Science.gov

Sample records for reactive power regulation

  1. Index-based reactive power compensation scheme for voltage regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dike, Damian Obioma

    2008-10-01

    Increasing demand for electrical power arising from deregulation and the restrictions posed to the construction of new transmission lines by environment, socioeconomic, and political issues had led to higher grid loading. Consequently, voltage instability has become a major concern, and reactive power support is vital to enhance transmission grid performance. Improved reactive power support to distressed grid is possible through the application of relatively unfamiliar emerging technologies of "Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS)" devices and "Distributed Energy Resources (DERS)." In addition to these infrastructure issues, a lack of situational awareness by system operators can cause major power outages as evidenced by the August 14, 2003 widespread North American blackout. This and many other recent major outages have highlighted the inadequacies of existing power system indexes. In this work, a novel "Index-based reactive compensation scheme" appropriate for both on-line and off-line computation of grid status has been developed. A new voltage stability index (Ls-index) suitable for long transmission lines was developed, simulated, and compared to the existing two-machine modeled L-index. This showed the effect of long distance power wheeling amongst regional transmission organizations. The dissertation further provided models for index modulated voltage source converters (VSC) and index-based load flow analysis of both FACTS and microgrid interconnected power systems using the Newton-Raphson's load flow model incorporated with multi-FACTS devices. The developed package has been made user-friendly through the embodiment of interactive graphical user interface and implemented on the IEEE 14, 30, and 300 bus systems. The results showed reactive compensation has system wide-effect, provided readily accessible system status indicators, ensured seamless DERs interconnection through new islanding modes and enhanced VSC utilization. These outcomes may contribute

  2. Common station system for voltage and reactive power regulation at the Mosenergo TETs-27 heating and electric power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnova, M. E.

    2009-05-15

    The system for common station regulation of the voltage and reactive power at the Mosenergo TETs-27 heating and electric power plant is described briefly. Features of the algorithms for this system, which uses programs and instrumentation from the automatic control system for the electrical equipment in the 450 MW power generation unit No. 3, are examined.

  3. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  4. Reactive Power Compensation Method Considering Minimum Effective Reactive Power Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yiyu; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Zhang; Li, Xuenan; Zuo, Xianghong; Zhen, Jiao; Sudan, Teng

    2017-05-01

    According to the calculation model of minimum generator reactive power reserve of power system voltage stability under the premise of the guarantee, the reactive power management system with reactive power compensation combined generator, the formation of a multi-objective optimization problem, propose a reactive power reserve is considered the minimum generator reactive power compensation optimization method. This method through the improvement of the objective function and constraint conditions, when the system load growth, relying solely on reactive power generation system can not meet the requirement of safe operation, increase the reactive power reserve to solve the problem of minimum generator reactive power compensation in the case of load node.

  5. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  6. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  7. Process stabilization by peak current regulation in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Villamayor, M.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and cost effective approach to stabilize the sputtering process in the transition zone during reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is proposed. The method is based on real-time monitoring and control of the discharge current waveforms. To stabilize the process conditions at a given set point, a feedback control system was implemented that automatically regulates the pulse frequency, and thereby the average sputtering power, to maintain a constant maximum discharge current. In the present study, the variation of the pulse current waveforms over a wide range of reactive gas flows and pulse frequencies during a reactive HiPIMS process of Hf-N in an Ar-N2 atmosphere illustrates that the discharge current waveform is a an excellent indicator of the process conditions. Activating the reactive HiPIMS peak current regulation, stable process conditions were maintained when varying the N2 flow from 2.1 to 3.5 sccm by an automatic adjustment of the pulse frequency from 600 Hz to 1150 Hz and consequently an increase of the average power from 110 to 270 W. Hf-N films deposited using peak current regulation exhibited a stable stoichiometry, a nearly constant power-normalized deposition rate, and a polycrystalline cubic phase Hf-N with (1 1 1)-preferred orientation over the entire reactive gas flow range investigated. The physical reasons for the change in the current pulse waveform for different process conditions are discussed in some detail.

  8. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  9. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  10. A Tariff for Reactive Power - IEEE

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan; Kirby, Brendan J

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a suggested tariff or payment for the local supply of reactive power from distributed energy resources. The authors consider four sample customers, and estimate the cost of supply of reactive power for each customer. The power system savings from the local supply of reactive power are also estimated for a hypothetical circuit. It is found that reactive power for local voltage regulation could be supplied to the distribution system economically by customers when new inverters are installed. The inverter would be supplied with a power factor of 0.8, and would be capable of local voltage regulation to a schedule supplied by the utility. Inverters are now installed with photovoltaic systems, fuel cells and microturbines, and adjustable-speed motor drives.

  11. Reactive power management and voltage control in deregulated power markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert G.

    The research that is the subject of this dissertation is about the management of reactive power and voltage support in the wholesale open access power markets in the United States (US). The purpose of this research is to place decisions about open access market structures, as they relate to reactive power and voltage control, on a logical and consistent economic basis, given the engineering needs of a commercial electric power system. An examination of the electricity markets operating in the US today reveals that current approaches to reactive power management and voltage support are extensions of those based on historical, regulated monopoly electric service. A case for change is built by first looking at the subject of reactive power from an engineering viewpoint and then from an economic perspective. Ultimately, a set of market rules for managing reactive power and voltage support is proposed. The proposal suggests that cost recovery for static and dynamic VARs is appropriately accomplished through the regulated transmission cost of service. Static VAR cost recovery should follow traditional rate recovery methodologies. In the case of dynamic VARs, this work provides a methodology based on the microeconomic theory of the firm for determining such cost. It further suggests that an operational strategy that reduces and limits the use of dynamic VARs, during normal operations, is appropriate. This latter point leads to an increase in the fixed cost of the transmission network but prevents price spikes and short supply situations from affecting, or being affected by, the reactive capability limitations associated with dynamic VARs supplied from synchronous generators. The rules are consistent with a market structure that includes competitive generation and their application will result in the communication of a clear understanding of the responsibilities, related to voltage control, of each type of market entity. In this sense, their application will contribute to

  12. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  13. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  14. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  15. Reactive power and harmonic compensation based on the generalized instantaneous reactive power theory for three-phase power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1996-10-01

    A generalized theory of instantaneous reactive power for three-phase power systems is proposed in this paper. This theory gives a generalized definition of instantaneous reactive power, which is valid for sinusoidal or nonsinusoidal, balanced or unbalanced, three- phase power systems with or without zero-sequence currents and/or voltages. The properties and physical meanings of the newly defined instantaneous reactive power are discussed in detail. With this new reactive power theory, it is very easy to calculate and decompose all components, such as fundamental active/reactive power and current, harmonic current, etc. Reactive power and/or harmonic compensation systems for a three-phase distorted power system with and without zero-sequence components in the source voltage and/or load current are then used as examples to demonstrate the measurement, decomposition, and compensation of reactive power and harmonics.

  16. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  17. Application of Newton's optimal power flow in voltage/reactive power control

    SciTech Connect

    Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S. ); Calovic, M.S. ); Ristanovic, P. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper considers an application of Newton's optimal power flow to the solution of the secondary voltage/reactive power control in transmission networks. An efficient computer program based on the latest achievements in the sparse matrix/vector techniques has been developed for this purpose. It is characterized by good robustness, accuracy and speed. A combined objective function appropriate for various system load levels with suitable constraints, for treatment of the power system security and economy is also proposed. For the real-time voltage/reactive power control, a suboptimal power flow procedure has been derived by using the reduced set of control variables. This procedure is based on the sensitivity theory applied to the determination of zones for the secondary voltage/reactive power control and corresponding reduced set of regulating sources, whose reactive outputs represent control variables in the optimal power flow program. As a result, the optimal power flow program output becomes a schedule to be used by operators in the process of the real-time voltage/reactive power control in both normal and emergency operating states.

  18. Compensation for Harmonic Currents and Reactive Power in Wind Power Generation System using PWM Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Katsuji; Shinhatsubo, Kurato; Iimori, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Kichiro; Saruban, Takamichi; Yamaemori, Takahiro

    In recent year, consciousness of environmental problems is enhancing, and the price of the electric power purchased by an electric power company is established expensive for the power plant utilizing the natural energy. So, the introduction of the wind power generation is promoted in Japan. Generally, squirrel-cage induction machines are widely used as a generator in wind power generation system because of its small size, lightweight and low-cost. However, the induction machines do not have a source of excitation. Thus, it causes the inrush currents and the instantaneous voltage drop when the generator is directly connected to a power grid. To reduce the inrush currents, an AC power regulator is used. Wind power generations are frequently connected to and disconnected from the power grid. However, when the inrush currents are reduced, harmonic currents are caused by phase control of the AC power regulator. And the phase control of AC power regulator cannot control the power factor. Therefore, we propose the use of the AC power regulator to compensate for the harmonic currents and reactive power in the wind power generation system, and demonstrate the validity of its system by simulated and experimental results.

  19. Reactive power optimization using fuzzy load representation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Rahman, K.H.; Shahidehpour, S.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a mathematical formulation for the optimal voltage/reactive power control problem taking into account linguistic declaration of system load values. The fuzzy set theory which is based on the feasibility rather than the frequency of occurrence of an outcome is considered, and possibility distributions are assigned to load values and bus voltages. The objective is to minimize power losses considering various load conditions. The problem is decomposed into four subproblems via the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition for reducing the dimensions of the problem. A second Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition divides each subproblem into several areas leading to a considerable reduction in the dimensions of subproblems. An illustrative example demonstrates the applicability of the approach. The fuzzy approach provides a global solution for the system behavior under various load conditions.

  20. 77 FR 24949 - Reactive Power Resources; Supplemental Notice Requesting Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reactive Power Resources; Supplemental Notice Requesting Comments On April... whether the Commission should reconsider or modify the reactive power provisions of Order No. 661-A and examine what evidence could be developed under Order No. 661 to support a request to apply reactive...

  1. Control circuit maintains unity power factor of reactive load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, M.; Martinage, L. H.

    1966-01-01

    Circuit including feedback control elements automatically corrects the power factor of a reactive load. It maintains power supply efficiency where negative load reactance changes and varies by providing corrective error signals to the control windings of a power supply transformer.

  2. Photovoltaic power regulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Jaster, D.R.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a multi-solar module direct current battery charging arrangement consisting of: a group of solar cells; a reverse current blocking diode; a first relay having an energizing winding; and a set of contacts; the diode, the energizing winding and the solar module connected across the battery; a second relay having a second set of contacts; the first relay contacts operate upon a predetermined current flow through the first relay winding to close the first relay and contacts to operate the second relay. A voltage regulator has a set of contacts. The regulator contacts operate upon the battery reaching a predetermined state of charge as indicated by the voltage level; solar cells and a third relay having a set of contacts; the second relay make contacts, the voltage regulator make contacts, the third relay and the second group of solar cells connected in series; the third relay operated upon the second relay operating indicating the solar cells are functioning, and the voltage regulator operating its associated contacts indicating the batteries require further charging to operate the third relay; and the third relay operated to close the associated contacts to connect the second plurality of solar cells across the battery.

  3. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Magnus, F.; Tryggvason, T. K.; Sveinsson, O. B.; Olafsson, S.

    2012-10-01

    Here we discuss reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering sputtering (HiPIMS) [1] of Ti target in an Ar/N2 and Ar/O2 atmosphere. The discharge current waveform is highly dependent on both the pulse repetition frequency and discharge voltage. The discharge current increases with decreasing frequency or voltage. This we attribute to an increase in the secondary electron emission yield during the self-sputtering phase of the pulse, as nitride [2] or oxide [3] forms on the target. We also discuss the growth of TiN films on SiO2 at temperatures of 22-600 ^oC. The HiPIMS process produces denser films at lower growth temperature and the surface is much smoother and have a significantly lower resistivity than dc magnetron sputtered films on SiO2 at all growth temperatures due to reduced grain boundary scattering [4].[4pt] [1] J. T. Gudmundsson, N. Brenning, D. Lundin and U. Helmersson, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, 30 030801 (2012)[0pt] [2] F. Magnus, O. B. Sveinsson, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, J. Appl. Phys., 110 083306 (2011)[0pt] [3] F. Magnus, T. K. Tryggvason, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., submitted 2012[0pt] [4] F. Magnus, A. S. Ingason, S. Olafsson and J. T. Gudmundsson, IEEE Elec. Dev. Lett., accepted 2012

  4. Compensation of Reactive Power of Isolated Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Bhatti, T. S.; Ramakrishna, K. S. S.

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the automatic reactive power control of an isolated wind-diesel hybrid power system with a synchronous generator (SG) for a diesel genset and an induction generator (IG) with wind energy conversion systems (WECS) to generate electricity. To reduce the gap between reactive power generation and demand, a variable source of reactive power is used such as static synchronous compensator (STATCOM). The mathematical model of the system based on reactive power flow equations is developed. Three examples of the wind-diesel hybrid power systems are considered with different wind power generation capacities to study the effect of the wind power generation on the system performance. The study is based on small signal analysis by considering IEEE type-1 excitation system for the SG. The paper also shows the transient performance of the hybrid systems for 1 % step increase in reactive power load and 1 % step increase in reactive power load plus 1 % step increase in input wind power.

  5. Shunt regulation electric power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, W. H.; Bless, J. J. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A regulated electric power system having load and return bus lines is described. A plurality of solar cells interconnected in a power supplying relationship and having a power shunt tap point electrically spaced from the bus lines is provided. A power dissipator is connected to the shunt tap point and provides for a controllable dissipation of excess energy supplied by the solar cells. A dissipation driver is coupled to the power dissipator and controls its conductance and dissipation and is also connected to the solar cells in a power taping relationship to derive operating power therefrom. An error signal generator is coupled to the load bus and to a reference signal generator to provide an error output signal which is representative of the difference between the electric parameters existing at the load bus and the reference signal generator. An error amplifier is coupled to the error signal generator and the dissipation driver to provide the driver with controlling signals.

  6. Reactivity and Regulation in Cortisol and Behavioral Responses to Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Examined relations between reactivity (peak response) and regulation (response dampening) in 6-month-olds' cortisol and behavioral responses to inoculation. Found that reactivity and regulation were unrelated for both cortisol and behavior, suggesting both measures are needed to characterize more accurately infant response to stress. Found…

  7. Relation of emotional reactivity and regulation to childhood stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Karrass, Jan; Walden, Tedra A.; Conture, Edward G.; Graham, Corrin G.; Arnold, Hayley S.; Hartfield, Kia N.; Schwenk, Krista A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children’s emotional reactivity, emotion regulation and stuttering. Participants were 65 preschool children who stutter (CWS) and 56 preschool children who do not stutter (CWNS). Parents completed the Behavior Style Questionnaire (BSQ) [McDevitt S. C., & Carey, W. B. (1978). A measure of temperament in 3–7 year old children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 19, 245–253]. Three groups of BSQ items measuring emotional reactivity, emotion regulation, and attention regulation were identified by experts in children’s emotions. Findings indicated that when compared to their normally fluent peers, CWS were significantly more reactive, significantly less able to regulate their emotions, and had significantly poorer attention regulation, even after controlling for gender, age, and language abilities. Findings suggest that the relatively greater emotional reactivity experienced by preschool children who stutter, together with their relative inability to flexibly control their attention and regulate the emotions they experience, may contribute to the difficulties these children have establishing reasonably fluent speech and language. Learning outcomes The reader should be able to (1) define emotional reactivity and emotion regulation, (2) explain how emotional reactivity and emotion regulation relate to preschool stuttering, and (3) understand recent empirical evidence linking reactivity and regulation to preschool stuttering. PMID:16488427

  8. A DFIG Islanding Detection Scheme Based on Reactive Power Infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Liu, C.; He, G. Q.; Li, G. H.; Feng, K. H.; Sun, W. W.

    2017-07-01

    A lot of research has been done on photovoltaic (the “PV”) power system islanding detection in recent years. As a comparison, much less attention has been paid to islanding in wind turbines. Meanwhile, wind turbines can work in islanding conditions for quite a long period, which can be harmful to equipments and cause safety hazards. This paper presents and examines a double fed introduction generation (the “DFIG”) islanding detection scheme based on feedback of reactive power and frequency and uses a trigger signal of reactive power infusion which can be obtained by dividing the voltage total harmonic distortion (the "THD") by the voltage THD of last cycle to avoid the deterioration of power quality. This DFIG islanding detection scheme uses feedback of reactive power current loop to amplify the frequency differences in islanding and normal conditions. Simulation results show that the DFIG islanding detection scheme is effective.

  9. Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Xu, Yan; Li, Huijuan; Adhikari, Sarina; Irminger, Philip

    2008-12-01

    Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results

  10. Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Jason; Walling, Reigh; Peter, William; Von Engeln, Edi; Seymour, Eric; Nelson, Robert; Casey, Leo; Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris.

    2012-02-01

    Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

  11. Static reactive power compensators for high-voltage power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A study conducted to summarize the role of static reactive power compensators for high voltage power system applications is described. This information should be useful to the utility system planning engineer in applying static var systems (SVS) to high voltage as (HVAC) systems. The static var system is defined as a form of reactive power compensator. The general need for reactive power compensation in HVAC systems is discussed, and the static var system is compared to other devices utilized to provide reactive power compensation. Examples are presented of applying SVS for specific functions, such as the prevention of voltage collapse. The operating principles of commercially available SVS's are discussed in detail. The perormance and active power loss characteristics of SVS types are compared.

  12. Voltage Stability Impact of Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Systems Utilizing Dynamic Reactive Power Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omole, Adedamola

    Photovoltaic (PV) DGs can be optimized to provide reactive power support to the grid, although this feature is currently rarely utilized as most DG systems are designed to operate with unity power factor and supply real power only to the grid. In this work, the voltage stability of a power system embedded with PV DG is examined in the context of the high reactive power requirement after a voltage sag or fault. A real-time dynamic multi-function power controller that enables renewable source PV DGs to provide the reactive power support necessary to maintain the voltage stability of the microgrid, and consequently, the wider power system is proposed. The loadability limit necessary to maintain the voltage stability of an interconnected microgrid is determined by using bifurcation analysis to test for the singularity of the network Jacobian and load differential equations with and without the contribution of the DG. The maximum and minimum real and reactive power support permissible from the DG is obtained from the loadability limit and used as the limiting factors in controlling the real and reactive power contribution from the PV source. The designed controller regulates the voltage output based on instantaneous power theory at the point-of-common coupling (PCC) while the reactive power supply is controlled by means of the power factor and reactive current droop method. The control method is implemented in a modified IEEE 13-bus test feeder system using PSCADRTM power system analysis software and is applied to the model of a Tampa ElectricRTM PV installation at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL. This dissertation accomplishes the systematic analysis of the voltage impact of a PV DG-embedded power distribution system. The method employed in this work bases the contribution of the PV resource on the voltage stability margins of the microgrid rather than the commonly used loss-of-load probability (LOLP) and effective load-carrying capability (ELCC) measures. The results of

  13. Reactive power optimization strategy considering analytical impedance ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongchao; Shen, Weibing; Liu, Jinming; Guo, Maoran; Zhang, Shoulin; Xu, Keqiang; Wang, Wanjun; Sui, Jinlong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, considering the traditional reactive power optimization cannot realize the continuous voltage adjustment and voltage stability, a dynamic reactive power optimization strategy is proposed in order to achieve both the minimization of network loss and high voltage stability with wind power. Due to the fact that wind power generation is fluctuant and uncertain, electrical equipments such as transformers and shunt capacitors may be operated frequently in order to achieve minimization of network loss, which affect the lives of these devices. In order to solve this problem, this paper introduces the derivation process of analytical impedance ratio based on Thevenin equivalent. Thus, the multiple objective function is proposed to minimize the network loss and analytical impedance ratio. Finally, taking the improved IEEE 33-bus distribution system as example, the result shows that the movement of voltage control equipment has been reduced and network loss increment is controlled at the same time, which proves the applicable value of this strategy.

  14. Reactive Power Compensation Using an Energy Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    power factor PG&E Pacific Gas and Electric PI proportional-integral PLL phase-locked loop PWM pulse width modulation RMS root mean square USMC...the reactive power compensation method presented in this thesis is the use of a phase-locked loop ( PLL ) control scheme to detect and match the source...current and voltage phase angles. While developing a PLL control scheme may be a more complex design effort, it could potentially alleviate the

  15. Reactive power in the full Gaussian light wave.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2009-11-01

    The electric current sources that are required for the excitation of the fundamental Gaussian beam and the corresponding full Gaussian light wave are determined. The current sources are situated on the secondary source plane that forms the boundary between the two half-spaces in which the waves are launched. The electromagnetic fields and the complex power generated by the current sources are evaluated. For the fundamental Gaussian beam, the reactive power vanishes, and the normalization is chosen such that the real power is 2 W. The various full Gaussian waves are identified by the length parameter b(t) that lies in the range 0 < or = b(t) < or = b, where b is the Rayleigh distance. The other parameters are the wavenumber k, the free-space wavelength lambda, and the beam waist w0 at the input plane. The dependence of the real power of the full Gaussian light wave on b(t)/b and w0/lambda is examined. For a specified w0/lambda, the reactive power, which can be positive or negative, increases as b(t)/b is increased from 0 to 1 and becomes infinite for b(t)/b=1. For a specified b(t)/b, the reactive power approaches zero as kw0 is increased and reaches the limiting value of zero of the paraxial beam.

  16. 77 FR 11109 - Reactive Power Resources; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... interconnecting asynchronous generators and raises questions concerning the need and efficacy of continuing the... by which reactive power is currently secured such as through self-supply; and how a technology that... accessibility@ferc.gov or call toll free 1-866-208- 3372 (voice) or 202-208-8659 (TTY); or send a fax to...

  17. Circuit reactivation dynamically regulates synaptic plasticity in neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruskal, Peter B.; Li, Lucy; Maclean, Jason N.

    2013-10-01

    Circuit reactivations involve a stereotyped sequence of neuronal firing and have been behaviourally linked to memory consolidation. Here we use multiphoton imaging and patch-clamp recording, and observe sparse and stereotyped circuit reactivations that correspond to UP states within active neurons. To evaluate the effect of the circuit on synaptic plasticity, we trigger a single spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) pairing once per circuit reactivation. The pairings reliably fall within a particular epoch of the circuit sequence and result in long-term potentiation. During reactivation, the amplitude of plasticity significantly correlates with the preceding 20-25 ms of membrane depolarization rather than the depolarization at the time of pairing. This circuit-dependent plasticity provides a natural constraint on synaptic potentiation, regulating the inherent instability of STDP in an assembly phase-sequence model. Subthreshold voltage during endogenous circuit reactivations provides a critical informative context for plasticity and facilitates the stable consolidation of a spatiotemporal sequence.

  18. Unity power factor switching regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A single or multiphase boost chopper regulator operating with unity power factor, for use such as to charge a battery is comprised of a power section for converting single or multiphase line energy into recharge energy including a rectifier (10), one inductor (L.sub.1) and one chopper (Q.sub.1) for each chopper phase for presenting a load (battery) with a current output, and duty cycle control means (16) for each chopper to control the average inductor current over each period of the chopper, and a sensing and control section including means (20) for sensing at least one load parameter, means (22) for producing a current command signal as a function of said parameter, means (26) for producing a feedback signal as a function of said current command signal and the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, means (28) for sensing current through said inductor, means (18) for comparing said feedback signal with said sensed current to produce, in response to a difference, a control signal applied to the duty cycle control means, whereby the average inductor current is proportionate to the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, and instantaneous line current is thereby maintained proportionate to the instantaneous line voltage, thus achieving a unity power factor. The boost chopper is comprised of a plurality of converters connected in parallel and operated in staggered phase. For optimal harmonic suppression, the duty cycles of the switching converters are evenly spaced, and by negative coupling between pairs 180.degree. out-of-phase, peak currents through the switches can be reduced while reducing the inductor size and mass.

  19. Voltage Control in Distribution Systems Considered Reactive Power Output Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Masato; Senjyu, Tomonobu; Yona, Atsushi; Urasaki, Naomitsu; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    In recent years, distributed generation (DG) and renewable energy source (RES) are attracting special attention to distribution systems. Renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) system and wind turbine generator are used as a source of clean energy. However, the large amount of distributed generation causes voltage deviation beyond a statutory range in distribution systems. This paper proposes a methodology for voltage control by using inverters interfaced with DG and tap changing transformers. In the proposed method a one-day schedule of voltage references for the control devices are determined by an optimization technique based on predicted values of load demand and PV power generation. Furthermore, decided reactive power output according to the locally measurable voltage based on droop characteristic. Slope and base value on droop characteristic are selected by fuzzy control. The proposed method accomplishes improvement against voltage distribution considered the reactive power output sharing and reduction of distribution loss. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by using MATLAB®.

  20. Optimal reactive power control of grid connected photovoltaic resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Joshua Ryan

    As more photovoltaic distributed generation resources are installed on distribution power systems, selective control of the inverters connecting the DC power sources presents the opportunity to supply both real and reactive power at the point of common coupling. This thesis presents a simulated distribution system with individually controlled PV resources with the objective of minimizing total system losses while operating at the maximum power point and below the simulated rating of the associated inverters. The control strategy assumes the characteristics of the distribution system are known and solves for the optimal power flow operating point. The ability of each PV source to provide real and reactive power varies instantaneously as irradiance changes, so the operating point for each resource must be constantly recalculated and adjusted. The assumption of known system paramaters can be justified in a SmartGrid context, and a solution based on overall system power flow should be considered as a benchmark for any other state estimation or local control approaches.

  1. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: combining simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Tomas; Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has recently been used for preparation of various oxide films with high application potential, such as TiO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, HfO2, VO2. Using our patented method of pulsed reactive gas flow control with an optimized reactive gas inlet, we achieved significantly higher deposition rates compared to typical continuous dc magnetron depositions. We have developed a time-dependent model of the reactive HiPIMS. The model includes a depth-resolved description of the sputtered target (featuring sputtering, implantation and knock-on implantation processes) and a parametric description of the discharge plasma (dissociation of reactive gas, ionization and return of sputtered atoms and gas rarefaction). The model uses a combination of experimental and simulation data as input. We have calculated the composition of the target and substrate for several deposition conditions. The simulations predict a reduced compound coverage of the target in HiPIMS compared to the continuous dc sputtering regime which explains the increased deposition rate. The simulations show that an increased dissociation of oxygen in a HiPIMS discharge is beneficial to achieve stoichiometric films on the substrate at high deposition rates.

  2. Osmotic regulation of airway reactivity by epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Yuan, L X; Chang, V C; Viola, J O; Cutler, D; Pettit, L L

    1999-05-01

    Inhalation of nonisotonic solutions can elicit pulmonary obstruction in asthmatic airways. We evaluated the hypothesis that the respiratory epithelium is involved in responses of the airways to nonisotonic solutions using the guinea pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to restrict applied agents to the mucosal (intraluminal) or serosal (extraluminal) surface of the airway. In methacholine-contracted tracheae, intraluminally applied NaCl or KCl equipotently caused relaxation that was unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but was attenuated by removal of the epithelium and Na+ and Cl- channel blockers. Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter and nitric oxide synthase blockers caused a slight inhibition of relaxation, whereas Na+,K+-pump inhibition produced a small potentiation. Intraluminal hyperosmolar KCl and NaCl inhibited contractions in response to intra- or extraluminally applied methacholine, as well as neurogenic cholinergic contractions elicited with electric field stimulation (+/- indomethacin). Extraluminally applied NaCl and KCl elicited epithelium-dependent relaxation (which for KCl was followed by contraction). In contrast to the effects of hyperosmolarity, intraluminal hypo-osmolarity caused papaverine-inhibitable contractions (+/- epithelium). These findings suggest that the epithelium is an osmotic sensor which, through the release of epithelium-derived relaxing factor, can regulate airway diameter by modulating smooth muscle responsiveness and excitatory neurotransmission.

  3. Relation of Emotional Reactivity and Regulation to Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karrass, Jan; Walden, Tedra A.; Conture, Edward G.; Graham, Corrin G.; Arnold, Hayley S.; Hartfield, Kia N.; Schwenk, Krista A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's emotional reactivity, emotion regulation and stuttering. Participants were 65 preschool children who stutter (CWS) and 56 preschool children who do not stutter (CWNS). Parents completed the Behavior Style Questionnaire (BSQ) [McDevitt S. C., & Carey, W. B. (1978). A…

  4. Relation of Emotional Reactivity and Regulation to Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karrass, Jan; Walden, Tedra A.; Conture, Edward G.; Graham, Corrin G.; Arnold, Hayley S.; Hartfield, Kia N.; Schwenk, Krista A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's emotional reactivity, emotion regulation and stuttering. Participants were 65 preschool children who stutter (CWS) and 56 preschool children who do not stutter (CWNS). Parents completed the Behavior Style Questionnaire (BSQ) [McDevitt S. C., & Carey, W. B. (1978). A…

  5. Maternal Regulation of Infant Reactivity From 2 to 6 Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahromi, Laudan B.; Putnam, Samuel P.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has investigated the effect of maternal soothing behaviors on reducing infant reactivity but not the differential effects of specific maternal behaviors on infant stress responses. The present study investigated maternal regulation of 2- and 6-month-olds' responses to an inoculation and found a significant decline with age in…

  6. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  7. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  8. Power-supply regulation by microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J.; Langenbach, H.

    1983-01-01

    Many small-magnet power supplies are regulated by using a microprocessor system to generate control voltages to continuously servoregulate each power supply. The power supplies are of very simple design since all regulation and feedback hardware are parts of the microprocessor system. Most of the supplies are bipolar transistor followers, powered by a common unregulated dc power supply and are used to power trim steering magnets on the three NSLS synchrotron rings. Twelve-bit accuracy is obtained using commercially available microprocessor pc cards.

  9. Power-MOSFET Voltage Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. N.; Gray, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-six parallel MOSFET devices with two-stage feedback circuit form a high-current dc voltage regulator that also acts as fully-on solid-state switch when fuel-cell out-put falls below regulated voltage. Ripple voltage is less than 20 mV, transient recovery time is less than 50 ms. Parallel MOSFET's act as high-current dc regulator and switch. Regulator can be used wherever large direct currents must be controlled. Can be applied to inverters, industrial furnaces photovoltaic solar generators, dc motors, and electric autos.

  10. A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; King, Thomas F

    2006-04-01

    the best way to allocate the benefit among customers, utilities, transmission companies or RTOs. With the hidden benefits discovered, it will be easier for the policy maker to re-assess the value of reactive power and to form a sound competitive market for this service. Along with the capability of DE to provide local reactive power, a market needs to exist to promote the operation of DE to regulate voltage and net power factor. There are a number of potential benefits that have been identified including capacity relief, loss reduction, improved system reliability, extended equipment life, reduced transport of reactive power from the G&T, and improved local voltage regulation and power factor. An attempt has been made using very simple data and cases to quantify these benefits. Only the model of a larger and more detailed distribution system with DE can truly give a full picture of the benefits that reactive power from local DE can provide.

  11. Redox signaling regulated by electrophiles and reactive sulfur species

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Motohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ihara, Hideshi; Fujii, Shigemoto; Motohashi, Hozumi; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Redox signaling is a key modulator of oxidative stress induced by nonspecific insults of biological molecules generated by reactive oxygen species. Current redox biology is revisiting the traditional concept of oxidative stress, such that toxic effects of reactive oxygen species are protected by diverse antioxidant systems upregulated by oxidative stress responses that are physiologically mediated by redox-dependent cell signaling pathways. Redox signaling is thus precisely regulated by endogenous electrophilic substances that are generated from reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and its derivative reactive species during stress responses. Among electrophiles formed endogenously, 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) has unique cell signaling functions, and pathways for its biosynthesis, signaling mechanism, and metabolism in cells have been clarified. Reactive sulfur species such as cysteine hydropersulfides that are abundant in cells are likely involved in 8-nitro-cGMP metabolism. These new aspects of redox biology may stimulate innovative and multidisciplinary research in cell and stem cell biology; infectious diseases, cancer, metabolic syndrome, ageing, and neurodegenerative diseases; and other oxidative stress-related disorders. This review focuses on the most recent progress in the biosynthesis, cell signaling, and metabolism of 8-nitro-cGMP, which is a likely target for drug development and lead to discovery of novel therapeutics for many diseases. PMID:27013774

  12. Sensitivity-based reactive power control for voltage profile improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Exposito, A.G.; Ramos, J.L.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Macias, J.L.R. ); Salinas, Y.C.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a procedure for dispatching reactive power when voltage deviations are not acceptable. The proposed method, intended for real-time use, determines which control variables are actually effective for solving voltage violations. Efficiency is measured according to sensitivities, current voltage profile and reserve margin of control variables. The selected control variables are rescheduled in proportion to their efficiency coefficients. State-of-the-art sparsity techniques are used to speed-up computation of sensitivities. An example is included to show effectiveness of the method.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Stomatal Movements.

    PubMed

    Sierla, Maija; Waszczak, Cezary; Vahisalu, Triin; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Guard cells form stomatal pores that optimize photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake with minimal water loss. Stomatal movements are controlled by complex signaling networks that respond to environmental and endogenous signals. Regulation of stomatal aperture requires coordinated activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating enzymes, signaling proteins, and downstream executors such as ion pumps, transporters, and plasma membrane channels that control guard cell turgor pressure. Accumulation of ROS in the apoplast and chloroplasts is among the earliest hallmarks of stomatal closure. Subsequent increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration governs the activity of multiple kinases that regulate the activity of ROS-producing enzymes and ion channels. In parallel, ROS directly regulate the activity of multiple proteins via oxidative posttranslational modifications to fine-tune guard cell signaling. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the role of ROS in stomatal closure and discuss the importance of ROS in regulation of signal amplification and specificity in guard cells.

  14. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  15. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  16. Short-term scheduling of reactive power controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Yingyi; Liao Csongming

    1995-05-01

    A two-level approach is presented to solve the problem of optimal short-term (one day) scheduling of reactive power controllers in this paper. The entire problem is decomposed into two levels: the master and the slave levels. The master level deals with minimization of the depreciation cost of compensators and EHV transformer taps in order to reduce the control action for compensators and EHV transformer taps while satisfying operating constraints. The slave level treats minimization of capitalized MW losses while satisfying system security constraints. The slave level also treats OLTCs and determines scheduling of the generator voltages. These two levels interact through linear constraints in the iteration process. A practical 265-bus system, namely Taiwan Power System, are used to serve as a sample to show the applicability of the presented approach.

  17. Behavioral reactivity to emotion challenge is associated with cortisol reactivity and regulation at 7, 15, and 24 months of age.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Alexandra; Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas A; Stifter, Cynthia; Voegtline, Kristin

    2014-04-01

    Emotionally arousing stimuli have been largely unsuccessful in eliciting cortisol responses in young children. Whether or not emotion challenge will elicit a cortisol response, however, may in part be determined by the extent to which the tasks elicit behavioral reactivity and regulation. We examined relations of behavioral reactivity and regulation to emotional arousal in the context of fear and frustration to the cortisol response at 7, 15, and 24 months of age in a low income, rural population based sample of 1,292 families followed longitudinally from birth. At each age, children participated in fear and frustration inducing tasks, and cortisol samples were taken at three time points (before the tasks began, 20 min following peak emotional arousal or after the series of tasks ended, and 40 min after peak arousal or the tasks ended) in order to capture both increases (reactivity) and subsequent decreases (regulation) in the cortisol response. Using multilevel models, we predicted the cortisol response from measures of behavioral reactivity and regulation. At 7 months of age, cortisol reactivity and recovery were related to behavioral reactivity during a frustration-eliciting task and marginally related to behavioral reactivity during a fear-eliciting task. At 15 and 24 months of age, however, cortisol reactivity and recovery were related only to behavioral reactivity during a fear-eliciting task. Results indicate that while behavioral reactivity is predictive of whether or not infants and young children will exhibit a cortisol response to emotionally arousing tasks, behavioral and cortisol reactivity are not necessarily coupled.

  18. Reactive Power Laboratory: Synchronous Condenser Testing&Modeling Results - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, SD

    2005-09-27

    The subject report documents the work carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during months 5-7 (May-July 2005) of a multi-year research project. The project has the overall goal of developing methods of incorporating distributed energy (DE) that can produce reactive power locally and for injecting into the distribution system. The objective for this new type of DE is to be able to provide voltage regulation and dynamic reactive power reserves without the use of extensive communication and control systems. The work performed over this three-month period focused on four aspects of the overall objective: (1) characterization of a 250HP (about 300KVAr) synchronous condenser (SC) via test runs at the ORNL Reactive Power Laboratory; (2) development of a data acquisition scheme for collecting the necessary voltage, current and power readings at the synchronous condenser and on the distribution system; (3) development of algorithms for analyzing raw test data from the various test runs; and (4) validation of a steady-state model for the synchronous condenser via the use of a commercial software package to study its effects on the ORNL 13.8/2.4kV distribution network.

  19. Unified active and reactive power modulation of HVDC transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, C. E.; Pohl, R. V.

    1981-11-01

    The power modulation of a high voltage direct current (HVDC) system for stabilization of an ac/dc network was investigated. It was found that simultaneous modulation of both dc current and voltage was more effective than just current modulation by itself, since the dc voltage modulation could be used to minimize the reactive power changes resulting from a change of the dc current. This helps stabilize the ac busbar voltages at the converters, which reduces undesirable load flow changes to voltage dependent ac loads, thus improving the effectiveness of the dc power modulation. This unified modulation control concept was evaluated by means of digital computer studies as well as a special purpose HVDC simulator. Several combined ac/dc power transmission systems were synthesized for testing of different modulation controller concepts. An optimum controller design incorporating a linear quadratic control algorithm with full state feedback was first studied. This provided a basis for comparison of suboptimal controller designs utilizing reduced state feedback and a Kalman filter state reconstruction technique.

  20. Transient Control of Synchronous Machine Active and Reactive Power in Micro-grid Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Luke G.

    There are two main topics associated with this dissertation. The first is to investigate phase-to-neutral fault current magnitude occurring in generators with multiple zero-sequence current sources. The second is to design, model, and tune a linear control system for operating a micro-grid in the event of a separation from the electric power system. In the former case, detailed generator, AC8B excitation system, and four-wire electric power system models are constructed. Where available, manufacturers data is used to validate the generator and exciter models. A gain-delay with frequency droop control is used to model an internal combustion engine and governor. The four wire system is connected through a transformer impedance to an infinite bus. Phase-to-neutral faults are imposed on the system, and fault magnitudes analyzed against three-phase faults to gauge their severity. In the latter case, a balanced three-phase system is assumed. The model structure from the former case - but using data for a different generator - is incorporated with a model for an energy storage device and a net load model to form a micro-grid. The primary control model for the energy storage device has a high level of detail, as does the energy storage device plant model in describing the LC filter and transformer. A gain-delay battery and inverter model is used at the front end. The net load model is intended to be the difference between renewable energy sources and load within a micro-grid system that has separated from the grid. Given the variability of both renewable generation and load, frequency and voltage stability are not guaranteed. This work is an attempt to model components of a proposed micro-grid system at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, and design, model, and tune a linear control system for operation in the event of a separation from the electric power system. The control module is responsible for management of frequency and active power, and voltage and reactive

  1. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor II) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D. )

    1989-11-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations.

  2. 78 FR 77670 - Zero Rate Reactive Power Rate Schedules; Notice Allowing Post-Workshop Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Comments On December 11, 2013, a Commission staff-led workshop explored the mechanics of filing reactive... written comments focused on the mechanics of filing reactive power rate schedules for which there is no...

  3. Reactive oxygen species in regulation of fungal development.

    PubMed

    Gessler, N N; Aver'yanov, A A; Belozerskaya, T A

    2007-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed by fungi in the course of metabolic activity. ROS production increases in fungi due to various stress agents such as starvation, light, mechanical damage, and interactions with some other living organisms. Regulation of ROS level appears to be very important during development of the fungal organism. ROS sources in fungal cells, their sensors, and ROS signal transduction pathways are discussed in this review. Antioxidant defense systems in different classes of fungi are characterized in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on ROS functions in interactions of phytopathogenic fungi with plant cells.

  4. Advanced Power Regulator Developed for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The majority of new satellites generate electrical power using photovoltaic solar arrays and store energy in batteries for use during eclipse periods. Careful regulation of battery charging during insolation can greatly increase the expected lifetime of the satellite. The battery charge regulator is usually custom designed for each satellite and its specific mission. Economic competition in the small satellite market requires battery charge regulators that are lightweight, efficient, inexpensive, and modular enough to be used in a wide variety of satellites. A new battery charge regulator topology has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to address these needs. The new regulator topology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. A transformer-isolated buck converter is connected such that the high input line is connected in series with the output. This "bypass connection" biases the converter's output onto the solar array voltage. Because of this biasing, the converter only processes the fraction of power necessary to charge the battery above the solar array voltage. Likewise, the same converter hookup can be used to regulate the battery output to the spacecraft power bus with similar fractional power processing. The advantages of this scheme are: 1) Because only a fraction of the power is processed through the dc-dc converter, the single- stage conversion efficiency is 94 to 98 percent; 2) Costly, high-efficiency dc-dc converters are not necessary for high end-to-end system efficiency; 3) The system is highly fault tolerant because the bypass connection will still deliver power if the dc-dc converter fails; and 4) The converters can easily be connected in parallel, allowing higher power systems to be built from a common building block. This new technology will be spaceflight tested in the Photovoltaic Regulator Kit Experiment

  5. Advanced Power Regulator Developed for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The majority of new satellites generate electrical power using photovoltaic solar arrays and store energy in batteries for use during eclipse periods. Careful regulation of battery charging during insolation can greatly increase the expected lifetime of the satellite. The battery charge regulator is usually custom designed for each satellite and its specific mission. Economic competition in the small satellite market requires battery charge regulators that are lightweight, efficient, inexpensive, and modular enough to be used in a wide variety of satellites. A new battery charge regulator topology has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to address these needs. The new regulator topology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. A transformer-isolated buck converter is connected such that the high input line is connected in series with the output. This "bypass connection" biases the converter's output onto the solar array voltage. Because of this biasing, the converter only processes the fraction of power necessary to charge the battery above the solar array voltage. Likewise, the same converter hookup can be used to regulate the battery output to the spacecraft power bus with similar fractional power processing.

  6. Investigating the role of reactive oxygen species in regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Spencer B

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular lysosomal degradation process induced under stress conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate autophagy implicated in cell survival, death, development, and many human diseases. This could be through generation of ROS from intracellular compartments such as the mitochondria or an external source such as oxidative stress. Various methods have been developed for the detection of autophagy; however, the implementation of these methods and the interpretation of results often differ. In this chapter, we summarize the current understanding of autophagy and ROS regulation of autophagy. Methods available for detecting autophagy under ROS conditions are described and considerations that need to be addressed when designing experimental protocols discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    The research work presented in this thesis discusses various complex issues associated with reactive power management and pricing in the context of new operating paradigms in deregulated power systems, proposing appropriate policy solutions. An integrated two-level framework for reactive power management is set forth, which is both suitable for a competitive market and ensures a secure and reliable operation of the associated power system. The framework is generic in nature and can be adopted for any electricity market structure. The proposed hierarchical reactive power market structure comprises two stages: procurement of reactive power resources on a seasonal basis, and real-time reactive power dispatch. The main objective of the proposed framework is to provide appropriate reactive power support from service providers at least cost, while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed procurement procedure is based on a two-step optimization model. First, the marginal benefits of reactive power supply from each provider, with respect to system security, are obtained by solving a loadability-maximization problem subject to transmission security constraints imposed by voltage and thermal limits. Second, the selected set of generators is determined by solving an optimal power flow (OPF)-based auction. This auction maximizes a societal advantage function comprising generators' offers and their corresponding marginal benefits with respect to system security, and considering all transmission system constraints. The proposed procedure yields the selected set of generators and zonal price components, which would form the basis for seasonal contracts between the system operator and the selected reactive power service providers. The main objective of the proposed reactive power dispatch model is to minimize the total payment burden on the Independent System Operator (ISO), which is associated with reactive power dispatch. The real power generation is

  8. Anticipatory regulation of complex power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieno, Thomas Edward

    Electric generation control is performed in a distributed manner to supply power to geographically defined control areas. The goal of generation control is to keep the inadvertent flow of power across a control area's boundary as small as possible. If a difference exists between the power supplied and the power demanded in a control area, the load deficit or surplus would be either borrowed from or stored as the kinetic energy in rotating machines on the grid. This thesis addresses the challenge of matching the power demand of a local area grid with the power delivered by a coal-fired power plant. An anticipatory controller for a model power plant is presented to prescribe the power output into the grid. The control system forecasts what the future demand of the power customers in a control area is likely to be and modifies the fuel input to the power generation facility in order to match the predicted demand. A neural network was found to be an adaptable and robust prediction mechanism for the highly nonlinear data found in the power consumption patterns in a residential area of the Commonwealth Edison grid. The corresponding control schedule of the power plant was tuned to match the anticipated demand using an iterative neural network approach. The use of neural networks and an iterative scheme allows the controller design in this research to be applied to a broad range of control problems. The control methodology presented takes into account limits in the magnitude and rate of control actions. Simulations show that this implementation of anticipatory control of electric power demand is effective and especially well suited to dynamic systems that include a dead time or control limitations. The response of the anticipatory neural network control system was shown to be more energy efficient than feedback control for a typical thermal power regulation facility and to have a much smoother, reduced control effort.

  9. Advanced configuration of hybrid passive filter for reactive power and harmonic compensation.

    PubMed

    Kececioglu, O Fatih; Acikgoz, Hakan; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Harmonics is one of the major power quality problems for power systems. The harmonics can be eliminated by power filters such as passive, active, and hybrid. In this study, a new passive filter configuration has been improved in addition to the existing passive filter configurations. Conventional hybrid passive filters are not successful to compensate rapidly changing reactive power demand. The proposed configure are capable of compensating both harmonics and reactive power at the same time. Simulation results show that performance of reactive power and harmonic compensation with advanced hybrid passive filter is better than conventional hybrid passive filters.

  10. Time resolved ion energy distribution functions of non-reactive and reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Katharina; Breilmann, Wolfgang; Maszl, Christian; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a technique for thin film deposition and can be operated in reactive and non-reactive mode. The growth rate of HiPIMS in non-reactive mode reduces to 30% compared to direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS) at same average power. However, the quality of the coatings produced with HiPIMS is excellent which makes these plasmas highly appealing. In reactive mode target poisoning is occurring which changes the plasma dynamics. An advantage of reactive HiPIMS is that it can be operated hysteresis-free which can result in a higher growth rate compared to dcMS. In this work thin films are deposited by a HiPIMS plasma which is generated by short pulses of 100 μs with high power densities in the range of 1 kW/cm2. Ar and Ar/N2 admixtures are used as a working gas to sputter a 2'' titanium target. The particle transport is analysed with time resolved ion energy distribution functions which are measured by a mass spectrometer with a temporal resolution of 2 μs. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy is executed to investigate the particle dynamics of different species. The time and energy resolved particle fluxes in non-reactive and reactive mode are compared and implications on the sputter process are discussed.

  11. An expert system for voltage and reactive power control of a power system

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.J.; Malik, O.P.; Hope, G.S. )

    1988-11-01

    A methodology, called the sensitivity tree, which can be easily used to form an expert system for real-time control is proposed in this paper. Based on this methodology, an expert system for control of voltage and reactive power of a power system is developed. The main objective of this expert system is to help the operator detect buses experiencing abnormal conditions, select the most effective control measures and calculate the control actions required to overcome the voltage violation. The control measures used to alleviate the voltage problem are capacitor compensation, transformer tap and generator terminal voltage changes. By keeping the bus voltage in the entire system within limits, system security is increased. The expert system is written in PROLOG language. Simulations studies with this expert system applied to a 30 bus power system show satisfactory results.

  12. Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jason; Rizy, D Tom; Kueck, John D

    2007-01-01

    Herein is discussed the instrumentation and control requirements for achieving the goal of operating multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in parallel to regulate local voltage. The process for establishing the flexible laboratory control and data acquisition system that allows for the integration of multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in XXXX Laboratory's Distributed Energy - Communications and Controls Laboratory (DECC) is discussed. The DE devices control local distribution system voltage through dynamic reactive power production. Although original efforts were made to control the reactive power (RP) output using information from commercially available meters specifically designed for monitoring and analyzing electric power values, these "intelligent" meters did not provide the flexibility needed. A very flexible and capable real-time monitoring and control system was selected after the evaluation of various methods of data acquisition (DAQ) and control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DAQ and controls system development. The chosen controller is a commercially available real-time controller from dSPACE. This controller has many excellent features including a very easy programming platform through Simulink and Matlab's Real Time Workshop. The dSPACE system proved to provide both the flexibility and expandability needed to integrate and control the RP producing devices under consideration. The desire was to develop controls with this flexible laboratory instrumentation and controls setup that could be eventually be included in an embedded controller on a DE device. Some experimental results are included that clearly show that some functional control strategies are currently being tested.

  13. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  14. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  15. Energy Storage and Reactive Power Compensator in a Large Wind Farm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.; Romanowitz, H.

    2003-10-01

    The size of wind farm power systems is increasing, and so is the number of wind farms contributing to the power systems network. The size of wind turbines is also increasing--from less than 1 MW a few years ago to the 2- to 3-MW machines being installed today and the 5-MW machines under development. The interaction of the wind farm, energy storage, reactive power compensation, and the power system network is being investigated. Because the loads and the wind farms' output fluctuate during the day, the use of energy storage and reactive power compensation is ideal for the power system network. Energy storage and reactive power compensation can minimize real/reactive power imbalances that can affect the surrounding power system. In this paper, we will show how the contribution of wind farms affects the power distribution network and how the power distribution network, energy storage, and reactive power compensation interact when the wind changes. We will also investigate the size of the components in relation to each other and to the power system.

  16. 78 FR 63177 - Order on Voluntary Remand and Clarifying Policy on Filing of Reactive Power Service Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Order on Voluntary Remand and Clarifying Policy on Filing of Reactive Power... Power Generating L.P. \\1\\ (Chehalis) proposed for supplying Reactive Supply and Voltage Control from Generation Sources Service (reactive power) to the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville or BPA) is a...

  17. Duty cycle control in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of hafnium and niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Treverrow, B.; Murdoch, B.; Xie, D.; Ross, A. E.; Partridge, J. G.; Falconer, I. S.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Instabilities in reactive sputtering have technological consequences and have been attributed to the formation of a compound layer on the target surface (‘poisoning’). Here we demonstrate how the duty cycle of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) can be used to control the surface conditions of Hf and Nb targets. Variations in the time resolved target current characteristics as a function of duty cycle were attributed to gas rarefaction and to the degree of poisoning of the target surface. As the operation transitions from Ar driven sputtering to metal driven sputtering, the secondary electron emission changes and reduces the target current. The target surface transitions smoothly from a poisoned state at low duty cycles to a quasi-metallic state at high duty cycles. Appropriate selection of duty cycle increases the deposition rate, eliminates the need for active regulation of oxygen flow and enables stable reactive deposition of stoichiometric metal oxide films. A model is presented for the reactive HIPIMS process in which the target operates in a partially poisoned mode with different degrees of oxide layer distribution on its surface that depends on the duty cycle. Finally, we show that by tuning the pulse characteristics, the refractive indices of the metal oxides can be controlled without increasing the absorption coefficients, a result important for the fabrication of optical multilayer stacks.

  18. Advanced power cube for wind power and grid regulation services

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kevin; Murphy, Maureen

    2012-10-31

    The objective of this project was to develop advanced power batteries suitable for power grid regulation services and for renewable energy applications. The primary goals were to purchase equipment, design and build equipment, determine equipment layout, install equipment, design and develop advanced power batteries, conduct trial manufacturing operations, and evaluate the advanced power batteries. The deliverable is a complete process evaluation summary. The purpose of the current work was to improve the speed, efficiency, and quality for advanced power battery production. More specifically, the project scope was focused on the UltraBattery® electrode production process only. The capacitor portion of the UltraBattery® demands a set of equipment specific to capacitor active material (CAM) mixing, transport, application, and curing. Teams were created to purchase and/or design and build equipment suitable for the capacitor electrode production process. Each piece of equipment was individually evaluated, optimized, and verified. At the conclusion of this process, electrodes were produced on the new equipment in the new production area. Batteries were built and tested using the new advanced battery test equipment.

  19. Reactive compatibilizer-tracer: A powerful tool for designing, scaling up and optimizing reactive blending processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-Yun; Feng, Lian-Fang; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer is developed to study reactive polymer blending processes in a twin screw extruder. It is summarized as follows. Fluorescent moieties such as anthracene are attached to a reactive compatibilizer so that the latter can be served both as a compatibilizer and a tracer. When evaluating its compatibilizing efficiency for a polymer blending system, unlike the polymer components of the blend which are continuously fed to the extruder, the reactive compatibilizer-tracer is added as a pulse. The concentration of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer in the polymer blend at the die exit is measured, in-line and in real time, using probes capable of detecting the signal of the emission of fluorescent moieties of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer. In the meantime, the corresponding size of the dispersed phase domains of the blend is determined off-line. These two pieces of information allow assessing the compatibilizing efficiency of a reactive compatibilizer in a much easier manner and using a much smaller amount of compatibilizer. Consequently, the concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer can help select most appropriate compatibilizers under real industrial polymer blending conditions as well as scaling up and/or optimizing them.

  20. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

    2011-05-01

    As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Protrusion Efficiency by Controlling Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Taulet, Nicolas; Delorme-Walker, Violaine D.; DerMardirossian, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Productive protrusions allowing motile cells to sense and migrate toward a chemotactic gradient of reactive oxygen species (ROS) require a tight control of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the mechanisms of how ROS affect cell protrusion and actin dynamics are not well elucidated yet. We show here that ROS induce the formation of a persistent protrusion. In migrating epithelial cells, protrusion of the leading edge requires the precise regulation of the lamellipodium and lamella F-actin networks. Using fluorescent speckle microscopy, we showed that, upon ROS stimulation, the F-actin retrograde flow is enhanced in the lamellipodium. This event coincides with an increase of cofilin activity, free barbed ends formation, Arp2/3 recruitment, and ERK activity at the cell edge. In addition, we observed an acceleration of the F-actin flow in the lamella of ROS-stimulated cells, which correlates with an enhancement of the cell contractility. Thus, this study demonstrates that ROS modulate both the lamellipodium and the lamella networks to control protrusion efficiency. PMID:22876286

  2. Detonation Ground Soils, & Explosive-Contaminated Metal Have No Reactivity Characteristics Under RCRA Hazardous Waste Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    DETONATION GROUND SOILS, & EXPLOSIVE-CONTAMINATED METAL HAVE NO REACTIVITY CHARACTERISTIC UNDER RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE REGULATIONS Jay L. Bishop, PhD...Metal Have No Reactivity Characteristics Under RCRA Hazardous Waste Regulations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  3. Modeling of the Reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Jon Tomas; Lundin, Daniel; Raadu, Michael; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-09-01

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) provides both a high ionization fraction of the sputtered material and a high dissociation fraction of the molecular gas. We demonstrate this through an ionization region model (IRM) of the reactive Ar/O2 HiPIMS discharge with a titanium target. We explore the influence of oxygen dilution on the discharge properties such as electron density, the ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor and the oxygen dissociation fraction. We discuss the important processes and challenges for more detailed modeling of the reactive HiPIMS discharge. Furthermore, we discuss experimental observations during reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering sputtering (HiPIMS) of Ti target in Ar/N2 and Ar/O2 atmosphere. The discharge current waveform is highly dependent on the reactive gas flow rate, pulse repetition frequency and discharge voltage. The discharge current increases with decreasing repetition frequency and increasing flowrate of the reactive gas.

  4. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Eric; Cízková, Alena; Demont, Jocelyne; Vojtísková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, Nicole L W; Keijer, Jaap; Simonnet, Hélène; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, Stanislav; Godinot, Catherine; Houstek, Josef

    2008-08-01

    A decrease in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is characteristic of many cancer types and, in particular, of clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) deficient in von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) gene. In the absence of functional pVHL, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1-alpha and HIF2-alpha subunits are stabilized, which induces the transcription of many genes including those involved in glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Transfection of these cells with vhl is known to restore HIF-alpha subunit degradation and to reduce glycolytic genes transcription. We show that such transfection with vhl of 786-0 CCRC (which are devoid of HIF1-alpha) also increased the content of respiratory chain subunits. However, the levels of most transcripts encoding OXPHOS subunits were not modified. Inhibition of HIF2-alpha synthesis by RNA interference in pVHL-deficient 786-0 CCRC also restored respiratory chain subunit content and clearly demonstrated a key role of HIF in OXPHOS regulation. In agreement with these observations, stabilization of HIF-alpha subunit by CoCl(2) decreased respiratory chain subunit levels in CCRC cells expressing pVHL. In addition, HIF stimulated ROS production and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase content. OXPHOS subunit content was also decreased by added H(2)O(2.) Interestingly, desferrioxamine (DFO) that also stabilized HIF did not decrease respiratory chain subunit level. While CoCl(2) significantly stimulates ROS production, DFO is known to prevent hydroxyl radical production by inhibiting Fenton reactions. This indicates that the HIF-induced decrease in OXPHOS is at least in part mediated by hydroxyl radical production.

  5. Modeling Stratospheric Constituents: Reactive Species That Regulate Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.

    2000-01-01

    Photochemical loss of stratospheric ozone occurs primarily by catalytic cycles whose rates are limited by the concentration of OH, HO2, NO2, ClO, and/or BrO as well as the concentration of either atomic oxygen or of ozone itself. Once the concentrations of these gases are established, the photochemical loss rate of O3 depends on the rate coefficient of only a handful of key reactions. We have developed a method for testing our understanding of stratospheric ozone photochemistry by comparing measured and modeled concentrations of reactive hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine and bromine radicals using a photochemical steady state model constrained by observed concentrations of long-lived precursors (e.g., NO(y), Cl(y), Br(y), O3, H2O, CH4) and environmental parameters such as ozone column, reflectivity, and aerosol surface area. We will show based on analyses of observations obtained by aircraft, balloon, and satellite platforms during the POLARIS campaign that our overall understanding of the processes that regulate these radical species is very good. The most notable current discrepancies are the tendency to underestimate observed NO2 by 15 to 30% for air masses that experience near continuous solar illumination over a 24 hour period and the tendency to underestimate observed OH and H02 by about 10 to 20% during midday and by much larger amounts at high solar zenith angle (SZA > 85). Possible resolutions to these discrepancies will be discussed. This study was carried out in close collaboration with many members of the POLARIS science team.

  6. KRIT1 Regulates the Homeostasis of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-01-01

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45α, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the

  7. KRIT1 regulates the homeostasis of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-07-26

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1(-/-) cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1(-/-) cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45alpha, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the cell

  8. Spindle position regulation for wind power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Chiang, Chao-Wen

    2010-04-01

    The three-time-scale plant model of a wind power generator, including a wind turbine, a flexible vertical shaft, a variable inertia flywheel (VIF) module, an active magnetic bearing (AMB) unit and the applied wind sequence, is constructed. In order to make the wind power generator be still able to operate as the spindle speed exceeds its rated speed, the VIF is equipped so that the spindle speed can be appropriately slowed down once any stronger wind field is exerted. Currently, most of wind energy input is, as a matter of fact, a waste since the commercially available wind power generators only operate for fairly mild or low-speed wind field. To prevent any potential damage due to collision by shaft against conventional bearings, the AMB unit is proposed to replace the traditional bearings and regulate the shaft position deviation. By singular perturbation order-reduction technique, a lower-order plant model can be established for the synthesis of feedback controller. It is found that two major system parameter uncertainties, an additive uncertainty and a multiplicative uncertainty, are constituted by the wind turbine and the VIF, respectively. The upper bounds of system parameters variation can be therefore estimated and the frequency shaping sliding mode control (FSSMC) loop is proposed to account for these uncertainties and suppress the unmodeled higher-order plant dynamics. At last, the efficacy of the FSSMC is verified by intensive computer and experimental simulations for regulation on position deviation of the shaft and counter-balance of unpredictable wind disturbance.

  9. Reactive Inkjet Printing: Reactive Inkjet Printing of Biocompatible Enzyme Powered Silk Micro-Rockets (Small 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Gregory, David A; Zhang, Yu; Smith, Patrick J; Zhao, Xiubo; Ebbens, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    On page 4048, X. Zhao, S. J. Ebbens, and co-workers demonstrate the ability to fabricate biocompatible silk microrockets via reactive inkjet printing. The microrockets are powered by catalase and undergo bubble propulsion in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Microrockets are capable of swimming in a large variety of media including biological solutions. Inkjet printing allows digital definition of enzyme distribution within the silk scaffold to control rocket directionality.

  10. Perspective on fossil power plant layup and reactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, many utilities have developed excess generation capacity problems during period of low system load growth, particularly with new generation units coming on-line. System load studies may indicate that the situation is temporary and higher generation capacity will be needed in the near future. The objective of layup is to prevent component deterioration during the long shut down periods. This paper discusses equipment preservation practices in use by the electric utility industry and the advantages/disadvantages of various layup methods. Other issues related to plant layup and reactivation are also presented.

  11. On the Sequential Control of ITER Poloidal Field Converters for Reactive Power Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongwen; Fu, Peng; Gao, Ge; Huang, Liansheng; Song, Zhiquan; He, Shiying; Wu, Yanan; Dong, Lin; Wang, Min; Fang, Tongzhen

    2014-12-01

    Sequential control applied to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) poloidal field converter system for the purpose of reactive power reduction is the subject of this investigation. Due to the inherent characteristics of thyristor-based phase-controlled converter, the poloidal field converter system consumes a huge amount of reactive power from the grid, which subsequently results in a voltage drop at the 66 kV busbar if no measure is taken. The installation of a static var compensator rated for 750 MVar at the 66 kV busbar is an essential way to compensate reactive power to the grid, which is the most effective measure to solve the problem. However, sequential control of the multi-series converters provides an additional method to improve the natural power factor and thus alleviate the pressure of reactive power demand of the converter system without any additional cost. In the present paper, by comparing with the symmetrical control technique, the advantage of sequential control in reactive power consumption is highlighted. Simulation results based on SIMULINK are found in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  12. Emotional reactivity, regulation and childhood stuttering: A behavioral and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Hayley S.; Conture, Edward G.; Key, Alexandra P.F.; Walden, Tedra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess whether behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of emotional reactivity and regulation are associated with developmental stuttering, as well as determine the feasibility of these methods in preschool-age children. Nine preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and nine preschool-age children who do not stutter (CWNS) listened to brief background conversations conveying happy, neutral, and angry emotions (a resolution conversation followed the angry conversation), then produced narratives based on a text-free storybook. Electroencephalograms (EEG) recorded during listening examined cortical correlates of emotional reactivity and regulation. Speech disfluencies and observed emotion regulation were measured during a narrative immediately after each background conversation. Results indicated that decreased use of regulatory strategies is related to more stuttering in children who stutter. However, no significant differences were found in EEG measurements of emotional reactivity and regulation between CWS and CWNS or between emotion elicitation conditions. Findings were taken to suggest that use of regulatory strategies may relate to the fluency of preschool-age children’s speech-language output. Learner Outcomes: The reader will be able to (1) describe emotional reactivity and regulation processes, (2) discuss evidence for or against the relations of emotional reactivity, regulation and stuttering, (3) understand how multiple measures can be used to measure emotional reactivity and regulation. PMID:21276977

  13. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  14. Review of Reactive Power Dispatch Strategies for Loss Minimization in a DFIG-based Wind Farm

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Baohua; Hu, Weihao; Hou, Peng; ...

    2017-06-27

    This study reviews and compares the performance of reactive power dispatch strategies for the loss minimization of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG)-based Wind Farms (WFs). Twelve possible combinations of three WF level reactive power dispatch strategies and four Wind Turbine (WT) level reactive power control strategies are investigated. All of the combined strategies are formulated based on the comprehensive loss models of WFs, including the loss models of DFIGs, converters, filters, transformers, and cables of the collection system. Optimization problems are solved by a Modified Particle Swarm Optimization (MPSO) algorithm. The effectiveness of these strategies is evaluated by simulations onmore » a carefully designed WF under a series of cases with different wind speeds and reactive power requirements of the WF. The wind speed at each WT inside the WF is calculated using the Jensen wake model. The results show that the best reactive power dispatch strategy for loss minimization comes when the WF level strategy and WT level control are coordinated and the losses from each device in the WF are considered in the objective.« less

  15. Genetic algorithms for optimal reactive power compensation planning on the national grid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, J. D.

    This work investigates the use of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) for optimal Reactive power Compensation Planning (RCP) of practical power systems. In particular, RCP of the transmission system of England and Wales as owned and operated by National Grid is considered. The GA is used to simultaneously solve both the siting problem---optimisation of the installation of new devices---and the operational problem---optimisation of preventive transformer taps and the controller characteristics of dynamic compensation devices. A computer package called Genetic Compensation Placement (GCP) has been developed which uses an Integer coded GA (IGA) to solve the RCP problem. The RCP problem is implemented as a multi-objective optimisation: in the interests of security, the number of system and operational constraint violations and the deviation of the busbar voltages from the ideal are all minimised for the base (intact) case and the contingent cases. In the interests of cost reduction, the reactive power cost is minimised for the base case. The reactive power cost encompasses the costs incurred from the installation of reactive power sources and the utilisation of new and existing dynamic reactive power compensation devices. GCP is compared to SCORPION (a planning program currently being used by National Grid) which uses a combination of linear programming and heuristic back-tracking. Results are presented for a practical test system developed with the cooperation of National Grid, and it is found that GCP produces solutions that are cheaper than solutions found by SCORPION and perform extremely well: an improvement in voltage profiles, a decrease in complex power mismatches, and a reduction in MVolt Amps-reactive (VAr) utilisation were observed.

  16. EV/PHEV Bidirectional Charger Assessment for V2G Reactive Power Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kisacikoglu, Mithat C; Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the available single-phase ac-dc topologies used for EV/PHEV, level-1 and -2 on-board charging and for providing reactive power support to the utility grid. It presents the design motives of single-phase on-board chargers in detail and makes a classification of the chargers based on their future vehicle-to-grid usage. The pros and cons of each different ac-dc topology are discussed to shed light on their suitability for reactive power support. This paper also presents and analyzes the differences between charging-only operation and capacitive reactive power operation that results in increased demand from the dc-link capacitor (more charge/discharge cycles and increased second harmonic ripple current). Moreover, battery state of charge is spared from losses during reactive power operation, but converter output power must be limited below its rated power rating to have the same stress on the dc-link capacitor.

  17. A Wolf Pack Algorithm for Active and Reactive Power Coordinated Optimization in Active Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H. M.; Jiang, X. J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an active and reactive power dynamic optimization model for active distribution network (ADN), whose control variables include the output of distributed generations (DGs), charge or discharge power of energy storage system (ESS) and reactive power from capacitor banks. To solve the high-dimension nonlinear optimization model, a new heuristic swarm intelligent method, namely wolf pack algorithm (WPA) with better global convergence and computational robustness, is adapted so that the network loss minimization can be achieved. In this paper, the IEEE33-bus system is used to show the effectiveness of WPA technique compared with other techniques. Numerical tests on the modified IEEE 33-bus system show that WPA for active and reactive multi-period optimization of ADN is exact and effective.

  18. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition is modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.

  19. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; ...

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition ismore » modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.« less

  20. Examination of a PHEV Bi-Directional Charger System for V2G Reactive Power Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Kisacikoglu, Mithat C; Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2010-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) potentially have the capability to fulfill the energy storage needs of the electric grid by supplying ancillary services such as reactive power compensation. However, in order to allow bidirectional power transfer, the PHEV battery charger should be designed to manage such capability. While many different battery chargers have been available since the inception of the first electric vehicles (EVs), an on-board, conductive charger with bidirectional power transferring capability have recently drawn attention due to their inherent advantages in charging accessibility, ease of use and efficiency. In this study, a reactive power compensation case study using the inverter dc-link capacitor is given when a PHEV battery is under charging operation. Finally, the impact of providing these services on the batteries is also explained.

  1. A new dynamic voltage restorer with separating active and reactive power circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Fu-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Conventional dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs) install parallel battery and capacitor sets at the DC bus to supply the required power for voltage sag compensation. However, the reactive power output of a DVR may increase the ripple voltage at the inner DC bus, possibly resulting in a higher operating temperature of the battery and thus decreased battery life. This paper proposes a DVR system that uses a cascade power module to effectively compensate voltage sag. By separating the active and reactive compensation powers, the proposed DVR provides a lower ripple DC link for extending battery life and offers a flexible way to design the capacitor bank. To confirm the effectiveness of the proposed design, theoretical analysis and experimental validation were conducted under various scenarios. Test results confirm the feasibility and practicality of the proposed method.

  2. The Role of Self-regulation and Affective Control in Predicting Interpersonal Reactivity of Drug Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Abolghasemi, Abbas; Rajabi, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its progressive nature in all aspects of life, addiction endangers the health of individuals, families and the society. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the role of self-regulation and affective control in predicting interpersonal reactivity of drug addicts. Materials and Methods This research is a correlation study. The statistical population of this study includes all drug addicts who were referred to addiction treatment centers of Ardabil in 2011 of whom 160 addicts were selected through convenience sampling. A self-regulation questionnaire, interpersonal reactivity questionnaire and affective control scale were used for data collection. Results Research results showed that self-regulation (r = -0.40) and affective control (r = -0.29) have a significant relationship with interpersonal reactivity of addicts (P < 0.001). The results of the multiple regression analysis indicated that 19 percent of interpersonal reactivity can be predicted by self-regulation and affective control. Conclusion These results suggest that self-regulation and affective control play an important role in exacerbating as well as reducing interpersonal reactivity of addicts. PMID:24971268

  3. Optimal reactive power planning for distribution systems considering intermittent wind power using Markov model and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng

    Wind farms, photovoltaic arrays, fuel cells, and micro-turbines are all considered to be Distributed Generation (DG). DG is defined as the generation of power which is dispersed throughout a utility's service territory and either connected to the utility's distribution system or isolated in a small grid. This thesis addresses modeling and economic issues pertaining to the optimal reactive power planning for distribution system with wind power generation (WPG) units. Wind farms are inclined to cause reverse power flows and voltage variations due to the random-like outputs of wind turbines. To deal with this kind of problem caused by wide spread usage of wind power generation, this thesis investigates voltage and reactive power controls in such a distribution system. Consequently static capacitors (SC) and transformer taps are introduced into the system and treated as controllers. For the purpose of getting optimum voltage and realizing reactive power control, the research proposes a proper coordination among the controllers like on-load tap changer (OLTC), feeder-switched capacitors. What's more, in order to simulate its uncertainty, the wind power generation is modeled by the Markov model. In that way, calculating the probabilities for all the scenarios is possible. Some outputs with consecutive and discrete values have been used for transition between successive time states and within state wind speeds. The thesis will describe the method to generate the wind speed time series from the transition probability matrix. After that, utilizing genetic algorithm, the optimal locations of SCs, the sizes of SCs and transformer taps are determined so as to minimize the cost or minimize the power loss, and more importantly improve voltage profiles. The applicability of the proposed method is verified through simulation on a 9-bus system and a 30-bus system respectively. At last, the simulation results indicate that as long as the available capacitors are able to sufficiently

  4. 77 FR 21555 - Reactive Power Resources; Supplemental Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Interconnection Studies. This panel will discuss: Methods used to determine the reactive power requirements for a... Robert Jenkins, Director--Utility Interconnection, First Solar Kris Zadlo, Vice President, Invenergy..., Director--Utility Interconnection, First Solar Michael Jacobs, Director Market and Regulatory Policy...

  5. Tutorial: Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (R-HiPIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, André

    2017-05-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is a coating technology that combines magnetron sputtering with pulsed power concepts. By applying power in pulses of high amplitude and a relatively low duty cycle, large fractions of sputtered atoms and near-target gases are ionized. In contrast to conventional magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS is characterized by self-sputtering or repeated gas recycling for high and low sputter yield materials, respectively, and both for most intermediate materials. The dense plasma in front of the target has the dual function of sustaining the discharge and providing plasma-assistance to film growth, affecting the microstructure of growing films. Many technologically interesting thin films are compound films, which are composed of one or more metals and a reactive gas, most often oxygen or nitrogen. When reactive gas is added, non-trivial consequences arise for the system because the target may become "poisoned," i.e., a compound layer forms on the target surface affecting the sputtering yield and the yield of secondary electron emission and thereby all other parameters. It is emphasized that the target state depends not only on the reactive gas' partial pressure (balanced via gas flow and pumping) but also on the ion flux to the target, which can be controlled by pulse parameters. This is a critical technological opportunity for reactive HiPIMS (R-HiPIMS). The scope of this tutorial is focused on plasma processes and mechanisms of operation and only briefly touches upon film properties. It introduces R-HiPIMS in a systematic, step-by-step approach by covering sputtering, magnetron sputtering, reactive magnetron sputtering, pulsed reactive magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS, and finally R-HiPIMS. The tutorial is concluded by considering variations of R-HiPIMS known as modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering and deep-oscillation magnetron sputtering and combinations of R-HiPIMS with superimposed dc magnetron sputtering.

  6. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  7. Nitric Oxide Regulates The Lymphatic Reactivity Following Hemorrhagic Shock Through Atp-Sensitive Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Qin, Li-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Zi-Gang; Niu, Chun-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Lymphatic reactivity has been shown to exhibit a biphasic change following hemorrhagic shock, and nitric oxide (NO) is involved in this process. However, the precise mechanism responsible for NO regulation of the lymphatic reactivity along with the progression of hemorrhagic shock is unclear. Therefore, the present study was to investigate how NO participates in regulating the shock-induced biphasic changes in lymphatic reactivity and its underlying mechanisms. First, the expressions or contents of inducible NO synthase, nitrite plus nitrate, and elements of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway in thoracic ducts tissue were assessed. The results revealed that levels of nitrite plus nitrate, cAMP, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), p-PKA, and p-PKG were increased gradually along with the process of shock. Second, the roles of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP in NO regulating lymphatic response to gradient substance P were evaluated with an isolated lymphatic perfusion system. The results showed that the NOS substrate (L-Arg), PKA donor (8-Br-cAMP) decreased the reactivity of shock 0.5 h-lymphatics, and that the PKA inhibitor (H-89) and KATP inhibitor (glibenclamide) restrained the effects of L-Arg while glibenclamide abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. Meanwhile, NOS antagonist (L-NAME), protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor (KT-5823), and soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) increased the reactivity of shock 2 h-lymphatics, whereas KATP opener (pinacidil) inhibited these elevated effects induced by either L-NAME, ODQ, or KT-5823. Taken together, these results indicate that NO regulation of lymphatic reactivity during shock involves both cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathways. These findings have potential significance for the treatment of hemorrhagic shock through regulating lymphatic reactivity.

  8. Emotional self-regulation in preschoolers: The interplay of child approach reactivity, parenting, and control capacities.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether child temperamental approach reactivity moderated the association between 2 factors, parenting and child control capacities and child emotional self-regulation. Participants (N = 113) were 3- and 4-year-olds (M = 48 months, SD = 5.78) and their mothers. Emotional self-regulation was measured as observed persistence and frustration and as maternal report of compliance. Parental approach, avoidance, control, and warmth were observed during play and a frustrating wait. Child approach reactivity and control capacities (inhibitory control and soothability) were assessed via maternal report. Results suggested that maternal approach during the wait was associated with persistence and frustration, whereas maternal warmth during the play was associated with compliance. These effects, and those of child control capacities, depended on the level of child approach. The implications of reactivity-control interactions and parent-child goodness-of-fit for emotional self-regulation are discussed. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Profiles of disruptive behavior across early childhood: Contributions of frustration reactivity, physiological regulation, and maternal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Kathryn A.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.

    2010-01-01

    Disruptive behavior, including aggression, defiance, and temper tantrums, typically peaks in early toddlerhood and decreases by school entry; however, some children do not show this normative decline. The current study examined disruptive behavior in 318 boys and girls at 2, 4, and 5 years of age and frustration reactivity, physiological regulation, and maternal behavior in the laboratory at 2 years of age. A latent profile analysis (LPA) resulted in 4 longitudinal profiles of disruptive behavior, which were differentiated by interactions between reactivity, regulation, and maternal behavior. A high profile was associated with high reactivity combined with high maternal control or low regulation combined with low maternal control. Results are discussed from a developmental psychopathology perspective. PMID:18826530

  10. Active and Reactive Power Optimal Dispatch Associated with Load and DG Uncertainties in Active Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J. F.; Zhao, S. S.; Ma, W. Q.; Jia, Z. Y.

    2017-05-01

    In order to reduce the adverse effects of uncertainty on optimal dispatch in active distribution network, an optimal dispatch model based on chance-constrained programming is proposed in this paper. In this model, the active and reactive power of DG can be dispatched at the aim of reducing the operating cost. The effect of operation strategy on the cost can be reflected in the objective which contains the cost of network loss, DG curtailment, DG reactive power ancillary service, and power quality compensation. At the same time, the probabilistic constraints can reflect the operation risk degree. Then the optimal dispatch model is simplified as a series of single stage model which can avoid large variable dimension and improve the convergence speed. And the single stage model is solved using a combination of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and point estimate method (PEM). Finally, the proposed optimal dispatch model and method is verified by the IEEE33 test system.

  11. NIRS-based cerebrovascular regulation assessment: exercise and cerebrovascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie; Mitra, Kunal

    2017-10-01

    Alterations to cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been implicated in diverse neurological conditions. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-measured regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation ([Formula: see text]) provides an estimate of oxygenation of interrogated cerebral volume useful in identifying variations in oxygen supply to cerebral tissue and in monitoring cerebrovascular function. [Formula: see text]-inhalation-based hypercapnic breathing challenges were used to simulate CBF dysregulation, utilizing NIRS to monitor the CBF autoregulatory response. A breathing circuit was designed to administer [Formula: see text]-compressed air mixtures and assess CBF regulatory responses to hypercapnia in 26 healthy young adults. One to three hypercapnic challenges of 5 or 10 min duration were delivered to each subject while continuously monitoring [Formula: see text], partial pressure of end tidal [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), and vital signs. Change in [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) during [Formula: see text] inhalation positively correlated to [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]). Grouping subjects into three exercise factor levels (h/week), (1) 0, (2) [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], and (3) [Formula: see text] showed significantly greater [Formula: see text] responses to [Formula: see text] challenges for level 3 subjects but similar [Formula: see text] responses for the three groups. Exercising greater than 10 h/week may produce a higher resting cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to [Formula: see text] inhalation. Establishing baseline values of [Formula: see text] and CVR to [Formula: see text] may aid in early detection of CBF changes.

  12. Movable-molybdenum-reflector reactivity experiments for control studies of compact space power reactor concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental reflector reactivity study was made with a compact cylindrical reactor using a uranyl fluoride - water fuel solution. The reactor was axially unreflected and radially reflected with segments of molybdenum. The reflector segments were displaced incrementally in both the axial and radial dimensions, and the shutdown of each configuration was measured by using the pulsed-neutron source technique. The reactivity effects for axial and radial displacement of reflector segments are tabulated separately and compared. The experiments provide data for control-system studies of compact-space-power-reactor concepts.

  13. Coordinated Control Method of Voltage and Reactive Power for Active Distribution Networks Based on Soft Open Point

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Peng; Ji, Haoran; Wang, Chengshan; ...

    2017-03-22

    The increasing penetration of distributed generators (DGs) exacerbates the risk of voltage violations in active distribution networks (ADNs). The conventional voltage regulation devices limited by the physical constraints are difficult to meet the requirement of real-time voltage and VAR control (VVC) with high precision when DGs fluctuate frequently. But, soft open point (SOP), a flexible power electronic device, can be used as the continuous reactive power source to realize the fast voltage regulation. Considering the cooperation of SOP and multiple regulation devices, this paper proposes a coordinated VVC method based on SOP for ADNs. Firstly, a time-series model of coordi-natedmore » VVC is developed to minimize operation costs and eliminate voltage violations of ADNs. Then, by applying the linearization and conic relaxation, the original nonconvex mixed-integer non-linear optimization model is converted into a mixed-integer second-order cone programming (MISOCP) model which can be efficiently solved to meet the requirement of voltage regulation rapidity. Here, we carried out some case studies on the IEEE 33-node system and IEEE 123-node system to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.« less

  14. New Approach to Optimize the Apfs Placement Based on Instantaneous Reactive Power Theory by Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Dezaki, Hamed; Mohammadalizadeh-Shabestary, Masoud; Askarian-Abyaneh, Hossein; Rezaei-Jegarluei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In electrical distribution systems, a great amount of power are wasting across the lines, also nowadays power factors, voltage profiles and total harmonic distortions (THDs) of most loads are not as would be desired. So these important parameters of a system play highly important role in wasting money and energy, and besides both consumers and sources are suffering from a high rate of distortions and even instabilities. Active power filters (APFs) are innovative ideas for solving of this adversity which have recently used instantaneous reactive power theory. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to optimize the allocation of APFs. The introduced method is based on the instantaneous reactive power theory in vectorial representation. By use of this representation, it is possible to asses different compensation strategies. Also, APFs proper placement in the system plays a crucial role in either reducing the losses costs and power quality improvement. To optimize the APFs placement, a new objective function has been defined on the basis of five terms: total losses, power factor, voltage profile, THD and cost. Genetic algorithm has been used to solve the optimization problem. The results of applying this method to a distribution network illustrate the method advantages.

  15. Regulation of folding and photochromic reactivity of terarylenes through a host-guest interaction.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takuya; Fujii, Ryosuke; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2011-09-19

    The photochromic reactivity of terarylenes is integrated with molecular folding that is controlled through a host-guest interaction. A thieno[3,2,b]pyridine unit is introduced into a photochromic terarylene structure as an aryl unit to form a guest-interacting site. Thienopyridine-containing terarylenes showed solvent-dependent photochromic reactivity in solution. A terarylene moiety that contains two thienopyridyl units showed significantly high photocoloration reactivity as high as 88% of photocyclization quantum yield in methanol, whereas that value was only 24% in hexane. A temperature-dependent (1)H NMR spectroscopic study in different solvents indicated an interconversion between photochromic-reactive and unreactive conformations. In methanol, the intermolecular interaction between terarylene species and the solvent molecule slows the rate of interconversion and increases the population of the photochromic-active form, whereas the unreactive conformation is dominant in hexane. Crystal-structural studies demonstrated the perfect regulation of molecular folding between a photochromic-active form and an unreactive conformation by changing the solvents for recrystallization. Single crystals prepared from solutions in methanol showed reversible photochromic reactivity, whereas recrystallization from solutions in hexane did not show this reactivity. X-ray crystallographic studies of single crystals from solutions in methanol demonstrated that the photochromic molecules bind a solvent methanol molecule at the guest-interacting site to regulate the molecular conformation into a photochromic-active form in collaboration with specific intramolecular interactions, whereas crystals from solutions in hexane possess the photochromic-unreactive conformation.

  16. Regulation of power pools and system operators: An international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J. Jr.; Tenenbaum, B.; Woolf, F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper focuses on the governance and regulation of power pools outside the United States. The current governance and regulatory arrangements for four power pools, as developed in pool documents and government regulations and laws, are compared and contrasted. The power pools analyzed are located in England and Wales, Australia, Canada, and Scandinavia. Topics discussed in relation to these pools are the effects of structure on governance, how each pool has dealt with a number of basic governance decisions, how the pools monitor the markets, ways in which regulators and other institutions control pools, and self-governance issues.

  17. Regulation of hamster splenocyte reactivity to concanavalin A during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Weppner, W.A.; Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1980-08-15

    The survival to term of mammalian fetuses regardless of their expression of paternal or embryonic developmental antigens suggests that some alteration in the immune capabilities of a female occur during pregnancy. The immunocompetence of female Syrian golden hamsters during pregnancy was investigated with respect to the blastogenic response of spleen cells to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A). The blastogenic response of spleen cells from pregnant hamsters during mid- or late gestation is 10% of that observed for spleen cells from age-matched, virgin female animals. The spleen cells from pregnant hamsters are not capable of suppressing the proliferative response of spleen cells from virgin females to Con A. However, the serum from pregnant hamsters, in comparison with serum from virgin female animals, is capable of reducing this mitogenic response. Extensive washing of the splenocytes from pregnant hamsters does reduce the degree of suppression. These results suggest that the hamster is an excellent animal model for the investigation of the mechanism(s) of immune regulation that operate during pregnancy.

  18. Emotional Reactivity, Regulation and Childhood Stuttering: A Behavioral and Electrophysiological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Hayley S.; Conture, Edward G.; Key, Alexandra P. F.; Walden, Tedra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess whether behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of emotional reactivity and regulation are associated with developmental stuttering, as well as determine the feasibility of these methods in preschool-age children. Nine preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and nine preschool-age children…

  19. Emotional Reactivity and Regulation in Infancy Interact to Predict Executive Functioning in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursache, Alexandra; Blair, Clancy; Stifter, Cynthia; Voegtline, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The relation of observed emotional reactivity and regulation in infancy to executive function in early childhood was examined in a prospective longitudinal sample of 1,292 children from predominantly low-income and rural communities. Children participated in a fear eliciting task at ages 7, 15, and 24 months and completed an executive function…

  20. The Role of Emotional Reactivity, Self-Regulation, and Puberty in Adolescents' Prosocial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlo, Gustavo; Crockett, Lisa J.; Wolff, Jennifer M.; Beal, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the roles of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, and pubertal timing in prosocial behaviors during adolescence. Participants were 850 sixth graders (50 percent female, mean age = 11.03, standard deviation = 0.17) who were followed up at the age of 15. In hierarchical regression models, measures of emotional…

  1. Emotional Reactivity and Regulation in Infancy Interact to Predict Executive Functioning in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursache, Alexandra; Blair, Clancy; Stifter, Cynthia; Voegtline, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The relation of observed emotional reactivity and regulation in infancy to executive function in early childhood was examined in a prospective longitudinal sample of 1,292 children from predominantly low-income and rural communities. Children participated in a fear eliciting task at ages 7, 15, and 24 months and completed an executive function…

  2. The Role of Emotional Reactivity, Self-Regulation, and Puberty in Adolescents' Prosocial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlo, Gustavo; Crockett, Lisa J.; Wolff, Jennifer M.; Beal, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the roles of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, and pubertal timing in prosocial behaviors during adolescence. Participants were 850 sixth graders (50 percent female, mean age = 11.03, standard deviation = 0.17) who were followed up at the age of 15. In hierarchical regression models, measures of emotional…

  3. Investigation of plasma spokes in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, A.; Corbella, C.; Maszl, C.; Breilmann, W.; von Keudell, A.

    2017-05-01

    Spokes, localised ionisation zones, are commonly observed in magnetron sputtering plasmas, appearing either with a triangular shape or with a diffuse shape, exhibiting self-organisation patterns. In this paper, we investigate the spoke properties (shape and emission) in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge when reactive gas (N2 or O2) is added to the Ar gas, for three target materials; Al, Cr, and Ti. Peak discharge current and total pressure were kept constant, and the discharge voltage and mass flow ratios of Ar and the reactive gas were adjusted. The variation of the discharge voltage is used as an indication of a change of the secondary electron yield. The optical emission spectroscopy data demonstrate that by addition of reactive gas, the HiPIMS plasma exhibits a transition from a metal dominated plasma to the plasma dominated by Ar ions and, at high reactive gas partial pressures, to the plasma dominated by reactive gas ions. For all investigated materials, the spoke shape changed to the diffuse spoke shape in the poisoned mode. The change from the metal to the reactive gas dominated plasma and increase in the secondary electron production observed as the decrease of the discharge voltage corroborate our model of the spoke, where the diffuse spoke appears when the plasma is dominated by species capable of generating secondary electrons from the target. Behaviour of the discharge voltage and maximum plasma emission is strongly dependant on the target/reactive gas combination and does not fully match the behaviour observed in DC magnetron sputtering.

  4. A Hierarchical Modeling for Reactive Power Optimization With Joint Transmission and Distribution Networks by Curve Fitting

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Tao; Li, Cheng; Huang, Can; ...

    2017-01-09

    Here, in order to solve the reactive power optimization with joint transmission and distribution networks, a hierarchical modeling method is proposed in this paper. It allows the reactive power optimization of transmission and distribution networks to be performed separately, leading to a master–slave structure and improves traditional centralized modeling methods by alleviating the big data problem in a control center. Specifically, the transmission-distribution-network coordination issue of the hierarchical modeling method is investigated. First, a curve-fitting approach is developed to provide a cost function of the slave model for the master model, which reflects the impacts of each slave model. Second,more » the transmission and distribution networks are decoupled at feeder buses, and all the distribution networks are coordinated by the master reactive power optimization model to achieve the global optimality. Finally, numerical results on two test systems verify the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical modeling and curve-fitting methods.« less

  5. Tutorial: Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (R-HiPIMS)

    DOE PAGES

    Anders, André

    2017-03-21

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is a coating technology that combines magnetron sputtering with pulsed power concepts. Furthermore, by applying power in pulses of high amplitude and a relatively low duty cycle, large fractions of sputtered atoms and near-target gases are ionized. In contrast to conventional magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS is characterized by self-sputtering or repeated gas recycling for high and low sputter yield materials, respectively, and both for most intermediate materials. The dense plasma in front of the target has the dual function of sustaining the discharge and providing plasma-assistance to film growth, affecting the microstructure of growing films.more » Many technologically interesting thin films are compound films, which are composed of one or more metals and a reactive gas, most often oxygen or nitrogen. When reactive gas is added, non-trivial consequences arise for the system because the target may become “poisoned,” i.e., a compound layer forms on the target surface affecting the sputtering yield and the yield of secondary electron emission and thereby all other parameters. It is emphasized that the target state depends not only on the reactive gas' partial pressure (balanced via gas flow and pumping) but also on the ion flux to the target, which can be controlled by pulse parameters. This is a critical technological opportunity for reactive HiPIMS (R-HiPIMS). The scope of this tutorial is focused on plasma processes and mechanisms of operation and only briefly touches upon film properties. It introduces R-HiPIMS in a systematic, step-by-step approach by covering sputtering, magnetron sputtering, reactive magnetron sputtering, pulsed reactive magnetron sputtering, HiPIMS, and finally R-HiPIMS. The tutorial is concluded by considering variations of R-HiPIMS known as modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering and deep-oscillation magnetron sputtering and combinations of R-HiPIMS with superimposed dc magnetron

  6. STATCOM-Based Wind-Solar-Hydro Electric Power System with Modified Real and Reactive Power Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhakar, J.; Ragavan, K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a control of distributed generation (DG) system subjected to sudden rise in demand, faults on the distribution feeder and unbalanced load condition. The effects of line to ground faults on the system are investigated and control measures are taken to stabilize the generator speed and to improve voltage quality at the point of common coupling (PCC). The static shunt compensator (STATCOM) is connected at PCC to provide voltage support during sudden demand rise and fault on feeder. Moreover, the STATCOM control is devised such that even during unbalanced load condition the converter current and hydro-turbine-driven induction generator current is balanced. Owing to this, the double power frequency oscillations in the dc-link voltage and torque pulsations in generator can be averted. The STATCOM also supplies reactive power to the load. In addition to this, generation-demand mismatch is moderated using real and reactive power controllers. To demonstrate the performance of the DG system with the said control approach, model of system is simulated in Matlab-Simulink environment and the results are presented.

  7. Power fluctuations smoothing and regulations in wind turbine generator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadehrokni, Hamed

    Wind is one of the most popular renewable energy sources and it has the potential to become the biggest energy source in future. Since the wind does not always blow constantly, the output wind power is not constant which may make some problem for the power grid. According to the grid code which is set by independent system operator, ISO, wind turbine generator systems need to follow some standards such as the predetermined acceptable power fluctuations. In order to smooth the output powers, the energy storage system and some power electronics modules are employed. The utilized power electronics modules in the wind turbine system can pursue many different goals, such as maintaining the voltage stability, frequency stability, providing the available and predetermined output active and reactive power. On the other side, the energy storage system can help achieving some of these goals but its main job is to store the extra energy when not needed and release the stored energy when needed. The energy storage system can be designed in different sizes, material and also combination of different energy storage systems (hybrid designs). Combination of power electronics devises and also energy storage system helps the wind turbine systems to smooth the output power according to the provided standards. In addition prediction of wind speed may improve the performance of wind turbine generator systems. In this research study all these three topics are studied and the obtained results are written in 10 papers which 7 of them are published and three of them are under process.

  8. Associations between narcissism and emotion regulation difficulties: Respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity as a moderator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhenhong; You, Xuqun; Lü, Wei; Luo, Yun

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the direct and interactive effects of two types of narcissism (overt and covert) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity on emotion regulation difficulties in 227 undergraduate students. Overt and covert narcissism and emotion regulation difficulties were assessed with self-report measures (narcissistic personality inventory (NPI)-16, hypersensitive narcissism scale (HSNS), and difficulties in emotion regulation scale (DERS)), and physiological data were measured during the baseline, stress (a public-speaking task), and recovery periods in the laboratory. Results indicated that overt narcissism was negatively related to a lack of emotional awareness and emotional clarity, whereas covert narcissism was positively related to overall emotion regulation difficulties, nonacceptance of emotional responses, impulse control difficulties, limited access to emotion regulation strategies, and a lack of emotional clarity. RSA reactivity in response to a mock job interview moderated the associations between covert narcissism (as a predictor) and overall emotion regulation difficulties and impulse control difficulties (as outcomes). This finding showed that a greater stress-induced RSA decrease may serve as a protective factor and ameliorate the effect of covert narcissism on individuals' emotion regulation difficulties.

  9. Linguistic Markers of Emotion Regulation and Cardiovascular Reactivity Among Older Caregiving Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Joan K.; Schulz, Richard; Lemay, Edward P.; Cook, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined linguistic markers of emotion regulation and cardiovascular stress reactivity in spousal caregivers. Fifty-three individuals were audiotaped while they privately disclosed an instance of partner suffering and a typical partner interaction (i.e., a meal together). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate (HR) were measured. Linguistic analysis determined emotion and cognitive processing word use. Results revealed that using more positive emotion words was associated with lower HR reactivity in each verbal account. Caregivers who used fewer cognitive processing words (e.g., think, realize, because) overall had the highest HR reactivity to talking about the partner’s suffering. These findings have implications for interventions for all caregivers as well as distinguishing more resilient caregivers from those who may be at a higher risk for caregiver burden. PMID:22369634

  10. Modeling for V—O2 reactive sputtering process using a pulsed power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yu, He; Dong, Xiang; Jiang, Ya-Dong; Chen, Chao; Wu, Ro-Land

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we present a time-dependent model that enables us to describe the dynamic behavior of pulsed DC reactive sputtering and predict the film compositions of VOx prepared by this process. In this modeling, the average current J is replaced by a new parameter of Jeff. Meanwhile, the four species states of V, V2O3, VO2, and V2O5 in the vanadium oxide films are taken into consideration. Based on this work, the influences of the oxygen gas supply and the pulsed power parameters including the duty cycle and frequency on film compositions are discussed. The model suggests that the time to reach process equilibrium may vary substantially depending on these parameters. It is also indicated that the compositions of VOx films are quite sensitive to both the reactive gas supply and the duty cycle when the power supply works in pulse mode. The ‘steady-state’ balance values obtained by these simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data, which indicates that the experimentally obtained dynamic behavior of the film composition can be explained by this time-dependent modeling for pulsed DC reactive sputtering process. Moreover, the computer simulation results indicate that the curves will essentially yield oscillations around the average value of the film compositions with lower pulse frequency.

  11. Proactive and Reactive Transmission Power Control for Energy-Efficient On-Body Communications

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Mónica; Recas, Joaquín.; Ayala, José L.

    2015-01-01

    In wireless body sensor network (WBSNs), the human body has an important effect on the performance of the communication due to the temporal variations caused and the attenuation and fluctuation of the path loss. This fact suggests that the transmission power must adapt to the current state of the link in a way that it ensures a balance between energy consumption and packet loss. In this paper, we validate our two transmission power level policies (reactive and predictive approaches) using the Castalia simulator. The integration of our experimental measurements in the simulator allows us to easily evaluate complex scenarios, avoiding the difficulties associated with a practical realization. Our results show that both schemes perform satisfactorily, providing overall energy savings of 24% and 22% for a case of study, as compared to the maximum transmission power mode. PMID:25769049

  12. Proactive and reactive transmission power control for energy-efficient on-body communications.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Mónica; Recas, Joaquín; Ayala, José L

    2015-03-11

    In wireless body sensor network (WBSNs), the human body has an important effect on the performance of the communication due to the temporal variations caused and the attenuation and fluctuation of the path loss. This fact suggests that the transmission power must adapt to the current state of the link in a way that it ensures a balance between energy consumption and packet loss. In this paper, we validate our two transmission power level policies (reactive and predictive approaches) using the Castalia simulator. The integration of our experimental measurements in the simulator allows us to easily evaluate complex scenarios, avoiding the difficulties associated with a practical realization. Our results show that both schemes perform satisfactorily, providing overall energy savings of 24% and 22% for a case of study, as compared to the maximum transmission power mode.

  13. Age-Related Differences in Emotional Reactivity, Regulation, and Rejection Sensitivity in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, Jennifer A.; McRae, Kateri; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Gross, James J.; Remy, Katherine A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Although adolescents’ emotional lives are thought to be more turbulent than those of adults, it is unknown whether this difference is attributable to developmental changes in emotional reactivity or emotion regulation. Study 1 addressed this question by presenting healthy individuals aged 10–23 with negative and neutral pictures and asking them to respond naturally or use cognitive reappraisal to down-regulate their responses on a trial-by-trial basis. Results indicated that age exerted both linear and quadratic effects on regulation success but was unrelated to emotional reactivity. Study 2 replicated and extended these findings using a different reappraisal task and further showed that situational (i.e., social vs. nonsocial stimuli) and dispositional (i.e., level of rejection sensitivity) social factors interacted with age to predict regulation success: young adolescents were less successful at regulating responses to social than to nonsocial stimuli, particularly if the adolescents were high in rejection sensitivity. Taken together, these results have important implications for the inclusion of emotion regulation in models of emotional and cognitive development. PMID:22642356

  14. The Unconscious Regulation of Emotion: Nonconscious Reappraisal Goals Modulate Emotional Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; Bargh, John A.; Nocera, Christopher C.; Gray, Jeremy R.

    2009-01-01

    People often encounter difficulty when making conscious attempts to regulate their emotions. We propose that nonconscious self-regulatory processes may be of help in these difficult circumstances, because nonconscious processes are not subject to the same set of limitations as are conscious processes. Two experiments examined the effects of nonconsciously operating goals on people's emotion-regulatory success. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in an anxiety-eliciting task who had a reappraisal emotion-control goal primed and operating nonconsciously achieved the same decrease in physiological reactivity as those explicitly instructed to reappraise, compared to a control group. In Experiment 2, the effect of nonconscious reappraisal priming on physiological reactivity was shown to be most pronounced for those who do not habitually use reappraisal strategies. The findings highlight the potential importance of nonconscious goals for facilitating emotional control in complex real-world environments, and have implications for contemporary models of emotion-regulation. PMID:20001127

  15. Neuroticism and responsiveness to error feedback: adaptive self-regulation versus affective reactivity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Moeller, Sara K; Fetterman, Adam K

    2010-10-01

    Responsiveness to negative feedback has been seen as functional by those who emphasize the value of reflecting on such feedback in self-regulating problematic behaviors. On the other hand, the very same responsiveness has been viewed as dysfunctional by its link to punishment sensitivity and reactivity. The present 4 studies, involving 203 undergraduate participants, sought to reconcile such discrepant views in the context of the trait of neuroticism. In cognitive tasks, individuals were given error feedback when they made mistakes. It was found that greater tendencies to slow down following error feedback were associated with higher levels of accuracy at low levels of neuroticism but lower levels of accuracy at high levels of neuroticism. Individual differences in neuroticism thus appear crucial in understanding whether behavioral alterations following negative feedback reflect proactive versus reactive mechanisms and processes. Implications for understanding the processing basis of neuroticism and adaptive self-regulation are discussed.

  16. Childhood anxiety and psychophysiological reactivity: hypnosis to build discrimination and self-regulation skills.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Pamela

    2014-04-01

    Clinically anxious, worried, and fearful children and teens need clinicians' assistance in reducing their exaggerated psychophysiological stress reactivity. Affective neuroscience finds that chronic activation of the body's emergency response system inhibits neurogenesis, disrupts neuronal plasticity, and is detrimental to physical and mental health. Patterns of faulty discrimination skills, for example, over-estimation of threat and danger and under-estimation of their coping capacity, fuel this over-arousal. Similarly, contributory patterns of reduced self-regulation skills are shown by "stuck" attention to and poor control of their exaggerated psychophysiological reactivity and somatization. This article considers the literature and focuses on cognitive hypnotherapy to enhance these under-developed capacities. A case illustration highlights various hypnotic phenomena and techniques, psychoeducation, and relaxation training that address the goals of interrupting these unproductive, interconnected patterns and fostering new patterns of more realistic and accurate discrimination capacities and sturdier psychophysiological self-regulation skills.

  17. The unconscious regulation of emotion: nonconscious reappraisal goals modulate emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lawrence E; Bargh, John A; Nocera, Christopher C; Gray, Jeremy R

    2009-12-01

    People often encounter difficulty when making conscious attempts to regulate their emotions. We propose that nonconscious self-regulatory processes may be of help in these difficult circumstances because nonconscious processes are not subject to the same set of limitations as are conscious processes. Two experiments examined the effects of nonconsciously operating goals on people's emotion regulatory success. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in an anxiety-eliciting task. Participants who had a reappraisal emotion control goal primed and operating nonconsciously achieved the same decrease in physiological reactivity as those explicitly instructed to reappraise. In Experiment 2, the effect of nonconscious reappraisal priming on physiological reactivity was shown to be most pronounced for those who do not habitually use reappraisal strategies. The findings highlight the potential importance of nonconscious goals for facilitating emotional control in complex real-world environments and have implications for contemporary models of emotion regulation.

  18. Evaluation of Techniques for Power Regulation on Nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Llorente, Jesus; Hurtado, Ronald; Sanchez-Sanjuan, Sergio; Ortiz-Rivera, Eduardo I.

    2014-08-01

    We evaluate two power regulation techniques to find which is more efficient in a 3U CubeSat nanosatellite. The comparison is between maximum power point tracking (MPPT) technique and direct energy transfer (DET). Previous work showed the effectiveness of MPPT techniques; however, the efficiency of the power converter topology must be considered, especially at low power as nanosatellites. We employ mathematical models that describe the electrical behavior of solar cells and power converters. By using the space environment characteristics, we obtain the delivered power to the load in order to determine which one is the best technique for the given conditions. Simulation results show that both techniques have similar performance for nadir aligned 3U CubeSat. Therefore, DET should be used since it is easier to implement than MPPT.

  19. Infant negative reactivity defines the effects of parent-child synchrony on physiological and behavioral regulation of social stress.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Maayan; Singer, Magi; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Feldman, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    How infants shape their own development has puzzled developmentalists for decades. Recent models suggest that infant dispositions, particularly negative reactivity and regulation, affect outcome by determining the extent of parental effects. Here, we used a microanalytic experimental approach and proposed that infants with varying levels of negative reactivity will be differentially impacted by parent-infant synchrony in predicting physiological and behavioral regulation of increasing social stress during an experimental paradigm. One hundred and twenty-two mother-infant dyads (4-6 months) were observed in the face-to-face still face (SF) paradigm and randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: SF with touch, standard SF, and SF with arms' restraint. Mother-infant synchrony and infant negative reactivity were observed at baseline, and three mechanisms of behavior regulation were microcoded; distress, disengagement, and social regulation. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia baseline, reactivity, and recovery were quantified. Structural equation modeling provided support for our hypothesis. For physiological regulation, infants high in negative reactivity receiving high mother-infant synchrony showed greater vagal withdrawal, which in turn predicted comparable levels of vagal recovery to that of nonreactive infants. In behavioral regulation, only infants low in negative reactivity who received high synchrony were able to regulate stress by employing social engagement cues during the SF phase. Distress was reduced only among calm infants to highly synchronous mothers, and disengagement was lowest among highly reactive infants experiencing high mother-infant synchrony. Findings chart two pathways by which synchrony may bolster regulation in infants of high and low reactivity. Among low reactive infants, synchrony builds a social repertoire for handling interpersonal stress, whereas in highly reactive infants, it constructs a platform for repeated reparation of

  20. Double Dissociation: Circadian Off-Peak Times Increase Emotional Reactivity; Aging Impairs Emotion Regulation Via Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adrienne M.; Feuerstein, Rebecca; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Stern, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how the effectiveness of specific emotion regulation strategies might be influenced by aging and by time of day, given that in older age the circadian peak in cognitive performance is earlier in the day. We compared the benefit gained by 40 older (60–78 years; 20 women) and 40 younger (18–30 years; 20 women) adults during either on-peak or off-peak circadian times on 2 specific types of cognitive emotion regulation strategies: distraction and reappraisal. Participants rated their negative emotional responses to negative and neutral images under 3 conditions: a baseline nonregulation condition, a distraction condition involving a working memory task, and a reappraisal condition that involved reinterpreting the situation displayed using specific preselected strategies. First, as hypothesized, there was a crossover interaction such that participants in each age group reported more negative reactivity at their off-peak time of day. Second, a double dissociation was observed as circadian rhythms affected only negative reactivity—with reactivity highest at off-peak times—and aging diminished reappraisal but not distraction ability or reactivity. These findings add to growing evidence that understanding the effects of aging on emotion and emotion regulation depends on taking both time of day and type of regulatory strategy into account. PMID:22642354

  1. The Role of Emotional Reactivity, Self-regulation, and Puberty in Adolescents' Prosocial Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gustavo; Crockett, Lisa J; Wolff, Jennifer M; Beal, Sarah J

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to examine the roles of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, and pubertal timing in prosocial behaviors during adolescence. Participants were 850 sixth graders (50% female, Mean age = 11.03, SD = .17) who were followed up at age 15. In hierarchical regression models, measures of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, pubertal timing and their interactions were used to predict (concurrently and over time) adolescents' prosocial behaviors in the home and with peers. Overall, the findings provide evidence for pubertal and temperament based predictors of prosocial behaviors expressed in different contexts. Self-regulation was positively related to both forms of prosocial behavior, concurrently and longitudinally. Emotional reactivity showed moderately consistent effects, showing negative concurrent relations to prosocial behavior with peers and negative longitudinal relations (four years later) to prosocial behavior at home. Some curvilinear effects of temperament on prosocial behaviors were also found. Effects of pubertal timing were found to interact with gender, such that boys who were early maturers showed the highest levels of prosocial behavior at home concurrently. Discussion focuses on the role of temperament-based mechanisms in the expression of prosocial behaviors in different contexts in adolescence.

  2. The Role of Emotional Reactivity, Self-regulation, and Puberty in Adolescents' Prosocial Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Gustavo; Crockett, Lisa J.; Wolff, Jennifer M.; Beal, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the roles of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, and pubertal timing in prosocial behaviors during adolescence. Participants were 850 sixth graders (50% female, Mean age = 11.03, SD = .17) who were followed up at age 15. In hierarchical regression models, measures of emotional reactivity, self-regulation, pubertal timing and their interactions were used to predict (concurrently and over time) adolescents’ prosocial behaviors in the home and with peers. Overall, the findings provide evidence for pubertal and temperament based predictors of prosocial behaviors expressed in different contexts. Self-regulation was positively related to both forms of prosocial behavior, concurrently and longitudinally. Emotional reactivity showed moderately consistent effects, showing negative concurrent relations to prosocial behavior with peers and negative longitudinal relations (four years later) to prosocial behavior at home. Some curvilinear effects of temperament on prosocial behaviors were also found. Effects of pubertal timing were found to interact with gender, such that boys who were early maturers showed the highest levels of prosocial behavior at home concurrently. Discussion focuses on the role of temperament-based mechanisms in the expression of prosocial behaviors in different contexts in adolescence. PMID:28316370

  3. Glutamine metabolism regulates autophagy-dependent mTORC1 reactivation during amino acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hayden Weng Siong; Sim, Arthur Yi Loong; Long, Yun Chau

    2017-08-24

    Activation of autophagy and elevation of glutamine synthesis represent key adaptations to maintain amino acid balance during starvation. In this study, we investigate the role of autophagy and glutamine on the regulation of mTORC1, a critical kinase that regulates cell growth and proliferation. We report that supplementation of glutamine alone is sufficient to restore mTORC1 activity during prolonged amino acid starvation. Inhibition of autophagy abolishes the restorative effect of glutamine, suggesting that reactivation of mTORC1 is autophagy-dependent. Inhibition of glutaminolysis or transamination impairs glutamine-mediated mTORC1 reactivation, suggesting glutamine reactivates mTORC1 specifically through its conversion to glutamate and restoration of non-essential amino acid pool. Despite a persistent drop in essential amino acid pool during amino acid starvation, crosstalk between glutamine and autophagy is sufficient to restore insulin sensitivity of mTORC1. Thus, glutamine metabolism and autophagy constitute a specific metabolic program which restores mTORC1 activity during amino acid starvation.mTORC1 is a critical kinase that regulates cell growth and proliferation. Here the authors show that glutamine metabolism is sufficient to restore mTORC1 activity during prolonged amino acid starvation in an autophagy-dependent manner.

  4. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  5. Experience in connecting the power generating units of thermal power plants to automatic secondary frequency regulation within the united power system of Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. V.; Komarov, A. N.; Safronov, A. N.; Barsukov, I. V.

    2009-05-15

    The principles of central control of the power generating units of thermal power plants by automatic secondary frequency and active power overcurrent regulation systems, and the algorithms for interactions between automatic power control systems for the power production units in thermal power plants and centralized systems for automatic frequency and power regulation, are discussed. The order of switching the power generating units of thermal power plants over to control by a centralized system for automatic frequency and power regulation and by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation is presented. The results of full-scale system tests of the control of power generating units of the Kirishskaya, Stavropol, and Perm GRES (State Regional Electric Power Plants) by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation at the United Power System of Russia on September 23-25, 2008, are reported.

  6. TOR complex 2–Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Brad J.; Powers, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells. PMID:25253719

  7. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Powers, Ted

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells.

  8. Comparisons of PRD (power-reactivity-decrements) components for various EBR-II configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1986-09-19

    Comparison of detailed calculations of contributions by region and component of the power-reactivity-decrements (PRD) for four differing loading configurations of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) are given. The linear components and Doppler components are calculated. The non-linear (primarily subassembly bowing) components are deduced by differences relative to measured total PRD values. Variations in linear components range from about 10% to as much as about 100% depending upon the component. The deduced non-linear components differ both in magnitude and sign as functions of reactor power. Effects of differing assumptions of the nature of the fuel-to-clad interactions upon the PRD components are also calculated.

  9. Reactive and proactive aggression: Differential links with emotion regulation difficulties, maternal criticism in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Skripkauskaite, Simona; Hawk, Skyler T; Branje, Susan J T; Koot, Hans M; van Lier, Pol A C; Meeus, Wim

    2015-05-01

    Proactive and reactive functions of aggression are thought to manifest through different familial and emotional processes, even though they often co-occur. We investigated direct and indirect pathways through which maternal criticism and emotion regulation (ER) difficulties relate to reactive and proactive aggression in adolescence. Further, we examined how maternal criticism and emotion dysregulation interrelate, both concurrently and over time. Participants were 482 Dutch adolescents (M = 15.03, SD = 0.45, 57% boys) who self-reported on their ER difficulties, perceived maternal criticism, and reactive/proactive aggression. Cross-lagged panel modeling across four annual measurements revealed direct bidirectional links over time between maternal criticism and emotion dysregulation. Positive links over time from maternal criticism to proactive (but not reactive) aggression were also present. Emotion dysregulation and proactive aggression were linked only indirectly via maternal criticism. Gender did not significantly moderate these links. By revealing differential developmental pathways involving adolescents' ER and maternal criticism, the present study offers support for the dual function model of aggression. Aggr. Behav. 41:214-226, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Voltage Regulator Chip: Power Supplies on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is finding ways to save real estate on a computer's motherboard that could be used for other critical functions. Every computer processor today contains a voltage regulator that automatically maintains a constant level of electricity entering the device. These regulators contain bulky components and take up about 30% of a computer's motherboard. CPES at Virginia Tech is developing a voltage regulator that uses semiconductors made of gallium nitride on silicon (GaN-on-Si) and high-frequency soft magnetic material. These materials are integrated on a small, 3D chip that can handle the same amount of power as traditional voltage regulators at 1/10 the size and with improved efficiency. The small size also frees up to 90% of the motherboard space occupied by current voltage regulators.

  11. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turbo alternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  12. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  13. Reactivity and regulation of motor responses in cocaine-exposed infants.

    PubMed

    Fallone, Melissa Duncan; LaGasse, Linda L; Lester, Barry M; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S; Bauer, Charles R

    2014-01-01

    Effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine on the reactivity and regulation of the motor system of 825 four-month-old infants enrolled in the Maternal Lifestyle Study were examined. Videotaped assessments of 338 cocaine-exposed (CE) infants and 487 non-exposed comparison infants were coded by examiners masked to exposure status. Exposure status was determined by meconium assay and maternal self-report of prenatal cocaine use. Infants were presented with a series of 17 visual, auditory and tactile stimuli for 30-s each. Intensity and latency of limb movement responses on a subset of items were analyzed to test the following hypotheses: CE infants are more active in general; CE infants exhibit increased movement levels for a larger proportion of time in response to stimulation; the motor systems of CE infants are more reactive to stimulation (e.g., shorter latencies to respond); and CE infants are poorer regulators of the motor system. CE infants were not more active in general and data do not indicate a more highly reactive motor system. However, CE infants exhibited increased movement levels for a larger proportion of time in response to stimulation. Additional analysis of movement exhibited during three tactile items found increased movement lability in CE infants and different patterns of responding, suggesting that the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the motor system may vary by context. Covariate effects for tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana are also reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fear and anger reactivity trajectories from 4 to 16 months: the roles of temperament, regulation, and maternal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braungart-Rieker, Julia M; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L; Karrass, Jan

    2010-07-01

    Two goals guided this study: (a) describe changes in infant fear and anger reactivity from 4 to 16 months and (b) examine the degree to which infant temperament, attentional regulation, and maternal sensitivity predict reactivity trajectories. Participants included 143 mothers and infants (57% male) who visited the laboratory at 4, 8, 12, and 16 months. Infant reactivity, regulation, and maternal sensitivity were assessed from laboratory situations; infant temperament was rated by mothers on the Infant Behavior Questionnaire (Rothbart, 1981). Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that overall, fear and anger reactivity increased with age, but the rate of increase for fear slowed over time. Maternal ratings of temperamental fear and anger each predicted laboratory ratings of fear and anger reactivity, respectively. Moreover, infants who showed less regulation showed greater fear reactivity and steeper increases in anger reactivity over time. Infants whose mothers were more sensitive showed slower increases in fear reactivity. Findings from this study suggest that it is important to consider both intrinsic and extrinsic factors to gain a better understanding of the processes that may be involved in the development of emotional reactivity systems.

  15. Fear and Anger Reactivity Trajectories from 4 to 16 Months: The Roles of Temperament, Regulation, and Maternal Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.; Karrass, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Two goals guided this study: (a) describe changes in infant fear and anger reactivity from 4 to 16 months and (b) examine the degree to which infant temperament, attentional regulation, and maternal sensitivity predict reactivity trajectories. Participants included 143 mothers and infants (57% male) who visited the laboratory at 4, 8, 12, and 16…

  16. Nonlinear Compensation of Solar Array Simulators with Dual Power Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrah, E. A.; Tkachev, S. B.; Poymanov, D. N.; Fedchenko, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    During the tests of the spacecraft electrical systems there is a need for simulators of individual parts of the spacecrafts, in particular, solar array simulators (SAS). One of the topologies of medium and high power SAS simulators has dual control of consumed power and contains series or parallel connected linear and switching regulators. This topology allows to provide wide bandwidth and high efficiency, but the range of the resistance change of periodically switched SAS load is limited to the value of the stabilized attribute. Nonlinear compensator (NC) allows to reduce the average feedback voltage of the switching regulator in case of periodic load switching, which, in turn, allows to increase the average value of the stabilized attribute. The describing function method provides a mathematical description of the NC electrical circuit, which allows to select parameters of NC that eliminate the excitation of self-oscillation based on the SAS load switching frequency range and to study the switching regulator stability.

  17. Regulation control and energy management scheme for wireless power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John M.

    2015-12-29

    Power transfer rate at a charging facility can be maximized by employing a feedback scheme. The state of charge (SOC) and temperature of the regenerative energy storage system (RESS) pack of a vehicle is monitored to determine the load due to the RESS pack. An optimal frequency that cancels the imaginary component of the input impedance for the output signal from a grid converter is calculated from the load of the RESS pack, and a frequency offset f* is made to the nominal frequency f.sub.0 of the grid converter output based on the resonance frequency of a magnetically coupled circuit. The optimal frequency can maximize the efficiency of the power transfer. Further, an optimal grid converter duty ratio d* can be derived from the charge rate of the RESS pack. The grid converter duty ratio d* regulates wireless power transfer (WPT) power level.

  18. Standard power regulator for the multi-mission modular spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kichak, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The Standard Power Regulator Unit (SPRU) which forms the central building block of the Modular Power Subsystem (MPS) for the Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) is described. A functional description of the SPRU is presented, detailing key design features, operational characteristics, and internal redundancy as well as giving block and schematic diagrams for all major subassemblies. The description of a qualification test program consisting of ten sequences ranging from a physical examination of the unit to calculating vibration and sine sweep of power on shock tests is presented. The results showed that some significant anomalies were encountered but no catastrophic failures were indicated, although several power module failures were found due to overvoltage malfunctions of the solar array stimulator.

  19. Maternal Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Infant Emotional Reactivity and Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Kitts, Robert L.; Blood, Emily; Bizarro, Andrea; Hofmeister, Michelle; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined associations between maternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and infant emotional reactivity and emotion regulation during the first year of life in a primarily low-income, urban, ethnic/racial minority sample of 52 mother-infant dyads. Mothers completed questionnaires assessing their own trauma exposure history and current PTSD and depressive symptoms and their infants’ temperament when the infants were 6 months old. Dyads participated in the repeated Still-Face Paradigm (SFP-R) when the infants were 6 months old, and infant affective states were coded for each SFP-R episode. Mothers completed questionnaires assessing infant trauma exposure history and infant current emotional and behavioral symptoms when the infants were 13 months old. Maternal PTSD symptoms predicted infants’ emotion regulation at 6 months as assessed by (a) infant ability to recover from distress during the SFP-R and (b) maternal report of infant rate of recovery from distress/arousal in daily life. Maternal PTSD symptoms also predicted maternal report of infant externalizing, internalizing, and dysregulation symptoms at 13 months. Maternal PTSD was not associated with measures of infant emotional reactivity. Neither maternal depressive symptoms nor infant direct exposure to trauma accounted for the associations between maternal PTSD symptoms and infant outcomes. These findings suggest that maternal PTSD is associated with offspring emotion regulation difficulties as early as infancy. Such difficulties may contribute to increased risk of mental health problems among children of mothers with PTSD. PMID:21862136

  20. Maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms and infant emotional reactivity and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Bosquet Enlow, Michelle; Kitts, Robert L; Blood, Emily; Bizarro, Andrea; Hofmeister, Michelle; Wright, Rosalind J

    2011-12-01

    The current study examined associations between maternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and infant emotional reactivity and emotion regulation during the first year of life in a primarily low-income, urban, ethnic/racial minority sample of 52 mother-infant dyads. Mothers completed questionnaires assessing their own trauma exposure history and current PTSD and depressive symptoms and their infants' temperament when the infants were 6 months old. Dyads participated in the repeated Still-Face Paradigm (SFP-R) when the infants were 6 months old, and infant affective states were coded for each SFP-R episode. Mothers completed questionnaires assessing infant trauma exposure history and infant current emotional and behavioral symptoms when the infants were 13 months old. Maternal PTSD symptoms predicted infants' emotion regulation at 6 months as assessed by (a) infant ability to recover from distress during the SFP-R and (b) maternal report of infant rate of recovery from distress/arousal in daily life. Maternal PTSD symptoms also predicted maternal report of infant externalizing, internalizing, and dysregulation symptoms at 13 months. Maternal PTSD was not associated with measures of infant emotional reactivity. Neither maternal depressive symptoms nor infant direct exposure to trauma accounted for the associations between maternal PTSD symptoms and infant outcomes. These findings suggest that maternal PTSD is associated with offspring emotion regulation difficulties as early as infancy. Such difficulties may contribute to increased risk of mental health problems among children of mothers with PTSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Return of target material ions leads to a reduced hysteresis in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlec, Stanislav; Čapek, Jiří

    2017-05-01

    A tendency to disappearing hysteresis in reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) has been reported previously without full physical explanation. An analytical model of reactive pulsed sputtering including HiPIMS is presented. The model combines a Berg-type model of reactive sputtering with the global HiPIMS model of Christie-Vlček. Both time and area averaging is used to describe the macroscopic steady state, especially the reactive gas balance in the reactor. The most important effect in the presented model is covering of reacted parts of target by the returning ionized metal, effectively lowering the target coverage by reaction product at a given partial pressure. The return probability of ionized sputtered metal has been selected as a parameter to quantify the degree of HiPIMS effects. The model explains the reasons for reduced hysteresis in HiPIMS. The critical pumping speed was up to a factor of 7 lower in reactive HiPIMS compared to the mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The model predicts reduced hysteresis in HiPIMS due to less negative slope of metal flux to substrates and of reactive gas sorption as functions of reactive gas partial pressure. Higher deposition rate of reactive HiPIMS compared to standard reactive sputtering is predicted for some parameter combinations. Comparison of the model with experiment exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement for three material combinations, namely, Ti-O2, Al-O2, and Ti-N2.

  2. The regulation of superoxide generation and nitric oxide synthesis by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; Mookerjea, S

    1998-01-01

    Activated macrophages utilize both reactive oxygen intermediates and reactive oxynitrogen intermediates for defence against microbes. However, simultaneous generation of superoxide (O- 2;) and nitric oxide (NO) could be harmful to host cells due to the production of peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, the regulation of the production of these molecules is critical to host survival. During periods of inflammation or infection, the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases in many species. Human and rat CRP have been shown to bind and interact with phagocytic cells. Since many of the interactions of CRP involve the binding to the phosphocholine ligand, we studied the role of CRP in O- 2; and NO generation through the modulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism in macrophages. This study has shown that, while rat CRP inhibited phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA) induced release of O- 2; by rat macrophages, CRP-treated macrophages released NO in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CRP increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme as well as iNOS mRNA levels in rat macrophages. Tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor to PC phospholipase C (PC-PLC), suppressed iNOS induction but enhanced PMA-induced release of O- 2;. These data indicate that an increased level of CRP during periods of inflammation may result in differential regulation of macrophage NADPH oxidase and iNOS activity. Increased hepatic synthesis of CRP may contribute to the mechanism by which phagocytic cells avoid simultaneous O- 2; and NO synthesis, and this could possibly be mediated through the regulation of PC-PLC. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9767445

  3. Reactive oxygen species produced via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase regulate anthocyanin synthesis in apple peel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangli; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Di; Li, Houhua; Li, Pengmin; Ma, Fengwang

    2014-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation regulates anthocyanin synthesis in apple peel by modulating the production of reactive oxygen species via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase instead of other pathways. The synthesis of anthocyanin in apple peels is dependent upon solar irradiation. Using 3-mm commercial glass to attenuate solar UV-A and UV-B light, we confirmed that solar UV irradiation regulated anthocyanin synthesis in apple peels after exposing previously bagged fruit to sunlight. During sunlight exposure, UV attenuation did not affect the expression of MdHY5, MdCOP1, or MdCRY2, but significantly lowered plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide anion concentrations. UV attenuation also reduced the expression levels of MdMYB10, MdPAL, MdCHS, MdF3H, MdDFR, MdANS and MdUFGT1, UDP-glycose:flavonoid 3-O-glycosyltransferase (UFGT) activity, and local concentrations of anthocyanin and quercetin-3-glycoside. In contrast, exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide could enhance anthocyanin and quercetin-3-glycoside synthesis. Xanthophyll cycle pool size on a chlorophyll basis was higher but its de-epoxidation was lower under direct sunlight irradiation than that under UV-attenuating conditions. This suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in chloroplast are not major contributors to anthocyanin synthesis regulation. Inhibition of plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity lowered the production of ROS through this mechanism, significantly inhibited the synthesis of anthocyanin, and increased the total production of ROS in apple peel under direct sunlight irradiation, suggesting that ROS produced via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase regulates anthocyanin synthesis. In summary, solar UV irradiation regulated anthocyanin synthesis in apple peels by modulating the production of ROS via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase.

  4. Evolving Role of the Power Sector Regulator: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zinaman, O.; Miller, M.; Bazilian, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper seeks to briefly characterize the evolving role of power sector regulation. Given current global dynamics, regulation of the power sector is undergoing dramatic changes. This transformation is being driven by various factors including technological advances and cost reductions in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and demand management; increasing air pollution and climate change concerns; and persistent pressure for ensuring sustainable economic development and increased access to energy services by the poor. These issues add to the already complex task of power sector regulation, of which the fundamental remit remains to objectively and transparently ensure least-cost service delivery at high quality. While no single regulatory task is trivial to undertake, it is the prioritization and harmonization of a multitude of objectives that exemplifies the essential challenge of power sector regulation. Evolving regulatory roles can be understood through the concept of existing objectives and an additional layer of emerging objectives. Following this categorization, we describe seven existing objectives of power sector regulators and nine emerging objectives, highlighting key challenges and outlining interdependencies. This essay serves as a preliminary installment in the Clean Energy Regulatory Initiative (CERI) series, and aims to lay the groundwork for subsequent reports and case studies that will explore these topics in more depth.

  5. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  6. Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Holt, Ed; Carroll, Ghita

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

  7. Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

  8. Application of fuzzy sets to optimal reactive power planning with security constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Rahman, K.H.; Shahidehpour, S.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a mathematical formulation for the optimal reactive power planning taking into account the static security constraints and the non-probabilistic uncertainty in load values. The planning process is decomposed into investment and operation problems via the generalized Benders decomposition (GBD). Fixed and variable costs are considered in the investment problem. Linguistic declarations of load values in the operation problem are translated into possibility distribution functions. The operation problem is decomposed into 4 subproblems via Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition (DWD), and the modeling of multi-area power systems is considered by applying a second DWD to each subproblem, leading to a significant reduction in its dimensions for personal computer applications. Voltage constraints within each area are modeled as fuzzy sets for the static security analysis by biasing the final solution towards desired values of variables within their given ranges. The overall solution is a compromise between economics (lower investment and operation costs) and security (tighter feasible region). Numerical examples for the applicability of the proposed approach to multi-area power systems are discussed.

  9. Reactive-power compensation of coal mining excavators by using a new-generation STATCOM

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgin, H.F.; Ermis, M.; Kose, K.N.; Cadirci, I.; Acik, A.; Demirci, T.; Terciyanli, A.; Kocak, C.; Yorukoglu, M.

    2007-01-15

    This paper deals with the development and implementation of a current-source-converter-based static synchronous compensator (CSC-STATCOM) applied to the volt-ampere-reactive (VAR) compensation problem of coal mining excavators. It is composed of a +/- 750-kVAR full-bridge CSC with selective harmonic elimination, a low-pass input filter tuned to 200 Hz, and a Delta/Y-connected coupling transformer for connection to medium-voltage load bus. Each power semiconductor switch is composed of an asymmetrical integrated gate commutated thyristor (IGCT) connected in series with a reverse-blocking diode and switched at 500 Hz to eliminate 5th, 7th, 11th, and 13th current harmonics produced by the CSC. Operating principles, power stage, design of dc link, and input filter are also described in this paper. It has been verified by field tests that the developed STATCOM follows rapid fluctuations in nearly symmetrical lagging and leading VAR consumption of electric excavators, resulting in nearly unity power factor on monthly basis, and the harmonic current spectra in the lines of CSC-STATCOM at the point of common coupling comply with the IEEE Standard 519-1992.

  10. Evolution of sputtering target surface composition in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubart, T.; Aijaz, A.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction between pulsed plasmas and surfaces undergoing chemical changes complicates physics of reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS). In this study, we determine the dynamics of formation and removal of a compound on a titanium surface from the evolution of discharge characteristics in an argon atmosphere with nitrogen and oxygen. We show that the time response of a reactive process is dominated by surface processes. The thickness of the compound layer is several nm and its removal by sputtering requires ion fluence in the order of 1016 cm-2, much larger than the ion fluence in a single HiPIMS pulse. Formation of the nitride or oxide layer is significantly slower in HiPIMS than in dc sputtering under identical conditions. Further, we explain very high discharge currents in HiPIMS by the formation of a truly stoichiometric compound during the discharge off-time. The compound has a very high secondary electron emission coefficient and leads to a large increase in the discharge current upon target poisoning.

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Oxygen-Sensitive Potassium Flux in Rainbow Trout Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated if reactive oxygen species are involved in the oxygen-dependent regulation of potassium-chloride cotransport activity in trout erythrocyte membrane. An increase in the oxygen level caused an increase in chloride-sensitive potassium transport (K+-Cl− cotransport). 5 mM hydrogen peroxide caused an increase in K+-Cl− cotransport at 5% oxygen. The increase in flux could be inhibited by adding extracellular catalase in the incubation. Pretreatment of the cells with mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species showing preference for hydroxyl radicals, abolished the activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter by increased oxygen levels. The inhibition by MPG was reversible, and MPG could not inhibit the activation of transporter by the sulfhydryl reagent, N-ethylmaleimide, indicating that the effect of MPG was due to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and not to the reaction of MPG with the cotransporter. Copper ions, which catalyze the production of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction, activated K+-Cl− cotransport significantly at hypoxic conditions (1% O2). These data suggest that hydroxyl radicals, formed from O2 in close vicinity to the cell membrane, play an important role in the oxygen-dependent activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter. PMID:11158169

  12. Using temporal distancing to regulate emotion in adolescence: modulation by reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S P; Somerville, L H; Sebastian, C L

    2017-08-17

    Adopting a temporally distant perspective on stressors reduces distress in adults. Here we investigate whether the extent to which individuals project themselves into the future influences distancing efficacy. We also examined modulating effects of age across adolescence and reactive aggression: factors associated with reduced future-thinking and poor emotion regulation. Participants (N = 83, aged 12-22) read scenarios and rated negative affect when adopting a distant-future perspective, near-future perspective, or when reacting naturally. Self-report data revealed significant downregulation of negative affect during the distant-future condition, with a similar though non-significant skin conductance pattern. Importantly, participants who projected further ahead showed the greatest distress reductions. While temporal distancing efficacy did not vary with age, participants reporting greater reactive aggression showed reduced distancing efficacy, and projected themselves less far into the future. Findings demonstrate the importance of temporal extent in effective temporal distancing; shedding light on a potential mechanism for poor emotional control associated with reactive aggression.

  13. Effects of human contact and vagal regulation on pain reactivity and visual attention in newborns.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Hadar; Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I

    2006-11-01

    In two experiments we examined the effects of human contact and vagal regulation on newborns' pain reactivity and visual attention. Baseline cardiac vagal tone was measured during quiet sleep and during the experiment, and vagal withdrawal was indexed as change in vagal tone from baseline to pain (study 1) or attention (study 2). In study 1, 62 healthy newborns were videotaped during a heel-prick procedure and pain reactivity was assessed from micro-level coding of facial expressions, cry behavior, and body movements. Infants were randomly assigned to a contact condition, held by a female assistant, or a no contact condition, on an infant-seat in a similar angle. In study 2, 62 additional healthy newborns, randomly assigned to contact and noncontact conditions, were presented with 2 visual stimuli for a 60 s familiarization period, which were then paired with a novel stimulus. Visual interest, alertness, and novelty preference were coded. Human contact had no effect on the newborns' pain response. Visual attention increased with human contact and newborns in the contact condition looked at the stimuli more frequently, with higher alertness, for longer durations, and had a higher novelty preference. Autonomic reactivity-as indexed by vagal withdrawal-differentiated newborns with intense and mild pain response. Discussion focused on proximity to conspecifics as a contributor to emerging regulatory and adaptive functioning in the human infant.

  14. New Enhanced Artificial Bee Colony (JA-ABC5) Algorithm with Application for Reactive Power Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The standard artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm involves exploration and exploitation processes which need to be balanced for enhanced performance. This paper proposes a new modified ABC algorithm named JA-ABC5 to enhance convergence speed and improve the ability to reach the global optimum by balancing exploration and exploitation processes. New stages have been proposed at the earlier stages of the algorithm to increase the exploitation process. Besides that, modified mutation equations have also been introduced in the employed and onlooker-bees phases to balance the two processes. The performance of JA-ABC5 has been analyzed on 27 commonly used benchmark functions and tested to optimize the reactive power optimization problem. The performance results have clearly shown that the newly proposed algorithm has outperformed other compared algorithms in terms of convergence speed and global optimum achievement. PMID:25879054

  15. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulate the strength of inhibitory GABA-mediated synaptic transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Michael V.; Daniels, Bryan A.; Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Bowie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal communication imposes a heavy metabolic burden in maintaining ionic gradients essential for action potential firing and synaptic signalling. Although cellular metabolism is known to regulate excitatory neurotransmission, it is still unclear whether the brain’s energy supply affects inhibitory signalling. Here we show that mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS) regulate the strength of postsynaptic GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses of cerebellar stellate cells. Inhibition is strengthened through a mechanism that selectively recruits α3-containing GABAA receptors into synapses with no discernible effect on resident α1-containing receptors. Since mROS promotes the emergence of postsynaptic events with unique kinetic properties, we conclude that newly recruited α3-containing GABAA receptors are activated by neurotransmitter released onto discrete postsynaptic sites. Although traditionally associated with oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease, our data identify mROS as a putative homeostatic signalling molecule coupling cellular metabolism to the strength of inhibitory transmission.

  16. Regulation of plant reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stress responses: learning from AtRBOHD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yukun; He, Chengzhong

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in plants, as the metabolic by-products or as the signaling components in stress responses. High levels of ROS are harmful to plants. In contrast, ROS play important roles in plant physiology, including abiotic and biotic tolerance, development, and cellular signaling. Therefore, ROS production needs to be tightly regulated to balance their function. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue (RBOH) proteins, also known as plant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases, are well studied enzymatic ROS-generating systems in plants. The regulatory mechanisms of RBOH-dependent ROS production in stress responses have been intensively studied. This has greatly advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate plant ROS production. This review attempts to integrate the regulatory mechanisms of RBOHD-dependent ROS production by discussing the recent advance. AtRBOHD-dependent ROS production could provide a valuable reference for studying ROS production in plant stress responses.

  17. Fatigability disrupts cognitive processes' regulation of inflammatory reactivity in old age.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Roiland, Rachel; Polesskaya, Oksana; Chapman, Benjamin; Johnson, Melissa; Brasch, Judith; Chen, Ding-Geng; Mapstone, Mark

    2014-12-01

    High fatigability, a dysfunctional adaption to fatigue, may lead to difficulties performing otherwise regularly encountered cognitive activities and may be related to pro-inflammatory reactivity. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of fatigability on cognitive processes and inflammatory response after an acute cognitive stress task in older adults. In an observational stress reactivity study conducted in a light- and temperature-controlled laboratory, we measured IL-6, self-reported acute fatigue, and frontally oriented cognitive processes in 55 community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older as part of a demanding set of cognitive tasks intended to induce stress. Subjects were classified into groups of low and high fatigability based on cluster analysis of their self-report acute fatigue before and after the cognitive tasks. The two clusters were comparable on levels of baseline IL-6 and cognitive processes; however, the high fatigability cluster had significantly higher levels of IL-6 response than the low fatigability cluster. After controlling for multiple covariates, fatigability moderated the relationship between speed of processing and IL-6 reactivity. Further exploratory analyses indicated significant adverse associations between speed of processing and attention and IL-6 reactivity in the group with low but not high fatigability. Although observational, these data are consistent with the notion that pro-inflammatory states in older adults might be reduced by improvements in cognitive processes. Because fatigability was associated with increased acute inflammatory response and disrupted the normal stress regulation provided by the cognitive processes, future randomized studies might examine whether fatigability alleviation reduces IL-6. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  18. Fatigability Disrupts Cognitive Processes' Regulation of Inflammatory Reactivity in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Roiland, Rachel; Polesskaya, Oksana; Chapman, Benjamin; Johnson, Melissa; Brasch, Judith; Chen, Ding-Geng; Mapstone, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objectives High fatigability, a dysfunctional adaption to fatigue, may lead to difficulties performing otherwise regularly encountered cognitive activities and may be related to pro-inflammatory reactivity. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of fatigability on cognitive processes and inflammatory response following an acute cognitive stress task in older adults. Design An observational laboratory stress reactivity study. Setting A light- and temperature-controlled laboratory. Participants Fifty-five community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older. Measurements We measured interleukin (IL)-6, self-reported acute fatigue, and frontally-oriented cognitive processes as part of a demanding set of cognitive tasks intended to induce stress. Results Subjects were classified into groups of low and high fatigability based on cluster analysis of their self-report acute fatigue before and after the cognitive tasks. The two clusters were comparable on levels of baseline IL-6 and cognitive processes; however, the high fatigability cluster had significantly higher levels of IL-6 response than the low fatigability cluster. After controlling for multiple covariates, fatigability moderated the relationship between speed of processing and IL-6 reactivity. Further exploratory analyses indicated significant adverse associations between speed of processing and attention and IL-6 reactivity in the group with low but not high fatigability. Conclusions While observational, these data are consistent with the notion that pro-inflammatory states in older adults might be reduced by improvements in cognitive processes. Since fatigability was associated with increased acute inflammatory response and disrupted the normal stress regulation provided by the cognitive processes, future randomized studies might examine whether fatigability alleviation reduces IL-6. PMID:24388221

  19. PRD (power-reactivity-decrement) components of a homogeneous U10Zr-fueled 900 MWt LMR

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The linear and Doppler feedback components of the regional contributions of the power-reactivity-decrement (PRD) for a representative 900 MWt homogeneous U10Zr-fueled sodium-cooled reactor are calculated. The PRD is the reactivity required to bring the reactor from zero-power hot-critical condition to a given power level. These components are further separated into power dependent and power-to-flow dependent parts. The values are compared with corresponding quantities calculated for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The implications of these comparisons upon inherent safety characteristics of metal-fueled sodium-cooled reactors are discussed. The effects of fuel axial restraint on feedback, resulting from possible fuel-clad interactions due to burnup are also calculated. The possible enhancement of desirable feedbacks by use of appropriately designed subassembly-duct bowing feedback characteristics is estimated.

  20. Trait Mindfulness Predicts Attentional and Autonomic Regulation of Alcohol Cue-Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The trait of mindfulness varies among meditation-naïve individuals and is associated with attentional and autonomic regulation, two neurocognitive functions that become impaired in addiction. It was hypothesized that alcohol dependent inpatients with comparatively high levels of trait mindfulness would exhibit significant autonomic recovery from stress-primed alcohol cues mediated by greater attentional disengagement from such cues. Methods 58 alcohol dependent inpatients participated in affect-modulated psychophysiological cue-reactivity protocol and a spatial cueing task designed to assess alcohol attentional bias (AB). Associations between trait mindfulness, alcohol AB, and an index of autonomic activity, high-frequency heart rate variability (HFHRV), were examined via multivariate path analysis. Results Higher trait mindfulness was significantly associated with less difficulty resisting the urge to drink and greater HFHRV recovery from stress-primed alcohol cues. After statistically controlling for the correlation of mindfulness and perceived difficulty resisting drinking urges, the association between mindfulness and HFHRV recovery was partially mediated by attentional disengagement from alcohol cues (model R2 = .30). Discussion Alcohol dependent inpatients higher in mindfulness are better able to disengage attention from alcohol cues, which in turn predicts the degree of HFHRV recovery from such cues. Trait mindfulness may index cognitive control over appetitive responses reflected in superior attentional and autonomic regulation of stress-primed alcohol cue-reactivity. PMID:23976814

  1. Emotional Reactivity and Regulation in Anxious and Nonanxious Youth: A Cell-Phone Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Patricia Z.; Forbes, Erika E.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Ryan, Neal D.; Siegle, Greg J.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Silk, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reviews have highlighted anxious youths' affective disturbances, specifically, elevated negative emotions and reliance on ineffective emotion regulation strategies. However, no study has examined anxious youth's emotional reactivity and regulation in real-world contexts. Methods: This study utilized an ecological momentary assessment…

  2. Emotional Reactivity and Regulation in Anxious and Nonanxious Youth: A Cell-Phone Ecological Momentary Assessment Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Patricia Z.; Forbes, Erika E.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Ryan, Neal D.; Siegle, Greg J.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Silk, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reviews have highlighted anxious youths' affective disturbances, specifically, elevated negative emotions and reliance on ineffective emotion regulation strategies. However, no study has examined anxious youth's emotional reactivity and regulation in real-world contexts. Methods: This study utilized an ecological momentary assessment…

  3. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate hypoxic down-regulation of hERG channel protein.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Wang, Ning; Bergson, Pamela; Yuan, Guoxiang; Ficker, Eckhard; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2008-08-22

    Previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological responses to hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of hypoxia on human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel protein expression and assessed the role of ROS. Hypoxia, in a stimulus- and time-dependent manner, decreased hERG protein with marked reduction in hERG K+ conductance in human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing the hERG alpha subunit. Down-regulation of hERG by hypoxia was not due to increased proteasomal degradation or decreased transcription but due to decreased synthesis of the protein. Hypoxia increased ROS in a time-dependent manner. Antioxidants prevented hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and exogenous oxidants mimicked the effects of hypoxia. Hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and elevation in ROS were absent in p(O) cells, which are devoid of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase failed to prevent the effects of hypoxia. These results demonstrate that hypoxia enhances the production of ROS in the mitochondria, resulting in down-regulation of hERG translation and decreased hERG-mediated K+ conductance.

  4. Biological substrates of emotional reactivity and regulation in adolescence during an emotional go-nogo task

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Todd A.; Tottenham, Nim; Galvan, Adriana; Voss, Henning U.; Glover, Gary H.; Casey, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adolescence is a transition period from childhood to adulthood that is often characterized by emotional instability. This period is also a time of increased incidence of anxiety and depression underscoring the importance of understanding biological substrates of behavioral and emotion regulation during adolescence. Developmental changes in the brain in concert with individual predispositions for anxiety may underlie the increased risk for poor outcomes reported during adolescence. We tested the hypothesis that difficulties in regulating behavior in emotional contexts in adolescents may be due to competition between heightened activity in subcortical emotional processing systems and immature top-down prefrontal systems. Individual differences in emotional reactivity may put some teens at greater risk during this sensitive transition in development. Methods We examined the association between emotion regulation, and frontoamygdala circuitry in 60 children, adolescents, and adults using an emotional go/nogo paradigm. We went beyond examining the magnitude of neural activity and focused on neural adaptation within this circuitry across time using fMRI. Results Adolescents showed exaggerated amygdala activity relative to children and adults. This age-related difference decreased with repeated exposures to the stimuli, and individual differences in self-ratings of anxiety predicted the extent of adaptation or habituation in amygdala. Individuals with higher trait anxiety showed less habituation over repeated exposures. This failure to habituate was associated with less functional connectivity between ventral prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Conclusions These findings suggest that exaggerated emotional reactivity during adolescence may increase the need for top-down control and put individuals with less control at greater risk for poor outcomes. PMID:18452757

  5. The fine line between 'brave' and 'reckless': amygdala reactivity and regulation predict recognition of risk.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Parodi, L R; Carlson, Joshua M; Cha, Jiook; Rubin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    High sensation-seekers (HSS) pursue novelty even at the cost of self-harm. When challenged, HSS are less anxious, show blunted physiological (cortisol, startle) and neurobiological (prefrontal-limbic) responses, and devalue aversive outcomes. Here, we investigate how these features interact under conditions of physical danger, in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive approaches to risk. We recruited a cohort of individuals who voluntarily sought out recreational exposure to physical risk, and obtained serial cortisol values over two time-locked days. On the 'baseline' day, we scanned subjects' brains with functional and structural MRI; on the 'skydiving day,' subjects completed a first-time tandem skydive. During neuroimaging, subjects viewed cues that predicted aversive noise; neural data were analyzed for prefrontal-limbic reactivity (activation) and regulation (non-linear complexity), as well as cortical thickness. To probe threat perception, subjects identified aggression for ambiguous faces morphed between neutral and angry poles. Individuals with prefrontal-limbic meso-circuits with less balanced regulation between excitatory and inhibitory components showed both diminished cortisol/anxiety responses to their skydives, as well as less accurate perceptual recognition of threat. This impaired control was localized to the inferior frontal gyrus, with associated cortical thinning. Structural equation modeling suggests that sensation-seeking is primarily mediated via threat-perception, which itself is primarily mediated via neural reactivity and regulation. Our results refine the sensation-seeking construct to provide important distinctions (brain-based, but with endocrine and cognitive consequences) between the brave, who feel fear but nonetheless overcome it, and the reckless, who fail to recognize danger. This distinction has important real-world implications, as those who fail to recognize risk are less likely to mitigate it. Copyright © 2014

  6. Biological substrates of emotional reactivity and regulation in adolescence during an emotional go-nogo task.

    PubMed

    Hare, Todd A; Tottenham, Nim; Galvan, Adriana; Voss, Henning U; Glover, Gary H; Casey, B J

    2008-05-15

    Adolescence is a transition period from childhood to adulthood that is often characterized by emotional instability. This period is also a time of increased incidence of anxiety and depression, underscoring the importance of understanding biological substrates of behavioral and emotion regulation during adolescence. Developmental changes in the brain in concert with individual predispositions for anxiety might underlie the increased risk for poor outcomes reported during adolescence. We tested the hypothesis that difficulties in regulating behavior in emotional contexts in adolescents might be due to competition between heightened activity in subcortical emotional processing systems and immature top-down prefrontal systems. Individual differences in emotional reactivity might put some teens at greater risk during this sensitive transition in development. We examined the association between emotion regulation and frontoamygdala circuitry in 60 children, adolescents, and adults with an emotional go-nogo paradigm. We went beyond examining the magnitude of neural activity and focused on neural adaptation within this circuitry across time with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Adolescents showed exaggerated amygdala activity relative to children and adults. This age-related difference decreased with repeated exposures to the stimuli, and individual differences in self-ratings of anxiety predicted the extent of adaptation or habituation in amygdala. Individuals with higher trait anxiety showed less habituation over repeated exposures. This failure to habituate was associated with less functional connectivity between ventral prefrontal cortex and amygdala. These findings suggest that exaggerated emotional reactivity during adolescence might increase the need for top-down control and put individuals with less control at greater risk for poor outcomes.

  7. Investigation of power-plant plume photochemistry using a reactive plume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, H. S.; Song, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Emissions from large-scale point sources have continuously increased due to the rapid industrial growth. In particular, primary and secondary air pollutants are directly relevant to atmospheric environment and human health. Thus, we tried to precisely describe the atmospheric photochemical conversion from primary to secondary air pollutants inside the plumes emitted from large-scale point sources. A reactive plume model (RPM) was developed to comprehensively consider power-plant plume photochemistry with 255 condensed photochemical reactions. The RPM can simulate two main components of power-plant plumes: turbulent dispersion of plumes and compositional changes of plumes via photochemical reactions. In order to evaluate the performance of the RPM developed in the present study, two sets of observational data obtained from the TexAQS II 2006 (Texas Air Quality Study II 2006) campaign were compared with RPM-simulated data. Comparison shows that the RPM produces relatively accurate concentrations for major primary and secondary in-plume species such as NO2, SO2, ozone, and H2SO4. Statistical analyses show good correlation, with correlation coefficients (R) ranging from 0.61 to 0.92, and good agreement with the Index of Agreement (IOA) ranging from 0.70 to 0.95. Following evaluation of the performance of the RPM, a demonstration was also carried out to show the applicability of the RPM. The RPM can calculate NOx photochemical lifetimes inside the two plumes (Monticello and Welsh power plants). Further applicability and possible uses of the RPM are also discussed together with some limitations of the current version of the RPM.

  8. Return of target material ions leads to a reduced hysteresis in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čapek, Jiří; Kadlec, Stanislav

    2017-05-01

    Titanium and aluminum targets have been reactively sputtered in Ar +O2 or Ar +N2 gas mixtures in order to systematically investigate the effect of reduced hysteresis in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) as compared to other sputtering techniques utilizing low discharge target power density (e.g., direct current or pulsed direct current mid-frequency magnetron sputtering) operated at the same average discharge power. We found that the negative slope of the flow rate of the reactive gas gettered by the sputtered target material as a function of the reactive gas partial pressure is clearly lower in the case of HiPIMS. This results in a lower critical pumping speed, which implies a reduced hysteresis. We argue that the most important effect explaining the observed behavior is covering of the reacted areas of the target by the returning ionized metal, effectively lowering the target coverage at a given partial pressure. This explanation is supported by a calculation using an analytical model of reactive HiPIMS with time and space averaging (developed by us).

  9. 75 FR 29531 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Supplemental Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...] Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Supplemental Notice of Technical... conference will provide a forum to consider issues related to frequency regulation compensation in...

  10. Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

  11. Reactive Power and Voltage Optimization Control Strategy in Active Distribution Network Based on the Determination of the Key Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingmeng; Che, Renfei; Gao, Shi

    2017-05-01

    The distributed generation which is integrated in the active distribution network changes power flow, bringing new challenges to the voltage control. When voltage limit violation happens, in order to make the voltage return to normal range and improve the voltage quality, a novel voltage control strategy is proposed. Considering the voltage quality and node importance, the electrical closeness centrality and key node contribution degree are defined, and the key nodes are determined by the orders of the key node contribution degree. This paper uses the reactive power compensation devices which are installed at the key nodes coordinated with the reactive power output of the distributed generation to realize the voltage optimization control. The voltage optimization control model is established by taking the minimum power loss as an objective function. Using the particle swarm optimization algorithm solves the model. The simulation results of the improved IEEE-33 bus system verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Threat and defense as goal regulation: from implicit goal conflict to anxious uncertainty, reactive approach motivation, and ideological extremism.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kyle; McGregor, Ian; Prentice, Mike

    2011-12-01

    Four studies investigated a goal regulation view of anxious uncertainty threat (Gray & McNaughton, 2000) and ideological defense. Participants (N = 444) were randomly assigned to have achievement or relationship goals implicitly primed. The implicit goal primes were followed by randomly assigned achievement or relationship threats that have reliably caused generalized, reactive approach motivation and ideological defense in past research. The threats caused anxious uncertainty (Study 1), reactive approach motivation (Studies 2 and 3), and reactive ideological conviction (Study 4) only when threat-relevant goals had first been primed, but not when threat-irrelevant goals had first been primed. Reactive ideological conviction (Study 4) was eliminated if participants were given an opportunity to attribute their anxiety to a mundane source. Results support a goal regulation view of anxious uncertainty, threat, and defense with potential for integrating theories of defensive compensation.

  13. Revised seismic and geologic siting regulations for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, A.J.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    The primary regulatory basis governing the seismic design of nuclear power plants is contained in Appendix A to Part 50, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). General Design Criteria (GDC) 2 defines requirements for design bases for protection against natural phenomena. GDC 2 states the performance criterion that {open_quotes}Structures, systems, and components important to safety shall be designed to withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, . . . without loss of capability to perform their safety functions. . .{close_quotes}. Appendix A to Part 100, Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, has been the principal document which provided detailed criteria to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites and suitability of the plant design basis established in consideration of the seismic and geologic characteristics of the proposed sites. Appendix A defines required seismological and geological investigations and requirements for other design conditions such as soil stability, slope stability, and seismically induced floods and water waves, and requirements for seismic instrumentation. The NRC staff is in the process of revising Appendix A. The NRC has recently revised seismic siting and design regulations for future applications. These revisions are discussed in detail in this paper.

  14. Current-voltage-time characteristics of the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Magnus, F.; Sveinsson, O. B.; Olafsson, S.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    The discharge current and voltage waveforms have been measured in a reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) Ar/N{sub 2} discharge with a Ti target for 400 {mu}s long pulses. We observe that the current waveform in the reactive Ar/N{sub 2} HiPIMS discharge is highly dependent on the pulse repetition frequency, unlike the non-reactive Ar discharge. The current is found to increase significantly as the frequency is lowered. This is attributed to an increase in the secondary electron emission yield during the self-sputtering phase, when the nitride forms on the target at low frequencies. In addition, self-sputtering runaway occurs at lower discharge voltages when nitrogen is added to the discharge. This illustrates the crucial role of self-sputtering in the behavior of the reactive HiPIMS discharge.

  15. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, G.R.

    1983-11-29

    A dc switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load is provided. The regulator basic circuit is a bridge arrangement of diodes and transistors. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. A dc power supply is connected to the input of the bridge and the output is connected to the load. A servo controller is provided to control the switching rate of the transistors to maintain a desired current to the load. The regulator may be operated in three stages or modes: (1) for current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned on and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned off, and load current flywheels through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays off, allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load.

  16. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, George R.

    1986-01-01

    A power supply for driving an inductive load current from a dc power supply hrough a regulator circuit including a bridge arrangement of diodes and switching transistors controlled by a servo controller which regulates switching in response to the load current to maintain a selected load current. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. The regulator may be operated in three "stages" or modes: (1) For current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned "on" and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned "off", and load current "flywheels" through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays "off", allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load. The three operating states are controlled automatically by the controller.

  17. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Teneng, Ivo; Montoya-Durango, Diego E; Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2011-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion which likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a "copy-and-paste" mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands.

  18. Mechanical forces regulate the reactivity of a thioester bond in a bacterial adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Echelman, Daniel J.; Lee, Alex Q.; Fernández, Julio M.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria must withstand large mechanical shear forces when adhering to and colonizing hosts. Recent structural studies on a class of Gram-positive bacterial adhesins have revealed an intramolecular Cys-Gln thioester bond that can react with surface-associated ligands to covalently anchor to host surfaces. Two other examples of such internal thioester bonds occur in certain anti-proteases and in the immune complement system, both of which react with the ligand only after the thioester bond is exposed by a proteolytic cleavage. We hypothesized that mechanical forces in bacterial adhesion could regulate thioester reactivity to ligand analogously to such proteolytic gating. Studying the pilus tip adhesin Spy0125 of Streptococcus pyogenes, we developed a single molecule assay to unambiguously resolve the state of the thioester bond. We found that when Spy0125 was in a folded state, its thioester bond could be cleaved with the small-molecule nucleophiles methylamine and histamine, but when Spy0125 was mechanically unfolded and subjected to forces of 50–350 piconewtons, thioester cleavage was no longer observed. For folded Spy0125 without mechanical force exposure, thioester cleavage was in equilibrium with spontaneous thioester reformation, which occurred with a half-life of several minutes. Functionally, this equilibrium reactivity allows thioester-containing adhesins to sample potential substrates without irreversible cleavage and inactivation. We propose that such reversible thioester reactivity would circumvent potential soluble inhibitors, such as histamine released at sites of inflammation, and allow the bacterial adhesin to selectively associate with surface-bound ligands. PMID:28348083

  19. A sex comparison of reactive knee stiffness regulation strategies under cognitive loads.

    PubMed

    Kim, Allison S; Needle, Alan R; Thomas, Stephen J; Higginson, Christopher I; Kaminski, Thomas W; Swanik, C Buz

    2016-06-01

    Sex differences may exist in cognitive faculties and neuromuscular strategies for maintaining joint stability. The purpose of this study was to assess whether preparatory and reactive knee stiffening strategies are affected differently in males and females exposed to sex-biased cognitive loads. 20 male and 20 female volunteers were tested for knee joint stiffness and quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation patterns throughout a rapid eccentric knee extension perturbation. Participants were tested under 3 cognitive loads (Benton's Judgment of Line Orientation; Symbol Digit modalities Test; and Serial 7's) and a control condition. Apparent knee joint stiffness and muscle activation amplitude and timing were quantified throughout the perturbation across the 4 conditions. Reactive knee stiffness values were significantly less during the cognitive tasks compared to the control condition (Judgment of Line Orientation=0.034Nm/deg/kg, Symbol Digit Modalities Test=0.037Nm/deg/kg, Serial 7's=0.037Nm/deg/kg, control=0.048Nm/deg/kg). Females had greater normalized total apparent stiffness than males. The quadriceps muscles had faster and greater activation than the hamstring muscles; however, no group differences were observed. No overall differences in muscle activation (magnitude and timing) were found between the cognitive loading tasks. Cognitive loading may decrease the ability of healthy individuals to reactively stiffen their knee joint and appears to interfere with the normal stiffness regulation strategies. This may elucidate an extrinsic risk factor for non-contact knee ligament injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactivation of L1 retrotransposon by benzo(a)pyrene involves complex genetic and epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Quertermous, James L; Lacy, Mary E

    2011-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke and a byproduct of fossil fuel combustion that likely contributes to the tumorigenic processes in human cancers including lung and esophageal. Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) or L1 is a mobile element within the mammalian genome that propagates via a “copy-and-paste” mechanism using reverse transcriptase and RNA intermediates. L1 is strongly expressed during early embryogenesis and then silenced as cells initiate differentiation programming. Although the complex transcriptional control mechanisms of L1 are not well understood, L1 reactivation has been described in several human cancers and following exposure of mouse or human cells to BaP. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms and epigenetic events that regulate L1 reactivation following BaP exposure. We show that challenge of HeLa cells with BaP induces early enrichment of the transcriptionally-active chromatin markers histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4Me3) and histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), and reduces association of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) with the L1 promoter. These changes are followed by proteasome-dependent decreases in cellular DNMT1 expression and sustained reduction of cytosine methylation within the L1 promoter CpG island. Pharmacological inhibition of the proteasome signaling pathway with the inhibitor MG132 blocks degradation of DNMT1 and alters BaP-mediated histone epigenetic modifications. We conclude that genetic reactivation of L1 by BaP involves an ordered cascade of epigenetic events that begin with nucleosomal histone modifications and is completed with alterations in DNMT1 recruitment to the L1 promoter and reduced DNA methylation of CpG islands. PMID:21150308

  1. Regulation of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I Latency and Reactivation by HBZ and Rex

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Zhi, Huijun; Ho, Yik-Khuan; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection is largely latent in infected persons. How HTLV-1 establishes latency and reactivates is unclear. Here we show that most HTLV-1-infected HeLa cells become senescent. By contrast, when NF-κB activity is blocked, senescence is averted, and infected cells continue to divide and chronically produce viral proteins. A small population of infected NF-κB-normal HeLa cells expresses low but detectable levels of Tax and Rex, albeit not Gag or Env. In these “latently” infected cells, HTLV-1 LTR trans-activation by Tax persists, but NF-κB trans-activation is attenuated due to inhibition by HBZ, the HTLV-1 antisense protein. Furthermore, Gag-Pol mRNA localizes primarily in the nuclei of these cells. Importantly, HBZ was found to inhibit Rex-mediated export of intron-containing mRNAs. Over-expression of Rex or shRNA-mediated silencing of HBZ led to viral reactivation. Importantly, strong NF-κB inhibition also reactivates HTLV-1. Hence, during HTLV-1 infection, when Tax/Rex expression is robust and dominant over HBZ, productive infection ensues with expression of structural proteins and NF-κB hyper-activation, which induces senescence. When Tax/Rex expression is muted and HBZ is dominant, latent infection is established with expression of regulatory (Tax/Rex/HBZ) but not structural proteins. HBZ maintains viral latency by down-regulating Tax-induced NF-κB activation and senescence, and by inhibiting Rex-mediated expression of viral structural proteins. PMID:24699669

  2. Power reactivity decrement components of a homogeneous UPu10Zr-fueled 900-MW(thermal) liquid metal reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Linear and Doppler feedback components of the power reactivity decrement (PRD) for a 900-MW(thermal) homogeneous UPu10Zr-fueled sodium-cooled reactor have been calculated. (The PRD is the negative of the reactivity required to bring the reactor from a zero-power hot-critical condition to a given power level.) The components are further separated into power-dependent and power-to-flow-dependent parts. These delineations enhance understanding of the contributions of the components to the feedback process. The delineation also enables the PRDs for other values of coolant flows to be estimated. The linear and Doppler components of the PRD are obtained using the EBRPOCO code, which calculates detailed axially delineated contributions of the components for every subassembly of a loading configuration. Separation of the components into power and power-to-flow parts is made by calculations of the components, assuming infinite thermal conductivities to obtain the power-to-flow values. Subtractions of these from the corresponding PRD quantities give the power-dependent parts. The values of the various feedback components are compared with corresponding quantities reported for an analogous U10Zr-fueled case.

  3. Mcl-1 regulates reactive oxygen species via NOX4 during chemotherapy-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Demelash, Abeba; Pfannenstiel, Lukas W; Liu, Li; Gastman, Brian R

    2017-04-25

    Mcl-1, a Bcl-2 family member, is highly expressed in a variety of human cancers and is believed to enhance tumorigenic potential and chemotherapy resistance through the inhibition of apoptosis and senescence. We previously reported that Mcl-1's regulation of chemotherapy-induced senescence (CIS) is dependent on its ability to prevent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In this report, we demonstrate that Mcl-1-regulated CIS requires not only ROS, but specifically mitochondrial ROS, and that these events are upstream of activation of the DNA damage response, another necessary step toward senescence. Mcl-1's anti-senescence activity also involves the unique ability to inhibit ROS formation by preventing the upregulation of pro-oxidants. Specifically, we found that NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are regulated by Mcl-1 and that NOX4 expression in particular is a required step for CIS induction that is blocked by Mcl-1. Lastly, we illustrate that by preventing expression of NOX4, Mcl-1 limits its availability in the mitochondria, thereby lowering the production of mitochondrial ROS during CIS. Our studies not only define the essential role of Mcl-1 in chemoresistance, but also for the first time link a key pro-survival Bcl-2 family member with the NOX protein family, both of which have significant ramifications in cancer progression.

  4. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  5. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  6. Regulation of glomerular heparanase expression by aldosterone, angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    van den Hoven, Mabel J; Waanders, Femke; Rops, Angelique L; Kramer, Andrea B; van Goor, Harry; Berden, Jo H; Navis, Gerjan; van der Vlag, Johan

    2009-09-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) provides renoprotection in adriamycin nephropathy (AN), along with a decrease in overexpression of glomerular heparanase. Angiotensin II (AngII) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate heparanase expression in vivo. However, it is unknown whether this is also the case for aldosterone. Therefore, we further assessed the role of aldosterone, AngII and ROS in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression. Six weeks after the induction of AN, rats were treated with vehicle (n = 8), lisinopril (75 mg/L, n = 10), spironolactone (3.3 mg/day, n = 12) or the combination of lisinopril and spironolactone (n = 14) for 12 weeks. Age-matched healthy rats served as controls (n = 6). After 18 weeks, renal heparanase and heparan sulfate (HS) expression were examined by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of aldosterone, AngII and ROS on heparanase expression in cultured podocytes was determined. Treatment with lisinopril, spironolactone or their combination significantly blunted the increased glomerular heparanase expression and restored the decreased HS expression in the GBM. Addition of aldosterone to cultured podocytes resulted in a significantly increased heparanase mRNA and protein expression, which could be inhibited by spironolactone. Heparanase mRNA and protein expression in podocytes were also significantly increased after stimulation with AngII or ROS. Our in vivo and in vitro results show that not only AngII and ROS, but also aldosterone is involved in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression.

  7. Reactive oxygen species regulate lovastatin biosynthesis in Aspergillus terreus during submerged and solid-state fermentations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Roxana U; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis E; Mendoza, Mariel; Pérez-Sánchez, Ailed; Fierro, Francisco; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-12-01

    In a previous work we detected an important increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations during idiophase in lovastatin fermentations. Hence, the objective of the present work was to determine if ROS contributes to the regulation of lovastatin biosynthesis. Exogenous antioxidants were used to reduce ROS accumulation. The addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) decreased ROS accumulation and concurrent lovastatin production. In solid-state fermentation (SSF), the addition of 100 mM of NAC lowered ROS accumulation by 53%, together with a 79% decrease in lovastatin biosynthesis. A similarly, situation was observed in submerged fermentation (SmF). Decreased lovastatin production was due to a lower expression of the regulatory gene lovE, and gene lovF. Moreover, the addition of H2O2 to the culture caused precocious gene expression and lovastatin biosynthesis. These results indicate that ROS accumulation in idiophase contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic genes. It was considered that Yap1 (Atyap1) could be a transcription factor linking ROS with lovastatin biosynthesis. In a Northern analysis, Aspergillus terreus yap1 gene (Atyap1) was highly expressed during trophophase but down regulated during idiophase. Conversely, expression pattern of srrA gene, suggested that SrrA could positively control lovastatin biosynthesis, and also explaining the characteristics of the biosynthesis in SSF. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TRPC3 positively regulates reactive oxygen species driving maladaptive cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Naoyuki; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kuroda, Takuya; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Miyano, Kei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Sato, Yoji; Ide, Tomomi; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Sumimoto, Hideki; Mori, Yasuo; Nishida, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) function as key mediators of mechanotransduction during both physiological adaptation to mechanical load and maladaptive remodeling of the heart. This is despite low levels of cardiac Nox2 expression. The mechanism underlying the transition from adaptation to maladaptation remains obscure, however. We demonstrate that transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3), a Ca2+-permeable channel, acts as a positive regulator of ROS (PRROS) in cardiomyocytes, and specifically regulates pressure overload-induced maladaptive cardiac remodeling in mice. TRPC3 physically interacts with Nox2 at specific C-terminal sites, thereby protecting Nox2 from proteasome-dependent degradation and amplifying Ca2+-dependent Nox2 activation through TRPC3-mediated background Ca2+ entry. Nox2 also stabilizes TRPC3 proteins to enhance TRPC3 channel activity. Expression of TRPC3 C-terminal polypeptide abolished TRPC3-regulated ROS production by disrupting TRPC3-Nox2 interaction, without affecting TRPC3-mediated Ca2+ influx. The novel TRPC3 function as a PRROS provides a mechanistic explanation for how diastolic Ca2+ influx specifically encodes signals to induce ROS-mediated maladaptive remodeling and offers new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:27833156

  9. Targeting and Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Nox Family NADPH Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Stanislas; Hurt, Darrell; Ueyama, Takehiko

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Nox family NADPH oxidases serve a variety of functions requiring reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, including antimicrobial defense, biosynthetic processes, oxygen sensing, and redox-based cellular signaling. We explored targeting, assembly, and activation of several Nox family oxidases, since ROS production appears to be regulated both spatially and temporally. Nox1 and Nox3 are similar to the phagocytic (Nox2-based) oxidase, functioning as multicomponent superoxide-generating enzymes. Factors regulating their activities include cytosolic activator and organizer proteins and GTP-Rac. Their regulation varies, with the following rank order: Nox2 > Nox1 > Nox3. Determinants of subcellular targeting include: (a) formation of Nox-p22phox heterodimeric complexes allowing plasma membrane translocation, (b) phospholipids-binding specificities of PX domain-containing organizer proteins (p47phox or Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1 and p40phox), and (c) variably splicing of Noxo1 PX domains directing them to nuclear or plasma membranes. Dual oxidases (Duox1 and Duox2) are targeted by different mechanisms. Plasma membrane targeting results in H2O2 release, not superoxide, to support extracellular peroxidases. Human Duox1 and Duox2 have no demonstrable peroxidase activity, despite their extensive homology with heme peroxidases. The dual oxidases were reconstituted by Duox activator 2 (Duoxa2) or two Duoxa1 variants, which dictate maturation, subcellular localization, and the type of ROS generated by forming stable complexes with Duox. Antioxid Redox Signal. 11, 2607–2619. PMID:19438290

  10. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  11. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  12. Tubulin cofactor B regulates microtubule densities during microglia transition to the reactive states

    SciTech Connect

    Fanarraga, M.L.

    2009-02-01

    Microglia are highly dynamic cells of the CNS that continuously survey the welfare of the neural parenchyma and play key roles modulating neurogenesis and neuronal cell death. In response to injury or pathogen invasion parenchymal microglia transforms into a more active cell that proliferates, migrates and behaves as a macrophage. The acquisition of these extra skills implicates enormous modifications of the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Here we show that tubulin cofactor B (TBCB), which has been found to contribute to various aspects of microtubule dynamics in vivo, is also implicated in microglial cytoskeletal changes. We find that TBCB is upregulated in post-lesion reactive parenchymal microglia/macrophages, in interferon treated BV-2 microglial cells, and in neonate amoeboid microglia where the microtubule densities are remarkably low. Our data demonstrate that upon TBCB downregulation both, after microglia differentiation to the ramified phenotype in vivo and in vitro, or after TBCB gene silencing, microtubule densities are restored in these cells. Taken together these observations support the view that TBCB functions as a microtubule density regulator in microglia during activation, and provide an insight into the understanding of the complex mechanisms controlling microtubule reorganization during microglial transition between the amoeboid, ramified, and reactive phenotypes.

  13. 75 FR 30812 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Further Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets... of Proposed Rulemaking on Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets, as previously announced.\\1\\ \\1\\ Notice of Technical Conference re Frequency Compensation in...

  14. 75 FR 31430 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Notice Establishing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets... technical conference regarding frequency regulation in the organized wholesale power markets, as previously announced.\\1\\ \\1\\ Notice of Technical Conference re Frequency Compensation in the Organized Wholesale...

  15. Mechanisms that Regulate Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cytochrome P450

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Davydov, Dmitri R.; Verma, Seema

    2004-09-15

    Mammalian cytochromes P450 (P450) are a family of heme-thiolate enzymes involved in the oxidative metabolism of a variety of endogenous and exogenous lipophilic compounds. Poor coupling of the P450 catalytic cycle results in continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which affect signaling pathways and other cellular functions. P450 generation of ROS is tightly controlled by regulation of gene transcription, as well as by modulation of interactions between protein constituents of the monooxygenase that affects its activity, coupling and stability. Malfunction of these mechanisms may result in a burst of ROS production, which can cause lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress downregulates P450 levels by a variety of feedback mechanisms. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of these feedback mechanisms that serve to limit P450 production of ROS. Some of the more likely physiological and cellular effects of P450 generation of ROS are also discussed.

  16. Alkbh8 Regulates Selenocysteine-Protein Expression to Protect against Reactive Oxygen Species Damage.

    PubMed

    Endres, Lauren; Begley, Ulrike; Clark, Ryan; Gu, Chen; Dziergowska, Agnieszka; Małkiewicz, Andrzej; Melendez, J Andres; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and metabolic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA, proteins and lipids to promote disease. Regulation of gene expression can prevent this damage and can include increased transcription, translation and post translational modification. Cellular responses to ROS play important roles in disease prevention, with deficiencies linked to cancer, neurodegeneration and ageing. Here we detail basal and damage-induced translational regulation of a group of oxidative-stress response enzymes by the tRNA methyltransferase Alkbh8. Using a new gene targeted knockout mouse cell system, we show that Alkbh8-/- embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) display elevated ROS levels, increased DNA and lipid damage and hallmarks of cellular stress. We demonstrate that Alkbh8 is induced in response to ROS and is required for the efficient expression of selenocysteine-containing ROS detoxification enzymes belonging to the glutathione peroxidase (Gpx1, Gpx3, Gpx6 and likely Gpx4) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) families. We also show that, in response to oxidative stress, the tRNA modification 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2'-O-methyluridine (mcm5Um) increases in normal MEFs to drive the expression of ROS detoxification enzymes, with this damage-induced reprogramming of tRNA and stop-codon recoding corrupted in Alkbh8-/- MEFS. These studies define Alkbh8 and tRNA modifications as central regulators of cellular oxidative stress responses in mammalian systems. In addition they highlight a new animal model for use in environmental and cancer studies and link translational regulation to the prevention of DNA and lipid damage.

  17. Multi-Objective Advanced Inverter Controls to Dispatch the Real and Reactive Power of Many Distributed PV Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Lave, Matthew Samuel; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Seuss, John; Grijalva, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this report compares several real - time control strategies for the power output of a large number of PV distributed throughout a large distribution feeder circuit. Both real and reactive power controls are considered with the goal of minimizing network over - voltage violations caused by large amounts of PV generation. Several control strategies are considered under various assumptions regarding the existence and latency of a communication network. The control parameters are adjusted to maximize the effectiveness of each control. The controls are then compared based on their ability to achieve multiple objectiv es. These objectives include minimizing the total number of voltage violations , minimizing the total amount of PV energy curtailed or reactive power generated, and maximizing the fairness of any control action among all PV systems . The controls are simulat ed on the OpenDSS platform using time series load and spatially - distributed irradiance data.

  18. Digital regulation of a phase controlled power converter

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, C.; Haque, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, now in construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will use phase controlled power converters for the main dipole and quadrupole magnet strings. The rectifiers in these power supplies will be controlled by a digital regulator based on the TI 320C30 Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The DSP implements the current loop, the voltage loop, and a system to actively reduce the sub-harmonic ripple components. Digital firing circuits consisting of a phase locked lop and counters are used to fire the SCRs. Corrections for the sub-harmonic reduction are calculated by the DSP and stored in registers in the firing circuit. These corrections are added in hardware, to the over-all firing count provided by the DSP. the resultant count is compared to a reference counter to fire the SCRs. This combination of a digital control system and the digital firing circuits allows the correction of the sub-harmonics in a real-time sense. A prototype of the regulator has been constructed, and the preliminary testing indicates a sub-harmonic reduction of 60 dB.

  19. A desensitized controller for voltage regulation of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heniche, A.; Bourles, H.; Houry, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    In this paper a robust linear voltage controller is proposed to improve power system stability and performance under varying operating conditions. This controller includes the automatic voltage regulator and the power system stabilizer. It limits the variations of the terminal voltage, damps the electromechanical oscillation and increases the excitation during and after a short circuit in all operating points. The design method chosen to improve the parametric robustness is desensitivity. It is the first time that a parametric robust design method has been applied to resolve the problem of voltage regulation. The method principles when the parameter is a vector, are presented. The desensitized controller has a simple structure and therefore can easily be implemented. The results obtained with a simulation software and with the Electricite de France Transient Network Analyzer show the good performance and the advantages of the controller with respect to various disturbances. This method can be applied to all kinds of generators, and is particularly well suited in the case of turbogenerators working in very different operating conditions.

  20. CFD-based turbulent reactive flow simulations of power plant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, K. Max

    2017-02-01

    trajectory with that estimated using a semi-empirical equation and Cumberland-specific parameters indicated that RANS-VS can reasonably predict plume evolution in the JDR as well. Our study suggested that properly configured CFD simulations (e.g., turbulence model, source representation and mesh sensitivity) were able to capture the evolution of chemical reactive plumes from power plants in high accuracy, however, with high computational cost and thus limited applicable spatial range.

  1. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions.

  2. Ethylene response factor 6 is a regulator of reactive oxygen species signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sewelam, Nasser; Kazan, Kemal; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Kidd, Brendan N; Manners, John M; Schenk, Peer M

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in plant cells in response to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses as well as during normal growth and development. Although a large number of transcription factor (TF) genes are up- or down-regulated by ROS, currently very little is known about the functions of these TFs during oxidative stress. In this work, we examined the role of ERF6 (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR6), an AP2/ERF domain-containing TF, during oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis. Mutant analyses showed that NADPH oxidase (RbohD) and calcium signaling are required for ROS-responsive expression of ERF6. erf6 insertion mutant plants showed reduced growth and increased H2O2 and anthocyanin levels. Expression analyses of selected ROS-responsive genes during oxidative stress identified several differentially expressed genes in the erf6 mutant. In particular, a number of ROS responsive genes, such as ZAT12, HSFs, WRKYs, MAPKs, RBOHs, DHAR1, APX4, and CAT1 were more strongly induced by H2O2 in erf6 plants than in wild-type. In contrast, MDAR3, CAT3, VTC2 and EX1 showed reduced expression levels in the erf6 mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that ERF6 plays an important role as a positive antioxidant regulator during plant growth and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  3. Calcium-dependent protein kinases regulate the production of reactive oxygen species by potato NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Ohura, Ikuko; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Yokota, Naohiko; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shimamoto, Ko; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2007-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in plant innate immunity. NADPH oxidase (RBOH; for Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog) plays a central role in the oxidative burst, and EF-hand motifs in the N terminus of this protein suggest possible regulation by Ca(2+). However, regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. We identified Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of potato (Solanum tuberosum) St RBOHB as potential phosphorylation sites. An anti-phosphopeptide antibody (pSer82) indicated that Ser-82 was phosphorylated by pathogen signals in planta. We cloned two potato calcium-dependent protein kinases, St CDPK4 and St CDPK5, and mass spectrometry analyses showed that these CDPKs phosphorylated only Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of St RBOHB in a calcium-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active mutant of St CDPK5, St CDPK5VK, provoked ROS production in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The CDPK-mediated ROS production was disrupted by knockdown of Nb RBOHB in N. benthamiana. The loss of function was complemented by heterologous expression of wild-type potato St RBOHB but not by a mutant (S82A/S97A). Furthermore, the heterologous expression of St CDPK5VK phosphorylated Ser-82 of St RBOHB in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that St CDPK5 induces the phosphorylation of St RBOHB and regulates the oxidative burst.

  4. Glutamate Transporter EAAT2 Expression is Up-Regulated in Reactive Astrocytes in Human Periventricular Leukomalacia

    PubMed Central

    DESILVA, TARA M.; BILLIARDS, SARAID S.; BORENSTEIN, NATALIA S.; TRACHTENBERG, FELICIA L.; VOLPE, JOSEPH J.; KINNEY, HANNAH C.; ROSENBERG, PAUL A.

    2010-01-01

    The major neuropathological correlate of cerebral palsy in premature infants is periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), a disorder of the immature cerebral white matter. Cerebral ischemia leading to excitotoxicity is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of this disorder, implying a critical role for glutamate transporters, the major determinants of extracellular glutamate concentration. Previously, we found that EAAT2 expression is limited primarily to premyelinating oligodendrocytes early in development and is rarely observed in astrocytes until >40 weeks. In this study, we analyzed the expression of EAAT2 in cerebral white matter from PVL and control cases. Western blot analysis suggested an up-regulation of EAAT2 in PVL compared with control cases. Single- and double-label immunocytochemistry showed a significantly higher percentage of EAAT2-immunopositive astrocytes in PVL (51.8% ± 5.6%) compared with control white matter (21.4% ± 5.6%; P = 0.004). Macrophages in the necrotic foci in PVL also expressed EAAT2. Premyelinating oligodendrocytes in both PVL and control cases expressed EAAT2, without qualitative difference in expression. The previously unrecognized up-regulation of EAAT2 in reactive astrocytes and its presence in macrophages in PVL reported here may reflect a response to either hypoxic-ischemic injury or inflammation. PMID:18314905

  5. Ethylene Response Factor 6 Is a Regulator of Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sewelam, Nasser; Kazan, Kemal; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Kidd, Brendan N.; Manners, John M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in plant cells in response to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses as well as during normal growth and development. Although a large number of transcription factor (TF) genes are up- or down-regulated by ROS, currently very little is known about the functions of these TFs during oxidative stress. In this work, we examined the role of ERF6 (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR6), an AP2/ERF domain-containing TF, during oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis. Mutant analyses showed that NADPH oxidase (RbohD) and calcium signaling are required for ROS-responsive expression of ERF6. erf6 insertion mutant plants showed reduced growth and increased H2O2 and anthocyanin levels. Expression analyses of selected ROS-responsive genes during oxidative stress identified several differentially expressed genes in the erf6 mutant. In particular, a number of ROS responsive genes, such as ZAT12, HSFs, WRKYs, MAPKs, RBOHs, DHAR1, APX4, and CAT1 were more strongly induced by H2O2 in erf6 plants than in wild-type. In contrast, MDAR3, CAT3, VTC2 and EX1 showed reduced expression levels in the erf6 mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that ERF6 plays an important role as a positive antioxidant regulator during plant growth and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:23940555

  6. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species1

    PubMed Central

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M.; Moreno, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions. PMID:27208225

  7. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  8. Electric utility power plant choice under investment regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Economists have examined electric utility behavior under an allowed rate of return (ARoR), but little attention has been given to the regulation of generation technology choice. Two financial methods for regulating this investment decision are Allowance for Funds Used During Construction (AFUDC) and Construction Work in Progress (CWIP). The switch from AFUDC to CWIP by federal and state commissions has sparked a national debate. One issue addressed in this study is whether AFUDC or CWIP influenced technology choice. The first chapter reviews policy and compares the present value of returns to the firm under AFUDC with returns under CWIP. Chapter 2 discusses previous studied of electric utility behavior. In the third chapter, a general model is developed in which profit and revenue maximization, and cost minimization, are nested. It incorporates cost uncertainty, as well as AFUDC and CWIP. Chapter 4 estimates cost functions for coal and nuclear capacity with data on 350 units completed between 1965 and 1980. These estimates are used to forecast firm expectations on the mean and variance of power plant costs. Results suggest that while rate-of-return and investment regulation may not have had a great influence on plant choice, policies that change perceived cost uncertainties will have a significant impact on firm behavior.

  9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) pathway and reactive oxygen species regulate tyrosine phosphorylation in capacitating boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Awda, Basim J; Buhr, Mary M

    2010-11-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) family of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is identified for the first time in boar sperm and is associated with capacitation and tyrosine phosphorylation (tyr-P). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate this signal transduction. Western immunoblotting detected the ERK pathway components RAF1, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 in extracts from fresh boar spermatozoa and determined that their phosphoprotein profiles differed in a capacitation-dependent fashion. Capacitation was accompanied by appearance of two new ERKs (158 and 161 kDa) and disappearance of others. Capacitation was verified with increased tyr-P, which was inhibited by a 30-min pre-exposure of fresh boar sperm to a xanthine/xanthine oxidase ROS-generating system prior to the capacitating incubation; ROS pre-exposure also affected the phosphorylation of RAF1, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2. Preincubating sperm with inhibitors of the ERK components with or without the ROS generator affected subsequent capacitation. Inhibiting ERK1/2 inhibited tyr-P of capacitated boar spermatozoa proteins of 172, 97, and 66 kDa (P ≤ 0.04); with ROS, this inhibition increased (P < 0.002) and tyr-P of 111 kDa declined (P < 0.028). Pre-exposure to ROS plus MEK1/2 inhibitor prevented capacitation-induced tyr-P of proteins of 187 (P < 0.01) and 112 kDa (P < 0.04) versus capacitation with or without ROS. Therefore, ERK1/2 components of the MAPK pathway significantly regulate boar sperm capacitation, and RAF1 and MEK1/2 may have some lesser influence through crosstalk with different pathways. ROS affect RAF1, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 and could influence the sequential events of boar sperm capacitation.

  10. High Power Factor Control Regulating Inverter Output Power in IPM Motor Driven by Inverter System without Electrolytic Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazuma, Kazuya; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Haga, Hitoshi; Sazawa, Mataki; Kondo, Seiji

    This paper presents a new high power factor control method for a single-to-three-phase power converter without an electrolytic capacitor. The circuit used in the method consists of a single-phase rectifier, a small film capacitor at DC-link, a voltage-source three-phase inverter, and an IPM motor. The inverter regulates both the velocity of the IPM motor and input current waveform. In order to obtain a power factor of unity, we propose a new control method that regulates the inverter output power. The inverter output power controller is placed between the speed controller and the q-axis current controller. The inverter power is regulated by a PI and repetitive controller. When repetitive control is applied to the inverter power controller, the phase delay of the inverter power controller is quite small. The superior performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by experimental results.

  11. GASA14 regulates leaf expansion and abiotic stress resistance by modulating reactive oxygen species accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shulan; Wang, Haoxiang; Yu, Hongmei; Zhong, Chunmei; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Peng, Jianzong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2013-04-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA) can regulate many plant developmental processes. GAST1 has been identified as a GA-stimulated transcript, and Arabidopsis GAST-like genes are known to constitute the GASA family. However, the functions of most GASA genes are not clear at present. In this study, the function of GASA14, a member of the GASA family, was investigated. GASA14 expression was upregulated by GA and downregulated by the transcriptional regulators that repress GA responses, the DELLA proteins GAI and RGA. Phenotypic analysis showed that growth of the GASA14 null mutant (gasa14-1) line was retarded, and the growth of the 35S::GASA14 lines were promoted in young plants. Furthermore, seed germination of the gasa14-1 plants showed more sensitivity to paclobutrazol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) than Columbia (Col) plants, suggesting that GASA14 is required for GA-dependent responses. Analysis of the responses of the gasa14-1 and 35S::GASA14 lines to abscisic acid (ABA) and salt revealed that germination and seedling establishment of gasa14-1 were poorer than those of Col plants and that the 35S::GASA14 lines were more resistant to ABA and salt. Further analysis showed that overexpression of GASA14 could suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that GASA14 regulates leaf expansion and abiotic stress resistance by modulating ROS accumulation. Because GASA14 contains both GASA (GA-stimulated in Arabidopsis) and PRP (proline-rich protein) domains, the PRP domain coding sequence was overexpressed in Col plants and it was found that the growth of the transgenic plants and the responses to ABA and salt were not altered. These results thus suggest that the GASA domain is necessary for the functions of GASA14.

  12. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Gerco; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H; Butcher, Lindsay D; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Crowe, Sheila E

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections.

  13. Lack of reactive oxygen species deteriorates blood pressure regulation in acute stress.

    PubMed

    Bernátová, I; Bališ, P; Goga, R; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J; Sekaj, I

    2016-10-24

    This study investigated the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to blood pressure regulation in conscious adult male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress. Role of ROS was investigated in rats with temporally impaired principal blood pressure regulation systems using ganglionic blocker pentolinium (P, 5 mg/kg), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (C, 10 mg/kg), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (L, 30 mg/kg) and superoxide dismutase mimeticum tempol (T, 25 mg/kg). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured by the carotid artery catheter and inhibitors were administered intravenously. MAP was disturbed by a 3-s air jet, which increased MAP by 35.2+/-3.0 % vs. basal MAP after the first exposure. Air jet increased MAP in captopril- and tempol-treated rats similarly as observed in saline-treated rats. In pentolinium-treated rats stress significantly decreased MAP vs. pre-stress value. In L-NAME-treated rats stress failed to affect MAP significantly. Treatment of rats with P+L+C resulted in stress-induced MAP decrease by 17.3+/-1.3 % vs. pre-stress value and settling time (20.1+/-4.2 s). In P+L+C+T-treated rats stress led to maximal MAP decrease by 26.4+/-2.2 % (p<0.005 vs. P+L+C) and prolongation of settling time to 32.6+/-3.3 s (p<0.05 vs. P+L+C). Area under the MAP curve was significantly smaller in P+L+C-treated rats compared to P+L+C+T-treated ones (167+/-43 vs. 433+/-69 a.u., p<0.008). In conclusion, in rats with temporally impaired blood pressure regulation, the lack of ROS resulted in greater stress-induced MAP alterations and prolongation of time required to reach new post-stress steady state.

  14. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H.; Butcher, Lindsay D.; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R.; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections. PMID:26761793

  15. [Effects of Reactive Jump Training in Handball Players Regarding Jump Height and Power Development in the Triceps Surae Muscle].

    PubMed

    Rensing, N; Westermann, A; Möller, D; von Piekartz, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown changes in the technical and physical demands in modern handball. The game has increased considerably in speed, power and dynamics. Jump training has, therefore, become ever more important in the training of the athletes. These developments contribute to the fact that handball is now one of the most injury-prone types of sport, with the lower extremities being most frequently affected. Reactive jump training is not only used in training by now, but also increasingly in injury prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of reactive jump training with handball players. 21 regional league handball players were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 9). The intervention group completed a six-week reactive jump training programme while the control group went through a non-specific training programme. Jump height (squat and counter movement jump), isokinetic and isometric maximum power as well as muscle activity served as measuring parameters. A comparison of the intervention and control groups revealed that the reactive jump training led to significant improvements in jump height. The isometric and isokinetic maximum power measurements and the electromyographic activities of the triceps surae muscle demonstrated an improvement in the values within the intervention group. However, this improvement was not significant compared with the control group. Likewise both jumps correlated with the muscle activity of the soleus muscle as shown by electromyography. A moderate correlation was noticed between the isokinetic maximum power measurement and the electromyographic activity of the soleus and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. Furthermore, the correlations of the isometric and isokinetic maximum power meas-urements resulted in a strong correlation coefficient. This study revealed a significant increase in jump height after reactive jump training. There was no significant difference in

  16. Satellite Power System (SPS). State and local regulations as applied to satellite power system microwave receiving antenna facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotin, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    State and local regulation of power plant construction and operation of solar power satellite (SPS) receiving stations is presented. Each receiving antenna station occupies a land area 100-200 km square, receives microwave transmissions from the solar power satellite, and converts them into electricity for transmission to the power grid. The long lead time associated with the SPS and the changing status of state and local regulation dictated emphasis on: generic classification of the types of regulation, and identification of regulatory vectors which affect rectenna facilities.

  17. Role of NADPH oxidases and reactive oxygen species in regulation of bone turnover and the skeletal toxicity of alcohol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies with genetically modified mice and dietary antioxidants have suggested an important role for superoxide derived from NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide in regulation of normal bone turnover during development and also in the r...

  18. 77 FR 35671 - Conformed Power Marketing Criteria or Regulations for the Boulder Canyon Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... Area Power Administration Conformed Power Marketing Criteria or Regulations for the Boulder Canyon Project AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Conformance of power marketing criteria in... (Western), a Federal power marketing agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), is modifying Part C of its...

  19. Photovoltaic-powered regulated cathodic-protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Wagdy R.; Alfons, Hany A.

    The objective of a cathodic protection system is to protect metallic structures against corrosion. To achieve this, a sacrificial anode is connected to the protected structure (which acts as a cathode) through a d.c. power supply. To stop the corrosion, the protected structure requires a constant current. The current is determined by the metal and area of the structure, as well as the surrounding medium. The major difficulty in achieving a constant current is the variation in the resistivity of the surrounding medium that is caused by changes in the climatic conditions. Conventional cathodic-protection systems resolve this problem by manual adjustment of the d.c. voltage periodically to obtain a constant current. Such adjustment depends on the experience of the technician and the accuracy of the measuring equipment. Moreover if the interval between successive adjustments is relative long, the corrosion could become excessive. To overcome such difficulties, an automatically regulated system has been developed. The proposed system senses variations is the resistivity of the surrounding medium and adjusts the d.c. voltage accordingly so that the current is kept constant at the required level. The design of a solar photovoltaic system to supply the required d.c. power is discussed in this communication.

  20. A new definition of instantaneous active-reactive current and power based on instantaneous space vectors on polar coordinates in three-phase circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Nabae, A.; Tanaka, T.

    1996-07-01

    This paper proposes a new definition of the instantaneous active-reactive current and power based directly on instantaneous space vectors on polar coordinates, and presents its application. The definition is applicable in three-phase three-wire systems. The instantaneous active-reactive power and current on {alpha} {minus} {beta} orthogonal coordinates have been defined by the so-called p-q theory. In comparison with the p-q theory, the new definition offers a lucid physical concept for the active-reactive current and power in three-phase circuits. The new method, thus, can decompose current into the instantaneous active and reactive currents without calculating the instantaneous active and reactive powers. An application example is presented to confirm the validity and practicability of the new definition using digital simulation.

  1. Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and the Antioxidant Protein DJ-1 in Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Kyun; Beaven, Michael A.; Kulinski, Joseph M.; Desai, Avanti; Bandara, Geethani; Bai, Yun; Prussin, Calman; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Komarow, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic accumulation of mast cells in systemic mastocytosis (SM) associates with activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT. Constitutive activation of tyrosine kinase oncogenes has been linked to imbalances in oxidant/antioxidant mechanisms in other myeloproliferative disorders. However, the impact of KIT mutations on the redox status in SM and the potential therapeutic implications are not well understood. Here, we examined the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of the antioxidant protein DJ-1 (PARK-7), which increases with cancer progression and acts to lessen oxidative damage to malignant cells, in relationship with SM severity. ROS levels were increased in both indolent (ISM) and aggressive variants of the disease (ASM). However, while DJ-1 levels were reduced in ISM with lower mast cell burden, they rose in ISM with higher mast cell burden and were significantly elevated in patients with ASM. Studies on mast cell lines revealed that activating KIT mutations induced constant ROS production and consequent DJ-1 oxidation and degradation that could explain the reduced levels of DJ-1 in the ISM population, while IL-6, a cytokine that increases with disease severity, caused a counteracting transcriptional induction of DJ-1 which would protect malignant mast cells from oxidative damage. A mouse model of mastocytosis recapitulated the biphasic changes in DJ-1 and the escalating IL-6, ROS and DJ-1 levels as mast cells accumulate, findings which were reversed with anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody. Our findings provide evidence of increased ROS and a biphasic regulation of the antioxidant DJ-1 in variants of SM and implicate IL-6 in DJ-1 induction and expansion of mast cells with KIT mutations. We propose consideration of IL-6 blockade as a potential adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with advanced mastocytosis, as it would reduce DJ-1 levels making mutation-positive mast cells vulnerable to oxidative damage. PMID:27611333

  2. Regulation of soybean seed germination through ethylene production in response to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Koda, Yuka; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Despite their toxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in plant cell signalling pathways, such as mediating responses to stress or infection and in programmed cell death, at lower levels. Although studies have indicated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) promotes seed germination of several plants such as Arabidopsis, barley, wheat, rice and sunflower, the role of H(2)O(2) in soybean seed germination is not well known. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationships between ROS, plant hormones and soybean seed germination. An examination was made of soybean seed germination, the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis, endogenous ethylene contents, and the number and area of cells in the root tip, using N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, to counteract the effect of ROS. H(2)O(2) promoted germination, which N-acetylcysteine suppressed, suggesting that ROS are involved in the regulation of soybean germination. H(2)O(2) was produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition. N-Acetylcysteine suppressed the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis and the production of endogenous ethylene. Interestingly, ethephon, which is converted to ethylene, and H(2)O(2) reversed the suppression of seed germination by N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, morphological analysis revealed that N-acetylcysteine suppressed cell elongation at the root tip, and this suppression was also reversed by ethephon or H(2)O(2) treatments, as was the case in germination. In soybean seeds, ROS produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition induce the production of endogenous ethylene, which promotes cell elongation in the root tip. This appears to be how ROS regulate soybean seed germination.

  3. A radical shift in perspective: mitochondria as regulators of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Munro, Daniel; Treberg, Jason R

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondria are widely recognized as a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in animal cells, where it is assumed that over-production of ROS leads to an overwhelmed antioxidant system and oxidative stress. In this Commentary, we describe a more nuanced model of mitochondrial ROS metabolism, where integration of ROS production with consumption by the mitochondrial antioxidant pathways may lead to the regulation of ROS levels. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are the main ROS formed by mitochondria. However, superoxide, a free radical, is converted to the non-radical, membrane-permeant H2O2; consequently, ROS may readily cross cellular compartments. By combining measurements of production and consumption of H2O2, it can be shown that isolated mitochondria can intrinsically approach a steady-state concentration of H2O2 in the medium. The central hypothesis here is that mitochondria regulate the concentration of H2O2 to a value set by the balance between production and consumption. In this context, the consumers of ROS are not simply a passive safeguard against oxidative stress; instead, they control the established steady-state concentration of H2O2 By considering the response of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria to high levels of ADP, we demonstrate that H2O2 production by mitochondria is far more sensitive to changes in mitochondrial energetics than is H2O2 consumption; this concept is further extended to evaluate how the muscle mitochondrial H2O2 balance should respond to changes in aerobic work load. We conclude by considering how differences in the ROS consumption pathways may lead to important distinctions amongst tissues, along with briefly examining implications for differing levels of activity, temperature change and metabolic depression. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Antioxidant Enzymes Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species during Pod Elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.− and.OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of.OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.− was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.− decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of.OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  5. Human cell growth regulator Ly-1 antibody reactive homologue accelerates processing of preribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Harunori; Magae, Satomi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Terukina, Goro; Suzuki, Ai; Nakamura-Fujiyama, Sally; Miura, Yutaka; Hayano, Toshiya; Komatsu, Wataru; Isobe, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential process for cell growth and proliferation and is enhanced in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Mouse Ly-1 antibody reactive clone product (Lyar) is expressed at very high levels in many tumor, leukemia or embryonic stem cells; is a novel nucleolar protein with zinc-finger DNA-binding motifs and is involved in cell growth regulation. However, cellular function of Lyar remains unexplored. Here, we show that human homologue of Lyar (LYAR) accelerates ribosome biogenesis at the level of processing of preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA). We show that LYAR is excluded from the nucleolus after actinomycin D treatment and is present in preribosomal fraction of the nuclear extract as well as in the fractions with 40S, 60S and 90S sedimentation coefficients. LYAR is required for processing of 47S/45S, 32S, 30S and 21S pre-rRNAs. In addition, we show that over-expression of LYAR increases cell proliferation without affecting the expression of c-Myc or p53. Combined, these results suggest that some rapidly growing cells enhance ribosome biogenesis by increasing the expression of LYAR. © 2014 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2014 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The Promotion of Erythropoiesis via the Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species by Lactic Acid.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shun-Tao; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Qin, Qing; Lu, Lian; Luo, Min; Guo, Fu-Chun; Shi, Hua-Shan; Jiang, Li; Shao, Bin; Li, Meng; Yang, Han-Shuo; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2017-02-06

    The simultaneous increases in blood lactic acid and erythrocytes after intense exercise could suggest a link between lactate and the erythropoiesis. However, the effects of lactic acid on erythropoiesis remain to be elucidated. Here, we utilized a mouse model to determine the role of lactic acid in this process in parallel with studies using leukaemic K562 cells. Treatment of K562 cells in vitro with lactic acid increased the mRNA and protein expression of haemoglobin genes and the frequency of GPA(+) cells. Also, increases in haematocrit and CD71(-)/Ter119(+) erythroid cells were observed in lactic acid-treated mice, which showed a physiological increase in blood lactate. Mouse bone marrow CD34(+)/CD117(-) cells showed an increase in erythroid burst-forming units after stimulation with lactic acid in vitro. Furthermore, lactic acid increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in bone marrow and in K562 cells. Erythroid differentiation induced in Haematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) and K562 cells by lactic acid was abolished by reducing ROS levels with SOD or 2-mercaptoethanol, which suggests that ROS is a critical regulator of this process. These findings provide a better understanding of the role of lactic acid in cellular metabolism and physiological functions.

  7. The Promotion of Erythropoiesis via the Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species by Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shun-Tao; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Qin, Qing; Lu, Lian; Luo, Min; Guo, Fu-Chun; Shi, Hua-Shan; Jiang, Li; Shao, Bin; Li, Meng; Yang, Han-Shuo; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2017-01-01

    The simultaneous increases in blood lactic acid and erythrocytes after intense exercise could suggest a link between lactate and the erythropoiesis. However, the effects of lactic acid on erythropoiesis remain to be elucidated. Here, we utilized a mouse model to determine the role of lactic acid in this process in parallel with studies using leukaemic K562 cells. Treatment of K562 cells in vitro with lactic acid increased the mRNA and protein expression of haemoglobin genes and the frequency of GPA+ cells. Also, increases in haematocrit and CD71−/Ter119+ erythroid cells were observed in lactic acid-treated mice, which showed a physiological increase in blood lactate. Mouse bone marrow CD34+/CD117− cells showed an increase in erythroid burst-forming units after stimulation with lactic acid in vitro. Furthermore, lactic acid increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in bone marrow and in K562 cells. Erythroid differentiation induced in Haematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) and K562 cells by lactic acid was abolished by reducing ROS levels with SOD or 2-mercaptoethanol, which suggests that ROS is a critical regulator of this process. These findings provide a better understanding of the role of lactic acid in cellular metabolism and physiological functions. PMID:28165036

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  9. The early embryo response to intracellular reactive oxygen species is developmentally regulated.

    PubMed

    Bain, Nathan T; Madan, Pavneesh; Betts, Dean H

    2011-01-01

    In vitro embryo production (IVP) suffers from excessive developmental failure. Its inefficiency is linked, in part, to reactive oxygen species (ROS) brought on by high ex vivo oxygen (O(2)) tensions. To further delineate the effects of ROS on IVP, the intracellular ROS levels of early bovine embryos were modulated by: (1) varying O(2) tension; (2) exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment; and (3) antioxidant supplementation. Although O(2) tension did not significantly affect blastocyst frequencies (P>0.05), 20% O(2) accelerated the rate of first cleavage division and significantly decreased and increased the proportion of permanently arrested 2- to 4-cell embryos and apoptotic 9- to 16-cell embryos, respectively, compared with embryos cultured in 5% O(2) tension. Treatment with H(2)O(2), when applied separately to oocytes, zygotes, 2- to 4-cell embryos or 9- to 16-cell embryos, resulted in a significant (P<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in blastocyst development in conjunction with a corresponding increase in the induction of either permanent embryo arrest or apoptosis in a stage-dependent manner. Polyethylene glycol-catalase supplementation reduced ROS-induced embryo arrest and/or death, resulting in a significant (P<0.05) increase in blastocyst frequencies under high O(2) culture conditions. Together, these results indicate that intracellular ROS may be signalling molecules that, outside an optimal range, result in various developmentally regulated modes of embryo demise.

  10. Caveolin-1 Regulates Endothelial Adhesion of Lung Cancer Cells via Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Chunhacha, Preedakorn

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge regarding the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein on endothelium adhesion of cancer cells is unclear. The present study revealed that Cav-1 plays a negative regulatory role on cancer-endothelium interaction. Endogenous Cav-1 was shown to down-regulate during cell detachment and the level of such a protein was conversely associated with tumor-endothelial adhesion. Furthermore, the ectopic overexpression of Cav-1 attenuated the ability of the cancer cells to adhere to endothelium while shRNA-mediated Cav-1 knock-down exhibited the opposite effect. We found that cell detachment increased cellular hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical generation and such reactive oxygen species (ROS) were responsible for the increasing interaction between cancer cells and endothelial cells through vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Importantly, Cav-1 was shown to suppress hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical formation by sustaining the level of activated Akt which was critical for the role of Cav-1 in attenuating the cell adhesion. Together, the present study revealed the novel role of Cav-1 and underlying mechanism on tumor adhesion which explain and highlight an important role of Cav-1 on lung cancer cell metastasis. PMID:23460862

  11. Peroxiredoxin-3 Is Involved in Bactericidal Activity through the Regulation of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sena; Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prdx3) is a mitochondrial protein of the thioredoxin family of antioxidant peroxidases and is the principal peroxidase responsible for metabolizing mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. Recent reports have shown that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) contribute to macrophage-mediated bactericidal activity in response to Toll-like receptors. Herein, we investigated the functional effect of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity. The mitochondrial localization of Prdx3 in HEK293T cells was confirmed by cell fractionation and confocal microscopy analyses. To investigate the functional role of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity, Prdx3-knockdown (Prdx3KD) THP-1 cells were generated. The mROS levels in Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly higher than those in control THP-1 cells. Moreover, the mROS levels were markedly increased in response to lipopolysaccharide. Notably, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection assay revealed that the Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly resistant to S. Typhimurium infection, as compared with control THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Prdx3 is functionally important in bactericidal activity through the regulation of mROS. PMID:28035213

  12. Regulation of insulin secretion and reactive oxygen species production by free fatty acids in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda Rodrigues; Valle, Maíra M R; Kowluru, Anjan; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo R

    2011-01-01

    Free fatty acids regulate insulin secretion through metabolic and intracellular signaling mechanisms such as induction of malonyl-CoA/long-chain CoA pathway, production of lipids, GPRs (G protein-coupled receptors) activation and the modulation of calcium currents. Fatty acids (FA) are also important inducers of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production in β-cells. Production of ROS for short periods is associated with an increase in GSIS (glucose-stimulated insulin secretion), but excessive or sustained production of ROS is negatively correlated with the insulin secretory process. Several mechanisms for FA modulation of ROS production by pancreatic β-cells have been proposed, such as the control of mitochondrial complexes and electron transport, induction of uncoupling proteins, NADPH oxidase activation, interaction with the renin-angiotensin system, and modulation of the antioxidant defense system. The major sites of superoxide production within mitochondria derive from complexes I and III. The amphiphilic nature of FA favors their incorporation into mitochondrial membranes, altering the membrane fluidity and facilitating the electron leak. The extra-mitochondrial ROS production induced by FA through the NADPH oxidase complex is also an important source of these species in β-cells.

  13. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  14. Flexible IQ-V Scheme of a DFIG for Rapid Voltage Regulation of a Wind Power Plant

    DOE PAGES

    Muljadi, Eduard; Kim, Jinho; Park, Jung-Wook; ...

    2017-04-28

    This paper proposes a flexible reactive current-to-voltage (IQ-V) scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) for the rapid voltage regulation of a wind power plant (WPP). In the proposed scheme, the WPP controller dispatches different voltage set points to the DFIGs depending on their rotor voltage margins. The DFIGs inject different reactive power with the flexible IQ-V schemes implemented in the rotor-side and grid-side converters. The IQ-V characteristic, which consists of the gain and width of a linear band and IQ capability, varies with time depending on the IQ capability of the converters and a voltage dip at the pointmore » of interconnection (POI). To increase the IQ capability during a fault, the active current is reduced in proportion to a voltage dip. If the IQ capability and/or the POI voltage dip are large, the IQ-V gain is set to be high, thereby providing rapid voltage regulation. To avoid an overvoltage after the fault clearance, a rapid IQ reduction scheme is implemented in the WPP and DFIG controllers. The performance of the proposed flexible scheme was verified under scenarios with various disturbances. The proposed scheme can help increase wind power penetration without jeopardizing voltage stability.« less

  15. Flexible $$I_{Q}\\!\\!-\\!\\!V$$ Scheme of a DFIG for Rapid Voltage Regulation of a Wind Power Plant

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jinho; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Jung -Wook; ...

    2017-04-28

    This paper proposes a flexible reactive current-to-voltage (IQ-V) scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) for the rapid voltage regulation of a wind power plant (WPP). In the proposed scheme, the WPP controller dispatches different voltage set points to the DFIGs depending on their rotor voltage margins. The DFIGs inject different reactive power with the flexible IQ-V schemes implemented in the rotor-side and grid-side converters. The IQ-V characteristic, which consists of the gain and width of a linear band and IQ capability, varies with time depending on the IQ capability of the converters and a voltage dip at the pointmore » of interconnection (POI). To increase the IQ capability during a fault, the active current is reduced in proportion to a voltage dip. If the IQ capability and/or the POI voltage dip are large, the IQ-V gain is set to be high, thereby providing rapid voltage regulation. To avoid an overvoltage after the fault clearance, a rapid IQ reduction scheme is implemented in the WPP and DFIG controllers. The performance of the proposed flexible scheme was verified under scenarios with various disturbances. In conclusion, the proposed scheme can help increase wind power penetration without jeopardizing voltage stability.« less

  16. Disrupted amygdala-prefrontal connectivity during emotion regulation links stress-reactive rumination and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carina H; Miernicki, Michelle E; Rudolph, Karen D; Telzer, Eva H

    2017-09-12

    Rumination in response to stress (stress-reactive rumination) has been linked to higher levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, no work to date has examined the neural mechanisms connecting stress-reactive rumination and adolescent depressive symptoms. The present work attempted to bridge this gap through an fMRI study of 41 adolescent girls (Mage=15.42, SD=0.33) - a population in whom elevated levels of depressive symptoms, rumination, and social stress sensitivity are displayed. During the scan, participants completed two tasks: an emotion regulation task and a social stress task. Using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses, we found that positive functional connectivity between the amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the emotion regulation task mediated the association between stress-reactive rumination and depressive symptoms. These results suggest that stress-reactive rumination may interfere with the expression and development of neural connectivity patterns associated with effective emotion regulation, which may contribute, in turn, to heightened depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Voltage regulator dissipates minimal power and functions as a voltage divider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, H. B.

    1971-01-01

    Regulator requires minimum amount of power for voltage division and it is not required continuously. The only power loss, except for regulating purposes, is that needed to provide for imbalances in load current requirements. For balanced loads, only leakage current flows through regulating transistors.

  18. Graphene-Based Functional Architectures: Sheets Regulation and Macrostructure Construction toward Actuators and Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huhu; Huang, Yaxin; Shi, Gaoquan; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti

    2017-07-18

    Graphene, with large delocalized π electron cloud on a two-dimensional (2D) atom-thin plane, possesses excellent carrier mobility, large surface area, high light transparency, high mechanical strength, and superior flexibility. However, the lack of intrinsic band gap, poor dispersibility, and weak reactivity of graphene hinder its application scope. Heteroatom-doping regulation and surface modification of graphene can effectively reconstruct the sp(2) bonded carbon atoms and tailor the surface chemistry and interfacial interaction, while microstructure mediation on graphene can induce the special chemical and physical properties because of the quantum confinement, edge effect, and unusual mass transport process. Based on these regulations on graphene, series of methods and techniques are developed to couple the promising characters of graphene into the macroscopic architectures for potential and practical applications. In this Account, we present our effort on graphene regulation from chemical modification to microstructure control, from the morphology-designed macroassemblies to their applications in functional systems excluding the energy-storage devices. We first introduce the chemically regulative graphene with incorporated heteroatoms into the honeycomb lattice, which could open the intrinsic band gap and provide many active sites. Then the surface modification of graphene with functional components will improve dispersibility, prevent aggregation, and introduce new functions. On the other hand, microstructure mediation on graphene sheets (e.g., 0D quantum dots, 1D nanoribbons, and 2D nanomeshes) is demonstrated to induce special chemical and physical properties. Benefiting from the effective regulation on graphene sheets, diverse methods including dimension-confined strategy, filtration assembly, and hydrothermal treatment have been developed to assemble individual graphene sheets to macroscopic graphene fibers, films, and frameworks. These rationally

  19. Voltage control for a wind power plant based on the available reactive current of a DFIG and its impacts on the point of interconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Usman, Yasir; Kim, Jinho; Muljadi, Eduard; ...

    2016-01-01

    Wake effects cause wind turbine generators (WTGs) within a wind power plant (WPP) to produce different levels of active power and subsequent reactive power capabilities. Further, the impedance between a WTG and the point of interconnection (POI)-which depends on the distance between them-impacts the WPP's reactive power injection capability at the POI. This paper proposes a voltage control scheme for a WPP based on the available reactive current of the doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) and its impacts on the POI to improve the reactive power injection capability of the WPP. In this paper, a design strategy for modifying the gainmore » of DFIG controller is suggested and the comprehensive properties of these control gains are investigated. In the proposed scheme, the WPP controller, which operates in a voltage control mode, sends the command signal to the DFIGs based on the voltage difference at the POI. The DFIG controllers, which operate in a voltage control mode, employ a proportional controller with a limiter. The gain of the proportional controller is adjusted depending on the available reactive current of the DFIG and the series impedance between the DFIG and the POI. The performance of the proposed scheme is validated for various disturbances such as a reactive load connection and grid fault using an EMTP-RV simulator. Furthermore, simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme promptly recovers the POI voltage by injecting more reactive power after a disturbance than the conventional scheme.« less

  20. Voltage control for a wind power plant based on the available reactive current of a DFIG and its impacts on the point of interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Usman, Yasir; Kim, Jinho; Muljadi, Eduard; Kang, Yong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Wake effects cause wind turbine generators (WTGs) within a wind power plant (WPP) to produce different levels of active power and subsequent reactive power capabilities. Further, the impedance between a WTG and the point of interconnection (POI)-which depends on the distance between them-impacts the WPP's reactive power injection capability at the POI. This paper proposes a voltage control scheme for a WPP based on the available reactive current of the doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) and its impacts on the POI to improve the reactive power injection capability of the WPP. In this paper, a design strategy for modifying the gain of DFIG controller is suggested and the comprehensive properties of these control gains are investigated. In the proposed scheme, the WPP controller, which operates in a voltage control mode, sends the command signal to the DFIGs based on the voltage difference at the POI. The DFIG controllers, which operate in a voltage control mode, employ a proportional controller with a limiter. The gain of the proportional controller is adjusted depending on the available reactive current of the DFIG and the series impedance between the DFIG and the POI. The performance of the proposed scheme is validated for various disturbances such as a reactive load connection and grid fault using an EMTP-RV simulator. Furthermore, simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme promptly recovers the POI voltage by injecting more reactive power after a disturbance than the conventional scheme.

  1. Influence of nitrogen admixture to argon on the ion energy distribution in reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breilmann, W.; Maszl, C.; Hecimovic, A.; von Keudell, A.

    2017-04-01

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of metals is of paramount importance for the deposition of various oxides, nitrides and carbides. The addition of a reactive gas such as nitrogen to an argon HiPIMS plasma with a metal target allows the formation of the corresponding metal nitride on the substrate. The addition of a reactive gas introduces new dynamics into the plasma process, such as hysteresis, target poisoning and the rarefaction of two different plasma gases. We investigate the dynamics for the deposition of chromium nitride by a reactive HiPIMS plasma using energy- and time-resolved ion mass spectrometry, fast camera measurements and temporal and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen to the argon plasma gas significantly changes the appearance of the localized ionization zones, the so-called spokes, in HiPIMS plasmas. In addition, a very strong modulation of the metal ion flux within each HiPIMS pulse is observed, with the metal ion flux being strongly suppressed and the nitrogen molecular ion flux being strongly enhanced in the high current phase of the pulse. This behavior is explained by a stronger return effect of the sputtered metal ions in the dense plasma above the racetrack. This is best observed in a pure nitrogen plasma, because the ionization zones are mostly confined, implying a very high local plasma density and consequently also an efficient scattering process.

  2. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  3. Review of nuclear power plant offsite power source reliability and related recommended changes to the NRC rules and regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Battle, R.E.; Clark, F.H.; Reddoch, T.W.

    1980-05-01

    The NRC has stated its concern about the reliability of the offsite power system as the preferred emergency source and about the possible damage to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that could result from a rapid decay of power grid frequency. ORNL contracted with NRC to provide technical assistance to establish criteria that can be used to evaluate the offsite power system for the licensing of a nuclear power plant. The results of many of the studies for this contract are recommendations to assess and control the power grid during operation. This is because most of the NRC regulations pertaining to the offsite power system are related to the design of the power grid, and we believe that additional emphasis on monitoring the power grid operation will improve the reliability of the nuclear plant offsite power supply. 46 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Vanadium compounds discriminate hepatoma and normal hepatic cells by differential regulation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Liu, Tong-Tong; Fu, Ying; Wang, Kui; Yang, Xiao-Gai

    2010-09-01

    Our previous study indicated that vanadium compounds can block cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in human hepatoma HepG2 cells via a highly activated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal. To explore their differential action on normal cells, we investigated the response of an immortalized hepatic cell line, L02 cells. The results demonstrated that a higher concentration of vanadium compounds was needed to inhibit L02 proliferation, which was associated with S and G2/M cell cycle arrest. In addition, in contrast to insignificant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HepG2 cells, all of the vanadium compounds resulted significant increases in both O2.- and H2O2 levels in L02 cells. At the same time, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as cell division control protein 2 homolog (Cdc2) were found to be highly phosphorylated, which could be counteracted with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The current study also demonstrated that both the ERK and the JNK pathways contributed to the cell cycle arrest induced by vanadium compounds in L02 cells. More importantly, it was found that although NAC can ameliorate the cytotoxicity of vanadium compounds in L02 cells, it did not decrease their cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. It thus shed light on the potential therapeutic applications of vanadium compounds with antioxidants as synergistic agents to reduce their toxicities in human normal cells without affecting their antitumor activities in cancer cells.

  5. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

    PubMed

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  6. 75 FR 23759 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power... technical conference to elicit input on issues pertaining to Frequency Regulation Compensation in the...

  7. The shunt-LDO regulator to power the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, L.; Barbero, M.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2012-01-01

    The shunt-LDO regulator is a new regulator concept which combines a shunt and a Low Drop-Out (LDO) regulator. Designed as an improved shunt regulator to match the needs of serially powered detector systems, it can also be used as a pure LDO regulator for general application in powering schemes requiring linear regulation. The flexibility of the design makes the shunt-LDO regulator a good candidate for use in the powering schemes envisaged for the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector. Two shunt-LDO regulators integrated in the prototype of the next ATLAS pixel front-end chip, the FE-I4A, are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed powering solutions.

  8. Observation of a periodic runaway in the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shayestehaminzadeh, Seyedmohammad E-mail: shayesteh@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Arnalds, Unnar B.; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-11-15

    This paper reports the observation of a periodic runaway of plasma to a higher density for the reactive discharge of the target material (Ti) with moderate sputter yield. Variable emission of secondary electrons, for the alternating transition of the target from metal mode to oxide mode, is understood to be the main reason for the runaway occurring periodically. Increasing the pulsing frequency can bring the target back to a metal (or suboxide) mode, and eliminate the periodic transition of the target. Therefore, a pulsing frequency interval is defined for the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} discharge in order to sustain the plasma in a runaway-free mode without exceeding the maximum power that the magnetron can tolerate.

  9. Evidence of an IFN-γ by early life stress interaction in the regulation of amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Ronny; Stacey, David; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Kugel, Harald; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Baune, Bernhard T; Dannlowski, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Since numerous studies have found that exposure to early life stress leads to increased peripheral inflammation and psychiatric disease, it is thought that peripheral immune activation precedes and possibly mediates the onset of stress-associated psychiatric disease. Despite early studies, IFNγ has received little attention relative to other inflammatory cytokines in the context of the pathophysiology of affective disorders. Neuroimaging endophenotypes have emerged recently as a promising means of elucidating these types of complex relationships including the modeling of the interaction between environmental factors and genetic predisposition. Here we investigate the GxE relationship between early-life stress and genetic variants of IFNγ on emotion processing. To investigate the impact of the relationship between genetic variants of IFNγ (rs1861494, rs2069718, rs2430561) and early life stress on emotion processing, a sample of healthy adults (n=409) undergoing an emotional faces paradigm in an fMRI study were genotyped and analysed. Information on early life stress was obtained via Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). A positive association between early life stress and amygdala reactivity was found. Specifically, the main effect of genotype of rs1861494 on amygdala reactivity indicates a higher neural response in C allele carriers compared to T homozygotes, while we did not find main effects of rs2069718 and rs2430561. Importantly, interaction analyses revealed a specific interaction between IFNγ genotype (rs1861494) and early life stress affecting amygdala reactivity to emotional faces, resulting from a positive association between CTQ scores and amygdala reactivity in C allele carriers while this association was absent in T homozygotes. Our findings indicate that firstly the genetic variant of IFNγ (rs1861494) is involved with the regulation of amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli and secondly, that this genetic variant moderates effects of early life

  10. An Aircraft Electric Power Testbed for Validating Automatically Synthesized Reactive Control Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    we describe our recently developed simulation models and a hardware testbed for validating reactive controllers synthesized using TuLiP [1], a...temporal logic planning toolbox, in order to investigate the validity of the assumptions made in controller synthesis. TuLiP is a collection of Python... TuLiP can be used to synthesize logic so that the satisfaction of certain safety requirements is guaranteed. The synthesized logic enables the contac

  11. Harnessing the power of the endosome to regulate neural development

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Endocytosis and endosomal trafficking play a multitude of roles in cellular function beyond regulating entry of essential nutrients. In this review, we discuss the cell biological principles of endosomal trafficking, the neuronal adaptations to endosomal organization, and the role of endosomal trafficking in neural development. In particular, we consider how cell fate decisions, polarity, migration, and axon outgrowth and guidance are influenced by five endosomal tricks: dynamic modulation of receptor levels by endocytosis and recycling, cargo-specific responses via cargo-specific endocytic regulators, cell type-specific endocytic regulation, ligand-specific endocytic regulation, and endosomal regulation of ligand processing and trafficking. PMID:22578496

  12. An ionization region model of the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Jon Tomas; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Raadu, Michel A.; Huo, Chunqing; Minea, Tiberiu

    2016-09-01

    A reactive ionization region model (R-IRM) is developed to describe the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge with titanium target. We compare the discharge properties when the discharge is operated in the two well established operating modes, the metal mode and the poisoned mode. Experimentally, it is found that in the metal mode the discharge current waveform displays a typical non-reactive evolution, while in the poisoned mode the discharge current waveform becomes distinctly triangular and the current increases significantly. Using the R-IRM we find that when the discharge is operated in the metal mode Ar+ and Ti+-ions contribute most significantly (roughly equal amounts) to the discharge current while in the poisoned mode the Ar+-ions contribute most significantly to the discharge current while the contribution of O+-ions and secondary electron emission is much smaller. Furthermore, we find that recycling of ionized atoms coming from the target are required for the current generation in both modes of operation. In the metal mode self-sputter recycling dominates and in the poisoned mode working gas recycling dominates, and it is concluded that the dominating type of recycling determines the discharge current waveform.

  13. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  14. A global plasma model for reactive deposition of compound films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B. C.; Wu, Z. L.; Wu, B.; Li, Y. G.; Lei, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    A spatially averaged, time-dependent global plasma model has been developed to describe the reactive deposition of a TiAlSiN thin film by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharges in Ar/N2 mixture gas, based on the particle balance and the energy balance in the ionization region, and considering the formation and erosion of the compound at the target surface. The modeling results show that, with increasing the N2 partial pressure from 0% to 40% at a constant working pressure of 0.3 Pa, the electron temperature during the strongly ionized period increases from 4 to 7 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient, which represents the power fraction that effectively heats the electrons and maintains the discharge, increases from about 4% to 7%; with increasing the working pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa at a constant N2 partial pressure of 25%, the electron temperature decreases from 10 to 4 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient decreases from 8% to 5%. Using the modeled plasma parameters to evaluate the kinetic energy of arriving ions, the ion-to-neutral flux ratio of deposited species, and the substrate heating, the variations of process parameters that increase these values lead to an enhanced adatom mobility at the target surface and an increased input energy to the substrate, corresponding to the experimental observation of surface roughness reduction, the microstructure transition from the columnar structure to the dense featureless structure, and the enhancement of phase separation. At higher N2 partial pressure or lower working pressure, the modeling results demonstrate an increase in electron temperature, which shifts the discharge balance of Ti species from Ti+ to Ti2+ and results in a higher return fraction of Ti species, corresponding to the higher Al/Ti ratio of deposited films at these conditions. The modeling results are well correlated with the experimental observation of the composition variation and the microstructure

  15. Calcium-dependent N-cadherin up-regulation mediates reactive astrogliosis and neuroprotection after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Kazunori; Kubota, Jun; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Hirose, Kenzo; Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-07-09

    Brain injury induces phenotypic changes in astrocytes, known as reactive astrogliosis, which may influence neuronal survival. Here we show that brain injury induces inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes, and that the Ca(2+) signaling is required for astrogliosis. We found that type 2 IP3 receptor knockout (IP3R2KO) mice deficient in astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling have impaired reactive astrogliosis and increased injury-associated neuronal death. We identified N-cadherin and pumilio 2 (Pum2) as downstream signaling molecules, and found that brain injury induces up-regulation of N-cadherin around the injured site. This effect is mediated by Ca(2+)-dependent down-regulation of Pum2, which in turn attenuates Pum2-dependent translational repression of N-cadherin. Furthermore, we show that astrocyte-specific knockout of N-cadherin results in impairment of astrogliosis and neuroprotection. Thus, astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling and the downstream function of N-cadherin play indispensable roles in the cellular responses to brain injury. These findings define a previously unreported signaling axis required for reactive astrogliosis and neuroprotection following brain injury.

  16. Calcium-dependent N-cadherin up-regulation mediates reactive astrogliosis and neuroprotection after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazunori; Kubota, Jun; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Hirose, Kenzo; Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury induces phenotypic changes in astrocytes, known as reactive astrogliosis, which may influence neuronal survival. Here we show that brain injury induces inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes, and that the Ca2+ signaling is required for astrogliosis. We found that type 2 IP3 receptor knockout (IP3R2KO) mice deficient in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling have impaired reactive astrogliosis and increased injury-associated neuronal death. We identified N-cadherin and pumilio 2 (Pum2) as downstream signaling molecules, and found that brain injury induces up-regulation of N-cadherin around the injured site. This effect is mediated by Ca2+-dependent down-regulation of Pum2, which in turn attenuates Pum2-dependent translational repression of N-cadherin. Furthermore, we show that astrocyte-specific knockout of N-cadherin results in impairment of astrogliosis and neuroprotection. Thus, astrocytic Ca2+ signaling and the downstream function of N-cadherin play indispensable roles in the cellular responses to brain injury. These findings define a previously unreported signaling axis required for reactive astrogliosis and neuroprotection following brain injury. PMID:23798419

  17. Effects of anodic potential and chloride ion on overall reactivity in electrochemical reactors designed for solar-powered wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kangwoo; Qu, Yan; Kwon, Daejung; Zhang, Hao; Cid, Clément A; Aryanfar, Asghar; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2014-02-18

    We have investigated electrochemical treatment of real domestic wastewater coupled with simultaneous production of molecular H2 as useful byproduct. The electrolysis cells employ multilayer semiconductor anodes with electroactive bismuth-doped TiO2 functionalities and stainless steel cathodes. DC-powered laboratory-scale electrolysis experiments were performed under static anodic potentials (+2.2 or +3.0 V NHE) using domestic wastewater samples, with added chloride ion in variable concentrations. Greater than 95% reductions in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium ion were achieved within 6 h. In addition, we experimentally determined a decreasing overall reactivity of reactive chlorine species toward COD with an increasing chloride ion concentration under chlorine radicals (Cl·, Cl2(-)·) generation at +3.0 V NHE. The current efficiency for COD removal was 12% with the lowest specific energy consumption of 96 kWh kgCOD(-1) at the cell voltage of near 4 V in 50 mM chloride. The current efficiency and energy efficiency for H2 generation were calculated to range from 34 to 84% and 14 to 26%, respectively. The hydrogen comprised 35 to 60% by volume of evolved gases. The efficacy of our electrolysis cell was further demonstrated by a 20 L prototype reactor totally powered by a photovoltaic (PV) panel, which was shown to eliminate COD and total coliform bacteria in less than 4 h of treatment.

  18. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-κB and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-01-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26442864

  19. Circuit protects regulated power supply against overload current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Airth, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Sensing circuit in which a tunnel diode controls a series regulator transistor protects a low voltage transistorized dc regulator from damage by excessive load currents. When a fault occurs, the faulty circuit is limited to a preset percentage of the current when limiting first occurs.

  20. Profiles of Disruptive Behavior across Early Childhood: Contributions of Frustration Reactivity, Physiological Regulation, and Maternal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degnan, Kathryn A.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; Hill-Soderlund, Ashley L.

    2008-01-01

    Disruptive behavior, including aggression, defiance, and temper tantrums, typically peaks in early toddlerhood and decreases by school entry; however, some children do not show this normative decline. The current study examined disruptive behavior in 318 boys and girls at 2, 4, and 5 years of age and frustration reactivity, physiological…

  1. Three-dimensional Reluctance Network Analysis of an EIE-Core Variable Inductor and Application to Reactive Power Compensation in a Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Ohinata, Takashi; Arimatsu, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kunio; Ichinokura, Osamu

    This paper describes a three-dimensional reluctance network analysis (RNA) of an EIE-core variable inductor, which can be applied as a reactive power compensator in electric power systems. First, a three-dimensional RNA model of an EIE-core considering the magnetic saturation and iron loss is presented. Using the proposed RNA model with external electric circuits, operating characteristics of the variable inductor including the iron loss are calculated accurately. Next, high performance of a 6.6 kV-300 kVA reactive power compensator using the EIE-core variable inductor is demonstrated in a distribution system.

  2. Role of Organic Coatings in Regulating N2O5 Reactive Uptake to Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Olivia S; Campbell, Nicole R; Morris, Holly; Forestieri, Sara; Ruppel, Matthew J; Cappa, Christopher; Tivanski, Alexei; Prather, Kimberly; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-12-03

    Previous laboratory measurements and field observations have suggested that the reactive uptake of N2O5 to sea spray aerosol particles is a complex function of particle chemical composition and phase, where surface active organics can suppress the reactive uptake by up to a factor of 60. To date, there are no direct studies of the reactive uptake of N2O5 to nascent sea spray aerosol that permit assessment of the role that organic molecules present in sea spray aerosol (SSA) may play in suppressing or enhancing N2O5 uptake kinetics. In this study, SSA was generated from ambient seawater and artificial seawater matrices using a Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), capable of producing nascent SSA representative of ambient conditions. The reactive uptake coefficient of N2O5 (γ(N2O5)) on nascent SSA was determined using an entrained aerosol flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer for measurement of surface area dependent heterogeneous loss rates. Population averaged measurements of γ(N2O5) for SSA generated from salt water sequentially doped with representative organic molecular mimics, or from ambient seawater, do not deviate statistically from that observed for sodium chloride (γ(N2O5)NaCl = 0.01-0.03) for relative humidity (RH) ranging between 50 and 65%. The results are consistent with measurements made under clean marine conditions at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Pier and those conducted on nascent SSA generated in the marine aerosol reference tank. The results presented here suggest that organic films present on nascent SSA (at RH greater than 50%) likely do not significantly limit N2O5 reactive uptake.

  3. Design of an Adaptive Power Regulation Mechanism and a Nozzle for a Hydroelectric Power Plant Turbine Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Burak; Aytac, Zeynep; Tascioglu, Yigit; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the design of a power regulation mechanism for a Hydroelectric Power Plant (HEPP) model turbine test system which is designed to test Francis type hydroturbines up to 2 MW power with varying head and flow(discharge) values. Unlike the tailor made regulation mechanisms of full-sized, functional HEPPs; the design for the test system must be easily adapted to various turbines that are to be tested. In order to achieve this adaptability, a dynamic simulation model is constructed in MATLAB/Simulink SimMechanics. This model acquires geometric data and hydraulic loading data of the regulation system from Autodesk Inventor CAD models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis respectively. The dynamic model is explained and case studies of two different HEPPs are performed for validation. CFD aided design of the turbine guide vanes, which is used as input for the dynamic model, is also presented. This research is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  4. Invoking the Power of Thrombospondins: Regulation of Thrombospondins Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stenina-Adognravi, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests critical functions of thrombospondins (TSPs) in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. With the growing understanding of the importance of these matricellular proteins, the need to understand the mechanisms of regulation of their expression and potential approaches to modulate their levels is also increasing. The regulation of TSPs expression is multi-leveled, cell- and tissue-specific, and very precise. However, the knowledge of mechanisms modulating the levels of TSPs is fragmented and incomplete. This review discusses the known mechanisms of regulation of TSPs levels and the gaps in our knowledge that prevent us from developing strategies to modulate the expression of these physiologically important proteins. PMID:24582666

  5. Voltage regulator for battery power source. [using a bipolar transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A bipolar transistor in series with the battery as the control element also in series with a zener diode and a resistor is used to maintain a predetermined voltage until the battery voltage decays to very nearly the predetermined voltage. A field effect transistor between the base of the bipolar transistor and a junction between the zener diode and resistor regulates base current of the bipolar transistor, thereby regulating the conductivity of the bipolar transistor for control of the output voltage.

  6. Cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-Glucoside Demonstrates Apoptogenesis in Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells (HT-29): Involvement of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hassan, Loiy Elsir Ahmed; Abdul Majid, Amin M. S.; Yagi, Sakina M. Ahmed; Mohan, Syam; Elhassan Taha, Manal Mohamed; Ahmad, Syahida; Chuen, Cheah Shiau; Narrima, Putri; Rais, Mohd Mustafa; Syam, Suvitha; Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Hadi, A. Hamid A.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species can contribute to diverse signalling pathways of inflammatory and tumour cells. Cucurbitacins are a group of highly oxygenated triterpenes. Many plants used in folk medicine to treat cancer have been found to contain cucurbitacins displaying potentially important anti-inflammatory actions. The current study was designed to investigate the anti-ROS and -RNS effects of cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-glucoside (CLG) and the role of these signaling factors in the apoptogenic effects of CLG on human colon cancer cells (HT-29). This natural cucurbitacin was isolated purely from Citrullus lanatus var. citroides (Cucurbitaceae). The results revealed that CLG was cytotoxic to HT-29. CLG increased significantly (P < 0.05) RNA and protein levels of caspase-3 in HT-29 cells when verified using a colorimetric assay and realtime qPCR, respectively. The results showed that lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma (LPS/INF-γ) increased nitrous oxide (NO) production inR AW264.7macrophages, whereas N(G)-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME) and CLG curtailed it. This compound did not reveal any cytotoxicity on RAW264.7 macrophages and human normal liver cells (WRL-68) when tested using the MTT assay. Findings of ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) assays demonstrate the antioxidant properties of CLG. The apoptogenic property of CLG on HT-29 cells is thus related to inhibition of reactive nitrogen and oxygen reactive species and the triggering of caspase-3-regulated apoptosis. PMID:22685485

  7. Sigma-1 Receptors Regulate Bcl-2 Expression by Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Johann

    2010-01-01

    The expression of Bcl-2, the major antiapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is under complex controls of several factors, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). The σ-1 receptor (Sig-1R), which was recently identified as a novel molecular chaperone at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), has been shown to exert robust cellular protective actions. However, mechanisms underlying the antiapoptotic action of the Sig-1R remain to be clarified. Here, we found that the Sig-1R promotes cellular survival by regulating the Bcl-2 expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although both Sig-1Rs and Bcl-2 are highly enriched at the MAM, Sig-1Rs neither associate physically with Bcl-2 nor regulate stability of Bcl-2 proteins. However, Sig-1Rs tonically regulate the expression of Bcl-2 proteins. Knockdown of Sig-1Rs down-regulates whereas overexpression of Sig-1Rs up-regulates bcl-2 mRNA, indicating that the Sig-1R transcriptionally regulates the expression of Bcl-2. The effect of Sig-1R small interfering RNA down-regulating Bcl-2 was blocked by ROS scavengers and by the inhibitor of the ROS-inducible transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs up-regulates p105, the precursor of NF-κB, while concomitantly decreasing inhibitor of nuclear factor-κBα. Sig-1R knockdown also accelerates the conversion of p105 to the active form p50. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of Sig-1Rs potentiates H2O2-induced apoptosis; the action is blocked by either the NF-κB inhibitor oridonin or overexpression of Bcl-2. Thus, these findings suggest that Sig-1Rs promote cell survival, at least in part, by transcriptionally regulating Bcl-2 expression via the ROS/NF-κB pathway. PMID:19855099

  8. Self-regulating control of parasitic loads in a fuel cell power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fuel cell power system comprises an internal or self-regulating control of a system or device requiring a parasitic load. The internal or self-regulating control utilizes certain components and an interconnection scheme to produce a desirable, variable voltage potential (i.e., power) to a system or device requiring parasitic load in response to varying operating conditions or requirements of an external load that is connected to a primary fuel cell stack of the system. Other embodiments comprise a method of designing such a self-regulated control scheme and a method of operating such a fuel cell power system.

  9. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David I.; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here we review the current literature regarding ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25634975

  10. Regulation of erythrocyte lifespan: do reactive oxygen species set the clock?

    PubMed

    Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-01

    The forkhead box O (Foxo) subfamily of transcription factors regulates expression of genes important for many cellular processes, ranging from initiation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to induction of DNA damage repair. Invertebrate Foxo orthologs such as DAF-16 also regulate longevity. Cellular responses inducing resistance to ROS are important for cellular survival and organism lifespan, but until recently, mammalian factors regulating resistance to oxidative stress have not been well characterized. Marinkovic and colleagues demonstrate in this issue of the JCI that Foxo3 is specifically required for induction of proteins that regulate the in vivo oxidative stress response in murine erythrocytes (see the related article beginning on page 2133). Their work offers the interesting hypothesis that in so doing, Foxo3 may regulate the lifespan of red blood cells, and underlies the importance of understanding the direct targets of this transcription factor and its regulation.

  11. Role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-α, β/δ and γ triad in regulation of reactive oxygen species signaling in brain.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Stepan; Reiser, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows that oxidative stress is a major cause in development of brain disorders. Low activity of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-degrading system as well as high levels of oxidative damage markers have been observed in brain tissue of patients with neurodegenerative and other brain diseases to a larger extent than in healthy individuals. Many studies aimed to develop effective and safe antioxidant strategies for the therapy or prevention of brain diseases. Nevertheless, it became clear that rigorous suppression of ROS is deleterious for normal cell functioning. Thus, approaches that can regulate the ROS levels over a wide range, from inhibition to induction, will be a powerful tool for neuroprotection. A most prominent target for such ROS management is the family of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). All three members (PPAR-α, -β/δ and -γ) of this nuclear receptor subfamily form a tightly connected triad. For individual PPAR isoforms, neuroprotective properties have been well proven. Their involvement in regulation of ROS production and degradation underlies the therapeutic effects. Nevertheless, the current paradigms of the involvement of PPAR in neuroprotective therapy ignore such interconnections of PPARs and aim at antioxidant effects of individual PPAR isoforms, but do not take into account the necessity of careful regulation of ROS levels. The present review (i) summarizes the data, which support the concept of the PPAR triad in brain, (ii) demonstrates that usage of the PPAR triad allows the regulation of PPAR-dependent genes over a wide range, from inhibition to upregulation, and (iii) summarizes the known data concerning the PPAR triad involvement in regulation of ROS. Our report opens new directions in the field of PPAR/ROS-related neuroscience research.

  12. Purines regulate adult brain subventricular zone cell functions: contribution of reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Boccazzi, Marta; Rolando, Chiara; Abbracchio, Maria P; Buffo, Annalisa; Ceruti, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Brain injuries modulate activation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult brain. In pathological conditions, the concentrations of extracellular nucleotides (eNTs) raise several folds, contribute to reactive gliosis, and possibly directly affect subventricular zone (SVZ) cell functioning. Among eNTs and derived metabolites, the P2Y1 receptor agonist ADP strongly promotes astrogliosis and might also influence SVZ progenitor activity. Here, we tested the ability of the stable P2Y1 agonist adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPβS) to control adult NSC functions both in vitro and in vivo, with a focus on the possible effects exerted by reactive astrocytes. In the absence of growth factors, ADPβS promoted proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors. Moreover, ADPβS-activated astrocytes markedly changed the pattern of released cytokines and chemokines, and strongly modulated neurosphere-forming capacity of SVZ progenitors. Notably, a significant enhancement in proliferation was observed when SVZ cells, initially grown in the supernatant of astrocytes exposed to ADPβS, were shifted to normal medium. In vivo, ADPβS administration in the lateral ventricle of adult mice by osmotic minipumps caused diffused reactive astrogliosis, and a strong response of SVZ progenitors. Indeed, proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive NSCs increased and led to a significant expansion of SVZ transit-amplifying progenitors and neuroblasts. Lineage tracing experiments performed in the GLAST::CreERT2;Rosa-YFP transgenic mice further demonstrated that ADPβS promoted proliferation of glutamate/aspartate transporter-positive progenitors and sustained their progression toward the generation of rapidly dividing progenitors. Altogether, our results show that the purinergic system crucially affects SVZ progenitor activities both directly and through the involvement of reactive astrocytes.

  13. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  14. Note: A new regulation method of stable operation of high power cathode ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. C.; Xie, Y. H. Hu, C. D.; Xie, Y. L.; Liu, S.; Liang, L. Z.; Liu, Z. M.

    2015-05-15

    The hot cathode ion source will tend to be unstable when operated with high power and long pulse. In order to achieve stable operation, a new regulation method based on the arc power (discharge power) feedback control was designed and tested on the hot cathode ion source test bed with arc discharge and beam extraction. The results show that the new regulation method can achieve stable arc discharge and beam extraction. It verifies the success of feedback control of arc source with arc power.

  15. An ionization region model of the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M. A.; Huo, Chunqing; Minea, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    A new reactive ionization region model (R-IRM) is developed to describe the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge with a titanium target. It is then applied to study the temporal behavior of the discharge plasma parameters such as electron density, the neutral and ion composition, the ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, the oxygen dissociation fraction, and the composition of the discharge current. We study and compare the discharge properties when the discharge is operated in the two well established operating modes, the metal mode and the poisoned mode. Experimentally, it is found that in the metal mode the discharge current waveform displays a typical non-reactive evolution, while in the poisoned mode the discharge current waveform becomes distinctly triangular and the current increases significantly. Using the R-IRM we explore the current increase and find that when the discharge is operated in the metal mode Ar+ and Ti+ -ions contribute most significantly (roughly equal amounts) to the discharge current while in the poisoned mode the Ar+ -ions contribute most significantly to the discharge current and the contribution of O+ -ions, Ti+ -ions, and secondary electron emission is much smaller. Furthermore, we find that recycling of atoms coming from the target, that are subsequently ionized, is required for the current generation in both modes of operation. From the R-IRM results it is found that in the metal mode self-sputter recycling dominates and in the poisoned mode working gas recycling dominates. We also show that working gas recycling can lead to very high discharge currents but never to a runaway. It is concluded that the dominating type of recycling determines the discharge current waveform.

  16. Formation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering containing C2H2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Kamata, Hikaru

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have attracted interest for material industries, because they have unique properties. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films are prepared by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) containing C2H2 gas and the properties of the films produced in Ar/C2H2 and Ne/C2H2 HiPIMS are compared. Production of hydrocarbon radicals and their ions strongly depends on both electron temperature and electron density in HiPIMS. Therefore, the influence of the difference in buffer gas (Ar and Ne) on the film properties is also valuable to investigate. The film preparation is performed at an average power of 60 W and a repetition frequency of 110 Hz. Total pressure ranges between 0.3 and 2 Pa. The maximum of instantaneous power is about 20-25 kW, and the magnitude of the current is 35 A. A negative pulse voltage is applied to the substrates for about 15 μs after the target voltage changed from about -500 V to 0 V. Hardness of the films prepared by Ar/C2H2 HiPIMS monotonically decreases with increasing the total pressure, whereas that of the films prepared by Ne/C2H2 HiPIMS does not strongly depend on the total pressure. This work is partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420230.

  17. Development of a Reactive Plume Model for the Consideration of Power-Plant Plume Photochemistry and Its Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong H; Kim, Hyun S; Song, Chul H

    2017-02-07

    A reactive plume model (RPM) was developed to comprehensively consider power-plant plume photochemistry with 255 condensed photochemical reactions. The RPM can simulate two main components of power-plant plumes: turbulent dispersion of plumes and compositional changes of plumes via photochemical reactions. In order to evaluate the performance of the RPM developed in the present study, two sets of observational data obtained from the TexAQS II 2006 (Texas Air Quality Study II 2006) campaign were compared with RPM-simulated data. Comparison shows that the RPM produces relatively accurate concentrations for major primary and secondary in-plume species such as NO2, SO2, ozone, and H2SO4. Statistical analyses show good correlation, with correlation coefficients (R) ranging from 0.61 to 0.92, and good agreement with the Index of Agreement (IOA) ranging from 0.76 to 0.95. Following evaluation of the performance of the RPM, a demonstration was also carried out to show the applicability of the RPM. The RPM can calculate NOx photochemical lifetimes inside the two plumes (Monticello and Welsh power plants). Further applicability and possible uses of the RPM are also discussed together with some limitations of the current version of the RPM.

  18. Mothers' Socialization of Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Children's Negative Emotional Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabile, Scott P.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Robison, Sarah D.

    2009-01-01

    During the toddler period, children begin to shift from being primarily dependent on parents to regulate their emotions to managing their emotions independently. The present study considers how children's propensity towards negative emotional arousal interacts with mothers' efforts to socialize emotion regulation. Fifty-five low income mothers and…

  19. Quality Certification, Regulation and Power in Fair Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renard, Marie-Christine

    2005-01-01

    This article examines governance changes and shifting power relations within the fair-labelling network. These shifts are framed analytically by reference to broader changes in the agrofoods sector tied to the increasingly key role played by quality relations and standards in the production and marketing of food. The author argues that evident…

  20. Quality Certification, Regulation and Power in Fair Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renard, Marie-Christine

    2005-01-01

    This article examines governance changes and shifting power relations within the fair-labelling network. These shifts are framed analytically by reference to broader changes in the agrofoods sector tied to the increasingly key role played by quality relations and standards in the production and marketing of food. The author argues that evident…

  1. Low Power Television: The Impact of the Final Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, James C.; And Others

    In August 1978, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) began studying the question of how to increase the diversity and coverage of television broadcast services either by modifying the television translator rules or by creating a new low power television service (LPTV). In Septemer 1980, the FCC finally adopted a "Notice of Proposed…

  2. An expert system for reactive power control of a distribution system. Part 2: System implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Laframboise, J.R.P.R.; Ferland, G.; Chikhani, A.Y.; Salama, M.M.A.

    1995-08-01

    Compared to using strictly algorithmic methods only, the planning of VAR control through an expert system will allow the integration of heuristics with equations representing the system`s model. In this paper, an expert system is developed for short and long-term planning of voltage control and loss reduction in distribution systems using shunt capacitors and voltages regulators. Ideally, the expert system will become part of the SCADA system. An application using a real system is also included.

  3. Perspective: Is there a hysteresis during reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strijckmans, K.; Moens, F.; Depla, D.

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses a few mechanisms that can assist to answer the title question. The initial approach is to use an established model for DC magnetron sputter deposition, i.e., RSD2013. Based on this model, the impact on the hysteresis behaviour of some typical HiPIMS conditions is investigated. From this first study, it becomes clear that the probability to observe hysteresis is much lower as compared to DC magnetron sputtering. The high current pulses cannot explain the hysteresis reduction. Total pressure and material choice make the abrupt changes less pronounced, but the implantation of ionized metal atoms that return to the target seems to be the major cause. To further substantiate these results, the analytical reactive sputtering model is coupled with a published global plasma model. The effect of metal ion implantation is confirmed. Another suggested mechanism, i.e., gas rarefaction, can be ruled out to explain the hysteresis reduction. But perhaps the major conclusion is that at present, there are too little experimental data available to make fully sound conclusions.

  4. Emotional reactivity and regulation associated with fluent and stuttered utterances of preschool-age children who stutter.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robin M; Conture, Edward G; Walden, Tedra A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between emotional reactivity and regulation associated with fluent and stuttered utterances of preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and those who do not (CWNS). Participants were eight 3 to 6-year old CWS and eight CWNS of comparable age and gender. Participants were exposed to three emotion-inducing overheard conversations--neutral, angry and happy--and produced a narrative following each overheard conversation. From audio-video recordings of these narratives, coded behavioral analysis of participants' negative and positive affect and emotion regulation associated with stuttered and fluent utterances was conducted. Results indicated that CWS were significantly more likely to exhibit emotion regulation attempts prior to and during their fluent utterances following the happy as compared to the negative condition, whereas CWNS displayed the opposite pattern. Within-group assessment indicated that CWS were significantly more likely to display negative emotion prior to and during their stuttered than fluent utterances, particularly following the positive overheard conversation. After exposure to emotional-inducing overheard conversations, changes in preschool-age CWS's emotion and emotion regulatory attempts were associated with the fluency of their utterances. After reading this article, the reader will be able to: (1) describe various measures of emotional reactivity and regulation, including parent-based reports and behavioral coding, and how they may contribute to childhood stuttering; (2) explain emotional differences between the stuttered and fluent utterances of CWS and CWNS; and (3) discuss how emotions may contribute to CWS' instances of stuttering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic Power Flow Controller: Compact Dynamic Phase Angle Regulators for Transmission Power Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-03

    GENI Project: Varentec is developing compact, low-cost transmission power controllers with fractional power rating for controlling power flow on transmission networks. The technology will enhance grid operations through improved use of current assets and by dramatically reducing the number of transmission lines that have to be built to meet increasing contributions of renewable energy sources like wind and solar. The proposed transmission controllers would allow for the dynamic control of voltage and power flow, improving the grid’s ability to dispatch power in real time to the places where it is most needed. The controllers would work as fail-safe devices whereby the grid would be restored to its present operating state in the event of a controller malfunction instead of failing outright. The ability to affordably and dynamically control power flow with adequate fail-safe switchgear could open up new competitive energy markets which are not possible under the current regulatory structure and technology base.

  6. Listening to music and physiological and psychological functioning: the mediating role of emotion regulation and stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Thoma, M V; Scholz, U; Ehlert, U; Nater, U M

    2012-01-01

    Music listening has been suggested to have short-term beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association and potential mediating mechanisms between various aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour and physiological and psychological functioning. An internet-based survey was conducted in university students, measuring habitual music-listening behaviour, emotion regulation, stress reactivity, as well as physiological and psychological functioning. A total of 1230 individuals (mean = 24.89 ± 5.34 years, 55.3% women) completed the questionnaire. Quantitative aspects of habitual music-listening behaviour, i.e. average duration of music listening and subjective relevance of music, were not associated with physiological and psychological functioning. In contrast, qualitative aspects, i.e. reasons for listening (especially 'reducing loneliness and aggression', and 'arousing or intensifying specific emotions') were significantly related to physiological and psychological functioning (all p = 0.001). These direct effects were mediated by distress-augmenting emotion regulation and individual stress reactivity. The habitual music-listening behaviour appears to be a multifaceted behaviour that is further influenced by dispositions that are usually not related to music listening. Consequently, habitual music-listening behaviour is not obviously linked to physiological and psychological functioning.

  7. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  8. Crosstalk between Nitrite, Myoglobin and Reactive Oxygen Species to Regulate Vasodilation under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response. PMID:25148388

  9. Reactive Inkjet Printing of Biocompatible Enzyme Powered Silk Micro-Rockets.

    PubMed

    Gregory, David A; Zhang, Yu; Smith, Patrick J; Zhao, Xiubo; Ebbens, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Inkjet-printed enzyme-powered silk-based micro-rockets are able to undergo autonomous motion in a vast variety of fluidic environments including complex media such as human serum. By means of digital inkjet printing it is possible to alter the catalyst distribution simply and generate varying trajectory behavior of these micro-rockets. Made of silk scaffolds containing enzymes these micro-rockets are highly biocompatible and non-biofouling. © 2016 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Reactive sulfur species regulate tRNA methylthiolation and contribute to insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wei, Fan-Yan; Watanabe, Sayaka; Hirayama, Mayumi; Ohuchi, Yuya; Fujimura, Atsushi; Kaitsuka, Taku; Ishii, Isao; Sawa, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Hideki; Akaike, Takaaki; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2017-01-01

    The 2-methylthio (ms2) modification at A37 of tRNAs is critical for accurate decoding, and contributes to metabolic homeostasis in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism of ms2 modification remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cysteine hydropersulfide (CysSSH), a newly identified reactive sulfur species, is involved in ms2 modification in cells. The suppression of intracellular CysSSH production rapidly reduced ms2 modification, which was rescued by the application of an exogenous CysSSH donor. Using a unique and stable isotope-labeled CysSSH donor, we show that CysSSH was capable of specifically transferring its reactive sulfur atom to the cysteine residues of ms2-modifying enzymes as well as ms2 modification. Furthermore, the suppression of CysSSH production impaired insulin secretion and caused glucose intolerance in both a pancreatic β-cell line and mouse model. These results demonstrate that intracellular CysSSH is a novel sulfur source for ms2 modification, and that it contributes to insulin secretion. PMID:27568003

  11. Reactive sulfur species regulate tRNA methylthiolation and contribute to insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wei, Fan-Yan; Watanabe, Sayaka; Hirayama, Mayumi; Ohuchi, Yuya; Fujimura, Atsushi; Kaitsuka, Taku; Ishii, Isao; Sawa, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Hideki; Akaike, Takaaki; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2017-01-09

    The 2-methylthio (ms(2)) modification at A37 of tRNAs is critical for accurate decoding, and contributes to metabolic homeostasis in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism of ms(2) modification remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cysteine hydropersulfide (CysSSH), a newly identified reactive sulfur species, is involved in ms(2) modification in cells. The suppression of intracellular CysSSH production rapidly reduced ms(2) modification, which was rescued by the application of an exogenous CysSSH donor. Using a unique and stable isotope-labeled CysSSH donor, we show that CysSSH was capable of specifically transferring its reactive sulfur atom to the cysteine residues of ms(2)-modifying enzymes as well as ms(2) modification. Furthermore, the suppression of CysSSH production impaired insulin secretion and caused glucose intolerance in both a pancreatic β-cell line and mouse model. These results demonstrate that intracellular CysSSH is a novel sulfur source for ms(2) modification, and that it contributes to insulin secretion.

  12. Reactive cysteine persulfides and S-polythiolation regulate oxidative stress and redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Tomoaki; Sawa, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideshi; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Yasuo; Kumagai, Yoshito; Suematsu, Makoto; Motohashi, Hozumi; Fujii, Shigemoto; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ono, Katsuhiko; Devarie-Baez, Nelmi O.; Xian, Ming; Fukuto, Jon M.; Akaike, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Using methodology developed herein, it is found that reactive persulfides and polysulfides are formed endogenously from both small molecule species and proteins in high amounts in mammalian cells and tissues. These reactive sulfur species were biosynthesized by two major sulfurtransferases: cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. Quantitation of these species indicates that high concentrations of glutathione persulfide (perhydropersulfide >100 μM) and other cysteine persulfide and polysulfide derivatives in peptides/proteins were endogenously produced and maintained in the plasma, cells, and tissues of mammals (rodent and human). It is expected that persulfides are especially nucleophilic and reducing. This view was found to be the case, because they quickly react with H2O2 and a recently described biologically generated electrophile 8-nitroguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate. These results indicate that persulfides are potentially important signaling/effector species, and because H2S can be generated from persulfide degradation, much of the reported biological activity associated with H2S may actually be that of persulfides. That is, H2S may act primarily as a marker for the biologically active of persulfide species. PMID:24733942

  13. Up-regulation of reactivity and survival genes in astrocytes after exposure to short duration overpressure.

    PubMed

    Vandevord, Pamela J; Leung, Lai Yee; Hardy, Warren; Mason, Matthew; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2008-04-04

    Gurdjian et al. proposed decades ago that pressure gradients played a major factor in neuronal injury due to impact. In the late 1950s, their experiments on concussion demonstrated that the principal factor in the production of concussion in animals was the sudden increase of intracranial pressure accompanying head injury. They reported the increase in pressure severity correlated with an increase in 'altered cells' resulting in animal death. More recently, Hardy et al. (2006) demonstrated the presence of transient pressure pulses with impact conditions. These studies indicate that short duration overpressure should be further examined as a mechanism of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the present study, we designed and fabricated a barochamber that simulated overpressure noted in various head injury studies. We tested the effect of overpressure on astrocytes. Expressions of apoptotic, reactivity and survival genes were examined at 24, 48 and 72 h post-overpressure exposure. At 24 h, we found elevated levels of reactivity and survival gene expression. By 48 h, a decreased expression of apoptotic genes was demonstrated. This study reinforces the hypothesis that transient pressure acts to instigate the cellular response displayed following TBI.

  14. Operational compatibility of 30-centimeter-diameter ion thruster with integrally regulated solar array power source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1977-01-01

    System tests were performed in which Integrally Regulated Solar Arrays (IRSA's) were used to directly power the beam and accelerator loads of a 30-cm-diameter, electron bombardment, mercury ion thruster. The remaining thruster loads were supplied from conventional power-processing circuits. This combination of IRSA's and conventional circuits formed a hybrid power processor. Thruster performance was evaluated at 3/4- and 1-A beam currents with both the IRSA-hybrid and conventional power processors and was found to be identical for both systems. Power processing is significantly more efficient with the hybrid system. System dynamics and IRSA response to thruster arcs are also examined.

  15. Programmable high voltage power supply with regulation confined to the high voltage section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen D. (Inventor); Ruitberg, Arthur P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high voltage power supply in a dc-dc converter configuration includes a pre-regulator which filters and regulates the dc input and drives an oscillator which applies, in turn, a low voltage ac signal to the low side of a step-up high voltage transformer. The high voltage side of the transformer drives a voltage multiplier which provides a stepped up dc voltage to an output filter. The output voltage is sensed by a feedback network which then controls a regulator. Both the input and output of the regulator are on the high voltage side, avoiding isolation problems. The regulator furnishes a portion of the drive to the voltage multiplier, avoiding having a regulator in series with the load with its attendant, relatively high power losses. This power supply is highly regulated, has low power consumption, a low parts count and may be manufactured at low cost. The power supply has a programmability feature that allows for the selection of a large range of output voltages.

  16. Real power regulation design for multi-terminal VSC-HVDC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Jie; Ruan, Si-Ye; Lie, Tek

    2013-06-01

    A multi-terminal voltage-source-converter (VSC) based high voltage direct current (HVDC) system is concerned for its flexibility and reliability. In this study, a control strategy for multiple VSCs is proposed to auto-share the real power variation without changing control mode, which is based on "dc voltage droop" power regulation functions. With the proposed power regulation design, the multiple VSCs automatically share the real power change and the VSC-HVDC system is stable even under loss of any one converter while there is no overloading for any individual converter. Simulation results show that it is effective to balance real power for power disturbance and thus improves operation reliability for the multi-terminal VSC-HVDC system by the proposed control strategy.

  17. 75 FR 3985 - Trade Regulation Rule Relating to Power Output Claims for Amplifiers Utilized in Home...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... CFR Part 432 Trade Regulation Rule Relating to Power Output Claims for Amplifiers Utilized in Home... Rule Relating to Power Output Claims for Amplifiers Utilized in Home Entertainment Products (``Amplifier Rule'' or ``Rule''), as part of the Commission's systematic review of all current...

  18. Early Childhood Teachers and Regulation: Complicating Power Relations Using a Foucauldian Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenech, Marianne; Sumsion, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article both supports and complicates the positioning of reconceptualists who frame the regulation of early childhood services as repressive. Drawing on Foucault's construction of power and, in particular, his notion of an "analytics of power", the authors analyse findings from an Australian study investigating university-qualified…

  19. 75 FR 26225 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets... conference to elicit input on issues pertaining to Frequency Regulation Compensation in the ISO/RTO...

  20. Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J [Knoxville, TN; Kirby, Brendan J [Knoxville, TN; Kisner, Roger A

    2009-05-19

    A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

  1. Multiobjective Model of Time-of-Use and Stepwise Power Tariff for Residential Consumers in Regulated Power Markets

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Bin; Yang, Rui; Li, Canbing; ...

    2017-07-04

    Here, time-of-use (TOU) rates and stepwise power tariff (SPT) are important economic levers to motivate residents to shift their electricity usage in response to electricity price. In this paper, a new multiobjective optimal tariff-making model of time-of-use and stepwise power tariff (TOUSPT) is proposed, which combines the complementary characteristics of two power tariffs, for residential energy conservation and peak load shaving. In the proposed approach, the residential demand response with price elasticity in regulated power market is considered to determine the optimum peak-valley TOU tariffs for each stepwise electricity partition. Furthermore, a practical case study is implemented to test themore » effectiveness of the proposed TOUSPT, and the results demonstrate that TOUSPT can achieve efficient end-use energy saving and also shift load from peak to off-peak periods.« less

  2. Using Self-regulation to Successfully Overcome the Negotiation Disadvantage of Low Power

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Andreas; Loschelder, David D.; Friese, Malte

    2017-01-01

    A plethora of studies has demonstrated that low-power negotiators attain lower outcomes compared to high-power negotiators. We argue that this low-power disadvantage can be conceptualized as impaired goal attainment and that self-regulation can help to overcome it. Three experiments tested this assertion. In Study 1, low-power negotiators attained lower profits compared to their high-power opponents in a face-to-face negotiation. Negotiators who set themselves goals and those who additionally formed if-then plans prior to the negotiation overcame the low-power disadvantage. Studies 2 and 3 replicated these effects in computer-mediated negotiations: Low-power negotiators conceded more than high-power negotiators. Again, setting goals and forming additional if-then plans helped to counter the power disadvantage. Process analyses revealed that negotiators’ concession-making at the start of the negotiation mediated both the low-power disadvantage and the beneficial effects of self-regulation. The present findings show how the low-power disadvantage unfolds in negotiations and how self-regulatory techniques can help to overcome it. PMID:28382005

  3. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Brown, David I; Griendling, Kathy K

    2015-01-30

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by ROS are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here, we review the current literature on ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress.

  4. Reciprocal regulation of TGF-β and reactive oxygen species: A perverse cycle for fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Desai, Leena P.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is the most potent pro-fibrogenic cytokine and its expression is increased in almost all of fibrotic diseases. Although signaling through Smad pathway is believed to play a central role in TGF-β's fibrogenesis, emerging evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate TGF-β's signaling through different pathways including Smad pathway. TGF-β1 increases ROS production and suppresses antioxidant enzymes, leading to a redox imbalance. ROS, in turn, induce/activate TGF-β1 and mediate many of TGF-β's fibrogenic effects, forming a vicious cycle (see graphic flow chart on the right). Here, we review the current knowledge on the feed-forward mechanisms between TGF-β1 and ROS in the development of fibrosis. Therapeutics targeting TGF-β-induced and ROS-dependent cellular signaling represents a novel approach in the treatment of fibrotic disorders. PMID:26496488

  5. Infant and maternal behaviors regulate infant reactivity to novelty at 6 months.

    PubMed

    Crockenberg, Susan C; Leerkes, Esther M

    2004-11-01

    Three issues were investigated: (a) the regulatory effects of presumed infant and maternal regulation behaviors on infant distress to novelty at 6 months, (b) stability of infant regulatory effects across contexts that vary in maternal involvement, and (c) associations and temporal dynamics between infant and maternal regulation behaviors. Participants were 87 low-risk infants and their mothers, observed at 6 months postpartum during infant exposure to novel toys. Contingencies derived from sequential analyses demonstrate that, by 6 months, some infants reduce their own distress to novelty by looking away from the novel toy or self-soothing, maternal engagement and support have comparable effects, and certain infant and maternal behaviors co-occur. Moreover, infants whose mothers engaged contingently when they looked away from the novel toy expressed less distress than comparable infants whose mothers did not. These findings implicate both infants and mothers in the development of emotion regulation during the infant's first year. (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved

  6. Flow Regulator Powered by the Stalk of Vorticella convarallia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, N.; Nagai, M.; Hayasaka, Y.; Oguri, M.; Kawashima, T.; Shibata, T.

    2012-03-01

    We propose flow regulation by the stalk of Vorticella convarallia. The motion of stalk can be controlled by introducing Ca2+ and chelator solutions alternatively. The fluid channel is narrowed by fully extended V. convarallia, which results in increasing fluidic resistance and reducing flow rate. The flow regulator consists of a microchannel and Vorticella. The microchannel has two layers. The top layer contains a fluid channel where Vorticella is stored to control the flow rate. The bottom layer includes a control channel which enables control of the fluid channel by an external compressed air supply. After cells were introduced to the device at 1.0×103 cells/μL, eight of 18 chambers contained more than a single cell. Four cells of Vorticella were cultured in one chamber at a maximum. The cells were alive for two days after the injection. We evaluated the change in mean flow rate through the fluidic channel. The flow rate without V. convarallia increased linearly from 5.5nL/min to 1.1μL/min with applied pressure from 4 to 18kPa. The switching time of solutions measured two seconds at 10 kPa. The response time for the device was estimated to be approximately four seconds after the partial removal of cell membrane.

  7. Modeling and performance improvement of the constant power regulator systems in variable displacement axial piston pump.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software.

  8. A transdiagnostic approach to examining the incremental predictive power of emotion regulation and basic personality dimensions.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Kasey; Rozek, David C; Stasik-O'Brien, Sara M; Ellickson-Larew, Stephanie; Watson, David

    2016-10-01

    Although personality and emotion regulation abilities appear to overlap considerably, few studies have adopted an integrative approach by examining personality and emotion regulation together. Therefore, it is unclear how much incremental power emotion regulation demonstrates in predicting psychopathology beyond personality traits, and vice versa. Results from a community sample characterized by high levels of psychopathology (N = 299) indicated that personality and emotion regulation represent strongly related but distinguishable constructs, with both showing incremental power beyond the other in many cases in predicting self-reported and interview-rated psychopathology. More specifically, difficulties in responding adaptively to negative emotional experiences displayed predictive power beyond neuroticism and other personality traits in predicting internalizing psychopathology and psychoticism. Conversely, neuroticism displayed substantial incremental predictive power beyond emotion regulation and other five-factor model traits, especially for anxiety and other internalizing psychopathology. Other five-factor model traits also showed incremental predictive power in specific cases (e.g., agreeableness and conscientiousness showed specificity in predicting antagonism and disinhibition, respectively). These data provide a starting point for developing a finer-grained understanding of how emotion dysregulation and personality traits are implicated in a range of psychopathology, highlighting the value of adopting an integrative approach of examining emotion regulation and personality traits concurrently. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Modeling and Performance Improvement of the Constant Power Regulator Systems in Variable Displacement Axial Piston Pump

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software. PMID:24282389

  10. Stress Regulation in Adolescents: Physiological Reactivity during the Adult Attachment Interview and Conflict Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijersbergen, Marielle D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether adolescents' attachment representations were associated with differences in emotion regulation during the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1996) and during a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task (Family Interaction Task [FIT]; J. P. Allen et al., 2003). Participants…

  11. Cortisol Reactivity and Regulation Associated with Shame Responding in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Imm, Gorette P.; Walling, Bobbi R.; Weiler, Hope A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cortisol response and regulation associated with shame responding in early childhood and to examine how general the relation between shame and cortisol is. It was predicted that children responding to task failure with shame would show a larger and more prolonged cortisol response than other children.…

  12. Cortisol Reactivity and Regulation Associated with Shame Responding in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Imm, Gorette P.; Walling, Bobbi R.; Weiler, Hope A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cortisol response and regulation associated with shame responding in early childhood and to examine how general the relation between shame and cortisol is. It was predicted that children responding to task failure with shame would show a larger and more prolonged cortisol response than other children.…

  13. Stress Regulation in Adolescents: Physiological Reactivity during the Adult Attachment Interview and Conflict Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijersbergen, Marielle D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether adolescents' attachment representations were associated with differences in emotion regulation during the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1996) and during a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task (Family Interaction Task [FIT]; J. P. Allen et al., 2003). Participants…

  14. SiNx coatings deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Process parameters influencing the residual coating stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Hänninen, T.; Wissting, J.; Hultman, L.; Goebbels, N.; Santana, A.; Tobler, M.; Högberg, H.

    2017-05-01

    The residual coating stress and its control is of key importance for the performance and reliability of silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings for biomedical applications. This study explores the most important deposition process parameters to tailor the residual coating stress and hence improve the adhesion of SiNx coatings deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (rHiPIMS). Reactive sputter deposition and plasma characterization were conducted in an industrial deposition chamber equipped with pure Si targets in N2/Ar ambient. Reactive HiPIMS processes using N2-to-Ar flow ratios of 0 and 0.28-0.3 were studied with time averaged positive ion mass spectrometry. The coatings were deposited to thicknesses of 2 μm on Si(001) and to 5 μm on polished CoCrMo disks. The residual stress of the X-ray amorphous coatings was determined from the curvature of the Si substrates as obtained by X-ray diffraction. The coatings were further characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and nanoindentation in order to study their elemental composition, morphology, and hardness, respectively. The adhesion of the 5 μm thick coatings deposited on CoCrMo disks was assessed using the Rockwell C test. The deposition of SiNx coatings by rHiPIMS using N2-to-Ar flow ratios of 0.28 yield dense and hard SiNx coatings with Si/N ratios <1. The compressive residual stress of up to 2.1 GPa can be reduced to 0.2 GPa using a comparatively high deposition pressure of 600 mPa, substrate temperatures below 200 °C, low pulse energies of <2.5 Ws, and moderate negative bias voltages of up to 100 V. These process parameters resulted in excellent coating adhesion (ISO 0, HF1) and a low surface roughness of 14 nm for coatings deposited on CoCrMo.

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide and Reactive Sulfur Species Impact Proteome S-Sulfhydration and Global Virulence Regulation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zhang, Yixiang; Palmer, Lauren D; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Skaar, Eric P; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Giedroc, David P

    2017-09-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is thought to protect bacteria from oxidative stress, but a comprehensive understanding of its function in bacteria is largely unexplored. In this study, we show that the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) harbors significant effector molecules of H2S signaling, reactive sulfur species (RSS), as low molecular weight persulfides of bacillithiol, coenzyme A, and cysteine, and significant inorganic polysulfide species. We find that proteome S-sulfhydration, a post-translational modification (PTM) in H2S signaling, is widespread in S. aureus. RSS levels modulate the expression of secreted virulence factors and the cytotoxicity of the secretome, consistent with an S-sulfhydration-dependent inhibition of DNA binding by MgrA, a global virulence regulator. Two previously uncharacterized thioredoxin-like proteins, denoted TrxP and TrxQ, are S-sulfhydrated in sulfide-stressed cells and are capable of reducing protein hydrodisulfides, suggesting that this PTM is potentially regulatory in S. aureus. In conclusion, our results reveal that S. aureus harbors a pool of proteome- and metabolite-derived RSS capable of impacting protein activities and gene regulation and that H2S signaling can be sensed by global regulators to affect the expression of virulence factors.

  16. Emotional reactivity and regulation associated with fluent and stuttered utterances of preschool-age children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robin M.; Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between emotional reactivity and regulation associated with fluent and stuttered utterances of preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and those who do not (CWNS). Participants Participants were eight 3 to 6-year old CWS and eight CWNS of comparable age and gender. Methods Participants were exposed to three emotion-inducing overheard conversations—neutral, angry and happy—and produced a narrative following each overheard conversation. From audio-video recordings of these narratives, coded behavioral analysis of participants’ negative and positive affect and emotion regulation associated with stuttered and fluent utterances was conducted. Results Results indicated that CWS were significantly more likely to exhibit emotion regulation attempts prior to and during their fluent utterances following the happy as compared to the negative condition, whereas CWNS displayed the opposite pattern. Within-group assessment indicated that CWS were significantly more likely to display negative emotion prior to and during their stuttered than fluent utterances, particularly following the positive overheard conversation. Conclusions After exposure to emotional-inducing overheard conversations, changes in preschool-age CWS’s emotion and emotion regulatory attempts were associated with the fluency of their utterances. PMID:24630144

  17. Engineering model of the electric drives of separation device for simulation of automatic control systems of reactive power compensation by means of serially connected capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juromskiy, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    It is developed a mathematical model for an electric drive of high-speed separation device in terms of the modeling dynamic systems Simulink, MATLAB. The model is focused on the study of the automatic control systems of the power factor (Cosφ) of an actuator by compensating the reactive component of the total power by switching a capacitor bank in series with the actuator. The model is based on the methodology of the structural modeling of dynamic processes.

  18. Inorganic Polyphosphates Regulate Hexokinase Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Mitochondria of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Amanda; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Menezes, Jackson; da Silva Vaz Jr, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Campos, Eldo

    2013-01-01

    The physiological roles of polyphosphates (poly P) recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the possible involvement of poly P with reactive oxygen species generation in mitochondria of Rhipicephalus microplus embryos was investigated. Mitochondrial hexokinase and scavenger antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase were assayed during embryogenesis of R. microplus. The influence of poly P3 and poly P15 were analyzed during the period of higher enzymatic activity during embryogenesis. Both poly Ps inhibited hexokinase activity by up to 90% and, interestingly, the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase activity was stimulated by the hexokinase reaction product, glucose-6-phosphate. Poly P increased hydrogen peroxide generation in mitochondria in a situation where mitochondrial hexokinase is also active. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were higher during embryo cellularization, at the end of embryogenesis and during embryo segmentation, respectively. All of the enzymes were stimulated by poly P3. However, superoxide dismutase was not affected by poly P15, catalase activity was stimulated only at high concentrations and glutathione reductase was the only enzyme that was stimulated in the same way by both poly Ps. Altogether, our results indicate that inorganic polyphosphate and mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase regulation can be correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria of R. microplus embryos. PMID:23983617

  19. Nature, correlates, and consequences of stress-related biological reactivity and regulation in Army nurses during combat casualty simulation.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Leigh K; Out, Dorothée; Hammermeister, Jon J; Ohlson, Carl J; Pickering, Michael A; Granger, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the nature, concomitants, and consequences of stress-related biological reactivity and regulation among Army nurses. Saliva was collected, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) recorded from 38 Army nurses (74% female; mean age 28.5 years [SD=6.5]) before, during, and after participation in the Combat Casualty Stress Scenario (CCSS). Saliva was assayed for cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA). The CCSS simulates emergency combat rescue, employing two simulated combat casualties, aversive body odors, recorded battlefield sounds, and smoke in a low light environment. Participants locate and conduct preliminary assessments of the simulated patients, triage based on injury severity, initiate treatment, and coordinate medical evacuation by radio. Results revealed large magnitude increases in cortisol, sAA, HR, systolic BP and diastolic BP in response to the CCSS, followed by recovery to baseline levels 30min after the task for all physiological parameters except cortisol. Age, gender, perceived difficulty of the CCSS, and previous nursing experience were associated with individual differences in the magnitude of the physiological responses. Lower levels of performance related to triage and treatment were associated with higher levels of reactivity and slower recovery for some of the physiological measures. The findings raise important questions regarding the utility of integrating measures of the psychobiology of the stress response into training programs designed to prepare first responders to handle highly complex and chaotic rescue situations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Reactivity Predicts Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in At-risk and Control Children

    PubMed Central

    Gentzler, Amy L.; Santucci, Aimee K.; Kovacs, Maria; Fox, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), emotion regulation (ER), and prospective depressive symptoms in children at risk for depression and controls. Of the 65 children (35 boys; 5 – 13 years) in the sample, 39 had a parent with childhood-onset mood disorder and 26 had a parent with no history of major psychiatric disorder. RSA during pre- and post-film baselines and RSA reactivity to sad film clip were measured. Later, children’s ER responses (focusing on sad/distressing affect) were assessed using a parent-reported questionnaire, and depressive symptoms were measured via clinical ratings. Results indicated that, compared to the initial baseline, a greater decrease in RSA (i.e. more vagal withdrawal) in response to the sad film clip predicted more adaptive ER responses and lower levels of clinician-rated depressive symptoms. However, tests for ER as a mediator of the association between RSA reactivity and depressive symptoms were precluded because maladaptive, but not adaptive, ER was associated with depressive symptoms. Overall, results suggest that cardiac vagal withdrawal (a greater decrease in RSA) in response to an emotional stimulus reflects more adaptive parasympathetic activity, which could facilitate children’s ability to effectively manage their sadness and distress and predict lower risk of depressive symptoms over time. PMID:19596044

  1. Candida albicans erythroascorbate peroxidase regulates intracellular methylglyoxal and reactive oxygen species independently of D-erythroascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Song, Sung-Hyun; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-07-08

    Candida albicans D-erythroascorbate peroxidase (EAPX1), which can catalyze the oxidation of D-erythroascorbic acid (EASC) to water, was observed to be inducible in EAPX1-deficient and EAPX1-overexpressing cells via activity staining. EAPX1-deficient cells have remarkably increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal independent of the intracellular EASC content. The increased methylglyoxal caused EAPX1-deficient cells to activate catalase-peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, which led to defects in cell growth, viability, mitochondrial respiration, filamentation and virulence. These findings indicate that EAPX1 mediates cell differentiation and virulence by regulating intracellular methylglyoxal along with oxidative stresses, regardless of endogenous EASC biosynthesis or alternative oxidase expression.

  2. HVCN1 modulates BCR signal strength via regulation of BCR-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Melania; Bhamrah, Mandeep K; Henley, Tom; Boyd, Robert S; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; Dinsdale, David; Pulford, Karen; Kan, Mahmood; Musset, Boris; Cherny, Vladimir V; Morgan, Deri; Gascoyne, Randy D; Vigorito, Elena; DeCoursey, Thomas E; MacLennan, Ian C M; Dyer, Martin J S

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton currents regulate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytic cells. In B cells, stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the production of ROS that participate in B cell activation, but the involvement of proton channels is unknown. We report here that the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 associated with the BCR complex and was internalized together with the BCR after activation. BCR-induced generation of ROS was lower in HVCN1-deficient B cells, which resulted in attenuated BCR signaling via impaired BCR-dependent oxidation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. This resulted in less activation of the kinases Syk and Akt, impaired mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and diminished antibody responses in vivo. Our findings identify unanticipated functions for proton channels in B cells and demonstrate the importance of ROS in BCR signaling and downstream metabolism. PMID:20139987

  3. Wind-powered asynchronous AC/DC/AC converter system. [for electric power supply regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitan, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Two asynchronous ac/dc/ac systems are modelled that utilize wind power to drive a variable or constant hertz alternator. The first system employs a high power 60-hertz inverter tie to the large backup supply of the power company to either supplement them from wind energy, storage, or from a combination of both at a preset desired current; rectifier and inverter are identical and operate in either mode depending on the silicon control rectifier firing angle. The second system employs the same rectification but from a 60-hertz alternator arrangement; it provides mainly dc output, some sinusoidal 60-hertz from the wind bus and some high harmonic content 60-hertz from an 800-watt inverter.

  4. Regulation of Murine Intestinal Inflammation by Reactive Metabolites of Oxygen and Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Krieglstein, Christian F.; Cerwinka, Wolfgang H.; Laroux, F. Stephen; Salter, James W.; Russell, Janice M.; Schuermann, Guido; Grisham, Matthew B.; Ross, Christopher R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2001-01-01

    Several reports have implicated reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites (RONS) in the initiation and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). We have investigated the role of three key RONS-metabolizing enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS], superoxide dismutase [SOD], nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADPH] oxidase) in a murine model of IBD. Mice genetically deficient (−/−) in either iNOS or the p47phox subunit of NADPH oxidase, transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress SOD, and their respective wild-type (WT) littermates were fed dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days to induce colitis. In addition, the specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W was used in DSS-treated WT and p47phox−/− mice. WT mice responded to DSS feeding with progressive weight loss, bloody stools, elevated serum NOX and colonic mucosal injury with neutrophil infiltration. Both the onset and severity of colitis were significantly attenuated in iNOS−/− and 1400W-treated WT mice. While the responses to DSS did not differ between WT and p47phox−/− mice, enhanced protection was noted in 1400W-treated p47phox−/− mice. Interestingly, SODTg mice exhibited more severe colitis than their WT littermates. These findings reveal divergent roles for superoxide and iNOS-derived NO in intestinal inflammation. PMID:11696587

  5. C-Reactive Protein: An In-Depth Look into Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Núñez, Victoria; Añez, Roberto; Torres, Yaquelin; Toledo, Alexandra; Chacín, Maricarmen; Silva, Carlos; Pacheco, Enrique; Rojas, Joselyn; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the adult population worldwide, with atherosclerosis being its key pathophysiologic component. Atherosclerosis possesses a fundamental chronic inflammatory aspect, and the involvement of numerous inflammatory molecules has been studied in this scenario, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a plasma protein with strong phylogenetic conservation and high resistance to proteolysis, predominantly synthesized in the liver in response to proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF. CRP may intervene in atherosclerosis by directly activating the complement system and inducing apoptosis, vascular cell activation, monocyte recruitment, lipid accumulation, and thrombosis, among other actions. Moreover, CRP can dissociate in peripheral tissue—including atheromatous plaques—from its native pentameric form into a monomeric form, which may also be synthesized de novo in extrahepatic sites. Each form exhibits distinct affinities for ligands and receptors, and exerts different effects in the progression of atherosclerosis. In view of epidemiologic evidence associating high CRP levels with cardiovascular risk—reflecting the biologic impact it bears on atherosclerosis—measurement of serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP has been proposed as a tool for assessment of cardiovascular risk. PMID:27433484

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle during exercise.

    PubMed

    Katz, Abram

    2016-06-01

    Glucose derived from extracellular sources serves as an energy source in virtually all eukaryotic cells, including skeletal muscle. Its contribution to energy turnover increases with exercise intensity up to moderately heavy workloads. However, at very high workloads, the contribution of extracellular glucose to energy turnover is negligible, despite the high rate of glucose transport. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the stimulation of glucose transport in isolated skeletal muscle preparations during intense repeated contractions. Consistent with this observation, heavy exercise is associated with significant production of ROS. However, during more mild to moderate stimulation or exercise conditions (in vitro, in situ and in vivo) antioxidants do not affect glucose transport. It is noteworthy that the production of ROS is limited or not observed under these conditions and that the concentration of the antioxidant used was extremely low. The results to date suggest that ROS involvement in activation of glucose transport occurs primarily during intense short-term exercise and that other mechanisms are involved during mild to moderate exercise. What remains puzzling is why ROS-mediated activation of glucose transport would occur under conditions where glucose transport is highest and utilization (i.e. phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase) is low. Possibly ROS production is involved in priming glucose transport during heavy exercise to accelerate glycogen biogenesis during the initial recovery period after exercise, as well as altering other aspects of intracellular metabolism.

  7. Fine tuning of reactive oxygen species homeostasis regulates primed immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Victoria; Luna, Estrella; Ton, Jurriaan; Cerezo, Miguel; García-Agustín, Pilar; Flors, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Selected stimuli can prime the plant immune system for a faster and stronger defense reaction to pathogen attack. Pretreatment of Arabidopsis with the chemical agent β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) augmented H2O2 and callose production after induction with the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) chitosan, or inoculation with the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. However, BABA failed to prime H2O2 and callose production after challenge with the bacterial PAMP Flg22. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutants in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (rbohD) or ROS scavenging (pad2, vtc1, and cat2) suggested a regulatory role for ROS homeostasis in priming of chitosan- and P. cucumerina-inducible callose and ROS. Moreover, rbohD and pad2 were both impaired in BABA-induced resistance against P. cucumerina. Gene expression analysis revealed direct induction of NADPH/respiratory burst oxidase protein D (RBOHD), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase 1 (GSH1), and vitamin C defective 1 (VTC1) genes after BABA treatment. Conversely, ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1) transcription was repressed by BABA after challenge with chitosan or P. cucumerina, probably to provide a more oxidized environment in the cell and facilitate augmented ROS accumulation. Measuring ratios between reduced and oxidized glutathione confirmed that augmented defense expression in primed plants is associated with a more oxidized cellular status. Together, our data indicate that an altered ROS equilibrium is required for augmented defense expression in primed plants.

  8. Lanthanum regulates the reactive oxygen species in the roots of rice seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongwu; Zheng, Shengnan; Wang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of La3+ on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant metabolism were studied in the roots of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Shengdao 16) exposed to increasing concentrations of La3+ (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM). The level of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and malondialdehyde was increased by 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM La3+, and the activity of catalase and peroxidase was increased by 0.05 and 0.1 mM La3+. However, La3+ treatments stimulated superoxide dismutase activity in the roots of rice seedlings at all tested concentrations. In addition, the probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA) was used to investigate the instantaneous change of ROS in the root cells with the laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The result indicated that ROS level was declined after treated with 0.05 mM La3+. The results showed that the appropriate concentration of La3+ decreased the level of ROS, and hormetic effects on the antioxidant metabolism were found in the roots of rice exposed to 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM La3+. PMID:27546334

  9. Role of reactive oxygen species in regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glucose derived from extracellular sources serves as an energy source in virtually all eukaryotic cells, including skeletal muscle. Its contribution to energy turnover increases with exercise intensity up to moderately heavy workloads. However, at very high workloads, the contribution of extracellular glucose to energy turnover is negligible, despite the high rate of glucose transport. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the stimulation of glucose transport in isolated skeletal muscle preparations during intense repeated contractions. Consistent with this observation, heavy exercise is associated with significant production of ROS. However, during more mild to moderate stimulation or exercise conditions (in vitro, in situ and in vivo) antioxidants do not affect glucose transport. It is noteworthy that the production of ROS is limited or not observed under these conditions and that the concentration of the antioxidant used was extremely low. The results to date suggest that ROS involvement in activation of glucose transport occurs primarily during intense short‐term exercise and that other mechanisms are involved during mild to moderate exercise. What remains puzzling is why ROS‐mediated activation of glucose transport would occur under conditions where glucose transport is highest and utilization (i.e. phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase) is low. Possibly ROS production is involved in priming glucose transport during heavy exercise to accelerate glycogen biogenesis during the initial recovery period after exercise, as well as altering other aspects of intracellular metabolism. PMID:26791627

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brain is a metabolically active organ exhibiting high oxygen consumption and robust production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The large amounts of ROS are kept in check by an elaborate network of antioxidants, which sometimes fail and lead to neuronal oxidative stress. Thus, ROS are typically categorized as neurotoxic molecules and typically exert their detrimental effects via oxidation of essential macromolecules such as enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. Most importantly, excessive ROS are associated with decreased performance in cognitive function. However, at physiological concentrations, ROS are involved in functional changes necessary for synaptic plasticity and hence, for normal cognitive function. The fine line of role reversal of ROS from good molecules to bad molecules is far from being fully understood. This review focuses on identifying the multiple sources of ROS in the mammalian nervous system and on presenting evidence for the critical and essential role of ROS in synaptic plasticity and memory. The review also shows that the inability to restrain either age- or pathology-related increases in ROS levels leads to opposite, detrimental effects that are involved in impairments in synaptic plasticity and memory function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2013–2054. PMID:20649473

  11. Design and analysis of a regulated peak-power tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, P.T.; Cho, B.H.

    1995-12-31

    Solar cells are known to be nonlinear, and there exists one operating point where the solar array produces maximum power. This nonlinear characteristic has resulted in many different power system configurations that make best use of the solar array. A regulated peak-power tracking (RPPT) system for space power application is proposed. Large-signal stability analysis is provided to understand the main four different modes of operations of the system, as well as the mode transitions. A simple and effective control scheme for the system is also proposed. Small-signal analysis is performed thereafter to provide design optimization, and the predictions are verified by computer simulations.

  12. PFKFB3-mediated glycolysis is involved in reactive astrocyte proliferation after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion and is regulated by Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Youyou; Zhang, Bo; Zhai, Chunchun; Qiu, Jin; Zhang, Yue; Yao, Wenlong; Zhang, Chuanhan

    2015-12-01

    Reactive astrocyte proliferation is involved in many central degenerative diseases. The enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase isoform 3 (PFKFB3), an allosteric activator of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK1), controls glycolytic flux. Furthermore, APC/C-Cdh1 plays a crucial role in brain metabolism by regulating PFKFB3 expression. Previous studies have defined the roles of PFKFB3-mediated glycolysis in pathological angiogenesis, cell autophagy, and amyloid plaque deposition in proliferating cells. However, the role of PFKFB3 in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia is unknown. In this study, we cultured rat primary cortical astrocytes and established an oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) model to mimic cerebral ischemia in vivo. Astrocyte proliferation was measured by western blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and by EdU incorporation. We found that OGD/R up-regulated PFKFB3 and PFK1 expression, which was accompanied by reactive astrocyte proliferation. Knockdown of PFKFB3 by siRNA transfection significantly inhibited reactive astrocyte proliferation and lactate release, an indicator of glycolysis. We found that PFKFB3 and PFK1 expression were down-regulated and lactate release was decreased when OGD/R-induced astrocyte proliferation was inhibited by a Cdh1-expressing lentivirus. Thus, reactive astrocyte proliferation can be effectively suppressed by down-regulation of PFKFB3 through control of glycolytic flux, which is downstream of APC/C-Cdh1.

  13. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  14. Reactive oxygen species regulate swelling-induced taurine efflux in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I H

    2003-03-01

    NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release taurine following exposure to hypotonic medium and to isotonic medium containing the lipase activator melittin. The swelling-induced taurine release is potentiated by H2O2, the calmodulin antagonist W7, and ATP, but inhibited by the antioxidant butulated hydroxytoluene (BHT), the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DI), and the iPLA2 inhibitor bromoenol lactone (BEL). The swelling-induced ROS production is also inhibited by BHT and BEL. H2O2 does not affect the volume set point for activation of the volume-sensitive taurine efflux. The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitor ETH 615-139 impairs the swelling-induced taurine efflux in the absence as well as in the presence of H2O2. The melittin-induced taurine release is, in analogy with the swelling-induced taurine release, potentiated by H2O2 and inhibited by BHT, DI, BEL, ETH 615-139 and anion channel blockers. Thus, swelling- and melittin-induced cell signalling and taurine release involve joint elements. The swelling-induced taurine efflux is potentiated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, and the potentiating effect of H2O2 and vanadate is impaired in the presence of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. It is suggested that (i) iPLA2 and 5-LO activity is required for the swelling-induced activation of taurine efflux from NIH3T3 cells, (ii) ROS are produced subsequent to the PLA2 activation by the NAD(P)H oxidase complex, and (iii) ROS inhibit a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) causing a potentiation of the swelling-induced taurine release.

  15. [ROLE α2-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS IN REGULATION PLATELET REACTIVITY IN THE ELDERLY AT CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PYELONEPHRITIS].

    PubMed

    Barinov, E F

    2016-01-01

    Objective of the research was to determine involvement of platelets and the role of adrenaline in chronic inflammation maintaining and the initiation of acute inflammatory response in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pyelonephritis against this background. The study includes 60 patients with chronic obstructive pyelonephritis (COPN), which are distributed into two groups: basic - 22 elderly patients (age 73±1,5 years) and the comparison group - 38 middle-aged patients (52,5±2,4 years). The study excluded patients who took antiplatelet drugs and non-selective blockers of α adrenergic receptors at least 1 week before the study. Analysis of platelets adrenoreactivity in vitro was carried out at the time of hospitalization before the start of conservative therapy. Platelet-rich plasma was isolated from peripheral blood by centrifuging. ADP and epinephrine were used in the effective (EC50) and sub-threshold (EC10) concentrations to stimulate platelets. The formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates was reproduced in vitro upon incubation of stimulated platelets (at a concentration of adrenaline EC50) and intact leukocytes isolated from patient peripheral blood. The study of platelet reactivity revealed that in elderly patients acute inflammatory response realization (relapse of COPN) is against optimal functioning of platelets α2 adrenergic receptors. Significant increase in the number of platelet-leukocyte aggregates is possible. Remission of COPN (the presence of chronic inflammation) in the examined patients of various ages was associated with platelet hypoadrenoreactivity. Increased platelet adrenoreactivity during transition from remission to relapse of COPN in the elderly patients is possible if adequate synthesis of ADP in platelets and its secretion from dense granules are preserved. The observed interaction of adrenaline and ADP with stimulated platelet hyporesponsiveness probably ensures adaptive response aimed at acute inflammatory response in

  16. Generation of reactive astrocytes from NG2 cells is regulated by sonic hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Honsa, Pavel; Valny, Martin; Kriska, Jan; Matuskova, Hana; Harantova, Lenka; Kirdajova, Denisa; Valihrach, Lukas; Androvic, Peter; Kubista, Mikael; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-09-01

    NG2 cells, a fourth glial cell type in the adult mammalian central nervous system, produce oligodendrocytes in the healthy nervous tissue, and display wide differentiation potential under pathological conditions, where they could give rise to reactive astrocytes. The factors that control the differentiation of NG2 cells after focal cerebral ischemia (FCI) are largely unknown. Here, we used transgenic Cspg4-cre/Esr1/ROSA26Sortm14(CAG-tdTomato) mice, in which tamoxifen administration triggers the expression of red fluorescent protein (tomato) specifically in NG2 cells and cells derived therefrom. Differentiation potential (in vitro and in vivo) of tomato-positive NG2 cells from control or postischemic brains was determined using the immunohistochemistry, single cell RT-qPCR and patch-clamp method. The ischemic injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of FCI. Using genetic fate-mapping method, we identified sonic hedgehog (Shh) as an important factor that influences differentiation of NG2 cells into astrocytes in vitro. We also manipulated Shh signaling in the adult mouse brain after FCI. Shh signaling activation significantly increased the number of astrocytes derived from NG2 cells in the glial scar around the ischemic lesion, while Shh signaling inhibition caused the opposite effect. Since Shh signaling modifications did not change the proliferation rate of NG2 cells, we can conclude that Shh has a direct influence on the differentiation of NG2 cells and therefore, on the formation and composition of a glial scar, which consequently affects the degree of the brain damage. GLIA 2016;64:1518-1531.

  17. Neutrophil NET formation is regulated from the inside by myeloperoxidase-processed reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Welin, Amanda; Michaëlsson, Erik; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Christenson, Karin; Sundqvist, Martina; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are mesh-like DNA fibers clad with intracellular proteins that are cast out from neutrophils in response to certain stimuli. The process is thought to depend on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the phagocyte NADPH-oxidase and the ROS-modulating granule enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO), but when, how, and where these factors contribute is so far uncertain. The neutrophil NADPH-oxidase can be activated at different cellular sites and ROS may be produced and processed by MPO within intracellular granules, even in situations where a phagosome is not formed, e.g., upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). We investigated the subcellular location of ROS production and processing by MPO in the context of PMA-induced NET formation. Complete neutralization of extracellular ROS was not sufficient to block NET formation triggered by PMA, indicating that intragranular ROS are critical for NETosis. Employing a set of novel MPO-inhibitors, inhibition of NET formation correlated with inhibition of intragranular MPO activity. Also, extracellular addition of MPO was not sufficient to rescue NET formation in completely MPO-deficient neutrophils and specific neutralization by luminol of MPO-processed ROS within intracellular granules led to a complete block of PMA-triggered NET formation. We show for the first time that inhibition of intragranular MPO activity, or neutralization of intragranular MPO-processed ROS by luminol effectively block NET formation. Our data demonstrate that ROS must be formed and processed by MPO in order to trigger NET formation, and that these events have to occur within intracellular granules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. TEMPO-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Regulation of Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchao; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Ying; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2017-10-04

    Controlling the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) shows a great potential in regenerative medicine. Because overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have an obvious inhibitory effect on the differentiation and functions of hMSCs, it is highly desirable to develop an effective strategy for ROS scavenging and stem cell differentiation controlling. In this study, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with an average size of 40 nm were conjugated with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) to endow them with ROS-scavenging capacity while holding the beneficial effect of Au NPs. The TEMPO-conjugated Au NPs (Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs) were used for the culture of hMSCs to investigate their effect on ROS scavenging, proliferation, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs had a negligible influence on cell viability and proliferation of hMSCs and could effectively reduce the ROS level of hMSCs under H2O2-exposed conditions because of their excellent cellular uptake. Similar to the counterparts without surface TEMPO modification (Au-mPEG NPs), the Au-PEG-TEMPO NPs could promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, whereas they could inhibit the adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The results indicated that the TEMPO-conjugated Au NPs had high scavenging capacity for overproduced ROS and maintained the promotive effect of Au NPs on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs without the inhibitory effect of free TEMPO. This study offers a promising strategy for ROS scavenging to control stem cell differentiation in stem cell transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  19. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Taylor A; Young, Martin E; Rubel, Carrie E; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J; Willis, Monte S

    2014-06-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1's role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1-/- mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased α-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose oxidation. However, total oxygen consumption was decreased [corrected]. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1-/- hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2's regulation of mitochondrial function.

  20. Novel Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination Sites Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species-dependent Degradation of Anti-apoptotic c-FLIP Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P.; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic protein c-FLIP (cellular Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme inhibitory protein) is an inhibitor of death receptor-mediated apoptosis that is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, contributing to apoptosis resistance. Several compounds found to restore sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, a TNF family death ligand with promising therapeutic potential, act by targeting c-FLIP ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in c-FLIP protein degradation. However, the mechanism by which ROS post-transcriptionally regulate c-FLIP protein levels is not well understood. We show here that treatment of prostate cancer PPC-1 cells with the superoxide generators menadione, paraquat, or buthionine sulfoximine down-regulates c-FLIP long (c-FLIPL) protein levels, which is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, pretreatment of PPC-1 cells with a ROS scavenger prevented ubiquitination and loss of c-FLIPL protein induced by menadione or paraquat. We identified lysine 167 as a novel ubiquitination site of c-FLIPL important for ROS-dependent degradation. We also identified threonine 166 as a novel phosphorylation site and demonstrate that Thr-166 phosphorylation is required for ROS-induced Lys-167 ubiquitination. The mutation of either Thr-166 or Lys-167 was sufficient to stabilize c-FLIP protein levels in PPC-1, HEK293T, and HeLa cancer cells treated with menadione or paraquat. Accordingly, expression of c-FLIP T166A or K167R mutants protected cells from ROS-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced cell death. Our findings reveal novel ROS-dependent post-translational modifications of the c-FLIP protein that regulate its stability, thus impacting sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL. PMID:23519470

  1. Novel phosphorylation and ubiquitination sites regulate reactive oxygen species-dependent degradation of anti-apoptotic c-FLIP protein.

    PubMed

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2013-05-03

    The cytosolic protein c-FLIP (cellular Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme inhibitory protein) is an inhibitor of death receptor-mediated apoptosis that is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, contributing to apoptosis resistance. Several compounds found to restore sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, a TNF family death ligand with promising therapeutic potential, act by targeting c-FLIP ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in c-FLIP protein degradation. However, the mechanism by which ROS post-transcriptionally regulate c-FLIP protein levels is not well understood. We show here that treatment of prostate cancer PPC-1 cells with the superoxide generators menadione, paraquat, or buthionine sulfoximine down-regulates c-FLIP long (c-FLIP(L)) protein levels, which is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, pretreatment of PPC-1 cells with a ROS scavenger prevented ubiquitination and loss of c-FLIP(L) protein induced by menadione or paraquat. We identified lysine 167 as a novel ubiquitination site of c-FLIP(L) important for ROS-dependent degradation. We also identified threonine 166 as a novel phosphorylation site and demonstrate that Thr-166 phosphorylation is required for ROS-induced Lys-167 ubiquitination. The mutation of either Thr-166 or Lys-167 was sufficient to stabilize c-FLIP protein levels in PPC-1, HEK293T, and HeLa cancer cells treated with menadione or paraquat. Accordingly, expression of c-FLIP T166A or K167R mutants protected cells from ROS-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced cell death. Our findings reveal novel ROS-dependent post-translational modifications of the c-FLIP protein that regulate its stability, thus impacting sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL.

  2. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Taylor A.; Young, Martin E.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2014-01-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1’s role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1−/− mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased alpha-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose or oleate oxidation; however, total oxygen consumption was decreased. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1−/− hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2’s regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:24733503

  3. Problems of standardizing and technical regulation in the electric power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabchak, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    A mandatory condition to ensure normal operation of a power system and efficiency in the sector is standardization and legal regulation of technological activities of electric power engineering entities and consumers. Compared to the times of USSR, the present-time technical guidance documents are not mandatory to follow in most cases, being of an advisory nature due to the lack of new ones. During the last five years, the industry has been showing a deterioration of the situation in terms of ensuring reliability and engineering controllability as a result of the dominant impact of short-term market stimuli and the differences in basic technological policies. In absence of clear requirements regarding the engineering aspects of such activities, production operation does not contribute to the preserving of technical integrity of the Russian power system, which leads to the loss of performance capability and controllability and causes disturbances in the power supply to consumers. The result of this problem is a high rate of accident incidence. The dynamics of accidents by the type of equipment is given, indicating a persisting trend of growth in the number of accidents, which are of a systematic nature. Several problematic aspects of engineering activities of electric power engineering entities, requiring standardization and legal regulation are pointed out: in the domestic power system, a large number of power electrotechnical and generating equipment operate along with systems of regulation, which do not comply with the principles and technical rules representing a framework where the Energy System of Russia is built and functioning

  4. Electric power: contemporary issues and the federal role in oversight and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-21

    Electric power will play an important role in the Nation's energy picture, but rapidly increasing fuel prices, lower growth rates, and difficulties in developing large powerplants have made it difficult for electric utilities to provide adequate supplies of power at prices the public is willing to pay. This report provides the Congress with a discussion of: important issues in electric power regulation and management, recent GAO reports on some of those issues, and questions and observations about power system planning and development which deserve Federal attention. It specifically highlights important electric power issues which transcend State, regional, and utility decisionmaking and identifies for the Congress significant areas which should be considered when making decisions affecting the electric power industry.

  5. [The significance of stress intensity for the emotional and visceral reactivity, especially for blood pressure regulation].

    PubMed

    Hecht, K; Hai, N V; Moritz, V; Hecht, T

    1976-01-01

    The influence of light, medium, and heavy chronic stress upon cerebro-visceral functions following 3 and 5 weeks of daily stress exposure was examined. The following results were obtained: Light stress produced no changes of cerebro-visceral functions. Medium stress restricted the learning and memory capacity, increased systolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar and adrenal weights. The B-cells of the pancreatic islets showed degranulations of varying intensity. Heavy stress diminished the learning and memory capacity, increased adrenal weights and led to hypergranulation of the pancreatic B-cells. Blood sugar and blood pressure values fall within physiological limits. Load tests, however, revealed in these animals symptoms of premorbid states. Since throughout the period of observation, light stress stablized the regulation processes, medium stress induced early stages of pathological processes, and heavy stress caused premorbid states, no linearity could be established between the load intensity and the changes of cerebro-visceral functions.

  6. Yap1-regulated glutathione redox system curtails accumulation of formaldehyde and reactive oxygen species in methanol metabolism of Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yano, Taisuke; Takigami, Emiko; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    The glutathione redox system, including the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione regeneration reaction, has been found to play a critical role in the yeast Pichia pastoris during growth on methanol, and this regulation was at least partly executed by the transcription factor PpYap1. During adaptation to methanol medium, PpYap1 transiently localized to the nucleus and activated the expression of the glutathione redox system and upregulated glutathione reductase 1 (Glr1). Glr1 activates the regeneration of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH). Depletion of Glr1 caused a severe growth defect on methanol and hypersensitivity to formaldehyde (HCHO), which could be complemented by addition of GSH to the medium. Disruption of the genes for the HCHO-oxidizing enzymes PpFld1 and PpFgh1 caused a comparable phenotype, but disruption of the downstream gene PpFDH1 did not, demonstrating the importance of maintaining intracellular GSH levels. Absence of the peroxisomal glutathione peroxidase Pmp20 also triggered nuclear localization of PpYap1, and although cells were not sensitive to HCHO, growth on methanol was again severely impaired due to oxidative stress. Thus, the PpYap1-regulated glutathione redox system has two important roles, i.e., HCHO metabolism and detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  7. Hyperosmotic stress-dependent NFkappaB activation is regulated by reactive oxygen species and IGF-1 in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Verónica; Criollo, Alfredo; Quiroga, Clara; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Santibañez, Juan Francisco; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Chiong, Mario; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Foncea, Rocío; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-08-07

    We have recently shown that hyperosmotic stress activates p65/RelB NFkappaB in cultured cardiomyocytes with dichotomic actions on caspase activation and cell death. It remains unexplored how NFkappaB is regulated in cultured rat cardiomyocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress. We study here: (a) if hyperosmotic stress triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and in turn whether they regulate NFkappaB and (b) if insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) modulates ROS production and NFkappaB activation in hyperosmotically-stressed cardiomyocytes. The results showed that hyperosmotic stress generated ROS in cultured cardiac myocytes, in particular the hydroxyl and superoxide species, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Hyperosmotic stress-induced NFkappaB activation as determined by IkappaBalpha degradation and NFkappaB DNA binding. NFkappaB activation and procaspase-3 and -9 fragmentation were prevented by NAC and IGF-1. However, this growth factor did not decrease ROS generation induced by hyperosmotic stress, suggesting that its actions over NFkappaB and caspase activation may be due to modulation of events downstream of ROS generation. We conclude that hyperosmotic stress induces ROS, which in turn activates NFkappaB and caspases. IGF-1 prevents NFkappaB activation by a ROS-independent mechanism.

  8. Anesthetic Propofol Reduces Endotoxic Inflammation by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species-regulated Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ming-Chung; Choi, Pui-Ching; Huang, Wei-Ching; Kai, Jui-In; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Chi-Yun; Chang, Yu-Ping; Chen, Yu-Hong; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Anesthetic propofol has immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the area of anti-inflammation. Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces inflammation through toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of propofol against LPS/TLR4-induced inflammatory activation in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Non-cytotoxic levels of propofol reduced LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO as determined by western blotting and the Griess reaction, respectively. Propofol also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Western blot analysis showed propofol inhibited LPS-induced activation and phosphorylation of IKKβ (Ser180) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB (Ser536); the subsequent nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 was also reduced. Additionally, propofol inhibited LPS-induced Akt activation and phosphorylation (Ser473) partly by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; inter-regulation that ROS regulated Akt followed by NF-κB activation was found to be crucial for LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. An in vivo study using C57BL/6 mice also demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties against LPS in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that propofol reduces LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/Akt/IKKβ/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21408125

  9. Emotion reactivity and regulation are associated with psychological functioning following the 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Sarah R; Fitzgerald, Erin J; Urry, Heather L

    2014-04-01

    Frequent and successful use of cognitive reappraisal, an emotion regulation strategy that involves rethinking the meaning of an emotional event in order to change one's emotional response, has been linked in everyday life to positive outcomes such as higher well-being. Whether we should expect this association to be maintained in a strong, temporally and spatially close emotional context is an unexplored question that might have important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation and its relations to psychological functioning. In this study of members of the U. S. Embassy Tokyo community in the months following the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis in Japan, self-reported use of cognitive reappraisal was not related to psychological functioning, but demonstrated success using cognitive reappraisal to decrease feelings of unpleasantness in response to disaster-related pictures on a performance-based task was associated with fewer symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress. Moreover, emotional reactivity to these pictures was associated with greater symptomatology. These results suggest that situational intensity may be an important moderator of reappraisal and psychological functioning relationships.

  10. Rho kinase acts as a downstream molecule to participate in protein kinase Cε regulation of vascular reactivity after hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhu, Yu; Zang, Jia-tao; Peng, Xiao-yong; Lan, Dan; Yang, Guang-ming; Xu, Jing; Liu, Liang-ming

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that Rho kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) played important parts in the regulation of vascular reactivity after shock. Using superior mesenteric arteries (SMAs) from hemorrhagic shock rats and hypoxia-treated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), relationship of PKCε regulation of vascular reactivity to Rho kinase, as well as the signal transduction after shock, was investigated. The results showed that inhibition of Rho kinase with the Rho kinase-specific inhibitor Y-27632 antagonized the PKCε-specific agonist carbachol and highly expressed PKCε-induced increase of vascular reactivity in SMAs and VSMCs, whereas inhibition of PKCε with its specific inhibitory peptide did not antagonize the Rho kinase agonist (U-46619)-induced increase of vascular reactivity in SMAs and VSMCs. Activation of PKCε or highly expressed PKCε upregulated the activity of Rho kinase and the phosphorylation of PKC-dependent phosphatase inhibitor 17 (CPI-17), zipper interacting protein kinase (ZIPK), and integrin-linked kinase (ILK), whereas activation of Rho kinase increased only CPI-17 phosphorylation. The specific neutralization antibodies of ZIPK and ILK antagonized PKCε-induced increases in the activity of Rho kinase, but CPI-17 neutralization antibody did not antagonize this effect. These results suggested that Rho kinase takes part in the regulation of PKCε on vascular reactivity after shock. Rho kinase is downstream of PKCε. Protein kinase Cε activates Rho kinase via ZIPK and ILK; CPI-17 is downstream of Rho kinase.

  11. Epithelial, Dendritic, and CD4+ T Cell Regulation of and by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Allergic Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Ckless, Karina; Hodgkins, Samantha R.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Martin, Rebecca; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    Background While many of the contributing cell types and mediators of allergic asthma are known, less well understood are the factors that induce allergy in the first place. Amongst the mediators speculated to affect initial allergen sensitization and the development of pathogenic allergic responses to innocuous inhaled antigens and allergens are exogenously- or endogenously-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Scope of Review The interactions between ROS/RNS, dendritic cells (DCs), and CD4+ T cells, as well as their modulation by lung epithelium, are of critical importance for the genesis of allergies that later manifest in allergic asthma. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on the initiation of pulmonary allergies and the role that ROS/RNS may play in the steps therein, using examples from our own work on the roles of NO2 exposure and airway epithelial NF-κB activation. Major Conclusions Endogenously-generated ROS/RNS and those encountered from environmental sources interact with epithelium, DCs, and CD4+ T cells to orchestrate allergic sensitization through modulation of the activities of each of these cell types, which quatitiatively and qualitatively dictate the degree and type of the allergic asthma phenotype. General Significance Knowledge of the effects of ROS/RNS at the molecular and cellular levels has the potential to provide powerful insight into the balance between inhalational tolerance (the typical immunologic response to an innocuous inhaled antigen) and allergy, as well as to potentially provide mechanistic targets for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21397661

  12. Child Maltreatment, Inflammation, and Internalizing Symptoms: Investigating the Roles of C-Reactive Protein, Gene Variation and Neuroendocrine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Dante; Handley, Elizabeth D.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent evidence regarding the association among childhood adversity, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms, perhaps because previous studies have yet to adequately integrate important factors such as the timing of the adversity, genetic variation, and other relevant processes such as neuroendocrine regulation. The aims of the present study were threefold: 1) Determine whether the effect of the timing of child maltreatment on C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, varies by CRP gene variation; 2) Explore whether links between salivary CRP and childhood internalizing symptoms depend on the presence and timing of maltreatment experiences; 3) Investigate the role of CRP in the relations between child neuroendocrine regulation and internalizing symptoms and examine whether these associations are moderated by the presence and timing of child maltreatment. Participants included a sample of 267 maltreated and 222 nonmaltreated children (M age= 9.72, SD=0.99; 52.4% male; 66% African-American) who attended a summer day camp research program designed for school-aged low-income children. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the onset and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. Results indicated that among children with recent onset maltreatment, those with at least one A allele from CRP SNP rs1417938 evidenced significantly higher CRP levels compared to recently maltreated children carrying the TT genotype. Moreover, higher levels of CRP were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms only for recently maltreated children. Finally, we did not find support for salivary CRP as a mechanism in the relation between neuroendocrine regulation and childhood internalizing symptoms. Our findings highlight the importance of the timing of child maltreatment and have important implications for characterizing variability in inflammation and internalizing symptoms among youth. PMID

  13. Child maltreatment, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms: Investigating the roles of C-reactive protein, gene variation, and neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A

    2015-05-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent evidence regarding the association among childhood adversity, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms, perhaps because previous studies have yet to adequately integrate important factors such as the timing of the adversity, genetic variation, and other relevant processes such as neuroendocrine regulation. The aims of the present study were threefold: (a) to determine whether the effect of the timing of child maltreatment on C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, varies by CRP gene variation; (b) to explore whether links between salivary CRP and childhood internalizing symptoms depend on the presence and timing of maltreatment experiences; and (c) to investigate the role of CRP in the relations between child neuroendocrine regulation and internalizing symptoms and examine whether these associations are moderated by the presence and timing of child maltreatment. Participants included a sample of 267 maltreated and 222 nonmaltreated children (M age = 9.72, SD = 0.99; 52.4% male; 66% African American) who attended a summer day camp research program designed for school-aged low-income children. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the onset and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. The results indicated that among children with recent onset maltreatment, those with at least one A allele from CRP single nucleotide polymorphism rs1417938 evidenced significantly higher CRP levels compared to recently maltreated children carrying the TT genotype. Moreover, higher levels of CRP were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms only for recently maltreated children. Finally, we did not find support for salivary CRP as a mechanism in the relation between neuroendocrine regulation and childhood internalizing symptoms. Our findings highlight the importance of the timing of child maltreatment and have important implications for characterizing variability in inflammation

  14. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. FLT3-regulated antigens as targets for leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brackertz, B; Conrad, H; Daniel, J; Kast, B; Krönig, H; Busch, D H; Adamski, J; Peschel, C; Bernhard, H

    2011-01-01

    The FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is highly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Internal tandem duplications (ITD) of the juxtamembrane domain lead to the constitutive activation of the FLT3 kinase inducing the activation of multiple genes, which may result in the expression of leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs). We analyzed the regulation of LAA in FLT3-wild-type (WT)- and FLT3-ITD+ myeloid cells to identify potential targets for antigen-specific immunotherapy for AML patients. Antigens, such as PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin, WT-1 and PRAME, were upregulated by constitutively active FLT3-ITD as well as FLT3-WT activated by FLT3 ligand (FL). Cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) clones against PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin and an AML-directed CTL clone recognized AML cell lines and primary AML blasts expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as FLT3-WT+ myeloid dendritic cells in the presence of FL. Downregulation of FLT3 led to the abolishment of CTL recognition. Comparing our findings concerning LAA upregulation by the FLT3 kinase with those already made for the Bcr-Abl kinase, we found analogies in the LAA expression pattern. Antigens upregulated by both FLT3 and Bcr-Abl may be promising targets for the development of immunotherapeutical approaches against myeloid leukemia of different origin. PMID:22829124

  16. FLT3-regulated antigens as targets for leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Brackertz, B; Conrad, H; Daniel, J; Kast, B; Krönig, H; Busch, D H; Adamski, J; Peschel, C; Bernhard, H

    2011-03-01

    The FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is highly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Internal tandem duplications (ITD) of the juxtamembrane domain lead to the constitutive activation of the FLT3 kinase inducing the activation of multiple genes, which may result in the expression of leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs). We analyzed the regulation of LAA in FLT3-wild-type (WT)- and FLT3-ITD(+) myeloid cells to identify potential targets for antigen-specific immunotherapy for AML patients. Antigens, such as PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin, WT-1 and PRAME, were upregulated by constitutively active FLT3-ITD as well as FLT3-WT activated by FLT3 ligand (FL). Cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) clones against PR-3, RHAMM, Survivin and an AML-directed CTL clone recognized AML cell lines and primary AML blasts expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as FLT3-WT(+) myeloid dendritic cells in the presence of FL. Downregulation of FLT3 led to the abolishment of CTL recognition. Comparing our findings concerning LAA upregulation by the FLT3 kinase with those already made for the Bcr-Abl kinase, we found analogies in the LAA expression pattern. Antigens upregulated by both FLT3 and Bcr-Abl may be promising targets for the development of immunotherapeutical approaches against myeloid leukemia of different origin.

  17. Reactive oxygen species regulate osteopontin expression in a murine model of postischemic neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Alicia N; Joseph, Giji; Fan, Aaron E; Weiss, Daiana; Landázuri, Natalia; Taylor, W Robert

    2012-06-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that neovascularization was impaired in osteopontin (OPN) knockout animals. However, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of OPN expression in the setting of ischemia remain undefined. Therefore, we sought to determine whether OPN is upregulated in response to ischemia and hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is a critical component of the signaling mechanism by which OPN expression is upregulated in response to ischemia in vivo. To determine whether ischemic injury upregulates OPN, we used a murine model of hindlimb ischemia. Femoral artery ligation in C57BL/6 mice significantly increased OPN expression and H(2)O(2) production. Infusion of C57BL/6 mice with polyethylene glycol-catalase (10 000 U/kg per day) or the use of transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell-specific catalase overexpression blunted ischemia-induced OPN, suggesting ischemia-induced OPN expression is H(2)O(2)-dependent. Decreased H(2)O(2)-mediated OPN blunted reperfusion and collateral formation in vivo. In contrast, the overexpression of OPN using lentivirus restored neovascularization. Scavenging H(2)O(2) blocks ischemia-induced OPN expression, providing evidence that ischemia-induced OPN expression is H(2)O(2) dependent. Decreased OPN expression impaired neovascularization, whereas overexpression of OPN increased angiogenesis, supporting our hypothesis that OPN is a critical mediator of postischemic neovascularization and a potential novel therapeutic target for inducing new vessel growth.

  18. Central tolerance regulates B cells reactive with Goodpasture antigen alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Susan C.; Hecox, Douglas B.; Brady, Graham F.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Clark, Amy G.; Foster, Mary H.

    2008-01-01

    Patients and rodents with Goodpasture’s syndrome (GPS) develop severe autoimmune crescentic glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, and lung hemorrhage due to binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. Target epitopes are cryptic, normally hidden from circulating antibodies by protein-protein interactions and the highly tissue-restricted expression of the alpha3(IV) collagen chain. Based on this limited antigen exposure, it has been suggested that target epitopes are not available as B cell tolerogens. To determine how pathogenic anti-GPS autoantibody responses are regulated, we generated an immunoglobulin (Ig) transgenic (Tg) mouse model that expresses an Ig that binds alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen epitopes recognized by serum IgG of patients with GPS. Phenotypic analysis reveals B cell depletion and light chain editing in Tg mice. To determine the default tolerance phenotype in the absence of receptor editing and endogenous lymphocyte populations, we crossed Tg mice two generations with mice deficient in recombinase activating gene (Rag). Resulting Tg Rag-deficient mice have central B cell deletion. Thus development of Tg anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells is halted in the bone marrow, at which point the cells are deleted unless rescued by a Rag enzyme-dependent process, such as editing. The central tolerance phenotype implies that tolerizing self antigen is expressed in bone marrow. PMID:18941198

  19. Central tolerance regulates B cells reactive with Goodpasture antigen alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Susan C; Hecox, Douglas B; Brady, Graham F; Mackin, Katherine M; Clark, Amy G; Foster, Mary H

    2008-11-01

    Patients and rodents with Goodpasture's syndrome (GPS) develop severe autoimmune crescentic glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, and lung hemorrhage due to binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. Target epitopes are cryptic, normally hidden from circulating Abs by protein-protein interactions and the highly tissue-restricted expression of the alpha3(IV) collagen chain. Based on this limited Ag exposure, it has been suggested that target epitopes are not available as B cell tolerogens. To determine how pathogenic anti-GPS autoantibody responses are regulated, we generated an Ig transgenic (Tg) mouse model that expresses an Ig that binds alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen epitopes recognized by serum IgG of patients with GPS. Phenotypic analysis reveals B cell depletion and L chain editing in Tg mice. To determine the default tolerance phenotype in the absence of receptor editing and endogenous lymphocyte populations, we crossed Tg mice two generations with mice deficient in Rag. Resulting Tg Rag-deficient mice have central B cell deletion. Thus, development of Tg anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells is halted in the bone marrow, at which point the cells are deleted unless rescued by a Rag enzyme-dependent process, such as editing. The central tolerance phenotype implies that tolerizing self-Ag is expressed in bone marrow.

  20. Early Activation of STAT3 Regulates Reactive Astrogliosis Induced by Diverse Forms of Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, James P.; Kelly, Kimberly A.; VanGilder, Reyna L.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Miller, Diane B.

    2014-01-01

    Astrogliosis, a cellular response characterized by astrocytic hypertrophy and accumulation of GFAP, is a hallmark of all types of central nervous system (CNS) injuries. Potential signaling mechanisms driving the conversion of astrocytes into “reactive” phenotypes differ with respect to the injury models employed and can be complicated by factors such as disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). As denervation tools, neurotoxicants have the advantage of selective targeting of brain regions and cell types, often with sparing of the BBB. Previously, we found that neuroinflammation and activation of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway in astrocytes precedes up regulation of GFAP in the MPTP mouse model of dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Here we show that multiple mechanistically distinct mouse models of neurotoxicity (MPTP, AMP, METH, MDA, MDMA, KA, TMT) engender the same neuroinflammatory and STAT3 activation responses in specific regions of the brain targeted by each neurotoxicant. The STAT3 effects seen for TMT in the mouse could be generalized to the rat, demonstrating cross-species validity for STAT3 activation. Pharmacological antagonists of the neurotoxic effects blocked neuroinflammatory responses, pSTAT3tyr705 and GFAP induction, indicating that damage to neuronal targets instigated astrogliosis. Selective deletion of STAT3 from astrocytes in STAT3 conditional knockout mice markedly attenuated MPTP-induced astrogliosis. Monitoring STAT3 translocation in GFAP-positive cells indicated that effects of MPTP, METH and KA on pSTAT3tyr705 were localized to astrocytes. These findings strongly implicate the STAT3 pathway in astrocytes as a broadly triggered signaling pathway for astrogliosis. We also observed, however, that the acute neuroinflammatory response to the known inflammogen, LPS, can activate STAT3 in CNS tissue without inducing classical signs of astrogliosis. Thus, acute phase neuroinflammatory responses and neurotoxicity-induced astrogliosis both signal through

  1. Process- and optoelectronic-control of NiOx thin films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keraudy, Julien; Delfour-Peyrethon, Brice; Ferrec, Axel; Garcia Molleja, Javier; Richard-Plouet, Mireille; Payen, Christophe; Hamon, Jonathan; Corraze, Benoît; Goullet, Antoine; Jouan, Pierre-Yves

    2017-05-01

    In this contribution, based on the analyses of the discharge behavior as well as final properties of the deposited Ni-O films during reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge, we have demonstrated that monitoring the oxygen flow rate leads to 4 different regimes of discharge. Tuning the oxygen partial pressure allows deposition of a large range of chemical compositions from pure nickel to nickel-deficient NiOx (x > 1) in the poisoned mode. Investigation of the plasma dynamics by time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy suggests that the discharge behavior in the poisoned mode principally comes from the higher contribution of both oxygen and argon ions in the total ionic current, leading to a change in the ion induced secondary electron emission coefficient. Additionally, material characterizations have revealed that optoelectronic properties of NiOx films can be easily tuned by adjusting the O/Ni ratio, which is influenced by the change of the oxygen flow rate. Stoichiometric NiO films (O/Ni ratio ˜ 1) are transparent in the visible range with a transmittance ˜80% and insulating as expected with an electrical resistivity ˜106 Ω cm. On the other hand, increasing the O/Ni > 1 leads to the deposition of more conductive coating (ρ ˜ 10 Ω cm) films with a lower transmittance ˜ 50%. These optoelectronic evolutions are accompanied by a band-gap narrowing 3.65 to 3.37 eV originating from the introduction of acceptor states between the Fermi level and the valence band maximum. In addition, our analysis has demonstrated that nickel vacancies are homogeneously distributed over the film thickness, explaining the p-type of the films.

  2. Commitment to autogamy in Paramecium blocks mating reactivity: implications for regulation of the sexual pathway and the breeding system.

    PubMed

    Berger, J D; Rahemtullah, S

    1990-03-01

    Commitment to autogamy blocks mating reactivity in Paramecium. Cells which had previously developed mating reactivity, lost reactivity 30-90 min prior to the preautogamous fission. Mating reactivity develops at a standard level of starvation when cells are allowed to exhaust their food supply naturally. In abruptly starved cultures, mating reactivity appears 3.3 h after downshift. Autogamy is also triggered by starvation. The level of starvation required for initiation of autogamy decreases progressively as cells age. When the autogamy starvation threshold drops to such a low level that all cells become committed to autogamy before any of them develop mating reactivity, reactivity does not occur under natural starvation conditions and the period of maturity for conjugation has come to an end. There is no absolute immature period for autogamy.

  3. Small size transformer provides high power regulation with low ripple and maximum control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoli, R.; Ulrich, B. R.

    1971-01-01

    Single, variable, transformer/choke device does work of several. Technique reduces drawer assembly physical size and design and manufacturing cost. Device provides power, voltage current and impedance regulation while maintaining maximum control of linearity and ensuring extremely low ripple. Nulling is controlled to very fine degree.

  4. A new system architecture improves output power regulation in electrosurgical generators.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Daniel A; Erickson, Robert W; Gilbert, James

    2011-01-01

    A new system architecture for electrosurgical generators inherently produces the ideal electrosurgical output characteristic with near-deadbeat control. Compared to existing technology, this converter significantly improves power regulation, leading to improved surgical outcomes by minimizing thermal spread and tissue charring.

  5. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  6. Distributed Cooperative Regulation for Multiagent Systems and Its Applications to Power Systems: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaping; Yong, Taiyou; Yu, Jie; Mao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative regulation of multiagent systems has become an active research area in the past decade. This paper reviews some recent progress in distributed coordination control for leader-following multiagent systems and its applications in power system and mainly focuses on the cooperative tracking control in terms of consensus tracking control and containment tracking control. Next, methods on how to rank the network nodes are summarized for undirected/directed network, based on which one can determine which follower should be connected to leaders such that partial followers can perceive leaders' information. Furthermore, we present a survey of the most relevant scientific studies investigating the regulation and optimization problems in power systems based on distributed strategies. Finally, some potential applications in the frequency tracking regulation of smart grids are discussed at the end of the paper. PMID:25243199

  7. Distributed cooperative regulation for multiagent systems and its applications to power systems: a survey.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianqiang; Li, Yaping; Yong, Taiyou; Cao, Jinde; Yu, Jie; Mao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative regulation of multiagent systems has become an active research area in the past decade. This paper reviews some recent progress in distributed coordination control for leader-following multiagent systems and its applications in power system and mainly focuses on the cooperative tracking control in terms of consensus tracking control and containment tracking control. Next, methods on how to rank the network nodes are summarized for undirected/directed network, based on which one can determine which follower should be connected to leaders such that partial followers can perceive leaders' information. Furthermore, we present a survey of the most relevant scientific studies investigating the regulation and optimization problems in power systems based on distributed strategies. Finally, some potential applications in the frequency tracking regulation of smart grids are discussed at the end of the paper.

  8. Application of simultaneous active and reactive power modulation of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit to damp turbine-generator subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chijui; Lee, Yuangshung )

    1993-03-01

    An active and reactive power (P-Q) simultaneous control scheme which is based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is designed to damp out the subsynchronous resonant (SSR) oscillations of a turbine-generator unit. In order to suppress unstable torsional mode oscillations, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is employed to modulate the active and reactive power input/output of the SMES unit according to speed deviation of the generator shaft. The gains of the proposed PID controller are determined by pole assignment approach based on modal control theory. Eigenvalue analysis of the studied system shows that the PID controller is quite effective over a wide range of operating conditions. Dynamic simulations using the nonlinear system model are also performed to demonstrate the damping effect of the proposed control scheme under disturbance conditions.

  9. The global regulator ArcA controls resistance to reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sangwei; Killoran, Patrick B; Fang, Ferric C; Riley, Lee W

    2002-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne diseases associated with consumption of shell eggs. Clinical isolates of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis exhibit a wide spectrum of virulence in mice. A highly virulent isolate (SE2472) was previously shown to be more resistant in vitro than other clinical isolates to acidified sodium nitrite (ASN), a generator of reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates (RNI/ROI). SE2472 is also more resistant to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than an ASN-susceptible isolate of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE8743). To investigate the molecular basis for the RNI/ROI resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, we transformed a genomic DNA library of SE2472 into SE8743. A plasmid clone conferred upon SE8743 enhanced resistance to ASN, GSNO, and H(2)O(2). The DNA insert in the clone encoded ArcA, a global regulator. An arcA mutant of SE2472 was constructed and was found to be more susceptible to GSNO and hydrogen peroxide but not more susceptible to ASN than wild-type SE2472. The susceptibility of the arcA mutant to GSNO and H(2)O(2) was complemented by a plasmid harboring arcA. The coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE2472 and the coding sequence of the arcA gene in SE8743 were identical, suggesting that the difference in resistance to RNI/ROI maybe due to the activity of genes regulated by ArcA. No significant difference in virulence between the wild type and the arcA mutant of SE2472 was observed in mice. These observations show that arcA is essential for resistance of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis to nitrosative and oxidative stress. However, additional genetic loci may contribute to the resistance to RNI/ROI and unusually high virulence for mice of SE2472.

  10. β-Cell Uncoupling Protein 2 Regulates Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Which Influences Both Insulin and Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Robson-Doucette, Christine A.; Sultan, Sobia; Allister, Emma M.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Koshkin, Vasilij; Bhatacharjee, Alpana; Prentice, Kacey J.; Sereda, Samuel B.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) in pancreatic β-cells is highly debated, partly because of the broad tissue distribution of UCP2 and thus limitations of whole-body UCP2 knockout mouse models. To investigate the function of UCP2 in the β-cell, β-cell–specific UCP2 knockout mice (UCP2BKO) were generated and characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS UCP2BKO mice were generated by crossing loxUCP2 mice with mice expressing rat insulin promoter-driven Cre recombinase. Several in vitro and in vivo parameters were measured, including respiration rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, islet ATP content, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), glucagon secretion, glucose and insulin tolerance, and plasma hormone levels. RESULTS UCP2BKO β-cells displayed mildly increased glucose-induced mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization but unchanged rates of uncoupled respiration and islet ATP content. UCP2BKO islets had elevated intracellular ROS levels that associated with enhanced GSIS. Surprisingly, UCP2BKO mice were glucose-intolerant, showing greater α-cell area, higher islet glucagon content, and aberrant ROS-dependent glucagon secretion under high glucose conditions. CONCLUSIONS Using a novel β-cell–specific UCP2KO mouse model, we have shed light on UCP2 function in primary β-cells. UCP2 does not behave as a classical metabolic uncoupler in the β-cell, but has a more prominent role in the regulation of intracellular ROS levels that contribute to GSIS amplification. In addition, β-cell UCP2 contributes to the regulation of intraislet ROS signals that mediate changes in α-cell morphology and glucagon secretion. PMID:21984579

  11. Myeloid cell-derived reactive oxygen species externally regulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors in emergency granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Peng; Bajrami, Besnik; Xu, Yuanfu; Park, Shin-Young; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; Mondal, Subhanjan; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Haiyan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cellular mechanisms controlling infection-induced emergency granulopoiesis are poorly defined. Here we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in the bone marrow (BM) were elevated during acute infection in a phagocytic NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in myeloid cells. Gr1+ myeloid cells were uniformly distributed in the BM, and all c-Kit+ progenitor cells were adjacent to Gr1+ myeloid cells. Inflammation-induced ROS production in the BM played a critical role in myeloid progenitor expansion during emergency granulopoiesis. ROS elicited oxidation and deactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in up-regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in BM myeloid progenitors. We further revealed that BM myeloid cell-produced ROS stimulated proliferation of myeloid progenitors via a paracrine mechanism. Taken together, our results establish that phagocytic NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production by BM myeloid cells plays a critical role in mediating emergency granulopoiesis during acute infection. PMID:25579427

  12. Allicin attenuates H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity in retinal pigmented epithelial cells by regulating the levels of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tu, Gerile; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Wei, Wei; Li, Langen; Zhang, Yanmei; Yang, Jia; Xing, Yiqiao

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) oxidative stress is known to have a vital role in the etiology of age‑related macular degeneration (AMD). The present study aimed to investigate whether allicin, a natural product with antioxidant activity, was able to protect RPEs (ARPE‑19) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced damage, and to determine the underlying mechanisms. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine cellular viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a ROS Assay kit. The results demonstrated that allicin was able to protect ARPE‑19 cells from H2O2‑induced damage in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, allicin attenuated oxidative stress by reducing the levels of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), and enhancing the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio. With regards to the underlying mechanism, allicin was able to markedly modulate the expression levels of ROS‑associated enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, NADPH oxidase 4 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, and elevate the activity of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 in the H2O2‑stimulated ARPE‑19 cells. These results suggested that allicin may exert protective effects against H2O2‑induced cytotoxicity in RPEs via ROS regulation.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates mercury toxicity by sequestering it in roots or regulating reactive oxygen species productions in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Moshun; Jiang, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Soil mercury (Hg) contamination is a major factor that affects agricultural yield and food security. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays multifunctional roles in mediating a variety of responses to abiotic stresses. The effects of exogenous H2S on rice (Oryza sativa var 'Nipponbare') growth and metabolism under mercuric chloride (HgCl2) stress were investigated in this study. Either 100 or 200 μM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a donor of H2S) pretreatment improved the transcription of bZIP60, a membrane-associated transcription factor, and then enhanced the expressions of non-protein thiols (NPT) and metallothioneins (OsMT-1) to sequester Hg in roots and thus inhibit Hg transport to shoots. Meanwhile, H2S promoted seedlings growth significantly even in the presences of Hg and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) or catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT). H2S might act as an antioxidant to inhibit or scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions for maintaining the lower MDA and H2O2 levels, and thereby preventing oxidative damages. All these results indicated H2S effectively alleviated Hg toxicity by sequestering it in roots or by regulating ROS in seedlings and then thus significantly promoted rice growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Role in Regulating a Fungus–Perennial Ryegrass Mutualistic Interaction[W

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Aiko; Christensen, Michael J.; Takemoto, Daigo; Park, Pyoyun; Scott, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Although much is known about the signals and mechanisms that lead to pathogenic interactions between plants and fungi, comparatively little is known about fungus–plant mutualistic symbioses. We describe a novel role for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in regulating the mutualistic interaction between a clavicipitaceous fungal endophyte, Epichloë festucae, and its grass host, Lolium perenne. In wild-type associations, E. festucae grows systemically in intercellular spaces of leaves as infrequently branched hyphae parallel to the leaf axis. A screen to identify symbiotic genes isolated a fungal mutant that altered the interaction from mutualistic to antagonistic. This mutant has a single-copy plasmid insertion in the coding region of a NADPH oxidase gene, noxA. Plants infected with the noxA mutant lose apical dominance, become severely stunted, show precocious senescence, and eventually die. The fungal biomass in these associations is increased dramatically, with hyphae showing increased vacuolation. Deletion of a second NADPH oxidase gene, noxB, had no effect on the E. festucae–perennial ryegrass symbiosis. ROS accumulation was detected cytochemically in the endophyte extracellular matrix and at the interface between the extracellular matrix and host cell walls of meristematic tissue in wild-type but not in noxA mutant associations. These results demonstrate that fungal ROS production is critical in maintaining a mutualistic fungus–plant interaction. PMID:16517760

  15. Potential role of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant genes in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Huan, Chen; Jiang, Li; An, Xiujuan; Yu, Mingliang; Xu, Yin; Ma, Ruijuan; Yu, Zhifang

    2016-07-01

    The roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as both toxic by-products and as signaling molecules have been reported in fruit development and ripening. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) play important roles in balancing the induction and removal of ROS in plants, and are respectively encoded by families of closely homologous genes. In the present study, we investigated the roles of ROS and the above-mentioned antioxidant genes during the development and ripening of peach fruit. The experimental results indicated that O2(-) and H2O2 acted as potential signaling molecules in the middle stage of fruit development, and only H2O2 might function as a main toxic molecule to stimulate lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in the late stage of fruit ripening. PpaCu/Zn-SODs were the most abundant members in the PpaSOD gene family and they expressed steadily in peach fruit development and ripening. Low temperature (4 °C) postponed and suppressed the climacteric peaks of respiration and ethylene, significantly enhanced the activities of CAT and GPX, and up-regulated the expression of PpaCAT1 and PpaGPX6 in the late stage of fruit ripening. PpaCAT1 and PpaGPX6 were two key genes in alleviating oxidative stress in the late stage of fruit ripening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporal-Spatial Interaction between Reactive Oxygen Species and Abscisic Acid Regulates Rapid Systemic Acclimation in Plants[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Miller, Gad; Salazar, Carolina; Mondal, Hossain A.; Shulaev, Elena; Cortes, Diego F.; Shuman, Joel L.; Luo, Xiaozhong; Shah, Jyoti; Schlauch, Karen; Shulaev, Vladimir; Mittler, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Being sessile organisms, plants evolved sophisticated acclimation mechanisms to cope with abiotic challenges in their environment. These are activated at the initial site of exposure to stress, as well as in systemic tissues that have not been subjected to stress (termed systemic acquired acclimation [SAA]). Although SAA is thought to play a key role in plant survival during stress, little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying it. Here, we report that SAA in plants requires at least two different signals: an autopropagating wave of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that rapidly spreads from the initial site of exposure to the entire plant and a stress-specific signal that conveys abiotic stress specificity. We further demonstrate that SAA is stress specific and that a temporal–spatial interaction between ROS and abscisic acid regulates rapid SAA to heat stress in plants. In addition, we demonstrate that the rapid ROS signal is associated with the propagation of electric signals in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings unravel some of the basic signaling mechanisms underlying SAA in plants and reveal that signaling events and transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming of systemic tissues in response to abiotic stress occur at a much faster rate than previously envisioned. PMID:24038652

  17. MLK3 is part of a feedback mechanism that regulates different cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Hwang, Chae Young; Shin, Sung-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-06-03

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence diverse cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. Both endogenous and exogenous ROS activate signaling through mitogen-activated proteins kinase (MAPK) pathways, including those involving extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) or c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). Whereas low concentrations of ROS generally stimulate proliferation, high concentrations result in cell death. We found that low concentrations of ROS induced activating phosphorylation of ERKs, whereas high concentrations of ROS induced activating phosphorylation of JNKs. Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3, also known as MAP3K11) directly phosphorylates JNKs and may control activation of ERKs. Mathematical modeling of MAPK networks revealed a positive feedback loop involving MLK3 that determined the relative phosphorylation of ERKs and JNKs by ROS. Cells exposed to an MLK3 inhibitor or cells in which MLK3 was knocked down showed increased activation of ERKs and decreased activation of JNKs and were resistant to cell death when exposed to high concentrations of ROS. Thus, the data indicated that MLK3 is a critical factor controlling the activity of kinase networks that control the cellular responses to different concentrations of ROS.

  18. Global regulation of reactive oxygen species scavenging genes in alfalfa root and shoot under gradual drought stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Udvardi, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging in plants under drought stress have been studied intensively in recent years. Here we report a global analysis of gene expression for the major ROS generating and scavenging proteins in alfalfa root and shoot under gradual drought stress followed by one-day recovery. Data from two alfalfa varieties, one drought tolerant and one drought sensitive, were compared and no qualitative differences in ROS gene regulation between the two were found. Conserved, tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in response to drought were observed for several ROS-scavenging gene families, including ascorbate peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and peroxiredoxin. In addition, differential gene expression within families was observed. Genes for the ROS-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase were generally induced under drought, while those for glycolate oxidase were repressed. Among the ROS-scavenging protein genes, Ferritin, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the majority of the glutathione peroxidase family members were induced under drought in both roots and shoots of both alfalfa varieties. In contrast, Fe-SOD, CC-type glutaredoxins, and thoiredoxins were downregulated.

  19. 76 FR 67259 - Frequency Regulation Compensation in the Organized Wholesale Power Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...Pursuant to section 206 of the Federal Power Act, the Commission is revising its regulations to remedy undue discrimination in the procurement of frequency regulation in the organized wholesale electric markets and ensure that providers of frequency regulation receive just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential rates. Frequency regulation service is one of the tools regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs) use to balance supply and demand on the transmission system, maintaining reliable operations. In doing so, RTOs and ISOs deploy a variety of resources to meet frequency regulation needs; these resources differ in both their ramping ability, which is their ability to increase or decrease their provision of frequency regulation service, and the accuracy with which they can respond to the system operator's dispatch signal. The Commission finds that current frequency regulation compensation practices of RTOs and ISOs result in rates that are unjust, unreasonable, and unduly discriminatory or preferential. Specifically, current compensation methods for regulation service in RTO and ISO markets fail to acknowledge the inherently greater amount of frequency regulation service being provided by faster-ramping resources. In addition, certain practices of some RTOs and ISOs result in economically inefficient economic dispatch of frequency regulation resources. By remedying these issues, the Commission is removing unduly discriminatory and preferential practices from RTO and ISO tariffs and requiring the setting of just and reasonable rates. Specifically, this Final Rule requires RTOs and ISOs to compensate frequency regulation resources based on the actual service provided, including a capacity payment that includes the marginal unit's opportunity costs and a payment for performance that reflects the quantity of frequency regulation service provided by a resource when the resource is accurately following

  20. Active power control of solar PV generation for large interconnection frequency regulation and oscillation damping

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Zhu, Lin; Zhan, Lingwei; Gracia, Jose R.; King, Thomas Jr.; Liu, Yilu

    2015-06-23

    Because of zero greenhouse gas emission and decreased manufacture cost, solar photovoltaic (PV) generation is expected to account for a significant portion of future power grid generation portfolio. Because it is indirectly connected to the power grid via power electronic devices, solar PV generation system is fully decoupled from the power grid, which will influence the interconnected power grid dynamic characteristics as a result. In this study, the impact of solar PV penetration on large interconnected power system frequency response and inter-area oscillation is evaluated, taking the United States Eastern Interconnection (EI) as an example. Furthermore, based on the constructed solar PV electrical control model with additional active power control loops, the potential contributions of solar PV generation to power system frequency regulation and oscillation damping are examined. The advantages of solar PV frequency support over that of wind generator are also discussed. Finally, simulation results demonstrate that solar PV generations can effectively work as ‘actuators’ in alleviating the negative impacts they bring about.

  1. Active power control of solar PV generation for large interconnection frequency regulation and oscillation damping

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yong; Zhu, Lin; Zhan, Lingwei; ...

    2015-06-23

    Because of zero greenhouse gas emission and decreased manufacture cost, solar photovoltaic (PV) generation is expected to account for a significant portion of future power grid generation portfolio. Because it is indirectly connected to the power grid via power electronic devices, solar PV generation system is fully decoupled from the power grid, which will influence the interconnected power grid dynamic characteristics as a result. In this study, the impact of solar PV penetration on large interconnected power system frequency response and inter-area oscillation is evaluated, taking the United States Eastern Interconnection (EI) as an example. Furthermore, based on the constructedmore » solar PV electrical control model with additional active power control loops, the potential contributions of solar PV generation to power system frequency regulation and oscillation damping are examined. The advantages of solar PV frequency support over that of wind generator are also discussed. Finally, simulation results demonstrate that solar PV generations can effectively work as ‘actuators’ in alleviating the negative impacts they bring about.« less

  2. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I. Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-15

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  3. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  4. Mothers' depressive symptoms predict both increased and reduced negative reactivity: aversion sensitivity and the regulation of emotion.

    PubMed

    Dix, Theodore; Moed, Anat; Anderson, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether, as mothers' depressive symptoms increase, their expressions of negative emotion to children increasingly reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to minimize ongoing stress or discomfort. In multiple interactions over 2 years, negative affect expressed by 319 mothers and their children was observed across variations in mothers' depressive symptoms, the aversiveness of children's immediate behavior, and observed differences in children's general negative reactivity. As expected, depressive symptoms predicted reduced maternal negative reactivity when child behavior was low in aversiveness, particularly with children who were high in negative reactivity. Depressive symptoms predicted high negative reactivity and steep increases in negative reactivity as the aversiveness of child behavior increased, particularly when high and continued aversiveness from the child was expected (i.e., children were high in negative reactivity). The findings are consistent with the proposal that deficits in parenting competence as depressive symptoms increase reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to avoid conflict and suppress children's aversive behavior.

  5. Modelling the effect of temperament on BMI through appetite reactivity and self-regulation in eating: a Structural Equation Modelling approach in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, V; Trinchera, L; Romo, L; Rigal, N

    2016-04-01

    Appetitive traits and general temperament traits have both been correlated with adiposity and obesity in children. However, very few studies have tested structural models to identify the links between temperament, appetitive traits and adiposity in children. A validated structural model would help suggesting mechanisms to explain the impact of temperament on body mass index (BMI). In this study, we used Rothbart's heuristic definition of temperament as a starting point to define four appetitive traits, including two appetite reactivity dimensions (Appetite Arousal and Appetite Persistence) and two dimensions of self-regulation in eating (Self-regulation In Eating Without Hunger and Self-regulation in Eating Speed). We conducted a cross-sectional study in young adolescents to validate a structural model including these four appetitive traits, Effortful Control (a general temperament trait) and adiposity. A questionnaire assessing the four appetitive trait dimensions and Effortful Control was completed by adolescents from 10 to 14 years old (n=475), and their BMI-for-age was calculated (n=441). In total, 74% of the study participants were normal weight, 26% were overweight and 8% were obese. We then used structural equation modelling to test the structural model. We identified a well-fitting structural model (Comparative Fit Index=0.91; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation=0.04) that supports the hypothesis that Effortful Control impacts both dimensions of self-regulation in eating, which in turn are linked with both appetite reactivity dimensions. Moreover, Appetite Persistence is the only appetitive trait that was significantly related to adiposity (B=0.12; P<0.05). Our model shows that Effortful Control is related to adiposity through the mediation of an individual's 'eating temperament' (appetite reactivity and self-regulation in eating). Results suggest that young adolescents who exhibit high appetite reactivity but a low level of self-regulation in eating

  6. Lightweight Battery Charge Regulator Used to Track Solar Array Peak Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Button, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    A battery charge regulator based on the series-connected boost regulator (SCBR) technology has been developed for high-voltage spacecraft applications. The SCBR regulates the solar array power during insolation to prevent battery overcharge or undercharge conditions. It can also be used to provide regulated battery output voltage to spacecraft loads if necessary. This technology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. The high-voltage SCBR shown in the photograph has demonstrated power densities of over 1000 watts per kilogram (W/kg). Using four 150-W dc-dc converter modules, it can process 2500 W of power at 120 Vdc with a minimum input voltage of 90 Vdc. Efficiency of the SCBR was 94 to 98 percent over the entire operational range. Internally, the unit is made of two separate SCBR s, each with its own analog control circuitry, to demonstrate the modularity of the technology. The analog controllers regulate the output current and incorporate the output voltage limit with active current sharing between the two units. They also include voltage and current telemetry, on/off control, and baseplate temperature sensors. For peak power tracking, the SCBR was connected to a LabView-based data acquisition system for telemetry and control. A digital control algorithm for tracking the peak power point of a solar array was developed using the principle of matching the source impedance with the load impedance for maximum energy transfer. The algorithm was successfully demonstrated in a simulated spacecraft electrical system at the Boeing PhantomWorks High Voltage Test Facility in Seattle, Washington. The system consists of a 42-string, high-voltage solar array simulator, a 77-cell, 80-ampere-hour (A-hr) nickel-hydrogen battery, and a constant power-load module. The SCBR and the LabView control algorithm successfully tracked the solar array peak

  7. Lightweight Battery Charge Regulator Used to Track Solar Array Peak Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.; Button, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    A battery charge regulator based on the series-connected boost regulator (SCBR) technology has been developed for high-voltage spacecraft applications. The SCBR regulates the solar array power during insolation to prevent battery overcharge or undercharge conditions. It can also be used to provide regulated battery output voltage to spacecraft loads if necessary. This technology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. The high-voltage SCBR shown in the photograph has demonstrated power densities of over 1000 watts per kilogram (W/kg). Using four 150-W dc-dc converter modules, it can process 2500 W of power at 120 Vdc with a minimum input voltage of 90 Vdc. Efficiency of the SCBR was 94 to 98 percent over the entire operational range. Internally, the unit is made of two separate SCBR s, each with its own analog control circuitry, to demonstrate the modularity of the technology. The analog controllers regulate the output current and incorporate the output voltage limit with active current sharing between the two units. They also include voltage and current telemetry, on/off control, and baseplate temperature sensors. For peak power tracking, the SCBR was connected to a LabView-based data acquisition system for telemetry and control. A digital control algorithm for tracking the peak power point of a solar array was developed using the principle of matching the source impedance with the load impedance for maximum energy transfer. The algorithm was successfully demonstrated in a simulated spacecraft electrical system at the Boeing PhantomWorks High Voltage Test Facility in Seattle, Washington. The system consists of a 42-string, high-voltage solar array simulator, a 77-cell, 80-ampere-hour (A-hr) nickel-hydrogen battery, and a constant power-load module. The SCBR and the LabView control algorithm successfully tracked the solar array peak

  8. Regulation of type I interferon responses by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agod, Zsofia; Fekete, Tünde; Budai, Marietta M; Varga, Aliz; Szabo, Attila; Moon, Hyelim; Boldogh, Istvan; Biro, Tamas; Lanyi, Arpad; Bacsi, Attila; Pazmandi, Kitti

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generated continuously under physiological conditions have recently emerged as critical players in the regulation of immune signaling pathways. In this study we have investigated the regulation of antiviral signaling by increased mtROS production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which, as major producers of type I interferons (IFN), are the key coordinators of antiviral immunity. The early phase of type I IFN production in pDCs is mediated by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs), whereas the late phase of IFN response can also be triggered by cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), expression of which is induced upon TLR stimulation. Therefore, pDCs provide an ideal model to study the impact of elevated mtROS on the antiviral signaling pathways initiated by receptors with distinct subcellular localization. We found that elevated level of mtROS alone did not change the phenotype and the baseline cytokine profile of resting pDCs. Nevertheless increased mtROS levels in pDCs lowered the TLR9-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators slightly, whereas reduced type I IFN production markedly via blocking phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the key transcription factor of the TLR9 signaling pathway. The TLR9-induced expression of RIG-I in pDCs was also negatively regulated by enhanced mtROS production. On the contrary, elevated mtROS significantly augmented the RIG-I-stimulated expression of type I IFNs, as well as the expression of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling (MAVS) protein and the phosphorylation of Akt and IRF3 that are essential components of RIG-I signaling. Collectively, our data suggest that increased mtROS exert diverse immunoregulatory functions in pDCs both in the early and late phase of type I IFN responses depending on which type of viral sensing pathway is stimulated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Resveratrol regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species homeostasis through Sirt3 signaling pathway in human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X; Chen, M; Zeng, X; Yang, J; Deng, H; Yi, L; Mi, M-t

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) homeostasis plays an essential role in preventing oxidative injury in endothelial cells, an initial step in atherogenesis. Resveratrol (RSV) possesses a variety of cardioprotective activities, however, little is known regarding the effects of RSV on mtROS homeostasis in endothelial cells. Sirt3 is a mitochondrial deacetylase, which plays a key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics and is closely associated with oxidative stress. The goal of the study is to investigate whether RSV could attenuate oxidative injury in endothelial cells via mtROS homeostasis regulation through Sirt3 signaling pathway. We found that pretreatment with RSV suppressed tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by increasing cell viability, inhibiting cell apoptosis, repressing collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreasing mtROS generation. Moreover, the enzymatic activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) as well as deacetylation of SOD2 were increased by RSV pretreatment, suggesting RSV notably enhanced mtROS scavenging in t-BHP-induced endothelial cells. Meanwhile, RSV remarkably reduced mtROS generation by promoting Sirt3 enrichment within the mitochondria and subsequent upregulation of forkhead box O3A (FoxO3A)-mediated mitochondria-encoded gene expression of ATP6, CO1, Cytb, ND2 and ND5, thereby leading to increased complex I activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, RSV activated the expressions of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and Sirt3, as well as estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα)-dependent Sirt3 mRNA transcription, which were abolished in the presence of AMPK inhibitor and AMPK, PGC-1α or Sirt3 siRNA transfection, indicating the effects of RSV on mt

  10. Gibberellin-regulated protein in Japanese apricot is an allergen cross-reactive to Pru p 7.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Naoko; Miyakawa, Mami; Aihara, Michiko

    2017-07-06

    Gibberellin-regulated protein (GRP, also known as peamaclein) was recently identified as a new marker allergen related to systemic reactions in peach allergy; however, its role in other fruit allergies is unknown. To investigate the allergenicity of Japanese apricot (JA) GRP and clarify the clinical characteristics of JA allergy patients with GRP sensitization. Seven patients (two males, five females, mean age 28.0 years) diagnosed with JA allergy based on relevant clinical history, positive skin test and/or challenge test were enrolled. JA GRP with a molecular weight of 6896.5 Da was purified by ion-exchange column chromatography. We performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), IgE-immunoblotting, basophil activating tests (BATs), and skin prick tests (SPTs) with purified JA GRP. To investigate the cross-reactivity between JA GRP and native Pru p 7 (nPru p 7), we performed ELISA inhibition tests. We measured specific IgE levels against apricot, peach, rPru p 1, rPru p 3, and rPru p 4 using ImmunoCAP. ELISA and IgE-immunoblotting using JA GRP showed positive reactions in six (85.7%) and seven (100%) patients, respectively. Five patients who provided informed consent for BATs and SPTs using JA GRP had positive results. In four patients who underwent ELISA inhibition tests using JA GRP and nPru p 7, IgE binding to one GRP inhibited binding to the other. The positivity for specific IgE against apricot, peach, rPru p 1, rPru p 3, and rPru p 4 was 14.3%, 57.1%, 0%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. Patients developed allergic reactions that were frequently accompanied with facial swelling, especially of the eyelids, which was dependent on cofactors, such as exercise. These results indicated that GRP might be a causative allergen of JA allergy, whose onset frequently requires a cofactor, such as exercise, and might be cross-reactive between JAs and peaches. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television...

  12. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television...

  13. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television...

  14. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television...

  15. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television...

  16. Efficiency and Regulation of Commercial Low Power DC/DC Converter Modules at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power systems of future NASA deep space missions. Design of these converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance, and reduce development and launch costs. At the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronics Laboratory, several commercial off-the-shelf dc/dc converter modules were evaluated for their low temperature performance. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature, in the range of 20 C to -190 C. Data pertaining to the efficiency and voltage regulation of the tested converters is presented and discussed.

  17. High voltage solar cell power generating system for regulated solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kw), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500 watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 per cent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  18. Soft-stall control versus furling control for small wind turbine power regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E; Forsyth, T; Butterfield, C P

    1998-07-01

    Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall control method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reducing furling noise, and reduced thrust.

  19. Soft-Stall Control versus Furling Control for Small Wind Turbine Power Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C. P.

    1998-07-01

    Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reduced furling noise, and reduced thrust.

  20. Calculation and comparison of xenon and samarium reactivities of the HEU, LEU core in the low power research reactor.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-07-01

    Comparative studies for the conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) have been performed using the MCNP4C and GETERA codes. The precise calculations of (135)Xe and (149)Sm concentrations and reactivities were carried out and compared during the MNSR operation time and after shutdown for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) in this paper using the MCNP4C and GETERA codes. It was found that the (135)Xe and (149)Sm reactivities did not reach their equilibrium reactivities during the daily operating time of the reactor. The (149)Sm reactivities could be neglected compared to (135)Xe reactivities during the reactor operating time and after shutdown. The calculations for the UAl4-Al produced the highest (135)Xe reactivity in all the studied fuel group during the reactor operation (0.39 mk) and after the reactor shutdown (0.735 mk), It followed by U3Si-Al (0.34 mk, 0.653 mk), U3Si2-Al (0.33 mk, 0.634 mk), U9Mo-Al (0.3 mk, 0.568 mk) and UO2 (0.24 mk, 0.448 mk) fuels, respectively. Finally, the results showed that the UO2 was the best candidate for fuel conversion to LEU in the MNSR since it gave the lowest (135)Xe reactivity during the reactor operation and after shutdown.

  1. Economic and safety analysis of unconventional peak regulation on power unit of peak shifting start-stop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Zhao, J. F.; Duan, X. Q.; Jin, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    Tthe capacity difference of peak regulation between the power gird and the actual demand has become a serious problem considering the growth in the difference between electricity supply and demand. Therefore, peak regulation of power grid needs to be deeply studied. Unconventional peak regulation on unit of peak shifting start-stop is a way that can broaden the range of power regulation, as well as benefit safe operation of the power grid. However, it requires frequent and fast unit start-stop, complex operation, and more staff labor. By carrying out unconventional thermal power unit load test, the start-stop mode of peak auxiliary equipment is studied in this paper, indicating that it has a positive effect on safety and economic of load-peaking operation. The best working conditions of the peak units is found by analysing consumption cost, safety specifications, and life lost of the start-stop peak regulation mode.

  2. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Coordinately Regulate the Germination of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Urediniospores

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shuining; Gao, Zhijuan; Wang, Chenfang; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng; Zhang, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signaling molecules in a number of critical signal transduction pathways in plants, including plant biotic interactions. In addition to the role of plant-derived NO and ROS in plant resistance, which has been well documented, pathogen-produced NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players in fungal development and pathogenesis. However, the effects of pathogenic fungi-derived NO and ROS on signaling pathways during fungal pre-infection development remain unknown. Here, using a combination of pharmacological approaches and confocal microscopy, we investigated the roles of NO and ROS during the germination of Puccinia striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici (Pst) the wheat stripe rust pathogen. Both NO and ROS have a crucial role in uredinial germination. The scavengers of NO and ROS delayed spore germination and decreased the lengths of germ tubes. A similar phenotype was produced after treatment with the promoter. However, the spores germinated and grew normally when the levels of NO and ROS were simultaneously elevated by the application of a promoter of NO and a donor of ROS. Confocal laser microscopy indicated that both NO and ROS preferentially localized at the germ pores and apexes of growing germ tubes when the ROS/NO ratio in the spores was maintained in a specific range. We concluded that both NO and ROS are critical signaling molecules in the pre-infection development of Pst and that the polar growth of the germ tube is coordinately regulated by NO and ROS. PMID:26941716

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal, Migration and Development, As Well As Their Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Aya; Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Golan, Karin; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Itkin, Tomer; Medaglia, Chiara; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Ledergor, Guy; Kollet, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Blood forming, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) mostly reside in the bone marrow in a quiescent, nonmotile state via adhesion interactions with stromal cells and macrophages. Quiescent, proliferating, and differentiating stem cells have different metabolism, and accordingly different amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, ROS is not just a byproduct of metabolism, but also plays a role in stem cell state and function. Recent Advances: ROS levels are dynamic and reversibly dictate enhanced cycling and myeloid bias in ROShigh short-term repopulating stem cells, and ROSlow quiescent long-term repopulating stem cells. Low levels of ROS, regulated by intrinsic factors such as cell respiration or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity, or extrinsic factors such as stem cell factor or prostaglandin E2 are required for maintaining stem cell self-renewal. High ROS levels, due to stress and inflammation, induce stem cell differentiation and enhanced motility. Critical Issues: Stem cells need to be protected from high ROS levels to avoid stem cell exhaustion, insufficient host immunity, and leukemic transformation that may occur during chronic inflammation. However, continuous low ROS production will lead to lack of stem cell function and opportunistic infections. Ultimately, balanced ROS levels are crucial for maintaining the small stem cell pool and host immunity, both in homeostasis and during stress situations. Future Directions: Deciphering the signaling pathway of ROS in HSC will provide a better understanding of ROS roles in switching HSC from quiescence to activation and vice versa, and will also shed light on the possible roles of ROS in leukemia initiation and development. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1605–1619. PMID:24762207

  4. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K; Zheng, Yi

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively.

  5. NTRC and chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species regulate Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato disease development in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Ishiga, Takako; Wangdi, Tamding; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Coronatine (COR)-producing pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, including pvs. tomato, maculicola, and glycinea, cause important diseases on tomato, crucifers, and soybean, respectively, and produce symptoms with necrotic lesions surrounded by chlorosis. The chlorosis is mainly attributed to COR. However, the significance of COR-induced chlorosis in localized lesion development and the molecular basis of disease-associated cell death is largely unknown. To identify host (chloroplast) genes that play a role in COR-mediated chlorosis, we used a forward genetics approach using Nicotiana benthamiana and virus-induced gene silencing and identified a gene which encodes 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prxs) that, when silenced, produced a spreading hypersensitive or necrosis-like phenotype instead of chlorosis after COR application in a COI1-dependent manner. Loss-of-function analysis of Prx and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), the central players of a chloroplast redox detoxification system, resulted in spreading accelerated P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 disease-associated cell death with enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in a COR-dependent manner in tomato and Arabidopsis. Consistent with these results, virulent strain DC3000 suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in Arabidopsis and tomato during pathogenesis. However, interestingly, authentic COR suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in tomato but not in Arabidopsis, suggesting that COR in conjunction with other effectors may modulate ROS and cell death in different host species. Taken together, these results indicated that NTRC or Prx function as a negative regulator of pathogen-induced cell death in the healthy tissues that surround the lesions, and COR-induced chloroplast-localized ROS play a role in enhancing the disease-associated cell death.

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6 is a novel regulator of reactive oxygen species-dependent megakaryocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, S; Miluzio, A; Brina, D; Clarke, K; Bonomo, M; Aiolfi, R; Guidotti, L G; Falciani, F; Biffo, S

    2015-11-01

    Ribosomopathies constitute a class of inherited disorders characterized by defects in ribosome biogenesis and function. Classically, bone marrow (BM) failure is a clinical symptom shared between these syndromes, including Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS). Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6) is a critical translation factor that rescues the quasilethal effect of the loss of the SBDS protein. To determine whether eIF6 activity is necessary for BM development. We used eIF6(+/-) mice and primary BM megakaryocytes to investigate the involvement of eIF6 in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We provide evidence that reduced eIF6 expression negatively impacts on megakaryopoiesis. We show that inhibition of eIF6 leads to a reduction in cell size and mean ploidy level of megakaryocytes and a delay in megakaryocyte maturation by blocking the G1 /S transition. Consistent with this phenotype, only few megakaryocyte-forming proplatelets were found in eIF6(+/-) cells. We also discovered that, in eIF6(+/-) cells, the steady-state abundance of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I-encoding mRNAs is decreased, resulting in decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Intriguingly, connectivity map analysis showed that eIF6-mediated changes overlap with specific translational inhibitors. eIF6 is a translation factor acting downstream of insulin/phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. PMA treatment significantly restored eIF6(+/-) megakaryocyte maturation, indicating that activation of eIF6 is essential for the rescue of the phenotype. Taken together, our results show a role for eIF6-driven translation in megakaryocyte development, and unveil the novel connection between translational control and ROS production in this cell subset. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively. PMID:27681226

  8. Proteinase activated receptor-2-mediated dual oxidase-2 up-regulation is involved in enhanced airway reactivity and inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Alharbi, Naif O; Vliagoftis, Harissios; Tyagi, Manoj; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M

    2015-07-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) express a variety of receptors, which sense danger signals from various aeroallergens/pathogens being inhaled constantly. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is one such receptor and is activated by cockroach allergens, which have intrinsic serine proteinase activity. Recently, dual oxidases (DUOX), especially DUOX-2, have been shown to be involved in airway inflammation in response to Toll-like receptor activation. However, the association between PAR-2 and DUOX-2 has not been explored in airways of allergic mice. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of DUOX-2/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling in airway reactivity and inflammation after PAR-2 activation. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with intact cockroach allergen extract (CE) in the presence of aluminium hydroxide followed by intranasal challenge with CE. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, oxidative stress (DUOX-2, ROS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrite, nitrotyrosine and protein carbonyls) and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3). Challenge with CE led to up-regulation of DUOX-2 and ROS in AECs with concomitant increases in airway reactivity/inflammation and parameters of oxidative stress, and apoptosis. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by intranasal administration of ENMD-1068, a small molecule antagonist of PAR-2 in allergic mice. Administration of diphenyliodonium to allergic mice also led to improvement of allergic airway responses via inhibition of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway; however, these effects were less pronounced than PAR-2 antagonism. The current study suggests that PAR-2 activation leads to up-regulation of the DUOX-2/ROS pathway in AECs, which is involved in regulation of airway reactivity and inflammation via oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  9. Applying and adapting the Swedish regulatory system for decommissioning to nuclear power reactors - The regulator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Amft, Martin; Leisvik, Mathias; Carroll, Simon

    2017-03-16

    Half of the original 13 Swedish nuclear power reactors will be shut down by 2020. The decommissioning of these reactors is a challenge for all parties involved, including the licensees, the waste management system, the financing system, and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). This paper presents an overview of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It describes some of the experiences that SSM has gained from the application of these regulations. The focus of the present paper is on administrative aspects of decommissioning, such as SSM's guidelines, the definition of fundamental concepts in the regulatory framework, and a proposed revision of the licensing process according to the Environmental Act. These improvements will help to streamline the administration of the commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning projects that are anticipated to commence in Sweden in the near future.

  10. Power spectra and cooperativity of a calcium-regulated cation channel.

    PubMed

    McGeoch, M W; McGeoch, J E

    1994-01-01

    In this article we show that a channel complex of cooperatively interacting subunits can produce a power law spectrum with the slope of the spectrum depending on the strength of the cooperative interaction. The effects of cooperativity are explored via a computational model of a calcium-regulated cation channel for which new data is presented. The results, which concern "flickering" conductances, are correlated with prior work on critical fluctuations in the Ising model of ferromagnetism.

  11. Large lead/acid batteries for frequency regulation, load levelling and solar power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.

    Lead/acid batteries are suitable for a multitude of utility applications. This paper presents some examples where large lead/acid batteries have been used for frequency regulation, load levelling and solar power applications. The operational experiences are given together with a discussion about the design and technical specialities of these batteries. In 1986, a 17 MW/14 MWh battery was installed at BEWAG in Berlin which, at that time, was the largest lead/acid battery in the world. Designed to strengthen Berlin's 'island' system, it was used since the beginning of 1987 for frequency regulation and spinning reserve. In December 1993, when Berlin was connected to the electricity grid, frequency regulation was no longer required but the battery was still used for spinning reserve. For many years, the industrial battery plant of Hagen in Soest has used a large lead/acid battery for load levelling. The experience gained during more than ten years shows that load levelling and peak shaving can be a marked benefit for customers and utilities with regard to reducing their peak demand. In the summer of 1992, a 216 V and 2200 Ah lead/acid battery with positive tubular plates and gelled electrolyte was installed at a solar power plant in Flanitzhutte, a small village in the south of Germany which is not connected to the electricity grid. A report is given of the first years of use and includes a discussion about the best charge strategy for such gel batteries when used for solar power applications.

  12. Trends in the use of digital technology for control and regulation of power supplies.

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.; Lenkszus, F.

    1999-10-22

    Since the availability of computers, accelerator power supplies have relied on digital technology in some way, from such simple tasks as turning the supplies on and off to the supplying of computer-controlled references. However, advances in digital technology, both in performance and cost, allow considerably more than simple control and monitoring. This, coupled with increasing demand for higher performance and monitoring capabilities, has made it appealing to integrate such technology into power supply designs. This paper will review current trends in the use of such advanced technology as embedded DSP controllers, and the application of real-time algorithms to the regulation and control of power supplies for accelerators and other large-scale physics applications.

  13. Vulnerability of US thermoelectric power generation to climate change when incorporating state-level environmental regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad; Li, Hongyi; Forman, Barton; Zhang, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    Previous modelling studies suggest that thermoelectric power generation is vulnerable to climate change, whereas studies based on historical data suggest the impact will be less severe. Here we explore the vulnerability of thermoelectric power generation in the United States to climate change by coupling an Earth system model with a thermoelectric power generation model, including state-level representation of environmental regulations on thermal effluents. We find that the impact of climate change is lower than in previous modelling estimates due to an inclusion of a spatially disaggregated representation of environmental regulations and provisional variances that temporarily relieve power plants from permit requirements. More specifically, our results indicate that climate change alone may reduce average generating capacity by 2-3% by the 2060s, while reductions of up to 12% are expected if environmental requirements are enforced without waivers for thermal variation. Our work highlights the significance of accounting for legal constructs and underscores the effects of provisional variances in addition to environmental requirements.

  14. 25 CFR 518.12 - Which investigative or enforcement powers of the Commission are inapplicable to self-regulating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Commission are inapplicable to self-regulating tribes? 518.12 Section 518.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS SELF-REGULATION OF CLASS II GAMING § 518.12 Which... time in which a tribe has a certificate of self-regulation, the powers of the Commission, as set...

  15. Technology diffusion and environmental regulation: Evidence from electric power plants under the Clean Air Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Elaine F.

    Even though environmental policy can greatly affect the path of technology diffusion, the economics literature contains limited empirical evidence of this relationship. My research will contribute to the available evidence by providing insight into the technology adoption decisions of electric generating firms. Since policies are often evaluated based on the incentives they provide to promote adoption of new technologies, it is important that policy makers understand the relationship between technological diffusion and regulation structure to make informed decisions. Lessons learned from this study can be used to guide future policies such as those directed to mitigate climate change. I first explore the diffusion of scrubbers, a sulfur dioxide (SO 2) abatement technology, in response to federal market-based regulations and state command-and-control regulations. I develop a simple theoretical model to describe the adoption decisions of scrubbers and use a survival model to empirically test the theoretical model. I find that power plants with strict command-and-control regulations have a high probability of installing a scrubber. These findings suggest that although market-based regulations have encouraged diffusion, many scrubbers have been installed because of state regulatory pressure. Although tradable permit systems are thought to give firms more flexibility in choosing abatement technologies, I show that interactions between a permit system and pre-existing command-and-control regulations can limit that flexibility. In a separate analysis, I explore the diffusion of combined cycle (CC) generating units, which are natural gas-fired generating units that are cleaner and more efficient than alternative generating units. I model the decision to consider adoption of a CC generating unit and the extent to which the technology is adopted in response to environmental regulations imposed on new sources of pollutants. To accomplish this, I use a zero-inflated Poisson

  16. Automatic system for regulating the frequency and power of the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units at the Reftinskaya GRES

    SciTech Connect

    Bilenko, V. A.; Gal'perina, A. I.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'skii, D. Yu.; Zhugrin, A. G.; Bebenin, P. A.; Syrchin, M. V.

    2009-03-15

    The monitoring and control systems at the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units No. 7, 8, and 9 at the Reftinskaya GRES have been modernized using information-regulator systems. Layouts for instrumental construction of these systems and expanded algorithmic schemes for the automatic frequency and power control system and for the boiler supply and fuelling are discussed. Results from tests and normal operation of the automatic frequency and power control system are presented.

  17. Coordination and decision making of regulation, operation, and market activities in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Tomoaki

    Electric power has been traditionally supplied to customers at regulated rates by vertically integrated utilities (VIUs), which own generation, transmission, and distribution systems. However, the regulatory authorities of VIUs are promoting competition in their businesses to lower the price of electric energy. Consequently, in new deregulated circumstances, many suppliers and marketers compete in the generation market, and conflict of interest may often occur over transmission. Therefore, a neutral entity, called an independent system operator (ISO), which operates the power system independently, has been established to give market participants nondiscriminatory access to transmission sectors with a natural monopoly, and to facilitate competition in generation sectors. Several types of ISOs are established at present, with their respective regions and authorities. The ISO receives many requests from market participants to transfer power, and must evaluate the feasibility of their requests under the system's condition. In the near future, regulatory authorities may impose various objectives on the ISOs. Then, based on the regulators' policies, the ISO must determine the optimal schedules from feasible solutions, or change the market participants' requests. In a newly developed power market, market participants will conduct their transactions in order to maximize their profit. The most crucial information in conducting power transactions is price and demand. A direct transaction between suppliers and consumers may become attractive because of its stability of price, while in a power exchange market, gaming and speculation of participants may push up electricity prices considerably. To assist the consumers in making effective decisions, suitable methods for forecasting volatile market price are necessary. This research has been approached from three viewpoints: Firstly, from the system operator's point of view, desirable system operation and power market structure

  18. Harnessing Evolutionary Toxins for Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species, Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in Plant Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, John T.

    2017-01-01

    During the early periods of evolution, as well as in niche environments today, organisms have had to learn to tolerate the presence of many reactive compounds, such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide. It is now known that such compounds are instrumental in the signaling processes in plant cells. There are enzymes which can make them, while downstream of their signaling pathways are coming to light. These include the production of cGMP, the activation of MAP kinases and transcription factors, and the modification of thiol groups on many proteins. However, organisms have also had to tolerate other reactive compounds such as ammonia, methane, and hydrogen gas, and these too are being found to have profound effects on signaling in cells. Before a holistic view of how such signaling works, the full effects and interactions of all such reactive compounds needs to be embraced. A full understanding will be beneficial to both agriculture and future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28239389

  19. Treatment with A2A receptor antagonist KW6002 and caffeine intake regulate microglia reactivity and protect retina against transient ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Elvas, Filipe; Madeira, Maria H; Aires, Inês D; Rodrigues-Neves, Ana C; Tralhão, Pedro; Szabó, Eszter C; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Tomé, Ângelo R; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ambrósio, António F; Santiago, Ana R

    2017-10-05

    Transient retinal ischemia is a major complication of retinal degenerative diseases and contributes to visual impairment and blindness. Evidences indicate that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has a key role in the neurodegenerative process, prompting the hypothesis that the control of microglia reactivity may afford neuroprotection to the retina against the damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). The available therapeutic strategies for retinal degenerative diseases have limited potential, but the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) emerges as candidate strategy. Therefore, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a selective A2AR antagonist (KW6002) against the damage elicited by I-R. The administration of KW6002 after I-R injury reduced microglia reactivity and inflammatory response and afforded protection to the retina. Moreover, we tested the ability of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in mediating protection to the retina in the I-R injury model. We demonstrated that caffeine administration dually regulated microglia reactivity and cell death in the transient retinal ischemic model, depending on the reperfusion time. At 24 h of reperfusion, caffeine increased microglial reactivity, inflammatory response and cell death elicited by I-R. However, at 7 days of reperfusion, caffeine administration decreased microglia reactivity and reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cell death. Together, these results provide a novel evidence for the use of adenosine A2AR antagonists as potential therapy for retinal ischemic diseases and demonstrate the effect of caffeine on the regulation of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the transient ischemic model.

  20. Pleiotrophin-induced endothelial cell migration is regulated by xanthine oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsirmoula, Sotiria; Lamprou, Margarita; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Kieffer, Nelly; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2015-03-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor that induces cell migration through binding to its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) and integrin alpha v beta 3 (ανβ3). In the present work, we studied the effect of PTN on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human endothelial cells and the involvement of ROS in PTN-induced cell migration. Exogenous PTN significantly increased ROS levels in a concentration and time-dependent manner in both human endothelial and prostate cancer cells, while knockdown of endogenous PTN expression in prostate cancer cells significantly down-regulated ROS production. Suppression of RPTPβ/ζ through genetic and pharmacological approaches, or inhibition of c-src kinase activity abolished PTN-induced ROS generation. A synthetic peptide that blocks PTN-ανβ3 interaction abolished PTN-induced ROS generation, suggesting that ανβ3 is also involved. The latter was confirmed in CHO cells that do not express β3 or over-express wild-type β3 or mutant β3Y773F/Y785F. PTN increased ROS generation in cells expressing wild-type β3 but not in cells not expressing or expressing mutant β3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or Erk1/2 inhibition suppressed PTN-induced ROS production, suggesting that ROS production lays down-stream of PI3K or Erk1/2 activation by PTN. Finally, ROS scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibition completely abolished both PTN-induced ROS generation and cell migration, while NADPH oxidase inhibition had no effect. Collectively, these data suggest that xanthine oxidase-mediated ROS production is required for PTN-induced cell migration through the cell membrane functional complex of ανβ3 and RPTPβ/ζ and activation of c-src, PI3K and ERK1/2 kinases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aging Enhances Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Up-Regulating Classical Activation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection is central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 mo) and aged (14–15 mo) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in macrophage recruitment into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to LPS. Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in proteins linked to immune cell pathways under both basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways up-regulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins are dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice. Collectively these results indicate that macrophages isolated from

  2. A Method for Compensating Customer Voltage Drops due to Nighttime Simultaneous Charging of EVs Utilizing Reactive Power Injection from Battery Chargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Taku; Kabasawa, Yuichiro; Fukushima, Kentaro; Nemoto, Koshichi; Uemura, Satoshi

    When we consider the global warming, the reduction of CO2 emission is one of the most important problems which require urgent solutions. One option is to integrate low-CO2-emission generators to the grid as much as possible. Another option is to replace inefficient vehicles based on internal-combustion engines with electric ones (EVs). Due to the latter, we can easily estimate that most consumers will charge EVs' batteries at nighttime. Thus, excessive voltage drops due to the nighttime simultaneous charging are supposed to be a possible future problem. This paper proposes a method for compensating the voltage drops by injecting reactive power from EV battery chargers.

  3. Committing to coal and gas: Long-term contracts, regulation, and fuel switching in power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Michael

    Fuel switching in the electricity sector has important economic and environmental consequences. In the United States, the increased supply of gas during the last decade has led to substantial switching in the short term. Fuel switching is constrained, however, by the existing infrastructure. The power generation infrastructure, in turn, represents commitments to specific sources of energy over the long term. This dissertation explores fuel contracts as the link between short-term price response and long-term plant investments. Contracting choices enable power plant investments that are relationship-specific, often regulated, and face uncertainty. Many power plants are subject to both hold-up in investment and cost-of-service regulation. I find that capital bias is robust when considering either irreversibility or hold-up due to the uncertain arrival of an outside option. For sunk capital, the rental rate is inappropriate for determining capital bias. Instead, capital bias depends on the regulated rate of return, discount rate, and depreciation schedule. If policies such as emissions regulations increase fuel-switching flexibility, this can lead to capital bias. Cost-of-service regulation can shorten the duration of a long-term contract. From the firm's perspective, the existing literature provides limited guidance when bargaining and writing contracts for fuel procurement. I develop a stochastic programming framework to optimize long-term contracting decisions under both endogenous and exogenous sources of hold-up risk. These typically include policy changes, price shocks, availability of fuel, and volatility in derived demand. For price risks, the optimal contract duration is the moment when the expected benefits of the contract are just outweighed by the expected opportunity costs of remaining in the contract. I prove that imposing early renegotiation costs decreases contract duration. Finally, I provide an empirical approach to show how coal contracts can limit

  4. Biomass "Green" Power Vs. Coal "Traditional" Power: Who is the Largest Emitter in Humboldt County and How Should Regulations be Addressed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurawski, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this research is to study how emissions from a fossil fuel power plant compare to emissions from a biomass power plant, and how these results can be used to improve current air-quality regulations. Outdoor air quality transcends national and political boundaries. Air pollution monitoring is essential to maintaining quality of life for humans and ecosystems. Due to anthropogenic disturbances (primarily related to burning of fossil fuels), air- quality management has become a priority on a long list of environmental issues. Quantifying and monitoring the largest emitters of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants is crucial to the creation and enforcement of appropriate environmental protection regulations. Emissions data were collected from January 2010 to January 2016 from sensors installed close to a biomass power plant, and sensors installed close to a fossil fuel and natural gas power plant, in Humboldt County, California. In Humboldt County, where air quality serves as a baseline of air pollution in the United States, data showed that the "green" biomass power plant emitted higher levels of particulate matter compared to the fossil fuel power plant. Additionally, the biomass power plant showed levels of CO2, NOx, and SO2 emissions that suggest its place as a "green" power source should be reconsidered. Our research suggests that regulations need to be reconsidered given the potential for high pollutant emissions from biomass plants.

  5. Peripheral self-reactivity regulates antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses and cell division under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Swee, Lee Kim; Tan, Zhen Wei; Sanecka, Anna; Yoshida, Nagisa; Patel, Harshil; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell identity is established by the expression of a clonotypic T-cell receptor (TCR), generated by somatic rearrangement of TCRα and β genes. The properties of the TCR determine both the degree of self-reactivity and the repertoire of antigens that can be recognized. For CD8 T cells, the relationship between TCR identity—hence reactivity to self—and effector function(s) remains to be fully understood and has rarely been explored outside of the H-2b haplotype. We measured the affinity of three structurally distinct CD8 T-cell-derived TCRs that recognize the identical H-2 Ld-restricted epitope, derived from the Rop7 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. We used CD8 T cells obtained from mice generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer as the closest approximation of primary T cells with physiological TCR rearrangements and TCR expression levels. First, we demonstrate the common occurrence of secondary rearrangements in endogenously rearranged loci. Furthermore, we characterized and compared the response of Rop7-specific CD8 T-cell clones upon Toxoplasma gondii infection as well as effector function and TCR signalling upon antigenic stimulation in vitro. Antigen-independent TCR cross-linking in vitro uncovered profound intrinsic differences in the effector functions between T-cell clones. Finally, by assessing the degree of self-reactivity and comparing the transcriptomes of naive Rop7 CD8 T cells, we show that lower self-reactivity correlates with lower effector capacity, whereas higher self-reactivity is associated with enhanced effector function as well as cell cycle entry under physiological conditions. Altogether, our data show that potential effector functions and basal proliferation of CD8 T cells are set by self-reactivity thresholds. PMID:27881740

  6. Peak power and blade loads on stall-regulated rotors as influenced by different airfoil families

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Tu, P.K.C.

    1988-08-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), new airfoils have been developed to help improve the performance and economics of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTS). The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of one of these airfoil families to other commonly used airfoil series for a typical three-bladed, stall-regulated HAWT. The traditional airfoil series chosen for comparison with SERI's new thin airfoil family were the NACA 23XXX, NACA 44XX, and NASA LS(1). The Micon 110 wind turbine was chosen because it is a typical three-bladed, stall-regulated rigid rotor system. The performance characteristics of the different airfoil series were derived analytically using the Eppler airfoil design code in the analysis mode. On a relative basis, this approach to comparing airfoils was considered more accurate than using airfoil performance characteristics based on wind-tunnel test data. After generating the performance characteristics for each airfoil series, the subsequent rotor performance and blade loads were calculated using SERI's PROPSH computer code. Resulting annual energy output, which is dependent on the wind-speed distribution, was calculated using SERI's Systems Engineering and Analysis Computer Code (SEACC). The results of the study show that fixed-wing airfoils generally result in excessive peak power for stall regulated, rigid rotors. By operating the wind turbine at a less desirable blade pitch angle, peak power can be reduced at the expense of higher mean blade loads and lower annual energy output. In contrast, the thin airfoil family was designed to reduce peak power at optimum blade pitch to minimize blade loads and maximize annual energy output. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Virtual welding equipment for simulation of GMAW processes with integration of power source regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Zabirov, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    A two dimensional transient numerical analysis and computational module for simulation of electrical and thermal characteristics during electrode melting and metal transfer involved in Gas-Metal-Arc-Welding (GMAW) processes is presented. Solution of non-linear transient heat transfer equation is carried out using a control volume finite difference technique. The computational module also includes controlling and regulation algorithms of industrial welding power sources. The simulation results are the current and voltage waveforms, mean voltage drops at different parts of circuit, total electric power, cathode, anode and arc powers and arc length. We describe application of the model for normal process (constant voltage) and for pulsed processes with U/I and I/I-modulation modes. The comparisons with experimental waveforms of current and voltage show that the model predicts current, voltage and electric power with a high accuracy. The model is used in simulation package SimWeld for calculation of heat flux into the work-piece and the weld seam formation. From the calculated heat flux and weld pool sizes, an equivalent volumetric heat source according to Goldak model, can be generated. The method was implemented and investigated with the simulation software SimWeld developed by the ISF at RWTH Aachen University.

  8. Microcomputer technology applications: Charger and regulator software for a breadboard programmable power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Software programs are described, one which implements a voltage regulation function, and one which implements a charger function with peak-power tracking of its input. The software, written in modular fashion, is intended as a vehicle for further experimentation with the P-3 system. A control teleprinter allows an operator to make parameter modifications to the control algorithm during experiments. The programs require 3K ROM and 2K ram each. User manuals for each system are included as well as a third program for simple I/O control.

  9. Halbach array generator/motor having an automatically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-02-22

    A motor/generator having its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along its axis of rotation. The rotor includes a Halbach array. The stator windings are switched or commutated to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor/generator. The voltage and power are automatically regulated by using centrifugal force to change the diameter of the rotor, and thereby vary the radial gap in between the stator and the rotating Halbach array, as a function of the angular velocity of the rotor.

  10. Halbach array generator/motor having mechanically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A motor/generator has its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along the axis of rotation of the rotor. The rotor includes a Halbach array of magnets. The voltage and power outputs are regulated by varying the radial gap in between the stator windings and the rotating Halbach array. The gap is varied by extensible and retractable supports attached to the stator windings that can move the windings in a radial direction.

  11. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced reactive oxidative species protects human hepatic stellate cells from apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Li, Shu-Jie; Xin, Yong-Ning; Ji, Shu-Sheng; Xie, Rui-Jin; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS)-induced apoptosis of human hepatic stellate (HSC) is one of the treatments for liver fibrosis. However, how ROS (reactive oxygen species) affect HSC apoptosis and liver fibrosis is still unknown. In our study, ROS in human HSC cell line LX-2 was induced by ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) and assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level. We found that in LX2 cells Fe-NTA induced notable ROS, which played a protective role in HSCs cells apoptosis by inhibiting Caspase-3 activation. Fe-NTA-induced ROS increased mRNA and protein level of anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 and decreased mRNA protein level of pro-apoptosis gene Bax, As a result, maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential of HSCs. Fe-NTA-induced ROS play a protective role in human HSCs by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins and mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26770403

  12. Sampling strategies and materials for investigating large reactive particle complaints from Valley Village homeowners near a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.; Davis, H.; Frazar, B.; Haines, B.

    1997-12-31

    This paper will present Phase 3`s sampling strategies, techniques, methods and substrates for assisting the District to resolve the complaints involving yellowish-brown staining and spotting of homes, cars, etc. These spots could not be easily washed off and some were permanent. The sampling strategies for the three phases were based on Phase 1 -- the identification of the reactive particles conducted in October, 1989 by APCD and IITRI, Phase 2 -- a study of the size distribution and concentration as a function of distance and direction of reactive particle deposition conducted by Radian and LG and E, and Phase 3 -- the determination of the frequency of soiling events over a full year`s duration conducted in 1995 by APCD and IITRI. The sampling methods included two primary substrates -- ACE sheets and painted steel, and four secondary substrates -- mailbox, aluminum siding, painted wood panels and roof tiles. The secondary substrates were the main objects from the Valley Village complaints. The sampling technique included five Valley Village (VV) soiling/staining assessment sites and one southwest of the power plant as background/upwind site. The five VV sites northeast of the power plant covered 50 degrees span sector and 3/4 miles distance from the stacks. Hourly meteorological data for wind speeds and wind directions were collected. Based on this sampling technique, there were fifteen staining episodes detected. Nine of them were in summer, 1995.

  13. A powerful combination: the use of positional scanning libraries and biometrical analysis to identify cross-reactive T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nino-Vasquez, J Javier; Allicotti, Gina; Borras, Eva; Wilson, Darcy B; Valmori, Danila; Simon, Richard; Martin, Roland; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2004-02-01

    Studies on the elucidation of the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) at the antigen and peptide level have contributed to the current understanding of T cell cross-reactivity. Historically, most studies of T cell specificity and degeneracy have relied on the determination of the effects on T cell recognition of amino acid changes at individual positions or MHC binding residues, and thus they have been limited to a small set of possible ligands. Synthetic combinatorial libraries (SCLs), and in particular positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCLs) represent collections of millions to trillions of peptides which allow the unbiased elucidation of T cell ligands that stimulate clones of both known and unknown specificity. PS-SCLs have been used successfully to study T cell recognition and to identify and optimize T cell clone (TCC) epitopes in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders and tumor antigens. PS-SCL-based biometrical analysis represents a further refinement in the analysis of the data derived from the screening of a library with a TCC. It combines this data with information derived from protein sequence databases to identify natural peptide ligands. PS-SCL-based biometrical analysis provides a method for the determination of new microbial antigen and autoantigen sequences based solely on functional data rather than sequence homology or motifs, making the method ideally suited for the prediction and identification of both native and cross-reactive epitopes by virtue of its ability to integrate the examination of trillions of peptides in a systematic manner with all of the protein sequences in a given database. We review here the application of PS-SCLs and biometrical analysis to identify cross-reactive T cell epitopes, as well as the current efforts to refine this strategy.

  14. An analysis of thermionic space nuclear reactor power system: I. Effect of disassembling radial reflector, following a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-10

    An analysis is performed to determine the effect of disassembling the radial reflector of the TOPAZ-II reactor, following a hypothetical severe Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). Such an RIA is assumed to occur during the system start-up in orbit due to a malfunction of the drive mechanism of the control drums, causing the drums to rotate the full 180[degree] outward at their maximum speed of 1.4[degree]/s. Results indicate that disassembling only three of twelve radial reflector panels would successfully shutdown the reactor, with little overheating of the fuel and the moderator.

  15. Coordinated control of wind generation and energy storage for power system frequency regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baone, Chaitanya Ashok

    Large-scale centralized synchronous generators have long been the primary actors in exercising active power and frequency control, and much of the existing grid control framework is predicated upon their dynamic terminal characteristics. Important among these characteristics is the inertia of such generators. These play key roles in determining the electromechanical stability of the electric power grid. Modern wind generator systems are partially or fully connected to the grid through power electronic interfaces, and hence do not present the same level of inertial coupling. The absence of inertial frequency response from modern wind generator systems is a topic of growing concern in power engineering practice, as the penetration of wind generation is expected to grow dramatically in the next few years. Solutions proposed in the literature have sought to address this problem by seeking to mimic the inherent inertial response characteristics of traditional synchronous generators via control loops added to wind generators. Recent literature has raised concerns regarding this approach, and the work here will further examine its shortcomings, motivating approaches that seek to optimally design for the characteristics of the equipment exercising the control, rather than forcing new technologies to mimic the characteristics of synchronous machines. In particular, this work will develop a new approach to power system frequency regulation, with features suited to distributed energy storage devices such as grid-scale batteries and wind turbine speed and blade pitch control. The dynamic characteristics of these new technologies are treated along with existing mechanisms, such as synchronous machine governor control, to develop a comprehensive multi-input control design approach. To make the method practically feasible for geographically distributed power systems, an observer-based distributed control design utilizing phasor measurement unit (PMU) signals along with local

  16. Eicosanoids up-regulate production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH-dependent oxidase in Spodoptera exigua phagocytic hemocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune responses in insects, including phagocytosis of invading microbes. Phagocytosis entails two major steps, the internalization of microbes and the subsequent killing of them via formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we posed the hypothesis that eicosanoi...

  17. The Optimisation Of Array Power Regulators (APRS) For Solar Observation Platforms And Future Electrical Power System (EPS) Through The B2R Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcindor, Peter; Bard, Frederic; Kiewe, Bernhard; Tonicello, Ferdinando; Mourra, Oliver

    2011-10-01

    Power regulators for solar observation platforms must be compatible with widely varying solar array voltages due to the large temperature variations resulting from contrasting sun distances or sun/eclipse cycling close to the sun. To produce a 28V regulated power bus for scientific instruments a Buck topology is necessary (today's qualified technology). Analysis will show that front end of Power Conditioning Units (PCUs) must work over voltage ranges of almost twice that of Earth orbiting spacecraft. This paper is targeted at missions that operate over the full mission trajectory and in particular at far sun distances where array sizing is performed. Performance degradation associated with Buck topologies operating over wide voltage ranges is established and the importance of reducing the solar array voltage to a minimum is highlighted. Finally, attention is drawn to how the Buck-Boost Regulator (B2R) topology, currently under development, provides a potential solution to this and other problems.

  18. Negative reactivity in toddlers born prematurely: indirect and moderated pathways considering self-regulation, neonatal distress and parenting stress.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Babett; Brandl, Alexa; Pietz, Joachim; Pauen, Sabina; Kliegel, Matthias; Reuner, Gitta

    2013-02-01

    High negative reactivity in early childhood interferes with later academic and behavioral adjustment. Thus, investigating the origins of high negative affectivity in early childhood is of high relevance for understanding emotional morbidity after preterm birth. The present work explored (1) direct prematurity-related consequences for negative reactivity, (2) self-regulatory deficits as a mechanism indirectly relating prematurity to negative affectivity and (3) the implications of the interplay between procedural distress in the neonatal period and parenting stress for preterm children's negative reactivity. The sample was comprised of 146 preterm children (very vs. moderately to late preterm) and 86 healthy full-term children, both free of major neurological impairment. Assessment involved negative affect and parenting stress (parent-report; 12, 24 months corrected age, CA), effortful control (behavioral battery, parent report; 24 months CA) and the number of potentially distressing neonatal intensive care procedures as well as severity of illness during the neonatal period (retrospective chart review). There was no direct link from prematurity to a disposition for high negative reactivity in early childhood nor was prematurity indirectly associated with higher negative reactivity through lower levels of effortful control. The relation between neonatal pain and distress and negative affectivity depended on the level of parenting stress with low parenting stress at the end of the first year of children's life buffering the negative influence of neonatal distress. The present findings underscore the importance of complex interactions among environmental factors in processes of emotional plasticity after preterm birth thereby providing critical suggestions for follow-up care.

  19. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase, receptor interacting protein, and reactive oxygen species regulate shikonin-induced autophagy in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Zhang, Zhenxing; Chen, Yicheng; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Wenhua

    2014-09-05

    Shikonin, a naphthoquinone derived from the Chinese medicinal plant Lithospermum erythrorhizon, shows potential to be a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Our previous data demonstrate that high doses (about 6 μM) of shikonin induce apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we discovered that a low dose of shikonin (2.5 μM) and a short treatment time (12h) induced autophagy, as evidenced by the upregulation of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II, the formation of acidic autophagic vacuoles (AVOs), and the punctate fluorescence pattern of GFP-LC3 protein. Next, we investigated the mechanism and found reactive oxygen species accumulation after shikonin treatment. The reactive oxygen species scavengers NAC and Tiron completely blocked autophagy. We further found activation of ERK by generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of RIP pathway, which are at least partially connected to shikonin-induced autophagy. Moreover, experiments in vivo revealed similar results: shikonin caused the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-ERK and thus induced autophagy in a tumor xenograft model. These findings suggest that shikonin is an inducer of autophagy and may be a promising clinical antitumor drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Single Event Transients in Voltage Regulators for FPGA Power Supply Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poivey, Christian; Sanders, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Forney, Jim; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Karsh, Jeremy; Pursley, Scott; Kleyner, Igor; Katz, Richard

    2006-01-01

    As with other bipolar analog devices, voltage regulators are known to be sensitive to single event transients (SET). In typical applications, large output capacitors are used to provide noise immunity. Therefore, since SET amplitude and duration are generally small, they are often of secondary importance due to this capacitance filtering. In low voltage applications, however, even small SET are a concern. Over-voltages may cause destructive conditions. Under-voltages may cause functional interrupts and may also trigger electrical latchup conditions. In addition, internal protection circuits which are affected by load as well as internal thermal effects can also be triggered from heavy ions, causing dropouts or shutdown ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In the case of FPGA power supplies applications, SETS are critical. For example, in the case of Actel FPGA RTAX family, core power supply voltage is 1.5V. Manufacturer specifies an absolute maximum rating of 1.6V and recommended operating conditions between 1.425V and 1.575V. Therefore, according to the manufacturer, any transient of amplitude greater than 75 mV can disrupt normal circuit functions, and overvoltages greater than 100 mV may damage the FPGA. We tested five low dropout voltage regulators for SET sensitivity under a large range of circuit application conditions.

  1. Power generation by a pH-regulated conical nanopore through reverse electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Lin, Sheng-Chang; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2017-10-01

    To assess the possibility of energy harvesting through reverse electrodialysis (RED), we consider the electrokinetic behavior of the ion transport in a pH-regulated conical nanopore connecting two large reservoirs having different bulk salt concentrations, taking account of the effect of osmotic flow. In particular, we examine the influence of the ion diffusion direction, the solution pH, and the bulk concentration ratio on that behavior in detail, and discuss the underlying mechanisms. We show that the geometrically asymmetric nature of the nanopore yields profound and interesting phenomena arising mainly from the distribution of ions in its interior. Assuming a single polymeric nanopore, a power density of 18.2 W/m2 can be generated. We show that the present system has the potential of serving as an ion-selective and a salinity gradient power generation device. The maximum power efficiency which is based on assuming a linear ionic distribution in nanopore can yield appreciable deviation, especially if pH deviates significantly from 7, where the presence of H+ and OH- needs be considered.

  2. Adaptive PI controller to voltage regulation in power systems: STATCOM as a case study.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Mohammad Reza; Khooban, Mohammad-Hassan; Niknam, Taher

    2017-01-01

    Static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) provides the means to improve quality and reliability of a power system as it has the functional capability to handle dynamic disturbances, such as transient stability and power oscillation damping as well as to providing voltage regulation. In this paper, a robust adaptive PI-based optimal fuzzy control strategy is proposed to control a STATCOM used in distribution systems. The proposed intelligent strategy is based on a combination of a new General Type-II Fuzzy Logic (GT2FL) with a simple heuristic algorithm named Teaching Learning Based Optimization (TLBO) Algorithm. The proposed framework optimally tunes parameters of a Proportional-Integral (PI) controller which, similar to most of other researchers regarding control of STATCOM, are in charge of controlling the device. The proposed controller guaranties robustness and stability against uncertainties caused by external disturbances or ever-changing nature of the power systems. The TLBO optimizes the parameters of the controller as well as the input and output membership functions. To validate the efficiency of the proposed controller, the obtained simulation results are compared with those of the two most recent researches applied in this field, namely, conventional Proportional Integral (PI) controller and Optimal Fuzzy PI (OFPI) controller. Results demonstrate the successfulness and effectiveness of the proposed online-TLBO General Type-2 Fuzzy PI (OGT2FPI) controller and its superiority over conventional approaches. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. αβ T cell receptor germline CDR regions moderate contact with MHC ligands and regulate peptide cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Attaf, Meriem; Holland, Stephan J.; Bartok, Istvan; Dyson, Julian

    2016-01-01

    αβ T cells respond to peptide epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The role of T cell receptor (TCR) germline complementarity determining regions (CDR1 and 2) in MHC restriction is not well understood. Here, we examine T cell development, MHC restriction and antigen recognition where germline CDR loop structure has been modified by multiple glycine/alanine substitutions. Surprisingly, loss of germline structure increases TCR engagement with MHC ligands leading to excessive loss of immature thymocytes. MHC restriction is, however, strictly maintained. The peripheral T cell repertoire is affected similarly, exhibiting elevated cross-reactivity to foreign peptides. Our findings are consistent with germline TCR structure optimising T cell cross-reactivity and immunity by moderating engagement with MHC ligands. This strategy may operate alongside co-receptor imposed MHC restriction, freeing germline TCR structure to adopt this novel role in the TCR-MHC interface. PMID:27775030

  4. αβ T cell receptor germline CDR regions moderate contact with MHC ligands and regulate peptide cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Attaf, Meriem; Holland, Stephan J; Bartok, Istvan; Dyson, Julian

    2016-10-24

    αβ T cells respond to peptide epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The role of T cell receptor (TCR) germline complementarity determining regions (CDR1 and 2) in MHC restriction is not well understood. Here, we examine T cell development, MHC restriction and antigen recognition where germline CDR loop structure has been modified by multiple glycine/alanine substitutions. Surprisingly, loss of germline structure increases TCR engagement with MHC ligands leading to excessive loss of immature thymocytes. MHC restriction is, however, strictly maintained. The peripheral T cell repertoire is affected similarly, exhibiting elevated cross-reactivity to foreign peptides. Our findings are consistent with germline TCR structure optimising T cell cross-reactivity and immunity by moderating engagement with MHC ligands. This strategy may operate alongside co-receptor imposed MHC restriction, freeing germline TCR structure to adopt this novel role in the TCR-MHC interface.

  5. GIPC mediates the generation of reactive oxygen species and the regulation of cancer cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1/IGF-1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Seung; Paek, A Rome; Kim, Soo Youl; You, Hye Jin

    2010-08-28

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)/IGF-1 receptor signaling participates in a variety of cellular processes, including cell survival, growth, and proliferation. Increased expression of IGF-1R and activation of its downstream signaling components have been implicated in human cancers. Although a regulatory role for IGF-1R has been established, the relationship between IGF-1R and its binding partner, GAIP-interacting protein C-terminus (GIPC), in terms of promoting cell proliferation, remains unclear. We found that siRNA-mediated silencing of GIPC expression decreased IGF-1-mediated IGF-1R phosphorylation and cellular proliferation in breast cancer models. IGF-1-mediated cellular proliferation was also inhibited by N-acetylcysteine, which implicates reactive oxygen species generation. siRNA-mediated silencing of GIPC expression also decreased IGF-1-mediated reactive oxygen species generation. Taken together, these data suggest that GIPC contributes to IGF-1-induced cancer cell proliferation via the regulation of reactive oxygen species production. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Age-Related Impairment in Ischemia-Induced Neovascularization by Regulating Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Yuen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate bone marrow microenvironment for stem and progenitor cells functions including self-renewal, differentiation, and cell senescence. In response to ischemia, ROS also play a critical role in mediating the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow to the sites of ischemic injury, which contributes to postnatal neovascularization. Aging is an unavoidable biological deteriorative process with a progressive decline in physiological functions. It is associated with increased oxidative stress and impaired ischemia-induced neovascularization. This review discusses the roles of ROS in regulating stem and progenitor cell function, highlighting the impact of unbalanced ROS levels on EPC dysfunction and the association with age-related impairment in ischemia-induced neovascularization. Furthermore, it discusses strategies that modulate the oxidative levels of stem and progenitor cells to enhance the therapeutic potential for elderly patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26697140

  7. Dynamics of processes during the deposition of ZrO2 films by controlled reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: A modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Tomáš; Vlček, Jaroslav

    2017-07-01

    A time-dependent parametric model was applied to controlled reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) depositions of stoichiometric ZrO2 films, carried out in our laboratories, (i) to clarify the complicated dynamics of the processes on the target and substrate surfaces during voltage pulses, and (ii) to corroborate the importance of the O2 inlet configuration (position and direction) which strongly affects the O2 dissociation in the discharge and the chemisorption flux of oxygen atoms and molecules onto the substrate. The repetition frequency was 500 Hz at the deposition-averaged target power densities of 25 Wcm-2, being close to a target power density applicable in industrial HiPIMS systems, and 50 Wcm-2 with a pulse-averaged target power density up to 2 kWcm-2. The pulse duration was 50 μs. For the experimental conditions with the to-substrate O2 inlets, the deposition-averaged target power density of 50 Wcm-2, and the oxygen partial pressure of 0.05 Pa (being close to the mean value during controlled depositions), our model predicts a low compound fraction, changing between 8% and 12%, in the target surface layer at an almost constant high compound fraction, changing between 92% and 93%, in the substrate surface layer during the pulse period (2000 μs). The calculated deposition rate of 89 nm/min for these films is in good agreement with the measured value of 80 nm/min achieved for optically transparent stoichiometric ZrO2 films prepared under these conditions.

  8. Modified DSTATCOM Topology with Reduced DC Link Voltage for Reactive and Harmonic Power Compensation of Unbalanced Nonlinear Load in Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddada, Nagesh; Karanki, Srinivas B.; Mishra, Mahesh K.

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a modified four-leg distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM) topology for compensation of unbalanced and nonlinear loads in three-phase four-wire distribution system. DSTATCOM, connected in parallel to the load, supplies reactive and harmonic powers demanded by unbalanced nonlinear loads. In this proposed topology, the voltage source inverter (VSI) of DSTATCOM is connected to point of common coupling (point of interconnection of source, load, DSTATCOM) through interface inductor and series capacitance, unlike the conventional topology which consists of interface inductor alone. Load compensation with a lower value of input DC link voltage of VSI is possible in this modified topology compared to conventional topology. A comparative study on modified and conventional topologies in terms of voltage rating of inverter power switches, switching losses in VSI and power rating of input DC capacitor of VSI is presented. The detailed design aspects of DC link capacitor and interface series capacitor are also presented. The reference filter currents are generated using instantaneous symmetrical component theory and are tracked using hysteresis current control technique. A detailed simulation study is carried out, to compare the compensation performances of conventional, modified topologies using PSCAD simulator and experimental studies are done to validate the simulation results.

  9. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  10. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  11. Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection impairs HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim imbalance due to CD127 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, J R; Lokhande, M U; García-Garzón, S; Miquel, J; González-Praetorius, A; Parra-Cid, T; Sanz-de-Villalobos, E

    2013-02-01

    In persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivity is impaired and this affects HCV control. Interleukin-7 receptor (CD127) expression on these cells could regulate CTL reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim balance modulation. Bim is a pro-apoptotic molecule blocked by the action of Mcl-1. Mcl-1/Bim expression and T cell reactivity on HCV-specific CTLs were compared according to CD127 phenotype. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from HLA-A2(+) HCV(+) patients were obtained. HCV-specific CTLs were visualized by staining PBL with anti-CD8 and HLA-A2/peptide pentameric complexes (pentamer). Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 phenotype of HCV-specific CTLs was tested by staining detectable CD8(+)/pentamer(+) cells with anti-Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 antibodies. HCV-specific CTL proliferation ability after specific in vitro challenge was tested in the presence and absence of pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. All stained cells were analysed by flow cytometry. CD127(low)-expressing HCV-specific CTLs associated with high HCV viraemia, while CD127(high) correlated with undetectable viral loads (P < 0.001). Directly ex vivo, pentamer(+) cell frequency was similar according to CD127 expression level. Nevertheless, CD127(low) pentamer(+) cell proliferation after specific in vitro challenge was impaired (P < 0.05), although this was corrected by z-VAD-fmk treatment (P < 0.05). Mcl-1 expression was low directly ex vivo (P < 0.01), and Bim was up-regulated after antigen encounter (P < 0.05) of CD127(low) pentamer(+) cells. The ex vivo difference between Mcl-1 and Bim expression on pentamer(+) cells correlated positively with CD127 expression level (P < 0.001) and with pentamer(+) cell reactivity (P < 0.05). In summary, a low ex vivo Mcl-1 expression and Bim up-regulation after antigen encounter are involved in CD127(low) HCV-specific CTL hyporeactivity during chronic infection, but it can be overcome by apoptosis blockade.

  12. Screen for reactivation of MeCP2 on the inactive X chromosome identifies the BMP/TGF-β superfamily as a regulator of XIST expression.

    PubMed

    Sripathy, Smitha; Leko, Vid; Adrianse, Robin L; Loe, Taylor; Foss, Eric J; Dalrymple, Emily; Lao, Uyen; Gatbonton-Schwager, Tonibelle; Carter, Kelly T; Payer, Bernhard; Paddison, Patrick J; Grady, William M; Lee, Jeannie T; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Bedalov, Antonio

    2017-02-14

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting mostly girls with heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2 on the X chromosome. Because restoration of MeCP2 expression in a mouse model reverses neurologic deficits in adult animals, reactivation of the wild-type copy of MeCP2 on the inactive X chromosome (Xi) presents a therapeutic opportunity in RS. To identify genes involved in MeCP2 silencing, we screened a library of 60,000 shRNAs using a cell line with a MeCP2 reporter on the Xi and found 30 genes clustered in seven functional groups. More than half encoded proteins with known enzymatic activity, and six were members of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/TGF-β pathway. shRNAs directed against each of these six genes down-regulated X-inactive specific transcript (XIST), a key player in X-chromosome inactivation that encodes an RNA that coats the silent X chromosome, and modulation of regulators of this pathway both in cell culture and in mice demonstrated robust regulation of XIST. Moreover, we show that Rnf12, an X-encoded ubiquitin ligase important for initiation of X-chromosome inactivation and XIST transcription in ES cells, also plays a role in maintenance of the inactive state through regulation of BMP/TGF-β signaling. Our results identify pharmacologically suitable targets for reactivation of MeCP2 on the Xi and a genetic circuitry that maintains XIST expression and X-chromosome inactivation in differentiated cells.

  13. Increased reactive oxygen species production down-regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha pathway in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Agatha; Alegret, Marta; Sanchez, Rosa M; Adzet, Tomas; Laguna, Juan C; Carrera, Manuel Vazquez

    2002-03-22

    Generation of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases involving intracellular lipid accumulation. To explore the mechanisms leading to these pathologies we tested the effects of etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which contains a fatty acid-derived structure, in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Etomoxir treatment for 24 h resulted in a down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) mRNA expression, achieving an 87% reduction at 80 microm etomoxir. The mRNA levels of most of the PPARalpha target genes studied were reduced at 100 microm etomoxir. By using several inhibitors of de novo ceramide synthesis and C(2)-ceramide we showed that they were not involved in the effects of etomoxir. Interestingly, the addition of triacsin C, a potent inhibitor of acyl-CoA synthetase, to etomoxir-treated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells did not prevent the down-regulation in PPARalpha mRNA levels, suggesting that the active form of the drug, etomoxir-CoA, was not involved. Given that saturated fatty acids may generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), we determined whether the addition of etomoxir resulted in ROS generation. Etomoxir increased ROS production and the activity of the well known redox transcription factor NF-kappaB. In the presence of the pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity, etomoxir did not down-regulate PPARalpha mRNA in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. These results indicate that ROS generation and NF-kappaB activation are responsible for the down-regulation of PPARalpha and may provide a new mechanism by which intracellular lipid accumulation occurs in skeletal muscle cells.

  14. A study of the oxygen dynamics in a reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge using an ionization region model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, D.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M. A.; Minea, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    The oxygen dynamics in a reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been studied using a new reactive ionization region model. The aim has been to identify the dominating physical and chemical reactions in the plasma and on the surfaces of the reactor affecting the oxygen plasma chemistry. We explore the temporal evolution of the density of the ground state oxygen molecule O 2 ( X 1 Σg - ) , the singlet metastable oxygen molecules O 2 ( a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 ( b 1 Σ g ) , the oxygen atom in the ground state O(3P), the metastable oxygen atom O(1D), the positive ions O2 + and O+, and the negative ion O-. We furthermore investigate the reaction rates for the gain and loss of these species. The density of atomic oxygen increases significantly as we move from the metal mode to the transition mode, and finally into the compound (poisoned) mode. The main gain rate responsible for the increase is sputtering of atomic oxygen from the oxidized target. Both in the poisoned mode and in the transition mode, sputtering makes up more than 80% of the total gain rate for atomic oxygen. We also investigate the possibility of depositing stoichiometric TiO2 in the transition mode.

  15. Reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying and non-clinical controls measured by self-report and performance-based tasks.

    PubMed

    Voth, Eva M; Claes, Laurence; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Selle, Janine; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-10-01

    To examine reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying (CB) by means of self-report measures and performance-based tasks and to explore the relationship between both measurement approaches. The study included 31 treatment-seeking patients with CB (25 women, 6 men) and an age and gender matched non-clinical control group without CB (CG). All participants answered the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). Reactive temperament was assessed using the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System Scales (BIS/BAS) and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Regulative temperament was measured using the Effortful Control subscale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (ATQ-EC) and a computerized version of the Stroop Task. To control the results for depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression Scale (PHQ-9) was administered. Crude group comparisons revealed higher BIS and BAS scores, poorer IGT performance and lower ATQ-EC scores in the CB-group compared to the CG. The groups did not differ in their performance on the Stroop task. After controlling for depressive symptoms that were significantly higher in the CB-group, only the group differences in BAS reactivity remained significant. No significant associations were found between questionnaires and performance-based tasks. Overall, the findings indicate that CB in the present clinical sample of treatment-seeking patients was mainly associated with higher approach tendencies and more depressive symptoms. The lacking correlation between self-reports and performance-based tasks is in line with prior research and suggests that both methodologies tap into different aspects of temperament. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. NDE evaluation of the intergranular corrosion susceptibility of a 2205 duplex stainless steel using thermoelectric power and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, N.; Carreón, H.; Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a nondestructive technique to assess rapidly and with confidence the degree of sensitization (DOS) in duplex stainless steel (DSS). In this investigation, we present the use of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements as nondestructive method for the determination of DOS in isothermally aged 2205 DSS at 700°C for different aging times. The DOS of the aged samples was first established by performing the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The microstructural evolution was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results indicate that TEP coefficient is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by thermal aging and can be used to monitor IGC sensitization of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

  17. Small RNA regulators in bacteria: powerful tools for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen; Zhang, Chuanzhi; Zhang, Junli; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Small RNAs, a large class of ancient posttranscriptional regulators, have recently attracted considerable attention. A plethora of small RNAs has been identified and characterized, many of which belong to the major small noncoding RNA (sRNA) or riboswitch families. It has become increasingly clear that most small RNAs play critical regulatory roles in many processes and are, therefore, considered to be powerful tools for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. In this review, we describe recent achievements in the identification, characterization, and application of small RNAs. We give particular attention to advances in the design and synthesis of novel sRNAs and riboswitches for metabolic engineering. In addition, a novel strategy for hierarchical control of global metabolic pathways is proposed.

  18. Coal-fired power generaion, new air quality regulations, and future U.S. coal production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Root, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Tighter new regulation of stack gas emissions and competition in power generation are driving electrical utilities to demand cleaner, lower sulfur coal. Historical data on sulfur content of produced coals shows little variability in coal quality for individual mines and individual coal-producing counties over relatively long periods of time. If coal-using power generators follow the compliance patterns established in Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, then the industry's response to the tighter Phase II emissions standards will result in large amounts of coal production shifting from higher sulfur areas to areas with lower cost low sulfur coal. One reason this shift will likely occur is that currently only 30% of U.S. coal-fired electrical generating capacity is equipped with flue-gas scrubbers. In 1995, coal mines in the higher sulfur areas of the Illinois Basin and Northern and Central Appalachia employed 78% of all coal miners (>70,000 miners). A substantial geographical redistribution of the nation's coal supplies will likely lead to economic dislocations that will reach beyond local coal-producing areas.

  19. A Novel Technique for Sterilization Using a Power Self-Regulated Single-Mode Microwave Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Reverte-Ors, Juan D.; Pedreño-Molina, Juan L.; Fernández, Pablo S.; Lozano-Guerrero, Antonio J.; Periago, Paula M.; Díaz-Morcillo, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique to achieve precise temperatures in food sterilization has been proposed. An accurate temperature profile is needed in order to reach a commitment between the total removal of pathogens inside the product and the preservation of nutritional and organoleptic characteristics. The minimal variation of the target temperature in the sample by means of a monitoring and control software platform, allowing temperature stabilization over 100 °C, is the main goal of this work. A cylindrical microwave oven, under pressure conditions and continuous control of the microwave supply power as function of the final temperature inside the sample, has been designed and developed with conditions of single-mode resonance. The uniform heating in the product is achieved by means of sample movement and the self-regulated power control using the measured temperature. Finally, for testing the sterilization of food with this technology, specific biological validation based on Bacillus cereus as a biosensor of heat inactivation has been incorporated as a distribution along the sample in the experimental process to measure the colony-forming units (CFUs) for different food samples (laboratory medium, soup, or fish-based animal by-products). The obtained results allow the validation of this new technology for food sterilization with precise control of the microwave system to ensure the uniform elimination of pathogens using high temperatures. PMID:28590423

  20. A Decentralized Multivariable Robust Adaptive Voltage and Speed Regulator for Large-Scale Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okou, Francis A.; Akhrif, Ouassima; Dessaint, Louis A.; Bouchard, Derrick

    2013-05-01

    This papter introduces a decentralized multivariable robust adaptive voltage and frequency regulator to ensure the stability of large-scale interconnnected generators. Interconnection parameters (i.e. load, line and transormer parameters) are assumed to be unknown. The proposed design approach requires the reformulation of conventiaonal power system models into a multivariable model with generator terminal voltages as state variables, and excitation and turbine valve inputs as control signals. This model, while suitable for the application of modern control methods, introduces problems with regards to current design techniques for large-scale systems. Interconnection terms, which are treated as perturbations, do not meet the common matching condition assumption. A new adaptive method for a certain class of large-scale systems is therefore introduces that does not require the matching condition. The proposed controller consists of nonlinear inputs that cancel some nonlinearities of the model. Auxiliary controls with linear and nonlinear components are used to stabilize the system. They compensate unknown parametes of the model by updating both the nonlinear component gains and excitation parameters. The adaptation algorithms involve the sigma-modification approach for auxiliary control gains, and the projection approach for excitation parameters to prevent estimation drift. The computation of the matrix-gain of the controller linear component requires the resolution of an algebraic Riccati equation and helps to solve the perturbation-mismatching problem. A realistic power system is used to assess the proposed controller performance. The results show that both stability and transient performance are considerably improved following a severe contingency.

  1. The role of perceived control in physiological reactivity: self-efficacy and incentive value as regulators of cardiovascular adjustment.

    PubMed

    Sanz, A; Villamarín, F

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the influence of self-efficacy and incentive value on cardiovascular reactivity. Ninety-six subjects were randomly assigned to four experimental groups in each of which the self-efficacy (high or low) and incentive value (high or low) were modified in relation to a mental arithmetic task. Subjects were led to believe that failure in this behaviour would result in the appearance of an aversive stimulus. Heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and skin temperature were all recorded throughout task performance, and at two given moments prior to the task, in order to establish baseline values. Subjects with high self-efficacy experienced a smaller increase in heart rate and systolic pressure, a greater increase in diastolic pressure, greater reduction in skin temperature and a reduction in pulse pressure during task performance. The effects were moderated by the incentive value in such a way that the effects of self-efficacy on cardiovascular reactivity were stronger when the consequences of task failure were perceived as highly relevant (high incentive value).

  2. Regulation of cellular marker modulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn injured mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakar, Bharath; Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Rai, Sharada; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-12-01

    The present study intends to understand the importance of cellular marker in tissue regeneration regulated upon irradiation of low power laser light in burn inflicted mice. Under anesthetic conditions, the thermal injury was induced on Swiss albino mice of either sex. Following injury, the animals were randomly divided into three groups; i. e., un-illuminated control, the group treated with 5% Povidone iodine (reference standard) and single exposure of 3 J/cm2 (830 nm). Burn tissue samples from each group were excised at day 6 post burn injury upon euthanization and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) staining was performed on the selected sections to asses proliferation and angiogenesis at day 6 post-injury. For immunohistochemical analysis, tissue sections from all the three treatment groups on day 6 were stained using specific antibody against Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The results of the histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed improved tissue restoration in animals treated with optimal laser influence as compared to un-illuminated controls. The findings of present study clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of 830 nm laser in burn wound healing and its influence in regulating the cellular marker.

  3. Ethylene negatively regulates transcript abundance of ROP-GAP rheostat-encoding genes and affects apoplastic reactive oxygen species homeostasis in epicarps of cold stored apple fruits.

    PubMed

    Zermiani, Monica; Zonin, Elisabetta; Nonis, Alberto; Begheldo, Maura; Ceccato, Luca; Vezzaro, Alice; Baldan, Barbara; Trentin, Annarita; Masi, Antonio; Pegoraro, Marco; Fadanelli, Livio; Teale, William; Palme, Klaus; Quintieri, Luigi; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-12-01

    Apple (Malus×domestica Borkh) fruits are stored for long periods of time at low temperatures (1 °C) leading to the occurrence of physiological disorders. 'Superficial scald' of Granny Smith apples, an economically important ethylene-dependent disorder, was used as a model to study relationships among ethylene action, the regulation of the ROP-GAP rheostat, and maintenance of H2O2 homeostasis in fruits during prolonged cold exposure. The ROP-GAP rheostat is a key module for adaptation to low oxygen in Arabidopsis through Respiratory Burst NADPH Oxidase Homologs (RBOH)-mediated and ROP GTPase-dependent regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. Here, it was shown that the transcriptional expression of several components of the apple ROP-GAP machinery, including genes encoding RBOHs, ROPs, and their ancillary proteins ROP-GEFs and ROP-GAPs, is coordinately and negatively regulated by ethylene in conjunction with the progressive impairment of apoplastic H2O2 homeostatic levels. RNA sequencing analyses showed that several components of the known ROP- and ROS-associated transcriptional networks are regulated along with the ROP-GAP rheostat in response to ethylene perception. These findings may extend the role of the ROP-GAP rheostat beyond hypoxic responses and suggest that it may be a functional regulatory node involved in the integration of ethylene and ROS signalling pathways in abiotic stress.

  4. Ethylene negatively regulates transcript abundance of ROP-GAP rheostat-encoding genes and affects apoplastic reactive oxygen species homeostasis in epicarps of cold stored apple fruits

    PubMed Central

    Zermiani, Monica; Zonin, Elisabetta; Nonis, Alberto; Begheldo, Maura; Ceccato, Luca; Vezzaro, Alice; Baldan, Barbara; Trentin, Annarita; Masi, Antonio; Pegoraro, Marco; Fadanelli, Livio; Teale, William; Palme, Klaus; Quintieri, Luigi; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Apple (Malus×domestica Borkh) fruits are stored for long periods of time at low temperatures (1 °C) leading to the occurrence of physiological disorders. ‘Superficial scald’ of Granny Smith apples, an economically important ethylene-dependent disorder, was used as a model to study relationships among ethylene action, the regulation of the ROP-GAP rheostat, and maintenance of H2O2 homeostasis in fruits during prolonged cold exposure. The ROP-GAP rheostat is a key module for adaptation to low oxygen in Arabidopsis through Respiratory Burst NADPH Oxidase Homologs (RBOH)-mediated and ROP GTPase-dependent regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. Here, it was shown that the transcriptional expression of several components of the apple ROP-GAP machinery, including genes encoding RBOHs, ROPs, and their ancillary proteins ROP-GEFs and ROP-GAPs, is coordinately and negatively regulated by ethylene in conjunction with the progressive impairment of apoplastic H2O2 homeostatic levels. RNA sequencing analyses showed that several components of the known ROP- and ROS-associated transcriptional networks are regulated along with the ROP-GAP rheostat in response to ethylene perception. These findings may extend the role of the ROP-GAP rheostat beyond hypoxic responses and suggest that it may be a functional regulatory node involved in the integration of ethylene and ROS signalling pathways in abiotic stress. PMID:26428066

  5. Power conditioning unit for photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghin, G.; Nguyen Phuoc, V. T.

    Operational features and components of a power conditioning unit for interconnecting solar cell module powers with a utility grid are outlined. The two-stage unit first modifies the voltage to desired levels on an internal dc link, then inverts the current in 2 power transformers connected to a vector summation control to neutralize harmonic distortion up to the 11th harmonic. The system operates in parallel with the grid with extra inductors to absorb line-to-line voltage and phase differences, and permits peak power use from the PV array. Reactive power is gained internally, and a power system controller monitors voltages, frequencies, and currents. A booster preregulator adjusts the input voltage from the array to provide voltage regulation for the inverter, and can commutate 450 amps. A total harmonic distortion of less than 5 percent is claimed, with a rating of 5 kVA, 50/60 Hz, 3-phase, and 4-wire.

  6. Pre-shot EEG alpha-power reactivity during expert air-pistol shooting: a comparison of best and worst shots.

    PubMed

    Loze, G M; Collins, D; Holmes, P S

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the proposal that pre-shot occipital electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-power reactivity would not only associate with, but also have a causal role in, the relative success of performance outcome in expert air-pistol shooting. Six expert air-pistol shooters performed a sixty-shot match, individually, while electroencephalograms were captured from occipital and anterior-temporal electrode sites during the aiming period (3 x 2 s epochs) before shot release. The five best shots and five worst shots were selected for each shooter on the basis of four shot quality indicators, and pre-shot EEG alpha power for best shots was compared with that of worst shots. Occipital EEG alpha power was found to increase during epochs 1-3 before best shots, but to decrease before worst shots; it was significantly greater during the final pre-shot epoch of best shots. This finding suggests that visual attention to the pistol and target was gradually suppressed during the pre-shot period of best shots, whereas it gradually increased before worst shots. In addition, significantly greater EEG alpha power was found at the left than at the right anterior-temporal site, lending support to the robust findings of previous target-sport studies. We conclude that the participants were able to shoot at the target with greatest success when not having maximal visual attention on where the pistol was aimed and that suppression of visual attention during the final seconds of the pre-shot period is a necessary prerequisite for automatic shot execution, as controlled by mechanisms of intention.

  7. Improved nuclear