently, measured time-dependent solvent response is utilized to investigate the dynamic solvent control on the measured rates of photoexcited intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) reactions of two molecules, 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) and 4-(1-pyrrolidinyl)benzonitrile (P5C), occurring in these media. Measured average reaction time scales (⟨τ(rxn)⟩) exhibit the following dependence on average solvation times scales (⟨τ(s)⟩): ⟨τ(rxn)⟩ ∝ ⟨τ(s)⟩(α) with α = 0.5 and 0.35 for P4C and P5C, respectively. Such a strong dynamic solvent control of ⟨τ(rxn)⟩, particularly for P4C, is different from earlier observations with these ICT molecules in conventional molecular solvents. Excitation wavelength-dependent fluorescence emissions of C153 and trans-2-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-benzothiazole (DMASBT), which differ widely in average fluorescence lifetimes (⟨τ(life)⟩), suggest the presence of substantial spatial heterogeneity in these systems. Dynamic heterogeneity is reflected via the following fractional viscosity (η) dependences of ⟨τ(s)⟩ and ⟨τ(r)⟩ (⟨τ(r)⟩ being solute's average rotation time): ⟨τx⟩ ∝ (η/T)(p) with 0.7 ≤ p ≤ 0.9. Different correlations between ⟨τ(s)⟩ and ⟨τ(r)⟩ emerge at different temperature regimes, indicating variable frictional coupling at low and high temperatures. Estimated dynamic Stokes shifts in these media vary between ∼1200 and ∼1600 cm(-1), more than 50% of which possess a time scale much faster than the temporal resolution (∼75 ps) employed in these measurements. Estimated activation energy for η is closer to that for ⟨τ(r)⟩ than that for ⟨τ(s)⟩, suggesting ⟨τ(s)⟩ being more decoupled

  9. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  10. A fluorescent hydrogel-based flow cytometry high-throughput screening platform for hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pitzler, Christian; Wirtz, Georgette; Vojcic, Ljubica; Hiltl, Stephanie; Böker, Alexander; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2014-12-18

    Screening throughput is a key in directed evolution experiments and enzyme discovery. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform based on a coupled reaction of glucose oxidase and a hydrolase (Yersinia mollaretii phytase [YmPh]). The coupled reaction produces hydroxyl radicals through Fenton's reaction, acting as initiator of poly(ethyleneglycol)-acrylate-based polymerization incorporating a fluorescent monomer. As a consequence, a fluorescent hydrogel is formed around Escherichia coli cells expressing active YmPh. We achieve five times enrichment of active cell population through flow cytometry analysis and sorting of mixed populations. Finally, we validate the performance of the fluorescent polymer shell (fur-shell) technology by directed phytase evolution that yielded improved variants starting from a library containing 10(7) phytase variants. Thus, fur-shell technology represents a rapid and nonlaborious way of identifying the most active variants from vast populations, as well as a platform for generation of polymer-hybrid cells for biobased interactive materials. PMID:25525992

  11. Fluorescent probe for high-throughput screening of membrane protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Backmark, A E; Olivier, N; Snijder, A; Gordon, E; Dekker, N; Ferguson, A D

    2013-01-01

    Screening of protein variants requires specific detection methods to assay protein levels and stability in crude mixtures. Many strategies apply fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to qualitatively monitor expression, stability, and monodispersity. However, GFP fusion proteins have several important disadvantages; including false-positives, protein aggregation after proteolytic removal of GFP, and reductions in protein yields without the GFP fusion. Here we describe a FSEC screening strategy based on a fluorescent multivalent NTA probe that interacts with polyhistidine-tags on target proteins. This method overcomes the limitations of GFP fusion proteins, and can be used to rank protein production based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. Domain boundaries of the human G-protein coupled adenosine A2a receptor were readily identified from crude detergent-extracts of a library of construct variants transiently produced in suspension-adapted HEK293-6E cells. Well expressing clones of MraY, an important bacterial infection target, could be identified from a library of 24 orthologs. This probe provides a highly sensitive tool to detect target proteins to expression levels down to 0.02 mg/L in crude lysate, and requires minimal amounts of cell culture. PMID:23776061

  12. A retrievable and highly selective fluorescent probe for monitoring sulfide and imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fengping; Huang, Liang; Xi, Pinxian; Cheng, Ju; Zhao, Xuefei; Xie, Guoqiang; Shi, Yanjun; Cheng, Fengjuan; Yao, Xiaojun; Bai, Decheng; Zeng, Zhengzhi

    2012-02-20

    A novel selective fluorescent chemosensor based on an 8-hydroxyquinoline-appended fluorescein derivative (L1) was synthesized and characterized. Once combined with Cu(2+), it displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induced the revival of fluoresecence of L1, which was quenched by Cu(2+), resulting in "off-on"-type sensing of sulfide anion. What's more, the sensor was retrievable to indicate sulfide anions with Cu(2+), and S(2-), in turn, increased. With the addition of Cu(2+), compound L1 could give rise to a visible pink-to-yellow color change and green fluorescence quenching. The resulting yellow solution could change to pink and regenerate to green fluorescence immediately upon the addition of sulfide anion; however, no changes were observed in the presence of other anions, including CN(-), P(2)O(7)(4-), and other forms of sulfate, making compound L1 an extremely selective and efficient sulfide chemosensor. The signal transduction occurs via reversible formation-separation of complex L1Cu and CuS. What's more, the biological imaging study has demonstrated that the chemosensor can detect sulfur anions in biological systems at a relatively low concentration. PMID:22303885

  13. Fluorescent water-soluble organic aerosols in the High Arctic atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Qin, Mingyue; Ren, Lujie; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Barrie, Leonard A.; Tachibana, Eri; Ding, Aijun; Yamashita, Youhei

    2015-01-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. They have been extensively studied in urban, rural and marine environments. However, little is known about the fluorescence properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or their transport to and distribution in the polar regions. Here, we present evidence that fluorescent WSOC is a substantial component of High Arctic aerosols. The ratios of fluorescence intensity of protein-like peak to humic-like peak generally increased from dark winter to early summer, indicating an enhanced contribution of protein-like organics from the ocean to Arctic aerosols after the polar sunrise. Such a seasonal pattern is in agreement with an increase of stable carbon isotope ratios of total carbon (δ13CTC) from −26.8‰ to −22.5‰. Our results suggest that Arctic aerosols are derived from a combination of the long-range transport of terrestrial organics and local sea-to-air emission of marine organics, with an estimated contribution from the latter of 8.7–77% (mean 45%). PMID:25920042

  14. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by highly reactive absorbent containing calcium hypochlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, P.Y.; Wang, L.D.

    2008-12-15

    Fly ash, industrial lime, and an additive (calcium hypochlorite )) were used to prepare a highly reactive absorbent. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried out in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors on the removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2} and NO were also investigated. Removal efficiencies of 94.5% for SO{sub 2} and 65.5% for NO were obtained under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen than sulfur species appeared in the spent absorbent. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe the microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The removal products of spent absorbent were analyzed using ion chromatography and chemical analysis. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  15. Development of a Highly Specific Fluorescence Immunoassay for Detection of Diisobutyl Phthalate in Edible Oil Samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiping; Wu, Panpan; Lai, Dan; Zheng, Shengwu; Chen, Yingshan; Eremin, Sergei A; Peng, Wei; Zhao, Suqing

    2015-10-28

    The diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) hapten containing an amino group was synthesized successfully, and the polyclonal antibody against 4-amino phthalate-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was developed. On the basis of the polyclonal antibody, a rapid and sensitive indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay (icFIA) has been established to detect DiBP in edible oil samples for the first time. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative working range of the icFIA was from 10.47 to 357.06 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.991), exhibiting a detection limit of 5.82 ng/mL. In this assay, the specific results showed that other similar phthalates did not significantly interfere with the analysis, with the cross-reactivity less than 1.5%, except for that of DiBAP. Thereafter, DiBP contamination in edible oil samples was detected by icFIA, with the recovery being from 79 to 103%. Furthermore, the reliability of icFIA was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Therefore, the developed icFIA is suitable for monitoring DiBP in some edible oil samples.

  16. Development of a Highly Specific Fluorescence Immunoassay for Detection of Diisobutyl Phthalate in Edible Oil Samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiping; Wu, Panpan; Lai, Dan; Zheng, Shengwu; Chen, Yingshan; Eremin, Sergei A; Peng, Wei; Zhao, Suqing

    2015-10-28

    The diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) hapten containing an amino group was synthesized successfully, and the polyclonal antibody against 4-amino phthalate-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was developed. On the basis of the polyclonal antibody, a rapid and sensitive indirect competitive fluorescence immunoassay (icFIA) has been established to detect DiBP in edible oil samples for the first time. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative working range of the icFIA was from 10.47 to 357.06 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.991), exhibiting a detection limit of 5.82 ng/mL. In this assay, the specific results showed that other similar phthalates did not significantly interfere with the analysis, with the cross-reactivity less than 1.5%, except for that of DiBAP. Thereafter, DiBP contamination in edible oil samples was detected by icFIA, with the recovery being from 79 to 103%. Furthermore, the reliability of icFIA was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Therefore, the developed icFIA is suitable for monitoring DiBP in some edible oil samples. PMID:26449794

  17. Smartphone-Based Fluorescent Diagnostic System for Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Choi, Kyunghan; Cuc, Bui Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Bao, Duong Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Le, Mai Quynh; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Thach, Nguyen Co; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yu, Kyoungsik; Park, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Field diagnostic tools for avian influenza (AI) are indispensable for the prevention and controlled management of highly pathogenic AI-related diseases. More accurate, faster and networked on-site monitoring is demanded to detect such AI viruses with high sensitivity as well as to maintain up-to-date information about their geographical transmission. In this work, we assessed the clinical and field-level performance of a smartphone-based fluorescent diagnostic device with an efficient reflective light collection module using a coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay. By application of an optimized bioconjugate, a smartphone-based diagnostic device had a two-fold higher detectability as compared to that of the table-top fluorescence strip reader for three different AI subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, and H9N2). Additionally, in a clinical study of H5N1-confirmed patients, the smartphone-based diagnostic device showed a sensitivity of 96.55% (28/29) [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.24 to 99.91] and a specificity of 98.55% (68/69) (95% CI: 92.19 to 99.96). The measurement results from the distributed individual smartphones were wirelessly transmitted via short messaging service and collected by a centralized database system for further information processing and data mining. Smartphone-based diagnosis provided highly sensitive measurement results for H5N1 detection within 15 minutes. Because of its high sensitivity, portability and automatic reporting feature, the proposed device will enable agile identification of patients and efficient control of AI dissemination. PMID:26877781

  18. Smartphone-Based Fluorescent Diagnostic System for Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Choi, Kyunghan; Cuc, Bui Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Bao, Duong Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Le, Mai Quynh; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Thach, Nguyen Co; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yu, Kyoungsik; Park, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Field diagnostic tools for avian influenza (AI) are indispensable for the prevention and controlled management of highly pathogenic AI-related diseases. More accurate, faster and networked on-site monitoring is demanded to detect such AI viruses with high sensitivity as well as to maintain up-to-date information about their geographical transmission. In this work, we assessed the clinical and field-level performance of a smartphone-based fluorescent diagnostic device with an efficient reflective light collection module using a coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay. By application of an optimized bioconjugate, a smartphone-based diagnostic device had a two-fold higher detectability as compared to that of the table-top fluorescence strip reader for three different AI subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, and H9N2). Additionally, in a clinical study of H5N1-confirmed patients, the smartphone-based diagnostic device showed a sensitivity of 96.55% (28/29) [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.24 to 99.91] and a specificity of 98.55% (68/69) (95% CI: 92.19 to 99.96). The measurement results from the distributed individual smartphones were wirelessly transmitted via short messaging service and collected by a centralized database system for further information processing and data mining. Smartphone-based diagnosis provided highly sensitive measurement results for H5N1 detection within 15 minutes. Because of its high sensitivity, portability and automatic reporting feature, the proposed device will enable agile identification of patients and efficient control of AI dissemination. PMID:26877781

  19. Smartphone-Based Fluorescent Diagnostic System for Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Choi, Kyunghan; Cuc, Bui Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Bao, Duong Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Le, Mai Quynh; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Thach, Nguyen Co; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yu, Kyoungsik; Park, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Field diagnostic tools for avian influenza (AI) are indispensable for the prevention and controlled management of highly pathogenic AI-related diseases. More accurate, faster and networked on-site monitoring is demanded to detect such AI viruses with high sensitivity as well as to maintain up-to-date information about their geographical transmission. In this work, we assessed the clinical and field-level performance of a smartphone-based fluorescent diagnostic device with an efficient reflective light collection module using a coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay. By application of an optimized bioconjugate, a smartphone-based diagnostic device had a two-fold higher detectability as compared to that of the table-top fluorescence strip reader for three different AI subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, and H9N2). Additionally, in a clinical study of H5N1-confirmed patients, the smartphone-based diagnostic device showed a sensitivity of 96.55% (28/29) [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.24 to 99.91] and a specificity of 98.55% (68/69) (95% CI: 92.19 to 99.96). The measurement results from the distributed individual smartphones were wirelessly transmitted via short messaging service and collected by a centralized database system for further information processing and data mining. Smartphone-based diagnosis provided highly sensitive measurement results for H5N1 detection within 15 minutes. Because of its high sensitivity, portability and automatic reporting feature, the proposed device will enable agile identification of patients and efficient control of AI dissemination.

  20. Highly sensitive detection of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue F.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Wodnicki, Pawel; Siadat-Pajouh, M.; Herman, Brian

    1995-04-01

    We have been interested in the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer and its diagnosis; to that end we have been developing microscopic imaging and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to genotype and quantitate the amount of HPV present at a single cell level in cervical PAP smears. However, we have found that low levels of HPV DNA are difficult to detect accurately because theoretically obtainable sensitivity is never achieved due to nonspecific autofluorescence, fixative induced fluorescence of cells and tissues, and autofluorescence of the optical components in the microscopic system. In addition, the absorption stains used for PAP smears are intensely autofluorescent. Autofluorescence is a rapidly decaying process with lifetimes in the range of 1-100 nsec, whereas phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence have lifetimes in the range of 1 microsecond(s) ec-10 msec. The ability to discriminate between specific fluorescence and autofluorescence in the time-domain has improved the sensitivity of diagnostic test such that they perform comparably to, or even more sensitive than radioisotopic assays. We have developed a novel time-resolved fluorescence microscope to improve the sensitivity of detection of specific molecules of interest in slide based specimens. This time-resolved fluorescence microscope is based on our recently developed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FILM) in conjunction with the use of long lifetime fluorescent labels. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the long lifetime probe (europium), we have demonstrated the utility of this technique for detection of HPV DNA in cervicovaginal cells. Our results indicate that the use of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes increases the sensitivity of detection by removing autofluorescence and will thus lead to improved early diagnosis of cervical cancer. Since the highly sensitive detection of DNA in clinical samples using

  1. A Dual Regime Reactive Transport Model for Simulation of High Level Waste Tank Closure Scenarios - 13375

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sohini; Kosson, David S.; Brown, Kevin; Garrabrants, Andrew C.; Meeussen, Hans; Van der Sloot, Hans

    2013-07-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented in this paper for estimating evolution of pH and release of major species from grout within high-level waste tanks after closure. This model was developed as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The reactive transport model consists of two parts - (1) transport of species, and (2) chemical reactions. The closure grout can be assumed to have varying extents of cracking and composition for performance assessment purposes. The partially or completely degraded grouted tank is idealized as a dual regime system comprising of a mobile region having solid materials with cracks and macro-pores, and an immobile/stagnant region having solid matrix with micropores. The transport profiles of the species are calculated by incorporating advection of species through the mobile region, diffusion of species through the immobile/stagnant region, and exchange of species between the mobile and immobile regions. A geochemical speciation code in conjunction with the pH dependent test data for a grout material is used to obtain a mineral set that best describes the trends in the test data of the major species. The dual regime reactive transport model predictions are compared with the release data from an up-flow column percolation test. The coupled model is then used to assess effects of crack state of the structure, rate and composition of the infiltrating water on the pH evolution at the grout-waste interface. The coupled reactive transport model developed in this work can be used as part of the performance assessment process for evaluating potential risks from leaching of a cracked tank containing elements of human health and environmental concern. (authors)

  2. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  3. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  4. Cardiovascular Reactivity in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder With High- or Low-Level Depressive Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Cardiovascular Reactivity to Laboratory-Induced Mental Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Yeh; Chiu, Chen-Huan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Su, Chien-Tien; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Depression increases the risk of adverse cardiac events. Cardiovascular reactivity is defined as the pattern of cardiovascular responses to mental stress. An altered pattern of cardiovascular reactivity is an indicator of subsequent cardiovascular disease. Because depression and adverse cardiac events may have a dose-dependent association, this study examined the differences in cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress between patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with high depression levels and those with low depression levels. Moreover, autonomic nervous system regulation is a highly plausible biological mechanism for the pattern of cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress. The association between cardiovascular reactivity and parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), an index for quantifying autonomic nervous system activity modulation, was thus examined. This study included 88 patients with MDD. HRV was measured before stress induction. The Stroop Color and Word Test and mirror star-tracing task were used to induce mental stress. We observed no significant association between depressive symptom level and any of the cardiovascular reactivity parameters. Cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress was comparable between patients with MDD with high-level depressive symptoms and those with low-level depressive symptoms. After adjusting for confounding variables, the high-frequency domain of HRV was found to be an independent predictor of the magnitude of heart rate reactivity (β = -.33, p = .002). In conclusion, the magnitude of cardiovascular reactivity may be independent of depression severity in patients with MDD. The autonomic regulation of cardiovascular responses to mental stress primarily influences heart rate reactivity in patients with MDD.

  5. A highly soluble, non-phototoxic, non-fluorescent blebbistatin derivative

    PubMed Central

    Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Képiró, Miklós; Horváth, István Ádám; Végner, László; Ráti, Szilvia; Zsigmond, Áron; Hegyi, György; Lenkei, Zsolt; Varga, Máté; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2016-01-01

    Blebbistatin is a commonly used molecular tool for the specific inhibition of various myosin II isoforms both in vitro and in vivo. Despite its popularity, the use of blebbistatin is hindered by its poor water-solubility (below 10 micromolar in aqueous buffer) and blue-light sensitivity, resulting in the photoconversion of the molecule, causing severe cellular phototoxicity in addition to its cytotoxicity. Furthermore, blebbistatin forms insoluble aggregates in water-based media above 10 micromolar with extremely high fluorescence and also high adherence to different types of surfaces, which biases its experimental usage. Here, we report a highly soluble (440 micromolar in aqueous buffer), non-fluorescent and photostable C15 amino-substituted derivative of blebbistatin, called para-aminoblebbistatin. Importantly, it is neither photo- nor cytotoxic, as demonstrated on HeLa cells and zebrafish embryos. Additionally, para-aminoblebbistatin bears similar myosin II inhibitory properties to blebbistatin or para-nitroblebbistatin (not to be confused with the C7 substituted nitroblebbistatin), tested on rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1 and on M2 and HeLa cells. Due to its drastically improved solubility and photochemical feature, as well as lack of photo- or cytotoxicity, para-aminoblebbistatin may become a feasible replacement for blebbistatin, especially at applications when high concentrations of the inhibitor or blue light irradiation is required. PMID:27241904

  6. High pressure sample cell for total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy at pressures up to 2500 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Juny; Czeslik, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) spectroscopy is a surface sensitive technique that is widely used to characterize the structure and dynamics of molecules at planar liquid-solid interfaces. In particular, biomolecular systems, such as protein adsorbates and lipid membranes can easily be studied by TIRF spectroscopy. Applying pressure to molecular systems offers access to all kinds of volume changes occurring during assembly of molecules, phase transitions, and chemical reactions. So far, most of these volume changes have been characterized in bulk solution, only. Here, we describe the design and performance of a high pressure sample cell that allows for TIRF spectroscopy under high pressures up to 2500 bar (2.5 × 108 Pa), in order to expand the understanding of volume effects from the bulk phase to liquid-solid interfaces. The new sample cell is based on a cylindrical body made of Nimonic 90 alloy and incorporates a pressure transmitting sample cuvette. This cuvette is composed of a fused silica prism and a flexible rubber gasket. It contains the sample solution and ensures a complete separation of the sample from the liquid pressure medium. The sample solution is in contact with the inner wall of the prism forming the interface under study, where fluorescent molecules are immobilized. In this way, the new high pressure TIRF sample cell is very useful for studying any biomolecular layer that can be deposited at a planar water-silica interface. As examples, high pressure TIRF data of adsorbed lysozyme and two phospholipid membranes are presented.

  7. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    PubMed

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting.

  8. A Highly Selective Ratiometric Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Human Cytochrome P450 1A.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zi-Ru; Ge, Guang-Bo; Feng, Lei; Ning, Jing; Hu, Liang-Hai; Jin, Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Lv, Xia; Dou, Tong-Yi; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2015-11-18

    Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), one of the most important phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans, plays a crucial role in the metabolic activation of procarcinogenic compounds to their ultimate carcinogens. Herein, we reported the development of a ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe NCMN that allowed for selective and sensitive detection of CYP1A for the first time. The probe was designed on the basis of substrate preference of CYP1A and its high capacity for O-dealkylation, while 1,8-naphthalimide was selected as fluorophore because of its two-photon absorption properties. To achieve a highly selective probe for CYP1A, a series of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives were synthesized and used to explore the potential structure-selectivity relationship, by using a panel of human CYP isoforms for selectivity screening. After screening and optimization, NCMN displayed the best combination of selectivity, sensitivity and ratiometric fluorescence response following CYP1A-catalyzed O-demetylation. Furthermore, the probe can be used to real-time monitor the enzyme activity of CYP1A in complex biological systems, and it has the potential for rapid screening of CYP1A modulators using tissue preparation as enzyme sources. NCMN has also been successfully used for two-photon imaging of intracellular CYP1A in living cells and tissues, and showed high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep-tissue imaging depth. In summary, a two-photon excited ratiometric fluorescent probe NCMN has been developed and well-characterized for sensitive and selective detection of CYP1A, which holds great promise for bioimaging of endogenous CYP1A in living cells and for further investigation on CYP1A associated biological functions in complex biological systems.

  9. High-Resolution, Noninvasive, Two-Photon Fluorescence Measurement of Molecular Concentrations in Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liping; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Xu, Lisen; MacRae, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To perform high-resolution, noninvasive, calibrated measurements of the concentrations and diffusion profiles of fluorescent molecules in the live cornea after topical application to the ocular surface. Methods. An 800-nm femtosecond laser was used to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPF) axial scanning measurements. Calibration solutions consisting of sodium fluorescein (Na-Fl; concentration range, 0.01%–2.5%) and riboflavin (concentration range, 0.0125%–0.1%) were tested in well slides, and TPF signals were assessed. Excised feline eyeballs preserved in corneal storage medium and with either intact or removed corneal epithelia were then treated with Na-Fl, riboflavin, or fluorescein dextran (Fl-d) of different molecular weight (MW) for 30 minutes. Calibrated TPF was then used immediately to measure the concentration of these molecules across the central corneal depth. Results. The axial resolution of our TPF system was 6 μm, and a linear relationship was observed between TPF signal and low concentrations of most fluorophores. Intact corneas treated with Na-Fl or riboflavin exhibited a detectable penetration depth of only approximately 20 μm, compared with approximately 400 to 600 μm when the epithelium was removed before fluorophore application. Peak concentrations for intact corneas were half those attained with epithelial removal. Debrided corneas treated with 2,000,000 MW Fl-d showed a half-maximum penetration depth of 156.7 μm compared with 384 μm for the 3,000 MW dextran. The peak concentration of the high MW dextran was one quarter that of the lower MW dextran. Conclusions. TPF is an effective, high-resolution, noninvasive method of quantifying the diffusion and concentration of fluorescent molecules across the cornea. PMID:21228379

  10. Trapping a Highly Reactive Nonheme Iron Intermediate That Oxygenates Strong C-H Bonds with Stereoretention.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Oloo, Williamson N; Acosta-Rueda, Laura; Meier, Katlyn K; Verdejo, Begoña; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2015-12-23

    An unprecedentedly reactive iron species (2) has been generated by reaction of excess peracetic acid with a mononuclear iron complex [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(PyNMe3)] (1) at cryogenic temperatures, and characterized spectroscopically. Compound 2 is kinetically competent for breaking strong C-H bonds of alkanes (BDE ≈ 100 kcal·mol(-1)) through a hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism, and the transformations proceed with stereoretention and regioselectively, responding to bond strength, as well as to steric and polar effects. Bimolecular reaction rates are at least an order of magnitude faster than those of the most reactive synthetic high-valent nonheme oxoiron species described to date. EPR studies in tandem with kinetic analysis show that the 490 nm chromophore of 2 is associated with two S = 1/2 species in rapid equilibrium. The minor component 2a (∼5% iron) has g-values at 2.20, 2.19, and 1.99 characteristic of a low-spin iron(III) center, and it is assigned as [Fe(III)(OOAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), also by comparison with the EPR parameters of the structurally characterized hydroxamate analogue [Fe(III)(tBuCON(H)O)(PyNMe3)](2+) (4). The major component 2b (∼40% iron, g-values = 2.07, 2.01, 1.95) has unusual EPR parameters, and it is proposed to be [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), where the O-O bond in 2a has been broken. Consistent with this assignment, 2b undergoes exchange of its acetate ligand with CD3CO2D and very rapidly reacts with olefins to produce the corresponding cis-1,2-hydroxoacetate product. Therefore, this work constitutes the first example where a synthetic nonheme iron species responsible for stereospecific and site selective C-H hydroxylation is spectroscopically trapped, and its catalytic reactivity against C-H bonds can be directly interrogated by kinetic methods. The accumulated evidence indicates that 2 consists mainly of an extraordinarily reactive [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+) (2b) species capable of hydroxylating unactivated alkyl C-H bonds with

  11. Trapping a Highly Reactive Nonheme Iron Intermediate That Oxygenates Strong C-H Bonds with Stereoretention.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Oloo, Williamson N; Acosta-Rueda, Laura; Meier, Katlyn K; Verdejo, Begoña; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2015-12-23

    An unprecedentedly reactive iron species (2) has been generated by reaction of excess peracetic acid with a mononuclear iron complex [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(PyNMe3)] (1) at cryogenic temperatures, and characterized spectroscopically. Compound 2 is kinetically competent for breaking strong C-H bonds of alkanes (BDE ≈ 100 kcal·mol(-1)) through a hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism, and the transformations proceed with stereoretention and regioselectively, responding to bond strength, as well as to steric and polar effects. Bimolecular reaction rates are at least an order of magnitude faster than those of the most reactive synthetic high-valent nonheme oxoiron species described to date. EPR studies in tandem with kinetic analysis show that the 490 nm chromophore of 2 is associated with two S = 1/2 species in rapid equilibrium. The minor component 2a (∼5% iron) has g-values at 2.20, 2.19, and 1.99 characteristic of a low-spin iron(III) center, and it is assigned as [Fe(III)(OOAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), also by comparison with the EPR parameters of the structurally characterized hydroxamate analogue [Fe(III)(tBuCON(H)O)(PyNMe3)](2+) (4). The major component 2b (∼40% iron, g-values = 2.07, 2.01, 1.95) has unusual EPR parameters, and it is proposed to be [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+), where the O-O bond in 2a has been broken. Consistent with this assignment, 2b undergoes exchange of its acetate ligand with CD3CO2D and very rapidly reacts with olefins to produce the corresponding cis-1,2-hydroxoacetate product. Therefore, this work constitutes the first example where a synthetic nonheme iron species responsible for stereospecific and site selective C-H hydroxylation is spectroscopically trapped, and its catalytic reactivity against C-H bonds can be directly interrogated by kinetic methods. The accumulated evidence indicates that 2 consists mainly of an extraordinarily reactive [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(PyNMe3)](2+) (2b) species capable of hydroxylating unactivated alkyl C-H bonds with

  12. Optical fibers for high-resolution in vivo microendoscopic fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Gyungseok; Chung, Euiheon; Yun, Seok H.

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber-based high-resolution fluorescence imaging techniques have promising applications in clinical practice and preclinical research using animals. Here we review the instrumentation and applications of microendoscopy based on various types of optical fibers. Single-mode fibers and double-clad fibers have been widely used for delivering light from light sources to tissues and collecting light from tissues to photodetectors. Coherent fiber bundles, cylindrical graded-index lenses, and multi-mode fibers have been employed in both beam-scanning and non-scanning microscopy. With continuing advances of optical fiber technologies, further innovations in optical microendoscopy are expected.

  13. Rapid construction of multisubstituted olefin structures using vinylboronate ester platform leading to highly fluorescent materials.

    PubMed

    Itami, Kenichiro; Tonogaki, Keisuke; Ohashi, Youichi; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2004-10-28

    [reaction: see text] A catalytic one-pot triarylation on the C=C core of vinylboronate pinacol ester (1) produces extended pi-systems based on a multisubstituted olefin structure very rapidly. We established an efficient protocol for the Pd-catalyzed double C-H arylation of 1 with aryl halides, which was successfully integrated with C-B arylation with aryl halides (cross-coupling) in one pot. By using this method, several highly fluorescent materials with a wide range of color variations (blue to red) were discovered.

  14. Synthesis, solubilization, and surface functionalization of highly fluorescent quantum dots for cellular targeting through a small molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Justin F.

    To achieve long-term fluorescence imaging with quantum dots (QDs), a CdSe core/shell must first be synthesized. The synthesis of bright CdSe QDs is not trivial and as a consequence, the role of surfactant in nucleation and growth was investigated. It was found that the type of surfactant used, either phosphonic or fatty acid, played a pivotal role in the size of the CdSe core. The study of surfactant on CdSe synthesis, ultimately led to an electrical passivation method that utilized a short-chained phosphonic acid and highly reactive organometallic precursors to achieve high quantum yield (QY) as has been previously described. The synthesis of QDs using organometallic precursors and a phosphonic acid for passivation resulted in 4 out of 9 batches of QDs achieving QYs greater than 50% and 8 out of 9 batches with QYs greater than 35%. The synthesis of CdSe QDs was done in organic solutions rendering the surface of the particle hydrophobic. To perform cell-targeting experiments, QDs must be transferred to water. The transfer of QDs to water was successfully accomplished by using single acyl chain lipids. A systematic study of different lipid combinations and coatings demonstrated that 20-40 mol% single acyl chained lipids were able to transfer QDs to water resulting in monodispersed, stable QDs without adversely affecting the QY. The advantage to water solubilization using single acyl chain lipids is that the QD have a hydrodynamic radius less than 15 nm, QYs that can exceed 50% and additional surface functionalization can be down using the reactive sites incorporated into the lipid bilayer. QDs that are bright and stable in water were studied for the purpose of targeting G protein-coupled Receptors (GPCR). GPCRs are transmembrane receptors that internalize extracellular cues, and thus mediate signal transduction. The cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Receptor 1 of the model organism Dictyostelium disodium was the receptor of interest. The Halo protein, a genetically

  15. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Särhammar, Erik Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  16. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control.

  17. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations of the initial stage of brown coal oxidation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guochao; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Kefeng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the detailed mechanisms for brown coal oxidation at high temperatures, a ReaxFF reactive forcefield was used to perform a series of molecular dynamics simulations from 1000 K to 2500 K. Analyses indicated that the chemical system tend to be more reactive with increasing temperature. It was found that the oxidation process of brown coal primarily initiates from hydrogen abstraction reactions by O2 and related oxygenated radicals from phenolic hydroxyl groups, methyl groups, especially carboxyl groups in lower temperature to form peroxygen species, or by either thermal decomposition of brown coal backbone in higher temperature. These peroxygen species usually could chemically adsorb on the C-centered radicals of brown coal backbone. The weak O-O bond in peroxygen makes them easier to break into oxygenated radical, which could also chemically adsorb on the C-centred radical to form hydroxyl group and other oxygenated compounds. In the oxidation process of brown coal, the decomposition and oxidation of aliphatic chain is easier than aromatic ring. The chemisorption of peroxygen radical induces the breakage of aromatic ring and accelerates the depth oxidation of brown coal. An increasing number of products are observed with increasing temperature.

  18. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer.

    PubMed

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control. PMID:27118531

  19. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer.

    PubMed

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-04-27

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control.

  20. Highly parameterized inversion of groundwater reactive transport for a complex field site.

    PubMed

    Carniato, Luca; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen; Sapion, Hans

    2015-02-01

    In this study a numerical groundwater reactive transport model of a shallow groundwater aquifer contaminated with volatile organic compounds is developed. In addition to advective-dispersive transport, the model includes contaminant release from source areas, natural attenuation, abiotic degradation by a permeable reactive barrier at the site, and dilution by infiltrating rain. Aquifer heterogeneity is parameterized using pilot points for hydraulic conductivity, specific yield and groundwater recharge. A methodology is developed and applied to estimate the large number of parameters from the limited data at the field site (groundwater levels, groundwater concentrations of multiple chemical species, point-scale measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity, and lab-scale derived information on chemical and biochemical reactions). The proposed methodology relies on pilot point parameterization of hydraulic parameters and groundwater recharge, a regularization procedure to reconcile the large number of spatially distributed model parameters with the limited field data, a step-wise approach for integrating the different data sets into the model, and high performance computing. The methodology was proven to be effective in reproducing multiple contaminant plumes and in reducing the prior parameter uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity and groundwater recharge. Our results further indicate that contaminant transport predictions are strongly affected by the choice of the groundwater recharge model and flow parameters should be identified using both head and concentration measurements.

  1. Highly sensitive SnO2 sensor via reactive laser-induced transfer

    PubMed Central

    Palla Papavlu, Alexandra; Mattle, Thomas; Temmel, Sandra; Lehmann, Ulrike; Hintennach, Andreas; Grisel, Alain; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Gas sensors based on tin oxide (SnO2) and palladium doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) active materials are fabricated by a laser printing method, i.e. reactive laser-induced forward transfer (rLIFT). Thin films from tin based metal-complex precursors are prepared by spin coating and then laser transferred with high resolution onto sensor structures. The devices fabricated by rLIFT exhibit low ppm sensitivity towards ethanol and methane as well as good stability with respect to air, moisture, and time. Promising results are obtained by applying rLIFT to transfer metal-complex precursors onto uncoated commercial gas sensors. We could show that rLIFT onto commercial sensors is possible if the sensor structures are reinforced prior to printing. The rLIFT fabricated sensors show up to 4 times higher sensitivities then the commercial sensors (with inkjet printed SnO2). In addition, the selectivity towards CH4 of the Pd:SnO2 sensors is significantly enhanced compared to the pure SnO2 sensors. Our results indicate that the reactive laser transfer technique applied here represents an important technical step for the realization of improved gas detection systems with wide-ranging applications in environmental and health monitoring control. PMID:27118531

  2. Highly parameterized inversion of groundwater reactive transport for a complex field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, Luca; Schoups, Gerrit; van de Giesen, Nick; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen; Sapion, Hans

    2015-02-01

    In this study a numerical groundwater reactive transport model of a shallow groundwater aquifer contaminated with volatile organic compounds is developed. In addition to advective-dispersive transport, the model includes contaminant release from source areas, natural attenuation, abiotic degradation by a permeable reactive barrier at the site, and dilution by infiltrating rain. Aquifer heterogeneity is parameterized using pilot points for hydraulic conductivity, specific yield and groundwater recharge. A methodology is developed and applied to estimate the large number of parameters from the limited data at the field site (groundwater levels, groundwater concentrations of multiple chemical species, point-scale measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity, and lab-scale derived information on chemical and biochemical reactions). The proposed methodology relies on pilot point parameterization of hydraulic parameters and groundwater recharge, a regularization procedure to reconcile the large number of spatially distributed model parameters with the limited field data, a step-wise approach for integrating the different data sets into the model, and high performance computing. The methodology was proven to be effective in reproducing multiple contaminant plumes and in reducing the prior parameter uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity and groundwater recharge. Our results further indicate that contaminant transport predictions are strongly affected by the choice of the groundwater recharge model and flow parameters should be identified using both head and concentration measurements.

  3. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: An alternative to mercury based UVC lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Masoud, N. M.; Murnick, D. E.

    2013-12-15

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers.

  4. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: an alternative to mercury based UVC lamps.

    PubMed

    Masoud, N M; Murnick, D E

    2013-12-01

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers.

  5. Detecting single graphene layer by using fluorescence from high-speed Ar^7+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    A highly-charged-ion interacting with graphite causes structural change in nano-scales [1]. While when the ion's kinetic energy reaches few MeVs, the induced is not the structural change but electronic excitation. An experiment [2] showed fluorescence from Ar^7+ ions penetrating through carbon foil with kinetic energy of 2 MeV. Motivated by this experiment, we tested interaction between an Ar^7+ ion and a graphene sheet by the time-dependent density functional approach, and found that the electronic excitation in the Ar^ 7+ ion is also the case even when the incident kinetic energy is 500 KeV and the target thickness is only mono-atomic layer. This simulation suggests the possibility of detecting a suspended mono-atomic layer of graphene [3] by monitoring fluorescence from the penetrated Ar^7+ ions. We will discuss its importance for analyzing bombardment of solids by highly charged, high-speed ions and possible experiments according to the present result. References: [1] T. Meguro, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 79, 3866 (2001). [2] S. Bashkin, H. Oona, E. Veje, Phys, Rev. A25, 417 (1982). [3] J. Mayer et al., Nature (London), 446, 60 (2007).

  6. Varicella-zoster reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation without routine prophylaxis--the incidence remains high.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Ola; Fjaertoft, Gustav; Winiarski, Jacek; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas; Remberger, Mats

    2014-10-01

    One-year prophylaxis with acyclovir has been shown to effectively prevent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in a cohort that underwent transplantation in the beginning of the 2000s. Transplantation procedures have since changed considerably and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is nowadays common. We investigated VZV reactivation without routine prophylaxis in a cohort of HSCT patients, 50% of whom had received RIC. The cumulative 2-year incidence of VZV reactivation was 20.7%. Risk factors in a multivariate analysis were treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (relative hazard [RH], 1.65; confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 2.54; P = .02), total body irradiation ≥6 Gy (RH, 1.55; CI, 1.14 to 2.13; P = .006), engraftment later than day 16 (RH, 1.46; CI, 1.07 to 2.00; P = .02), and age 0 to 19 years (RH, 1.68; CI, 1.21 to 2.35; P = .002). There was no difference in VZV reactivation between patients receiving myeloablative conditioning or RIC. VZV-related complications occurred in 29% of the patients with reactivation; most common were disseminated disease and postherpetic neuralgia. No single low-risk group for VZV reactivation could be identified. We conclude that VZV reactivation remains common after HSCT and carries a high complication rate, warranting prophylaxis.

  7. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-06

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly

  8. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  9. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Wan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Seo, Sung-Min; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA), and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL) for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold) compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold) by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm) for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody. PMID:27171097

  10. A gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence sensor for high sensitive and selective detection of thiols in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Yu, Hui; Hu, Yue; Chen, Mingzhong; Shao, Shijun

    2016-01-15

    A novel gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based sensor for detecting thiols in aqueous solution has been developed. Due to the weak N···Au interactions, meso-(4-pyridinyl)-substituted BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene) dyes were coordinated to AuNP surfaces, which effectively quenched the fluorescence of organic/inorganic hybrid systems. The fluorescent quenching mechanism was mainly ascribed to the highly efficient fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) and the inner filter effect. In the presence of thiols, meso-(4-pyridinyl)-substituted BODIPY chromophore were displaced and released from the AuNP surfaces and thus restored the fluorescence of BODIPY chromophore. The modulation of the fluorescence quenching efficiency of BODIPY–AuNPs in the presence of thiols can achieve a large turn-on fluorescence enhancement (40-fold) in aqueous solution. The new AuNP-based fluorescence sensor displayed desired properties such as high specificity, relatively low detection limit (30 nM for Cys), appreciable water solubility and rapid response time (within 2 min for Cys/Hcy). Moreover, the sensor has been successfully applied for monitoring and imaging of intracellular thiols within living HeLa cells. PMID:26278044

  11. Fluorescence Quenching Nanoprobes Dedicated to In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging and High-Efficient Tumor Therapy in Deep-Seated Tissue.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huan; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-06-10

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photoacoustic (PA) therapy have promising applications for treating tumors. It is known that the utilization of high-absorption-coefficient probes can selectively enhance the PAI target contrast and PA tumor therapy efficiency in deep-seated tissue. Here, the design of a probe with the highest availability of optical-thermo conversion by using graphene oxide (GO) and dyes via π-π stacking interactions is reported. The GO serves as a base material for loading dyes and quenching dye fluorescence via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), with the one purpose of maximum of PA efficiency. Experiments verify that the designed fluorescence quenching nanoprobes can produce stronger PA signals than the sum of the separate signals generated in the dye and the GO. Potential applications of the fluorescence quenching nanoprobes are demonstrated, dedicating to enhance PA contrast of targets in deep-seated tissues and tumors in living mice. PA therapy efficiency both in vitro and in vivo by using the fluorescence quenching nanoprobes is found to be higher than with the commonly used PA therapy agents. Taken together, quenching dye fluorescence via FRET will provide a valid means for developing high-efficiency PA probes. Fluorescence quenching nanoprobes are likely to become a promising candidate for deep-seated tumor imaging and therapy.

  12. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Wan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Seo, Sung-Min; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA), and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL) for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold) compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold) by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm) for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody.

  13. Application of a high-resolution x-ray fluorescence analyzer.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Attenkofer, K.; Experimental Facilities Division

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a high resolution x-ray fluorescence analyzer based on the principle of active optics. It combines a resolution of ca. 5 eV with a tunability over several keV and a wide solid-angle coverage (ca. 2 by 5 degrees). To date, this analyzer has been used in near-edge spectroscopy of gallium in GaAs, and for the detection and chemical speciation of trace amounts platinum in soot from an diesel engine. The latter application illustrates the use of the analyzer to enhance the signal-to-background ratio in trace-element x-ray fluorescence analysis. The analyzer is shown schematically in Fig. 1. In it, a strip of silicon is bent by an axial force from two pushers at its ends, and eight correctors act from above to bring the shape of the bent crystal to approximate a logarithmic spiral. A more detailed description of the device, its underlying theory, and adjustment procedures may be found elsewhere. The sample consisted of soot collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine burning a fuel with a platinum-based additive that was tested for the purpose of facilitating clean combustion. The concentration of platinum in the soot was about 100 ppm, and the chemical speciation (oxidation state, dispersed or in the form of nanoparticles, etc.) was unknown. A small speck of this soot containing 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} atoms was placed into the x-ray beam of the 11-ID-D station of the APS. The incident photon energy was scanned over the Pt L{sub 3} edge, and the Pt L{sub {alpha}1} fluorescence was detected using two silicon drift detectors (Vortex), one directly and one with the analyzer. The purpose of the analyzer in this application was to enhance the energy resolution by a factor of about 50 (250 eV for the drift detector, 5 eV for the analyzer), and thus reduce the background of elastically or Compton-scattered photons, while keeping the fluorescent line. Whereas the detector with the analyzer recorded a clear signature of platinum in the form of an absorption

  14. A flavone-based turn-on fluorescent probe for intracellular cysteine/homocysteine sensing with high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lv, Yanlin; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Hui; Liu, Rongji; Zhao, Yongsheng; Zhang, Guangjin; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of flavone-based fluorescent probe (DMAF) capable of cysteine (Cys)/homocysteine (Hcy) sensing with high selectivity over other amino acids was developed. Such type of probe undergoes Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction with the involvement of its aldehyde group, which suppresses of the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process of the probe molecule and consequently leads to the enhancement of fluorescence emission upon excitation using visible light. The formation of product of the Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction was confirmed and the preliminary fluorescence imaging experiments revealed the biocompatibility of the as-prepared probe and validated its practicability for intracellular Cys/Hcy sensing.

  15. A flavone-based turn-on fluorescent probe for intracellular cysteine/homocysteine sensing with high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lv, Yanlin; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Hui; Liu, Rongji; Zhao, Yongsheng; Zhang, Guangjin; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of flavone-based fluorescent probe (DMAF) capable of cysteine (Cys)/homocysteine (Hcy) sensing with high selectivity over other amino acids was developed. Such type of probe undergoes Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction with the involvement of its aldehyde group, which suppresses of the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process of the probe molecule and consequently leads to the enhancement of fluorescence emission upon excitation using visible light. The formation of product of the Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction was confirmed and the preliminary fluorescence imaging experiments revealed the biocompatibility of the as-prepared probe and validated its practicability for intracellular Cys/Hcy sensing. PMID:26695232

  16. Development of a Sensitive Bioluminogenic Probe for Imaging Highly Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Takakura, Hideo; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive bioluminogenic probe for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), SO3 H-APL, was developed based on the concept of dual control of bioluminescence emission by means of bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer (BioLeT) and modulation of cell-membrane permeability. This probe enables non-invasive visualization of physiologically relevant amounts of hROS generated deep inside the body of living rats for the first time. It is expected to serve as a practical analytical tool for investigating a wide range of biological functions of hROS in vivo. The design concept should be applicable to other in vivo bioluminogenic probes. PMID:26474404

  17. High-temperature thermal degradation of polyethylene from reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Moore, Nathan W.

    Thermal degradation of polyethylene is studied under extremely high-rate temperature ramp rates from 1014 to 1010 K/s in isochoric, condensed phases. The molecular evolution and macroscopic state variables are extracted as a function of density from reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF potential. These results are used to parameterize a kinetic rate model for the dissociation and coalescence of hydrocarbons as a function of temperature, temperature ramp rate, and density. The results are contrasted to first-order random-scission macrokinetic models often assumed for pyrolysis of linear polyethylene under ambient conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  18. Novel fluorescently labeled peptide compounds for detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein at high specificity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yamanaka, Hikaru; Oe, Keitaro; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    The probes for specific detection of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in plasma and in atherosclerotic plaques are expected to be useful for the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for atherosclerosis. In this study, to develop a fluorescent peptide probe for specific detection of ox-LDL, we investigated the interaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled peptides with ox-LDL using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two heptapeptides (KWYKDGD and KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the N-terminus to FITC in the presence/absence of 6-amino-n-caproic acid (AC) linker to FITC--(FITC-AC)KP6 and (FITC)KP6--both bound with high specificity to ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, a tetrapeptide (YKDG) labeled with FITC at the N-terminus and a pentapeptide (YKDGK) coupled through the ε-amino group of K at the C-terminus to FITC did not bind selectively to ox-LDL. Furthermore, (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 bound with high specificity to the protein in mouse plasma (probably ox-LDL fraction). These findings strongly suggest that (FITC)KP6 and (FITC-AC)KP6 may be effective novel fluorescent probes for specific detection of ox-LDL.

  19. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17812.001 PMID:27436096

  20. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as tool for high-content-screening in yeast (HCS-FCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Christopher; Huff, Joseph; Marshall, Will; Yu, Elden Qingfeng; Unruh, Jay; Slaughter, Brian; Wiegraebe, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    To measure protein interactions, diffusion properties, and local concentrations in single cells, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a well-established and widely accepted method. However, measurements can take a long time and are laborious. Therefore investigations are typically limited to tens or a few hundred cells. We developed an automated system to overcome these limitations and make FCS available for High Content Screening (HCS). We acquired data in an auto-correlation screen of more than 4000 of the 6000 proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tagged with eGFP and expanded the HCS to use cross-correlation between eGFP and mCherry tagged proteins to screen for molecular interactions. We performed all high-content FCS screens (HCS-FCS) in a 96 well plate format. The system is based on an extended Carl Zeiss fluorescence correlation spectrometer ConfoCor 3 attached to a confocal microscope LSM 510. We developed image-processing software to control these hardware components. The confocal microscope obtained overview images and we developed an algorithm to search for and detect single cells. At each cell, we positioned a laser beam at a well-defined point and recorded the fluctuation signal. We used automatic scoring of the signal for quality control. All data was stored and organized in a database based on the open source Open Microscopy Environment (OME) platform. To analyze the data we used the image processing language IDL and the open source statistical software package R.

  1. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  2. A highly sensitive ratiometric fluorescent probe for the detection of cytoplasmic and nuclear hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ying; Liu, Keyin; Yang, Huiran; Li, Yi; Lan, Haichuang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xinyu; Yi, Tao

    2014-10-01

    As a marker for oxidative stress and a second messenger in signal transduction, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role in living systems. It is thus critical to monitor the changes in H2O2 in cells and tissues. Here, we developed a highly sensitive and versatile ratiometric H2O2 fluorescent probe (NP1) based on 1,8-naphthalimide and boric acid ester. In response to H2O2, the ratio of its fluorescent intensities at 555 and 403 nm changed 1020-fold within 200 min. The detecting limit of NP1 toward H2O2 is estimated as 0.17 μM. It was capable of imaging endogenous H2O2 generated in live RAW 264.7 macrophages as a cellular inflammation response, and especially, it was able to detect H2O2 produced as a signaling molecule in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells through stimulation by epidermal growth factor. This probe contains an azide group and thus has the potential to be linked to various molecules via the click reaction. After binding to a Nuclear Localization Signal peptide, the peptide-based combination probe (pep-NP1) was successfully targeted to nuclei and was capable of ratiometrically detecting nuclear H2O2 in living cells. These results indicated that NP1 was a highly sensitive ratiometric H2O2 dye with promising biological applications.

  3. Monochromatic multicomponent fluorescence sedimentation velocity for the study of high-affinity protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Fu, Yan; Glasser, Carla; Andrade Alba, Eric J; Mayer, Mark L; Patterson, George; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multi-protein complexes underlies fundamental processes in cell biology. A mechanistic understanding of assemblies requires accurate measurement of their stoichiometry, affinity and cooperativity, and frequently consideration of multiple co-existing complexes. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with fluorescence detection (FDS-SV) allows the characterization of protein complexes free in solution with high size resolution, at concentrations in the nanomolar and picomolar range. Here, we extend the capabilities of FDS-SV with a single excitation wavelength from single-component to multi-component detection using photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (psFPs). We exploit their characteristic quantum yield of photo-switching to imprint spatio-temporal modulations onto the sedimentation signal that reveal different psFP-tagged protein components in the mixture. This novel approach facilitates studies of heterogeneous multi-protein complexes at orders of magnitude lower concentrations and for higher-affinity systems than previously possible. Using this technique we studied high-affinity interactions between the amino-terminal domains of GluA2 and GluA3 AMPA receptors. PMID:27436096

  4. Genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity amplifies effects of early-life adversity.

    PubMed

    McIlwrick, Silja; Rechenberg, Alexandra; Matthes, Mariana; Burgstaller, Jessica; Schwarzbauer, Thomas; Chen, Alon; Touma, Chadi

    2016-08-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the experience of early-life adversity are both well-established risk factors for the development of affective disorders, such as major depression. However, little is known about the interaction of these two factors in shaping endophenotypes of the disease. Here, we studied the gene-environment interaction of a genetic predisposition for HPA axis dysregulation with early-life stress (ELS), assessing the short-, as well as the long-lasting consequences on emotional behavior, neuroendocrine functions and gene expression profiles. Three mouse lines, selectively bred for either high (HR), intermediate (IR), or low (LR) HPA axis reactivity, were exposed to one week of ELS using the limited nesting and bedding material paradigm. Measurements collected during or shortly after the ELS period showed that, regardless of genetic background, ELS exposure led to impaired weight gain and altered the animals' coping behavior under stressful conditions. However, only HR mice additionally showed significant changes in neuroendocrine stress responsiveness at a young age. Accordingly, adult HR mice also showed lasting consequences of ELS, including hyperactive stress-coping, HPA axis hyperreactivity, and gene expression changes in the Crh system, as well as downregulation of Fkbp5 in relevant brain regions. We suggest that the genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity interacts with ELS exposure by disturbing the suppression of corticosterone release during a critical period of brain development, thus exerting lasting programming effects on the HPA axis, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. In concert, these changes lead to the emergence of important endophenotypes associated with affective disorders. PMID:27179233

  5. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of five assay methods for vancomycin: bioassay, high-pressure liquid chromatography, fluorescence polarization immunoassay, radioimmunoassay, and fluorescence immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Krogstad, D J; Granich, G G; Murray, P R

    1984-01-01

    We compared the precision and accuracy of five methods used to measure the concentration of vancomycin in serum: bioassay, high-pressure liquid chromatography, fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA [TDX; Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.]), radioimmunoassay (RIA), and fluorescence immunoassay. Based on an analysis of seven standards and of 106 patient samples, all five methods were accurate, and four (bioassay, high-pressure liquid chromatography, FPIA, and RIA) were also precise. The FPIA was the most precise and the fluorescence immunoassay was the least precise of the methods tested; intrarun coefficients of variation for these two methods were 0.9 to 3.0% versus 8.9 to 14.5%, and interrun coefficients of variation were 2.8 to 8.1% versus 12.2 to 16.2%, respectively. The RIA was inconvenient because it required an extra dilution of the specimen being tested and an additional (64 micrograms/ml) vancomycin standard for specimens with 32 to 64 micrograms of vancomycin per ml. Based on its rapid turnaround time and the stability of its standard curve, we believe that the FPIA is the best method currently available to quantitate vancomycin in the clinical laboratory. PMID:6386852

  7. Improved Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometer Prototype for High Sensitivity Detection of Rare Circulating Cells In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Noah Benjamin

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of pre-clinical and clinical biomedical research, for example, in the study of cancer metastasis or the immune response following tissue and organ transplants. Normally this is done "ex-vivo" by drawing and purifying a small volume of blood and then analyzing it with flow cytometry, hemocytometry or microfludic devices, but the sensitivity of these techniques are poor and the process of handling samples has been shown to affect cell viability and behavior. More recently "in vivo flow cytometry" (IVFC) techniques have been developed where fluorescently-labeled cells flowing in a small blood vessel in the ear or retina are analyzed, but the sensitivity is generally poor due to the small sampling volume. To address this, our group recently developed a method known as "Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry" (DFFC) that allows detection and counting of rare circulating cells with diffuse photons, offering extremely high single cell counting sensitivity. In this thesis, an improved DFFC prototype was designed and validated. The chief improvements were three-fold, i) improved optical collection efficiency, ii) improved detection electronics, and iii) development of a method to mitigate motion artifacts during in vivo measurements. In combination, these improvements yielded an overall instrument detection sensitivity better than 1 cell/mL in vivo, which is the most sensitive IVFC system reported to date. Second, development and validation of a low-cost microfluidic device reader for analysis of ocular fluids is described. We demonstrate that this device has equivalent or better sensitivity and accuracy compared a fluorescence microscope, but at an order-of-magnitude reduced cost with simplified operation. Future improvements to both instruments are also discussed.

  8. Deriving chlorophyll fluorescence emissions of vegetation canopies from high resolution field reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Daughtry, Craig S.; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Butcher, L. Maryn

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) peaks centered at 685 nm and 735 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops and small tree plots of three deciduous species (red maple, tulip poplar, sweet gum). Leaf level measurements were also made of foliage which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) contents). As part of ongoing experiments, measurements were made on N application plots within corn (280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N/ha) and tree (0, 37.5, 75, 112.5, 150 kg N /ha) sites at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrow- band regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red SIF ratio (SIFratio) derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment ratios altered by N application rates in both corn crops. This ratio was also positively correlated to the C/N ratio at leaf and canopy levels, for the available corn data (e.g., 2004). No consistent N treatment or species differences in SIF were detected in the tree foliage, but additional 2005 data are forthcoming. This study has relevance to future passive satellite remote sensing approaches to monitoring C dynamics from space.

  9. Ultra-high-speed pumping of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) for high-speed laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöholm, Johan; Kristensson, Elias; Richter, Mattias; Aldén, Marcus; Göritz, Guido; Knebel, Kai

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of pumping an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with an ultra-high repetition rate multi:YAG laser system, producing a burst of up to eight high-energy pulses, has been investigated. For this investigation an OPO with a bandwidth around 5 cm-1, together with a frequency doubling crystal, was selected. In some laser-induced fluorescence measurements the large linewidth from the OPO can be advantageous as several lines can be excited simultaneously avoiding the saturation effects of individual lines. The energy output from the OPO as a function of pulse separation was measured down to pulse separations of 400 ns and was found to be completely independent of the pulse separation. The efficiency of the OPO unit, when optimized for single-pulse operation, was measured to be around 25% for all pulses, giving over 80 mJ at 585 nm output when pumped with ~350 mJ at 355 nm. This is similar to the specified efficiency for the OPO. The system was found to give a slightly lower efficiency when double pulsing the Nd:YAG lasers. This is attributed to a somewhat elongated pulse length from the Nd:YAG lasers giving a lower pump energy density. The system was applied for measuring high-speed planar laser-induced fluorescence images of OH radicals in a Bunsen burner.

  10. X-ray Methods in High-Intensity Discharges and Metal-Halide Lamps: X-ray Induced Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, John J.; Lapatovich, Walter P.; Henins, Albert

    2011-12-09

    We describe the use of x-ray induced fluorescence to study metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps and to measure equilibrium vapor pressures of metal-halide salts. The physical principles of metal-halide lamps, relevant aspects of x-ray-atom interactions, the experimental method using synchrotron radiation, and x-ray induced fluorescence measurements relevant to metal-halide lamps are covered.

  11. Saturated fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in laminar high-pressure flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Campbell D.; King, Galen B.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) for OH concentration measurements in high pressure flames was studied theoretically and experimentally. Using a numerical model describing the interaction of hydroxyl with nonuniform laser excitation, the effect of pressure on the validity of the balanced cross-rate model was studied along with the sensitivity of the depopulation of the laser-coupled levels to the ratio of rate coefficients describing: (1) electronic quenching to (sup 2) Sigma (+) (v double prime greater than 0), and (2) vibrational relaxation from v double prime greater than 0 to v double prime = 0. At sufficiently high pressures and near-saturated conditions, the total population of the laser-coupled levels reaches an asymptotic value, which is insensitive to the degree of saturation. When the ratio of electronic quenching to vibrational relaxation is small and the rate of coefficients for rotational transfer in the ground and excited electronic states are nearly the same, the balanced cross-rate model remains a good approximation for all pressures. When the above ratio is large, depopulation of the laser-coupled levels becomes significant at high pressures, and thus the balanced cross-rate model no longer holds. Under these conditions, however, knowledge of the depletion of the laser-coupled levels can be used to correct the model. A combustion facility for operation up to 20 atm was developed to allow LSF measurements of OH in high pressure flames. Using this facility, partial saturation in laminar high pressure (less than or equal to 12.3 atm) C2H6/O2/N2 flames was achieved. To evaluate the limits of the balanced cross-rate model, absorption and calibrated LSF measurements at 3.1 and 6.1 atm were compared. The fluorescence voltages were calibrated with absorption measurements in an atmospheric flame and corrected for their finite sensitivity to quenching with: (1) estimated quenching rate coefficients, and (2) an in situ measurement from a

  12. Coumarin-based 'turn-off' fluorescent chemosensor with high selectivity for Cu2+ in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Jun; Qi, De-Qiang; You, Jin-Zong; Hu, Fei-Fei; Bian, Jia-Ying; Yang, Chun-Xia; Huang, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Coumarin-based "turn-off" fluorescent chemosensor, 3-acetoacetyl-7-diethylaminocoumarin (1), has been synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, 1H NMR and X-ray crystal structure analysis. The fluorescence behaviors in the presence of various metal ions were investigated in aqueous media. 1 Exhibits highly selective and sensitive absorbance and fluorescence sensing ability for Cu2+ over other metal ions. Addition of Cu2+ to the aqueous solution of 1 gave rise to obvious absorbance change and fluorescence quenching. Other competing ions, such as Mg2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, induced negligible absorbance and fluorescence changes under the same conditions. The job's plot showed that the stoichiometry between 1 and Cu2+ was estimated to be 1:1. The fluorescence intensity varied almost linearly vs. the concentration of Cu2+ (1.0-7.0 μM), and the detection limit of Cu2+ was estimated to be 1.81 nM, indicating that 1 can be used as "turn-off" fluorescent chemosensor to selectively detect Cu2+ in aqueous solution.

  13. Highly selective fluorescent chemosensor for detection of Fe3+ based on Fe3O4@ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingshuai; Wang, Qi; Guo, Zhankui; Ma, Hongmin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bing; Bin, Du; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The combination of fluorescent nanoparticles and specific molecular probes appears to be a promising strategy for developing fluorescent nanoprobes. In this work, L-cysteine (L-Cys) capped Fe3O4@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized for the highly selective detection of Fe3+. The proposed nanoprobe shows excellent fluorescent property and high selectivity for Fe3+ due to the binding affinity of L-Cys with Fe3+. The binding of Fe3+ to the nanoprobe induces an apparent decrease of the fluorescence. Thus a highly selective fluorescent chemosensor for Fe3+ was proposed based on Fe3O4@ZnO nanoprobe. The magnetism of the nanoprobe enables the facile separation of bound Fe3+ from the sample solution with an external magnetic field, which effectively reduces the interference of matrix. The detection limit was 3 nmol L−1 with a rapid response time of less than 1 min. The proposed method was applied to detect Fe3+ in both serum and wastewater samples with acceptable performance. All above features indicated that the proposed fluorescent probe as sensing platform held great potential in applications of biological and analytical field. PMID:27000972

  14. Highly Stable Near-Infrared Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles with a Large Stokes Shift for Noninvasive Long-Term Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Rui; Zhu, Zelin; Adachi, Chihaya; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles based on small molecules have been regarded as promising candidates for bioimaging in recent years. In this study, we report a highly stable near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent organic nanoprobes based on nanoparticles of an anthraquinone derivate with strong aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics and a large Stokes shift (>175 nm). These endow the nanoprobe with high fluorescent brightness and high signal-to-noise ratio. On the other hand, the nanoprobe also shows low cytotoxicity, good stability over a wide pH range, superior resistance against photodegradation and photobleaching comparing to typical commercial fluorescent organic dyes such as fluorescein sodium. Endowed with such merits in term of optical performance, biocompatibility, and stability, the nanoprobe is demonstrated to be an ideal fluorescent probe for noninvasive long-term cellular tracing and imaging applications. As an example, it is shown that strong red fluorescence from the nanoprobe can still be clearly observed in A549 human lung cancer cells after incubation for six generations over 15 days.

  15. Consensus and future directions on the definition of high on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Bonello, Laurent; Tantry, Udaya S; Marcucci, Rossella; Blindt, Ruediger; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Becker, Richard; Bhatt, Deepak L; Cattaneo, Marco; Collet, Jean Philippe; Cuisset, Thomas; Gachet, Christian; Montalescot, Gilles; Jennings, Lisa K; Kereiakes, Dean; Sibbing, Dirk; Trenk, Dietmar; Van Werkum, Jochem W; Paganelli, Franck; Price, Matthew J; Waksman, Ron; Gurbel, Paul A

    2010-09-14

    The addition of clopidogrel to aspirin treatment reduces ischemic events in a wide range of patients with cardiovascular disease. However, recurrent ischemic event occurrence during dual antiplatelet therapy, including stent thrombosis, remains a major concern. Platelet function measurements during clopidogrel treatment demonstrated a variable and overall modest level of P2Y(12) inhibition. High on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was observed in selected patients. Multiple studies have now demonstrated a clear association between high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP measured by multiple methods and adverse clinical event occurrence. However, the routine measurement of platelet reactivity has not been widely implemented and recommended in the guidelines. Reasons for the latter include: 1) a lack of consensus on the optimal method to quantify high on-treatment platelet reactivity and the cutoff value associated with clinical risk; and 2) limited data to support that alteration of therapy based on platelet function measurements actually improves outcomes. This review provides a consensus opinion on the definition of high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP based on various methods reported in the literature and proposes how this measurement may be used in the future care of patients.

  16. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  17. Fluorescence techniques as suitable methods to discriminate wheat genotypes under drought and high-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balota, Maria; Sowinska, Malgorzata; Buschmann, Claus; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.; Heisel, Francine; Babani, Fardbardha

    1999-05-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fo and Fd/Fs (equals Rfd690), related to the quantum conversion capacity at dark-adapted and light-adapted state of the photosynthetic apparatus respectively, have been evaluated as possible indicators of drought and heat tolerance in winter wheat. The measurements were carried out on primary leaves of 8-day old seedlings. Rfd values decreased in 8 days by 20% (p less than or equal to 0.01) only under severe water limitation and for the drought susceptible genotype. The photosynthetic apparatus was more sensitive to high temperature with both ratios, Fv/Fo and Rfd690, showing mean decrease (p less than or equal to 0.001) of 27% and 43%, respectively, in 5 days at 35 degrees Celsius. The susceptible cultivars decreased of up to 42% and 65% and the drought and heat tolerant genotypes only 7% and 12% for Fv/Fo and Rfd690, respectively. The Fv/Fo ratio correlated well (p less than or equal to 0.05 and p less than or equal to 0.01) with seedling responses to oxidative and osmotic stresses. The Rfd690-values correlated better with all physiological parameters considered and with the deviations from linear regression of drought susceptibility index DSI (r equals -0.84, p less than or equal to 0.01) on yield potential showing the highest potential to predict drought and heat tolerance. In addition the blue, green, red and far-red fluorescence have been determined using a laser-induced-fluorescence imaging system in entire seedlings of wheat and triticale grown under optimal laboratory conditions. The ratios F690/F740 and F440/F520 correlated well (p less than or equal to 0.05) with the total chlorophyll content (detected by the SPAD-chlorophyll-meter) and the specific leaf dry weight (SLDW) showing the potential of the both fluorescence ratios to discriminate genetic differences between cultivars for these leaf structural sources of water use efficiency (WUE) improvement.

  18. Determination of vancomycin in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Abu-Shandi, Khalid Hamad

    2009-09-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection for the quantification of vancomycin in human plasma was developed and validated. The method includes an extraction of vancomycin by deproteinization with acetonitrile. The analyses were carried out at 258 nm as the emission wavelength while exciting at 225 nm on a reversed-phase column (30 cm x 4 mm i.d. x 10 microm Waters Associates microBondapak C18) using a mobile phase composed of methanol and phosphate buffer at pH 6.3. Vancomycin was quantitatively recovered from human plasma samples (>96%) with high values of precision. The separation was completed within 27 min. The calibration curve was linear over the range from 5 to 1,000 ng/mL with the detection and quantification limits of 2 ng/mL and 5 ng/mL, respectively. This method is suitable for the routine assay of plasma samples.

  19. Highly efficient electroluminescence from a solution-processable thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Shosei; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kaji, Hironori; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-11-02

    We developed a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter, 2,4,6-tris(4-(9,9-dimethylacridan-10-yl)phenyl)-1,3,5-triazine (3ACR-TRZ), suitable for use in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). When doped into 4,4′-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) host at 16 wt. %, 3ACR-TRZ showed a high photoluminescence quantum yield of 98%. Transient photoluminescence decay measurements of the 16 wt. % 3ACR-TRZ:CBP film confirmed that 3ACR-TRZ exhibits efficient TADF with a triplet-to-light conversion efficiency of 96%. This high conversion efficiency makes 3ACR-TRZ attractive as an emitting dopant in OLEDs. Using 3ACR-TRZ as an emitter, we fabricated a solution-processed OLED exhibiting a maximum external quantum efficiency of 18.6%.

  20. Ultrasensitive and High-Throughput Fluorescence Analysis of Droplet Contents with Orthogonal Line Confocal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Gavin D.M.; Lorenz, Robert M.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple modification to traditional confocal fluorescence detection that greatly improves signal-to-noise (S/N) for the high-speed analysis of droplet streams. Rather than using the conventional epi geometry, illumination of the droplet was in the form of a line that is orthogonal to both the direction of flow and the light-collection objective. In contrast to the epi geometry where we observed high levels of scattering background from the droplets, we detected more than 10-fold less background (depending on the laser power used) when orthogonal-line-confocal illumination was used. We characterized this improvement using a standard microfluidic platform over a range of analyte concentrations, and observed an improvement in limits of detection of greater than 10. Using this method, we were able to analyze pico-molar concentrations of analytes contained within picoliter-volume droplets at a rate of greater than 350 droplets per second. PMID:21062029

  1. Detection of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers with a single-pixel fluorescence telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Malacari, M.; Bertaina, M.; Casolino, M.; Dawson, B.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Jiang, J.; Mandat, D.; Matalon, A.; Matthews, J. N.; Motloch, P.; Palatka, M.; Pech, M.; Privitera, P.; Schovanek, P.; Takizawa, Y.; Thomas, S. B.; Travnicek, P.; Yamazaki, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Telescopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report first results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photomultiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment. The FAST prototype took data for 19 nights, demonstrating remarkable operational stability. We detected laser shots at distances of several kilometers as well as 16 highly significant UHECR shower candidates.

  2. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo; Yoshimura, Shinji; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  3. Highly CO2 sensitive extruded fluorescent plastic indicator film based on HPTS.

    PubMed

    Mills, Andrew; Yusufu, Dilidaer

    2016-02-01

    Highly-sensitive optical fluorescent extruded plastic films are reported for the detection of gaseous and dissolved CO2. The pH-sensitive fluorescent dye used is 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS, PTS(-)) coated on the surface of hydrophilic fumed silica and the base is tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH). The above components are used to create an HPTS pigment (i.e. HPTS/SiO2/TBAH) with a high CO2 sensitivity (%CO2 (S = 1/2) = 0.16%) and fast 50% response (t50↓) = 2 s and recovery (t50↑) = 5 s times. Highly CO2-sensitive plastic films are then fabricated, via the extrusion of the HPTS pigment powder in low-density polyethylene (LDPE). As with the HPTS-pigment, the luminescence intensity (at 515 nm) and absorbance (at 475 nm) of the HPTS plastic film decreases as the %CO2 in the ambient gas phase increases. The HPTS plastic film exhibits a high CO2 sensitivity, %CO2 (S = 1/2), of 0.29%, but a response time <2 min and recovery time <40 min, which is slower than that of the HPTS pigment. The HPTS plastic film is very stable under ambient conditions, (with a shelf life >six month when stored in the dark but under otherwise ambient conditions). Moreover, the HPTS-LDPE film is stable in water, salt solution and even in acid (pH = 2), and in each of these media it can be used to detect dissolved CO2.

  4. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  5. High performance magnesium anode in paper-based microfluidic battery, powering on-chip fluorescence assay

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Youngmi; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-01-01

    A high power density and long-lasting stable/disposable magnesium battery anode was explored for a paper-based fluidic battery to power on-chip functions of various Point of Care (POC) devices. The single galvanic cell with magnesium foil anode and silver foil cathode in Origami cellulose chip provided open circuit potential, 2.2 V, and power density, 3.0 mW/cm2. A paper-based fluidic galvanic cell was operated with one drop of water (80 μl) and continued to run until it was dry. To prove the concept about powering on-chip POC devices, two-serial galvanic cells are developed and incorporated with a UV-light emitting diode (λ = 365 nm) and fluorescence assay for alkaline phosphatase reaction. Further, detection using smart phones was performed for quantitative measurement of fluorescent density. To conclude, a magnesium-based fluidic battery paper chip was extremely low-cost, required minute sample volumes, was easy to dispose of, light weight, easy to stack, store and transport, easy to fabricate, scalable, and has faster analysis times. PMID:25332741

  6. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary A; Tolstykh, Gleb P; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-09-23

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1-43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz-500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition rates impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd(3+)), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. PMID:27553279

  7. Highly stable antibacterial silver nanoparticles as selective fluorescent sensor for Fe³⁺ ions.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Bharat A; Vyas, Disha J; Bhatt, Keyur D; Jain, Vinod K; Agrawal, Yadvendra K

    2015-01-01

    Calix[4]resorcinarene polyhydrazide (CPH) protected water dispersible fluorescent silver nanaoparticles (AgNps) were prepared by one-pot method using water soluble CPH and AgNO₃. (CPH) bearing hydrazide group on its periphery acts as a reducing agent and its web type of structure as a stabilizing agent for the formation of calix protected silver nanoparticles (CPH-AgNps). CPH-AgNps were found to be highly stable over 120 days at room temperature and at varied pH. CPH-AgNps were characterized by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Duly characterized nanoparticles were explored for their application as sensitive and selective fluorescent chemosensors for various metal ions. It was found that nanoparticles were selective and sensitive only for Fe(3+) ions with the linear range of detection from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. CPH-AgNps were also found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity when compared with standard Chloramphenicol. The selectivity and antimicrobial activity of CPH-AgNps suggests its potential use as a sensor for Fe(III) ions in ecosystems prone to industrial pollution and as an antimicrobial agent in biological applications.

  8. Fluorescent-Protein Stabilization and High-Resolution Imaging of Cleared, Intact Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Martin K.; Scherbarth, Annemarie; Sprengel, Rolf; Engelhardt, Johann; Theer, Patrick; Giese, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain. PMID:25993380

  9. Highly stable antibacterial silver nanoparticles as selective fluorescent sensor for Fe3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Bharat A.; Vyas, Disha J.; Bhatt, Keyur D.; Jain, Vinod K.; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Calix[4]resorcinarene polyhydrazide (CPH) protected water dispersible fluorescent silver nanaoparticles (AgNps) were prepared by one-pot method using water soluble CPH and AgNO3. (CPH) bearing hydrazide group on its periphery acts as a reducing agent and its web type of structure as a stabilizing agent for the formation of calix protected silver nanoparticles (CPH-AgNps). CPH-AgNps were found to be highly stable over 120 days at room temperature and at varied pH. CPH-AgNps were characterized by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Duly characterized nanoparticles were explored for their application as sensitive and selective fluorescent chemosensors for various metal ions. It was found that nanoparticles were selective and sensitive only for Fe3+ ions with the linear range of detection from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. CPH-AgNps were also found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity when compared with standard Chloramphenicol. The selectivity and antimicrobial activity of CPH-AgNps suggests its potential use as a sensor for Fe(III) ions in ecosystems prone to industrial pollution and as an antimicrobial agent in biological applications.

  10. [Determination of peroxides in environmental samples by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinrong; Chen, Zhongming

    2005-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was developed for the determination of hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in environmental samples, and the method has been applied to peroxides detection in urban air and rain samples. The analytical sensitivity was improved. Post-column derivatization involved the oxidation of peroxides to a fluorescent dimer using p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, a reaction catalyzed by hemin. The optimal excitation wavelength was 315 nm, while the emission wavelength was 400 nm. The temperature of the reaction coil was controlled at about 30 degrees C. Based on the ratio of signal to noise of 3, the detection limits were 4.0 x 10(-9) mol/L for hydroperoxide (H2O2), 4.1 x 10(-8) mol/L for methylhydroperoxide (MHP) and 6.7 x 10(-8) mol/L for ethylhydroperoxide (EHP) for aqueous samples. While the corresponding detection limits were 2.4 ng/m3 for H2O2, 35.2 ng/m3 for MHP, and 74.4 ng/m3 for EHP for air samples. Air samples were collected by Horibe cold trap at the temperature of about -90 degrees C. The results show that H2O2, hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), MHP, and EHP were the major peroxides in air, and that peroxyacetic acid (PAA) was occasionally detected. In rain samples, the two major peroxides were H2O2 and HMHP.

  11. Strategy for high recovery of fluorescence from quencher assembled quantum-dot donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2014-05-01

    We fabricated 1.4 nm nanogold and molecular dark quencher assembled quantum dot for estimating their performances in a target specific conformal changing molecular event. For the assembling, we immobilized each acceptor linked molecular beacons using interaction between biotin at molecular beacon and streptavidins on quantum dot. Through optical analysis of the purified hybrids of the acceptors and quantum dots, we could estimate numbers of the assembled acceptors per quantum dot and their efficiency of energy transfer depending on conformal changes of molecular beacons. We obtained maximum 95 % and 78% of energy transfer efficiency with 17 metallic nanocrystals and 41 black hole quencher 2, the molecular dark quencher per single quantum dote, respectively. Molecular beacons form linear helix from a hair-pin structure by hybridizing with complementary DNA. In the presence of target DNA, energy transfer efficiency of the organic quencher was 22 % while only 2 % decreased efficiency was obtained with the nanogold, indicating higher fluorescence recovery with the ordinary organic quencher. Considering the relatively low assembled number and the large size, a steric hindrance might be attributed to the low fluorescence recovery. Since the energy transfer efficiency obtained with the nanogold at a fixed distance is high enough, it would be still effective to apply nanogold a system, where nanogold is removed permanently from quantum dots.

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Gibson, Emily; Razzaghi, Hamid

    2009-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as the ``good cholesterol'', carries free cholesterol to the liver to be filtered from the bloodstream and is important to our understanding of atherosclerosis. HDL is metabolized in part by the enzyme Endothelial Lipase (EL). With this project we will use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the metabolism of HDL by EL comparing wild type with different genetic mutations. FCS is an advanced microscopy technique in which we record fluctuations in the fluorescence of dye-labeled molecules (in this case, HDL labeled with Nile Red) as they freely diffuse through a small focal volume. This data can be analyzed mathematically using the cross-correlation function, from which we can ultimately ascertain much information. In our case, we are interested in the diffusion coefficient which, via the Stokes-Einstein relation for a sphere, we can determine the size of HDL as it undergoes the process of metabolism. Preliminary results seem to indicate that the metabolic process occurs very quickly, that the final size of HDL depends primarily on the concentration of EL, and that the wild and mutant variants of EL have a similar effectiveness. In following experiments, we hope to investigate these relationships further.

  13. Development of a High Output Fluorescent Light Module for the Commercial Plant Biotechnology Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Zhou, Wei-Jia; Doty, Laura (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To maximize the use of available resources provided onboard the International Space Station, the development of an efficient lighting 1 system is critical to the overall performance of the CPBF. Not only is it important to efficiently generate photon energy, but thermal loads on the CPBF Temperature and Humidity Control System must be minimized. By utilizing optical coatings designed to produce highly diffuse reflectance in the visible wavelengths while minimizing reflectance in the infrared region, the design of the fluorescent light module for the CPBF is optimized for maximum photon flux, spatial uniformity and energy efficiency. Since the Fluorescent Light Module must be fully enclosed to meet (ISS) requirements for containment of particulates and toxic materials, heat removal from the lights presented some unique design challenges. By using the Express Rack moderate C, temperature-cooling loop, heat is rejected by means of a liquid/air coolant manifold. Heat transfer to the manifold is performed by conduction using copper fins, by forced air convection using miniature fans, and by radiation using optically selective coatings that absorb in the infrared wavelengths. Using this combination of heat transfer mechanisms builds in redundancy to prevent thermal build up and premature bulb failure.

  14. High Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Cancers Using Lanthanide Ion-Doped Upconverting Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, Rafik; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Bogdan, Nicoleta; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; de la Cruz, Maria del Carmen Iglesias; de la Fuente, Ángeles Juarranz; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Jaque, Daniel; Solé, José García; Capobianco, John A.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade inorganic luminescent nanoparticles that emit visible light under near infrared (NIR) excitation (in the biological window) have played a relevant role for high resolution imaging of cancer. Indeed, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles, mostly gold nanorods (GNRs), are already commercially available for this purpose. In this work we review the role which is being played by a relatively new class of nanoparticles, based on lanthanide ion doped nanocrystals, to target and image cancer cells using upconversion fluorescence microscopy. These nanoparticles are insulating nanocrystals that are usually doped with small percentages of two different rare earth (lanthanide) ions: The excited donor ions (usually Yb3+ ion) that absorb the NIR excitation and the acceptor ions (usually Er3+, Ho3+ or Tm3+), that are responsible for the emitted visible (or also near infrared) radiation. The higher conversion efficiency of these nanoparticles in respect to those based on QDs and GNRs, as well as the almost independent excitation/emission properties from the particle size, make them particularly promising for fluorescence imaging. The different approaches of these novel nanoparticles devoted to “in vitro” and “in vivo” cancer imaging, selective targeting and treatment are examined in this review. PMID:24213500

  15. Highly sensitive immunoassay of protein molecules based on single nanoparticle fluorescence detection in a nanowell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Lakshmana, Sudheendra; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2011-03-01

    A nanoarray based-single molecule detection system was developed for detecting proteins with extremely high sensitivity. The nanoarray was able to effectively trap nanoparticles conjugated with biological sample into nanowells by integrating with an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES). The nanoarray/EPES is superior to other biosensor using immunoassays in terms of saving the amounts of biological solution and enhancing kinetics of antibody binding due to reduced steric hindrance from the neighboring biological molecules. The nanoarray patterned onto a layer of PMMA and LOL on conductive and transparent indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass slide by using e-beam lithography. The suspension of 500 nm-fluorescent (green emission)-carboxylated polystyrene (PS) particles coated with protein-A followed by BDE 47 polyclonal antibody was added to the chip that was connected to the positive voltage. The droplet was covered by another ITO-coated-glass slide and connected to a ground terminal. After trapping the particles into the nanowells, the solution of different concentrations of anti-rabbit- IgG labeled with Alexa 532 was added for an immunoassay. A single molecule detection system could quantify the anti-rabbit IgG down to atto-mole level by counting photons emitted from the fluorescent dye bound to a single nanoparticle in a nanowell.

  16. High performance magnesium anode in paper-based microfluidic battery, powering on-chip fluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Koo, Youngmi; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2014-09-01

    A high power density and long-lasting stable/disposable magnesium battery anode was explored for a paper-based fluidic battery to power on-chip functions of various Point of Care (POC) devices. The single galvanic cell with magnesium foil anode and silver foil cathode in Origami cellulose chip provided open circuit potential, 2.2 V, and power density, 3.0 mW/cm(2). A paper-based fluidic galvanic cell was operated with one drop of water (80 μl) and continued to run until it was dry. To prove the concept about powering on-chip POC devices, two-serial galvanic cells are developed and incorporated with a UV-light emitting diode (λ = 365 nm) and fluorescence assay for alkaline phosphatase reaction. Further, detection using smart phones was performed for quantitative measurement of fluorescent density. To conclude, a magnesium-based fluidic battery paper chip was extremely low-cost, required minute sample volumes, was easy to dispose of, light weight, easy to stack, store and transport, easy to fabricate, scalable, and has faster analysis times.

  17. Highly efficient electrochemical generation of fluorescent intramolecular charge-transfer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapturkiewicz, Andrzej; Herbich, Jerzy; Nowacki, Jacek

    1997-08-01

    The electrochemically generated chemiluminescence of 4-(3,6-di-tert-butylcarbazol-9-yl)-benzonitrile (CBP) and 3,6-di-tert-butylcarbazol-9-yl- terephthalonitrile (CTO) was studied using the triple-potential-step method. In the electrogenerated emission spectra the charge-transfer (CT) bands (the same as in photoluminescence) were observed. The Feldberg plot analysis indicates that the 1,3CT states are formed directly by the electron transfer between the radical anion and cation. High emission efficiencies (0.027 for CBP and 0.011 for CTO) were found with population yields of the fluorescent state markedly different for both compounds (0.066 for CBP and unusually large, 0.64 for CTO). Evidence is also presented that at low temperatures the efficiency of the fluorescent state formation (for CTO) is still higher, approaching unity. This finding is interpreted in terms of the different electronic structure of the lowest excited triplet states of the two compounds.

  18. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth. PMID:27133204

  19. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity Following Acclimatization to High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W; Duffin, James; Lovering, Andrew T; Roach, Robert C; Kayser, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv) responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL), upon ascent (ALT1) and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16) to 5260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95 vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P = 0.024) and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5%/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P = 0.026) to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177, 95% CI [139, 215], P < 0.001; slope: 10.3%/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P = 0.003) compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P = 0.982), while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P = 0.001 vs. SL), indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude.

  20. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity Following Acclimatization to High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Duffin, James; Lovering, Andrew T.; Roach, Robert C.; Kayser, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv) responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL), upon ascent (ALT1) and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16) to 5260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95 vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P = 0.024) and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5%/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P = 0.026) to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177, 95% CI [139, 215], P < 0.001; slope: 10.3%/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P = 0.003) compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P = 0.982), while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P = 0.001 vs. SL), indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:26779030

  1. High-frequency behavior of FeN thin films fabricated by using reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae-Jong; Lee, Joonsik; Kim, Ki Hyeon; Kim, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We used ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and its relationship with the static magnetic properties to investigate the high-frequency behavior of FeN thin films prepared by using reactive sputtering. The FMR was observed in the frequency range from 2 to 18 GHz in the FeN films fabricated at a proper nitrogen flow rate (NFR). In those FeN thin films, a decrease in the saturation magnetization and a corresponding decrease of the FMR frequency were observed as the NFR was increased during the deposition. The external field dependences of the FMR frequencies fit the Kittel formula well, and the Landé g-factors determined from the fit were found to be very close to the free electron value. The high-field damping parameters were almost insensitive to the NFR. However, the lowfield damping parameters exhibited a high sensitivity to the NFR very similar to the dependence of the hard-axis coercivity on the NFR, suggesting that extrinsic material properties, such as impurities and defect structures, could be important in deciding the low-field damping behavior.

  2. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Isailovic, Dragan

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  3. A new hydroxynaphthyl benzothiazole derived fluorescent probe for highly selective and sensitive Cu2 + detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lijun; He, Ping; Zhong, Keli; Hou, Shuhua; Bian, Yanjiang

    2016-12-01

    A new reactive probe, 1-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)naphthalen-2-yl-picolinate (BTNP), was designed and synthesized. BTNP acts as a highly selective probe to Cu2 + in DMSO/H2O (7/3, v/v, Tris-HCl 10 mM, pH = 7.4) solution based on Cu2 + catalyzed hydrolysis of the picolinate ester moiety in BTNP, which leads to the formation of an ESIPT active product with dual wavelength emission enhancement. The probe also possesses the advantages of simple synthesis, rapid response and high sensitivity. The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant was calculated to be 0.205 min- 1. Moreover, application of BTNP to Cu2 + detection in living cells and real water samples was also explored.

  4. High-Level Incorporation of Silver in Gold Nanoclusters: Fluorescence Redshift upon Interaction with Hydrogen Peroxide and Fluorescence Enhancement with Herbicide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijian; Cai, Yongqing; Liu, Shuhua; Yu, Haidong; Bai, Shiqiang; Cheng, Yuan; Tang, Tao; Bharathi, M S; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-01-26

    High-level incorporation of Ag in Au nanoclusters (NCs) is conveniently achieved by controlling the concentration of Ag(+) in the synthesis of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-protected Au NCs, and the resulting structure is determined to be bimetallic Ag28 Au10-BSA NCs through a series of characterizations including energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, together with density functional theory simulations. Interestingly, the Ag28 Au10 NCs exhibit a significant fluorescence redshift rather than quenching upon interaction with hydrogen peroxide, providing a new approach to the detection of hydrogen peroxide through direct comparison of their fluorescence peaks. Furthermore, the Ag28 Au10 NCs are also used for the sensitive and selective detection of herbicide through fluorescence enhancement. The detection limit for herbicide (0.1 nm) is far below the health value established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; such sensitive detection was not achieved by using AuAg NCs with low-level incorporation of Ag or by using the individual metal NCs. PMID:26692116

  5. Blueberry intervention improves vascular reactivity and lowers blood pressure in high-fat-, high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Ishisaka, Akari; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Terao, Junji

    2013-05-28

    Growing evidence suggests that intake of flavonoid-containing foods may exert cardiovascular benefits in human subjects. We have investigated the effects of a 10-week blueberry (BB) supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and vascular reactivity in rats fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, known to induce endothelial dysfunction. Rats were randomly assigned to follow a control chow diet, a chow diet supplemented with 2 % (w/w) BB, a high-fat diet (10 % lard; 0·5 % cholesterol) or the high fat plus BB for 10 weeks. Rats supplemented with BB showed significant reductions in systolic BP (SBP) of 11 and 14 %, at weeks 8 and 10, respectively, relative to rats fed the control chow diet (week 8 SBP: 107·5 (SEM 4·7) v. 122·2 (SEM 2·1) mmHg, P= 0·018; week 10 SBP: 115·0 (SEM 3·1) v. 132·7 (SEM 1·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Furthermore, SBP was reduced by 14 % in rats fed with the high fat plus 2 % BB diet at week 10, compared to those on the high-fat diet only (SBP: 118·2 (SEM 3·6) v. 139·5 (SEM 4·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Aortas harvested from BB-fed animals exhibited significantly reduced contractile responses (to L-phenylephrine) compared to those fed the control chow or high-fat diets. Furthermore, in rats fed with high fat supplemented with BB, aorta relaxation was significantly greater in response to acetylcholine compared to animals fed with the fat diet. These data suggest that BB consumption can lower BP and improve endothelial dysfunction induced by a high fat, high cholesterol containing diet. PMID:23046999

  6. High precision during food recruitment of experienced (reactivated) foragers in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Nieh, James C.; Hénaut, Yann; Cruz, Leopoldo; Vandame, Rémy

    Several studies have examined the existence of recruitment communication mechanisms in stingless bees. However, the spatial accuracy of location-specific recruitment has not been examined. Moreover, the location-specific recruitment of reactivated foragers, i.e., foragers that have previously experienced the same food source at a different location and time, has not been explicitly examined. However, such foragers may also play a significant role in colony foraging, particularly in small colonies. Here we report that reactivated Scaptotrigona mexicana foragers can recruit with high precision to a specific food location. The recruitment precision of reactivated foragers was evaluated by placing control feeders to the left and the right of the training feeder (direction-precision tests) and between the nest and the training feeder and beyond it (distance-precision tests). Reactivated foragers arrived at the correct location with high precision: 98.44% arrived at the training feeder in the direction trials (five-feeder fan-shaped array, accuracy of at least +/-6° of azimuth at 50 m from the nest), and 88.62% arrived at the training feeder in the distance trials (five-feeder linear array, accuracy of at least +/-5 m or +/-10% at 50 m from the nest). Thus, S. mexicana reactivated foragers can find the indicated food source at a specific distance and direction with high precision, higher than that shown by honeybees, Apis mellifera, which do not communicate food location at such close distances to the nest.

  7. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  8. Shock compression response of highly reactive Ni + Al multilayered thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean C.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-03-01

    The shock-compression response of Ni + Al multilayered thin foils is investigated using laser-accelerated thin-foil plate-impact experiments over the pressure range of 2 to 11 GPa. The foils contain alternating Ni and Al layers (parallel but not flat) of nominally 50 nm bilayer spacing. The goal is to determine the equation of state and shock-induced reactivity of these highly reactive fully dense thin-foil materials. The laser-accelerated thin-foil impact set-up involved combined use of photon-doppler-velocimetry to monitor the acceleration and impact velocity of an aluminum flyer, and VISAR interferometry was used to monitor the back free-surface velocity of the impacted Ni + Al multilayered target. The shock-compression response of the Ni + Al target foils was determined using experimentally measured parameters and impedance matching approach, with error bars identified considering systematic and experimental errors. Meso-scale CTH shock simulations were performed using real imported microstructures of the cross-sections of the multilayered Ni + Al foils to compute the Hugoniot response (assuming no reaction) for correlation with their experimentally determined equation of state. It was observed that at particle velocities below ˜150 m/s, the experimentally determined equation of state trend matches the CTH-predicted inert response and is consistent with the observed unreacted state of the recovered Ni + Al target foils from this velocity regime. At higher particle velocities, the experimentally determined equation of state deviates from the CTH-predicted inert response. A complete and self-sustained reaction is also seen in targets recovered from experiments performed at these higher particle velocities. The deviation in the measured equation of state, to higher shock speeds and expanded volumes, combined with the observation of complete reaction in the recovered multilayered foils, confirmed via microstructure characterization, is indicative of the occurrence

  9. Effect of planar dielectric interfaces on fluorescence emission and detection. Evanescent excitation with high-aperture collection.

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, T P; Thompson, N L

    1984-01-01

    We consider the effect of planar dielectric interfaces (e.g., solid/liquid) on the fluorescence emission of nearby probes. First, we derive an integral expression for the electric field radiated by an oscillating electric dipole when it is close to a dielectric interface. The electric field depends on the refractive indices of the interface, the orientation of the dipole, the distance from the dipole to the interface, and the position of observation. We numerically calculate the electric field intensity for a dipole on an interface, as a function of observation position. These results are applicable to fluorescent molecules excited by the evanescent field of a totally internally reflected laser beam and thus very close to a solid/liquid interface. Next, we derive an integral expression for the electric field radiated when a second dielectric interface is also close to the fluorescent molecule. We numerically calculate this intensity as observed through the second interface. These results are useful when the fluorescence is collected by a high-aperture microscope objective. Finally, we define and calculate a "dichroic factor," which describes the efficiency of collection, in the two-interface system, of polarized fluorescence. The limit when the first interface is removed is applicable for any high-aperture collection of polarized or unpolarized fluorescence. The limit when the second interface is removed has application in the collection of fluorescence with any aperture from molecules close to a dielectric interface. The results of this paper are required for the interpretation of order parameter measurements on fluorescent probes in supported phospholipid monolayers (Thompson, N.L., H. M. McConnell, and T. P. Burghardt, 1984, Biophys. J., 46:739-747). PMID:6518253

  10. Biogeochemical processing of nutrients in groundwater-fed stream during baseflow conditions - the value of fluorescence spectroscopy and automated high-frequency nutrient monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Louise

    2014-05-01

    Recent research in groundwater-dominated streams indicates that organic matter plays an important role in nutrient transformations at the surface-groundwater interface known as the hyporheic zone. Mixing of water and nutrient fluxes in the hyporheic zone controls in-stream nutrients availability, dynamics and export to downstream reaches. In particular, benthic sediments can form adsorptive sinks for organic matter and reactive nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) that sustain a variety of hyporheic processes e.g. denitrification, microbial uptake. Thus, hyporheic metabolism can have an important effect on both quantity (concentration) and quality (labile vs. refractory character) of organic matter. Here high-frequency nutrient monitoring combined with spectroscopic analysis was used to provide insights into biogeochemical processing of a small, agricultural stream in the NE England subject to diffuse nutrient pollution. Biogeochemical data were collected hourly for a week at baseflow conditions when in-stream-hyporheic nutrient dynamics have the greatest impact on stream health. In-stream nutrients (total phosphorus, reactive phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen) and water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential) were measured in situ hourly by an automated bank-side laboratory. Concurrent hourly autosamples were retrieved daily and analysed for nutrients and fine sediments including spectroscopic analyses of dissolved organic matter - excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectroscopy. Our results show that organic matter can potentially be utilised as a natural, environmental tracer of the biogeochemical processes occurring at the surface-groundwater interface in streams. High-frequency spectroscopic characterisation of in-stream organic matter can provide useful quantitative and qualitative information on fluxes of reactive nutrients in

  11. Highly sensitive quantification of pyrethroid insecticide etofenprox in vegetables with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Baba, Koji

    2015-03-13

    This paper describes a highly sensitive analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) capable of quantifying trace amounts of synthetic pyrethroid insecticide etofenprox residue in six vegetable samples: bell pepper, cucumber, eggplant, Japanese mustard spinach, spinach, and tomato. After extraction with acetonitrile, the crude sample extract was cleaned up with a solid-phase extraction cartridge. The matrix interference derived from the tested vegetable samples was evaluated. Quantification was conducted using external calibrators prepared in pure acetonitrile. The limits of quantification for etofenprox in each sample were 1.87-3.87 ng/g. Recoveries obtained by application of the proposed analytical method of vegetable samples spiked at the considerably low levels (5-100 ng/g) were 85-111% with relative standard deviations of less than 12%. The proposed method using the HPLC-FLD was applied for trace analysis of the insecticide residue in vegetable samples.

  12. Highly sensitive quantification of pyrethroid insecticide etofenprox in vegetables with high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Baba, Koji

    2015-03-13

    This paper describes a highly sensitive analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) capable of quantifying trace amounts of synthetic pyrethroid insecticide etofenprox residue in six vegetable samples: bell pepper, cucumber, eggplant, Japanese mustard spinach, spinach, and tomato. After extraction with acetonitrile, the crude sample extract was cleaned up with a solid-phase extraction cartridge. The matrix interference derived from the tested vegetable samples was evaluated. Quantification was conducted using external calibrators prepared in pure acetonitrile. The limits of quantification for etofenprox in each sample were 1.87-3.87 ng/g. Recoveries obtained by application of the proposed analytical method of vegetable samples spiked at the considerably low levels (5-100 ng/g) were 85-111% with relative standard deviations of less than 12%. The proposed method using the HPLC-FLD was applied for trace analysis of the insecticide residue in vegetable samples. PMID:25662063

  13. High pressure reactivity of solid furan probed by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Santoro, Mario; Bini, Robert; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of crystalline furan has been investigated, at room temperature, along the 0-47-0 GPa pressure cycle by using IR and Raman spectroscopy. These data, joint to high pressure low temperature IR data, allow the identification of two solid phases in the 1.2-12 GPa pressure range: the low-pressure orientationally disordered phase IV and the high-pressure ordered phase III. Above 10-12 GPa solid furan starts to chemically transform. The threshold pressure for the transformation is much lower than in benzene, as expected according to the minor stability of the heteroaromatic ring. The reaction proceeds continuously along the compression path, but it becomes complete only with releasing pressure, and a yellow-brownish sample is recovered. This compound was identified as an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) containing alkylpolyether type segments, alcoholic functions, and C=O bonds. The presence of these new chemical species attests to the opening of the original furan rings and to the transfer of hydrogen atoms. The reaction seems to be very similar to that induced in crystalline benzene. This comparison indicates a general behavior for the reactivity under ultrahigh pressures of the whole class of aromatic compounds.

  14. Reactively-sputtered zinc semiconductor films of high conductivity for heterojunction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A high conductivity, n-doped semiconductor film is produced from zinc, or Zn and Cd, and group VI elements selected from Se, S and Te in a reactive magnetron sputtering system having a chamber with one or two targets, a substrate holder, means for heating the substrate holder, and an electric field for ionizing gases in the chamber. Zinc or a compound of Zn and Cd is placed in the position of one of the two targets and doping material in the position of the other of the two targets. Zn and Cd may be placed in separate targets while a dopant is placed in the third target. Another possibility is to place an alloy of Zn and dopant, or Zn, Cd and dopant in one target, thus using only one target. A flow of the inert gas is ionized and directed toward said targets, while a flow of a reactant gas consisting of hydrides of the group VI elements is directed toward a substrate on the holder. The targets are biased to attract negatively ionized inert gas. The desired stochiometry for high conductivity is achieved by controlling the temperature of the substrate, and partial pressures of the gases, and the target power and total pressure of the gases in the chamber.

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Reactive In Situ Zr Based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Reactive in situ multi-material additive manufacturing of ZrB2-based ultra-high-temperature ceramics in a Zr metal matrix was demonstrated using LENS™. Sound metallurgical bonding was achieved between the Zr metal and Zr-BN composites with Ti6Al4V substrate. Though the feedstock Zr power had α phase, LENS™ processing of the Zr powder and Zr-BN premix powder mixture led to the formation of some β phase of Zr. Microstructure of the Zr-BN composite showed primary grains of zirconium diboride phase in zirconium metal matrix. The presence of ZrB2 ceramic phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness of pure Zr was measured as 280 ± 12 HV and, by increasing the BN content in the feedstock, the hardness was found to increase. In Zr-5%BN composite, the hardness was 421 ± 10 HV and the same for Zr-10%BN composite was 562 ± 10 HV. It is envisioned that such multi-materials additive manufacturing will enable products in the future that cannot be manufactured using traditional approaches particularly in the areas of high-temperature metal-ceramic composites with compositional and functional gradation.

  16. Bioaugmented remediation of high concentration BTEX-contaminated groundwater by permeable reactive barrier with immobilized bead.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bao-Ping; Wu, Chih-Hung; Wu, Cheng-Han; Lin, Chi-Wen

    2013-01-15

    Ineffective biostimulation requires immediate development of new technologies for remediation of high concentration BTEX-contaminated (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) groundwater. In this study, bioaugmentation with Mycobacterium sp. CHXY119 and Pseudomonas sp. YATO411 immobilized bead was used to remediate BTEX-contaminated groundwater with about 100 mg l(-1) in total concentration. The batch test results showed that the CHXY119 and YATO411 immobilized bead completely biodegraded each BTEX compound, and the maximum biodegradation rates were 0.790 mg l(-1) h(-1) for benzene, 1.113 mg l(-1) h(-1) for toluene, 0.992 mg l(-1) h(-1) for ethylbenzene and 0.231 mg l(-1) h(-1) for p-xylene. The actual mineralization rates were 10.8% for benzene, 10.5% for toluene, 5.8% for ethylbenzene and 11.4% for p-xylene, which indicated that the bioremediation of BTEX by the immobilized bead requires a rather small oxygen supply. Degradation rates achieved by the bioaugmented permeable reactive barrier (Bio-PRB) system of the immobilized bead were 97.8% for benzene, 94.2% for toluene, 84.7% for ethylbenzene and 87.4% for p-xylene; and the toxicity of the groundwater fell by 91.2% after bioremediation by the bioaugmented PRB, which confirmed its great potential for remediating groundwater with high concentrations of contaminants.

  17. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  18. High-Throughput Fluorescent Tagging of Full-Length Arabidopsis Gene Products in Planta1

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guo-Wei; Mohanty, Amitabh; Chary, S. Narasimha; Li, Shijun; Paap, Brigitte; Drakakaki, Georgia; Kopec, Charles D.; Li, Jianxiong; Ehrhardt, David; Jackson, David; Rhee, Seung Y.; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2004-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput methodology, termed fluorescent tagging of full-length proteins (FTFLP), to analyze expression patterns and subcellular localization of Arabidopsis gene products in planta. Determination of these parameters is a logical first step in functional characterization of the approximately one-third of all known Arabidopsis genes that encode novel proteins of unknown function. Our FTFLP-based approach offers two significant advantages: first, it produces internally-tagged full-length proteins that are likely to exhibit native intracellular localization, and second, it yields information about the tissue specificity of gene expression by the use of native promoters. To demonstrate how FTFLP may be used for characterization of the Arabidopsis proteome, we tagged a series of known proteins with diverse subcellular targeting patterns as well as several proteins with unknown function and unassigned subcellular localization. PMID:15141064

  19. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  20. Incorporation of magnetite nanoparticle clusters in fluorescent silica nanoparticles for high-performance brain tumor delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiaqi; Meng, Xiangxi; Liu, Enzhong; Chen, Kezheng

    2010-06-01

    Bifunctional nanoprobes with both magnetic and optical contrast have been developed for ultra-sensitive brain tumor imaging at the cellular level. The nanoprobes were synthesized by simultaneously incorporating a magnetite nanoparticle cluster and fluorescence dyes into silica encapsulation by a sol-gel approach under ultrasonic treatment. The nanoprobes maintain superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and possess enhanced transverse relaxivity and good photostability. As a glioma targeting ligand, chlorotoxin was covalently bonded to the surface of the nanoprobes. In vitro cellular uptake assays demonstrated that the nanoprobes were highly specific, taken up by human U251-MG glioma cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The labeled glioma cells were readily detectable by both MR imager and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  1. Fabrication of fluorescent composite with ultrafast aqueous synthesized high luminescent CdTe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei Chen, Haibin E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk; Wu, Jingshen E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk; Bi, Xianghong

    2014-05-15

    Without precursor preparation, inert gas protection and enormous amount of additives and reductants, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) can be rapidly synthesized with high quality. A 600 nm photoluminescence peak wavelength could be obtained within 1 hour's refluxing through minimal addition of 1,2-diaminoethane (DAE). The theoretical design for the experiments are illustrated and further proved by the characterization results with different concentrations and reagents. On the other hand, generation of CdTe QDs was found even under room temperature by applying droplet quantity of DAE. This indicates that QDs can be synthesized with simply a bottle and no enormous additives required. The QDs were mixed into the epoxy matrix through solution casting method with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) capping for phase transfer. The acquired epoxy based nanocomposite exhibits good transparency, compatibility and fluorescence.

  2. High spectral resolution observations of fluorescent molecular hydrogen in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Geballe, T. R.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Moorhouse, A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1-0 S(1) line of molecular hydrogen has been observed at high spectral resolution in several sources where the emission was suspected of being fluorescent. In NGC 2023, the Orion Bar, and Parsamyan 18, the S(1) line is unresolved, and the line center close to the rest velocity of the ambient molecular cloud. Such behavior is expected for UV-excited line emission. The H2 line widths in molecular clouds thus can serve as diagnostic for shocked and UV-excitation mechanisms. If the lines are broader than several km/s or velocity shifts are observed across a source it is likely that shocks are responsible for the excitation of the gas.

  3. Comparison of fluorescent and high-pressure sodium lamps on growth of leaf lettuce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Koontz, R. F.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation from high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps provided more than a 50% increased yield (fresh and dry weight of tops) of loose-leaf lettuce cultivars Grand Rapids Forcing and RubyConn, compared to that obtained by radiation from cool-white fluorescent (CWF) lamps at equal photosynthetic photon flux; yet, input wattage was approximately 36% less. It was postulated that the considerable output of 700 to 850 nm radiation from the HPS lamp was a significant factor of the increased yield. Under HPS lamps, the leaves of both cultivars were slightly less green with very little red pigmentation ('RubyConn') and slightly elongated, compared to CWF, but plant productivity per unit electrical energy input was vastly superior with HPS.

  4. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM/TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  5. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

    2008-12-01

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

  6. High repetition rate laser induced fluorescence applied to Surfatron Induced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Palomares, J. M.; Carbone, E. A. D.; Graef, W.; Hübner, S.

    2012-05-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar and the conversion space of Ar-molecule mixtures are explored using a combination of high rep-rate YAG-Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable Surfatron Induced Plasma set-up. Applying the method of Saturation Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence (SaTiRe-LIF), we could trace excitation and conversion channels and determine rates of electron and heavy particle excitation kinetics. The time resolved density disturbances observed in the Ar excitation space, which are initiated by the laser, reveal the excitation channels and corresponding rates; responses of the molecular radiation in Ar-molecule mixtures corresponds to the presence of conversion processes induced by heavy particle excitation kinetics.

  7. High-resolution mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography based on compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugang; Ozturk, Mehmet S; Zhao, Lingling; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography (MFMT) is new imaging modality aiming at 3-D imaging of molecular probes in a few millimeter thick biological samples with high-spatial resolution. In this paper, we develop a compressive sensing-based reconstruction method with l1-norm regularization for MFMT with the goal of improving spatial resolution and stability of the optical inverse problem. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of anatomically accurate microvasculature and real data obtained from phantom experiments are employed to evaluate the merits of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 80 μm spatial resolution for a biological sample of 3 mm thickness and more accurate quantifications of concentrations and locations for the fluorophore distribution than those of the conventional methods.

  8. Novel Phenotypic Fluorescent Three-Dimensional Platforms for High-throughput Drug Screening and Personalized Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Changge; Avis, Ingalill; Salomon, David; Cuttitta, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We have developed novel phenotypic fluorescent three-dimensional co-culture platforms that efficiently and economically screen anti-angiogenic/anti-metastatic drugs on a high-throughput scale. Individual cell populations can be identified and isolated for protein/gene expression profiling studies and cellular movement/interactions can be tracked by time-lapse cinematography. More importantly, these platforms closely parallel the in vivo angiogenic and metastatic outcomes of a given tumor xenograft in the nude mouse model but, unlike in vivo models, our co-culture platforms produce comparable results in five to nine days. Potentially, by incorporating cancer patient biopsies, the co-culture platforms should greatly improve the effectiveness and efficiency of personalized chemotherapy. PMID:23833685

  9. Simultaneous determination of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in mitochondrial compartments of apoptotic HepG2 cells and PC12 cells based on microchip electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Qingling; Sun, Qianqian; Chen, Hao; Wang, Xu; Li, Na; Yin, Miao; Xie, Yanxia; Li, Hongmin; Tang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Determination of intracellular bioactive species will afford beneficial information related to cell metabolism, signal transduction, cell function, and disease treatment. In this study, the first application of a microchip electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (MCE-LIF) method for concurrent determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), i.e., superoxide (O(2)(-•)) and nitric oxide (NO) in mitochondria, was developed using fluorescent probes 2-chloro-1,3-dibenzothiazolinecyclohexene (DBZTC) and 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2',7'-difluorescein (DAF-FM), respectively. Potential interference of intracellular dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and ascorbic acid (AA) for NO detection with DAF-FM was eliminated through oxidation of AA with the addition of ascorbate oxidase, followed by subsequent MCE separation. Fluorescent products of O(2)(-•) and NO, DBZTC oxide (DBO), and DAF-FM triazole (DAF-FMT) showed excellent baseline separation within 1 min with a running buffer of 40 mM Tris solution (pH 7.4) and a separating electric field of 500 V/cm. The levels of DBO and DAF-FMT in mitochondria isolated from normal HepG2 cells and PC12 cells were evaluated using this method. Furthermore, the changes of DBO and DAF-FMT levels in mitochondria isolated from apoptotic HepG2 cells and PC12 cells could also be detected. The current approach was proved to be simple, fast, reproducible, and efficient. Measurement of the two species with the method will be beneficial to understand ROS/RNS distinctive functions. In addition, it will provide new insights into the role that both species play in biological systems.

  10. "Fastening" porphyrin in highly cross-linked polyphosphazene hybrid nanoparticles: powerful red fluorescent probe for detecting mercury ion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Meng, Lingjie; Lu, Qinghua

    2014-04-22

    It is a significant issue to overcome the concentration-quenching effect of the small fluorescent probes and maintain the high fluorescent efficiency at high concentration for sensitive and selective fluorescent mark or detection. We developed a new strategy to "isolate" and "fasten" porphyrin moieties in a highly cross-linked poly(tetraphenylporphyrin-co-cyclotriphosphazene) (TPP-PZS) by the polycondensation of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (TPP-(OH)4) in a suitable solvent. The resulting TPP-PZS particles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra. Remarkably, TPP-PZS particles obtained in acetone emitted a bright red fluorescence both in powder state and in solution because the aggregation of porphyrin moieties in "H-type" (face-to-face) and "J-type" (edge-to-edge) was effectively blocked. The fluorescent TPP-PZS particles also showed superior resistance to photobleaching, and had a high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of Hg(2+) ions. The TPP-PZS particles were therefore used as an ideal material for preparing test strips to quickly detect/monitor the Hg(2+) ions in a facile way.

  11. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  12. Automatic analyzer for highly polar carboxylic acids based on fluorescence derivatization-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Todoroki, Kenichiro; Nakano, Tatsuki; Ishii, Yasuhiro; Goto, Kanoko; Tomita, Ryoko; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Inoue, Koichi; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive, versatile, and reproducible automatic analyzer for highly polar carboxylic acids based on a fluorescence derivatization-liquid chromatography (LC) method was developed. In this method, carboxylic acids were automatically and fluorescently derivatized with 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-PZ) in the presence of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride by adopting a pretreatment program installed in an LC autosampler. All of the DBD-PZ-carboxylic acid derivatives were separated on the ODS column within 30 min by gradient elution. The peak of DBD-PZ did not interfere with the separation and the quantification of all the acids with the exception of lactic acid. From the LC-MS/MS analysis, we confirmed that lactic acid was converted to an oxytriazinyl derivative, which was further modified with a dimethoxy triazine group of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). We detected this oxytriazinyl derivative to quantify lactic acid. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) for the examined acids ranged from 0.19 to 1.1 µm, which correspond to 95-550 fmol per injection. The intra- and inter-day precisions of typical, highly polar carboxylic acids were all <9.0%. The developed method was successfully applied to the comprehensive analysis of carboxylic acids in various samples, which included fruit juices, red wine and media from cultured tumor cells.

  13. A highly reactive chalcogenide precursor for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Dong-Liang; Zhu, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to the organic phase for synthesizing noble metal NCs (such as Ag and Au NCs).Metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are ideal inorganic materials for solar cells and biomedical labeling. In consideration of the hazard and instability of alkylphosphines, the phosphine-free synthetic route has become one of the most important trends in synthesizing selenide QDs. Here we report a novel phase transfer strategy to prepare phosphine-free chalcogenide precursors. The anions in aqueous solution were transferred to toluene via electrostatic interactions between the anions and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The obtained chalcogenide precursors show high reactivity with metal ions in the organic phase and could be applied to the low-temperature synthesis of various metal chalcogenide NCs based on a simple reaction between metal ions (e.g. Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+) and chalcogenide anions (e.g. S2-) in toluene. In addition to chalcogenide anions, other anions such as BH4- ions and AuCl4- ions can also be transferred to

  14. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-02-21

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  15. Alpha reactivity to first names differs in subjects with high and low dream recall frequency

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Perrine; Blochet, Camille; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Olivier; Morlet, Dominique; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    Studies in cognitive psychology showed that personality (openness to experience, thin boundaries, absorption), creativity, nocturnal awakenings, and attitude toward dreams are significantly related to dream recall frequency (DRF). These results suggest the possibility of neurophysiological trait differences between subjects with high and low DRF. To test this hypothesis we compared sleep characteristics and alpha reactivity to sounds in subjects with high and low DRF using polysomnographic recordings and electroencephalography (EEG). We acquired EEG from 21 channels in 36 healthy subjects while they were presented with a passive auditory oddball paradigm (frequent standard tones, rare deviant tones and very rare first names) during wakefulness and sleep (intensity, 50 dB above the subject's hearing level). Subjects were selected as High-recallers (HR, DRF = 4.42 ± 0.25 SEM, dream recalls per week) and Low-recallers (LR, DRF = 0.25 ± 0.02) using a questionnaire and an interview on sleep and dream habits. Despite the disturbing setup, the subjects' quality of sleep was generally preserved. First names induced a more sustained decrease in alpha activity in HR than in LR at Pz (1000–1200 ms) during wakefulness, but no group difference was found in REM sleep. The current dominant hypothesis proposes that alpha rhythms would be involved in the active inhibition of the brain regions not involved in the ongoing brain operation. According to this hypothesis, a more sustained alpha decrease in HR would reflect a longer release of inhibition, suggesting a deeper processing of complex sounds than in LR during wakefulness. A possibility to explain the absence of group difference during sleep is that increase in alpha power in HR may have resulted in awakenings. Our results support this hypothesis since HR experienced more intra sleep wakefulness than LR (30 ± 4 vs. 14 ± 4 min). As a whole our results support the hypothesis of neurophysiological trait differences in high

  16. Alexandrite as a high-temperature pressure calibrant, and implications for the ruby-fluorescence scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahren, A. H.; Kruger, M. B.; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    The wavelength shifts of the R1 and R2 fluorescence lines of alexandrite (BeAl2O4:Cr(+3)) have been experimentally calibrated against the ruby-fluorescence scale as a function of both hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic pressures between 0 and 50 GPa, and simultaneously as a function of temperatures between 290 and 550 K. It is found that the pressure-temperature cross derivative of the fluorescence wavelength shifts are negligible for both ruby and alexandrite.

  17. A simple but highly efficient multi-formyl phenol-amine system for fluorescence detection of peroxide explosive vapour.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Fu, Yanyan; Gao, Yixun; Yao, Junjun; Fan, Tianchi; Zhu, Defeng; He, Qingguo; Cao, Huimin; Cheng, Jiangong

    2015-07-11

    A simple, highly stable, sensitive and selective fluorescent system for peroxide explosives was developed via an aromatic aldehyde oxidation reaction. The high efficiency arises from its higher HOMO level and multiple H-bonding. The sensitivity is obtained to be 0.1 ppt for H2O2 and 0.2 ppb for TATP. PMID:26054635

  18. Large Enhancement of Quantum Dot Fluorescence by Highly Scalable Nanoporous Gold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Song, Yunke; Fujita, Takeshi; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Nanoengineered metallic materials have been shown to have a number of exclusive physicochemical properties not available at neither larger (micro- and macroscopic) nor smaller (molecular) scales. Recently, these materials in particular have drawn significant attention due to their capability to enhance fluorescent signals of nearby fluorescent species through a phenomenon known as metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). MEF originates from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), a collective oscillation of conduction-band electrons that can modify both the extinction coefficient and quantum yield of adjacent fluorescent molecules/species. [1] The extinction coefficient is a function of the electromagnetic field intensity experienced by the fluorescent molecules, and under an enhanced electromagnetic field, fluorescent molecules absorb photons and promote electrons into excited states at accelerated rates. LSPR of metallic nanostructures can also modify the quantum yield of fluorescent species by increasing their radioactive decay rate. The combined enhancement of extinction coefficient and quantum yield can result in significantly strengthened fluorescence from fluorescent species. PMID:24339211

  19. High temperature monitoring of silicon carbide ceramics by confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we presented an alternative method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics at various high temperatures in air by measuring the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratios (ICo/IRa) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of SiC ceramics with the confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. A calibration curve of the relationship between ICo/IRa and Zeff was established by using a set of 8 SiC calibration samples. The sensitivity of this approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished samples of Zeff differing from each other by only 0.01. The linear relationship between the variation of Zeff and the variations of contents of C, Si and O of SiC ceramics were found, and the corresponding calculation model of the relationship between the ΔZ and the ΔCC, ΔCSi, and ΔCO were established. The variation of contents of components of the tested SiC ceramics after oxidation at high temperature was quantitatively calculated based on the model. It was shown that the results of contents of carbon, silicon and oxygen obtained by this method were in good agreement with the results obtained by XPS, giving values of relative deviation less than 1%. It was concluded that the practicality of this proposed method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of SiC ceramics at high temperatures was acceptable.

  20. Glass tube of high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss for external electrode fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Guangsup; Shin, Myeong-Ju; Jeong, Jong-Mun; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Hong, Byoung-Hee; Koo, Je-Huan; Kim, YunKi; Choi, Eun-Ha; Fechner, Joerg; Letz, Martin; Ott, Franz

    2007-12-01

    A glass tube of aluminosilicate glass, with high dielectric constant K{approx}6.0 and low dielectric loss tan {delta}{approx}8.0x10{sup -4}, was investigated for the external electrode fluorescent lamps (EEFLs) of a dielectric barrier discharge. Compared with conventional EEFLs made out of borosilicate glass tubes with K{approx}(4.9-5.3) and tan {delta}{approx}(2.3-2.4)x10{sup -3}, the efficiency of the aluminosilicate EEFL increases by 15%-25% even at high luminance above 20 000 cd/m{sup 2} and the pinhole stability of the aluminosilicate EEFL also improves remarkably. In a soda-lime glass EEFL with a high dielectric loss tan {delta}{approx}7.0x10{sup -3}, the luminance and pinhole stability deteriorate even with a high dielectric constant K{approx}7.2 at room temperature, because the value of tan {delta} escalates as the temperature on the external electrode increases due to the dielectric heat dissipation.

  1. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment. PMID:27077538

  2. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment.

  3. Anthropogenic Emissions of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) Inferred from Oversampling of OMI HCHO Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lei; Jacob, Daniel; Mickley, Loretta; Marais, Eloise; Zhang, Aoxing; Cohan, Daniel; Yoshida, Yasuko; Duncan, Bryan; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Chance, Kelly; DeSmedt, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously to constrain emissions of isoprene from vegetation, but application to US anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005 - 2008 enables quantitative detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas-Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the individual urban-industrial HCHO plumes observed by OMI we can constrain the corresponding HCHO-weighted HRVOC emissions. Application to the Houston plume indicates a HCHO source of 260 plus or minus 110 kmol h-1 and implies a factor of 5.5 plus or minus 2.4 underestimate of anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory. With this approach we are able to monitor the trend in HRVOC emissions over the US, in particular from the oil-gas industry, over the past decade.

  4. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) & cardiovascular disease: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Deepak Y; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Pais, Prem

    2015-09-01

    The role of low grade systemic inflammation as evidenced by elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been intensely investigated through observational studies and clinical trials in the past two decades. On the basis of evidence that has accrued, hsCRP measurement has been integrated into the Reynolds risk scoring system to predict cardiovascular risk. The JUPITER trial proved the benefit of statins in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with low grades of systemic inflammation and 'normal' cholesterol levels. However, substantial evidence has been generated from western studies. We, therefore, conducted a scoping review for studies done in India with a view to identify gaps in evidence and make further recommendations. Most Indian studies had small sample sizes and short term follow ups. There were no large population based prospective studies where patients were followed up for long periods of time for major cardiovascular end points. An analysis of the hsCRP level from the control arms of case-control studies derived a mean hsCRP value of 1.88 mg/l, which is higher than the western population where values < 1 mg/l are classified as low cardiovascular risk. Further large prospective cohort studies with longer term follow ups are essential before we can make further recommendations to integrate hsCRP into risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  5. [The significance of high sensitive C reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Ishibashi, Midori; Takei, Izumi

    2012-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Several prospective studies have indicated that an elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level is a risk factor for CVD. These results were also confirmed by prospective studies in Japan both for primary and secondary prevention. A randomized control study using statins also revealed that lower levels of both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP were independently related to the incidence of CVD. Recent meta-analysis revealed that hs-CRP was a risk factor not only for CVD but for other diseases including cancers. It revealed that the absolute value of hs-CRP varied among the study populations. The mechanism of how hs-CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of CVD is not fully understood. Generally, inflammation in the vascular wall and the release of inflammatory cytokines from macrophages was considered to the main mechanism, but infection with such as chlamydia or Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal disease have been postulated as the causes of systemic inflammation. Recently, visceral fat accumulation and its cross-interaction with inflammatory cells have been proposed as the cause of systemic inflammation as "innate inflammation". Our original cross sectional studies also showed the correlations of hs-CRP with BMI and triglyceride. Although there is no specific therapy for the reduction of hs-CRP, we have to consider hs-CRP as a risk factor for CVD which complements other classical risk factors. PMID:22686046

  6. A Statistical Hot Spot Reactive Flow Model for Shock Initiation and Detonation of Solid High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2002-07-01

    A statistical hot spot reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid high explosives developed in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code is presented. This model is intended to evolve into a physically correct description of the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the onset of shock initiation via hotspot formation, the growth (01 failure to grow) of these hotspots into the surrounding explosive particles, the rapid transition to detonation, and self-sustaining detonation. Mesoscale modeling of the shock compression and temperature dependent chemical decomposition of individual explosive particles are currently yielding accurate predictions of hot spot formation and the subsequent growth (or failure) of these hotspot reactions in the surrounding grains. For two- and three-dimensional simulations of larger scale explosive charges, a statistical hotspot model that averages over thousands of individual hotspot dimensions and temperatures and then allows exothermic chemical reactions to grow (or fail to grow) due to thermal conduction is required. This paper outlines a first approach to constructing a probabilistic hot spot formulation based on the number density of potential hotspot sites. These hotspots can then either ignite or die out if they do not exceed certain ignition criteria, which are based on physical properties of the explosive particles. The growing hot spots spread at burn velocities given by experimentally determined deflagration velocity versus pressure relationships. The mathematics and assumptions involved in formulating the model and practical examples of its usefulness are given.

  7. High Resolution Dissection of Reactive Glial Nets in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, David S.; Jones, Emma V.; Quesseveur, Gaël; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; A. Ferreira, Tiago; Quirion, Rémi; Mechawar, Naguib; Murai, Keith K.

    2016-01-01

    Fixed human brain samples in tissue repositories hold great potential for unlocking complexities of the brain and its alteration with disease. However, current methodology for simultaneously resolving complex three-dimensional (3D) cellular anatomy and organization, as well as, intricate details of human brain cells in tissue has been limited due to weak labeling characteristics of the tissue and high background levels. To expose the potential of these samples, we developed a method to overcome these major limitations. This approach offers an unprecedented view of cytoarchitecture and subcellular detail of human brain cells, from cellular networks to individual synapses. Applying the method to AD samples, we expose complex features of microglial cells and astrocytes in the disease. Through this methodology, we show that these cells form specialized 3D structures in AD that we refer to as reactive glial nets (RGNs). RGNs are areas of concentrated neuronal injury, inflammation, and tauopathy and display unique features around β-amyloid plaque types. RGNs have conserved properties in an AD mouse model and display a developmental pattern coinciding with the progressive accumulation of neuropathology. The method provided here will help reveal novel features of the healthy and diseased human brain, and aid experimental design in translational brain research. PMID:27090093

  8. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; de Oliveira Izar, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for “high-sensitivity C-reactive protein” (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  9. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for "high-sensitivity C-reactive protein" (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  10. Associations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia and comparison groups.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Daly, Rebecca E; Glorioso, Danielle K; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by physical (mainly metabolic and cardiovascular) comorbidity and shortened lifespan. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an inflammatory marker of hepatic origin linked to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population, has been reported to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. However, the relationship of hs-CRP to psychiatric and medical risk factors, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as smoking, is not well established in schizophrenia. We assessed hs-CRP levels along with various demographic, psychiatric, and metabolic measures in 88 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 age epoch-matched comparison subjects with no history of a major psychiatric illness. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in comparison subjects. Higher hs-CRP levels in the schizophrenia group were associated with female gender, more severe negative symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, and worse metabolic risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels. hs-CRP was not related to age, race, education, smoking status, antipsychotic dosage, or cognitive impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP and long-term health outcomes including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in schizophrenia. PMID:26341579

  11. Oxidative Reactivities of 2-Furylquinolines: Ubiquitous Scaffolds in Common High-Throughput Screening Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Margaret E.; Abate-Pella, Daniel; Perkins, Angela L.; Li, Ming; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Harris, Reuben S.; Harki, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) was employed to discover APOBEC3G inhibitors and multiple 2-furylquinolines (e.g., 1) were found. Dose-response assays with 1 from the HTS sample, as well as commercial material, yielded similar confirmatory results. Interestingly, freshly synthesized and DMSO-solubilized 1 was inactive. Repeated screening of the DMSO aliquot of synthesized 1 revealed increasing APOBEC3G inhibitory activity with age, suggesting 1 decomposes into an active inhibitor. Laboratory aging of 1 followed by analysis revealed that 1 undergoes oxidative decomposition in air, resulting from a [4+2] cycloaddition between the furan of 1 and 1O2. The resulting endoperoxide then undergoes additional transformations, highlighted by Baeyer-Villager rearrangements, to deliver lactam, carboxylic acid, and aldehyde products. The endoperoxide also undergoes hydrolytic opening followed by further transformations to a bis-enone. Eight structurally related analogues from HTS libraries were similarly reactive. This study constitutes a cautionary to validate 2-furylquinolines for structure and stability prior to chemical optimization campaigns. PMID:26358009

  12. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) & cardiovascular disease: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Deepak Y.; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Pais, Prem

    2015-01-01

    The role of low grade systemic inflammation as evidenced by elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been intensely investigated through observational studies and clinical trials in the past two decades. On the basis of evidence that has accrued, hsCRP measurement has been integrated into the Reynolds risk scoring system to predict cardiovascular risk. The JUPITER trial proved the benefit of statins in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with low grades of systemic inflammation and ‘normal’ cholesterol levels. However, substantial evidence has been generated from western studies. We, therefore, conducted a scoping review for studies done in India with a view to identify gaps in evidence and make further recommendations. Most Indian studies had small sample sizes and short term follow ups. There were no large population based prospective studies where patients were followed up for long periods of time for major cardiovascular end points. An analysis of the hsCRP level from the control arms of case-control studies derived a mean hsCRP value of 1.88 mg/l, which is higher than the western population where values < 1 mg/l are classified as low cardiovascular risk. Further large prospective cohort studies with longer term follow ups are essential before we can make further recommendations to integrate hsCRP into risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:26458341

  13. Generation of a high-valent iron imido corrolazine complex and NR group transfer reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leeladee, Pannee; Jameson, Guy N L; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2013-04-15

    The generation of a new high-valent iron terminal imido complex prepared with a corrolazine macrocycle is reported. The reaction of [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)] (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) with the commercially available chloramine-T (Na(+)TsNCl(-)) leads to oxidative N-tosyl transfer to afford [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] in dichloromethane/acetonitrile at room temperature. This complex was characterized by UV-vis, Mössbauer (δ = -0.05 mm s(-1), ΔE(Q) = 2.94 mm s(-1)), and EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) spectroscopies, and together with reactivity patterns and DFT calculations has been established as an iron(IV) species antiferromagnetically coupled with a Cz-π-cation-radical (S(total) = 1/2 ground state). Reactivity studies with triphenylphosphine as substrate show that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] is an efficient NTs transfer agent, affording the phospharane product Ph3P═NTs under both stoichiometric and catalytic conditions. Kinetic analysis of this reaction supports a bimolecular NTs transfer mechanism with rate constant of 70(15) M(-1) s(-1). These data indicate that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] reacts about 100 times faster than analogous Mn terminal arylimido corrole analogues. It was found that two products crystallize from the same reaction mixture of Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3, [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were definitively characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sequential production of Ph3P═NTs, Ph3P═NH, and Ph3P═O was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and led to a proposed mechanism that accounts for all of the observed products. The latter Fe(III) complex was then rationally synthesized and structurally characterized from Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) and OPPh3, providing an important benchmark compound for spectroscopic studies. A combination of Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies led to the characterization of both intermediate spin (S = 3/2 and low spin (S = 1/2) Fe(III) corrolazines, as

  14. Generation of a high-valent iron imido corrolazine complex and NR group transfer reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leeladee, Pannee; Jameson, Guy N L; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2013-04-15

    The generation of a new high-valent iron terminal imido complex prepared with a corrolazine macrocycle is reported. The reaction of [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)] (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) with the commercially available chloramine-T (Na(+)TsNCl(-)) leads to oxidative N-tosyl transfer to afford [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] in dichloromethane/acetonitrile at room temperature. This complex was characterized by UV-vis, Mössbauer (δ = -0.05 mm s(-1), ΔE(Q) = 2.94 mm s(-1)), and EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) spectroscopies, and together with reactivity patterns and DFT calculations has been established as an iron(IV) species antiferromagnetically coupled with a Cz-π-cation-radical (S(total) = 1/2 ground state). Reactivity studies with triphenylphosphine as substrate show that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] is an efficient NTs transfer agent, affording the phospharane product Ph3P═NTs under both stoichiometric and catalytic conditions. Kinetic analysis of this reaction supports a bimolecular NTs transfer mechanism with rate constant of 70(15) M(-1) s(-1). These data indicate that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] reacts about 100 times faster than analogous Mn terminal arylimido corrole analogues. It was found that two products crystallize from the same reaction mixture of Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3, [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were definitively characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sequential production of Ph3P═NTs, Ph3P═NH, and Ph3P═O was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and led to a proposed mechanism that accounts for all of the observed products. The latter Fe(III) complex was then rationally synthesized and structurally characterized from Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) and OPPh3, providing an important benchmark compound for spectroscopic studies. A combination of Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies led to the characterization of both intermediate spin (S = 3/2 and low spin (S = 1/2) Fe(III) corrolazines, as

  15. Visual and fluorescent detection of tyrosinase activity by using a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Li, Hongxia; Zheng, Weishi; Su, Xingguang

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we designed a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe by hybridizing two differently colored quantum dots (QDs), which possess a built-in correction that eliminates the environmental effects and increases sensor accuracy. Red emissive QDs were embedded in the silica nanoparticle as reference while the green emissive QDs were covalently linked to the silica nanoparticle surface to form ratiometric fluorescence probes (RF-QDs). Dopamine (DA) was then conjugated to the surface of RF-QDs via covalent bonding. The ratiometric fluorescence probe functionalized with dopamine (DA) was highly reactive toward tyrosinase (TYR), which can catalyze the oxidization of DA to dopamine quinine and therefore quenched the fluorescence of the green QDs on the surface of ratiometric fluorescence probe. With the addition of different amounts of TYR, the ratiometric fluorescence intensity of the probe continually varied, leading to color changes from yellow-green to red. So the ratiometric fluorescence probe could be utilized for sensitive and selective detection of TYR activity. There was a good linear relationship between the ratiometric fluorescence intensity and TYR concentration in the range of 0.05-5.0 μg mL(-1), with the detection limit of 0.02 μg mL(-1). Significantly, the ratiometric fluorescence probe has been used to fabricate paper-based test strips for visual detection of TYR activity, which validates the potential on-site application.

  16. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  17. Regulatory Behaviors and Stress Reactivity among Infants at High Risk for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirikowic, Tracy; Chen, Maida; Nash, Jennifer; Gendler, Beth; Olson, Heather Carmichael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This article examines regulatory behaviors and physiological stress reactivity among 6-15 month-old infants with moderate to heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), a group at very high risk for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and self-regulation impairments, compared to low risk infants with no/low exposure. Participants: Eighteen…

  18. Synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus doped carbon dots for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Karmakar, Parimal; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus-doped carbon dots with a quantum yield 59% have been successfully synthesized from citric acid and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate by single step hydrothermal method. The synthesized carbon dots have high solubility as well as stability in aqueous medium. The as-obtained carbon dots are well monodispersed with particle sizes 1.5-4 nm. Owing to a good tunable fluorescence property and biocompatibility, the carbon dots were applied for intercellular sensing of Fe(3+) ions as well as cancer cell imaging.

  19. High frequency application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields alters cellular membrane disruption and fluorescent dye uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Cells exposed to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exhibit a wide variety of nonspecific effects, including blebbing, swelling, intracellular calcium bursts, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, formation of nanopores, and depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) to induce activation of the inositol trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway. While several studies have taken place in which multiple pulses were delivered to cells, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) is not well understood. To better understand the effects of PRR, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe CHO-K1 cells exposed to ten 600ns, 200V pulses at varying repetition rates (5Hz up to 500KHz) in the presence of either FM 1-43, YO-PRO-1, or Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent dyes, probes frequently used to indicate nanoporation or permeabilization of the plasma membrane. Dye uptake was monitored for 30 seconds after pulse application at a rate of 1 image/second. In addition, a single long pulse of equivalent energy (200V, 6 μs duration) was applied to test the hypothesis that very fast PRR will approximate the biological effects of a single long pulse of equal energy. Upon examination of the data, we found strong variation in the relationship between PRR and uptake in each of the three dyes. In particular, PI uptake showed little frequency dependence, FM 1-43 showed a strong inverse relationship between frequency and internal cell fluorescence, and YO-PRO-1 exhibited a "threshold" point of around 50 KHz, after which the inverse trend observed in FM 1-43 was seen to reverse itself. Further, a very high PRR of 500 KHz only approximated the biological effects of a single 6 μs pulse in cells stained with YO-PRO-1, suggesting that uptake of different dyes may proceed by different physical mechanisms.

  20. Simulations of compressible, diffusive, reactive flows with detailed chemistry using a high-order hybrid WENO-CD scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Jack L.

    A hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO)/centered-difference (CD) numerical method, with low numerical dissipation, high-order shock-capturing, and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR), has been developed for the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the multicomponent, compressive, reactive Navier-Stokes equations. The method enables accurate resolution of diffusive processes within reaction zones. This numerical method is verified with a series of one- and two-dimensional test problems, including a convergence test of a two-dimensional unsteady reactive double Mach reflection problem. Validation of the method is conducted with experimental comparisons of three applications all of which model multi-dimensional, unsteady reactive flow: an irregular propane detonation, shock and detonation bifurcations, and spark ignition deflagrations.

  1. High extensibility of stress fibers revealed by in vitro micromanipulation with fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Sato, Masaaki; Deguchi, Shinji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •We isolate contractile stress fibers from vascular smooth muscle cells. •We measure the extensibility of individual stress fibers. •We present the first direct evidence that individual stress fibers are highly extensible. •We quantitatively determine the local strain along the length of stress fibers. •The high extensibility we found is beyond that explained by a conventional model. -- Abstract: Stress fibers (SFs), subcellular bundles of actin and myosin filaments, are physically connected at their ends to cell adhesions. The intracellular force transmitted via SFs plays an essential role in cell adhesion regulation and downstream signaling. However, biophysical properties intrinsic to individual SFs remain poorly understood partly because SFs are surrounded by other cytoplasmic components that restrict the deformation of the embedded materials. To characterize their inherent properties independent of other structural components, we isolated SFs from vascular smooth muscle cells and mechanically stretched them by in vitro manipulation while visualizing strain with fluorescent quantum dots attached along their length. SFs were elongated along their entire length, with the length being approximately 4-fold of the stress-free length. This surprisingly high extensibility was beyond that explained by the tandem connection of actin filaments and myosin II bipolar filaments present in SFs, thus suggesting the involvement of other structural components in their passive biophysical properties.

  2. High-efficiency and long-lifetime fluorescent blue organic-emitting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Lin, Tien-Chun; Wu, Chia-Fang; Lee, Jiun-Haw

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, We have demonstrated a blue fluorescent organic light-emitting device (OLED) with a current efficiency of 19.2 cd/A at 100 cd/m2, an estimated half-lifetime of 15611 hours at an initial luminance of 1000 cd/m2, and a voltage of 4.9 V at 20 mA/cm2 with a high electron mobility electron transport layer (ETL) material and high efficiency dopant material. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) in this optimized OLED is 8.32%, which is very close to the theoretical limit. Carrier balance condition is achieved due to the incorporation of the high mobility ETL, bis(10- hydroxyben-zo[h]quinolinato)beryllium (Bebq2), which can not only effectively increase the current efficiency and elongate the operation lifetime, but also reduce the driving voltage and increase the power efficiency. The EML consisted of 4,4'-bis[2-(4-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl)vinyl]biphenyl (DPAVBi) as the blue dopant and 9,10-bis(2'- naphthyl) anthracene (ADN) as the matrix. We found that the dopant concentration of DPAVBi did not affect the mobility value of the EML which is consistent with the J-V characteristics. Besides, although it is believed the bulk ADN is a kind of HTL materials, we found the electron mobility of ADN is one order of magnitude higher than its hole mobility in our blue OLEDs.

  3. Simultaneous determination of 11 fluorescent whitening agents in food-contact paper and board by ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dingguo; Chen, Lisong; Fu, Wusheng; Qiu, Hanquan

    2015-02-01

    4,4'-Diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid based fluorescent whitening agents (DSD-FWAs) are prohibited in food-contact paper and board in many countries. In this work, a reliable high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 11 common DSD-FWAs in paper material. Sample preparation and extraction as well as chromatographic separation of multicomponent DSD-FWAs were successfully optimized. DSD-FWAs in prepared samples were ultrasonically extracted with acetonitrile/water/triethylamine (40:60:1, v/v/v), separated on the C(18) column with the mobile phase containing tetrabutylammonium bromide, and then detected by a fluorescence detector. The limits of detection were 0.12-0.24 mg/kg, and the calibration curves showed the linear correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.9994) within the range of 8.0-100 ng/mL, which was equivalent to the range of 0.80-10 mg/kg in the sample. The average recoveries and the RSDs were 81-106% and 2-9% at two fortification levels (1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg) in paper bowls, respectively. The successful determination of 11 DSD-FWAs in food-contact paper and board obtained from local markets indicated that the newly developed method was rapid, accurate, and highly selective.

  4. Enantiomer-specific high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection of methamphetamines in abusers' hair and urine.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirbashi, O; Wada, M; Kuroda, N; Inuduka, S; Nakashima, K

    1999-12-01

    Enantiomer-specific high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection using 4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-benzoyl chloride as a fluorescence labeling reagent was applied to determine methamphetamine and its metabolites in abusers' hair and urine. Hair samples were segmentally analyzed based on 1 cm long segments. In four hair samples, only the S(+)-enantiomers of methamphetamine and its N-demethylated metabolite, S(+)-amphetamine were detected. Satisfactory correlation (r = 0.901) between the results of high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence and those of gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection was obtained (n = 19). In an abuser's urine sample, the S(+)- and R(-)-enantiomers of methamphetamine, amphetamine and para-hydroxymethamphetamine were detected. The degree of N-demethylation of S(+)-methamphetamine into the corresponding metabolite of amphetamine was significantly higher than that of the R(-)-enantiomer.

  5. Optimizing the Operation of a Vertical Johann Spectrometer Using a High Energy Fluorescer X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, Michael; Stewart, Richard

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the operation and testing for a Vertical Johann Spectrometer (VJS) operating in the 13 keV range. The spectrometer is designed to use thin curved mica crystals or thick germanium crystals. The VJS must have a resolution E/ΔE=3000 or better to measure Doppler broadening of highly ionized krypton and operate at a small X-ray angle in order to be used as a diagnostic in a laser plasma target chamber. The VJS was aligned, tested, and optimized using a fluorescer type high energy X-ray (HEX) source located at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), in Livermore, California. The HEX uses a 160 kV X-ray tube to excite fluorescence from various targets. Both rubidium and bismuth fluorescers were used for this effort. This presentation describes the NSTec HEX system and the methods used to optimize and characterize the VJS performance.

  6. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min‑1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability.

  7. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min−1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability. PMID:27147586

  8. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most “state of the art” groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers and has exhibited impressive strong scalability on up to 4000 processors on the ORNL Cray XT3. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies where overly-simplistic historical modeling erroneously predicted decade removal times for uranium by ambient groundwater flow. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  9. A highly selective fluorescent probe for sulfide ions based on aggregation of Cu nanocluster induced emission enhancement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenghe; Guo, Song; Lu, Chao

    2015-04-21

    In this study, S(2-) ions were found to enhance the fluorescence of cysteine-capped Cu nanoclusters (Cu NCs). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) measurements, zeta potential and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrated that the S(2-) ion-induced aggregation of the Cu NCs contributed to the fluorescence enhancement of the dispersed Cu NCs. Based on these findings, a highly selective fluorescent probe was developed for the determination of H2S using the S(2-) ion-enhanced fluorescence of the as-prepared Cu NCs. The relative fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of S(2-) in the range from 0.2 to 50 μM. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was 42 nM. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine H2S produced from toys called "Fart Bomb" with recoveries of 97.6-101.8%. The results of the proposed method were in good agreement with those determined by a standard methylene blue method. This work is not only of importance for a better understanding of the aggregation induced emission (AIE) properties of the Cu NCs but also of great potential to find extensive biological applications for H2S. PMID:25697240

  10. High-efficiency yellow double-doped organic light-emitting devices based on phosphor-sensitized fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrade, Brian W.; Baldo, Marc A.; Adachi, Chihaya; Brooks, Jason; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2001-08-13

    We demonstrate high-efficiency yellow organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) employing [2-methyl-6-[2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H,5H-benzo[ij]quinolizin-9-yl-ethenyl]-4H-pyran-4-ylidene] propane-dinitrile (Dcm{sup 2}) as a fluorescent lumophore, with a green electrophospho- rescent sensitizer, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy){sub 3}] co-doped into a 4,4{prime}-N,N{prime}dicarbazole-biphenyl host. The devices exhibit peak external fluorescent quantum and power efficiencies of 9%{+-}1% (25 cd/A) and 17{+-}2 lm/W at 0.01 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. At 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, the efficiencies are 4.1%{+-}0.5% (11 cd/A) and 3.1{+-}0.3 lm/W. We show that this exceptionally high performance for a fluorescent dye is due to the {approx}100% efficient transfer of both singlet and triplet excited states in the doubly doped host to the fluorescent material using Ir(ppy){sub 3} as a sensitizing agent. These results suggest that 100% internal quantum efficiency fluorescent OLEDs employing this sensitization process are within reach. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy of kerosene vapour at high temperatures and pressures: potential for gas turbines measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, M.; Baranger, P.; Ledier, C.; Apeloig, J.; Grisch, F.

    2014-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of kerosene vapour was performed in a heated test cell operating between 450 and 900 K, at pressure from 0.1 to 3.0 MPa, for oxygen molar fraction between 0 and 21 %, with different laser excitation wavelengths (248, 266, 282 and 308 nm). Results show that, depending on the laser excitation scheme, kerosene fluorescence spectrum exhibits one or two fluorescence bands in the UV-visible range (attributed to aromatics naturally present in kerosene fuel). Fluorescence intensity of these bands decreases with increasing temperature, pressure and oxygen molar fraction. Different imaging strategies were derived from spectroscopic findings to simultaneously measure temperature and equivalence ratio fields in kerosene/air sprays, or flame structure and fuel spatial distribution in kerosene/air aeronautical combustors, by means of planar laser-induced fluorescence on kerosene vapour (K-PLIF).

  12. Generation 3 programmable array microscope (PAM) for high speed large format optical sectioning in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Anthony H. B.; Cook, Nathan P.; Kramer, Stephan; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the current version of the optical sectioning programmable array microscope (PAM) implemented with a single digital micro-mirror device (DMD) spatial light modulator utilized as a mask in both the fluorescence excitation and emission paths. The PAM incorporates structured illumination and structured detection operating in synchrony. A sequence of binary patterns of excitation light in high definition format (1920×1080 elements) is projected into the focal plane of the microscope at the 18 kHz binary frame rate of the Texas Instruments 1080p DMD. The resulting fluorescent emission is captured as two distinct signals: conjugate (c, ca. "on-focus") consisting of light impinging on and deviated from the "on" elements of the DMD, and the non-conjugate (nc, ca. "out-of-focus") light falling on and deviated from the "off" elements. The two distinct, deflected beams are optically filtered and detected either by two individual cameras or captured as adjacent images on a single camera after traversing an image combiner. The sectioned image is gained from a subtraction of the nc image from the c image, weighted in accordance with the pattern(s) used for illumination and detection and the relative exposure times of the cameras. The widefield image is given by the sum of the c and nc images. This procedure allows a high duty cycle (typically 25-50%) of on-elements in the excitation patterns and thus functions with low light intensities, preventing saturation and minimizing photobleaching of sensitive fluorophores. The corresponding acquisition speed is also very high, limited only by the bandwidth of the camera(s) (100 fps full frame with the sCMOS camera in current use) and the optical power of the light source (lasers, large area LEDs). In contrast to the static patterns typical of SIM systems, the programmable array allows optimization of the patterns (duty cycle, feature size and distribution), thus enabling a wide range of applications, ranging from patterned

  13. Functional Reactive Polymer Electrospun Matrix.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vipul; Ho, Dominic; Ho, Diwei; Galabura, Yuriy; Yasin, Faizah; Gong, Peijun; Ye, Weike; Singh, Ruhani; Munshi, Alaa; Saunders, Martin; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy; Wood, Fiona M; Fear, Mark; Lorenser, Dirk; Sampson, David D; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor; Smith, Nicole M; Iyer, K Swaminathan

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic multifunctional electrospun composites are a new class of hybrid materials with many potential applications. However, the lack of an efficient, reactive large-area substrate has been one of the major limitations in the development of these materials as advanced functional platforms. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of electrospun poly(glycidyl methacrylate) films as a highly versatile platform for the development of functional nanostructured materials anchored to a surface. The utility of this platform as a reactive substrate is demonstrated by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to incorporate stimuli-responsive properties. Additionally, we demonstrate that functional nanocomposites can be fabricated using this platform with properties for sensing, fluorescence imaging, and magneto-responsiveness. PMID:26780245

  14. Phase transformation and fluorescent enhancement of ErF3 at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wentao; Ren, Xiangting; Huang, Yanwei; Yu, Zhenhai; Mi, Zhongying; Tamura, Nobumichi; Li, Xiaodong; Peng, Fang; Wang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Pressure-induced phase transformation and fluorescent properties of ErF3 were investigated here using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence up to 32.1 GPa at room temperature. Results showed that ErF3 underwent a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from the β-YF3-type to the fluocerite LaF3-type at 9.8 GPa. The bulk moduli B0 for low- and high-pressure phases were determined to be 130 and 208 GPa, respectively. Photoluminescencent studies showed that new emission lines belonging to the transition of 2H11/2→4I15/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2, and 4F9/2→4I15/2 appeared during phase transition, suggesting pressure-induced electronic band splitting. Remarkably, significant pressure-induced enhancement of photoluminescence was observed, which was attributed to lattice distortion of the material under high pressure.

  15. Ultra-small, highly stable, and membrane-impermeable fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-dong; Stolwijk, Judith A.; Sperber, Michaela; Meier, Robert J.; Wegener, Joachim; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the preparation of ultra-small fluorescent nanosensors for oxygen via a one-pot approach. The nanoparticles have a hydrophobic core capable of firmly hosting hydrophobic luminescent oxygen probes. Their surface is composed of a dense and long-chain poly(ethylene glycol) shell, which renders them cell-membrane impermeable but yet highly sensitive to oxygen, and also highly stable in aqueous solutions and cell culture media. These features make them potentially suitable for sensing oxygen in extracellular fluids such as blood, interstitial and brain fluid, in (micro) bioreactors and micro- or nanoscale fluidic devices. Four kinds of nanosensors are presented, whose excitation spectra cover a wide spectral range (395-630 nm), thus matching many common laser lines, and with emission maxima ranging from 565 to 800 nm, thereby minimizing interference from background luminescence of biomatter. The unquenched lifetimes are on the order of 5.8-234 μs, which—in turn—enables lifetime imaging and additional background separation via time-gated methods.

  16. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, K; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 10(7) M(-1)) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  17. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  18. Luminescent Nanofibers Fabricated from Phenanthroimidazole Derivatives by Organogelation: Fluorescence Response towards Acid with High Performance.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiang; Sun, Jingbo; Gong, Peng; Xue, Pengchong; Zhang, Zhenqi; Zhang, Gonghe; Lu, Ran

    2015-08-01

    Nanofibers based on phenanthroimidazole derivatives PCC, PDC, and PSC were fabricated by organogelation processes, and their fluorescence sensory properties towards acid were investigated. It was found that the emission of PCC in the nanofiber-based film could be quenched significantly upon exposure to gaseous TFA due to the formation of protonated PCC, in which ICT (intramolecular charge transfer) would occur. On the other hand, TFA vapor led to the emitting colors of PDC and PSC in the nanofiber-based films to turn to yellow and green from sky blue and blue, respectively. Additionally, we found that the decay times of PCC were 0.1 s and 1.9 s in probing the saturated vapor of TFA in nanofiber-based film and in spin-coated film, respectively. The results suggested that the high surface-to-volume ratio and large interspace in the nanofiber-based networks favored the enhanced adsorption, accumulation, and diffusion of gaseous molecules, resulting in such a high performance. PMID:26034011

  19. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M−1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies. PMID:27032526

  20. Marek's disease virus undergoes complete morphogenesis after reactivation in a T-lymphoblastoid cell line transformed by recombinant fluorescent marker virus.

    PubMed

    Denesvre, Caroline; Rémy, Sylvie; Trapp-Fragnet, Laetitia; Smith, Lorraine P; Georgeault, Sonia; Vautherot, Jean-François; Nair, Venugopal

    2016-02-01

    T-lymphocytes are central targets of Marek's disease, a major chicken disease induced by the oncogenic alphaherpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV). T-lymphocyte infection is also associated with immunosuppression and virus latency. To decipher viral morphogenesis in T-lymphocytes, we used the recombinant vRB-1B 47EGFP marker virus to generate a new lymphoblastoid cell line, 3867K, that exhibited typical properties of other MDV-transformed chicken cell lines in term of cell markers, reactivation rate and infectivity. Examination of reactivating EGFP-positive 3867K cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of most types of herpesvirus particles inside the cells but no extracellular ones. Quantification of virion types indicated only 5% cytoplasmic particles, with 0.5% being mature. This study demonstrated that MDV morphogenesis is complete upon reactivation in T-lymphocytes, albeit with poor efficiency, with a defect in the exit of virions from the nucleus and secondary envelopment, as occurs in infected fibroblasts. PMID:26612074