Science.gov

Sample records for reactively scattered products

  1. A Chebyshev method for state-to-state reactive scattering using reactant-product decoupling: OH + H2 → H2O + H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvitaš, Marko T.; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2013-08-01

    We extend a recently developed wave packet method for computing the state-to-state quantum dynamics of AB + CD → ABC + D reactions [M. T. Cvitaš and S. C. Althorpe, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 4557 (2009)], 10.1021/jp8111974 to include the Chebyshev propagator. The method uses the further partitioned approach to reactant-product decoupling, which uses artificial decoupling potentials to partition the coordinate space of the reaction into separate reactant, product, and transition-state regions. Separate coordinates and basis sets can then be used that are best adapted to each region. We derive improved Chebyshev partitioning formulas which include Mandelshtam-and-Taylor-type decoupling potentials, and which are essential for the non-unitary discrete variable representations that must be used in 4-atom reactive scattering calculations. Numerical tests on the fully dimensional OH + H2 → H2O + H reaction for J = 0 show that the new version of the method is as efficient as the previously developed split-operator version. The advantages of the Chebyshev propagator (most notably the ease of parallelization for J > 0) can now be fully exploited in state-to-state reactive scattering calculations on 4-atom reactions.

  2. Reactive scattering of F+HD -> HF(v,J)+D: HF(v,J) nascent product state distributions and evidence for quantum transition state resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W. ); Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Nesbitt, David

    2001-12-01

    Single collision reactive scattering dynamics of F+ HDHF(v,J)+ D have been investigated exploiting high-resolution (0.0001 cm?1) infrared laser absorption for quantum state resolved detection of nascent HF(v,J) product states. State resolved Doppler profiles are recorded for a series of HF rovibrational transitions and converted into state resolved fluxes via density-to-flux analysis, yielding cross-section data for relative formation of HF(v,J) at Ecom0.6(2), 1.0(3), 1.5(3), and 1.9(4) kcal/mol. State resolved HF(v,J) products at all but the lowest collision energy exhibit Boltzmann-type populations, characteristic of direct reactive scattering dynamics. At the lowest collision energy[Ecom0.6(2) kcal/mol], however, the HF(v= 2,J) populations behave quite anomalously, exhibiting a nearly''flat'' distribution out to J11 before dropping rapidly to zero at the energetic limit. These results provide strong experimental support for quantum transition state resonance dynamics near Ecom0.6 kcal /mol corresponding classically to H atom chattering between the F and D atoms, and prove to be in remarkably quantitative agreement with theoretical wave packet predictions by Skodje et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 112, 4536 (2000)]. These fully quantum state resolved studies therefore nicely complement the recent crossed beam studies of Dong et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 113, 3633 (2000)], which confirm the presence of this resonance via angle resolved differential cross-section measurements. The observed quantum state distributions near threshold also indicate several rotational states in the HF(v= 3) vibrational manifold energetically inaccessible to F(2P3/2) reagent, but which are consistent with a minor (5%) nonadiabatic contribution from spin?orbit excited F*(2P1/2).?2002 American Institute of Physics.

  3. State-to-state dynamics of high-n Rydberg H-atom scattering with H2: inelastic scattering and reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengrui; Su, Shu; Dai, Dongxu; Yuan, Kaijun; Yang, Xueming

    2015-04-21

    The state-to-state dynamics of high-n Rydberg H-atom scattering with para-H2 at the collision energies of 0.45 and 1.07 eV have been studied using the H-atom Rydberg tagging time-of-flight technique. Both the inelastic scattering and reactive scattering are observed in the experimental time-of-flight spectra. The products H2(v', j' = odd) come only from reactive scattering and present clearly forward-backward asymmetric angular distributions, which differ from those of the corresponding ion-molecule reaction. The products H2(v', j' = even), however, come from both reactive scattering and inelastic scattering. Simulating the rotational distribution from reactive scattering, we found that most of the H2(v', j' = even) products come from inelastic scattering. The angular distributions of the product H2(v', j' = even) are consistent with what is predicted by the conventional textbook mechanism of inelastic scattering, and are a little different from those of the corresponding ion-molecule inelastic scattering. These results suggest that the effect of Rydberg electron could not be neglected in describing the differential cross sections of H* + para-H2 scattering. From the simulation, the branching ratios of the inelastic scattering channel were determined to be 66% and 79% at the collision energies of 0.45 and 1.07 eV, respectively.

  4. Reactive scattering of a supersonic oxygen atom beam : O IBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, A.; Smith, D. J.; Grice, R.

    Reactive scattering of O atoms with IBr molecules has been studied at an initial translational energy E = 40 kJ mol-1 using a supersonic beam of O atoms seeded in He, and at E = 15 kJ mol-1 using O atoms seeded in Ne. Velocity distributions of OI product were measured by cross-correlation time-of-flight analysis. Full contour maps of the differential reaction cross section were obtained which show mild peaking equally in the forward and backward directions at both initial translational energies. The product translational energy distributions are consistent with a long-lived collision complex dissociating via a loose transition state. The triplet O-I-Br complex is more stable with respect to reaction products than the corresponding O-Br-Br complex of the O + Br2 reaction, due to the lower electronegativity of the central halogen atom. The emergence of rebound dynamics in the O + Br2 reaction is attributed to a shallower well in the exit valley of the potential energy surface compared with that for O + IBr.

  5. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl/sup -/ repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O/sub 2/ is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO/sub 2/ is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed.

  6. Non-partial wave treatment of reactive and non-reactive scattering Coupled integral equation formalism.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, E. F.; Kouri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Coupled integral equations are derived for the full scattering amplitudes for both reactive and nonreactive channels. The equations do not involve any partial wave expansion and are obtained using channel operators for reactive and nonreactive collisions. These coupled integral equations are similar in nature to equations derived for purely nonreactive collisions of structureless particles. Using numerical quadrature techniques, these equations may be reduced to simultaneous algebraic equations which may then be solved.

  7. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  8. Seemingly anomalous angular distributions in H + D₂ reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Jankunas, Justin; Zare, Richard N; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F Javier

    2012-06-29

    When a hydrogen (H) atom approaches a deuterium (D(2)) molecule, the minimum-energy path is for the three nuclei to line up. Consequently, nearly collinear collisions cause HD reaction products to be backscattered with low rotational excitation, whereas more glancing collisions yield sideways-scattered HD products with higher rotational excitation. Here we report that measured cross sections for the H + D(2) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reaction at a collision energy of 1.97 electron volts contradict this behavior. The anomalous angular distributions match closely fully quantum mechanical calculations, and for the most part quasiclassical trajectory calculations. As the energy available in product recoil is reduced, a rotational barrier to reaction cuts off contributions from glancing collisions, causing high-j' HD products to become backward scattered.

  9. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  10. Modern integral equation techniques for quantum reactive scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Scott Michael

    1993-11-01

    Rigorous calculations of cross sections and rate constants for elementary gas phase chemical reactions are performed for comparison with experiment, to ensure that our picture of the chemical reaction is complete. We focus on the H/D+H2 → H2/DH + H reaction, and use the time independent integral equation technique in quantum reactive scattering theory. We examine the sensitivity of H+H2 state resolved integral cross sections σ{sub v'j',vj}(E) for the transitions (v = 0,j = 0) to (v'} = 1,j' = 1,3), to the difference between the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and double many body expansion (DMBE) ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES). This sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the origin of a large discrepancy between experimental cross sections with sharply peaked energy dependence and theoretical ones with smooth energy dependence. We find that the LSTH and DMBE PESs give virtually identical cross sections, which lends credence to the theoretical energy dependence.

  11. Quantum Theory of (H,H{Sub 2}) Scattering: Approximate Treatments of Reactive Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Tang, K. T.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    A quantum mechanical study is made of reactive scattering in the (H, H{sub 2}) system. The problem is formulated in terms of a form of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) suitable for collisions in which all particles have finite mass. For certain incident energies, differential and total cross sections, as well as other attributes of the reactive collisions, (e.g. reaction configuration), are determined. Two limiting models in the DWBA formulation are compared; in one, the molecule is unperturbed by the incoming atom and in the other, the molecule adiabatically follows the incoming atom. For thermal incident energies and semi-empirical interaction potential employed, the adiabatic model seems to be more appropriate. Since the DWBA method is too complicated for a general study of the (H, H{sub 2}) reaction, a much simpler approximation method, the “linear model” is developed. This model is very different in concept from treatments in which the three atoms are constrained to move on a line throughout the collision. The present model includes the full three-dimensional aspect of the collision and it is only the evaluation of the transition matrix element itself that is simplified. It is found that the linear model, when appropriately normalized, gives results in good agreement with that of the DWBA method. By application of this model, the energy dependence, rotational state of dependence and other properties of the total and differential reactions cross sections are determined. These results of the quantum mechanical treatment are compared with the classical calculation for the same potential surface. The most important result is that, in agreement with the classical treatment, the differential cross sections are strongly backward peaked at low energies and shifts in the forward direction as the energy increases. Finally, the implications of the present calculations for a theory of chemical kinetics are discussed.

  12. Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf{sub 2}] and [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Bohan; Zhang Jianming; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Slattery, John M.; Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C.

    2011-05-20

    Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol{sup -1}, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf{sub 2}]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H{sub 2}O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf{sub 2}], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf{sub 2}] than for [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}].

  13. Glory and thresholds effects in H+D 2 reactive angular scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, D.

    2003-03-01

    We analyse H+D 2 reactive angular scattering using the S-matrix elements obtained by Aoiz et al. and Althorpe et al. Enhancement of small angle scattering in the v'=3← v=0 H+D 2 delayed reaction is attributed to a glory effect caused by threshold resonances in the v=3 vibrationally adiabatic channel. The oscillatory structures in the reactive angular distributions are shown to be of nearside-farside (NP) origin and are likely to arise from capture in a number of relatively short-lived barrier Regge states at large angular momenta. Padé reconstruction of the reactive matrix element is discussed in detail.

  14. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  15. Vibrationally and rotationally resolved angular distributions for F+H2 --> HF(ν,j)+H reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmasena, Gamini; Phillips, Timothy R.; Shokhirev, Kirill N.; Parker, Gregory A.; Keil, Mark

    1997-06-01

    Angular distributions for individually resolved ν, j states from the F+H2→HF(ν,j)+H chemical reaction are measured for the first time. Vibrational and rotational resolution is achieved simultaneously by applying laser+bolometer detection techniques to crossed-beam reactive scattering. In addition to backward-scattering HF(ν=1, j=6) and HF(ν=2, j=5), we also observe HF(ν=1, j=6) products scattered into the forward hemisphere. The results are in qualitative agreement with fully three-dimensional exact quantum reactive scattering calculations [Castillo et al., J. Chem. Phys. 104, 6531 (1996)] which were conducted on an accurate potential-energy surface [Stark and Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 6515 (1996)]. However, the forward-scattered HF(ν=1, j=6) observed in this experiment is not reproduced by quasi-classical calculations [Aoiz et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 223, 215 (1994)] on the same potential-energy surface.

  16. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-01

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  17. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-28

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  18. The k-j-j' vector correlation in inelastic and reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, M.; Chadwick, H.; Eyles, C. J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Kłos, J.

    2011-08-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) methods are presented which allow characterization of the angular momentum depolarization of the products of inelastic and reactive scattering. The particular emphasis of the theory is on three-vector correlations, and on the connection with the two-vector correlation between the initial and final angular momenta, j and j^' }, which is amenable to experimental measurement. The formal classical theory is presented, and computational results for NO(A) + He are used to illustrate the type of mechanistic information provided by analysis of the two- and three-vector correlations. The classical j-j^' } two-vector correlation results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations, and are shown to be in good agreement. The data for NO(A) + He support previous conclusions [M. Brouard, H. Chadwick, Y.-P. Chang, R. Cireasa, C. J. Eyles, A. O. L. Via, N. Screen, F. J. Aoiz, and J. Kłos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104307 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3212608 that this system is only weakly depolarizing. Furthermore, it is shown that the projection of j along the kinematic apse is nearly conserved for this system under thermal collision energy conditions.

  19. The k-j-j' vector correlation in inelastic and reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J; Aoiz, F J; Kłos, J

    2011-08-28

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) methods are presented which allow characterization of the angular momentum depolarization of the products of inelastic and reactive scattering. The particular emphasis of the theory is on three-vector correlations, and on the connection with the two-vector correlation between the initial and final angular momenta, j and j', which is amenable to experimental measurement. The formal classical theory is presented, and computational results for NO(A) + He are used to illustrate the type of mechanistic information provided by analysis of the two- and three-vector correlations. The classical j-j' two-vector correlation results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations, and are shown to be in good agreement. The data for NO(A) + He support previous conclusions [M. Brouard, H. Chadwick, Y.-P. Chang, R. Cireasa, C. J. Eyles, A. O. L. Via, N. Screen, F. J. Aoiz, and J. Kłos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104307 (2009)] that this system is only weakly depolarizing. Furthermore, it is shown that the projection of j along the kinematic apse is nearly conserved for this system under thermal collision energy conditions.

  20. Quantum state resolved inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics in molecular systems via high resolution IR laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, William Brewster

    This thesis describes a series of experiments undertaken to investigate inelastic and reactive molecular collision dynamics at the quantum-state resolved level of detail. First, time- and frequency-resolved infrared laser absorption is used to probe state-resolved collisional energy transfer in scattering of fast C1(2P3/2) radicals with room temperature HCl molecules. Final state distributions of HCl are monitored via transient infrared laser absorption yielding absolute integral collisional cross sections for energy transfer into final rotational states. Analysis of translational distributions inferred from high-resolution infrared Dopplerimetry leads to state-resolved differential scattering cross sections, which exhibit forward scattering into all observed levels. Results are compared with quasiclassical trajectory calculations on a recently proposed potential surface. Second, absolute state-to-state cross sections are reported for rotationally inelastic scattering of HF, CH4, and H2O with rare gases in crossed supersonic jets. Column-integrated densities of HF, CH4, and H2O in initial and final scattering states are probed in the jet intersection region via direct infrared laser absorption. Total inelastic cross sections for loss out of rotational ground states and excitation into higher states are determined in absolute units from the dependence of infrared absorption signals on collider gas concentration. Comparison is made with close coupling calculations performed on best available potential energy surfaces for each of the scattering systems. Finally, fluorine radicals from a pulsed discharge source are crossed with supersonically cooled hydrogen molecules to study the F + H2 /to HF(v,J) + H reaction under single collision conditions. HF(v,J) product states are probed with complete rovibrational state resolution via direct infrared laser absorption. The nascent HF(v,J) state distribution is measured for all populated vibrational manifolds at a collision

  1. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This is the final report pertaining to the development of aluminides by reactive synthesis. Included in this report is an overview of results during the scope of this effort, details on specific task accomplishments, and a summary of customer evaluations. Opportunities for future work are also included at the end of this report.

  2. Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

  3. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  4. Surface chemistry on semiconductors studied by molecular-beam reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming L.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    This Report reviews the use of molecular-beam reactive scattering to study the surface reactions of gas molecules on semiconductors which have relevance to microelectronic technologies. Modern semiconductor fabrication techniques rely heavily on dry processes where gas-surface reactions are the basic premise. This article focuses on the use of supersonic molecular-beam-surface scattering to study the dynamics and kinetics of surface reactions connected with the growth and etching processes on semiconductor surfaces. The discussion on growth processes covers the oxidation of silicon and germanium, the tungsten-hexafluoride-based tungsten deposition, and the organometallic chemical vapor deposition of gallium arsenide. The discussion on etching processes covers the halogen-based etching of gallium arsenide and silicon. An overview of the experimental technique and the underlying principles in surface-reaction dynamics and kinetics is included for readers in the technology area. The potential use of the molecular beams for actual semiconductor materials processing is also discussed.

  5. The Role of Intelligent Reactive Processing in Production Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-04

    Our work has been concerned with the construction of intelligent systems for production management and control. This paper focuses on the reactive...floor, identifying deviations from predicted production schedules, and intelligent schedule repair. Keywords include: Intelligent systems and Production management .

  6. Nuclear effects on tetraquark production by double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F.; Navarra, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the nuclear effects in exotic meson production. We estimate the total cross section as a function of the energy for pPb scattering using a version of the color evaporation model (CEM) adapted to Double Parton Scattering (DPS). We fond that the cross section grows significantly with the atomic number, indicating that the hypothesis of tetraquark states can be tested in pA collisions at LHC.

  7. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Effort over the past 3 months was directed at increasing manufacturing capacity (ball milling) and improving product quality. Orders for the powder have increased, mainly for plasma spray powders. NiAl is an excellent coat between a metal and a ceramic, and its use instead of cobalt should extending operating range for carbide tools. The feather phase in the sintered Ni[sub 3]Al was identified to be a Ni-rich phase nucleated on the grain boundaries with 10 wt % Al composition. The ductile to brittle temperature of powder extruded NiAl was found to be between 500 and 600 C, and shows a 50% elongation at 600 C.

  8. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  9. Transition state dynamics of O( 3P) + H2S reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. Z.; McDouall, J. J. W.; Smith, D. J.; Grice, R.

    1992-01-01

    A simple model is proposed for the direct rebound dynamics of O( 3P) atoms reacting with H 2S molecules whereby an H atom is displaced at a bending angle β with respect to the direction of the OS axis of the triplet H 2SO transition state. Comparison with the recent angular distribution measurements of HSO reactive scattering by Casavecchia et al. at an initial translational energy E = 50 kJ mol -1, suggests that the bending angle lies in the range β = 60° ± 10°, where β = 0° refers to the collinear OSH configuration. Ab initio calculations indicate a more strongly bent transition state which is initially pyramidal but passes through a planar configuration before dissociating, with the bending angle decreasing from β ≈ 96° to β ≈ 80°. Excitation of both the HSH bending and asymmetric stretch modes of the transition state results in final dissociation through less strongly bent configurations.

  10. Quantum and classical dynamics of reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Díaz, Cristina

    2016-06-27

    We review the state-of-the art in dynamics calculations on the reactive scattering of H2 from metal surfaces, which is an important model system of an elementary reaction that is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis. In many applications, quantum dynamics and classical trajectory calculations are performed within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model. However, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) is finding increased use in applications aimed at modeling the effect of surface phonons on the dynamics. Molecular dynamics with electronic friction has been used to model the effect of electron-hole pair excitation. Most applications are still based on potential energy surfaces (PESs) or forces computed with density functional theory (DFT), using a density functional within the generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation energy. A new development is the use of a semi-empirical version of DFT (the specific reaction parameter (SRP) approach to DFT). We also discuss the accurate methods that have become available to represent electronic structure data for the molecule-surface interaction in global PESs. It has now become possible to describe highly activated H2 + metal surface reactions with chemical accuracy using the SRP-DFT approach, as has been shown for H2 + Cu(111) and Cu(100). However, chemical accuracy with SRP-DFT has yet to be demonstrated for weakly activated systems like H2 + Ru(0001) and non-activated systems like H2 + Pd(111), for which SRP DFs are not yet available. There is now considerable evidence that electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation does not need to be modeled to achieve the (chemically) accurate calculation of dissociative chemisorption and scattering probabilities. Dynamics calculations show that phonons can be safely neglected in the chemically accurate calculation of sticking probabilities on cold metal surfaces for activated systems, and in the calculation of a number of other observables. However, there is now sufficient

  11. Sensitive skin and stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1996-02-01

    Products intended for individuals with sensitive skin are being increasingly developed by formulators of household cleaning products. However, there is currently no consensus about the definition and recognition of the biological basis of sensitive skin. We sought to determine the relation between the nature of environmental threat perceived as aggressive by panelists, and the stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products as measured by the corneosurfametry test. Results indicate substantial differences in irritancy potential between proprietary products. Corneosurfametry data show significant differences in stratum corneum reactivity between, on the one hand, individuals with either non-sensitive skin or skin sensitive to climate/fabrics, and, on the other hand, individuals with detergent-sensitive skin. It is concluded that sensitive skin is not one single condition. Sound information in rating detergent-sensitive skin may be gained by corneosurfametry.

  12. Meson Productions in Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi X.

    A dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region is developed. This is an extension of the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of πN, γp → πN, ηN, KΛ, KΣ reaction data for W ≤ 2.1 GeV. The vector current form factors up to Q2 ≤ 3.0 (GeV/c)2 are determined by analyzing electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets. Within the DCC model, axial-current matrix elements and the πN interactions are related by the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC). As a result, the interference pattern between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes is uniquely fixed. We find that neutrino-induced single-pion production cross sections from the DCC model are consistent with available data. Double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region are also calculated, for the first time, with relevant resonance contributions and channel couplings.

  13. A MATLAB-based finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. I. Collinear atom-diatom reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warehime, Mick; Alexander, Millard H.

    2014-07-01

    We restate the application of the finite element method to collinear triatomic reactive scattering dynamics with a novel treatment of the scattering boundary conditions. The method provides directly the reactive scattering wave function and, subsequently, the probability current density field. Visualizing these quantities provides additional insight into the quantum dynamics of simple chemical reactions beyond simplistic one-dimensional models. Application is made here to a symmetric reaction (H+H2), a heavy-light-light reaction (F+H2), and a heavy-light-heavy reaction (F+HCl). To accompany this article, we have written a MATLAB code which is fast, simple enough to be accessible to a wide audience, as well as generally applicable to any problem that can be mapped onto a collinear atom-diatom reaction. The code and user's manual are available for download from http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM.

  14. A MATLAB-based finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. I. Collinear atom-diatom reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Alexander, Millard H.

    2014-07-14

    We restate the application of the finite element method to collinear triatomic reactive scattering dynamics with a novel treatment of the scattering boundary conditions. The method provides directly the reactive scattering wave function and, subsequently, the probability current density field. Visualizing these quantities provides additional insight into the quantum dynamics of simple chemical reactions beyond simplistic one-dimensional models. Application is made here to a symmetric reaction (H+H{sub 2}), a heavy-light-light reaction (F+H{sub 2}), and a heavy-light-heavy reaction (F+HCl). To accompany this article, we have written a MATLAB code which is fast, simple enough to be accessible to a wide audience, as well as generally applicable to any problem that can be mapped onto a collinear atom-diatom reaction. The code and user's manual are available for download from http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM.

  15. Quantum State-Resolved Reactive and Inelastic Scattering at Gas-Liquid and Gas-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grütter, Monika; Nelson, Daniel J.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum state-resolved reactive and inelastic scattering at gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces has become a research field of considerable interest in recent years. The collision and reaction dynamics of internally cold gas beams from liquid or solid surfaces is governed by two main processes, impulsive scattering (IS), where the incident particles scatter in a few-collisions environment from the surface, and trapping-desorption (TD), where full equilibration to the surface temperature (T{TD}≈ T{s}) occurs prior to the particles' return to the gas phase. Impulsive scattering events, on the other hand, result in significant rotational, and to a lesser extent vibrational, excitation of the scattered molecules, which can be well-described by a Boltzmann-distribution at a temperature (T{IS}>>T{s}). The quantum-state resolved detection used here allows the disentanglement of the rotational, vibrational, and translational degrees of freedom of the scattered molecules. The two examples discussed are (i) reactive scattering of monoatomic fluorine from room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and (ii) inelastic scattering of benzene from a heated (˜500 K) gold surface. In the former experiment, rovibrational states of the nascent HF beam are detected using direct infrared absorption spectroscopy, and in the latter, a resonace-enhanced multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) scheme is employed in combination with a velocity-map imaging (VMI) device, which allows the detection of different vibrational states of benzene excited during the scattering process. M. E. Saecker, S. T. Govoni, D. V. Kowalski, M. E. King and G. M. Nathanson Science 252, 1421, 1991. A. M. Zolot, W. W. Harper, B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian and D. J. Nesbitt J. Chem. Phys 125, 021101, 2006. J. R. Roscioli and D. J. Nesbitt Faraday Disc. 150, 471, 2011.

  16. Resistive and reactive force production in actuated elastic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Pineirua, Miguel; Thiria, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    We study the force production dynamics of undulating elastic plates as a model for fish-like inertial swimmers. Using a beam model coupled with Lighthill's large-amplitude elongated-body theory, we explore different localized actuations at one extremity of the plate (heaving, pitching, and a combination of both) in order to quantify the reactive and resistive contributions to the thrust. The latter has only recently been pointed out as a crucial element in the force balance of large Reynolds number swimmers. We show that this balance is modified as the frequency of excitation changes and the response of the elastic plate shifts between different resonant modes. In the heaving case for instance, higher frequencies and thus higher modes are associated to a stronger resistive contribution to the thrust, while in pitching case, at all frequencies, thrust production comes mostly from the reactive term. We acknowledge support from EADS foundation through project ``Fluids and elasticity in biomimetic propulsion''.

  17. Adiabatic/nonadiabatic state-to-state reactive scattering dynamics implemented on graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-Yu; Han, Ke-Li

    2013-09-12

    An efficient graphics processing units (GPUs) version of time-dependent wavepacket code is developed for the atom-diatom state-to-state reactive scattering processes. The propagation of the wavepacket is entirely calculated on GPUs employing the split-operator method after preparation of the initial wavepacket on the central processing unit (CPU). An additional split-operator method is introduced in the rotational part of the Hamiltonian to decrease communication of GPUs without losing accuracy of state-to-state information. The code is tested to calculate the differential cross sections of H + H2 reaction and state-resolved reaction probabilities of nonadiabatic triplet-singlet transitions of O((3)P,(1)D) + H2 for the total angular momentum J = 0. The global speedups of 22.11, 38.80, and 44.80 are found comparing the parallel computation of one GPU, two GPUs by exact rotational operator, and two GPU versions by an approximate rotational operator with serial computation of the CPU, respectively.

  18. State-to-state and state-to-all-states reactive scattering angular distributions: F+H /sub 2/. -->. HF+H

    SciTech Connect

    Emmons, R.W.; Suck, S.H.

    1983-04-01

    How each state-to-state reactive transition determines nonundulatory ''state-to-all-states'' angular distribution has not yet been investigated. Here we present a complete exposure of state-to-state distorted-wave Born-approximation angular distributions in order to examine how the nonoscillatory and backward-peaked state-to-all-states reactive scattering angular distribution occurs.

  19. Geochemical production of reactive oxygen species from biogeochemically reduced Fe.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah A; Solomon, Benson M; Meng, Shengnan; Copeland, Justin M; Shaw, Timothy J; Ferry, John L

    2014-04-01

    The photochemical reduction of Fe(III) complexes to Fe(II) is a well-known initiation step for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sunlit waters. Here we show a geochemical mechanism for the same in dark environments based on the tidally driven, episodic movement of anoxic groundwaters through oxidized, Fe(III) rich sediments. Sediment samples were collected from the top 5 cm of sediment in a saline tidal creek in the estuary at Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina and characterized with respect to total Fe, acid volatile sulfides, and organic carbon content. These sediments were air-dried, resuspended in aerated solution, then exposed to aqueous sulfide at a range of concentrations chosen to replicate the conditions characteristic of a tidal cycle, beginning with low tide. No detectable ROS production occurred from this process in the dark until sulfide was added. Sulfide addition resulted in the rapid production of hydrogen peroxide, with maximum concentrations of 3.85 μM. The mechanism of hydrogen peroxide production was tested using a simplified three factor representation of the system based on hydrogen sulfide, Fe(II) and Fe(III). The resulting predictive model for maximum hydrogen peroxide agreed with measured hydrogen peroxide in field-derived samples at the 95% level of confidence, although with a persistent negative bias suggesting a minor undiscovered peroxide source in sediments.

  20. DYNAMICS OF THE REACTION OF N{sup +} WITH H{sub 2}. V. REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE SCATTERING OF N{sup +}({sup 3}p) AT RELATIVE ENERGIES BELOW 3.6 eV.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Steven G.; Farrar, James M.; Mahan, Bruce H.

    1980-05-01

    We have measured product velocity vector distributions for the processes N{sup +}({sup 3}P)(H{sub 2},H)NH{sup +} and N{sup +}({sup 3}P)(H{sub 2},H{sub 2})N+ in the initial relative energy ranges of 0.98~3.60 eV and 0.66~ 2.50 eV respectively using the crossed beam technique. At energies below about 1.9 eV the predominance of a long-lived NH{sub 2}{sup +} complex is inferred from isotropic reactive scattering and a backscattered peak in the non-reactive distributions. Above 1.9 eV there is still a substantial interaction between all three atoms. The dynamics are adequately explained by a mechanism which involves accessing the deep {sup 3}B{sub 1} potential well through an avoided crossing with the {sup 3}A{sub 2} surface when the ·symmetry is relaxed from C{sub 2v} to C{sub s}. The reaction of electronically excited metastable ions, probably N{sup +}({sup 1}D), is seen as a forward peak in the reactive distributions.

  1. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  2. Reactivity impact of {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering nuclear data for some numerical and critical benchmark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.; Roubtsov, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.

    2012-07-01

    The thermal neutron-elastic-scattering cross-section data for {sup 16}O used in various modern evaluated-nuclear-data libraries were reviewed and found to be generally too high compared with the best available experimental measurements. Some of the proposed revisions to the ENDF/B-VII.0 {sup 16}O data library and recent results from the TENDL system increase this discrepancy further. The reactivity impact of revising the {sup 16}O data downward to be consistent with the best measurements was tested using the JENDL-3.3 {sup 16}O cross-section values and was found to be very small in MCNP5 simulations of the UO{sub 2} and reactor-recycle MOX-fuel cases of the ANS Doppler-defect numerical benchmark. However, large reactivity differences of up to about 14 mk (1400 pcm) were observed using {sup 16}O data files from several evaluated-nuclear-data libraries in MCNP5 simulations of the Los Alamos National Laboratory HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments, which were performed in the 1950's. The latter result suggests that new measurements using HEU in a heavy-water-moderated critical facility, such as the ZED-2 zero-power reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories, might help to resolve the discrepancy between the {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering cross-section values and thereby reduce or better define its uncertainty, although additional assessment work would be needed to confirm this. (authors)

  3. Products of rectangular random matrices: singular values and progressive scattering.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Gernot; Ipsen, Jesper R; Kieburg, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the product of M rectangular random matrices with independent Gaussian entries, which have several applications, including wireless telecommunication and econophysics. For complex matrices an explicit expression for the joint probability density function is obtained using the Harish-Chandra-Itzykson-Zuber integration formula. Explicit expressions for all correlation functions and moments for finite matrix sizes are obtained using a two-matrix model and the method of biorthogonal polynomials. This generalizes the classical result for the so-called Wishart-Laguerre Gaussian unitary ensemble (or chiral unitary ensemble) at M=1, and previous results for the product of square matrices. The correlation functions are given by a determinantal point process, where the kernel can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We compare the results with numerical simulations and known results for the macroscopic level density in the limit of large matrices. The location of the end points of support for the latter are analyzed in detail for general M. Finally, we consider the so-called ergodic mutual information, which gives an upper bound for the spectral efficiency of a MIMO communication channel with multifold scattering.

  4. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  5. A combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering detector for measurements on reactive systems.

    PubMed

    Vallenhag, Linda; Canton, Sophie E; Sondhauss, Peter; Haase, Dörthe; Ossler, Frederik

    2011-08-01

    A detector with high dynamic range designed for combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments has been developed. It allows measurements on single events and reactive systems, such as particle formation in flames and evaporation of levitating drops. The detector consists of 26 channels covering a region from 0.5° to 60° and it provides continuous monitoring of the sampled signal without readout dead time. The time resolution for fast single events is about 40 μs and for substances undergoing slower dynamics, the time resolution is set to 0.1 or 1 s with hours of continuous sampling. The detector has been used to measure soot particle formation in a flame, burning magnesium and evaporation of a toluene drop in a levitator. The results show that the detector can be used for many different applications with good outcomes and large potential.

  6. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-12-07

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.

  7. Positronium beam production and scattering cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Dawn Elizabeth

    In this work, the efficiency for the production of a monoenergetic positronium beam via the charge-exchange reaction of a positron beam in a gaseous target has been determined for molecular hydrogen and molecular nitrogen. In the case of molecular nitrogen, it has been found that the energy range over which a useful intensity of collimated positronium may be produced can be extended to 250eV, 100eV higher than previously achieved. This should enable measurements of the total and partial positronium cross-sections at correspondingly higher energies, where target inelastic effects are expected to be significant A recent measurement of the integrated positronium formation cross-section for xenon found a larger yield of positronium atoms compared to the other noble gases. A shoulder was also seen 10eV above the peak and it was suggested that this might be due to the production of positronium in an excited state. These findings have provided an incentive to investigate the collimated positronium production efficiency from xenon, which has been found to be surprisingly low. The quantum state of the beam atoms has also been found to be dominantly ground state. Possible reasons for these findings are discussed Total cross-sections for positronium-gas scattering have been extracted from the measurements of the positronium beam production efficiency for both molecular nitrogen and xenon. These quantities have also been determined directly by measuring the intensity of the positronium beam transmitted through a gas cell via the Beer-Lambert Law. A good consistency is found between the values obtained using this method and those determined indirectly. Recently, measurements have been made of the absolute integrated cross-section for the fragmentation of positronium in collision with helium atoms, along with the longitudinal energy distributions of the residual positrons in the energy range -Ep/=13-33eV. Measurements of the latter indicate a peak close to half the residual

  8. Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2014-05-27

    Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

  9. Complex generalized minimal residual algorithm for iterative solution of quantum-mechanical reactive scattering equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Reeves, Melissa S.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Duneczky, Csilla; Schwenke, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Complex dense matrices corresponding to the D + H2 and O + HD reactions were solved using a complex generalized minimal residual (GMRes) algorithm described by Saad and Schultz (1986) and Saad (1990). To provide a test case with a different structure, the H + H2 system was also considered. It is shown that the computational effort for solutions with the GMRes algorithm depends on the dimension of the linear system, the total energy of the scattering problem, and the accuracy criterion. In several cases with dimensions in the range 1110-5632, the GMRes algorithm outperformed the LAPACK direct solver, with speedups for the linear equation solution as large as a factor of 23.

  10. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  11. Gas-Microjet Reactive Scattering: Collisions of HCl and DCl with Cool Salty Water.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jennifer A; Sobyra, Thomas B; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-02-18

    Liquid microjets provide a powerful means to investigate reactions of gases with salty water in vacuum while minimizing gas-vapor collisions. We use this technique to explore the fate of gaseous HCl and DCl molecules impinging on 8 molal LiCl and LiBr solutions at 238 K. The experiments reveal that HCl or DCl evaporate infrequently if they become thermally accommodated at the surface of either solution. In particular, we observe minimal thermal desorption of HCl following HCl collisions and no distinct evidence for rapid, interfacial DCl→HCl exchange following DCl collisions. These results imply that surface thermal motions are not generally strong enough to propel momentarily trapped HCl or DCl back into the gas phase before they ionize and disappear into solution. Instead, only HCl and DCl molecules that scatter directly from the surface escape entry. These recoiling molecules transfer less energy upon collision to LiBr/H2O than to LiCl/H2O, reflecting the heavier mass of Br(-) than of Cl(-) in the interfacial region.

  12. Higher-order split operator schemes for solving the Schrödinger equation in the time-dependent wave packet method: applications to triatomic reactive scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Yang, Weitao; Zhang, Dong H

    2012-02-14

    The efficiency of the numerical propagators for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the wave packet approach to reactive scattering is of vital importance. In this Perspective, we first briefly review the propagators used in quantum reactive scattering calculations and their applications to triatomic reactions. Then we present a detailed comparison of about thirty higher-order split operator propagators for solving the Schrödinger equation with their applications to the wave packet evolution within a one-dimensional Morse potential, and the total reaction probability calculations for the H + HD, H + NH, H + O(2), and F + HD reactions. These four triatomic reactions have quite different dynamic characteristics and thus provide a comprehensive picture of the relative advantages of these higher-order propagation methods for describing reactive scattering dynamics. Our calculations reveal that the most often used second-order split operator method is typically more efficient for a direct reaction, particularly for those involving flat potential energy surfaces. However, the optimal higher-order split operator methods are more suitable for a reaction with resonances and intermediate complexes or a reaction experiencing potential energy surface with fluctuations of considerable amplitude. Three 4th-order and one 6th-order split operator methods, which are most efficient for solving reactive scattering in various conditions among the tested ones, are recommended for general applications. In addition, a brief discussion on the relative performance between the Chebyshev real wave packet method and the split operator method is given. The results in this Perspective are expected to stimulate more applications of (high-order) split operators to the quantum reactive scattering calculation and other related problems.

  13. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  14. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Bandy, Brian; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Hopkins, James; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-02-01

    Near-continuous measurements of hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity in the urban background atmosphere of central London during the summer of 2012 are presented. OH reactivity behaviour is seen to be broadly dependent on air mass origin, with the highest reactivity and the most pronounced diurnal profile observed when air had passed over central London to the east, prior to measurement. Averaged over the entire observation period of 26 days, OH reactivity peaked at ˜ 27 s-1 in the morning, with a minimum of ˜ 15 s-1 during the afternoon. A maximum OH reactivity of 116 s-1 was recorded on one day during morning rush hour. A detailed box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism was used to calculate OH reactivity, and was constrained with an extended measurement data set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from a gas chromatography flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) and a two-dimensional GC instrument which included heavier molecular weight (up to C12) aliphatic VOCs, oxygenated VOCs and the biogenic VOCs α-pinene and limonene. Comparison was made between observed OH reactivity and modelled OH reactivity using (i) a standard suite of VOC measurements (C2-C8 hydrocarbons and a small selection of oxygenated VOCs) and (ii) a more comprehensive inventory including species up to C12. Modelled reactivities were lower than those measured (by 33 %) when only the reactivity of the standard VOC suite was considered. The difference between measured and modelled reactivity was improved, to within 15 %, if the reactivity of the higher VOCs (⩾ C9) was also considered, with the reactivity of the biogenic compounds of α-pinene and limonene and their oxidation products almost entirely responsible for this improvement. Further improvements in the model's ability to reproduce OH reactivity (to within 6 %) could be achieved if the reactivity and degradation mechanism of unassigned two-dimensional GC peaks were estimated. Neglecting the contribution of the higher VOCs (⩾ C

  15. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Stone, D.; Bandy, B.; Dunmore, R.; Hamilton, J. F.; Hopkins, J.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Heard, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    Near-continuous measurements of OH reactivity in the urban background atmosphere of central London during the summer of 2012 are presented. OH reactivity behaviour is seen to be broadly dependent on airmass origin with the highest reactivity and the most pronounced diurnal profile observed when air had passed over central London to the East, prior to measurement. Averaged over the entire observation period of 26 days, OH reactivity peaked at ~ 27 s-1 in the morning with a minimum of ~ 15 s-1 during the afternoon. A maximum OH reactivity of 116 s-1 was recorded on one day during morning rush hour. A detailed box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism was used to calculate OH reactivity, and was constrained with an extended measurement dataset of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from GC-FID and a two-dimensional GC instrument which included heavier molecular weight (up to C12) aliphatic VOCs, oxygenated VOCs and the biogenic VOCs of α pinene and limonene. Comparison was made between observed OH reactivity and modelled OH reactivity using (i) a standard suite of VOC measurements (C2-C8 hydrocarbons and a small selection of oxygenated VOCs) and (ii) a more comprehensive inventory including species up to C12. Modelled reactivities were lower than those measured (by 33 %) when only the reactivity of the standard VOC suite was considered. The difference between measured and modelled reactivity was improved, to within 15 %, if the reactivity of the higher VOCs (≥ C9) was also considered, with the reactivity of the biogenic compounds of α pinene and limonene and their oxidation products almost entirely responsible for this improvement. Further improvements in the model's ability to reproduce OH reactivity (to within 6 %) could be achieved if the reactivity and degradation mechanism of unassigned two-dimensional GC peaks were estimated. Neglecting the contribution of the higher VOCs (≥ C9) (particularly α pinene and limonene) and model

  16. Multiple-scattering model for inclusive proton production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    A formalism is developed for evaluating the momentum distribution for proton production in nuclear abrasion during heavy ion collisions using the Glauber multiple-scattering series. Several models for the one-body density matrix of nuclei are considered for performing numerical calculations. Calculations for the momentum distribution of protons in abrasion are compared with experimental data for inclusive proton production.

  17. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Polyhalogenated Cyclic Hydrocarbons (PCH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-14

    value is the mean ± S.D. of four animals 0.030 0.26 - 12 -HOURS W24 - IIiOURS 0.24 - 0.025 48- HOURS ENOaRd 72 - HOURS0 22 -( mama ) "" 0 0.020 0 0 0ŕ... tumor promotion leading to membrane perturbation.’ 0 Hence, membrane fluidity and lipid peroxidation of isolated hepatic mitochondria and microsomes from...superoxide anion radical production by tumor promoters. Cancer Len. 11: 257-262; 1981. 3. Witz, G. The role of free radicals in tumor promotion: Oxy

  18. Jet production in muon-proton and muon-nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Proton Muon- Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Proton deep-inelastic scattering are compared to perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD) and Monte Carlo model predictions. We observe hadronic (2+1)-jet rates which are a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the partonic level. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a suppression of the jet rates as compared to deuterium. The two- forward jet sample present higher suppression as compared to the one-forward jet sample.

  19. Catalytic reactive distillation process development for 1,1 diethoxy butane production from renewable sources.

    PubMed

    Agirre, I; Barrio, V L; Güemez, B; Cambra, J F; Arias, P L

    2011-01-01

    Some acetals can be produced from renewable resources (bioalcohols) and seem to be good candidates for different applications such as oxygenated diesel additives. In the present case the production of 1,1 diethoxy butane from bioethanol and butanal is presented. Butanal can be obtained from biobutanol following a partial oxidation or a dehydrogenation process. In this paper innovative process development about the synthesis of the mentioned acetal including catalytic reactive distillation experimental and simulation results will be presented and discussed. Katapak SP modules containing Amberlyst 47 resin were used as structured catalytic packings. This reactive system allowed reaching higher conversions than the equilibrium ones at the same temperatures. All the experimental data gathered allowed to tune a simulation model for the reactive distillation operation which showed a fairly good behavior in order to perform initial 1,1 diethoxy butane production process design studies.

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Product-Weighted Reactivity Limits by Coating Category

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Coating Category 1 Table 1 to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings... Coating Category Coating category Category code a Reactivity limit Clear Coatings CCP 1.50 Flat...

  1. Biodiesel production from integration between reaction and separation system: reactive distillation process.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nívea de Lima; Santander, Carlos Mario Garcia; Batistella, César Benedito; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf

    2010-05-01

    Biodiesel is a clean burning fuel derived from a renewable feedstock such as vegetable oil or animal fat. It is biodegradable, non-inflammable, non-toxic, and produces lesser carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons than petroleum-based fuel. The purpose of the present work is to present an efficient process using reactive distillation columns applied to biodiesel production. Reactive distillation is the simultaneous implementation of reaction and separation within a single unit of column. Nowadays, it is appropriately called "Intensified Process". This combined operation is especially suited for the chemical reaction limited by equilibrium constraints, since one or more of the products of the reaction are continuously separated from the reactants. This work presents the biodiesel production from soybean oil and bioethanol by reactive distillation. Different variables affect the conventional biodiesel production process such as: catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, level of agitation, ethanol/soybean oil molar ratio, reaction time, and raw material type. In this study, the experimental design was used to optimize the following process variables: the catalyst concentration (from 0.5 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%), the ethanol/soybean oil molar ratio (from 3:1 to 9:1). The reactive column reflux rate was 83 ml/min, and the reaction time was 6 min.

  2. Analysis of a reactive extraction process for biodiesel production using a lipase immobilized on magnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dussan, K J; Cardona, C A; Giraldo, O H; Gutiérrez, L F; Pérez, V H

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitating Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions in a sodium hydroxide solution and used as support for lipase. The lipase-coated particles were applied in a reactive extraction process that allowed separation of the products formed during transesterification. Kinetics data for triolein and ethanol consumption during biodiesel (ethyl oleate) synthesis together with a thermodynamic phase equilibrium model (liquid-liquid) were used for simulation of batch and continuous processes. The analysis demonstrated the possibility of applying this biocatalytic system in the reactive zone using external magnetic fields. This approach implies new advantages in efficient location and use of lipases in column reactors for producing biodiesel.

  3. Polarized gluon distributions from high-pT pair hadron productions in polarized deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, Teruya; Yu-Bing, Dong; Morii, Toshiyuki

    2001-06-01

    To study the polarized gluon density Δg(x) in the nucleon, we propose the high-pT pair charmed hadron production process in polarized lp scattering. The double spin asymmetry ALL for this process is a good observable for testing the models of Δg(x). .

  4. Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

  5. Emission of reactive compounds and secondary products from wood-based furniture coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salthammer, T.; Schwarz, A.; Fuhrmann, F.

    Emissions of organic fragmentation products, so-called "secondary emission products" and reactive species from wood-based furniture coatings have been studied in 1 m 3 test chambers. the climatic conditions were representative of indoor environments. Relevant compounds and compound groups were the wetting agent 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-dicyne-4,7-diol (T4MDD), the plasticiser di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP), aliphatic aldehydes, monoterpenes, photoinitiator fragments, acrylic monomers/reactive solvents and diisocyanate monomers. Such substances may affect human health in several ways. Aliphatic aldehydes and some photoinitiator fragments are of strong odour, while acrylates and diisocyanates cause irritation of skin, eyes and upper airways. Terpenes and reactive solvents like styrene undergo indoor chemistry in the presence of ozone, nitrogen oxides or hydroxy radicals. Secondary emission products and reactive species can achieve significant indoor concentrations. On the other hand, it has been reported that even small quantities can cause health effects. In the cases of indoor studies with special regard to emissions from furniture, chemical analysis should always include these compounds.

  6. Evidence of Phenotypic and Genetic Relationships between Sociality, Emotional Reactivity and Production Traits in Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Recoquillay, Julien; Leterrier, Christine; Calandreau, Ludovic; Bertin, Aline; Pitel, Frédérique; Gourichon, David; Vignal, Alain; Beaumont, Catherine; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Arnould, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    The social behavior of animals, which is partially controlled by genetics, is one of the factors involved in their adaptation to large breeding groups. To understand better the relationships between different social behaviors, fear behaviors and production traits, we analyzed the phenotypic and genetic correlations of these traits in Japanese quail by a second generation crossing of two lines divergently selected for their social reinstatement behavior. Analyses of results for 900 individuals showed that the phenotypic correlations between behavioral traits were low with the exception of significant correlations between sexual behavior and aggressive pecks both at phenotypic (0.51) and genetic (0.90) levels. Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between emotional reactivity toward a novel object and sexual (0.89) or aggressive (0.63) behaviors. The other genetic correlations were observed mainly between behavioral and production traits. Thus, the level of emotional reactivity, estimated by the duration of tonic immobility, was positively correlated with weight at 17 and 65 days of age (0.76 and 0.79, respectively) and with delayed egg laying onset (0.74). In contrast, a higher level of social reinstatement behavior was associated with an earlier egg laying onset (-0.71). In addition, a strong sexual motivation was correlated with an earlier laying onset (-0.68) and a higher number of eggs laid (0.82). A low level of emotional reactivity toward a novel object and also a higher aggressive behavior were genetically correlated with a higher number of eggs laid (0.61 and 0.58, respectively). These results bring new insights into the complex determinism of social and emotional reactivity behaviors in birds and their relationships with production traits. Furthermore, they highlight the need to combine animal welfare and production traits in selection programs by taking into account traits of sociability and emotional reactivity. PMID:24324761

  7. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nicholas G.; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  8. The Dubna-Mainz-Taipei Dynamical Model for πN Scattering and π Electromagnetic Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shin Nan

    Some of the featured results of the Dubna-Mainz-Taipei (DMT) dynamical model for πN scattering and π0 electromagnetic production are summarized. These include results for threshold π0 production, deformation of Δ(1232),and the extracted properties of higher resonances below 2 GeV. The excellent agreement of DMT model's predictions with threshold π0 production data, including the recent precision measurements from MAMI establishes results of DMT model as a benchmark for experimentalists and theorists in dealing with threshold pion production.

  9. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  10. Why black hole production in scattering of cosmic ray neutrinos is generically suppressed.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Dejan; Starkman, Glenn D; Dai, De-Chang

    2006-02-03

    It has been argued that neutrinos originating from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays can produce black holes deep in the atmosphere in models with TeV-scale quantum gravity. Such black-hole events could be observed at the Auger Observatory. However, any phenomenologically viable model with a low scale of quantum gravity must explain how to preserve protons from rapid decay. We argue that the suppression of proton decay will also suppress lepton-nucleon scattering and hence black-hole production by scattering of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray neutrinos in the atmosphere. We discuss explicitly the split fermion solution to the problem of fast proton decay.

  11. Analytical Expressions for the Hard-Scattering Production of Massive Partons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the two-particle differential cross section $E_c E_\\kappa d\\sigma (AB \\to c\\kappa X) /d\\bb c d \\bb \\kappa$ and the two-particle angular correlation function \\break $d\\sigma(AB$$ \\to$$ c\\kappa X)/d\\Delta \\phi \\, d\\Delta y$ in the hard-scattering production of massive partons in order to exhibit the ``ridge" structure on the away side in the hard-scattering process. The single-particle production cross section $d\\sigma(AB \\to cX) /dy_c c_T dc_T $ is also obtained and compared with the ALICE experimental data for charm production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV at LHC.

  12. Benchmark studies of the Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) reactive scattering code: Implications for accurate quantum calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, E.F.; Darakjian, Z. . Dept. of Chemistry); Walker, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The Bending Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM), developed by Hayes and Walker, is a simple approximation to the true multidimensional scattering problem for reaction of the type: A + BC {yields} AB + C. While the BCRLM method is simpler than methods designed to obtain accurate three dimensional quantum scattering results, this turns out to be a major advantage in terms of our benchmarking studies. The computer code used to obtain BCRLM scattering results is written for the most part in standard FORTRAN and has been reported to several scalar, vector, and parallel architecture computers including the IBM 3090-600J, the Cray XMP and YMP, the Ardent Titan, IBM RISC System/6000, Convex C-1 and the MIPS 2000. Benchmark results will be reported for each of these machines with an emphasis on comparing the scalar, vector, and parallel performance for the standard code with minimum modifications. Detailed analysis of the mapping of the BCRLM approach onto both shared and distributed memory parallel architecture machines indicates the importance of introducing several key changes in the basic strategy and algorithums used to calculate scattering results. This analysis of the BCRLM approach provides some insights into optimal strategies for mapping three dimensional quantum scattering methods, such as the Parker-Pack method, onto shared or distributed memory parallel computers.

  13. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  14. Double parton scattering in pair production of J /ψ mesons at the LHC revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borschensky, Christoph; Kulesza, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Double parton scattering (DPS) is studied for the example of J /ψ pair production in the LHCb and ATLAS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of √{S }=7 , 8, and 13 TeV. We report theoretical predictions delivered to the LHCb and ATLAS Collaborations adjusted for the fiducial volumes of the corresponding measurements during run I, and we provide new predictions at 13 TeV collision energy. It is shown that DPS can lead to noticeable contributions in the distributions of longitudinal variables of the di-J /ψ system, especially at 13 TeV. The increased DPS rate in double J /ψ production at high energies will open up more possibilities for the separation of single parton scattering and DPS contributions in future studies.

  15. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  16. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy: Jet-cooled halogenated methyl radicals and reactive scattering dynamics in an atom + polyatom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Erin Sue

    chlorination. These two projects are followed by an investigation utilizing a well-characterized radical source, F, in a reaction with ethane to form HF and ethyl radical. The non-radical HF product is detected directly through similar high-resolution infrared absorption methods as described above, and its analysis is used to make inferences about the internal energy redistribution of the other radical fragment, ethyl. State-to-state reaction dynamics under single collision conditions are interpreted in the context of a simple impulsive model based on conservation of linear/angular momentum yields predictions in good agreement with experiment. Deviations from the model indicate only minor excitation of the ethyl vibrations, in contrast with a picture of extensive intramolecular vibrational energy flow but consistent with Franck-Condon excitation of the methylene CH2 bending mode. The results suggest a relatively simple dynamical picture for exothermic atom + polyatomic scattering, i.e., that of early barrier dynamics in atom + diatom systems but modified by impulsive recoil coupling at the transition state between translational/rotational degrees of freedom.

  17. On atmospheric lidar performance comparison: from power aperture product to power aperture mixing ratio scattering cross-section product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Chiao-Yao

    2005-12-01

    A new performance index for atmospheric lidar, namely the power aperture mixing ratio scattering cross-section (PAMS) product, is proposed. Unlike the index widely used at present, namely the power aperture (PA) product, the new index provides an accurate comparison between different types of lidar for measuring the same atmospheric parameters. Using a sodium resonance lidar and a ‘Rayleigh’ lidar for measuring temperature and wind in the mesopause region (80 105 km) as an example, the concept and application of PAMS are illustrated.

  18. Catalytic reactive separation system for energy-efficient production of cumene

    DOEpatents

    Buelna, Genoveva; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to an atmospheric pressure, reactive separation column packed with a solid acid zeolite catalyst for producing cumene from the reaction of benzene with propylene. Use of this un-pressurized column, where simultaneous reaction and partial separation occur during cumene production, allow separation of un-reacted, excess benzene from other products as they form. This high-yielding, energy-efficient system allows for one-step processing of cumene, with reduced need for product purification. Reacting propylene and benzene in the presence of beta zeolite catalysts generated a selectivity greater than 85% for catalytic separation reactions at a reaction temperature of 115 degrees C and at ambient pressure. Simultaneously, up to 76% of un-reacted benzene was separated from the product; which could be recycled back to the reactor for re-use.

  19. Deoxyamphimedine, a Pyridoacridine Alkaloid, Damages DNA via the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kathryn M.; Andjelic, Cynthia D.; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P.; Ireland, Chris M.; Barrows, Louis R.

    2009-01-01

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity. PMID:19597581

  20. Deoxyamphimedine, a pyridoacridine alkaloid, damages DNA via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-05-25

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity.

  1. Heterogeneous reactivity of pyrene and 1-nitropyrene with NO 2: Kinetics, product yields and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miet, K.; Le Menach, K.; Flaud, P.-M.; Budzinski, H.; Villenave, E.

    The heterogeneous reactivity of nitrogen dioxide with pyrene and 1-nitropyrene (1NP) adsorbed on silica particles has been investigated using a fast-flow-tube in the absence of light. Reactants and products were extracted from particles using pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) and concentration measurements were performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The pseudo-first order rate constants were obtained from the fit of the experimental decay of particulate polycyclic compound concentrations versus reaction time. Experiments were performed at three different NO 2 concentrations and second order rate constants were calculated considering the oxidant concentration. The following rate constant values were obtained at room temperature: k(NO 2 + pyrene) = (9.3 ± 2.3) × 10 -17 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and k(NO 2 + 1NP) = (6.2 ± 1.5) × 10 -18 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, showing that the reactivity of 1NP was slower by a factor of 15 than that of pyrene. 1NP was identified as the only NO 2-initiated oxidation product of pyrene and all the three dinitropyrenes were identified in the case of the 1NP reaction. The product quantification allowed showing that the kinetics of oxidation product formation was equal to that measured for parent compounds degradation, within uncertainties, confirming the validity of the reaction kinetics measurements.

  2. Heterogeneous OH Oxidation of Two Structure Isomers of Dimethylsuccinic Acid Aerosol: Reactivity and Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Cheng, C. T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol contribute a significant mass fraction of ambient aerosol carbon and can continuously undergo oxidation by colliding with gas phase OH radicals. Although heterogeneous oxidation plays a significant role in the chemical transformation of organic aerosol, the effect of molecular structure on the reactivity and oxidation products remains unclear. We investigate the effect of branched methyl groups on the reactivity of two dimethylsuccinic acids (2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA)) toward gas phase OH radicals in an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The oxidation products formed upon oxidation is characterized in real time by the Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), an ambient soft ionization source. The 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA are structural isomers with the same oxidation state (OSC = -0.33) and carbon number (NC = 6), but different branching characteristics (2,2-DMSA has one secondary carbon and 2,3-DMSA has two tertiary carbons). The difference in molecular distribution of oxidation products observed in these two structural isomers would allow one to assess the sensitivity of kinetics and chemistry to the position of branched methyl group in the DMSA upon oxidation. We observe that the reactivity of 2,3-DMSA toward OH radicals is about 2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA. This difference in OH reactivity may attribute to the stability of the carbon-centered radical generated after hydrogen abstraction because an alkyl radical formed from the hydrogen abstraction on a tertiary carbon in 2,3-DMSA is more stable than on a secondary carbon in 2,2-DMSA. For both 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA, the molecular distribution and evolution of oxidation products is characterized by a predominance of functionalization products at the early oxidation stages. When the oxidation further proceeds, the fragmentation becomes more favorable and the oxidation mainly leads to the reduction of the carbon chain length through

  3. Semiclassical study of reactive scattering in a laser field - F + H2 + barred-h times omega times /1.06 microns/ system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.-M.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Semiclassical calculations of collinear F+H2(nu = 0) reactive and inelastic scattering in an Nd-glass laser field of various intensities are described. The decoupling approximation developed for the Miller-George theory is used for nonadiabatic transitions between the electronic-field surfaces, and special attention is paid to the choice of a proper coordinate system for applying the decoupling approximation. An increase in the total reaction probability and population ratio of the nu = 3 over nu = 2 vibrational state of HF occurs suddenly as the field intensity increases beyond 10 TW/sq cm. It is found that in a laser field the H2 molecule can be vibrationally excited while the F atom is electronically excited.

  4. Quantum reactive scattering of O(3P)+H2 at collision energies up to 4.4 eV.

    PubMed

    Gacesa, Marko; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2014-10-28

    We report the results of quantum scattering calculations for the O((3)P)+H2 reaction for a range of collision energies from 0.4 to 4.4 eV, important for astrophysical and atmospheric processes. The total and state-to-state reactive cross sections are calculated using a fully quantum time-independent coupled-channel approach on recent potential energy surfaces of (3)A' and (3)A″ symmetry. A larger basis set than in the previous studies was used to ensure single-surface convergence at higher energies. Our results agree well with the published data at lower energies and indicate the breakdown of reduced dimensionality approach at collision energies higher than 1.5 eV. Differential cross sections and momentum transfer cross sections are also reported.

  5. Quantum reactive scattering of O({sup 3}P)+H{sub 2} at collision energies up to 4.4 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Gacesa, Marko; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2014-10-28

    We report the results of quantum scattering calculations for the O({sup 3}P)+H{sub 2} reaction for a range of collision energies from 0.4 to 4.4 eV, important for astrophysical and atmospheric processes. The total and state-to-state reactive cross sections are calculated using a fully quantum time-independent coupled-channel approach on recent potential energy surfaces of {sup 3}A{sup ′} and {sup 3}A{sup ″} symmetry. A larger basis set than in the previous studies was used to ensure single-surface convergence at higher energies. Our results agree well with the published data at lower energies and indicate the breakdown of reduced dimensionality approach at collision energies higher than 1.5 eV. Differential cross sections and momentum transfer cross sections are also reported.

  6. Reduced dimensionality diatom--diatom reactive scattering: Application to a model H sub 2 +A sub 2 r arrow H+HA sub 2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Q.; Bowman, J.M. )

    1990-01-15

    We apply a recently formulated quantum theory of diatom--diatom reactions (Q. Sun and J. M. Bowman, Int. J. Quant. Chem., Quant. Chem. Symp. {bold 23}, 9 (1989)) to a model collinear H{sub 2}+A{sub 2}{r arrow}H+HA{sub 2} reaction, where A has the mass of a hydrogen atom. The theory assumes one diatom bond is nonreactive, and the reactive scattering Hamiltonian is written in terms of hyperspherical and cylindrical coordinates. The potential-energy surface used is the PK2 H+H{sub 2} surface augmented by a harmonic degree of freedom describing the nonreactive A{sub 2}. Details of the formulation and solution of the coupled-channel equations are given, along with convergence tests, and a discussion of the new state-to-state transition probabilities. In particular, the partial quenching of the well-known collinear H+H{sub 2} resonances is noted.

  7. A study of scattering, production, and stimulated emission of sound by vortex flows. [Bernouli enthalpy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic theory of aeroacoustics of homentropic fluid media is applied to the problems of sound scattering, production, and stimulated emission. A general theory of scattering from low speed three-dimensional vortex flows is presented. Specific results are given for the horseshoe vortex and vortex ring. The noise of an elementary corotating vortex pair in various flows is calculated. It is shown that a potential flow and shear flow can substantially increase the basic pair noise. Small reverse shears can annihilate vortex pairs and eliminate the pair noise mechanism. The pair results are used to explain qualitatively the operation of noise suppression devices. The stimulated emission of a single vortex pair and four and six vortex arrays is demonstrated. The results for six vortices illustrate how external pure tones can amplify the broadband noise of a jet in agreement with recent experimental evidence.

  8. D^* production in deep-inelastic scattering at low Q^2

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Inclusive production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA is studied in the range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2} of the photon virtuality and 0.02 < y < 0.70 of the inelasticity of the scattering process. The visible range for the D* meson is p{sub T} (D*) > 1.25 GeV and |{eta}(D*)| < 1.8. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb{sup -1}. Single and double differential cross sections are measured. The results are compared to QCD predictions.

  9. Quantum reactive scattering studies of the CN + H 2 → HCN + H reaction: the role of the non-reactive CN bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Schatz, George C.

    1997-02-01

    An extended version of the rotating-bond approximation (RBA) has been developed to study the title reaction, in which CN stretching is added to usual CH stretching and bend degrees of freedom in a coupled channel expansion. Calculations have been done on potential energy surfaces developed by Sun and Bowman (SB) and by ter Horst, Schatz, and Harding (TSH). The HCN vibrational product state distribution calculated on TSH surface shows significant population in both CH and CN stretching, indicating that the CN bond is not a spectator.

  10. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by amoebocytes of Asterias rubens (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Coteur, Geoffroy; Warnau, Michel; Jangoux, Michel; Dubois, Philippe

    2002-03-01

    An adapted peroxidase, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence method in an EDTA-free, Ca++-containing medium is described and used to characterise reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by starfish immunocytes using a standard microplate reader luminometer. ROS production was stimulated by direct interaction of immunocytes with bacteria or bacterial wall components, but not by the soluble stimulant PMA nor the lectin concanavalin A. Produced ROS detected by this method are apparently superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite. Comparison with other chemiluminescence methods indicates that the described method is the only one to detect the stimulation of starfish immunocytes by the Gram-positive bacteria, Micrococcus luteus, a fact that questions previous reports indicating a lack of stimulation by pathogens. The adapted method provides a rapid determination of the overall ROS production, which is suitable for both disease control and immunotoxicological studies in echinoderms.

  11. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-06

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities.

  12. Characterisation and O 2 titration of CO islands on Pt 100: helium atom scattering and reactive sticking probability measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteur, A. T.; Guo, X.-C.; Ali, T.; Gruyters, M.; King, D. A.

    1996-11-01

    Thermal energy atom scattering (TEAS) has been used simultaneously with molecular beam adsorption and thermal desorption to probe the lateral distribution of CO on a Pt 100 single-crystal surface. On the initial hex-R phase at 350 K, (1 × 1) island growth occurs at a constant local coverage ( θ(1 × 1)CO) of 0.4 ML. However, during desorption the surface remains wholly in the (1 × 1) state until ( θ(1 × 1)CO) ≈ 0.25 ML. Subsequent reconstruction to hex occurs at a constant local coverage of 0.19 ML in the remaining (1 × 1) domains. Hysteresis is not observed for the pre-prepared (1 × 1) surface, on which a random CO distribution is observed during adsorption. The scattering cross-section Σ for a single CO molecule on the hex-R and (1 × 1) surfaces at 350 K has been determined as 71 ± 10 and 130 ± 18Å 2 respectively. The behaviour during oxidation of (1 × 1)-CO islands on the initial hex-R surface prepared by either adsorption or desorption is found to be consistent with the TEAS data. The first sticking probabilities for O 2 and CO on the CO ad-freed and O ad-freed (1 × 1) phase of Pt 100 are also reported.

  13. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M; Fledderus, Joost O; Braam, Branko; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2015-03-15

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated reactive oxygen species production contributes to oleic acid (OA)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells, due to eNOS uncoupling. We measured reactive oxygen species production and eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in the presence of OA bound to bovine serum albumin, using the CM-H2DCFDA assay and the L-arginine/citrulline conversion assay, respectively. OA induced a concentration-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). OA had little effect on eNOS activity when stimulated by a calcium-ionophore, but decreased both basal and insulin-induced eNOS activity, which was restored by TTFA. Pretreatment of bEnd.3 cells with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) prevented OA-induced reactive oxygen species production and restored inhibition of eNOS activity by OA. Elevation of OA levels leads to both impairment in receptor-mediated stimulation of eNOS and to production of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and hence endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Fingerprinting the reactive toxicity pathways of 50 drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; O'Malley, Elissa; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-03-15

    A set of nine in vitro cellular bioassays indicative of different stages of the cellular toxicity pathway was applied to 50 disinfection by-products (DBPs) to obtain a better understanding of the commonalities and differences in the molecular mechanisms of reactive toxicity of DBPs. An Eschericia coli test battery revealed reactivity towards proteins/peptides for 64% of the compounds. 98% activated the NRf2-mediated oxidative stress response and 68% induced an adaptive stress response to genotoxic effects as indicated by the activation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. All DBPs reactive towards DNA in the E. coli assay and activating p53 also induced oxidative stress, confirming earlier studies that the latter could trigger DBP's carcinogenicity. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ELUMO as reactivity descriptor was linearly correlated with oxidative stress induction for trihalomethanes (r(2)=0.98) and haloacetamides (r(2)=0.58), indicating that potency of these DBPs is connected to electrophilicity. However, the descriptive power was poor for haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (r(2) (<) 0.06). For HAAs, we additionally accounted for speciation by including the acidity constant with ELUMO in a two-parameter multiple linear regression model. This increased r(2) to >0.80, indicating that HAAs' potency is connected to both, electrophilicity and speciation. Based on the activation of oxidative stress response and the soft electrophilic character of most tested DBPs we hypothesize that indirect genotoxicity-e.g., through oxidative stress induction and/or enzyme inhibition-is more plausible than direct DNA damage for most investigated DBPs. The results provide not only a mechanistic understanding of the cellular effects of DBPs but the effect concentrations may also serve to evaluate mixture effects of DBPs in water samples.

  15. Lifetime of reactive scattering resonances: Q-matrix analysis and angular momentum dependence for the F+H2 reaction by the hyperquantization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Cavalli, Simonetta; Simoni, Andrea; Aguilar, Antonio; Lucas, Josep Maria; De Fazio, Dario

    2004-12-15

    We report a study on the behavior with total angular momentum J of several resonances occurring at collision energies below or slightly above the reaction barrier in the F+H2-->HF+H reaction. Resonance positions and widths are extracted from exact time-independent quantum mechanical calculations using the hyperquantization algorithm and Smith's Q-matrix formalism which exploits complete S-matrix information. The results confirm previous work but provide much greater insight. Identification of quasi-bound states responsible for the resonances based on adiabatic models for the long-range atom-molecule interactions both in the entrance and exit channels, is successful except for the feature occurring at the lowest energy, which is found to overlap with an exit-channel resonance for J approximately 7. The two features are analyzed as overlapping resonances and their excellent Lorentzian fits, with well-behaved J-dependences of positions and widths, support the interpretation of the low-energy feature as a resonance to be associated to the triatomic transition state of the reaction. Resonance role on the reactive observables (integral cross sections and angular distributions) is investigated. The mechanism leading to forward scattering in the reactive differential cross section is commented, while the effects on rate constants, as well as the sensitivity of the resonance pattern to modification of the potential energy surface, are fully discussed elsewhere.

  16. Phosphoinositol 3-phosphate acts as a timer for reactive oxygen species production in the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi Min; Bouchab, Leïla; Hudik, Elodie; Le Bars, Romain; Nüsse, Oliver; Dupré-Crochet, Sophie

    2017-01-17

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the phagosome by the NADPH oxidase is critical for mammalian immune defense against microbial infections and phosphoinositides are important regulators in this process. Phosphoinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) regulates ROS production at the phagosome via p40(phox) by an unknown mechanism. This study tested the hypothesis that PI(3)P controls ROS production by regulating the presence of p40(phox) and p67(phox) at the phagosomal membrane. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI(3)P synthesis at the phagosome decreased the ROS production both in differentiated PLB-985 cells and human neutrophils. It also releases p67(phox), the key cytosolic subunit of the oxidase, and p40(phox) from the phagosome. The knockdown of the PI(3)P phosphatase MTM1 or Rubicon or both increases the level of PI(3)P at the phagosome. That increase enhances ROS production inside the phagosome and triggers an extended accumulation of p67(phox) at the phagosome. Furthermore, the overexpression of MTM1 at the phagosomal membrane induces the disappearance of PI(3)P from the phagosome and prevents sustained ROS production. In conclusion, PI(3)P, indeed, regulates ROS production by maintaining p40(phox) and p67(phox) at the phagosomal membrane.

  17. Regulation of insulin secretion and reactive oxygen species production by free fatty acids in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda Rodrigues; Valle, Maíra M R; Kowluru, Anjan; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo R

    2011-01-01

    Free fatty acids regulate insulin secretion through metabolic and intracellular signaling mechanisms such as induction of malonyl-CoA/long-chain CoA pathway, production of lipids, GPRs (G protein-coupled receptors) activation and the modulation of calcium currents. Fatty acids (FA) are also important inducers of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production in β-cells. Production of ROS for short periods is associated with an increase in GSIS (glucose-stimulated insulin secretion), but excessive or sustained production of ROS is negatively correlated with the insulin secretory process. Several mechanisms for FA modulation of ROS production by pancreatic β-cells have been proposed, such as the control of mitochondrial complexes and electron transport, induction of uncoupling proteins, NADPH oxidase activation, interaction with the renin-angiotensin system, and modulation of the antioxidant defense system. The major sites of superoxide production within mitochondria derive from complexes I and III. The amphiphilic nature of FA favors their incorporation into mitochondrial membranes, altering the membrane fluidity and facilitating the electron leak. The extra-mitochondrial ROS production induced by FA through the NADPH oxidase complex is also an important source of these species in β-cells.

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Meson Production at Jlab/CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    This report reviews the recent experimental results from the CLAS collaboration (Hall B of Jefferson Lab, or JLab) on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) and discusses their interpretation in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The impact of the experimental data on the applicability of the GPD mechanism to these exclusive reactions is discussed. Initial results obtained from JLab 6 GeV data indicate that DVCS might already be interpretable in this framework while GPD models fail to describe the exclusive meson production (DVMP) data with the GPD parameterizations presently used. An exception is the {phi} meson production for which the GPD mechanism appears to apply. The recent global analyses aiming to extract GPDs from fitting DVCS CLAS and world data are discussed. The GPD experimental program at CLAS12, planned with the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade of JLab, is briefly presented.

  19. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-22

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  20. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting [alpha][sub s]. Results on the Q[sup 2] dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s]. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x[sub B[sub j

  1. Study of Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Y.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Y.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, C.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Y.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Y. A.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Y.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-10-01

    Large samples of Λ, Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperons produced in the deep-inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of Σ(1385)+, Σ(1385)-, , , Ξ(1321)-, and hyperons decaying into were measured. The ratios of heavy-hyperon to Λ and heavy-antihyperon to were found to be in the range 3.8 % to 5.6 % with a relative uncertainty of about 10 %. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

  2. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  3. QCD CORRECTIONS TO DILEPTON PRODUCTION NEAR PARTONIC THRESHOLD IN PP SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    SHIMIZU, H.; STERMAN, G.; VOGELSANG, W.; YOKOYA, H.

    2005-10-02

    We present a recent study of the QCD corrections to dilepton production near partonic threshold in transversely polarized {bar p}p scattering, We analyze the role of the higher-order perturbative QCD corrections in terms of the available fixed-order contributions as well as of all-order soft-gluon resummations for the kinematical regime of proposed experiments at GSI-FAIR. We find that perturbative corrections are large for both unpolarized and polarized cross sections, but that the spin asymmetries are stable. The role of the far infrared region of the momentum integral in the resummed exponent and the effect of the NNLL resummation are briefly discussed.

  4. Measurement of D*± production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    The production of D *± mesons in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured for exchanged photon virtualities 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross sections have been measured and compared to next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The cross-sections are used to extract the charm contribution to the proton structure functions, expressed in terms of the reduced charm cross section, σ_{red}^{{coverline{c}}} . Theoretical calculations based on fits to inclusive HERA data are compared to the results.

  5. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Ríos, Edith; Rosado García, Adolfo; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Königsberg, Mina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Rodríguez-Tobón, Ahiezer; Fuentes-Mascorro, Gisela; León-Galván, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage.

  6. Photoreactivity of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes in sunlight: reactive oxygen species production in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Jafvert, Chad T

    2010-09-01

    Very limited information exists on transformation processes of carbon nanotubes in the natural aquatic environment. Because the conjugated pi-bond structure of these materials is efficient in absorbing sunlight, photochemical transformations are a potential fate process with reactivity predicted to vary with their diameter, chirality, number and type of defects, functionalization, residual metal catalyst and amorphous carbon content, and with the composition of the water, including the type and composition of materials that act to disperse them into the aqueous environment. In this study, the photochemical reactions involving colloidal dispersions of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-COOH) in sunlight were examined. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during irradiation occurs and is evidence for potential further phototransformation and may be significant in assessing their overall environmental impacts. In aerated samples exposed to sunlight or to lamps that emit light only within the solar spectrum, the probe compounds, furfuryl alcohol (FFA), tetrazolium salts (NBT2+ and XTT), and p-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA), were used to indicate production of 1O2, O2.-, and .OH, respectively. All three ROS were produced in the presence of SWNT-COOH and molecular oxygen (3O2). 1O2 production was confirmed by observing enhanced FFA decay in deuterium oxide, attenuated decay of FFA in the presence of azide ion, and the lack of decay of FFA in deoxygenated solutions. Photogeneration of O2.- and .OH was confirmed by applying superoxide dismutase (SOD) and tert-butanol assays, respectively. In air-equilibrated suspensions, the loss of 0.2 mM FFA in 10 mg/L SWNT-COOH was approximately 85% after 74 h. Production of 1O2 was not dependent on pH from 7 to 11; however photoinduced aggregation was observed at pH 3.

  7. Mitochondrial metabolic suppression in fasting and daily torpor: consequences for reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Daily torpor results in an ∼70% decrease in metabolic rate (MR) and a 20%-70% decrease in state 3 (phosphorylating) respiration rate of isolated liver mitochondria in both dwarf Siberian hamsters and mice even when measured at 37°C. This study investigated whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression also occurs in these species during euthermic fasting, when MR decreases significantly but torpor is not observed. State 3 respiration rate measured at 37°C was 20%-30% lower in euthermic fasted animals when glutamate but not succinate was used as a substrate. This suggests that electron transport chain complex I is inhibited during fasting. We also investigated whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression alters mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In both torpor and euthermic fasting, ROS production (measured as H(2)O(2) release rate) was lower with glutamate in the presence (but not absence) of rotenone when measured at 37°C, likely reflecting inhibition at or upstream of the complex I ROS-producing site. ROS production with succinate (with rotenone) increased in torpor but not euthermic fasting, reflecting complex II inhibition during torpor only. Finally, mitochondrial ROS production was twofold more temperature sensitive than mitochondrial respiration (as reflected by Q(10) values). These data suggest that electron leak from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which leads to ROS production, is avoided more efficiently at the lower body temperatures experienced during torpor.

  8. Extracellular production of reactive oxygen species during seed germination and early seedling growth in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Kranner, Ilse; Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Whitaker, Claire; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-07-01

    Extracellularly produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in plant development, but their significance for seed germination and seedling establishment is poorly understood. Here we report on the characteristics of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development in Pisum sativum. Extracellular superoxide (O2(.-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and the activity of extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) were determined spectrophotometrically, and O2(.-) was identified by electron paramagnetic resonance. Cell wall fractionation of cotyledons, seed coats and radicles was used in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to investigate substrate specificity and molecular masses of O2(.-)-producing enzymes, and the forces that bind them to the cell wall. Seed imbibition was accompanied by an immediate, transient burst of redox activity that involved O2(.-) and other substances capable of oxidizing epinephrine, and also H2O2. At the final stages of germination, coinciding with radicle elongation, a second increase in O2(.-) but not H2O2 production occurred and was correlated with an increase in extracellular ECPOX activity. Electrophoretic analyses of cell wall fractions demonstrated the presence of enzymes capable of O2(.-) production. The significance of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development, and also during seed aging, is discussed.

  9. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  10. Four-jet production in single- and double-parton scattering within high-energy factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutak, Krzysztof; Maciula, Rafal; Serino, Mirko; Szczurek, Antoni; van Hameren, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We perform a first study of 4-jet production in a complete high-energy factorization (HEF) framework. We include and discuss contributions from both single-parton scattering (SPS) and double-parton scattering (DPS). The calculations are performed for kinematical situations relevant for two experimental measurements (ATLAS and CMS) at the LHC. We compare our results to those reported by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations for different sets of kinematical cuts. The results of the HEF approach are compared with their counterparts for collinear factorization. For symmetric cuts the DPS HEF result is considerably smaller than the one obtained with collinear factorization. The mechanism leading to this difference is of kinematical nature. We conclude that an analysis of inclusive 4-jet production with asymmetric p T -cuts below 50 GeV would be useful to enhance the DPS contribution relative to the SPS contribution. In contrast to the collinear approach, the HEF approach nicely describes the distribution of the Δ S variable, which involves all four jets and their angular correlations.

  11. Determination of bismuth in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as molecular probe by resonance light scattering.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yanru; Cui, Fengling; Geng, Shaoguang; Jin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the sensitive determination of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as a molecular probe by resonance light scattering (RLS) is discussed. In 0.5 mol/L phosphoric acid (H3 PO4) medium, bismuth(III) reacted with PO4 (3-) to form an ion association compound, which resulted in the significant enhancement of RLS intensity and the appearance of the corresponding RLS spectral characteristics. The maximum scattering peak of the system existed at 364 nm. Under optimal conditions, there was linear relationship between the relative intensity of RLS and concentration of bismuth(III) in the range of 0.06-10.0 µg/mL for the system. A low detection limit for bismuth(III) of 3.22 ng/mL was achieved. The relative standard deviations (RSD) for the determination of 0.40 and 0.80 µg/mL bismuth(III) were 2.1% and 1.1%, respectively, for five determinations. Based on this fact, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of bismuth(III) at nanogram level by RLS technique with a common spectrofluorimeter. This analytical system was successfully applied to determine the trace amounts of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products, which was in good agreement with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  12. Exclusive meson pair production in {gamma}*{gamma} scattering at small momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.

    2006-04-01

    We study the exclusive production of {pi}{pi} and {rho}{pi} in hard {gamma}*{gamma} scattering in the forward kinematical region where the virtuality of one photon provides us with a hard scale in the process. The newly introduced concept of Transition Distribution Amplitudes (TDA) is used to perform a QCD calculation of these reactions thanks to two simple models for TDAs. Cross sections for {rho}{pi} and {pi}{pi} production are evaluated and compared to the possible background from the Bremsstrahlung process. This picture may be tested at intense electron-positron colliders such as CLEO and B factories. The cross section e{gamma}{yields}e{sup '}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is finally shown to provide a possible determination of the {pi}{sup 0} axial form factor, F{sub A}{sup {pi}{sup 0}}, at small t, which seems not to be measurable elsewhere.

  13. Evidence of coherent $$K^{+}$$ meson production in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Z.

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA→μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which ismore » a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. Furthermore, we find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.« less

  14. Evidence of coherent $K^{+}$ meson production in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA→μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. Furthermore, we find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.

  15. Evidence of Coherent K^{+} Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Marshall, C M; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; da Motta, H; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Solano Salinas, C J; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production ν_{μ}A→μ^{-}K^{+}A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K^{+} on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K^{+}, μ^{-}, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.

  16. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  17. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  18. Evidence of Coherent K+ Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Marshall, C. M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA →μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3 σ significance.

  19. Double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    We present first measurable predictions for electromagnetic (two-photon) double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at LHC. Measurable cross sections are obtained with realistic cuts on electron/positron (pseudo)rapidities and transverse momenta for the ALICE and ATLAS or CMS experiments. The predictions for total and differential cross sections are presented. We show also two-dimensional distributions in rapidities of the opposite-sign (from the same or different subcollisions) and of the same-sign (e+e+ or e-e-) electrons and in rapidity distance between them. Expected number of events are presented and discussed. Our calculations strongly suggest that relevant measurements with the help of ATLAS, CMS and ALICE detectors are possible in a near future. We show and compare energy dependence of the cross sections for one-pair and two-pair production.

  20. Ultraendurance exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria from human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shabalina, Irina G.; Mattsson, C. Mikael; Bakkman, Linda; Fernström, Maria; Rozhdestvenskaya, Zinaida; Enqvist, Jonas K.; Nedergaard, Jan; Ekblom, Björn; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced oxidative stress is important for the muscular adaptation to training but may also cause muscle damage. We hypothesized that prolonged exercise would increase mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured in vitro and that this correlates with oxidative damage. Eight male athletes (24–32 yr) performed ultraendurance exercise (kayaking/running/cycling) with an average work intensity of 55% V̇o2peak for 24 h. Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis before exercise, immediately after exercise, and after 28 h of recovery. The production of H2O2 was measured fluorometrically in isolated mitochondria with the Amplex red and peroxidase system. Succinate-supported mitochondrial H2O2 production was significantly increased after exercise (73% higher, P = 0.025) but restored to the initial level at recovery. Plasma level of free fatty acids (FFA) increased fourfold and exceeded 1.2 mmol/l during the last 6 h of exercise. Plasma FFA at the end of exercise was significantly correlated to mitochondrial ROS production (r = 0.74, P < 0.05). Mitochondrial content of 4-hydroxy-nonenal-adducts (a marker of oxidative damage) was increased only after recovery and was not correlated with mitochondrial ROS production. Total thiol group level and glutathione peroxidase activity were elevated after recovery. In conclusion, ultraendurance exercise increases ROS production in isolated mitochondria, but this is reversed after 28 h recovery. Mitochondrial ROS production was not correlated with oxidative damage of mitochondrial proteins, which was increased at recovery but not immediately after exercise. PMID:20110545

  1. Fetal programming alters reactive oxygen species production in sheep cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Nicholas H; Koppenhafer, Stacia L; Spitz, Douglas R; Volk, Kenneth A; Patel, Sonali S; Roghair, Robert D; Lamb, Fred S; Segar, Jeffrey L; Scholz, Thomas D

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to an adverse intrauterine environment is recognized as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease later in life. Although oxidative stress has been proposed as a mechanism for the fetal programming phenotype, the role of mitochondrial O(2)(*-) (superoxide radical) production has not been explored. To determine whether mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production is altered by in utero programming, pregnant ewes were given a 48-h dexamethasone (dexamethasone-exposed, 0.28 mg.kg(-1) of body weight.day(-1)) or saline (control) infusion at 27-28 days gestation (term=145 days). Intact left ventricular mitochondria and freeze-thaw mitochondrial membranes were studied from offspring at 4-months of age. AmplexRed was used to measure H(2)O(2) production. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD (manganese superoxide dismutase), GPx (glutathione peroxidase) and catalase were measured. Compared with controls, a significant increase in Complex I H(2)O(2) production was found in intact mitochondria from dexamethasone-exposed animals. The treatment differences in Complex I-driven H(2)O(2) production were not seen in mitochondrial membranes. Consistent changes in H(2)O(2) production from Complex III in programmed animals were not found. Despite the increase in H(2)O(2) production in intact mitochondria from programmed animals, dexamethasone exposure significantly increased mitochondrial catalase activity, whereas Mn-SOD and GPx activities were unchanged. The results of the present study point to an increase in the rate of release of H(2)O(2) from programmed mitochondria despite an increase in catalase activity. Greater mitochondrial H(2)O(2) release into the cell may play a role in the development of adult disease following exposure to an adverse intrauterine environment.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Invasion Induces Interleukin-1β Production Through Reactive Oxygen Species and Cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 play a crucial role in inflammatory responses in a variety of diseases including periodontitis. In this study, the periodontopathic bacterial pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, induced cell death and cytokine release in macrophages. Cell viability was reduced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion using (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The production of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophage cells was detected by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor and silencing of the caspase-1 gene had no effect on IL-1β secretion induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Pattern recognition receptor, NLRP3 was upregulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophages. However, NLRP3 knockdown had no effect on the secretion of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded RAW 264 cells. In addition, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the release of cathepsin B in RAW 264 cells. Interestingly, CA074-Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, and N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS inhibitor, prevented the production of IL-1β induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Taken together, these results suggest A. actinomycetemcomitans induce IL-1β production in RAW 264 cells through the production of ROS and cathepsin B, but not through the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway.

  3. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration.

  4. Oxygen Pathway Modeling Estimates High Reactive Oxygen Species Production above the Highest Permanent Human Habitation

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper; Roca, Josep; Wagner, Peter D.; Cascante, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the inner mitochondrial membrane is one of many fundamental processes governing the balance between health and disease. It is well known that ROS are necessary signaling molecules in gene expression, yet when expressed at high levels, ROS may cause oxidative stress and cell damage. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia may alter ROS production by changing mitochondrial Po2 (). Because depends on the balance between O2 transport and utilization, we formulated an integrative mathematical model of O2 transport and utilization in skeletal muscle to predict conditions to cause abnormally high ROS generation. Simulations using data from healthy subjects during maximal exercise at sea level reveal little mitochondrial ROS production. However, altitude triggers high mitochondrial ROS production in muscle regions with high metabolic capacity but limited O2 delivery. This altitude roughly coincides with the highest location of permanent human habitation. Above 25,000 ft., more than 90% of exercising muscle is predicted to produce abnormally high levels of ROS, corresponding to the “death zone” in mountaineering. PMID:25375931

  5. Francisella tularensis Antioxidants Harness Reactive Oxygen Species to Restrict Macrophage Signaling and Cytokine Production*

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Amanda A.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Melendez, J. Andrés

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of the highly infectious animal and human disease tularemia. Its extreme infectivity and virulence are associated with its ability to evade immune detection, which we now link to its robust reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity. Infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages with virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 prevented proinflammatory cytokine production in the presence or absence of IFN-γ compared with infection with the attenuated live vaccine strain. SchuS4 infection also blocked signals required for macrophage cytokine production, including Akt phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB nuclear localization and activation. Concomitant with SchuS4-mediated suppression of Akt phosphorylation was an increase in the levels of the Akt antagonist PTEN. Moreover, SchuS4 prevented the H2O2-dependent oxidative inactivation of PTEN compared with a virulent live vaccine strain. Mutation of catalase (katG) sensitized F. tularensis to H2O2 and enhanced PTEN oxidation, Akt phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and inflammatory cytokine production. Together, these findings suggest a novel role for bacterial antioxidants in restricting macrophage activation through their ability to preserve phosphatases that temper kinase signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:20558723

  6. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Photosystem II as a Response to Light and Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The effect of various abiotic stresses on photosynthetic apparatus is inevitably associated with formation of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, recent progress on ROS production by photosystem II (PSII) as a response to high light and high temperature is overviewed. Under high light, ROS production is unavoidably associated with energy transfer and electron transport in PSII. Singlet oxygen is produced by the energy transfer form triplet chlorophyll to molecular oxygen formed by the intersystem crossing from singlet chlorophyll in the PSII antennae complex or the recombination of the charge separated radical pair in the PSII reaction center. Apart to triplet chlorophyll, triplet carbonyl formed by lipid peroxidation transfers energy to molecular oxygen forming singlet oxygen. On the PSII electron acceptor side, electron leakage to molecular oxygen forms superoxide anion radical which dismutes to hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by the non-heme iron to hydroxyl radical. On the PSII electron donor side, incomplete water oxidation forms hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by manganese to hydroxyl radical. Under high temperature, dark production of singlet oxygen results from lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase, whereas incomplete water oxidation forms hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by manganese to hydroxyl radical. The understanding of molecular basis for ROS production by PSII provides new insight into how plants survive under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:28082998

  7. Interactions of U.S. Agricultural Production with Climatic Stresses and Reactive Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehl, R. J.; Robertson, G. P.; Bruulsema, T. W.; Kanter, D.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Rotz, C. A.; Williams, C. O.

    2011-12-01

    . Here we summarize reactive nitrogen (Nr)-climate interactions as they relate to U.S. agricultural production.

  8. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Lewis, A. C.; Carey, T. J.; Wenger, J. C.; Garcia, E. Borrás. I.; Muñoz, A.

    2009-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1-5 TgC yr-1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  9. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase interaction with methylglyoxal as reactive metabolic side product.

    PubMed

    Svrckova, Marika; Zatloukalova, Martina; Dvorakova, Petra; Coufalova, Dominika; Novak, David; Hernychova, Lenka; Vacek, Jan

    2017-03-22

    Proteins are subject to oxidative modification and the formation of adducts with a broad spectrum of reactive species via enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. Here we report that in vitro non-enzymatic methylglyoxal (MGO) binding causes the inhibition and formation of MGO advanced glycation end-products (MAGEs) in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA). Concretely, MGO adducts with NKA amino acid residues (mainly Arg) and N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) formation were found. MGO is not only an inhibitor for solubilized NKA (IC50=91±16μM), but also for reconstituted NKA in the lipid bilayer environment, which was clearly demonstrated using a DPPC/DPPE liposome model in the presence or absence of the NKA-selective inhibitor ouabain. High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of a tryptic digest of NKA isolated from pig (Sus scrofa) kidney indicates that the intracellular α-subunit is naturally (post-translationally) modified by MGO in vivo. In contrast to this, the β-subunit could only be modified by MGO artificially, and the transmembrane part of the protein did not undergo MGO binding under the experimental setup used. As with bovine serum albumin, serving as the water-soluble model, we also demonstrated a high binding capacity of MGO to water-poorly soluble NKA using a multi-spectral methodology based on electroanalytical, immunochemical and fluorimetric tools. In addition, a partial suppression of the MGO-mediated inhibitory effect could be observed in the presence of aminoguanidine (pimagedine), a glycation suppressor and MGO-scavenger. All the results here were obtained with the X-ray structure of NKA in the E1 conformation (3WGV) and could be used in the further interpretation of the functionality of this key enzyme in the presence of highly-reactive metabolic side-products, glycation agents and generally under oxidative stress conditions.

  10. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Lewis, A. C.; Carey, T. J.; Wenger, J. C.; Garcia, E. Borrás. I.; Muñoz, A.

    2009-06-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1-5 TgC yr-1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  11. Ordered analysis of heavy flavor production in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. S.; Roberts, R. G.

    1998-06-01

    At low Q2, charm production in deep-inelastic scattering is adequately described by assuming generation in electroweak boson-light parton scattering (dominantly boson-gluon fusion), which naturally incorporates the correct threshold behavior. At high Q2 this description is inadequate, since it does not sum logs in Q2/m2c, and is replaced by the treatment of the charm quark as a light parton. We show how the problem of going from one description to the other can be solved in a satisfactory manner to all orders. The key ingredient is the constraint of matching the evolution of the physical structure function F2 order by order in αs(Q2), in addition, to the matching of the value of F2 itself. This leads to new expressions for the coefficient functions associated with the charm parton, which are unique in incorporating both the correct threshold and asymptotic behaviors at each order in perturbation theory. The use of these improved coefficients leads to an improvement in global fits and an excellent description of the observed F2,charm.

  12. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ken; Takahari, Youko; Higashijima, Naoko; Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Ishizuka, Nobuhiko; Endo, Koichi; Fukuyama, Naoto; Hirano, Katsuya; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC), an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22(phox) mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  13. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects against bacterial infection by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akihiro; Abe, Hiromi; Tsuruta, Sanae; Chiba, Sayuri; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Sekiya, Takashi; Morita, Rimpei; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is crucial for various immune responses. The relationship between AhR and infection with the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is poorly understood. Here, we show that in response to LM infection, AhR is required for bacterial clearance by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. AhR-deficient mice were more susceptible to listeriosis, and AhR deficiency enhances bacterial growth in vivo and in vitro. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased in AhR-deficient macrophages infected with LM despite enhanced susceptibility to LM infection in AhR-deficient mice. Subsequent studies demonstrate that AhR protects against macrophage cell death induced by LM infection through the induction of the antiapoptotic factor, the apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages, which promotes macrophage survival in the setting of LM infection. Furthermore, AhR promotes ROS production for bacterial clearance. Our results demonstrate that AhR is essential to the resistance against LM infection as it promotes macrophage survival and ROS production. This suggests that the activation of AhR by its ligands may be an effective strategy against listeriosis.

  14. Reactive oxygen species production in energized cardiac mitochondria during hypoxia/reoxygenation: modulation by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Ping, Peipei; Weiss, James N

    2008-10-10

    Mitochondria are an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. When isolated from ischemic myocardium, mitochondria demonstrate increased ROS production as a result of damage to electron transport complexes. To investigate the mechanisms, we studied effects of hypoxia/reoxygenation on ROS production by isolated energized heart mitochondria. ROS production, tracked using Fe(2+)-catalyzed, H(2)O(2)-dependent H(2)DCF oxidation or Amplex Red, was similar during normoxia and hypoxia but markedly increased during reoxygenation, in proportion to the duration of hypoxia. In contrast, if mitochondria were rapidly converted from normoxia to near-anoxia ([O(2)], <1 micromol/L), the increase in H(2)DCF oxidation rate during reoxygenation was markedly blunted. To elicit the robust increase in H(2)DCF oxidation rate during reoxygenation, hypoxia had to be severe enough to cause partial, but not complete, respiratory chain inhibition (as shown by partial dissipation of membrane potential and increased NADH autofluorescence). Consistent with its cardioprotective actions, nitric oxide ( O) abrogated increased H(2)DCF oxidation under these conditions, as well as attenuating ROS-induced increases in matrix [Fe(2+)] and aconitase inhibition caused by antimycin. Collectively, these results suggest that (1) hypoxia that is sufficient to cause partial respiratory inhibition is more damaging to mitochondria than near-anoxia; and (2) O suppresses ROS-induced damage to electron transport complexes, probably by forming O-Fe(2+) complexes in the presence of glutathione, which inhibit hydroxyl radical formation.

  15. Increased reactive oxygen species production during reductive stress: The roles of mitochondrial glutathione and thioredoxin reductases.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Both extremes of redox balance are known to cause cardiac injury, with mounting evidence revealing that the injury induced by both oxidative and reductive stress is oxidative in nature. During reductive stress, when electron acceptors are expected to be mostly reduced, some redox proteins can donate electrons to O2 instead, which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the high level of reducing equivalents also concomitantly enhances ROS scavenging systems involving redox couples such as NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG. Here our objective was to explore how reductive stress paradoxically increases net mitochondrial ROS production despite the concomitant enhancement of ROS scavenging systems. Using recombinant enzymes and isolated permeabilized cardiac mitochondria, we show that two normally antioxidant matrix NADPH reductases, glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase, generate H2O2 by leaking electrons from their reduced flavoprotein to O2 when electron flow is impaired by inhibitors or because of limited availability of their natural electron acceptors, GSSG and oxidized thioredoxin. The spillover of H2O2 under these conditions depends on H2O2 reduction by peroxiredoxin activity, which may regulate redox signaling in response to endogenous or exogenous factors. These findings may explain how ROS production during reductive stress overwhelms ROS scavenging capability, generating the net mitochondrial ROS spillover causing oxidative injury. These enzymes could potentially be targeted to increase cancer cell death or modulate H2O2-induced redox signaling to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion damage.

  16. Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Small, J.

    2007-07-01

    The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

  17. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  18. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  19. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  20. The exclusive production of Rho mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmahn, Jeffrey W.

    1997-11-01

    The exclusive production of ρ0 mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) was studied using data obtained with the ZEUS detector from the 1994 HERA run. The cross section for this process has been determined in the range 3 < Q2 < 30 [ GeV2] and 42 < W < 141 [ GeV], subject to the restrictions pT2 < 0.6 [ GeV2] and 0.4 < M/piπ/

  1. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting {alpha}{sub s}. Results on the Q{sup 2} dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x{sub B{sub j}} > 0.001 are discussed. Initial results indicate a suppression in the rate of two forward jets in carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. All results presented are preliminary.

  2. Measurement of D ± production in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D ± mesons in the D ± → K ∓π±π± decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, 0 .02 < y < 0 .7, 1 .5 < p T ( D ±) < 15 GeV and | η( D ±)| < 1 .6, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p T ( D ±) and η( D ±) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D ± meson, respectively. Next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F_2^{{coverline{c}}} , to the proton structure-function F 2 was extracted.

  3. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e^± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb^{-1}. The measurement was performed for γ ^{*}- p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90< W < {250} {GeV} and for photon virtualities Q^2 > {25} {GeV2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ , where β =x/x_IP, x is the Bjorken variable and x_IP is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ ^{*}-dijet plane and the γ ^{*}-e^± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β . The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  4. The ozone productivity of n-propyl bromide: Part 2--An exception to the Maximum Incremental Reactivity Scale.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Gary Z; Yarwood, Greg

    2008-07-01

    In an earlier paper the ozone-forming potential of n-propyl bromide (NPB) was studied with a new methodology designed to address issues associated with a marginal smog-forming compound. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subsequently revised its policy and now recommends using the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale to rank the ozone-forming potential of all volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including those of marginal ozone productivity. Nevertheless, EPA contemplated exceptions to the box-model-derived MIR scale by allowing use of photochemical grid-model simulations for case specific reactivity assessments. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) also uses the MIR scale and CARB has a Reactivity Scientific Advisory Committee that can consider exceptions to the MIR scale. In this study, grid-model simulations that were recommended by EPA are used to evaluate the incremental ozone impacts of NPB using an update to the chemical mechanism developed in an earlier paper. New methods of analysis of the grid-model output are further developed here to quantify the relative reactivities between NPB and ethane over a wide range of conditions. The new grid-model-based analyses show that NPB is significantly different and generally less in ozone-forming potential (i.e., reactivity) than predicted by the box-model-based MIR scale relative to ethane, EPA's "bright-line" test for non-VOC status. Although NPB has low reactivity compared to typical VOCs on any scale, the new grid-model analyses developed here show that NPB is far less reactive (and even has negative reactivity) compared to the reactivity predicted by the MIR scale.

  5. Analysis of acidity production during enhanced reductive dechlorination using a simplified reactive transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Barry, D. A.; Robinson, C.; Gerhard, J. I.

    2012-07-01

    Build-up of fermentation products and hydrochloric acid at a contaminated site undergoing enhanced reductive dechlorination can result in groundwater acidification. Sub-optimal pH conditions can inhibit microbial activity and lead to reduced dechlorination rates. The extent of acidification likely to occur is site-specific and depends primarily on the extent of fermentation and dechlorination, the geochemical composition of soil and groundwater, and the pH-sensitivity of the active microbial populations. Here, the key chemical and physical mechanisms that control the extent of groundwater acidification in a contaminated site were examined, and the extent to which the remediation efficiency was affected by variations in groundwater pH was evaluated using a simplified process-based reactive-transport model. This model was applied successfully to a well-documented field site and was then employed in a sensitivity analysis to identify the processes likely to significantly influence acidity production and subsequent microbial inhibition. The accumulation of organic acids produced from the fermentation of the injected substrate was the main cause of the pH change. The concentration of dissolved sulphates controlled substrate utilisation efficiency because sulphate-reducing biomass competed with halo-respiring biomass for the fermentation products. It was shown further that increased groundwater velocity increases dilution and reduces the accumulation of acidic products. As a consequence, the flow rate corresponding to the highest remediation efficiency depends on the fermentation and dechlorination rates. The model enables investigation and forecasting of the extent and areal distribution of pH change, providing a means to optimise the application of reductive dechlorination for site remediation.

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Bacterial Clearance by Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Juliana K; das Gupta, Kaustav; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Iyer, Abishek; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2015-12-28

    Broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are used clinically as anticancer agents, and more isoform-selective HDACi have been sought to modulate other conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Mouse studies suggest that HDACi downregulate immune responses and may compromise host defense. However, their effects on human macrophage antimicrobial responses are largely unknown. Here, we show that overnight pretreatment of human macrophages with HDACi prior to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Escherichia coli results in significantly reduced intramacrophage bacterial loads, which likely reflect the fact that this treatment regime impairs phagocytosis. In contrast, cotreatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial challenge did not impair phagocytosis; instead, HDACi cotreatment actually promoted clearance of intracellular S. Typhimurium and E. coli. Mechanistically, treatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial infection enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by these cells. The capacity of HDACi to promote the clearance of intracellular bacteria from human macrophages was abrogated when cells were pretreated with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, which perturbs mitochondrial function. The HDAC6-selective inhibitor tubastatin A promoted bacterial clearance from human macrophages, whereas the class I HDAC inhibitor MS-275, which inhibits HDAC1 to -3, had no effect on intracellular bacterial loads. These data are consistent with HDAC6 and/or related HDACs constraining mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production from human macrophages during bacterial challenge. Our findings suggest that, whereas long-term HDACi treatment regimes may potentially compromise host defense, selective HDAC inhibitors may have applications in treating acute bacterial infections.

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Bacterial Clearance by Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Juliana K.; das Gupta, Kaustav; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Iyer, Abishek; Reid, Robert C.; Fairlie, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are used clinically as anticancer agents, and more isoform-selective HDACi have been sought to modulate other conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Mouse studies suggest that HDACi downregulate immune responses and may compromise host defense. However, their effects on human macrophage antimicrobial responses are largely unknown. Here, we show that overnight pretreatment of human macrophages with HDACi prior to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Escherichia coli results in significantly reduced intramacrophage bacterial loads, which likely reflect the fact that this treatment regime impairs phagocytosis. In contrast, cotreatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial challenge did not impair phagocytosis; instead, HDACi cotreatment actually promoted clearance of intracellular S. Typhimurium and E. coli. Mechanistically, treatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial infection enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by these cells. The capacity of HDACi to promote the clearance of intracellular bacteria from human macrophages was abrogated when cells were pretreated with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, which perturbs mitochondrial function. The HDAC6-selective inhibitor tubastatin A promoted bacterial clearance from human macrophages, whereas the class I HDAC inhibitor MS-275, which inhibits HDAC1 to -3, had no effect on intracellular bacterial loads. These data are consistent with HDAC6 and/or related HDACs constraining mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production from human macrophages during bacterial challenge. Our findings suggest that, whereas long-term HDACi treatment regimes may potentially compromise host defense, selective HDAC inhibitors may have applications in treating acute bacterial infections. PMID:26711769

  8. Differential production of reactive oxygen species in distinct brain regions of hypoglycemic mice.

    PubMed

    Amador-Alvarado, Leticia; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes

    2014-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of insulin therapy in patients suffering from type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Severe hypoglycemia leading to coma (isoelectricity) induces massive neuronal death in vulnerable brain regions such as the hippocampus, the striatum and the cerebral cortex. It has been suggested that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is involved in hypoglycemic brain damage, and that ROS generation is stimulated by glucose reintroduction (GR) after the hypoglycemic coma. However, the distribution of ROS in discrete brain regions has not been studied in detail. Using the oxidation sensitive marker dihydroethidium (DHE) we have investigated the distribution of ROS in different regions of the mouse brain during prolonged severe hypoglycemia without isoelectricity, as well as the effect of GR on ROS levels. Results show that ROS generation increases in the hippocampus, the cerebral cortex and the striatum after prolonged severe hypoglycemia before the coma. The hippocampus showed the largest increases in ROS levels. GR further stimulated ROS production in the hippocampus and the striatum while in the cerebral cortex, only the somatosensory and parietal areas were significantly affected by GR. Results suggest that ROS are differentially produced during the hypoglycemic insult and that a different response to GR is present among distinct brain regions.

  9. Calcium-dependent protein kinases regulate the production of reactive oxygen species by potato NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Ohura, Ikuko; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Yokota, Naohiko; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shimamoto, Ko; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2007-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in plant innate immunity. NADPH oxidase (RBOH; for Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog) plays a central role in the oxidative burst, and EF-hand motifs in the N terminus of this protein suggest possible regulation by Ca(2+). However, regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. We identified Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of potato (Solanum tuberosum) St RBOHB as potential phosphorylation sites. An anti-phosphopeptide antibody (pSer82) indicated that Ser-82 was phosphorylated by pathogen signals in planta. We cloned two potato calcium-dependent protein kinases, St CDPK4 and St CDPK5, and mass spectrometry analyses showed that these CDPKs phosphorylated only Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of St RBOHB in a calcium-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active mutant of St CDPK5, St CDPK5VK, provoked ROS production in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The CDPK-mediated ROS production was disrupted by knockdown of Nb RBOHB in N. benthamiana. The loss of function was complemented by heterologous expression of wild-type potato St RBOHB but not by a mutant (S82A/S97A). Furthermore, the heterologous expression of St CDPK5VK phosphorylated Ser-82 of St RBOHB in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that St CDPK5 induces the phosphorylation of St RBOHB and regulates the oxidative burst.

  10. Sibutramine provokes apoptosis of aortic endothelial cells through altered production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Shibata, Akinobu; Okumura, Naoko; Ikari, Akira; Sasajima, Yasuhide; Suenami, Koichi; Sato, Kiyohito; Takekoshi, Yuji; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Overdose administration of sibutramine, a serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, is considered to elicit severe side effects including hypertension, whose pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that 48-h incubation with >10μM sibutramine provokes apoptosis of human aortic endothelial (HAE) cells. Treatment with the lethal concentration of sibutramine facilitated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), altered expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress response genes (heat shock protein 70 and C/EBP homologous protein), and inactivated 26S proteasome-based proteolysis. The treatment also decreased cellular level of nitric oxide (NO) through lowering of expression and activity of endothelial NO synthase. These results suggest that ROS production and depletion of NO are crucial events in the apoptotic mechanism and may be linked to the pathogenesis of vasoconstriction elicited by the drug. Compared to sibutramine, its metabolites (N-desmethylsibutramine and N-didesmethylsibutramine) were much less cytotoxic to HAE cells, which hardly metabolized sibutramine. In contrast, both the drug and metabolites showed low cytotoxicity to hepatic HepG2 cells with high metabolic potency and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The cytotoxicity of sibutramine to HepG2 and Chang Liver cells was remarkably augmented by inhibition and knockdown of CYP3A4. This study also suggests an inverse relationship between sibutramine cytotoxicity and CYP3A4-mediated metabolism into the N-desmethyl metabolites.

  11. Long-lived Indy induces reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Neretti, Nicola; Wang, Pei-Yu; Brodsky, Alexander S.; Nyguyen, Hieu H.; White, Kevin P.; Rogina, Blanka; Helfand, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Decreased Indy activity extends lifespan in D. melanogaster without significant reduction in fecundity, metabolic rate, or locomotion. To understand the underlying mechanisms leading to lifespan extension in this mutant strain, we compared the genome-wide gene expression changes in the head and thorax of adult Indy mutant with control flies over the course of their lifespan. A signature enrichment analysis of metabolic and signaling pathways revealed that expression levels of genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway are significantly lower in Indy starting at day 20. We confirmed experimentally that complexes I and III of the electron transport chain have lower enzyme activity in Indy long-lived flies by Day 20 and predicted that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria could be reduced. Consistently, we found that both ROS production and protein damage are reduced in Indy with respect to control. However, we did not detect significant differences in total ATP, a phenotype that could be explained by our finding of a higher mitochondrial density in Indy mutants. Thus, one potential mechanism by which Indy mutants extend life span could be through an alteration in mitochondrial physiology leading to an increased efficiency in the ATP/ROS ratio. PMID:19164521

  12. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  13. [FEATURES OF CHANGES IN THE IMMUNE REACTIVITY IN EMPLOYEES IN MODERN PRODUCTION OF SULPHATE CELLULOSE].

    PubMed

    Meshchakova, N M; Bodienkova, G M

    2015-01-01

    There are reported changes in the indices of the immunoreactivity of the body in employees in modern productions of sulphate cellulose in dependence on the specificity of exposing factors of the production environment. At that the main adverse factor affecting the state of the immune reactivity of workers was found to be is air pollution of the working area with methyl-sulfur compounds in the pulping process, with chlorine and chlorine dioxide--in the process of bleaching, lime and limestone dust--in the process of caustic regeneration. There were shown differences in the character and severity of the immune response to the impact of different chemical compounds. The exertion of protective immune mechanisms is most pronounced in workers employed in the process of boiling and bleaching, in whom there were revealed significant changes in humoral compartment of immunity (pronounced inhibition of the IgA synthesis, which plays an important role in the state of broncho-pulmonary immunity). At the same time, the inhibition of the functional activity of phagocytic neutrophils was the most significant in workers who was experienced to the exposure to lime and limestone dust, testifying about the depression of nonspecific mechanisms of anti-infectious protection. The revealed changes in the immune system are the basis for the formation in workers certain health disorders, mainly with broncho-pulmonary pathology.

  14. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  15. The Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus orf35 gene product is required for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Shir; Itzhak, Inbal; Wasserman, Talya; Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Sarid, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the etiology of several human malignancies. KSHV open reading frame (orf) 35 encodes a conserved gammaherpesvirus protein with an, as yet, unknown function. Employing the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated a recombinant viral clone that fails to express ORF35 (BAC16-ORF35-stop) but preserves intact adjacent and overlapping reading frames. Using this construct, we studied the role of this previously uncharacterized gene product during lytic reactivation of KSHV. Upon lytic reactivation, the ORF35-stop recombinant virus displayed significantly reduced lytic viral gene expression, viral DNA replication, and progeny virus production as compared to control wild-type virus. Exogenous expression of ORF35-Flag reversed the effects of ORF35 deficiency. These results demonstrate that ORF35 is important for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

  16. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Excitable Cells: Modulators of Mitochondrial and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2•−) is generated under specific bioenergetic conditions at several sites within the electron-transport system; most is converted to H2O2 inside and outside the mitochondrial matrix by superoxide dismutases. H2O2 is a major chemical messenger that, in low amounts and with its products, physiologically modulates cell function. The redox state and ROS scavengers largely control the emission (generation scavenging) of O2•−. Cell ischemia, hypoxia, or toxins can result in excess O2•− production when the redox state is altered and the ROS scavenger systems are overwhelmed. Too much H2O2 can combine with Fe2+ complexes to form reactive ferryl species (e.g., Fe(IV) = O•). In the presence of nitric oxide (NO•), O2•− forms the reactant peroxynitrite (ONOO−), and ONOOH-induced nitrosylation of proteins, DNA, and lipids can modify their structure and function. An initial increase in ROS can cause an even greater increase in ROS and allow excess mitochondrial Ca2+ entry, both of which are factors that induce cell apoptosis and necrosis. Approaches to reduce excess O2•− emission include selectively boosting the antioxidant capacity, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation to reduce generation of O2•− by inducing proton leak, and reversibly inhibiting electron transport. Mitochondrial cation channels and exchangers function to maintain matrix homeostasis and likely play a role in modulating mitochondrial function, in part by regulating O2•− generation. Cell-signaling pathways induced physiologically by ROS include effects on thiol groups and disulfide linkages to modify posttranslationally protein structure to activate/inactivate specific kinase/phosphatase pathways. Hypoxia-inducible factors that stimulate a cascade of gene transcription may be mediated physiologically by ROS. Our knowledge of the role played by ROS and their scavenging systems in

  17. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  18. Photoreactivity of Metal-Organic Frameworks in Aqueous Solutions: Metal Dependence of Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Gao, Yanxin; Liu, Jing; Wen, Yifan; Zhao, Yingcan; Zhang, Kunyang; Yu, Gang

    2016-04-05

    Promising applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in various fields have raised concern over their environmental fate and safety upon inevitable discharge into aqueous environments. Currently, no information regarding the transformation processes of MOFs is available. Due to the presence of repetitive π-bond structure and semiconductive property, photochemical transformations are an important fate process that affects the performance of MOFs in practical applications. In the current study, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isoreticular MIL-53s was studied. Scavengers were employed to probe the production of (1)O2, O2(•-), and •OH, respectively. In general, MIL-53(Cr) and MIL-53(Fe) are dominated by type I and II photosensitization reactions, respectively, and MIL-53(Al) appears to be less photoreactive. The generation of ROS in MIL-53(Fe) may be underestimated due to dismutation. Further investigation of MIL-53(Fe) encapsulated diclofenac transformation revealed that diclofenac can be easily transformed by MIL-53(Fe) generated ROS. However, the cytotoxicity results implied that the ROS generated from MIL-53s have little effect on the viability of the human hepatocyte (HepG2) cell line. These results suggest that the photogeneration of ROS by MOFs may be metal-node dependent, and the application of MIL-53s as drug carriers needs to be carefully considered due to their high photoreactivity.

  19. Inhibition of reactive nitrogen species production in COPD airways: comparison of inhaled corticosteroid and oral theophylline

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, T; Yamagata, T; Gohda, M; Yamagata, Y; Ichikawa, T; Yanagisawa, S; Ueshima, K; Akamatsu, K; Nakanishi, M; Matsunaga, K; Minakata, Y; Ichinose, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are thought to be one of the important factors in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A study was undertaken to examine the effects of theophylline and fluticasone propionate (FP) on RNS production in subjects with COPD. Methods Sixteen COPD subjects participated in the study. Theophylline (400 mg/day orally) or FP (400 μg/day inhalation) were administered for 4 weeks in a randomised crossover manner with a washout period of 4 weeks. Induced sputum was collected at the beginning and end of each treatment period. 3‐nitrotyrosine (3‐NT), which is a footprint of RNS, was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detection method as well as by immunohistochemical staining. Results Theophylline significantly reduced the level of 3‐NT in the sputum supernatant as well as the number of 3‐NT positive cells (both p<0.01). FP also reduced 3‐NT formation, but the effect was smaller than that of theophylline. Theophylline also significantly reduced the neutrophil cell counts in the sputum (p<0.01), while FP treatment had no effect on the number of inflammatory cells in the sputum, except eosinophils. Conclusions Theophylline reduces nitrative stress and neutrophil infiltration in COPD airways to a larger extent than inhaled corticosteroid. PMID:16936236

  20. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  1. Reactive oxygen species production and Brugia pahangi survivorship in Aedes polynesiensis with artificial Wolbachia infection types.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Elizabeth S; Crain, Philip R; Fu, Yuqing; Howe, Daniel K; Dobson, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous transinfection with the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has been shown previously to induce pathogen interference phenotypes in mosquito hosts. Here we examine an artificially infected strain of Aedes polynesiensis, the primary vector of Wuchereria bancrofti, which is the causative agent of Lymphatic filariasis (LF) throughout much of the South Pacific. Embryonic microinjection was used to transfer the wAlbB infection from Aedes albopictus into an aposymbiotic strain of Ae. polynesiensis. The resulting strain (designated "MTB") experiences a stable artificial infection with high maternal inheritance. Reciprocal crosses of MTB with naturally infected wild-type Ae. polynesiensis demonstrate strong bidirectional incompatibility. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the MTB strain differ significantly relative to that of the wild-type, indicating an impaired ability to regulate oxidative stress. Following a challenge with Brugia pahangi, the number of filarial worms achieving the infective stage is significantly reduced in MTB as compared to the naturally infected and aposymbiotic strains. Survivorship of MTB differed significantly from that of the wild-type, with an interactive effect between survivorship and blood feeding. The results demonstrate a direct correlation between decreased ROS levels and decreased survival of adult female Aedes polynesiensis. The results are discussed in relation to the interaction of Wolbachia with ROS production and antioxidant expression, iron homeostasis and the insect immune system. We discuss the potential applied use of the MTB strain for impacting Ae. polynesiensis populations and strategies for reducing LF incidence in the South Pacific.

  2. Lycopene induces apoptosis in Candida albicans through reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-08-01

    Lycopene, a well-known carotenoid pigment found in tomatoes, has shown various biological functions. In our previous report, we showed that lycopene induces two apoptotic hallmarks, plasma membrane depolarization and G2/M cell cycle arrest, in Candida albicans. In this study, we investigated the ability of lycopene to induce apoptosis, and the mechanism by which it regulates apoptosis. FITC-Annexin V staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) assay showed that lycopene exerted its antifungal activity during the early and late stages of apoptosis in C. albicans. During apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased, and specifically the hydroxyl radicals contributed to the fungal cell death. Furthermore, lycopene treatment caused intracellular Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. At last caspase activation was triggered. In summary, lycopene exerted its antifungal effects against C. albicans by inducing apoptosis via ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs’ treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs’ treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS. PMID:26730190

  4. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs' treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs' treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS.

  5. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  6. Production of modified C-reactive protein in U937-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ciubotaru, Irina; Potempa, Lawrence A; Wander, Rosemary C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) has been proposed to be a strong independent predictor for cardiovascular disease. This circulating form of CRP (native CRP or nCRP) is well described. Recently, the existence of a conformationally distinct isoform of CRP (modified CRP or mCRP) has been reported. The relevance of each CRP isoform to atherosclerotic disease is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the natural expression of CRP in undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated macrophages, cells known to contribute to atherogenesis in vivo, and to determine whether transcribed CRP was expressed as nCRP or mCRP. Macrophages were generated from U937 monocytes using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Differentiated macrophages were further stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated cells, CRP expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and CRP protein production was measured by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (cellular CRP) or high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (secreted CRP). CRP transcript was minimally expressed in undifferentiated cells. Expression increased markedly in macrophages during differentiation and was not affected by LPS at 24 hrs. Cellular CRP protein increased in a time-dependent manner after LPS stimulation, and this induction was mediated via interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta. A small amount of secreted CRP was detected in the media of differentiated cells, but it was not significantly increased after LPS stimulation. Using specific monoclonal antibodies, our data indicate that cellular CRP is directly translated as the mCRP rather than the nCRP isomer. These results indicate that U937-derived macrophages are a good cell model to further study the production of mCRP under conditions relevant for the atherogenic process.

  7. Reactive oxygen species production and redox state in parthenogenetic and sperm-mediated bovine oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Morado, S; Cetica, P; Beconi, M; Thompson, J G; Dalvit, G

    2013-05-01

    The knowledge concerning redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated regulation of early embryo development is scarce and remains controversial. The aim of this work was to determine ROS production and redox state during early in vitro embryo development in sperm-mediated and parthenogenetic activation of bovine oocytes. Sperm-mediated oocyte activation was carried out in IVF-modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF) with frozen-thawed semen. Parthenogenetic activation was performed in TALP plus ionomycin and then in IVF-mSOF with 6-dimethylaminopurine plus cytochalasin B. Embryos were cultured in IVF-mSOF. ROS and redox state were determined at each 2-h interval (7-24 h from activation) by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and RedoxSensor Red CC-1 fluorochromes respectively. ROS levels and redox state differed between activated and non-activated oocytes (P<0.05 by ANOVA). In sperm-activated oocytes, an increase was observed between 15 and 19 h (P<0.05). Conversely, in parthenogenetically activated oocytes, we observed a decrease at 9 h (P<0.05). In sperm-activated oocytes, ROS fluctuated throughout the 24 h, presenting peaks around 7, 19, and 24 h (P<0.05), while in parthenogenetic activation, peaks were detected at 7, 11, and 17 h (P<0.05). In the present work, we found clear distinctive metabolic patterns between normal and parthenogenetic zygotes. Oxidative activity and ROS production are an integral part of bovine zygote behavior, and defining a temporal pattern of change may be linked with developmental competence.

  8. Interactions of corrosion products and bentonite: An extended multicomponent reactive transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chuanhe; Samper, Javier; Fritz, Bertrand; Clement, Alain; Montenegro, Luis

    Radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories envisages various engineered barriers such as carbon-steel canisters and compacted bentonite. Canister corrosion and the chemical interactions of corrosion products with bentonite are key reactions for the long term performance of a repository. Samper, Lu, and Montenegro (Physics and Chemistry of the Earth 2008; 33S: S306-S316) reported numerical models to simulate canister corrosion and the interactions of corrosion products with bentonite for the near field of a repository in granite. Here we present an updated version of their reactive transport model which accounts for: (1) Three types of sorption sites in the bentonite; (2) Kinetically-controlled canister corrosion, (3) Kinetically-controlled magnetite precipitation; and (4) The competition effect of Ni 2+ for sorbing sites. Accounting for kinetically-controlled canister corrosion leads to a significant reduction in the corrosion rate. Uncertainties in the surface complexation reactions play a minor role in the time evolution of the computed pH in the bentonite and the granite. Computed iron concentrations, however, are very sensitive to changes in the surface complexation reactions. The apparent distribution coefficient of Fe computed with the three-site model is 10 times larger than that obtained with a single-site model. The concentration of dissolved Fe computed with kinetic magnetite precipitation is smaller than that obtained with magnetite precipitation at local equilibrium. The largest difference in the concentration of dissolved Fe occurs after 3 × 10 4 years. The competition of Ni 2+ for sorption sites affects significantly the chemical evolution of the bentonite porewater. The sorption of Ni 2+ on bentonite releases protons and therefore the pH in the bentonite is smaller than that computed without Ni 2+ transport. The sorption of Ni 2+ leads to a decrease of the concentration of sorbed Fe and an increase of the concentration of dissolved

  9. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  10. The development of the super-biodiesel production continuously from Sunan pecan oil through the process of reactive distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohana, Eflita; Yulianto, Moh. Endy; Ikhsan, Diyono; Nanta, Aditya Marga; Puspitasari, Ristiyanti

    2016-06-01

    In general, a vegetable oil-based biodiesel production commercially operates a batch process with high investments and operational costs. Thus, it is necessary to develop super-biodiesel production from sunan pecan oil continuously through the process of reactive distillation. There are four advantages of the reactive distillation process for the biodiesel production, as follows: (i) it incorporates the process of transesterification reaction, and product separation of residual reactants become one stage of the process, so it saves the investment and operation costs, (ii) it reduces the need for raw materials because the methanol needed corresponds to the stoichiometry, so it also reduces the operation costs, (iii) the holdup time in the column is relatively short (5±0,5 minutes) compared to the batch process (1-2 hours), so it will reduce the operational production costs, and (iv) it is able to shift the reaction equilibrium, because the products and reactants that do not react are instantly separated (based on Le Chatelier's principles) so the conversion will be increased. However, the very crucial problem is determining the design tools and process conditions in order to maximize the conversion of the transesterification reaction in both phases. Thus, the purpose of this research was to design a continuous reactive distillation process by using a recycled condensate to increase the productivity of the super-biodiesel from sunan pecan oil. The research was carried out in three stages including (i) designing and fabricating the reactive distillation equipment, (ii) testing the tool performance and the optimization of the biodiesel production, and (iii) biodiesel testing on the diesel engine. These three stages were needed in designing and scaling-up the process tools and the process operation commercially. The reactive distillation process tools were designed and manufactured with reference to the design system tower by Kitzer, et.al. (2008). The manufactured

  11. HIV antiretroviral drug combination induces endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production, but not apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Li, Yuchi; Mathis, J. Michael; Alexander, J. Steven; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2007-10-01

    Numerous reports now indicate that HIV patients administered long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at a greater risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction is an initiating event in atherogenesis and may contribute to HIV-associated atherosclerosis. We previously reported that ART induces direct endothelial dysfunction in rodents. In vitro treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with ART indicated endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we determined whether ART-induced endothelial dysfunction is mediated via mitochondria-derived ROS and whether this mitochondrial injury culminates in endothelial cell apoptosis. Two major components of ART combination therapy, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor, were tested, using AZT and indinavir as representatives for each. Microscopy utilizing fluorescent indicators of ROS and mitochondria demonstrated the mitochondrial localization of ART-induced ROS. MnTBAP, a cell-permeable metalloporphyrin antioxidant, abolished ART-induced ROS production. As a final step in confirming the mitochondrial origin of the ART-induced ROS, HUVEC were transduced with a cytosolic- compared to a mitochondria-targeted catalase. Transduction with the mitochondria-targeted catalase was more effective than cytoplasmic catalase in inhibiting the ROS and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) produced after treatment with either AZT or indinavir. However, both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic catalase attenuated ROS and 8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}} production induced by the combination treatment, suggesting that in this case, the formation of cytoplasmic ROS may also occur, and thus, that the mechanism of toxicity in the combination treatment group may be different compared to treatment with AZT or indinavir alone. Finally, to determine whether ART-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and

  12. Reactive organic gas emissions from livestock feed contribute significantly to ozone production in central California.

    PubMed

    Howard, Cody J; Kumar, Anuj; Malkina, Irina; Mitloehner, Frank; Green, Peter G; Flocchini, Robert G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California currently experiences some of the highest surface ozone (O(3)) concentrations in the United States even though it has a population density that is an order of magnitude lower than many urban areas with similar ozone problems. Previously unrecognized agricultural emissions may explain why O(3) concentrations in the SJV have not responded to traditional emissions control programs. In the present study, the ozone formation potentials (OFP) of livestock feed emissions were measured on representative field samples using a transportable smog chamber. Seven feeds were considered: cereal silage (wheat grain and oat grain), alfalfa silage, corn silage, high moisture ground corn (HMGC), almond shells, almond hulls, and total mixed ration (TMR = 55% corn silage, 16% corn grain, 8% almond hulls, 7% hay, 7% bran + seeds, and 5% protein + vitamins + minerals). The measured short-term OFP for each gram of reactive organic gas (ROG) emissions from all livestock feed was 0.17-0.41 g-O(3) per g-ROG. For reference, OFP of exhaust from light duty gasoline powered cars under the same conditions is 0.69 +/- 0.15 g-O(3) per g-ROG. Model calculations were able to reproduce the ozone formation from animal feeds indicating that the measured ROG compounds account for the observed ozone formation (i.e., ozone closure was achieved). Ethanol and other alcohol species accounted for more than 50% of the ozone formation for most types of feed. Aldehydes were also significant contributors for cereal silage, high moisture ground corn, and total mixed ration. Ozone production calculations based on feed consumption rates, ROG emissions rates, and OFP predict that animal feed emissions dominate the ROG contributions to ozone formation in the SJV with total production of 25 +/- 10 t O(3) day(-1). The next most significant ROG source of ozone production in the SJV is estimated to be light duty vehicles with total production of 14.3 +/- 1.4 t O(3) day(-1). The

  13. Effects of Pectic Polysaccharides Isolated from Leek on the Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Mariana; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Kratchanova, Maria; Denev, Petko; Kussovski, Veselin; Ciz, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The current survey investigates the effect of four polysaccharides isolated from fresh leek or alcohol insoluble substances (AIS) of leek on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from phagocytes. The ability of the polysaccharides to activate serum complement was also investigated. Despite the lack of antioxidant activity, the pectic polysaccharides significantly decreased the production of ROS by human neutrophils. Polysaccharides isolated from AIS markedly activated RAW 264.7 macrophages for RNS production in a concentration-dependent manner. The Western blot analysis revealed that this effect was due to the stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression of macrophages. The polysaccharides extracted from AIS with water showed the ability to fix serum complement, especially through the alternative pathway. It was found that the polysaccharide that has the highest complement-fixing effect is characterized by the highest content of uronic acids and the highest molecular weight. PMID:23905651

  14. Recent Advances and Open Questions in Neutrino-induced Quasi-elastic Scattering and Single Photon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G. T.; Harris, D. A.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Zeller, G. P.

    2015-06-15

    The study of neutrino–nucleus interactions has recently seen rapid development with a new generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments employing medium and heavy nuclear targets for the study of neutrino oscillations. A few unexpected results in the study of quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production have spurred a revisiting of the underlying nuclear physics and connections to electron–nucleus scattering. A thorough understanding and resolution of these issues is essential for future progress in the study of neutrino oscillations.

  15. Analysis of Neutron Production in Passively Scattered Ion-Beam Therapy.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Jung, Wongyun; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2016-11-24

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12-0.18 and 0.0067-0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Function to Mediate the Fe Deficiency Response in an Fe-Efficient Apple Genotype: An Early Response Mechanism for Enhancing Reactive Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaohua; Wu, Ting; Zhai, Longmei; Li, Duyue; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Huiqin; Wang, Yi; Han, Zhenhai

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation. This study demonstrated that ROS play a critical role in Fe deficiency-induced signaling at an early stage in Malus xiaojinensis. Once ROS production has been initiated, prolonged Fe starvation leads to activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. Further, we demonstrated that ROS scavengers are involved in maintaining the cellular redox homeostasis during prolonged Fe deficiency treatment. Taken together, our results describe a feedback repression loop for ROS to preserve redox homeostasis and maintain a continuous Fe deficiency response in the Fe-efficient woody plant M. xiaojinensis. More broadly, this study reveals a new mechanism in which ROS mediate both positive and negative regulation of plant responses to Fe deficiency stress. PMID:27899933

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Function to Mediate the Fe Deficiency Response in an Fe-Efficient Apple Genotype: An Early Response Mechanism for Enhancing Reactive Oxygen Production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chaohua; Wu, Ting; Zhai, Longmei; Li, Duyue; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Huiqin; Wang, Yi; Han, Zhenhai

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation. This study demonstrated that ROS play a critical role in Fe deficiency-induced signaling at an early stage in Malus xiaojinensis. Once ROS production has been initiated, prolonged Fe starvation leads to activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. Further, we demonstrated that ROS scavengers are involved in maintaining the cellular redox homeostasis during prolonged Fe deficiency treatment. Taken together, our results describe a feedback repression loop for ROS to preserve redox homeostasis and maintain a continuous Fe deficiency response in the Fe-efficient woody plant M. xiaojinensis. More broadly, this study reveals a new mechanism in which ROS mediate both positive and negative regulation of plant responses to Fe deficiency stress.

  18. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  19. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Gerco; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H; Butcher, Lindsay D; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Crowe, Sheila E

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections.

  20. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H.; Butcher, Lindsay D.; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R.; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections. PMID:26761793

  1. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  2. In situ self-catalyzed reactive extraction of germinated oilseed with short-chained dialkyl carbonates for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Li, Dan; Li, Yang; Gao, Jing; Zhou, Liya; He, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In order to eliminate the expense associated with solvent extraction and oil cleanup, and reduce the processing steps in biodiesel production, reactive extraction has become a focus of research in recent years. In this study, germinated castor seed was used as substrate and catalyst, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used as acyl acceptor and oil extractant to produce biodiesel. The optimum conditions were as follows: the germination time of castor seed was 72 h, DMC/germinated seed ratio was 12.5 ml/g, reaction temperature was 35°C, and water content was 2.11%. The biodiesel yield could reach as much as 87.41% under the optimized conditions. This germinated oilseed self-catalyzed reactive extraction can be a promising route for biodiesel production.

  3. Patterns of accumulation of miRNAs encoded by herpes simplex virus during productive infection, latency, and on reactivation.

    PubMed

    Du, Te; Han, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Guoying; Zhou, Grace; Roizman, Bernard

    2015-01-06

    The key events in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are (i) replication at a portal of entry into the body modeled by infection of cultured cells; (ii) establishment of a latent state characterized by a sole latency-associated transcript and microRNAs (miRNAs) modeled in murine peripheral ganglia 30 d after inoculation; and (iii) reactivation from the latent state modeled by excision and incubation of ganglia in medium containing anti-NGF antibody for a timespan of a single viral replicative cycle. In this report, we examine the pattern of synthesis and accumulation of 18 HSV-1 miRNAs in the three models. We report the following: (i) H2-3P, H3-3P, H4-3P, H5-3P, H6-3P, and H7-5P accumulated in ganglia harboring latent virus. All but H4-3P were readily detected in productively infected cells, and most likely they originate from three transcriptional units. (ii) H8-5P, H15, H17, H18, H26, and H27 accumulated during reactivation. Of this group, only H26 and H27 could be detected in productively infected cells. (iii) Of the 18 we have examined, only 10 miRNAs were found to accumulate above background levels in productively infected cells. The disparity in the accumulation of miRNAs in cell culture and during reactivation may reflect differences in the patterns of regulation of viral gene expression during productive infection and during reactivation from the latent state.

  4. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase reduces crescentic and necrotic glomerular lesions, reactive oxygen production, and MCP1 production in murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Gilkeson, Gary S; Mashmoushi, Ahmad K; Ruiz, Phillip; Caza, Tiffany N; Perl, Andras; Oates, Jim C

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, in both animal models and in humans, is characterized by autoantibody production followed by immune complex deposition in target tissues. Ensuing target organ damage is modulated by reactive intermediates, including reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, through as of now incompletely understood mechanisms. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase is known to impact vascular reactivity; however its impact on reactive intermediate production and inflammatory renal disease is less well defined. In this study, we assessed the impact of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) on disease in lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. Mice lacking eNOS developed earlier more severe disease with decreased survival. eNOS deficient mice died sooner and developed significantly more glomerular crescents, necrosis, inflammatory infiltrates and vasculitis, indicating a role for eNOS in modulating these renal lesions. Immune complex deposition was similar between groups, indicating the impact of eNOS is distal to antibody/complement glomerular deposition. Urinary nitric oxide production was decreased in the eNOS deficient mice, while proteinuria was increased. Urinary monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was also increased in the knockout mice. CD4+ T cells from MRL/lpr mice demonstrated mitochondrial hyperpolarization, increased nitric oxide and superoxide production and increased calcium flux compared to B6 control mice. Deficiency of eNOS resulted in decreased nitric oxide and mitochondrial calcium levels but had no effect on mitochondrial hyperpolarization. Renal cortices from MRL/lpr mice that are eNOS deficient demonstrated increased superoxide production, which was blocked by both nitric oxide synthase and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. These studies thus demonstrate a key role for eNOS in modulating renal disease in lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. The impact appears to be mediated by effects on superoxide production in the kidney, impacting downstream mediators such as monocyte

  6. Evidence for photochemical production of reactive oxygen species in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Sun, Henry J; McKay, Christopher P; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Gaosen; Koutsopoulou, Eleni; Christidis, George E; Margiolaki, Irene

    2015-05-11

    The combination of intense solar radiation and soil desiccation creates a short circuit in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, where soils release significant amounts of CO2 and reactive nitrogen oxides by abiotic oxidation. Here we show that desert soils accumulate metal superoxides and peroxides at higher levels than non-desert soils. We also show the photogeneration of equimolar superoxide and hydroxyl radical in desiccated and aqueous soils, respectively, by a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism supported by their mineralogical composition. Reactivity of desert soils is further supported by the generation of hydroxyl radical via aqueous extracts in the dark. Our findings extend to desert soils the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by certain mineral oxides and also explain previous studies on desert soil organic oxidant chemistry and microbiology. Similar processes driven by ultraviolet radiation may be operating in the surface soils on Mars.

  7. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  8. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  9. Investigating a Chemoselective Grignard Reaction in an Undergraduate Discovery Lab to Predict Reactivity and Final Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michael J.; Hayes, Colin O.; Vaccaro, Francesca A.; Flynn, Cailyn B.; Thedford, R. Paxton; Stephenson, Clifton J.

    2016-01-01

    A discovery-based Grignard experiment that emphasizes several important concepts in organic chemistry is reported. The Grignard reagent from 1- bromo-4-chlorobenzene was prepared and reacted with dimethylformamide (DMF) to synthesize 4-chlorobenzaldehyde. Students were tasked with predicting halogen reactivity in the formation of the Grignard…

  10. Structure-reactivity relationships of flavan-3-ols on product generation in aqueous glucose/glycine model systems.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yuko; Peterson, Devin G

    2007-05-02

    Ring structure-reactivity relationships of three flavan-3-ols [epicatechin (EC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)] and three simple phenolic compounds (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and methylgallate as the analogous individual A, B, and C benzene rings of EGCG) on product generation in an aqueous glucose-glycine reaction model system (125 degrees C and 30 min) were investigated. The addition of EC, ECG, or EGCG to a glucose-glycine model was reported to similarly significantly reduce the formation of pyrazine, methyl-substituted pyrazines, and cyclotene. All three flavan-3-ols were also reported to generate phenolic-C2, C3, C4, and C6 sugar fragment adducts and to statistically reduce the concentration of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, diacetyl, acetoin, and 3-deoxyglucosone during the reaction time course, except for the EGCG reaction where 3-deoxyglucosone was not statistically different from the control after 20 min. For the simple phenolic compounds, methylgallate followed by 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene was the least reactive, while 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene was reported as the most reactive phenolic structure for quenching or reducing the concentration of the alpha-hydroxy- and alpha-dicarbonyl sugar fragments during the reaction time course. These results imply that the main mechanism flavan-3-ols reduced product generation was phenolic-sugar fragment carbonyl trapping reactions primarily on the A ring (the meta-polyhydroxylated benzene ring) or not due to the alteration of the reaction reduction potential.

  11. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life. PMID:28327661

  12. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  13. Interaction of insulin with methyl tert-butyl ether promotes molten globule-like state and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Valipour, Masoumeh; Maghami, Parvaneh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Sadeghpour, Mostafa; Khademian, Mohamad Ali; Mosavi, Khadijeh; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-09-01

    Interaction of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with proteins is a new look at its potential adverse biological effects. When MTBE is released to the environment it enters the blood stream through inhalation, and could affect the properties of various proteins. Here we investigated the interaction of MTBE with insulin and its effect on insulin structural changes. Our results showed that insulin formed a molten globule (MG)-like structure in the presence of 8 μM MTBE under physiological pH. The insulin structural changes were studied using spectroscopy methods, viscosity calculation, dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. To delineate the mechanisms involved in MTBE-protein interactions, the formation of reactive oxygen specious (ROS) and formation of protein aggregates were measured. The chemiluminscence experiments revealed an increase in ROS production in the presence of MTBE especially in the MG-like state. These results were further confirmed by the aggregation tests, which indicated more aggregation of insulin at 40 μM MTBE compared with 8 μM. Thus, the formation of initial aggregates and exposure of the hydrophobic patches upon formation of the MG-like state in the presence of MTBE drives protein oxidation and ROS generation.

  14. In situ lipase-catalyzed reactive extraction of oilseeds with short-chained dialkyl carbonates for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Su, Erzheng; You, Pengyong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2009-12-01

    Dimethyl/diethyl carbonate was adopted as extraction solvent and transesterification reagent at the same time for in situ lipase-catalyzed reactive extraction of oilseeds for biodiesel production in this work. Fatty acid methyl esters and ethyl esters were respectively obtained with higher yields than those achieved by conventional two-step extraction/transesterification. The augment ranged from 15.7% to 31.7%. The key parameters such as solvent/seed ratio and water content were further investigated to find their effects on the in situ reactive extraction. The highest yields of Pistacia chinensis Bunge methyl ester, P. chinensis Bunge ethyl ester, Jatropha curcas L methyl ester and J. curcas L ethyl ester could attain 89.6%, 90.7%, 95.9% and 94.5%, respectively under the optimized conditions.

  15. Room-Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    PubMed

    El-Demellawi, Jehad K; Holt, Christopher R; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Saih, Youssef; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-07-01

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from biolabeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties remain still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g., isopropanol) into ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was monitored by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy, and solid-state NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their reactivity in solvents in general, as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  16. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  17. Production of Ξ- in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. Mohammad; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ- has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  18. Production of Ξ{sup −} in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, N. Mohammad Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ{sup −} has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  19. Raman scattering and associated fast electron production. Final technical report, April 16, 1984-April 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.

    1985-08-01

    High energy electrons in plasmas have been attributed to various causes including trapping by electron plasma waves created by stimulated Raman scattering. A theory, consistent with experimental results, based on the acceleration of trapped electrons by such electron plasma waves as they propagate in the presence of a density gradient away from the region where they are created is presented. Single particle simulations show accelerating voltages as high as 20 GV/m.

  20. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kötz, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections σ_red^{cbar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5≤ Q 2≤2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 3ṡ10-5≤ x≤5ṡ10-2. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W ± and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  1. [Roles of reactive oxygen species in Streptomyces pactum Act12-induced tanshinone production in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Shun-Cang; Liu, Yan; Liang, Zong-Suo

    2014-06-01

    Our previous research indicated that the Streptomyces pactum Act12 (Act12) had a certain promotional effect on tanshinone accumulation and up-regulated the expression of genes 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots. This study focuses on the roles of reactive oxygen species in S. pactum Act12-induced tanshinone production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. The 4% Act12, 4% Act12 + CAT and 4% Act12 + SOD were added to S. miltiorrhiza hairy root and subcultured for 21 days, the dry weight, contents of reactive oxygen species, contents of tanshinones and expression of HMGR and DXR were determined at different harvest-time. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots was triggered by 4% Act12 treatment. The relative expressions of genes HMGR and DXR in 4% Act12 treatment were 32.4 and 4.8-fold higher than those in the control. And the total tanshinone in the hairy roots was 10.2 times higher than that of the control. The CAT and SOD could significantly inhibit the ROS accumulation and relative expressions of genes HMGR and DXR in 4% Act12 treatment, which induced the total tanshinone content was decreased by 74.6% comparing with the 4% Act12 treatment. ROS mediated Act12-induced tanshinone production. The Act12 may be via the ROS signal channel to activate the tanshinone biosynthesis pathways. Thereby the tanshinon content in hairy roots was increased.

  2. Benidipine, an anti-hypertensive drug, inhibits reactive oxygen species production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and oxidative stress in salt-loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Akizuki, Osamu; Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Saeki, Koji; Yao, Kozo; Sasaki, Katsutoshi

    2008-02-02

    Oxidative stress is associated with exacerbation of renal injuries in hypertension. In clinical studies benidipine hydrochloride (benidipine), a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker with antioxidant activity, reduced oxidative stress. However, the mechanism of suppression of oxidative stress remains to be fully characterized. Reactive oxygen species production by polymorphonuclear leukocyte plays important pathological roles in hypertension. Therefore, we examined the effects of benidipine both on reactive oxygen species production of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and oxidative stress of an animal model. Human peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocyte-like differentiated HL-60 cells were used to examine effects of benidipine (0.1-30 microM) on formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced reactive oxygen species production, calcium mobilization, NADPH oxidase activation and phosphorylation of protein kinase C substrates. High-salt (8% NaCl) loaded stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with or without benidipine (1, 3, 10 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a plasma oxidative stress marker, and renal expression of oxidative stress-induced genes were measured. Benidipine concentration-dependently suppressed formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced reactive oxygen species production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes more potently than other calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine, azelnidipine, nitrendipine and nifedipine. Benidipine partially inhibited all of intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, protein kinase C activation and NADPH oxidase activation. Salt loading in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats augmented plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels; renal dysfunction; and renal expression of transforming growth factor-beta, collagen I and collagen III mRNAs; which were attenuated by benidipine treatment. These results indicate that benidipine prevents the polymorphonuclear leukocyte

  3. The impact of dehydration rate on the production and cellular location of reactive oxygen species in an aquatic moss

    PubMed Central

    Cruz de Carvalho, Ricardo; Catalá, Myriam; Marques da Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina; Barreno, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica requires a slow rate of dehydration to survive a desiccation event. The present work examined whether differences in the dehydration rate resulted in corresponding differences in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore in the amount of cell damage. Methods Intracellular ROS production by the aquatic moss was assessed with confocal laser microscopy and the ROS-specific chemical probe 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The production of hydrogen peroxide was also quantified and its cellular location was assessed. Key Results The rehydration of slowly dried cells was associated with lower ROS production, thereby reducing the amount of cellular damage and increasing cell survival. A high oxygen consumption burst accompanied the initial stages of rehydration, perhaps due to the burst of ROS production. Conclusions A slow dehydration rate may induce cell protection mechanisms that serve to limit ROS production and reduce the oxidative burst, decreasing the number of damaged and dead cells due upon rehydration. PMID:22875812

  4. Glutathione prevents preterm parturition and fetal death by targeting macrophage-induced reactive oxygen species production in the myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Tarik; Bardou, Marc; Mace, Guillaume; Sicard, Pierre; Wendremaire, Maeva; Barrichon, Marina; Richaud, Sarah; Demidov, Oleg; Sagot, Paul; Garrido, Carmen; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth is an inflammatory process resulting from the massive infiltration of innate immune cells and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in the myometrium. However, proinflammatory cytokines, which induce labor in vivo, fail to induce labor-associated features in human myometrial cells (MCs). We thus aimed to investigate if reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be the missing step between immune cell activation and MC response. Indeed, we found that ROS production is increased in the human preterm laboring myometrium (27% ROS producing cells, respectively, versus 2% in nonlaboring controls), with 90% ROS production in macrophages. Using LPS-stimulated myometrial samples and cell coculture experiments, we demonstrated that ROS production is required for labor onset. Furthermore, we showed that ROS are required first in the NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-2/NF-κB-dependent macrophage response to inflammatory stimuli but, more importantly, to trigger macrophage-induced MCs transactivation. Remarkably, in a murine model of LPS-induced preterm labor (inducing delivery within 17 hours, with no pup survival), cotreatment with glutathione delayed labor onset up to 94 hours and prevented in utero fetal distress, allowing 46% pups to survive. These results suggest that targeting ROS production with the macrophage-permeable antioxidant glutathione could constitute a promising strategy to prevent preterm birth.

  5. A Reactive-Transport Model Describing Methanogen Growth and Methane Production in Diffuse Flow Vents at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an important mode of metabolism in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Diffuse vent fluids often show a depletion in hydrogen with a corresponding increase in methane relative to pure-mixing of end member fluid and seawater, and genomic surveys show an enrichment in genetic sequences associated with known methanogens. However, because we cannot directly sample the subseafloor habitat where these organisms are living, constraining the size and activity of these populations remains a challenge and limits our ability to quantify the role they play in vent biogeochemistry. Reactive-transport modeling may provide a useful tool for approaching this problem. Here we present a reactive-transport model describing methane production along the flow-path of hydrothermal fluid from its high temperature end-member to diffuse venting at the seafloor. The model is set up to reflect conditions at several diffuse vents in the Axial Seamount. The model describes the growth of the two dominant thermophilic methanogens, Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus, observed at Axial seamount. Monod and Arrhenius constants for Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were obtained for the model using chemostat and bottle experiments at varying temperatures. The model is used to investigate the influence of different mixing regimes on the subseafloor populations of these methanogens. By varying the model flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations, and fitting to observed hydrogen and methane concentrations in the venting fluid, the subseafloor biomass, fluid residence time, and methane production rate can be constrained.

  6. Krebs cycle intermediates modulate thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Robson L; Nogueira, Cristina W; Rocha, João B T

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Krebs cycle intermediates on basal and quinolinic acid (QA)- or iron-induced TBARS production in brain membranes. Oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate and malate reduced significantly the basal and QA-induced TBARS production. The potency for basal TBARS inhibition was in the order (IC50 is given in parenthesis as mM) citrate (0.37) > oxaloacetate (1.33) = succinate (1.91) > > malate (12.74). alpha-Ketoglutarate caused an increase in TBARS production without modifying the QA-induced TBARS production. Cyanide (CN-) did not modify the basal or QA-induced TBARS production; however, CN- abolished the antioxidant effects of succinate. QA-induced TBARS production was enhanced by iron ions, and abolished by desferrioxamine (DFO). The intermediates used in this study, except for alpha-ketoglutarate, prevented iron-induced TBARS production. Oxaloacetate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate, but no succinate and QA, exhibited significantly iron-chelating properties. Only alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced deoxyribose degradation, while succinate and malate showed a modest effect against Fe2+/H2O2-induced deoxyribose degradation. Using heat-treated preparations citrate, malate and oxaloacetate protected against basal or QA-induced TBARS production, whereas alpha-ketoglutarate induced TBARS production. Succinate did not offer protection against basal or QA-induced TBARS production. These results suggest that oxaloacetate, malate, succinate, and citrate are effective antioxidants against basal and iron or QA-induced TBARS production, while alpha-ketoglutarate stimulates TBARS production. The mechanism through which Krebs cycle intermediates offer protection against TBARS production is distinct depending on the intermediate used. Thus, under pathological conditions such as ischemia, where citrate concentrations vary it can assume an important role as a modulator of oxidative

  7. Effect of adenosine modified with a boron cluster pharmacophore on reactive oxygen species production by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Piskala, Agnieszka; Klink, Magdalena; Sulowska, Zofia; Lesnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2012-11-15

    Methods for the synthesis of adenosine/boron cluster conjugates are proposed and the potential of the obtained derivatives to modulate neutrophil activity, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro, is described. An efficient inhibition of ROS production in activated neutrophils by adenosine modified at the 2'-C and 6-N positions with a para-carborane cluster (C(2)B(10)H(11)) was discovered. The high affinity of the selected compounds for adenosine receptor A(2A) was established. These results are in agreement with the possible involvement of receptor A(2A) in the biological activities of adenosine/boron cluster conjugates. This study extends the range of innovative molecules available for testing as agents affecting inflammatory processes.

  8. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  9. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Provo, James L.

    2015-07-15

    A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner—A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters, Spring 2014), p. 50–51] describes various methods for producing oxides, nitrides, carbides, and some compounds, but hydrides were not mentioned. A study was performed in the mid-1970s at the General Electric Company Neutron Devices Department in Largo, FL, by the author to study preparation of thin film hydrides using reactive evaporation and to determine their unique characteristics and properties. Films were produced of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and the rare earth praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), gadolinium (Gd), dysprosium (Dy), and erbium (Er) hydrides by hot crucible filament and electron beam evaporation in atmospheres of deuterium and tritium gases. All-metal vacuum systems were used and those used with tritium were dedicated for this processing. Thin film test samples 1000 nm thick were prepared on 1.27 cm diameter molybdenum disk substrates for each occluder (i.e., an element that can react with hydrogen to form a hydride) material. Loading characteristics as determined by gas-to-metal atomic ratios, oxidation characteristics as determined by argon–sputter Auger analysis, film structure as determined by scanning electron microscope analysis, and film stress properties as determined by a double resonator technique were used to define properties of interest. Results showed hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratios varied from 1.5 to 2.0 with near maximum loading for all but Pr and Nd occluders which correlated with the oxidation levels observed, with all occluder oxidation levels being variable due to vacuum system internal processing conditions and the materials used. Surface oxide levels varied from ∼80 Å to over 1000 Å. For most films studied, results showed that a maximum loading ratio of near 2.0 and a minimum surface oxide level of ∼80 Å could be

  10. Pomegranate-Derived Polyphenols Reduce Reactive Oxygen Species Production via SIRT3-Mediated SOD2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong; Sakaguchi, Takenori; Fujita, Kosuke; Ito, Hideyuki; Nishida, Norihisa; Nagatomo, Akifumi; Tanaka-Azuma, Yukimasa

    2016-01-01

    Pomegranate-derived polyphenols are expected to prevent life-style related diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of 8 pomegranate-derived polyphenols, along with other polyphenols, to augment SIRT3, a mammalian SIR2 homolog localized in mitochondria. We established a system for screening foods/food ingredients that augment the SIRT3 promoter in Caco-2 cells and identified 3 SIRT3-augmenting pomegranate-derived polyphenols (eucalbanin B, pomegraniin A, and eucarpanin T1). Among them, pomegraniin A activated superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) through SIRT3-mediated deacetylation, thereby reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species. The other SIRT3-augmenting polyphenols tested also activated SOD2, suggesting antioxidant activity. Our findings clarify the underlying mechanisms involved in the antioxidant activity of pomegraniin A. PMID:27840668

  11. Aluminum toxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Devi, S Rama; Rikiishi, Sanae; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    Potential mechanisms of Al toxicity measured as Al-induced inhibition of growth in cultured tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum, nonchlorophyllic cell line SL) and pea (Pisum sativum) roots were investigated. Compared with the control treatment without Al, the accumulation of Al in tobacco cells caused instantaneously the repression of mitochondrial activities [monitored by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and the uptake of Rhodamine 123] and, after a lag of about 12 h, triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, respiration inhibition, ATP depletion, and the loss of growth capability almost simultaneously. The presence of an antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisol, during Al treatment of SL cells prevented not only ROS production but also ATP depletion and the loss of growth capability, suggesting that the Al-triggered ROS production seems to be a cause of ATP depletion and the loss of growth capability. Furthermore, these three late events were similarly repressed in an Al-tolerant cell line (ALT301) isolated from SL cells, suggesting that the acquisition of antioxidant functions mimicking butylated hydroxyanisol can be a mechanism of Al tolerance. In the pea root, Al also triggered ROS production, respiration inhibition, and ATP depletion, which were all correlated with inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, we conclude that Al affects mitochondrial functions, which leads to ROS production, probably the key critical event in Al inhibition of cell growth.

  12. Estimating production and consumption of solid reactive Fe phases in marine sediments from concentration profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    1D diffusion models may be used to estimate rates of production and consumption of dissolved metabolites in marine sediments, but are applied less often to the solid phase. Here we used a numerical inverse method to estimate solid phase Fe(III) and Fe(II) consumption and product...

  13. Quantum mechanical mechanisms of inelastic and reactive H + D(2)(v = 0, j = 2) collisions.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, Jesús; Jambrina, P G; Sáez-Rábanos, Vicente; de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F J

    2010-11-07

    This article analyses the mechanisms of inelastic and reactive H + D(2)(v = 0, j = 2) collisions that result in highly vibrationally excited products when the collision energy is 1.70 eV. The analytical method is entirely quantum mechanical and focuses on correlations between the polarization of the reactant molecule and the direction of product scattering. Two viewpoints are used. The "intrinsic" viewpoint reveals the reactant polarizations that lead to the largest cross section at each value of the scattering angle (the angle between the reactant-approach and product-recoil directions); the "extrinsic" viewpoint reveals how the dependence of the collision cross section on the scattering angle changes when the reactant polarization is fixed at each one of a set of experimentally feasible alternatives. Comparison of processes correlating with the same range of impact parameters is also used, to facilitate isolation and identification of directional effects. When products are scattered in the backward and sideways regions, the results for inelastic and reactive collisions are rather similar. When products are scattered in the forward region, the results for inelastic and reactive collisions are clearly different: a side-on collision geometry that largely increases the inelastic cross section hardly affects the reactive cross section. This feature is the quantum mechanical signature of the so-called "tug-of-war" mechanism.

  14. Annato extract and β-carotene modulate the production of reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide in neutrophils from diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni-Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Araújo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2012-01-01

    Annatto has been identified as carotenoids that have antioxidative effects. It is well known that one of the key elements in the development of diabetic complications is oxidative stress. The immune system is especially vulnerable to oxidative damage because many immune cells, such as neutrophils, produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as part of the body’s defense mechanisms to destroy invading pathogens. Reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species are excessively produced by active peripheral neutrophils, and may damage essential cellular components, which in turn can cause vascular complications in diabetes. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of annatto on the reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in neutrophils from alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Adult female rats were divided into six groups based on receiving either a standard diet with or without supplementation of annatto extract or beta carotene. All animals were sacrificed 30 days after treatment and the neutrophils were isolated using two gradients of different densities. The reactive oxygen species and NO were quantified by a chemiluminescence and spectrophotometric assays, respectively. Our results show that neutrophils from diabetic animals produce significantly more reactive oxygen species and NO than their respective controls and that supplementation with beta carotene and annatto is able to modulate the production of these species. Annatto extract may have therapeutic potential for modulation of the balance reactive oxygen species/NO induced by diabetes. PMID:22573917

  15. Disassembly Sequence Optimization for Large-Scale Products With Multiresource Constraints Using Scatter Search and Petri Nets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiwang; Liu, Shixin; Zhou, MengChu; Tian, Guangdong

    2016-11-01

    Disassembly modeling and planning are meaningful and important to the reuse, recovery, and recycling of obsolete and discarded products. However, the existing methods pay little or no attention to resources constraints, e.g., disassembly operators and tools. Thus a resulting plan when being executed may be ineffective in actual product disassembly. This paper proposes to model and optimize selective disassembly sequences subject to multiresource constraints to maximize disassembly profit. Moreover, two scatter search algorithms with different combination operators, namely one with precedence preserved crossover combination operator and another with path-relink combination operator, are designed to solve the proposed model. Their validity is shown by comparing them with the optimization results from well-known optimization software CPLEX for different cases. The experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. A transition state view on reactive scattering: Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4-->H2+CH3 reaction studied in full dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffel, Gerd; Manthe, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Initial state-selected reaction probabilities for the H+CH4→H2+CH3 reaction are computed for vanishing total angular momentum by full-dimensional calculations employing the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree approach. An ensemble of wave packets completely describing reactivity for total energies up to 0.58 eV is constructed in the transition state region by diagonalization of the thermal flux operator. These wave packets are then propagated into the reactant asymptotic region to obtain the initial state-selected reaction probabilities. Reaction probabilities for reactants in all rotational states of the vibrational 1A1, 1F2, and 1E levels of methane are presented. Vibrational excitation is found to decrease reactivity when reaction probabilities at equivalent total energies are compared but to increase reaction probabilities when the comparison is done at the basis of equivalent collision energies. Only a fraction of the initial vibrational energy can be utilized to promote the reaction. The effect of rotational excitation on the reactivity differs depending on the initial vibrational state of methane. For the 1A1 and 1F2 vibrational states of methane, rotational excitation decreases the reaction probability even when comparing reaction probabilities at equivalent collision energies. In contrast, rotational energy is even more efficient than translational energy in increasing the reaction probability when the reaction starts from the 1E vibrational state of methane. All findings can be explained employing a transition state based interpretation of the reaction process.

  17. Increased reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorders patients with JAK2 (V617F) mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Csillag-Grange, Marie-José; Boussetta, Tarek; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Fay, Michèle; Cassinat, Bruno; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel

    2013-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are associated with increased risk of thrombosis and vascular complications. The pathogenesis of these complications is not completely known. Reactive oxygen species produced by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase could have a role in this process. The aim of this study was to evaluate reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils of myeloproliferative disorder patients. Patients with or without the JAK2 V617F mutation were characterized. Reactive oxygen species production was assessed by chemiluminescence, and phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox was analyzed by Western blots. In a comparison of controls and myeloproliferative disorder patients without the JAK2 V617F mutation, reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils from patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation was dramatically increased in non-stimulated and in stimulated conditions. This increase was associated with increased phosphorylation of the p47phox on Ser345 and of the uspstream kinase ERK1/2. In neutrophils from healthy donors, JAK2 can be activated by GM-CSF. GM-CSF-induced p47phox phosphorylation and priming of reactive oxygen species production are inhibited by the selective JAK2 inhibitors AG490 and lestaurtinib (CEP-701), supporting a role for JAK2 in the upregulation of NADPH oxidase activation. These findings show an increase in reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorder patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation, and demonstrate that JAK2 is involved in GM-CSF-induced NADPH oxidase hyperactivation. As neutrophil hyperactivation could be implicated in the thrombophilic status of patients with myeloproliferative disorders, aberrant activation of JAK2 V617F, leading to excessive neutrophil reactive oxygen species production might play a role in this setting. PMID:23975181

  18. Mobile Phone Radiation Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Production and DNA Damage in Human Spermatozoa In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    De Iuliis, Geoffry N.; Newey, Rhiannon J.; King, Bruce V.; Aitken, R. John

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent times there has been some controversy over the impact of electromagnetic radiation on human health. The significance of mobile phone radiation on male reproduction is a key element of this debate since several studies have suggested a relationship between mobile phone use and semen quality. The potential mechanisms involved have not been established, however, human spermatozoa are known to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress by virtue of the abundant availability of substrates for free radical attack and the lack of cytoplasmic space to accommodate antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, the induction of oxidative stress in these cells not only perturbs their capacity for fertilization but also contributes to sperm DNA damage. The latter has, in turn, been linked with poor fertility, an increased incidence of miscarriage and morbidity in the offspring, including childhood cancer. In light of these associations, we have analyzed the influence of RF-EMR on the cell biology of human spermatozoa in vitro. Principal Findings Purified human spermatozoa were exposed to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) tuned to 1.8 GHz and covering a range of specific absorption rates (SAR) from 0.4 W/kg to 27.5 W/kg. In step with increasing SAR, motility and vitality were significantly reduced after RF-EMR exposure, while the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation were significantly elevated (P<0.001). Furthermore, we also observed highly significant relationships between SAR, the oxidative DNA damage bio-marker, 8-OH-dG, and DNA fragmentation after RF-EMR exposure. Conclusions RF-EMR in both the power density and frequency range of mobile phones enhances mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by human spermatozoa, decreasing the motility and vitality of these cells while stimulating DNA base adduct formation and, ultimately DNA fragmentation. These findings have clear implications for the safety of

  19. Strategy to eliminate catalyst hot-spots in the partial oxidation of methane: enhancing its activity for direct hydrogen production by reducing the reactivity of lattice oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wen, Cun; Liu, Yi; Guo, Yun; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2010-02-14

    Hydrogen can be produced over Er(2)O(3) in methane oxidation (oxygen/methane = 26). The reactivity of lattice oxygen in the catalyst plays a main role in the conversion of surface hydroxyl species to hydrogen or water. Adding a rare earth element into a catalyst can reduce the reactivity of lattice oxygen, resulting in increased hydrogen production, to eliminate catalyst hot-spots.

  20. Continuous Production of Biodiesel Via an Intensified Reactive/Extractive Process

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Jennings, Hal L

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is considered as a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. For a number of reasons ranging from production issues to end use, biodiesel represents only a small fraction of the transportation fuel used worldwide. This work addresses the aspect of biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. Conventional production methods are batch in nature, based on the assumption that the rates of the key chemical reactions are slow. The hypothesis motivating this work is that the reaction kinetics for the transesterification of the reagent triglyceride is sufficiently fast, particularly in an excess of catalyst, and that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the process. If this is the case, an intensified two-phase reactor adapted from solvent extraction equipment may be utilized to greatly increase biodiesel production rates by increasing interphase transport and phase separation. To prove this idea, we are investigating two aspects: (1) determining the rate-limiting step in biodiesel production by evaluating the reaction kinetics, and (2) enhancing biodiesel production rates by using an intensified reactor. A centrifugal contactor combining interphase mass transfer, chemical reaction, and phase separation is employed for process intensification.

  1. Amyloid-β-induced reactive oxygen species production and priming are differentially regulated by ion channels in microglia.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Tom; Eder, Claudia

    2011-12-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by microglial cells and subsequent oxidative stress are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is recognized that amyloid-β (Aβ) plays a major role in inducing and regulating microglial ROS production in Alzheimer's disease, to date little is known about cellular mechanisms underlying Aβ-stimulated ROS production. Here, we identified ion channels involved in Aβ-induced microglial ROS production and in Aβ-induced microglial priming. Acute stimulation of microglial cells with either fibrillar Aβ(1-42) (fAβ(1-42) ) or soluble Aβ(1-42) (sAβ(1-42) ) caused significant increases in microglial ROS production, which were abolished by inhibition of TRPV1 cation channels with 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (I-RTX), but were unaffected by inhibition of K(+) channels with charybdotoxin (CTX). Furthermore, pretreatment with either fAβ(1-42) or sAβ(1-42) induced microglial priming, that is, increased ROS production upon secondary stimulation with the phorbol ester PMA. Microglial priming induced by fAβ(1-42) or sAβ(1-42) remained unaffected by TRPV1 channel inhibition with I-RTX. However, sAβ(1-42) -induced priming was inhibited by CTX and margatoxin, but not by TRAM-34 or paxilline, indicating a role of Kv1.3 voltage-gated K(+) channels, but not of Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels, in the priming process. In summary, our data suggest that in microglia Aβ-induced ROS production and priming are differentially regulated by ion channels, and that TRPV1 cation channels and Kv1.3 K(+) channels may provide potential therapeutic targets to reduce microglia-induced oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum)

    PubMed Central

    Muzila, Mbaki; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum. PMID:27429708

  3. Piperlongumine Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Has Therapeutic Potential for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Youjun; Shi, Maohua; Qiu, Qian; Huang, Mingcheng; Zeng, Shan; Zou, Yaoyao; Zhan, Zhongping; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-06-15

    Piperlongumine (PLM) is a natural product from the plant Piper longum that inhibits platelet aggregation, atherosclerosis plaque formation, and tumor cell growth. It has potential value in immunomodulation and the management of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of PLM in regulating the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), a critical regulator of immune tolerance, and evaluated its clinical effects in a rheumatoid arthritis mouse model. We found that PLM treatment reduced LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived DC maturation, characterized by reduced expression of CD80/86, secretion of MCP-1, IL-12p70, IL-6, TNFα, IFN-γ, and IL-23, and reduced alloproliferation of T cells; however, PLM does not affect cell differentiation. Furthermore, PLM reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by DCs and inhibited the activation of p38, JNK, NF-κB, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Conversely, PLM increased the expression of GSTP1 and carbonyl reductase 1, two enzymes that counteract ROS effects. ROS inhibition by exogenous N-acetyl-l-cysteine suppressed DC maturation. PLM treatment improved the severity of arthritis and reduced in vivo splenic DC maturation, collagen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, and ROS production in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. Taken together, these results suggest that PLM inhibits DC maturation by reducing intracellular ROS production and has potential as a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, proton conductance and reactive oxygen species production of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in frogs.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Damien; Salin, Karine; Dumet, Adeline; Romestaing, Caroline; Rey, Benjamin; Voituron, Yann

    2015-10-01

    Body size is a central biological parameter affecting most biological processes (especially energetics) and the mitochondrion is a key organelle controlling metabolism and is also the cell's main source of chemical energy. However, the link between body size and mitochondrial function is still unclear, especially in ectotherms. In this study, we investigated several parameters of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver of three closely related species of frog (the common frog Rana temporaria, the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus and the bull frog Lithobates catesbeiana). These particular species were chosen because of their differences in adult body mass. We found that mitochondrial coupling efficiency was markedly increased with animal size, which led to a higher ATP production (+70%) in the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) compared with the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). This was essentially driven by a strong negative dependence of mitochondrial proton conductance on body mass. Liver mitochondria from the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) displayed 50% of the proton conductance of mitochondria from the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). Contrary to our prediction, the low mitochondrial proton conductance measured in L. catesbeiana was not associated with higher reactive oxygen species production. Instead, liver mitochondria from the larger individuals produced significantly lower levels of radical oxygen species than those from the smaller frogs. Collectively, the data show that key bioenergetics parameters of mitochondria (proton leak, ATP production efficiency and radical oxygen species production) are correlated with body mass in frogs. This research expands our understanding of the relationship between mitochondrial function and the evolution of allometric scaling in ectotherms.

  5. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  6. BGP-15 Protects against Oxidative Stress- or Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mitochondrial Destabilization and Reduces Mitochondrial Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sumegi, Katalin; Fekete, Katalin; Antus, Csenge; Debreceni, Balazs; Hocsak, Eniko; Gallyas, Ferenc; Sumegi, Balazs; Szabo, Aliz

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in the progression of mitochondria-related diseases. A novel insulin sensitizer drug candidate, BGP-15, has been shown to have protective effects in several oxidative stress-related diseases in animal and human studies. In this study, we investigated whether the protective effects of BGP-15 are predominantly via preserving mitochondrial integrity and reducing mitochondrial ROS production. BGP-15 was found to accumulate in the mitochondria, protect against ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization and attenuate ROS-induced mitochondrial ROS production in a cell culture model, and also reduced ROS production predominantly at the complex I-III system in isolated mitochondria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, BGP-15 protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death by reducing both apoptosis and necrosis. Additionally, it attenuated bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production in LPS-sensitive U-251 glioma cells, suggesting that BGP-15 may have a protective role in inflammatory diseases. However, BGP-15 did not have any antioxidant effects as shown by in vitro chemical and cell culture systems. These data suggest that BGP-15 could be a novel mitochondrial drug candidate for the prevention of ROS-related and inflammatory disease progression. PMID:28046125

  7. Norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in rodent hearts by activating Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fuxia; Xiao, Daliao; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-07-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Recent studies demonstrate that fetal programming of PKCε gene repression results in ischemia-sensitive phenotype in the heart. The present study tests the hypothesis that increased norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart via Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Prolonged norepinephrine treatment increased ROS production in fetal rat hearts and embryonic ventricular myocyte H9c2 cells via a selective increase in Nox1 expression. Norepinephrine-induced ROS resulted in an increase in PKCε promoter methylation at Egr-1 and Sp-1 binding sites, leading to PKCε gene repression. N-acetylcysteine, diphenyleneiodonium, and apocynin blocked norepinephrine-induced ROS production and the promoter methylation, and also restored PKCε mRNA and protein to control levels in vivo in fetal hearts and in vitro in embryonic myocyte cells. Accordingly, norepinephrine-induced ROS production, promoter methylation, and PKCε gene repression were completely abrogated by knockdown of Nox1 in cardiomyocytes. These findings provide evidence of a novel interaction between elevated norepinephrine and epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart mediated by Nox1-dependent oxidative stress and suggest new insights of molecular mechanisms linking the heightened sympathetic activity to aberrant cardioprotection and increased ischemic vulnerability in the heart.

  8. The allelochemical L-DOPA increases melanin production and reduces reactive oxygen species in soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Soares, Anderson Ricardo; de Lourdes Lucio Ferrarese, Maria; de Cássia Siqueira-Soares, Rita; Marchiosi, Rogério; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2011-08-01

    The non-protein amino acid, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), is the main allelochemical released from the roots of velvetbean and affects seed germination and root growth of several plant species. In the work presented here, we evaluated, in soybean roots, the effects of L-DOPA on the following: polyphenol oxidase (PPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities; superoxide anion (O·-2), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and melanin contents; and lipid peroxidation. To this end, 3-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland's solution (pH 6.0), with or without 0.1 to 1.0 mM L-DOPA in a growth chamber (at 25°C, with a light/dark photoperiod of 12/12 hr and a photon flux density of 280 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for 24 hr. The results showed that L-DOPA increased the PPO activity and, further, the melanin content. The activities of SOD and POD increased, but CAT activity decreased after the chemical exposure. The contents of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as O·-2 and H(2)O(2), and the levels of lipid peroxidation significantly decreased under all concentrations of L-DOPA tested. These results suggest that L-DOPA was absorbed by the soybean roots and metabolized to melanin. It was concluded that the reduction in the O·-2 and H(2)O(2) contents and lipid peroxidation in soybean roots was due to the enhanced SOD and POD activities and thus a possible antioxidant role of L-DOPA.

  9. Hypoxia dysregulates the production of adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 independent of reactive oxygen species in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Baoying; Lam, Karen S.L.; Wang Yu; Wu Donghai; Lam, Michael C.; Shen Jiangang; Wong Laiching; Hoo, Ruby L.C.; Zhang Jialiang; Xu Aimin . E-mail: amxu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2006-03-10

    Low plasma levels of adiponectin (hypoadiponectinemia) and elevated circulating concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism that mediates the aberrant production of these two adipokines in obesity remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative PCR and immunoassays showed that ambient hypoxia markedly suppressed adiponectin mRNA expression and its protein secretion, and increased PAI-1 production in mature adipocytes. Dimethyloxallyl glycine, a stabilizer of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), mimicked the hypoxia-mediated modulations of these two adipokines. Hypoxia caused a modest elevation of ROS in adipocytes. However, ablation of intracellular ROS by antioxidants failed to alleviate hypoxia-induced aberrant production of adiponectin and PAI-1. On the other hand, the antioxidants could reverse hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced dysregulation of adiponectin and PAI-1 production. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment decreased the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP{alpha}), but had no effect on HIF-1{alpha}, whereas hypoxia stabilized HIF-1{alpha} and decreased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}. Taken together, these data suggest that hypoxia and ROS decrease adiponectin production and augment PAI-1 expression in adipocytes via distinct signaling pathways. These effects may contribute to hypoadiponectinemia and elevated PAI-1 levels in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems.

  11. Comparison of the chemical reactivity of synthetic peroxynitrite with that of the autoxidation products of nitroxyl or its anion.

    PubMed

    Jorolan, Joel H; Buttitta, Lisa Ann; Cheah, Cheryl; Miranda, Katrina M

    2015-01-30

    Donors of nitroxyl (HNO) exhibit pharmacological properties that are potentially favorable for treatment of a variety of diseases. To fully evaluate the pharmacological utility of HNO, it is therefore important to understand its chemistry, particularly involvement in deleterious biological reactions. Of particular note is the cytotoxic species formed from HNO autoxidation that is capable of inducing double strand DNA breaks. The identity of this species remains elusive, but a conceivable product is peroxynitrous acid. However, chemical comparison studies have demonstrated that HNO autoxidation leads to a unique reactive nitrogen oxide species to that of synthetic peroxynitrite. Here, we extend the analysis to include a new preparation of peroxynitrite formed via autoxidation of nitroxyl anion (NO(-)). Both peroxynitrite preparations exhibited similar chemical profiles, although autoxidation of NO(-) provided a more reliable sample of peroxynitrite. Furthermore, the observed dissimilarities to the HNO donor Angeli's salt substantiate that HNO autoxidation produces a unique intermediate from peroxynitrite.

  12. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.Y.

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed.

  13. Stable bio-oil production from proteinaceous cyanobacteria: tail gas reactive pyrolysis of spirulina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis of Spirulina, a cyanobacteria with high levels of protein (74 wt %) and low levels of lipid (0.8 wt %) content, has the potential to produce fuels and platform chemicals that differ from those produced from lignocellulosic materials. The yields and product distribution from fluidized-bed p...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Product-Weighted Reactivity Limits by Coating Category

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Primers ABP 1.55 Automotive Bumper and Trim Products ABT 1.75 Aviation or Marine Primers AMP 2.00 Aviation... Finish—Engine Enamel EEE 1.70 Exact Match Finish—Automotive EFA 1.50 Exact Match Finish—Industrial EFI...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Product-Weighted Reactivity Limits by Coating Category

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Primers ABP 1.55 Automotive Bumper and Trim Products ABT 1.75 Aviation or Marine Primers AMP 2.00 Aviation... Finish—Engine Enamel EEE 1.70 Exact Match Finish—Automotive EFA 1.50 Exact Match Finish—Industrial EFI...

  16. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Product-Weighted Reactivity Limits by Coating Category

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....40 Primers PCP 1.20 Ground Traffic/Marking GTM 1.20 Art Fixatives or Sealants AFS 1.80 Auto Body Primers ABP 1.55 Automotive Bumper and Trim Products ABT 1.75 Aviation or Marine Primers AMP 2.00 Aviation... Primers, Surfacers or Undercoaters PCS 1.05 Pleasure Craft Topcoats PCT 0.60 Polyolefin Adhesion...

  17. Aging and luteinizing hormone effects on reactive oxygen species production and DNA damage in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Matthew C; Chen, Haolin; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Miller, Paul; Zirkin, Barry R

    2013-04-01

    We observed previously that after long-term suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH) and thus of Leydig cell steroidogenesis, restimulation of the Leydig cells by LH resulted in significantly higher testosterone production than by age-matched cells from control rats. These studies suggest that stimulation over time may elicit harmful effects on the steroidogenic machinery, perhaps through alteration of the intracellular oxidant-to-antioxidant balance. Herein we compared the effects of LH stimulation on stress response genes, formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS-induced damage to ROS-susceptible macromolecules (DNA) in young and in aged cells. Microarray analysis indicated that LH stimulation resulted in significant increases in expression of genes associated with stress response and antiapoptotic pathways. Short-term LH treatment of primary Leydig cells isolated from young rats resulted in transiently increased ROS levels compared to controls. Aged Leydig cells also showed increased ROS soon after LH stimulation. However, in contrast to the young cells, ROS production peaked later and the time to recovery was increased. In both young and aged cells, treatment with LH resulted in increased levels of DNA damage but significantly more so in the aged cells. DNA damage levels in response to LH and the levels of intracellular ROS were highly correlated. Taken together, these results indicate that LH stimulation causes increased ROS production by young and aged Leydig cells and that while DNA damage occurs in cells of both ages, there is greater damage in the aged cells.

  18. Schisandrin B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection are mediated by reactive oxidant species production in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Ko, Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of reactive oxidant species (ROS), presumably arising from cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-catalyzed metabolism of schisandrin B (Sch B), in triggering glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B induced reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent and CYP-catalyzed reaction and associated ROS production were examined in rat heart microsomes. Sch B analogs were also studied for comparison. Using rat heart microsomes as a source of CYP, Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate (an intermediate compound derived from the synthesis of Sch C), were found to serve as co-substrate for the CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction, with concomitant production of ROS. The stimulation of CYP-catalyzed NADPH oxidation reaction and/or ROS production by Sch B or Sch C correlated with the increase in mitochondrial reduced glutathione level and protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. The involvement of ROS in Sch B-induced cardioprotection was further confirmed by the suppressive effect produced by N-acetylcysteine or alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Taken together, these results suggest that Sch B-induced glutathione antioxidant response and cardioprotection may be mediated by ROS arising from CYP-catalyzed reaction.

  19. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  20. Entropy and chemical change. 1: Characterization of product (and reactant) energy distributions in reactive molecular collisions: Information and enthropy deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R. B.; Levine, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Optimal means of characterizing the distribution of product energy states resulting from reactive collisions of molecules with restricted distributions of initial states are considered, along with those for characterizing the particular reactant state distribution which yields a given set of product states at a specified total energy. It is suggested to represent the energy-dependence of global-type results in the form of square-faced bar plots, and of data for specific-type experiments as triangular-faced prismatic plots. The essential parameters defining the internal state distribution are isolated, and the information content of such a distribution is put on a quantitative basis. The relationship between the information content, the surprisal, and the entropy of the continuous distribution is established. The concept of an entropy deficiency, which characterizes the specificity of product state formation, is suggested as a useful measure of the deviance from statistical behavior. The degradation of information by experimental averaging is considered, leading to bounds on the entropy deficiency.

  1. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P < 0.01) linear relationship between EPR data collected on capillary blood versus venous blood (R (2) = 0.95), plasma (R (2) = 0.82), and erythrocytes (R (2) = 0.73) was found. Then (step II) ROS production changes of various subjects' categories, young versus old and healthy versus pathological at rest condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  2. Nafamostat Mesilate Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Vascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Hee-Jung; Kang, Shin Kwang; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Saet-Byel; Jee, Sungju; Moon, Jae Young; Suh, Kwang-Sun; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2015-05-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM) is a serine protease inhibitor with anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory effects. NM has been used in Asia for anticoagulation during extracorporeal circulation in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. Oxidative stress is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and is associated with vascular endothelial function. We investigated whether NM could inhibit endothelial dysfunction induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with TNF-α for 24 h. The effects of NM on monocyte adhesion, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein expression, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, and intracellular superoxide production were then examined. NM (0.01~100 µg/mL) did not affect HUVEC viability; however, it inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and p66shc expression elicited by TNF-α (3 ng/mL), and it dose dependently prevented the TNF-α-induced upregulation of endothelial VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In addition, it mitigated TNF-α-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and the adhesion of U937 monocytes. These data suggest that NM mitigates TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion and the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules, and that the anti-adhesive effect of NM is mediated through the inhibition of p66shc, ROS production, and p38 MAPK activation.

  3. Galangin prevents aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity by decreasing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in mouse cochlear cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ri; Kim, Min-A; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Oh, Se-Kyung; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2016-03-14

    Amikacin is a semi-synthetic aminoglycoside widely used to treat infections caused by gentamicin-resistant gram-negative organisms and nontuberculous mycobacteria. However, the use of this agent often results in ototoxicity due to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Galangin, a natural flavonoid, has been shown to play a protective role against mitochondrial dysfunction by reducing mitochondrial ROS production. In this study, the effect of galangin on amikacin-induced ototoxicity was examined using cultures of cochlear explants. Immunofluorescent staining showed that treatment of inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) with galangin significantly decreased damage induced by amikacin. Moreover, pretreatment with galangin resulted in decreased amikacin-provoked increase in ROS production in both types of hair cells by MitoSOX-red staining. Attenuation of apoptotic cell death was assessed immunohistochemically using active caspase-3 antibody and with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, compared to explants exposed to amikacin alone (P<0.05). These results indicate that galangin protects hair cells in the organ of Corti from amikacin-induced toxicity by reducing the production of mitochondrial ROS. The results of this study suggest that galangin can potentially be used as an antioxidant and antiapoptotic agent to prevent hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside induced-oxidative stress.

  4. Do Productive Activities Reduce Inflammation in Later Life? Multiple Roles, Frequency of Activities, and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seoyoun; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The study investigates whether productive activities by older adults reduce bodily inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomeasure associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Design and Methods: The study uses a representative survey of adults aged 57–85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (N = 1,790). Linear regression models were used to analyze the effects of multiple roles (employment, volunteering, attending meetings, and caregiving) and the frequency of activity within each role on log values of CRP concentration (mg/L) drawn from assayed blood samples. Results: Number of roles for productive activities was associated with lower levels of CRP net of chronic conditions, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic resources. When specific types of activity were examined, volunteering manifested the strongest association with lower levels of inflammation, particularly in the 70+ group. There was no evidence that frequent engagement in volunteer activity was associated with heightened inflammation. Implications: Productive activities—and frequent volunteering in particular—may protect individuals from inflammation that is associated with increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23969258

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Product-Weighted Reactivity Limits by Coating Category

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PCP 1.20 Ground Traffic/Marking GTM 1.20 Art Fixatives or Sealants AFS 1.80 Auto body primers ABP 1.55 Automotive Bumper and Trim Products ABT 1.75 Aviation or Marine Primers AMP 2.00 Aviation Propellor Coatings... Metallic HMC 1.60 Marine Spar Varnishes MSV 0.90 Photograph Coatings PHC 1.00 Pleasure Craft...

  6. Antihistoplasma effect of activated mouse splenic macrophages involves production of reactive nitrogen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T E; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Howard, D H

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism by which recombinant murine gamma interferon (rMuIFN-gamma) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activate mouse resident splenic macrophages to inhibit the intracellular growth of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum was examined. Growth inhibition depended on L-arginine metabolism. The growth inhibitory state normally induced by rMuIFN-gamma and LPS in resident splenic macrophages did not occur when the macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of L-arginine metabolism. Resident splenic macrophages treated with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS produced nitrite (NO2-), an end product of L-arginine metabolism. When macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine together with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS, only baseline levels of NO2- were detected. Spleen cells from H. capsulatum-infected mice produced high levels of NO2- in culture. The production of NO2- correlated with in vitro inhibition of the intracellular growth of H. capsulatum. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody did not block NO2- production by the immigrant splenic macrophages and did not abolish the antihistoplasma activity. PMID:8168960

  7. Land, irrigation water, greenhouse gas, and reactive nitrogen burdens of meat, eggs, and dairy production in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Gidon; Shepon, Alon; Makov, Tamar; Milo, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Livestock production impacts air and water quality, ocean health, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on regional to global scales and it is the largest use of land globally. Quantifying the environmental impacts of the various livestock categories, mostly arising from feed production, is thus a grand challenge of sustainability science. Here, we quantify land, irrigation water, and reactive nitrogen (Nr) impacts due to feed production, and recast published full life cycle GHG emission estimates, for each of the major animal-based categories in the US diet. Our calculations reveal that the environmental costs per consumed calorie of dairy, poultry, pork, and eggs are mutually comparable (to within a factor of 2), but strikingly lower than the impacts of beef. Beef production requires 28, 11, 5, and 6 times more land, irrigation water, GHG, and Nr, respectively, than the average of the other livestock categories. Preliminary analysis of three staple plant foods shows two- to sixfold lower land, GHG, and Nr requirements than those of the nonbeef animal-derived calories, whereas irrigation requirements are comparable. Our analysis is based on the best data currently available, but follow-up studies are necessary to improve parameter estimates and fill remaining knowledge gaps. Data imperfections notwithstanding, the key conclusion—that beef production demands about 1 order of magnitude more resources than alternative livestock categories—is robust under existing uncertainties. The study thus elucidates the multiple environmental benefits of potential, easy-to-implement dietary changes, and highlights the uniquely high resource demands of beef. PMID:25049416

  8. Ameliorating Effects of Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles on Glycated End Product Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Cellular Toxicity in Osteogenic Saos-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ashe, Sarbani; Nayak, Debasis; Kumari, Manisha; Nayak, Bismita

    2016-11-09

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) that result from nonenzymatic glycation are one of the major factors involved in diabetes and its secondary complications and diseases. This necessitates our urge to discover new compounds that may be used as potential AGEs inhibitors without affecting the normal structure and function of biomolecules. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of AgNP (silver nanoparticles) on AGEs formation as well as their inhibitory effects on glycation mediated cell toxicity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage. The excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to investigate the interaction of AgNP during glycation. The values of conditional stability constant (log Ka = 4.44) derived from the Stern-Volmer equation indicate that AgNP have strong binding capacity for glycated protein. UV-vis, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectral data reveal complexation of AgNP with glycated bovine serum albumin, which significantly inhibits AGEs formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cytotoxic evaluations suggest that simultaneous administration of AgNP and glycated product reduces cell death (42.82% ± 3.54) as compared to the glycated product alone. Similarly, ROS production in AgNP treated cells is significantly less compared to only glycated product treated cells. Although DNA damage studies show DNA damage in both GP and GP-AgNP treated cells, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis demonstrates that glycated products induce cell death by necrosis, while AgNP cause cell death via apoptotic pathways. AgNP have a positive effect on restoring native protein structure deduced from spectral studies, and hence, inferences can be drawn that AgNP have ameliorating effects on glycated induced cytotoxicity observed in osteogenic Saos-2 cells.

  9. The reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical: reactive intermediates and methanethiol production.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Ivan; Bogdanović Pristov, Jelena; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Spasić, Mihajlo

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical are not fully understood. Here, we unequivocally show using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and GC-FID and GC-MS, the presence of specific carbon-, nitrogen- and sulfur-centered radicals as intermediates of this reaction, as well as the liberation of methanethiol as a gaseous end product. Taking into account the many roles that methionine has in eco- and biosystems, our results may elucidate redox chemistry of this amino acid and processes that methionine is involved in.

  10. A Production System Model of Capturing Reactive Moving Targets. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagacinski, R. J.; Plamondon, B. D.; Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Subjects manipulated a control stick to position a cursor over a moving target that reacted with a computer-generated escape strategy. The cursor movements were described at two levels of abstraction. At the upper level, a production system described transitions among four modes of activity; rapid acquisition, close following, a predictive mode, and herding. Within each mode, differential equations described trajectory-generating mechanisms. A simulation of this two-level model captures the targets in a manner resembling the episodic time histories of human subjects.

  11. High protonic potential actuates a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, S S; Skulachev, V P; Starkov, A A

    1997-10-13

    Formation of H2O2 has been studied in rat heart mitochondria, pretreated with H2O2 and aminotriazole to lower their antioxidant capacity. It is shown that the rate of H2O2 formation by mitochondria oxidizing 6 mM succinate is inhibited by a protonophorous uncoupler, ADP and phosphate, malonate, rotenone and myxothiazol, and is stimulated by antimycin A. The effect of ADP is abolished by carboxyatractylate and oligomycin. Addition of uncoupler after rotenone induces further inhibition of H2O2 production. Inhibition of H2O2 formation by uncoupler, malonate and ADP+Pi is shown to be proportional to the delta psi decrease by these compounds. A threshold delta psi value is found, above which a very strong increase in H2O2 production takes place. This threshold slightly exceeds the state 3 delta psi level. The data obtained are in line with the concept [Skulachev, V.P., Q. Rev. Biophys. 29 (1996), 169-2021 that a high proton motive force in state 4 is potentially dangerous for the cell due to an increase in the probability of superoxide formation.

  12. Neutron production from beam-modifying devices in a modern double scattering proton therapy beam delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Newhauser, Wayne D; DeLuca, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    In this work the neutron production in a passive beam delivery system was investigated. Secondary particles including neutrons are created as the proton beam interacts with beam shaping devices in the treatment head. Stray neutron exposure to the whole body may increase the risk that the patient develops a radiogenic cancer years or decades after radiotherapy. We simulated a passive proton beam delivery system with double scattering technology to determine the neutron production and energy distribution at 200 MeV proton energy. Specifically, we studied the neutron absorbed dose per therapeutic absorbed dose, the neutron absorbed dose per source particle and the neutron energy spectrum at various locations around the nozzle. We also investigated the neutron production along the nozzle's central axis. The absorbed doses and neutron spectra were simulated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulations revealed that the range modulation wheel (RMW) is the most intense neutron source of any of the beam spreading devices within the nozzle. This finding suggests that it may be helpful to refine the design of the RMW assembly, e.g., by adding local shielding, to suppress neutron-induced damage to components in the nozzle and to reduce the shielding thickness of the treatment vault. The simulations also revealed that the neutron dose to the patient is predominated by neutrons produced in the field defining collimator assembly, located just upstream of the patient. PMID:19147903

  13. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  14. Efficient transformation of DDT by peroxymonosulfate activated with cobalt in aqueous systems: Kinetics, products, and reactive species identification.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenxiu; Fang, Guodong; Wang, Yujun; Wu, Tongliang; Zhu, Changyin; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-04-01

    Recently, sulfate radical ( [Formula: see text] ) based-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) have been attracted great attention in the remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In the present study, Co(2+) ions activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) system was used to degrade 1, 1, 1-trichloro-2, 2'bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) in aqueous solutions. It was found that DDT was efficiently degraded in the PMS/Co(II) solutions within several hours, and the degradation efficiency of DDT was dependent on the concentrations of PMS and Co(II), and the optimum molar ratio of PMS and Co(II) was 50:1. The degradation kinetics of DDT were well described with pseudo-first-order equations over a range of temperature (10-40 °C), and the activation energy that was calculated with Arrhenius equation was 72.3 ± 2.6 kJ/mol. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and GC-MS techniques were applied to identify the intermediates and reactive species for DDT degradation. The results indicated that [Formula: see text] and OH were the main reactive species accounting for DDT degradation. Dichlorobenzophenone, 4-chlorobenzoic acid and benzylalcohol were the dominant intermediates for DDT degradation, and the likely degradation pathway of DDT was proposed on the basis of these identified products. Increasing pH inhibited the formation of [Formula: see text] and OH, and thus decreased the catalytic degradation of DDT. Cl(-) ion was found to significantly inhibit, while [Formula: see text] and dissolved oxygen had limited effects on DDT degradation.

  15. Isochoric Burn, an Internally Consistent Method for the Reactant to Product Transformation in Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E; Lee, E L

    2002-07-01

    Mixture rules for partially reacted explosives differ amongst various models. For instance, JWL++ uses a partial pressure addition to compute an average zonal pressure, Ignition and Growth requires pressure equilibration and thermal equilibration of temperature dependent JWL EOSs, CHEETAH In Line RF also assumes temperature and pressure equilibration. It has been suggested in the past that a more realistic equilibration scheme should comprise isentropic pressure equilibration of the separate reacted and unreacted phases. This turns out not to be a proper path for equilibration. Rather, we find that the only internally consistent method is the evaluation of the equilibrium pressure that satisfies the particular conditions of reactant and product resulting from deflagration in a fixed volume.

  16. Liver Fibrosis Can Be Induced by High Salt Intake through Excess Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Yeung, Cheung-kwan; Wong, Wing-Yan; Zhang, Nuan; Wei, Yi-fan; Zhang, Jing-li; Yan, Yu; Wong, Ching-yee; Tang, Jun-jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wang, Li-jing; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-02-24

    High salt intake has been known to cause hypertension and other side effects. However, it is still unclear whether it also affects fibrosis in the mature or developing liver. This study demonstrates that high salt exposure in mice (4% NaCl in drinking water) and chick embryo (calculated final osmolality of the egg was 300 mosm/L) could lead to derangement of the hepatic cords and liver fibrosis using H&E, PAS, Masson, and Sirius red staining. Meanwhile, Desmin immunofluorescent staining of mouse and chick embryo livers indicated that hepatic stellate cells were activated after the high salt exposure. pHIS3 and BrdU immunohistological staining of mouse and chick embryo livers indicated that cell proliferation decreased; as well, TUNEL analyses indicated that cell apoptosis increased in the presence of high salt exposure. Next, dihydroethidium staining on the cultured chick hepatocytes indicated the excess ROS was generated following high salt exposure. Furthermore, AAPH (a known inducer of ROS production) treatment also induced the liver fibrosis in chick embryo. Positive Nrf2 and Keap1 immunohistological staining on mouse liver suggested that Nrf2/Keap1 signaling was involved in high salt induced ROS production. Finally, the CCK8 assay was used to determine whether or not the growth inhibitory effect induced by high salt exposure can be rescued by antioxidant vitamin C. Meanwhile, the RT-PCR result indicated that the Nrf2/Keap1 downsteam genes including HO-1, NQO-1, and SOD2 were involved in this process. In sum, these experiments suggest that high salt intake would lead to high risk of liver damage and fibrosis in both adults and developing embryos. The pathological mechanism may be the result from an imbalance between oxidative stress and the antioxidant system.

  17. A Structural Determinant of Chemical Reactivity and Potential Health Effects of Quinones from Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tingting; Giblin, Daryl; Gross, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Although many phenols and catechols found as polyphenol natural products are antioxidants and have putative disease-preventive properties, others have deleterious health effects. One possible route to toxicity is the bioactivation of the phenolic function to quinones that are electrophilic, redox-agents capable of modifying DNA and proteins. The structure-property relationships of biologically important quinones and their precursors may help understand the balance between their health benefits and risks. We describe a mass-spectrometry-based study of four quinones produced by oxidizing flavanones and flavones. Those with a C2-C3 double bond on ring C of the flavonoid stabilize by delocalization an incipient positive charge from protonation and render the protonated quinone particularly susceptible to nucleophilic attack. We hypothesize that the absence of this double bond is one specific structural determinant that is responsible for the ability of quinones to modify biological macromolecules. Those quinones containing a C2-C3 single bond have relative higher aqueous stability and longer half-lives than those with a double bond at the same position; the latter have short half-lives at or below ~ 1 s. Quinones with a C2-C3 double bond show little ability to depurinate DNA because they are rapidly hydrated to unreactive species. Molecular-orbital calculations support that quinone hydration by a highly structure-dependent mechanism accounts for their chemical properties. The evidence taken together support a hypothesis that those flavonoids and related natural products that undergo oxidation to quinones and are then rapidly hydrated are unlikely to damage important biological macromolecules. PMID:21721570

  18. Production of laccase from Pleurotus florida using agro-wastes and efficient decolorization of Reactive blue 198.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, P; Murugesan, K; Palvannan, T

    2010-08-01

    Pleurotus florida NCIM 1243 produced laccase as the dominant lignolytic enzyme during the dye decolorization. Banana peel was the best substrate for extracellular laccase production under solid state fermentation when compared to mandarin peel and cantaloupe peel. The maximum activity of laccase (5.4 U/g) was detected on the 10 day. The ratio of banana peel: mandarin peel: cantaloupe peel (5:2:3) showed increased production of laccase (6.8 U/g). P. florida produced two extracellular laccase isoenzymes (L1 and L2). The half life of laccase at 60 degrees C was 2 h and at 4 h it retained 25% residual activity. P. florida laccase showed high thermostability and an interesting difference was noticed in the behavior of laccase isoenzymes at different temperature. The L1 isoenzyme of laccase showed remarked thermostability at 60 degrees C in the native PAGE when compared to L2 isoenzyme. The optimum pH, temperature and enzyme concentration for maximum decolorization was found to be 4.5, 60 degrees C and 1.2 U/ml, respectively. Partially purified laccase enzyme showed excellent decolorization activity to Reactive blue 198. The maximum decolorization (96%) was observed at lower dye concentrations (50-100 ppm) which decreased markedly when the dye concentration was increased beyond 150 ppm. The thermostable laccase of P. florida could be effectively used to decolorize the synthetic dyes in the textile effluent and other biotechnological applications.

  19. Pore-scale dynamics of enzyme adsorption, swelling and reactive dissolution determine sugar yield in hemicellulose hydrolysis for biofuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sajal Kanti; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2016-12-01

    Hemicelluloses are the earth’s second most abundant structural polymers, found in lignocellulosic biomass. Efficient enzymatic depolymerization of xylans by cleaving their β-(1 → 4)-glycosidic bonds to produce soluble sugars is instrumental to the cost-effective production of liquid biofuels. Here we show that the multi-scale two-phase process of enzymatic hydrolysis of amorphous hemicelluloses is dominated by its smallest scale–the pores. In the crucial first five hours, two to fourfold swelling of the xylan particles allow the enzymes to enter the pores and undergo rapid non-equilibrium adsorption on the pore surface before they hydrolyze the solid polymers, albeit non-competitively inhibited by the products xylose and xylobiose. Rapid pore-scale reactive dissolution increases the solid carbohydrate’s porosity to 80–90%. This tightly coupled experimental and theoretical study quantifies the complex temporal dynamics of the transport and reaction processes coupled across scales and phases to show that this unique pore-scale phenomenon can be exploited to accelerate the depolymerization of hemicelluloses to monomeric sugars in the first 5–6 h. We find that an ‘optimal substrate loading’ of 5 mg/ml (above which substrate inhibition sets in) accelerates non-equilibrium enzyme adsorption and solid hemicellulose depolymerization at the pore-scale, which contributes three-quarters of the soluble sugars produced for bio-alcohol fermentation.

  20. Pore-scale dynamics of enzyme adsorption, swelling and reactive dissolution determine sugar yield in hemicellulose hydrolysis for biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sajal Kanti; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Hemicelluloses are the earth’s second most abundant structural polymers, found in lignocellulosic biomass. Efficient enzymatic depolymerization of xylans by cleaving their β-(1 → 4)-glycosidic bonds to produce soluble sugars is instrumental to the cost-effective production of liquid biofuels. Here we show that the multi-scale two-phase process of enzymatic hydrolysis of amorphous hemicelluloses is dominated by its smallest scale–the pores. In the crucial first five hours, two to fourfold swelling of the xylan particles allow the enzymes to enter the pores and undergo rapid non-equilibrium adsorption on the pore surface before they hydrolyze the solid polymers, albeit non-competitively inhibited by the products xylose and xylobiose. Rapid pore-scale reactive dissolution increases the solid carbohydrate’s porosity to 80–90%. This tightly coupled experimental and theoretical study quantifies the complex temporal dynamics of the transport and reaction processes coupled across scales and phases to show that this unique pore-scale phenomenon can be exploited to accelerate the depolymerization of hemicelluloses to monomeric sugars in the first 5–6 h. We find that an ‘optimal substrate loading’ of 5 mg/ml (above which substrate inhibition sets in) accelerates non-equilibrium enzyme adsorption and solid hemicellulose depolymerization at the pore-scale, which contributes three-quarters of the soluble sugars produced for bio-alcohol fermentation. PMID:27905534

  1. Sodium-myoinositol cotransporter-1, SMIT1, mediates the production of reactive oxygen species induced by hyperglycemia in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Van Steenbergen, Anne; Balteau, Magali; Ginion, Audrey; Ferté, Laura; Battault, Sylvain; Ravenstein, Christophe de Meester de; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos-Panagiotis; Gilon, Patrick; Despa, Florin; Despa, Sanda; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Horman, Sandrine; Koepsell, Hermann; Berry, Gerard; Hue, Louis; Bertrand, Luc; Beauloye, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species in the heart through activation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2). This production is independent of glucose metabolism but requires sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLT). Seven SGLT isoforms (SGLT1 to 6 and sodium-myoinositol cotransporter-1, SMIT1) are known, although their expression and function in the heart remain elusive. We investigated these 7 isoforms and found that only SGLT1 and SMIT1 were expressed in mouse, rat and human hearts. In cardiomyocytes, galactose (transported through SGLT1) did not activate NOX2. Accordingly, SGLT1 deficiency did not prevent HG-induced NOX2 activation, ruling it out in the cellular response to HG. In contrast, myo-inositol (transported through SMIT1) reproduced the toxic effects of HG. SMIT1 overexpression exacerbated glucotoxicity and sensitized cardiomyocytes to HG, whereas its deletion prevented HG-induced NOX2 activation. In conclusion, our results show that heart SMIT1 senses HG and triggers NOX2 activation. This could participate in the redox signaling in hyperglycemic heart and contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:28128227

  2. A common mechanism links differently acting complex II inhibitors to cardioprotection: modulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Dröse, Stefan; Bleier, Lea; Brandt, Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of different cardioprotective complex II inhibitors on the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because ROS seem to be essential for signaling during preconditioning to prevent ischemia/reperfusion injury. Despite different binding sites and concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition-ranging from nanomolar for the Q site inhibitor atpenin A5 to millimolar for the succinate analog malonate-all inhibitors modulated ROS production in the same ambivalent fashion: they promoted the generation of superoxide at the Q(o) site of complex III under conditions of "oxidant-induced reduction" but attenuated ROS generated at complex I due to reverse electron transfer. All inhibitors showed these ambivalent effects independent of the presence of K(+). These findings suggest a direct modulation of mitochondrial ROS generation during cardioprotection via complex II inhibition and question the recently proposed role of complex II as a regulatory component of the putative mitochondrial K(ATP) channel.

  3. Hexokinase II acts through UCP3 to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and maintain aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Dumouchel, Tyler; Aguer, Céline; deKemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-07-15

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) mitigates mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies have also examined UCP3 effects, including decreased ROS production, during metabolic states when fatty acid oxidation is high (e.g. a fasting state). However, the role of UCP3 when carbohydrate oxidation is high (e.g. fed state) has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we show that mitochondrial-bound HK (hexokinase) II curtails oxidative stress and enhances aerobic metabolism of glucose in the fed state in a UCP3-dependent manner. Genetic knockout or inhibition of UCP3 significantly decreased mitochondrial-bound HKII. Furthermore, UCP3 was required for the HKII-mediated decrease in mitochondrial ROS emission. Intriguingly, the UCP3-mediated modulation of mitochondria-associated HKII was only observed in cells cultured under high-glucose conditions. UCP3 was required to maintain high rates of aerobic metabolism in high-glucose-treated cells and in muscle of fed mice. Deficiency in UCP3 resulted in a metabolic shift that favoured anaerobic glycolytic metabolism, increased glucose uptake and increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. PET (positron emission tomography) of [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake confirmed these findings in UCP3-knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings link the anti-oxidative and metabolic functions of UCP3 through a surprising molecular connection with mitochondrial-bound HKII.

  4. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human microvascular endothelial cells: role in endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong; Ducatman, Alan; Ward, Rebecca; Leonard, Steve; Bukowski, Valerie; Guo, Nancy Lan; Shi, Xianglin; Vallyathan, Val; Castranova, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) containing an 8-carbon backbone. PFOS is a man-made chemical with carbon-fluorine bonds that are one of the strongest in organic chemistry and widely used in industry. Human occupational and environmental exposure to PFOS occurs globally. PFOS is non-biodegradable and persistent in the human body and environment. In this study, data demonstrated that exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to PFOS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at both high and low concentrations. Morphologically, it was found that exposure to PFOS induced actin filament remodeling and endothelial permeability changes in HMVEC. Furthermore, data demonstrated the production of ROS plays a regulatory role in PFOS-induced actin filament remodeling and the increase in endothelial permeability. Our results indicate that the generation of ROS may play a role in PFOS-induced aberrations of the endothelial permeability barrier. The results generated from this study may provide a new insight into the potential adverse effects of PFOS exposure on humans at the cellular level. PMID:20391123

  5. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines by Ebselen via Enhancing the Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jia; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Cheng, Yi; Peng, Yang; Xie, Jiayin; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen a selenoorganic compound showing glutathione peroxidase like activity is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its cytoprotective activity has been investigated in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several cancer cell types whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of ebselen on multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in vitro. The results showed that ebselen significantly enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanied by cell viability decrease and apoptosis rate increase. Further studies revealed that ebselen can induce Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm changes and cytochrome C release from the mitochondria to cytosol. Furtherly, we found that exogenous addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely diminished the cell damage induced by ebselen. This result suggests that relatively high concentration of ebselen can induce MM cells apoptosis in culture by enhancing the production of endogenous ROS and triggering mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:24587987

  6. Measurement of Coherent π+ Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π+ production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al. models.

  7. Measurement of Coherent π^{+} Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Ban, S; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Campbell, T; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coplowe, D; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Harada, J; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Lasorak, P; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Novella, P; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Stowell, P; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-11-04

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π^{+} production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al.

  8. Measurement of beauty production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA using decays into electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bolilyi, O.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Y.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Y.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-02-01

    The production of beauty quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared Q 2>10 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1. The beauty events were identified using electrons from semileptonic b decays with a transverse momentum 0.9 < pTe < 8 GeV and pseudorapidity | η e |<1.5. Cross sections for beauty production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty contribution to the proton structure function F 2 was extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of Bjorken- x and Q 2.

  9. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential.

  10. The Use of HRP in Decolorization of Reactive Dyes and Toxicological Evaluation of Their Products

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Michelle Reis; de Sá, Lívian Ribeiro Vasconcelos; Russo, Carlos; Scio, Elita; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the potential use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the decolorization of the following textile dyes: Drimarene Blue X-3LR (DMBLR), Drimarene Blue X-BLN (DMBBLN), Drimarene Rubinol X-3LR (DMR), and Drimarene Blue CL-R (RBBR). Dyes were individually tested in the reaction media containing 120 mg·L−1, considering the following parameters: temperature (20–45°C), H2O2 concentration (0–4.44 mmol·L−1), and reaction time (5 minutes, 1 and 24 h). The following conditions: 35°C, 0.55 mmol·L−1, and 1h, provided the best set of results of color removal for DMBLR (99%), DMBBLN (77%), DMR (94%), and RBBR (97%). It should be mentioned that only 5 minutes of reaction was enough to obtain 96% of decolorization for DMBLR and RBBR. After the decolorization reactions of DMBLR, DMR, and RBBR, it was possible to observe the reduction of Artemia salina mortality and the no significant increase in toxicity for the products generated from DMBBLN. PMID:21318147

  11. Reactive-Atom Scattering from Liquid Crystals at the Liquid-Vacuum Interface: [C12mim][BF4] and 4-Cyano-4'-Octylbiphenyl (8CB).

    PubMed

    Purcell, Simon M; Tesa-Serrate, Maria A; Marshall, Brooks C; Bruce, Duncan W; D'Andrea, Lucía; Costen, Matthew L; Slattery, John M; Smoll, Eric J; Minton, Timothy K; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2016-10-04

    Two complementary approaches were used to study the liquid-vacuum interface of the liquid-crystalline ionic liquid 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C12mim][BF4]) in the smectic A (SmA) and isotropic phases. O atoms with two distinct incident translational energies were scattered from the surface of [C12mim][BF4]. Angle-dependent time-of-flight distributions and OH yields, respectively, were recorded from high- and low-energy O atoms. There were no significant changes in the measurements using either approach, nor the properties derived from them, accompanying the transition from the SmA to the isotropic phase. This indicates that the surface structure of [C12mim][BF4] remains essentially unchanged across the phase boundary, implying that the bulk order and surface structure are not strongly correlated for this material. This effect is ascribed to the strong propensity for the outer surfaces of ionic liquids to be dominated by alkyl chains, over an underlying layer rich in anions and cation head groups, whether or not the bulk material is a liquid crystal. In a comparative study, the OH yield from the surface of the liquid crystal, 8CB, was found to be affected by the bulk order, showing a surprising step increase at the SmA-nematic transition temperature, whose origin is the subject of speculation.

  12. Reactivity of β-blockers/agonists with aqueous permanganate. Kinetics and transformation products of salbutamol.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, Tania; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    The possible oxidation of two β-blockers, atenolol and propranolol, and one β-agonist, salbutamol, with aqueous potassium permanganate (KMnO4) was investigated by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). Under strong oxidation conditions (2 mg L(-1) KMnO4, 24 h), only salbutamol did significantly react. In this way, the oxidation kinetics of salbutamol was further investigated at different concentrations of KMnO4, chloride, phosphate and sample pH by means of a full factorial experimental design. Depending on these factors, half-lives were in the range 1-144 min for drug and it was observed that KMnO4 concentration was the most significant factor, resulting in increased reaction rate as it is increased. Moreover, the reaction of salbutamol is also enhanced at basic pH and to a minor extent by the presence of phosphates, being both factors more relevant at low KMnO4 concentrations. The use of an accurate-mass LC-QTOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of seven transformation products (TPs). The transformation path of the drug begins by the attack of KMnO4 on two double bonds of the aromatic ring of salbutamol via 3 + 2 and 2 + 2 addition reactions, which resulted in the ring opening and that continues with oxidative reactions to finally produce smaller size TPs, ending with tert-butyl-formamide, as the smallest TP identified. Reaction in real samples showed a slower and partial oxidation of the pharmaceutical, due to other competing water organic constituents, but still exceeding 60%. Moreover, the software predicted toxicity of TPs indicates that they are expected not to be more toxic than salbutamol, in contrast to the results obtained for the predicted toxicity of chlorination TPs, excepting predicted developmental toxicity.

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases from rice production with simultaneous incorporation of wheat straw and nitrogen fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Longlong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ma, Shutan; Wang, Jinyang; Wang, Shuwei; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Impacts of simultaneous inputs of crop straw and nitrogen (N) fertilizer on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and N losses from rice production are not well understood. A 2-year field experiment was established in a rice-wheat cropping system in the Taihu Lake region (TLR) of China to evaluate the GHG intensity (GHGI) as well as reactive N intensity (NrI) of rice production with inputs of wheat straw and N fertilizer. The field experiment included five treatments of different N fertilization rates for rice production: 0 (RN0), 120 (RN120), 180 (RN180), 240 (RN240), and 300 kg N ha-1 (RN300, traditional N application rate in the TLR). Wheat straws were fully incorporated into soil before rice transplantation. The meta-analytic technique was employed to evaluate various Nr losses. Results showed that the response of rice yield to N rate successfully fitted a quadratic model, while N fertilization promoted Nr discharges exponentially (nitrous oxide emission, N leaching, and runoff) or linearly (ammonia volatilization). The GHGI of rice production ranged from 1.20 (RN240) to 1.61 kg CO2 equivalent (CO2 eq) kg-1 (RN0), while NrI varied from 2.14 (RN0) to 10.92 g N kg-1 (RN300). Methane (CH4) emission dominated the GHGI with a proportion of 70.2-88.6 % due to direct straw incorporation, while ammonia (NH3) volatilization dominated the NrI with proportion of 53.5-57.4 %. Damage costs to environment incurred by GHG and Nr releases from current rice production (RN300) accounted for 8.8 and 4.9 % of farmers' incomes, respectively. Cutting N application rate from 300 (traditional N rate) to 240 kg N ha-1 could improve rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency by 2.14 and 10.30 %, respectively, while simultaneously reducing GHGI by 13 %, NrI by 23 %, and total environmental costs by 16 %. Moreover, the reduction of 60 kg N ha-1 improved farmers' income by CNY 639 ha-1, which would provide them with an incentive to change the current N application rate. Our study suggests that GHG

  14. Investigation of the photochemical reactivity of soot particles derived from biofuels toward NO2. A kinetic and product study.

    PubMed

    Romanías, Manolis N; Dagaut, Philippe; Bedjanian, Yuri; Andrade-Eiroa, Auréa; Shahla, Roya; Emmanouil, Karafas S; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Spyros, Apostolos

    2015-03-12

    In the current study, the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with soot and biosoot surfaces was investigated in the dark and under illumination relevant to atmospheric conditions (J(NO2) = 0.012 s(-1)). A flat-flame burner was used for preparation and collection of soot samples from premixed flames of liquid fuels. The biofuels were prepared by mixing 20% v/v of (i) 1-butanol (CH3(CH2)3OH), (ii) methyl octanoate (CH3(CH2)6COOCH3), (iii) anhydrous diethyl carbonate (C2H5O)2CO and (iv) 2,5 dimethyl furan (CH3)2C4H2O additive compounds in conventional kerosene fuel (JetA-1). Experiments were performed at 293 K using a low-pressure flow tube reactor (P = 9 Torr) coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The initial and steady-state uptake coefficients, γ0 and γ(ss), respectively, as well as the surface coverage, N(s), were measured under dry and humid conditions. Furthermore, the branching ratios of the gas-phase products NO (∼80-100%) and HONO (<20%) were determined. Soot from JetA-1/2,5-dimethyl furan was the most reactive [γ0 = (29.1 ± 5.8) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (9.09 ± 1.82) × 10(-7) and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (14.0 ± 2.8)(-7)] while soot from JetA-1/1-butanol [γ0 = (2.72 ± 0.544) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (4.57 ± 0.914) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (3.64 ± 0.728) × 10(-7)] and JetA-1/diethyl carbonate [γ0 = (2.99 ± 0.598) × 10(-6), γ(ss)(dry) = (3.99 ± 0.798) × 10(-7), and γ(ss)(5.5%RH) = (4.80 ± 0.960) × 10(-7)] were less reactive. To correlate the chemical reactivity with the physicochemical properties of the soot samples, their chemical composition was analyzed employing Raman spectroscopy, NMR, and high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption isotherms and the particle size distributions were determined employing a Quantachrome Nova 2200e gas sorption analyzer. The analysis of the results showed that factors such as (i) soot mass collection rate, (ii) porosity of the particles formed, (iii

  15. Excess reactive oxygen species production mediates monoclonal antibody-induced human embryonic stem cell death via oncosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji Yun; Tan, Heng Liang; Matsudaira, Paul Thomas; Choo, Andre

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-mediated cell killing has significantly facilitated the elimination of undesired cells in therapeutic applications. Besides the well-known Fc-dependent mechanisms, pathways of antibody-induced apoptosis were also extensively studied. However, with fewer studies reporting the ability of antibodies to evoke an alternative form of programmed cell death, oncosis, the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated oncosis remains underinvestigated. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), TAG-A1 (A1), was generated to selectively kill residual undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) so as to prevent teratoma formation upon transplantation of hESC-derived products. We revealed that A1 induces hESC death via oncosis. Aided with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we uncovered nanoscale morphological changes in A1-induced hESC oncosis, as well as A1 distribution on hESC surface. A1 induces hESC oncosis via binding-initiated signaling cascade, most likely by ligating receptors on surface microvilli. The ability to evoke excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via the Nox2 isoform of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is critical in the cell death pathway. Excess ROS production occurs downstream of microvilli degradation and homotypic adhesion, but upstream of actin reorganization, plasma membrane damage and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of mAb-induced oncosis on hESC revealing a previously unrecognized role for NAPDH oxidase-derived ROS in mediating oncotic hESC death. These findings in the cell death pathway may potentially be exploited to improve the efficiency of A1 in eliminating undifferentiated hESC and to provide insights into the study of other mAb-induced cell death.

  16. Sinoporphyrin sodium, a novel sensitizer, triggers mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in ECA-109 cells via production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Shaoliang; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Quanhong

    2014-01-01

    Background Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a promising method that uses ultrasound to activate certain chemical sensitizers for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the sonoactivity of a novel sensitizer, sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS), and its sonotoxicity in an esophageal cancer (ECA-109) cell line. Methods The fluorescence intensity of DVDMS, hematoporphyrin, protoporphyrin IX, and Photofrin II was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Generation of singlet oxygen was measured using a 1, 3-diphenylisobenzofuran experiment. A 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to examine cell viability. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and destabilization of the mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed using Annexin-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Confocal microscopy was performed to assess mitochondrial damage and identify release of cytochrome C after treatment. Western blots were used to determine expression of oxidative stress-related and apoptosis-associated protein. Ultrastructural changes in the cell were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results DVDMS showed higher autofluorescence intensity and singlet oxygen production efficiency compared with other photosensitizers in both cancerous and normal cells. Compared with hematoporphyrin, DVDMS-mediated SDT was more cytotoxic in ECA-109 cells. Abundant intracellular ROS was found in the SDT groups, and the cytotoxicity induced by SDT was effectively remitted by ROS scavengers. DVDMS located mainly to the mitochondria of ECA-109 cells, which were seriously damaged after exposure to SDT. Release of cytochrome C, an increased rate of apoptosis, and activated apoptosis protein were detected in the SDT group. In addition, relatively severe cell damage was observed on scanning electron microscopy after treatment with DVDMS and SDT. Conclusion These results suggest that DVDMS

  17. Molecular engineering of cycloisomaltooligosaccharide glucanotransferase from Bacillus circulans T-3040: structural determinants for the reaction product size and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kimura, Keitarou; Kitamura, Shinichi; Kimura, Atsuo; Funane, Kazumi

    2015-04-15

    Cycloisomaltooligosaccharide glucanotransferase (CITase) is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 66 and it produces cycloisomaltooligosaccharides (CIs). Small CIs (CI-7-9) and large CIs (CI-≥10) are designated as oligosaccharide-type CIs (oligo-CIs) and megalosaccharide-type CIs (megalo-CIs) respectively. CITase from Bacillus circulans T-3040 (BcCITase) produces mainly CI-8 with little megalo-CIs. It has two family 35 carbohydrate-binding modules (BcCBM35-1 and BcCBM35-2). BcCBM35-1 is inserted in a catalytic domain of BcCITase and BcCBM35-2 is located at the C-terminal region. Our previous studies suggested that BcCBM35-1 has two substrate-binding sites (B-1 and B-2) [Suzuki et al. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 12040-12051]. We implemented site-directed mutagenesis of BcCITase to explore the preference for product size on the basis of the 3D structure of BcCITase. Mutational studies provided evidence that B-1 and B-2 contribute to recruiting substrate and maintaining product size respectively. A mutant (mutant-R) with four mutations (F268V, D469Y, A513V and Y515S) produced three times as much megalo-CIs (CI-10-12) and 1.5 times as much total CIs (CI-7-12) as compared with the wild-type (WT) BcCITase. The 3D structure of the substrate-enzyme complex of mutant-R suggested that the modified product size specificity was attributable to the construction of novel substrate-binding sites in the B-2 site of BcCBM35-1 and reactivity was improved by mutation on subsite -3 on the catalytic domain.

  18. Light dark matter in neutrino beams: Production modeling and scattering signatures at MiniBooNE, T2K, and SHiP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deNiverville, Patrick; Chen, Chien-Yi; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the prospects for detection of light sub-GeV dark matter produced in experiments designed to study the properties of neutrinos, such as MiniBooNE, T2K, SHiP, DUNE etc. We present an improved production model, when dark matter couples to hadronic states via a dark photon or baryonic vector mediator, incorporating bremsstrahlung of the dark vector. In addition to elastic scattering, we also study signatures of light dark matter undergoing deep inelastic or quasielastic NC π0 -like scattering in the detector producing neutral pions, which for certain experiments may provide the best sensitivity. Supplemental Material provides extensive documentation for a publicly available simulation tool BdNMC that can be applied to determine the hidden sector dark matter production and scattering rate at a range of proton fixed target experiments.

  19. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  20. Scattering rates for leptogenesis: Damping of lepton flavour coherence and production of singlet neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Glowna, Frank; Schwaller, Pedro

    2013-12-01

    Using the Closed Time Path (CTP) approach, we perform a systematic leading order calculation of the relaxation rate of flavour correlations of left-handed Standard Model leptons. This quantity is of pivotal relevance for flavoured leptogenesis in the Early Universe, and we find it to be 5.19×10-3T at T=107 GeV and 4.83×10-3T at T=1013 GeV, in substantial agreement with estimates used in previous phenomenological analyses. These values apply to the Standard Model with a Higgs-boson mass of 125 GeV. The dependence of the numerical coefficient on the temperature T is due to the renormalisation group running. The leading linear and logarithmic dependencies of the flavour relaxation rate on the gauge and top-quark couplings are extracted, such that the results presented in this work can readily be applied to extensions of the Standard Model. We also derive the production rate of light (compared to the temperature) sterile right-handed neutrinos, a calculation that relies on the same methods. We confirm most details of earlier results, but find a substantially larger contribution from the t-channel exchange of fermions.

  1. Autophagy inhibition enhances silibinin-induced apoptosis by regulating reactive oxygen species production in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hun; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Yu, Sun-Nyoung; Park, Seul-Ki; Choi, Hyeun-Deok; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Ahn, Soon-Cheol

    Silibinin is a major bioactive component of silymarin and has anticancer effects on cancer cell line and has been used as a supportive therapy for chronic inflammatory liver condition. These anticancer effects of silibinin have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo cancer models. Although various evidences showed apoptosis signaling pathways by silibinin, there is no report to address the clearly mechanism of silibinin-induced autophagy in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Our study showed that silibinin triggered autophagy through up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO) and punctuate of GFP-LC3, which was inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an inhibitor of specific autophagy. In addition, silibinin induced autophagy through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ROS with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a ROS inhibitor, attenuated silibinin-triggered autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA enhanced the silibinin-induced apoptosis through the regulation of caspase-3 and PARP. These results suggested that silibinin induced autophagy by regulating ROS and its mechanism played a protective role against apoptosis in PC-3 cells.

  2. Effects of lead on growth, photosynthetic characteristics and production of reactive oxygen species of two freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Dao, Ly H T; Beardall, John

    2016-03-01

    In the natural environment, heavy metal contamination can occur as long-term pollution of sites or as pulses of pollutants from wastewater disposal. In this study two freshwater green algae, Chlorella sp. FleB1 and Scenedesmus YaA6, were isolated from lead-polluted water samples and the effects of 24 h vs 4 and 8 d exposure of cultures to lead on growth, photosynthetic physiology and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of these algae were investigated. In Chlorella sp. FleB1, there was agreement between lead impacts on chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and growth in most case. However, in Scenedesmus acutus YaA6 growth was inhibited at lower lead concentrations (0.03-0.87 × 10(-9) M), under which ROS, measured by 2',7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, were 4.5 fold higher than in controls but photosynthesis was not affected, implying that ROS had played a role in the growth inhibition that did not involve direct effects on photosynthesis. Effects of short-term (5 h, 24 h) vs long-term (4 d and 8 d) exposure to lead were also compared between the two algae. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of lead toxicity to algae.

  3. Production and Scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Signaling during Leaf and Flower Senescence: Similar But Different1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the regulation of many developmental processes, including senescence, and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Several mechanisms of ROS generation and scavenging are similar, but others differ between senescing leaves and petals, despite these organs sharing a common evolutionary origin. Photosynthesis-derived ROS, nutrient remobilization, and reversibility of senescence are necessarily distinct features of the progression of senescence in the two organs. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed specific redox signaling processes that act in concert with phytohormones and transcription factors to regulate senescence-associated genes in leaves and petals. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the production and elimination of ROS in these two organs. We focus on unveiling common and differential aspects of redox signaling in leaf and petal senescence, with the aim of linking physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes. We conclude that the spatiotemporal impact of ROS in senescing tissues differs between leaves and flowers, mainly due to the specific functionalities of these organs. PMID:27208233

  4. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  5. Reactivity of Tannic Acid with Common Corrosion Products and Its Influence on the Hydrolysis of Iron in Alkaline Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; Araúz, E. Y.; Iglesias, J.; Delgado, Y.

    2003-06-01

    To ascertain the role of tannic acid in the anticorrosive protection of steels, the reaction between 5% tannic acid aqueous solutions with lepidocrocite, goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, akaganeite, poorly crystalline maghemite, magnetite and hematite was studied using color changes, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. After three months of interaction with lepidocrocite, the formation of an iron tannate complex was detected by its dark blue color and confirmed by infrared and Mössbauer analysis. Evidence for the chemical transformation was obtained for goethite in nanoparticles and poorly crystalline maghemite after reaction for six months. The other iron compounds do not transform to another oxide or phase upon treatment with the tannic acid solution. These results showed that lepidocrocite is the most reactive phase and that the size and degree of crystallinity have strong influence on the formation of the tannate complexes. The precipitation of iron phases from alkaline solutions of iron (II) sulfate heptahydrate containing different amount of tannic acid and potassium nitrate as oxidative agent was also studied. Mössbauer and infrared results show that in the absence of tannic acid some common rust components are obtained (viz. goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, maghemite and non-stoichiometric magnetite). The presence of 0.1% tannic acid in a low alkalinity solution results in the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides and some iron tannates. Concentrations of 1% tannic acid are required for the formation of the tannates complexes as main reaction product.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson's disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson's disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis.

  7. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Jin Sil; Lee, Sora; Yoo, Young Do

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development.

  8. ortho-Quinol Acetate Chemistry - Reactivity towards Aryl-Based Nucleophiles and Applications to the Synthesis of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Companys, Simon; Pouységu, Laurent; Peixoto, Philippe A; Chassaing, Stefan; Quideau, Stephane

    2017-03-10

    Two model ortho-quinol acetates were easily prepared by iodane-mediated acetoxylative phenol dearomatization and evaluated for their reactivity towards various aryl-based nucleophiles, i.e., aryl metallic reagents and phenolic derivatives. Novel modes of reactivity, allowing the formation of biaryl linkages, were revealed and here exploited for the synthesis of two natural phenolics.

  9. Rayleigh Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andrew T.

    1982-01-01

    The correct usage of such terminology as "Rayleigh scattering,""Rayleigh lines,""Raman lines," and "Tyndall scattering" is resolved during an historical excursion through the physics of light-scattering by gas molecules. (Author/JN)

  10. A Novel Nontoxic Inhibitor of the Activation of NADPH Oxidase Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Mouse LungS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Intae; Dodia, Chandra; Chatterjee, Shampa; Zagorski, John; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A.; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Jain, Mahendra

    2013-01-01

    1-Hexadecyl-3-trifluoroethylglycero-sn-2-phosphomethanol (MJ33) is a fluorinated phospholipid analog that inhibits the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6). Prdx6 PLA2 activity is required for activation of NADPH oxidase 2 and subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vitro, MJ33 inhibited agonist-stimulated production of ROS by the isolated perfused mouse lung, lung microvascular endothelial cells, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. MJ33 (0.02–0.5 µmol MJ33/kg body weight) in mixed unilamellar liposomes was administered to C57BL/6 mice by either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. routes. Lung MJ33 content, measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, showed uptake of 67–87% of the injected dose for i.t. and 23–42% for i.v. administration at 4 hours postinjection. PLA2 activity of lung homogenates was markedly inhibited (>85%) at 4 hours postadministration. Both MJ33 content and PLA2 activity gradually returned to near control levels over the subsequent 24–72 hours. Mice treated with MJ33 at 12.5–25 µmol/kg did not show changes (compared with control) in clinical symptomatology, body weight, hematocrit, and histology of lung, liver, and kidney during a 30- to 50-day observation period. Thus, the toxic dose of MJ33 was >25 µmol/kg, whereas the PLA2 inhibitory dose was approximately 0.02 µmol/kg, indicating a high margin of safety. MJ33 administered to mice prior to lung isolation markedly reduced ROS production and tissue lipid and protein oxidation during ischemia followed by reperfusion. Thus, MJ33 could be useful as a therapeutic agent to prevent ROS-mediated tissue injury associated with lung inflammation or in harvested lungs prior to transplantation. PMID:23475902

  11. In vitro assessment of the effects of temperature on phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis in bovine polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Rota, Nicola; Vitali, Andrea; Ceciliani, Fabrizio; Lacetera, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    Heat stress exerts a direct negative effect on farm animal health, triggering physiological responses. Environmental high temperature induces immunosuppression in dairy cows, increasing the risk of mastitis and milk somatic cell counts. The influence of heat stress on leukocytes activities has not been fully elucidated. The present in vitro study was aimed at assessing whether the exposure to temperature simulating conditions of severe whole body hyperthermia affects defensive functions of bovine blood polymorphonuclear cells. Blood was collected from seven clinically healthy, multiparous, late lactating Holstein cows. After isolation, PMN were incubated at either 39 or 41°C. Phagocytosis, respiratory burst and apoptosis were then investigated. The selected temperatures of 39°C or 41°C mimicked conditions of normothermia or severe heat stress, respectively. Phagocytosis assay was carried out by measuring the fluorescence of phagocyted fluorescein-labelled E. coli bioparticles. The modulation of oxidative burst activity was studied by the cytochrome C reduction method. Apoptosis was determined by measuring the activities of two enzymes that play an effector role in the process, namely Caspase-3 and Caspase-7. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 22.0. A Student t-test for paired samples and a Generalised Estimating Equation were used based on data distribution. The phagocytosis rate was reduced (-37%, P<0.01) when PMN were incubated for 2h at 41°C, when compared to phagocytosis rate measured at 39°C. The oxidative burst, as determined by extracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was also reduced by the exposure of cells to 41°C compared to 39°C. Such reduction ranged between -2 and -21% (P<0.05). Apoptosis rate was not affected by different temperatures. The results reported in this study suggest that phagocytosis and ROS production in PMN exposed to severe high temperature are impaired, partially explaining the higher occurrence of

  12. Reactive transport model of growth and methane production by high-temperature methanogens in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, L. C.; Algar, C. K.; Topçuoğlu, B. D.; Fortunato, C. S.; Larson, B. I.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Vallino, J. J.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are keystone high-temperature autotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and tracers of habitability and biogeochemical activity in the hydrothermally active subseafloor. At Axial Seamount, nearly all thermophilic methanogens are Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus species, making this site amenable to modeling through pure culture laboratory experiments coupled with field studies. Based on field microcosm incubations with 1.2 mM, 20 μM, or no hydrogen, the growth of methanogens at 55°C and 80°C is limited primarily by temperature and hydrogen availability, with ammonium amendment showing no consistent effect on total methane output. The Arrhenius constants for methane production by Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (optimum 82°C) and Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus (optimum 65°C) were determined in pure culture bottle experiments. The Monod constants for hydrogen concentration were measured by growing both organisms in a 2-liter chemostat at two dilution rates; 55°C, 65°C and 82°C; and variable hydrogen concentrations. M. jannaschii showed higher ks and Vmax constants than M. thermolithotrophicus. In the field, hydrogen and methane concentrations in hydrothermal end-member and low-temperature diffuse fluids were measured, and the concentrations of methanogens that grow at 55°C and 80°C in diffuse fluids were determined using most-probable-number estimates. Methane concentration anomalies in diffuse fluids relative to end-member hydrothermal concentrations and methanogen cell concentrations are being used to constrain a 1-D reactive transport model using the laboratory-determined Arrhenius and Monod constants for methane production by these organisms. By varying flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations in the model, our goal is to determine solutions for the potential depth of the subseafloor biosphere coupled with the amount of methanogenic biomass it contains.

  13. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Taylor A; Young, Martin E; Rubel, Carrie E; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J; Willis, Monte S

    2014-06-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1's role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1-/- mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased α-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose oxidation. However, total oxygen consumption was decreased [corrected]. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1-/- hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2's regulation of mitochondrial function.

  14. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Taylor A.; Young, Martin E.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Spaniel, Carolyn; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Gautel, Mathias; Xu, Zhelong; Anderson, Ethan J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2014-01-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1’s role in regulating mitochondrial function to date. In the present study, we measured cardiac mitochondrial function from isolated permeabilized muscle fibers in previously phenotyped MuRF1 transgenic and MuRF1−/− mouse models to determine the role of MuRF1 in intermediate energy metabolism and ROS production. We identified a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species production in cardiac muscle fibers from MuRF1 transgenic mice with increased alpha-MHC driven MuRF1 expression. Increased MuRF1 expression in ex vivo and in vitro experiments revealed no alterations in the respiratory chain complex I and II function. Working perfusion experiments on MuRF1 transgenic hearts demonstrated significant changes in glucose or oleate oxidation; however, total oxygen consumption was decreased. This data provides evidence for MuRF1 as a novel regulator of cardiac ROS, offering another mechanism by which increased MuRF1 expression may be cardioprotective in ischemia reperfusion injury, in addition to its inhibition of apoptosis via proteasome-mediate degradation of c-Jun. The lack of mitochondrial function phenotype identified in MuRF1−/− hearts may be due to the overlapping interactions of MuRF1 and MuRF2 with energy regulating proteins found by yeast two-hybrid studies reported here, implying a duplicity in MuRF1 and MuRF2’s regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:24733503

  15. Chlamydia muridarum infection of macrophages elicits bactericidal nitric oxide production via reactive oxygen species and cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Krithika; Nelson, David E

    2015-08-01

    The ability of certain species of Chlamydia to inhibit the biogenesis of phagolysosomes permits their survival and replication within macrophages. The survival of macrophage-adapted chlamydiae correlates with the multiplicity of infection (MOI), and optimal chlamydial growth occurs in macrophages infected at an MOI of ≤1. In this study, we examined the replicative capacity of Chlamydia muridarum in the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line at different MOIs. C. muridarum productively infected these macrophages at low MOIs but yielded few viable elementary bodies (EBs) when macrophages were infected at a moderate (10) or high (100) MOI. While high MOIs caused cytotoxicity and irreversible host cell death, macrophages infected at a moderate MOI did not show signs of cytotoxicity until late in the infectious cycle. Inhibition of host protein synthesis rescued C. muridarum in macrophages infected at a moderate MOI, implying that chlamydial growth was blocked by activated defense mechanisms. Conditioned medium from these macrophages was antichlamydial and contained elevated levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and beta interferon (IFN-β). Macrophage activation depended on Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signaling, and cytokine production required live, transcriptionally active chlamydiae. A hydroxyl radical scavenger and inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cathepsin B also reversed chlamydial killing. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) led to an increase in cathepsin B activity, and pharmacological inhibition of ROS and cathepsin B reduced iNOS expression. Our data demonstrate that MOI-dependent TLR2 activation of macrophages results in iNOS induction via a novel ROS- and cathepsin-dependent mechanism to facilitate C. muridarum clearance.

  16. Instability of Succinate Dehydrogenase in SDHD Polymorphism Connects Reactive Oxygen Species Production to Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomic Mutations in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Lan; Hsieh, Meng-Hsun; Chang, Wei-Wen; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Lin, Mei-Chun; Wang, Cheng-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an essential complex of the electron transport chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle. Mutations in the human SDH subunit D frequently lead to paraganglioma (PGL), but the mechanistic consequences of the majority of SDHD polymorphisms have yet to be unraveled. In addition to the originally discovered yeast SDHD subunit Sdh4, a conserved homolog, Shh4, has recently been identified in budding yeast. To assess the pathogenic significance of SDHD mutations in PGL patients, we performed functional studies in yeast. Results: SDHD protein expression was reduced in SDHD-related carotid body tumor tissues. A BLAST search of SDHD to the yeast protein database revealed a novel protein, Shh4, that may have a function similar to human SDHD and yeast Sdh4. The missense SDHD mutations identified in PGL patients were created in Sdh4 and Shh4, and, surprisingly, a severe respiratory incompetence and reduced expression of the mutant protein was observed in the sdh4Δ strain expressing shh4. Although shh4Δ cells showed no respiratory-deficient phenotypes, deletion of SHH4 in sdh4Δ cells further abolished mitochondrial function. Remarkably, sdh4Δ shh4Δ strains exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nuclear DNA instability, mtDNA mutability, and decreased chronological lifespan. Innovation and Conclusion: SDHD mutations are associated with protein and nuclear and mitochondrial genomic instability and increase ROS production in our yeast model. These findings reinforce our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGL tumorigenesis and point to the yeast Shh4 as a good model to investigate the possible pathogenic relevance of SDHD in PGL polymorphisms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 587–602. PMID:25328978

  17. Hypothesis on Skeletal Muscle Aging: Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Translocator Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species Production While Preserving Coupling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diolez, Philippe; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Calmettes, Guillaume; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Rouland, Richard; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production—but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius) of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling) or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating—in vivo—conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand), coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies. PMID:26733871

  18. Nonadiabatic reactive scattering in atom+triatom systems: Nascent rovibronic distributions in F+H{sub 2}O{yields}HF+OH

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Nesbitt, David J.

    2009-08-07

    Crossed supersonic jet studies of F+H{sub 2}O{yields}HF+OH({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2},{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}) have been performed under low density, single collision conditions at E{sub com}=6(2) kcal/mol, yielding rotational, vibrational, and spin-orbit state distributions in the nascent OH product by laser induced fluorescence methods. The lowest reaction barriers on the ground and first excited electronic surfaces are {Delta}E{approx_equal}4 kcal/mol and {Delta}E{approx_equal}25 kcal/mol, correlating with OH({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}) and OH({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}), respectively. Although only reactions on the ground state potential are Born-Oppenheimer allowed at the experimental collision energies, both ground and excited spin-orbit OH products are observed in a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}:{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}=69(1)%:31(1)% branching ratio. This indicates the presence of strong nonadiabatic surface hopping interactions, in agreement with previous results for the F+D{sub 2}O{yields}DF+OD reaction. Despite clear differences in the rotational distributions between F+H{sub 2}O and F+D{sub 2}O isotopic reactions, the overall electronic branching into spin-orbit manifolds is nearly identical for both OH and OD products. Furthermore, when plotted versus total electronic+rotational energy, the nascent OH and OD populations each lie on single curves, with pronounced kinks in the Boltzmann plots suggestive of microscopic branching in the reaction dynamics. Such an equivalence of electronic and rotational energy release in the OH/OD products is consistent with predominantly nonadiabatic processes taking place in the immediate post-transition state region rather than asymptotically in the exit channel.

  19. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  20. Baccharis trimera inhibits reactive oxygen species production through PKC and down-regulation p47 (phox) phosphorylation of NADPH oxidase in SK Hep-1 cells.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Rabelo, Ana Carolina Silveira; Meira, Janaína Serenato; Rossoni-Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Castro-Borges, William de; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Batista, Maurício Azevedo; Silveira-Lemos, Denise da; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco de; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2017-02-01

    Baccharis trimera, popularly known as "carqueja", is a native South-American plant possessing a high concentration of polyphenolic compounds and therefore high antioxidant potential. Despite the antioxidant potential described for B. trimera, there are no reports concerning the signaling pathways involved in this process. So, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of B. trimera on the modulation of PKC signaling pathway and to characterize the effect of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase enzyme (NOX) on the generation of reactive oxygen species in SK Hep-1 cells. SK-Hep 1 cells were treated with B. trimera, quercetin, or rutin and then stimulated or not with PMA/ionomycin and labeled with carboxy H2DCFDA for detection of reactive oxygen species by flow cytometer. The PKC expression by Western blot and enzyme activity was performed to evaluate the influence of B. trimera and quercetin on PKC signaling pathway. p47 (phox) and p47 (phox) phosphorylated expression was performed by Western blot to evaluate the influence of B. trimera on p47 (phox) phosphorylation. The results showed that cells stimulated with PMA/ionomycin (activators of PKC) showed significantly increased reactive oxygen species production, and this production returned to baseline levels after treatment with DPI (NOX inhibitor). Both B. trimera and quercetin modulated reactive oxygen species production through the inhibition of PKC protein expression and enzymatic activity, also with inhibition of p47 (phox) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that B. trimera has a potential mechanism for inhibiting reactive oxygen species production through the PKC signaling pathway and inhibition subunit p47 (phox) phosphorylation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase.

  1. Analysis of pion production data in electron-hadron scattering at JLAB using the TMD Parton Model Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmate, Tamuno-Negiyeofori; Gamberg, Leonard; Prokudin, Alexei

    2016-09-01

    I have performed a phenomenological analysis of pion production data from Jefferson Laboratory in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons on unpolarized nucleons and deuterium using the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton model formalism. We parameterize the data in terms of TMD parton distribution functions that describe the three-dimensional (3-D) partonic structure of the nucleon. One of the main enigmas of data analysis is how to reliably estimate the errors of the parameters that describe some particular physical process. A common method is to use Hessian matrix or vary the delta chi-square of the corresponding fits to the data. In this particular project we use the so-called bootstrap method that is very robust for error estimation. This method has not been extensively used in the description of the TMD distributions that describe the 3-D nucleon structure. The reliable estimate of the errors and thus reliable predictions for future experiments is of great scientific interest. We are using Python and modern methods of data analysis in this project. The results of the project will be useful for understanding the effects of internal motion of quarks and gluons inside of the proton and will be reported in a forthcoming publication.

  2. Taurocholate-induced nitric oxide signaling and the ensuing production of reactive oxygen species lead to an increase in epithelial permeability in cultivated mouse gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Harri; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Paimela, Hannu; Mentula, Panu; Kemppainen, Esko; Kivilaakso, Eero

    2008-12-01

    We have here elucidated whether ulcerogenic agents affect the production of NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ulcerogenic agents dose dependently induced NO and ROS production in mouse gastric epithelial cells. Taurocholate (TC, 5 mM) exposure did not affect cell viability, but it increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, NO production, ROS production, and epithelial permeability. Epithelial permeability was inhibited with NOS inhibitors or antioxidants. Oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and ethanol was not inhibited with NOS inhibitors. ASA induced ROS production even at low concentrations (1 mM), which did not affect cell viability. Ethanol-induced ROS production was linked to cell viability, suggesting direct oxidative stress caused by ethanol. Taurocholate-induced NO signaling and the ensuing production of ROS might contribute to initiation of defensive or adaptive cellular mechanisms. ASA-induced ROS signaling might have similar effects, whereas ethanol induced direct oxidative stress, having an influence on cell viability.

  3. Toxicity of nano-TiO2 on algae and the site of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmin; Liang, Zhi; Zheng, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Miao; Wang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Given the extensive use of nanomaterials, they may enter aquatic environments and harm the growth of algae, which are primary producers in an aquatic ecosystem. Thus, the balance of an aquatic ecosystem may be destroyed. In this study, Karenia brevis and Skeletonema costatum were exposed to nano-TiO2 (anatase, average particle size of 5-10 nm, specific surface area of 210±10 m(2) g(-1)) to assess the effects of nano-TiO2 on algae. The findings of transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate aggregation of nano-TiO2 in the algal suspension. Nano-TiO2 was also found to be inside algal cells. The growth of the two species of algae was inhibited under nano-TiO2 exposure. The 72 h EC50 values of nano-TiO2 to K. brevis and S. costatum were 10.69 and 7.37 mg L(-1), respectively. TEM showed that the cell membrane of K. brevis was destroyed and its organelles were almost undistinguished under nano-TiO2 exposure. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of K. brevis and S. costatum significantly increased compared with those of the control (p<0.05). Meanwhile, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities (CAT) of K. brevis and S. costatum changed in different ways. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in both species were significantly higher than those of the control (p<0.05). The site of ROS production and accumulation in K. brevis and S. costatum under nano-TiO2 exposure was explored with the addition of inhibitors of different electron transfer chains. This study indicated that nano-TiO2 in algal suspensions inhibited the growth of K. brevis and S. costatum. This effect was attributed to oxidative stress caused by ROS production inside algal cells. The levels of anti-oxidative enzymes changed, which destroyed the balance between oxidation and anti-oxidation. Thus, algae were damaged by ROS accumulation, resulting in lipid oxidation and inhibited algae growth. The inhibitors of the

  4. Barth Syndrome: From Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Associated with Aberrant Production of Reactive Oxygen Species to Pluripotent Stem Cell Studies

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie; Møller, Ian M.; Petit, Patrice X.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated with TAZ mutations. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial phospholipidlysophospholipid transacylase that shuttles acyl groups between phospholipids and regulates the remodeling of cardiolipin (CL), a unique inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid dimer consisting of two phosphatidyl residues linked by a glycerol bridge. After their biosynthesis, the acyl chains of CLs may be modified in remodeling processes involving up to three different enzymes. Their characteristic acyl chain composition depends on the function of tafazzin, although the enzyme itself surprisingly lacks acyl specificity. CLs are crucial for correct mitochondrial structure and function. In addition to their function in the basic mitochondrial function of ATP production, CLs play essential roles in cardiac function, apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Recent developments in tafazzin research have provided strong insights into the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important tool has been the generation of BTHS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BTHS patients. In a complementary approach, disease-specific mutations have been introduced into wild-type iPSC lines enabling direct comparison with isogenic controls. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were then characterized using biochemical and classical bioenergetic

  5. A process for enhancing the accessibility and reactivity of hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp for viscose rayon production by cellulase treatment.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingxian; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Tian, Chao; Zheng, Linqiang; Ni, Yonghao

    2014-02-01

    The commercial pre-hydrolysis kraft-based dissolving pulp production process can be a typical example for the demonstration/implementation of the integrated forest biorefinery concept. In this study, the concept of cellulase treatment of this dissolving pulp for enhancement of accessibility/reactivity in terms of viscose rayon production was demonstrated. The cellulase treatment resulted in the formation of additional openings/surface areas in the fiber structure via the possible action of "etching". As a result, the pore volume of pulp fibers increased, which led to the increase in the accessibility to xanthation, and thus Fock reactivity. Results showed that the cellulase treatment was effective in increasing the Fock reactivity, at a cellulase dosage of 2u/g (based on the dry weight of pulp), the Fock reactivity increased from 47.67% to 79.9%. The adoption of cellulase treatment to hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp can provide an efficient approach for enhancing its performance in the commercial viscose-rayon process.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Jeong, Soyeon; Shin, Soyeon; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DHA prevents PQ-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss via decreasing of excessive ROS. • DHA increases GR and GCLm derivate GSH pool by enhancement of Nrf2 expression. • Protective mechanism is removal of PQ-induced ROS via DHA-dependent GSH pool. • DHA may be a good preventive strategy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) therapy. - Abstract: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson’s disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson’s disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis.

  7. Uncoupling is without an effect on the production of reactive oxygen species by in situ synaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Laszlo; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2007-12-01

    Earlier reports that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by isolated mitochondria supported by succinate was sensitive to small changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) served as a basis for the concept of 'mild uncoupling' suggesting that a few millivolts decrease in DeltaPsim would be beneficial in neuroprotection because of reducing the production of ROS by mitochondria. In this study, we tested whether ROS generation by in situ mitochondria, which function in a normal cytosolic environment and oxidize glucose-derived physiological substrates, is also dependent on changes in DeltaPsim. The release of H(2)O(2) was measured by the Amplex red fluorescence assay in freshly prepared isolated nerve terminals, synaptosomes incubated in a glucose-containing medium. DeltaPsim was decreased by the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon (FCCP) (10-200 nmol/L), which accelerated the oxygen consumption, decreased the NADH level and induced depolarization, as shown by the fluorescence indicator JC-1, in in situ mitochondria. These changes were detected at already the smallest FCCP concentration. H(2)O(2) generation, however, was found to be unaltered by FCCP at any of the applied concentration. Depolarization of mitochondria was also induced by veratridine (40 mumol/L), which enhances the cytosolic Na(+) concentration and imposes an ATP demand in synaptosomes. The accelerated oxygen consumption and the small depolarization of in situ mitochondria by veratridine were not paralleled by any significant alteration in the ROS generation. These findings indicate that a basal ROS generation by in situ mitochondria is not sensitive to changes in DeltaPsim challenging the rational of the 'mild uncoupling' theory for neuroprotection and suggest that the DeltaPsim-dependent characteristics of ROS generation is limited mainly to well-coupled succinate-supported isolated mitochondria.

  8. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: differential cross sections and product rotational alignment.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm(-1) for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  9. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: Differential cross sections and product rotational alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, M. Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B.; Kłos, J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm{sup −1} for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  10. [Effect of myelopeptides on reactive oxygen species generation and IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production by peripheral blood cells].

    PubMed

    Chereshnev, V A; Mazunina, L S; Geĭn, S V; Gavrilova, T V; Chereshneva, M V

    2012-01-01

    Myelopeptides MP-3, MP-5, and MP-6 were found to suppress zymosan-induced production of reactive oxygen species by leukocytes both under one-way introduction and under pretreatment. All of myelopeptides under examination in case of one-way introduction in cultures with zymosan demonstrated a decrease in zymosan-stimulated (1500 mkg/ml) production of IL-1beta, and activation of spontaneous production of this cytokine by whole blood cells. TNF-alpha production under myelopeptide effect was lowered in cultures with 150 mkg/ml zymosan. Under pretreatment myelopeptides did not render effect on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production, with the exception of single stimulating effect of MP-5 on IL-1beta level in spontaneous cultures. Using comparative analysis the difference in direction and expressivity of effects of various myelopeptides was not revealed that suggests the existence of common mechanism of action in this group of peptide bioregulators.

  11. Distinct reactivity of the commercially available monoclonal antibodies of D-dimer and plasma FDP testing to the molecular variants of fibrin degradation products.

    PubMed

    Madoiwa, Seiji; Kitajima, Isao; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Sakata, Yoichi; Mimuro, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Fibrin degradation products (FDP) are an important marker of coagulopathy. We assessed the reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies used in clinical laboratory testing (6 D-dimer reagents, D-dimer-1-6; 4 plasma FDP reagents, plasma FDP-1-4) to quantify FDP using in vitro-generated FDP as well as FDP in clinical samples. The monoclonal antibodies used in D-dimer-1, -2, -5, and -6 reacted poorly to the low molecular weight forms of in vitro-generated FDP. The monoclonal antibodies used in D-dimer-3 and -4 had better reactivity to the low molecular weight forms of in vitro-generated FDP. The monoclonal antibodies used in plasma FDP-2, -3, and -4 reacted well to the high and low molecular weight FDP forms, while the monoclonal antibody in plasma FDP-1 reacted poorly to the low molecular weight FDP forms. Analysis of clinical samples revealed deviations in FDP molecular weight forms in DIC samples. The reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies of laboratory FDP testing to FDP variants in clinical samples was similar to that of in vitro-generated FDP. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibodies used in clinical laboratories to detect FDP have distinct reactivity to the molecular variants of FDP generated in vitro as well as those present in clinical samples. Our findings support the consensus for the standardization of D-dimer and plasma FDP testing.

  12. Measurement of “pretzelosity” asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; ...

    2014-11-24

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized ³He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q² < 2.7 GeV². Our results show that both π± on 3He and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  13. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  14. Aging enhances the production of reactive oxygen species and bactericidal activity in peritoneal macrophages by upregulating classical activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C

    2011-11-15

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3-4 months) and aged (14-15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  15. Black tattoo inks induce reactive oxygen species production correlating with aggregation of pigment nanoparticles and product brand but not with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content.

    PubMed

    Høgsberg, Trine; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Clausen, Per Axel; Serup, Jørgen

    2013-07-01

    Black tattoo inks are composed of carbon nanoparticles, additives and water and may contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We aimed to clarify whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by black inks in vitro is related to pigment chemistry, physico-chemical properties of the ink particles and the content of chemical additives and contaminants including PAHs. The study included nine brands of tattoo inks of six colours each (black, red, yellow, blue, green and white) and two additional black inks of different brands (n = 56). The ROS formation potential was determined by the dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) assay. A semiquantitative method was developed for screening extractable organic compounds in tattoo ink based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Two black inks produced high amounts of ROS. Peroxyl radicals accounted for up to 72% of the free radicals generated, whereas hydroxyl radicals and H₂O₂ accounted for <14% and 16%, respectively. The same two inks aggregated strongly in water in contrast to the other black inks. They did not exhibit any shared pattern in PAHs and other organic substances. Aggregation was exclusively shared by all ink colours belonging to the same two brands. Ten of 11 black inks had PAH concentrations exceeding the European Council's recommended level, and all 11 exceeded the recommended level for benzo(a)pyrene. It is a new finding that aggregation of tattoo pigment particles correlates with ROS production and brand, independently of chemical composition including PAHs. ROS is hypothesized to be implicated in minor clinical symptoms.

  16. Theoretical and Experimental Studies in Reactive Scattering.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-11

    200 22 0.A 04) 05 .0 060( I ~- OM 24i ttedmninespattlnn rbblte Vd .- f ’a ucino h rato fteaalhek-0 mehnia 04M 05 cussaesos o bt h oi 2 0 4 Ill ~bs...ReferncesPbys. A353 (1981) 341 c.References1121 L.H. Beard and D.A. Micha, J. Chem. Phys. 73 (1980) 1193. 11l) M.R. Levs. P"top. React. Kinetics 10 (1979...0.419e-03 0155~e-04 0 11 le-04 0,81 le-04 0.209e-03 0 134c-03 0 t4tbe-0 4 0 262e-03 0.205e-04 0 44 1e-0 3 0 205e-04 0. 1 37e- 05 0 29 1e-04 0. 199e-03

  17. Eicosanoids up-regulate production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH-dependent oxidase in Spodoptera exigua phagocytic hemocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune responses in insects, including phagocytosis of invading microbes. Phagocytosis entails two major steps, the internalization of microbes and the subsequent killing of them via formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we posed the hypothesis that eicosanoi...

  18. Inorganic nanoparticles enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the autoxidation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa).

    PubMed

    Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Field, Jim A; Cobo-Curiel, Angel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2011-09-01

    Public concerns over the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) are growing due to the rapid development of nanotechnology. An important mechanism of nanotoxicity is oxidative stress resulting from reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the chemical production of ROS by inorganic NPs oxidizing the mammalian phenolic compound, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) was evaluated using a ROS sensitive dye, 2',7'-diclorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH). CeO(2), Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(0) NPs enhanced ROS production during the autoxidation of L-dopa by more than four-fold in reactions that were dependent on O(2). This is the first report of chemical ROS production due to interaction of phenolic compounds with NPs. Mn(2)O(3) oxidized DCFH in a reaction that did not require O(2) or L-dopa, suggesting a direct redox reaction between the Mn(2)O(3) and the dye. CeO(2), Mn(2)O(3) and to a lesser extent Fe(0) formed clear electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signature for hydroxyl radicals when incubated in aerobic aqueous suspensions with spin traps. The results indicate that NPs can generate ROS via chemical reactions with medium components and biomolecules susceptible to oxidation, such as L-dopa. NPs were reactive whereas micron-sized particles were not. The combined assay with L-dopa and DCFH is a method proposed to screen for chemical ROS production by NPs.

  19. Mechanism of inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by beta-lactams. 2. Stability, reactivation kinetics, and products of beta-lactam-derived E-I complexes.

    PubMed

    Green, B G; Chabin, R; Mills, S; Underwood, D J; Shah, S K; Kuo, D; Gale, P; Maycock, A L; Liesch, J; Burgey, C S

    1995-11-07

    The monocyclic beta-lactams reported by Knight et al. [Knight, W. B., et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 8160; Chabin, R., et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 8970] as inhibitors of human leucocyte elastase (HLE) produce stable HLE-inhibitor complexes that slowly reactivate with half-lives ranging from less than 1 to 15 h at 37 degrees C. The complexes produced between PPE and two C-3 dimethyl-substituted beta-lactams are less stable than those produced between HLE and analogous C-3 diethyl-substituted lactams. The stability of the HLE-I complexes is governed primarily by the structure of the substituted urea portion of the inhibitors and not by the identity or presence of a leaving group at C-4 of the lactam ring. In some cases substitutions on the urea portion of the inhibitors yielded complexes that displayed biphasic reactivation kinetics. This suggests the presence of at least two different complexes. The stereochemistry of the leaving group at C-4 has a small effect on the stability of the final complex (1.3-2-fold); therefore, the identity of the final complex is dependent upon the initial stereochemistry at that position. The stability of the complexes was relatively insensitive to hydroxylamine, which suggests that the acyl-enzymes are protected from nucleophilic "rescue". The rate of reactivation of the complex derived from L-680,833,[S-R*,S*)]-4-[(1-(((1-(4- methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-oxo-4-azetidinyl)ben zeneacetic acid, was pH independent, while the L-684,481, (R)-(1-(((1-(4-methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-azeti din one generated complex displayed a pH-dependent reactivation rate. In the latter case, the increase in reactivation rate with pH displayed a pKa of 7.2. This is consistent with the requirement for base catalysis by the active site histidine to regenerate enzymatic activity. Reactivation of the L-680,833-derived complex produced different products as a function of pH, suggesting two different pH-dependent routes

  20. Direct Carbon Conversion: Review of Production and Electrochemical Conversion of Reactive Carbons, Economics and Potential Impact on the Carbon Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Upadhye, R; Pasternak, A; Steinberg, M

    2000-12-12

    Concerns over global warning have motivated the search for more efficient technologies for electric power generation from fossil fuels. Today, 90% of electric power is produced from coal, petroleum or natural gas. Higher efficiency reduces the carbon dioxide emissions per unit of electric energy. Exercising an option of deep geologic or ocean sequestration for the CO{sub 2} byproduct would reduce emissions further and partially forestall global warming. We introduce an innovative concept for conversion of fossil fuels to electricity at efficiencies in the range of 70-85% (based on standard enthalpy of the combustion reaction). These levels exceed the performance of common utility plants by up to a factor of two. These levels are also in excess of the efficiencies of combined cycle plants and of advanced fuel cells now operated on the pilot scale. The core of the concept is direct carbon conversion a process that is similar to that a fuel cell but differs in that synthesized forms of carbon, not hydrogen, are used as fuel. The cell sustains the reaction, C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} (E {approx} 1.0 V, T = 800 C). The fuel is in the form of fine particulates ({approx}100 nm) distributed by entrainment in a flow of CO{sub 2} to the cells to form a slurry of carbon in the melt. The byproduct stream of CO{sub 2} is pure. It affords the option of sequestration without additional separation costs, or can be reused in secondary oil or gas recovery. Our experimental program has discovered carbon materials with orders of magnitude spreads in anode reactivity reflected in cell power density. One class of materials yields energy at about 1 kW/m{sup 2} sufficiently high to make practical the use of the cell in electric utility applications. The carbons used in such cells are highly disordered on the nanometer scale (2-30 nm), relative to graphite. Such disordered or turbostratic carbons can be produced by controlled pyrolysis (thermal decomposition) of hydrocarbons extracted from

  1. Production and characterization of activated carbon prepared from safflower seed cake biochar and its ability to absorb reactive dyestuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angın, Dilek; Köse, T. Ennil; Selengil, Uğur

    2013-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from biochar for the removal of reactive dyestuff from aqueous solutions at various contact times, pHs and temperatures was investigated. The biochar was chemically modified with potassium hydroxide. The surface area and micropore volume of activated carbon was 1277 m2/g and 0.4952 cm3/g, respectively. The surface characterization of both biochar and activated carbon was undertaken using by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetics of reactive dyestuff obeys the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG̊, ΔH̊ and ΔS̊ were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 1.12 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal reactive dyestuff from wastewater.

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 immediate-early and early gene expression during reactivation from latency under conditions that prevent infectious virus production.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Jean M; Zhu, Jia; Knipe, David M; Coen, Donald M

    2005-12-01

    The program of gene expression exhibited by herpes simplex virus during productive infection of cultured cells is well established; however, less is known about the regulatory controls governing reactivation from latency in neurons. One difficulty in examining gene regulation during reactivation lies in distinguishing between events occurring in initial reactivating cells versus events occurring in secondarily infected cells. Thus, two inhibitors were employed to block production of infectious virus: acyclovir, which inhibits viral DNA synthesis, and WAY-150138, which permits viral DNA synthesis but inhibits viral DNA encapsidation. Latently infected murine ganglia were explanted in the presence of either inhibitor, and then amounts of RNA, DNA, or infectious virus were quantified. In ganglia explanted for 48 h, the levels of five immediate-early and early RNAs did not exhibit meaningful differences between acyclovir and WAY-150138 treatments when analyzed by in situ hybridization or quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. However, comparative increases in viral DNA and RNA content in untreated ganglia suggested that virus was produced before 48 h postexplant. This was confirmed by the detection of infectious virus as early as 14 h postexplant. Together, these results suggest that high levels of viral gene expression at 48 h postexplant are due largely to the production of infectious virus and subsequent spread through the tissue. These results lead to a reinterpretation of previous results indicating a role for DNA replication in immediate-early and early viral gene expression; however, it remains possible that viral gene expression is regulated differently in neurons than in cultured cells.

  3. Production and characterization of thermoplastic cassava starch, functionalized poly(lactic acid), and their reactive compatibilized blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detyothin, Sukeewan

    Cassava starch was blended with glycerol using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder (TSE). Thermoplastic cassava starch (TPCS) at a ratio of 70/30 by weight of cassava/glycerol was selected and further blended with other polymers. TPCS sheets made from compression molding had low tensile strength (0.45 +/- 0.05 MPa) and Young's modulus (1.24 +/- 0.58 MPa), but moderate elongation at break (83.0 +/- 0.18.6%), medium level of oxygen permeability, and high water vapor permeability with a very high rate of water absorption. TPCS was blended with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) at various ratios by using a TSE. The blend resins exhibited good properties such as increased thermal stability (Tmax) and crystallinity of PLA, and improved water sensitivity and processability of TPCS. PLA and TPCS exhibited a high interfacial tension between the two phases of 7.9 mJ·m -2, indicating the formation of an incompatible, immiscible blend. SEM micrographs showed a non-homogeneous distribution of TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase. TEM micrographs of the blend films made by cast-film extrusion showed coalescence of the TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase of the blend, indicating that the compatibility between the polymer pair needs to be improved. A response surface methodology (RSM) design was used to analyze the effects of maleic anhydride (MA) and 2,5-bis(tert-butylperoxy)-2,5-dimethylhexane (Luperox or L101) contents, and TSE screw speed on the degree of grafted MA and number average molecular weight (Mn) of functionalized PLA (PLA-g-MA), a reactive compatibilizer. PLA-g- MA made by reactive extrusion had an array of colors depending on the content of L101 and MA used. New FTIR peaks suggested that MA was grafted onto the PLA backbone and oligomeric MA may occur. Increasing L101 increased the degree of grafting and decreased Mn, but the Mn of the PLA-g-MA's produced with a high amount of L101 was stable during storage. MA exhibited an optimum concentration for maximizing the

  4. Production of associated Y and open charm hadrons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV via double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Associated production of bottomonia and open charm hadrons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV is observed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 accumulated with the LHCb detector. The observation of five combinations, Y(1S)D0, Y(2S)D0, Y(1S)D+, Y(2S)D+ and Y(1S)D s + , is reported. Production crosssections are measured for Y(1S)D0 and Y(1S)D+ pairs in the forward region. The measured cross-sections and the differential distributions indicate the dominance of double parton scattering as the main production mechanism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Microfluidic Platform for the Continuous Production and Characterization of Multilamellar Vesicles: A Synchrotron Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Study.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Aghiad; Gontsarik, Mark; Kutter, Jörg P; Lafleur, Josiane P; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Labrador, Ana; Salentinig, Stefan; Yaghmur, Anan

    2017-01-05

    A microfluidic platform combined with synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used for monitoring the continuous production of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Their production was fast and started to evolve within less than 0.43 s of contact between the lipids and the aqueous phase. To obtain nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution, it was important to use a modified hydrodynamic flow focusing (HFF) microfluidic device with narrower microchannels than those normally used for SAXS experiments. Monodispersed MLVs as small as 160 nm in size, with a polydispersity index (PDI) of approximately 0.15 were achieved. The nanoparticles produced were smaller and had a narrower size distribution than those obtained via conventional bulk mixing methods. This microfluidic platform therefore has a great potential for the continuous production of monodispersed NPs.

  6. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  7. Effects of the condensation and scattering of radiation at the plasma-dynamic expansion of the detonation products of lead azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, I. A.; Naumov, V. V.; Kochelap, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    The kinetics of the superluminescence of lead atoms, Pb 3 P {1/0} → 1 D 2 (722.9 nm) and 3 P {1/0} → 3 P 2 (405.8 nm), at the fast adiabatic expansion and cooling of the detonation products of lead azide Pb(N3)2 in vacuum has been studied. The effects of the condensation and scattering of light from drop clusters in an optically active heterophase medium has been analyzed in order to interpret the experiments in laser detonation plasma-dynamic systems based on metal azides.

  8. New calculations of cross-sections and charge asymmetries for lepton pair production and wide angle Bhabha scattering in e+e- collisions near the Z-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. H.

    1994-03-01

    A new event generator for lepton pair production and wide angle Bhabha scattering, BHAGENE3, is presented. Both electroweak and higher order (beyond O(α) QED corrections are included. Comparisons are made with results from the programs, based on the structure function formalism, ALIBABA, TOPAZ0 and ZFITTER. For the case of the final states l+l-γγ ( l = e, μ, τ) BHAGENE3 results are compared with those of Monte Carlo generators that use the exact O( α2) amplitudes.

  9. Reactivity of H2O2 towards different UO2-based materials: The relative impact of radiolysis products revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Trummer, Martin; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-03-01

    The reactivity of doped UO2 such as SIMFUEL towards H2O2 has been shown to be fairly similar to that of pure UO2. However, the oxidative dissolution yield, i.e. the ratio between the amount of dissolved uranium and the amount of consumed H2O2 is significantly lower for doped UO2. In this work we have studied the mechanistic difference between SIMFUEL and pure UO2. H2O2 can be catalytically decomposed on UO2 in competition with the redox process in which U(IV) is oxidized. The latter process leads to the dissolution of oxidized uranium. The first step in the catalytic decomposition is the formation of hydroxyl radicals. The presence of hydroxyl radicals was verified using Tris buffer as a radical scavenger. For both UO2 and SIMFUEL pellets, significant amounts of hydroxyl radicals were formed. The results also show that the difference in dissolution yield between the two materials can mainly be attributed to differences in the redox reactivity. Based on this, the rate constants for electron transfer were revised and the relative impact of the radiolytic oxidants in oxidative dissolution of UO2 and SIMFUEL pellets were calculated. The impact of H2O2 is shown to be slightly reduced.

  10. Reactivity of vinca alkaloids during water chlorination processes: Identification of their disinfection by-products by high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Regueiro, Jorge; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2016-02-15

    Concerns about the presence of anticancer drugs in the environment are rapidly increasing mainly due to their growing use in the developed countries and their known cytotoxic effects. Vinca alkaloids are widely used in cancer therapy; however, very scarce information is available on their occurrence, environmental fate and toxicological effects on aquatic organisms. Even less attention has been paid to their potential transformation products, which can exert higher toxicity than the parent compounds. Thus, in the present work, the reactivity of vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine and its metabolite 4-O-deacetyl vinorelbine during water chlorination processes has been investigated for the first time. Under the studied chlorination conditions, vincristine was fairly stable whereas vinblastine, vinorelbine and 4-O-deacetyl vinorelbine were quickly degraded. A total of sixty-five disinfection by-products were tentatively identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, twenty by-products corresponded to mono-chlorinated compounds, eight to di-chlorinated compounds and two to tri-chlorinated compounds, which may be of major environmental concern. Other disinfection by-products involved hydroxylation and oxidation reactions. Although the structures of these by-products could not be positively confirmed due to lack of commercial standards, their chemical formulas and product ions can be added to databases, which will allow their screening in future monitoring studies.

  11. Embryopathic effects of thalidomide and its hydrolysis products in rabbit embryo culture: evidence for a prostaglandin H synthase (PHS)-dependent, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Crystal J J; Gonçalves, Luisa L; Wells, Peter G

    2011-07-01

    Thalidomide (TD) causes birth defects in humans and rabbits via several potential mechanisms, including bioactivation by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) enzymes to a reactive intermediate that enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We show herein that TD in rabbit embryo culture produces relevant embryopathies, including decreases in head/brain development by 28% and limb bud growth by 71% (P<0.05). Two TD hydrolysis products, 2-phthalimidoglutaramic acid (PGMA) and 2-phthalimidoglutaric acid (PGA), were similarly embryopathic, attenuating otic vesicle (ear) and limb bud formation by up to 36 and 77%, respectively (P<0.05). TD, PGMA, and PGA all increased embryonic DNA oxidation measured as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) by up to 2-fold (P<0.05). Co- or pretreatment with the PHS inhibitors eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or the free-radical spin trap phenylbutylnitrone (PBN), completely blocked embryonic 8-oxoG formation and/or embryopathies initiated by TD, PGMA, and PGA. This is the first demonstration of limb bud embryopathies initiated by TD, as well as its hydrolysis products, in a mammalian embryo culture model of a species susceptible to TD in vivo, indicating that all likely contribute to TD teratogenicity in vivo, in part through PHS-dependent, ROS-mediated mechanisms.

  12. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, Howard G. . E-mail: shertzhg@ucmail.uc.edu; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2006-12-15

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels.

  13. Polyphosphate-enhanced production of reactive oxidants by nanoparticulate zero-valent iron and ferrous ion in the presence of oxygen: Yield and nature of oxidants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Hyeon; Lee, Hongshin; Kim, Hyung-Eun; Seo, Jiwon; Hong, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Changha

    2015-12-01

    The production of reactive oxidants from nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ferrous ion (Fe(II)) in the presence of oxygen was greatly enhanced by the addition of tetrapolyphosphate (TPP) as an iron-chelating agent. Compared to other ligands, TPP exhibited superior activity in improving the oxidant yields. The nZVI/TPP/O2 and the Fe(II)/TPP/O2 systems showed similar oxidant yields with respect to the iron consumed, indicating that nZVI only serves as a source of Fe(II). The degradation efficacies of selected organic compounds were also similar in the two systems. It appeared that both hydroxyl radical (OH) and ferryl ion (Fe(IV)) are produced, and OH dominates at acidic pH. However, at pH > 6, little occurrence of hydroxylated oxidation products suggests that Fe(IV) is a dominant oxidant. The degradation rates of selected organic compounds by the Fe(II)/TPP/O2 system had two optimum points at pH 6 and 9, and these pH-dependent trends are likely attributed to the speciation of Fe(IV) with different reactivities.

  14. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Shertzer, Howard G.; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner-membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly-synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox-cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels. PMID:17109908

  15. Niobium sputtered Havar foils for the high-power production of reactive [18F]fluoride by proton irradiation of [18O]H2O targets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J S; Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Johnson, R R; Zyuzin, A; McQuarrie, S A

    2008-05-01

    Niobium sputtered Havar entrance foils were used for the production of reactive [(18)F]fluoride by proton irradiation of [(18)O]H(2)O targets under pressurized conditions. The synthesis yield in the routine production of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) was used as an indicative parameter of the reactivity of (18)F. The yield of FDG obtained with (18)F produced in a target with Havar foil was used as a baseline. No statistically significant difference was found in the saturated yields of (18)F when using Havar or Havar-Nb sputtered entrance foils. However, the amount of long-lived radionuclidic impurities decreased more than 10-fold using the Havar-Nb entrance foil. The average decay corrected synthesis yield of FDG, evaluated over a period of more than 2 years, was found to be approximately 5% higher when using a Havar-Nb entrance foil and a marked improvement on the FDG yield consistency was noted. In addition, the frequency of target rebuilding was greatly diminished when using the Nb sputtered entrance foil.

  16. The histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induces a cell-death pathway characterized by cleavage of Bid and production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Astrid A.; Ausserlechner, Michael J.; Bernhard, David; Sutton, Vivien R.; Tainton, Kellie M.; Kofler, Reinhard; Smyth, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2001-01-01

    Many chemotherapeutic agents induce mitochondrial-membrane disruption to initiate apoptosis. However, the upstream events leading to drug-induced mitochondrial perturbation have remained poorly defined. We have used a variety of physiological and pharmacological inhibitors of distinct apoptotic pathways to analyze the manner by which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a chemotherapeutic agent and histone deacetylase inhibitor, induces cell death. We demonstrate that SAHA initiates cell death by inducing mitochondria-mediated death pathways characterized by cytochrome c release and the production of reactive oxygen species, and does not require the activation of key caspases such as caspase-8 or -3. We provide evidence that mitochondrial disruption is achieved by means of the cleavage of the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bid. SAHA-induced Bid cleavage was not blocked by caspase inhibitors or the overexpression of Bcl-2 but did require the transcriptional regulatory activity of SAHA. These data provide evidence of a mechanism of cell death mediated by transcriptional events that result in the cleavage of Bid, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane, and production of reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. PMID:11535817

  17. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  18. Areca nut components stimulate ADAM17, IL-1α, PGE2 and 8-isoprostane production in oral keratinocyte: role of reactive oxygen species, EGF and JAK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Chan, Chiu-Po; Chen, Yi-Jane; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Chang, Ya-Ching; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-03-29

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is an etiologic factor of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and oral cancer. There are 600 million BQ chewers worldwide. The mechanisms for the toxic and inflammatory responses of BQ are unclear. In this study, both areca nut (AN) extract (ANE) and arecoline stimulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) production of gingival keratinocytes (GKs), whereas only ANE can stimulate a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane production. ANE-induced EGF production was inhibited by catalase. Addition of anti-EGF neutralizing antibody attenuated ANE-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), mature ADAM9 expression and PGE2 and 8-isoprostane production. ANE-induced IL-1α production was inhibited by catalase, anti-EGF antibody, PD153035 (EGF receptor antagonist) and U0126 (MEK inhibitor) but not by α-naphthoflavone (cytochrome p450-1A1 inhibitor). ANE-induced ADAM17 production was inhibited by pp2 (Src inhibitor), U0126, α-naphthoflavone and aspirin. AG490 (JAK inhibitor) prevented ANE-stimulated ADAM17, IL-1α, PGE2 production, COX-2 expression, ADAM9 maturation, and the ANE-induced decline in keratin 5 and 14, but showed little effect on cdc2 expression and EGF production. Moreover, ANE-induced 8-isoprostane production by GKs was inhibited by catalase, anti-EGF antibody, AG490, pp2, U0126, α-naphthoflavone, Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and aspirin. These results indicate that AN components may involve in BQ-induced oral cancer by induction of reactive oxygen species, EGF/EGFR, IL-1α, ADAMs, JAK, Src, MEK/ERK, CYP1A1, and COX signaling pathways, and the aberration of cell cycle and differentiation. Various blockers against ROS, EGF, IL-1α, ADAM, JAK, Src, MEK, CYP1A1, and COX can be used for prevention or treatment of BQ chewing-related diseases.

  19. Nitric oxide production occurs downstream of reactive oxygen species in guard cells during stomatal closure induced by chitosan in abaxial epidermis of Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nupur; Gonugunta, Vijay K; Puli, Mallikarjuna R; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2009-03-01

    The effects of chitosan (beta-1,4 linked glucosamine, a fungal elicitor), on the patterns of stomatal movement and signaling components were studied. cPTIO (NO scavenger), sodium tungstate (nitrate reductase inhibitor) or L: -NAME (NO synthase inhibitor) restricted the chitosan induced stomatal closure, demonstrating that NO is an essential factor. Similarly, catalase (H(2)O(2) scavenger) or DPI [NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor] and BAPTA-AM or BAPTA (calcium chelators) prevented chitosan induced stomatal closure, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium were involved during such response. Monitoring the NO and ROS production in guard cells by fluorescent probes (DAF-2DA and H(2)DCFDA) indicated that on exposure to chitosan, the levels of NO rose after only 10 min, while those of ROS increased already by 5 min. cPTIO or sodium tungstate or L: -NAME prevented the rise in NO levels but did not restrict the ROS production. In contrast, catalase or DPI restricted the chitosan-induced production of both ROS and NO in guard cells. The calcium chelators, BAPTA-AM or BAPTA, did not have a significant effect on the chitosan induced rise in NO or ROS. We propose that the production of NO is an important signaling component and participates downstream of ROS production. The effects of chitosan strike a marked similarity with those of ABA or MJ on guard cells and indicate the convergence of their signal transduction pathways leading to stomatal closure.

  20. A high-statistics measurement of transverse spin effects in dihadron production from muon-proton semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    A measurement of the azimuthal asymmetry in dihadron production in deep-inelastic scattering of muons on transversely polarised proton (NH3) targets is presented. They provide independent access to the transversity distribution functions through the measurement of the Collins asymmetry in single hadron production. The data were taken in the year 2010 with the COMPASS spectrometer using a 160 GeV/c muon beam of the CERN SPS, increasing by a factor of about four the overall statistics with respect to the previously published data taken in the year 2007. The measured sizeable asymmetry is in good agreement with the published data. An approximate equality of the Collins asymmetry and the dihadron asymmetry is observed, suggesting a common physical mechanism in the underlying fragmentation.

  1. Reactive oxygen species production in cardiac mitochondria after complex I inhibition: Modulation by substrate-dependent regulation of the NADH/NAD(+) ratio.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by isolated complex I is steeply dependent on the NADH/NAD(+) ratio. We used alamethicin-permeabilized mitochondria to study the substrate-dependence of matrix NADH and ROS production when complex I is inhibited by piericidin or rotenone. When complex I was inhibited in the presence of malate/glutamate, membrane permeabilization accelerated O2 consumption and ROS production due to a rapid increase in NADH generation that was not limited by matrix NAD(H) efflux. In the presence of inhibitor, both malate and glutamate were required to generate a high enough NADH/NAD(+) ratio to support ROS production through the coordinated activity of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). With malate and glutamate present, the rate of ROS production was closely related to local NADH generation, whereas in the absence of substrates, ROS production was accelerated by increase in added [NADH]. With malate alone, oxaloacetate accumulation limited NADH production by MDH unless glutamate was also added to promote oxaloacetate removal via AST. α-ketoglutarate (KG) as well as AST inhibition also reversed NADH generation and inhibited ROS production. If malate and glutamate were provided before rather than after piericidin or rotenone, ROS generation was markedly reduced due to time-dependent efflux of CoA. CoA depletion decreased KG oxidation by α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), such that the resulting increase in [KG] inhibited oxaloacetate removal by AST and NADH generation by MDH. These findings were largely obscured in intact mitochondria due to robust H2O2 scavenging and limited ability to control substrate concentrations in the matrix. We conclude that in mitochondria with inhibited complex I, malate/glutamate-stimulated ROS generation depends strongly on oxaloacetate removal and on the ability of KGDH to oxidize KG generated by AST.

  2. Suppression of IRG-1 Reduces Inflammatory Cell Infiltration and Lung Injury in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Lv, Yuanzi; Zhuo, Yujie; Chen, Changmai; Shi, Hengfei; Guo, Lin; Yang, Guang; Hou, Yayi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and children. RSV is a negative-sense, single-strand RNA (ssRNA) virus that mainly infects airway epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a major factor for pulmonary inflammation and tissue damage of RSV disease. We investigated immune-responsive gene-1 (IRG1) expression during RSV infection, since IRG1 has been shown to mediate innate immune response to intracellular bacterial pathogens by modulating ROS and itaconic acid production. We found that RSV infection induced IRG1 expression in human A549 cells and in the lung tissues of RSV-infected mice. RSV infection or IRG1 overexpression promoted ROS production. Accordingly, knockdown of IRG1 induction blocked RSV-induced ROS production and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression. Finally, we showed that suppression of IRG1 induction reduced immune cell infiltration and prevented lung injury in RSV-infected mice. These results therefore link IRG1 induction to ROS production and immune lung injury after RSV infection. IMPORTANCE RSV infection is among the most common causes of childhood diseases. Recent studies identify ROS production as a factor contributing to RSV disease. We investigated the cause of ROS production and identified IRG1 as a critical factor linking ROS production to immune lung injury after RSV infection. We found that IRG1 was induced in A549 alveolar epithelial cells and in mouse lungs after RSV infection. Importantly, suppression of IRG1 induction reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and lung injury in mice. This study links IRG1 induction to oxidative damage and RSV disease. It also uncovers a potential therapeutic target in reducing RSV-caused lung injury. PMID:27252532

  3. Sensitivities in the production of spread-out Bragg peak dose distributions by passive scattering with beam current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-M.; Brett, Robert; Engelsman, Martijn; Slopsema, Roelf; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay

    2007-10-15

    A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used in proton beam therapy to create a longitudinal conformality of the required dose to the target. In order to create this effect in a passive beam scattering system, a variety of components must operate in conjunction to produce the desired beam parameters. We will describe how the SOBP is generated and will explore the tolerances of the various components and their subsequent effect on the dose distribution. A specific aspect of this investigation includes a case study involving the use of a beam current modulated system. In such a system, the intensity of the beam current can be varied in synchronization with the revolution of the range-modulator wheel. As a result, the weights of the pulled-back Bragg peaks can be individually controlled to produce uniform dose plateaus for a large range of treatment depths using only a small number of modulator wheels.

  4. Inhibition of Reactive Oxygen Species Production Ameliorates Inflammation Induced by Influenza A Viruses via Upregulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Sue; Stambas, John

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection is associated with severe mortality in both humans and poultry. The mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and immunity are poorly understood although recent evidence suggests that cytokine/chemokine dysregulation contributes to disease severity following H5N1 infection. Influenza A virus infection causes a rapid influx of inflammatory cells, resulting in increased reactive oxygen species production, cytokine expression, and acute lung injury. Proinflammatory stimuli are known to induce intracellular reactive oxygen species by activating NADPH oxidase activity. We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of this activity would restore host cytokine homeostasis following avian influenza virus infection. A panel of airway epithelial and immune cells from mammalian and avian species were infected with A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1 virus, low-pathogenicity avian influenza H5N3 virus (A/duck/Victoria/0305-2/2012), highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Vietnam/0008/2004), or low-pathogenicity avian influenza H7N9 virus (A/Anhui/1/2013). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR showed that H5N1 and H7N9 viruses significantly stimulated cytokine (interleukin-6, beta interferon, CXCL10, and CCL5) production. Among the influenza-induced cytokines, CCL5 was identified as a potential marker for overactive immunity. Apocynin, a Nox2 inhibitor, inhibited influenza-induced cytokines and reactive oxygen species production, although viral replication was not significantly altered in vitro. Interestingly, apocynin treatment significantly increased influenza virus-induced mRNA and protein expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3, enhancing negative regulation of cytokine signaling. These findings suggest that apocynin or its derivatives (targeting host responses) could be used in combination with antiviral strategies (targeting viruses) as therapeutic agents to ameliorate disease severity in susceptible species

  5. Transient Influx of nickel in root mitochondria modulates organic acid and reactive oxygen species production in nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Bhavana; Czymmek, Kirk J; Sparks, Donald L; Bais, Harsh P

    2013-03-08

    Mitochondria are important targets of metal toxicity and are also vital for maintaining metal homeostasis. Here, we examined the potential role of mitochondria in homeostasis of nickel in the roots of nickel hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum murale. We evaluated the biochemical basis of nickel tolerance by comparing the role of mitochondria in closely related nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale and non-accumulator Alyssum montanum. Evidence is presented for the rapid and transient influx of nickel in root mitochondria of nickel hyperaccumulator A. murale. In an early response to nickel treatment, substantial nickel influx was observed in mitochondria prior to sequestration in vacuoles in the roots of hyperaccumulator A. murale compared with non-accumulator A. montanum. In addition, the mitochondrial Krebs cycle was modulated to increase synthesis of malic acid and citric acid involvement in nickel hyperaccumulation. Furthermore, malic acid, which is reported to form a complex with nickel in hyperaccumulators, was also found to reduce the reactive oxygen species generation induced by nickel. We propose that the interaction of nickel with mitochondria is imperative in the early steps of nickel uptake in nickel hyperaccumulator plants. Initial uptake of nickel in roots results in biochemical responses in the root mitochondria indicating its vital role in homeostasis of nickel ions in hyperaccumulation.

  6. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  7. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  8. Groundwater dynamics in wetland soils control the production and transfer mechanisms of dissolved reactive phosphorus in an agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Rémi; Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-04-01

    Because of its high sorption affinity on soils solid phase, mitigation options to reduce diffuse P transfer usually focus on trapping particulate P forms delivered via surface flowpaths. Therefore, vegetated buffer zones placed between croplands and watercourses have been promoted worldwide, sometimes in wetland areas. To investigate the risk of such P trapping riparian wetlands (RWs) releasing dissolved P to rivers, we monitored molybdate reactive P (MRP) in the free soil solution of two RWs in an intensively farmed catchment. Two main mechanisms causing MRP release were identified in light of the geochemical and hydrological conditions in the RWs, controlled by groundwater dynamics. First, soil rewetting after the dry summer was associated with the presence of a pool of mobile P, limited in size. Its mobilization started under conditions of water saturation caused by groundwater uprise in RW organo-mineral soil horizons. Second, the establishment of anoxic conditions in the end of the winter caused reductive solubilization of Fe oxide-hydroxide, along with release of P. Comparison between sites revealed that the first MRP release occurred only in a RW with P enriched soils, whereas the second was recorded even in a RW with a low soil P status. Seasonal variations in MRP concentrations in the stream were synchronized with those in RW soils. Hence, enriched and/or periodically anoxic RWs can act as a key component of the P transfer continuum in agricultural landscapes by converting particulate P from croplands into MRP released to rivers.

  9. Left Ventricular Transmural Gradient in Mitochondrial Respiration Is Associated with Increased Sub-Endocardium Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Productions

    PubMed Central

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Hoang Minh, Tam; Charles, Anne-Laure; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Zoll, Joffrey; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricle (LV) transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration has been recently reported. However, to date, the physiological mechanisms involved in the lower endocardium mitochondrial respiration chain capacity still remain to be determined. Since, nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression in the heart has spatial heterogeneity and might impair mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential association between LV transmural NO and mitochondrial function gradient. Methods: Maximal oxidative capacity (VMax) and relative contributions of the respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VSucc) and IV (VTMPD), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase activity), coupling, NO (electron paramagnetic resonance), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining) were determined in rat sub-endocardium (Endo) and sub-epicardium (Epi). Further, the effect of a direct NO donor (MAHMA NONOate) on maximal mitochondrial respiratory rates (Vmax) was determined. Results: Mitochondrial respiratory chain activities were reduced in the Endo compared with the Epi (−16.92%; P = 0.04 for Vmax and –18.73%; P = 0.02, for Vsucc, respectively). NO production was two-fold higher in the Endo compared with the Epi (P = 0.002) and interestingly, increasing NO concentration reduced Vmax. Mitochondrial H2O2 and LV ROS productions were significantly increased in Endo compared to Epi, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial coupling being similar in the two layers. Conclusions: LV mitochondrial respiration transmural gradient is likely related to NO and possibly ROS increased production in the sub-endocardium. PMID:27582709

  10. Winery by-products: extraction optimization, phenolic composition and cytotoxic evaluation to act as a new source of scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Melo, Priscilla Siqueira; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Denny, Carina; dos Santos, Luciana Ferracini; Franchin, Marcelo; Pereira, Giuliano Elias; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; de Alencar, Severino Matias

    2015-08-15

    Nearly 20 million tons of winery by-products, with many biological activities, are discarded each year in the world. The extraction of bioactive compounds from Chenin Blanc, Petit Verdot, and Syrah grape by-products, produced in the semi-arid region in Brazil, was optimized by a Central Composite Rotatable Design. The phenolic compounds profile, antioxidant capacity against synthetic free radicals (DPPH and ABTS), reactive oxygen species (ROS; peroxyl radical, superoxide radical, hypochlorous acid), cytotoxicity assay (MTT) and quantification of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells were conducted. Gallic acid, syringic acid, procyanidins B1 and B2, catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, quercetin 3-β-d-glucoside, delfinidin 3-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-glucoside were the main phenolic compounds identified. In general, rachis showed higher antioxidant capacity than pomace extract, especially for Chenin Blanc. All extracts showed low cytotoxicity against RAW 264.7 cells and Petit Verdot pomace suppressed TNF-α liberation in vitro. Therefore, these winery by-products can be considered good sources of bioactive compounds, with great potential for application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Lycopene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in SK-Hep-1 cells and attenuates acetaminophen-induced liver injury in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; da Silva, Talita Prato; de Araujo, Glaucy Rodrigues; Araujo, Carolina Morais; da Silva, Rafaella Cecília; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the antioxidant potential of lycopene in different experimental liver models: in vitro, to evaluate the influence of lycopene on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production mediated by the PKC pathway and in vivo, to evaluate the protective effects of lycopene in an experimental model of hepatotoxicity. The in vitro study assessed the lycopene antioxidant potential by the quantification of ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells unstimulated or stimulated by an activator of the PKC pathway. The role of NADPH oxidase was evaluated by measuring its inhibition potential using an inhibitor of this enzyme. In the in vivo study, male C57BL/6 mice received lycopene (10 or 100 mg/kg by oral gavage) and 1 h later, acetaminophen (APAP) (500 mg/kg) was administrated. Lycopene decreased ROS production in SK-Hep-1 cells through inhibition of NADPH oxidase, brought about in the PKC pathway. Lycopene improved hepatotoxicity acting as an antioxidant, reduced GSSG and regulated tGSH and CAT levels, reduced oxidative damage primarily by decreasing protein carbonylation, promoted the downregulation of MMP-2 and reduced areas of necrosis improving the general appearance of the lesion in C57BL/6 mice. Lycopene is a natural compound that was able to inhibit the production of ROS in vitro and mitigate the damage caused by APAP overdose in vivo.

  12. Endogenous abscisic acid is involved in methyl jasmonate-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production but not in cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous ABA is involved in MeJA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production and cytosolic alkalization in guard cells using an ABA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant, aba2-2, and an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, fluridon (FLU). The aba2-2 mutation impaired MeJA-induced ROS and NO production. FLU inhibited MeJA-induced ROS production in wild-type guard cells. Pretreatment with 0.1 μM ABA, which does not induce stomatal closure in the wild type, complemented the insensitivity to MeJA of the aba2-2 mutant. However, MeJA induced cytosolic alkalization in both wild-type and aba2-2 guard cells. These results suggest that endogenous ABA is involved in MeJA-induced ROS and NO production but not in MeJA-induced cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  13. Leghemoglobin green derivatives with nitrated hemes evidence production of highly reactive nitrogen species during aging of legume nodules.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Joaquín; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Gay, Marina; Marcos, Manuel; Yang, Fei; Walker, F Ann; Desbois, Alain; Abián, Joaquín; Becana, Manuel

    2012-02-14

    Globins constitute a superfamily of proteins widespread in all kingdoms of life, where they fulfill multiple functions, such as efficient O(2) transport and modulation of nitric oxide bioactivity. In plants, the most abundant Hbs are the symbiotic leghemoglobins (Lbs) that scavenge O(2) and facilitate its diffusion to the N(2)-fixing bacteroids in nodules. The biosynthesis of Lbs during nodule formation has been studied in detail, whereas little is known about the green derivatives of Lbs generated during nodule senescence. Here we characterize modified forms of Lbs, termed Lba(m), Lbc(m), and Lbd(m), of soybean nodules. These green Lbs have identical globins to the parent red Lbs but their hemes are nitrated. By combining UV-visible, MS, NMR, and resonance Raman spectroscopies with reconstitution experiments of the apoprotein with protoheme or mesoheme, we show that the nitro group is on the 4-vinyl. In vitro nitration of Lba with excess nitrite produced several isomers of nitrated heme, one of which is identical to those found in vivo. The use of antioxidants, metal chelators, and heme ligands reveals that nitration is contingent upon the binding of nitrite to heme Fe, and that the reactive nitrogen species involved derives from nitrous acid and is most probably the nitronium cation. The identification of these green Lbs provides conclusive evidence that highly oxidizing and nitrating species are produced in nodules leading to nitrosative stress. These findings are consistent with a previous report showing that the modified Lbs are more abundant in senescing nodules and have aberrant O(2) binding.

  14. β-Cell Uncoupling Protein 2 Regulates Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Which Influences Both Insulin and Glucagon Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Robson-Doucette, Christine A.; Sultan, Sobia; Allister, Emma M.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Koshkin, Vasilij; Bhatacharjee, Alpana; Prentice, Kacey J.; Sereda, Samuel B.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) in pancreatic β-cells is highly debated, partly because of the broad tissue distribution of UCP2 and thus limitations of whole-body UCP2 knockout mouse models. To investigate the function of UCP2 in the β-cell, β-cell–specific UCP2 knockout mice (UCP2BKO) were generated and characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS UCP2BKO mice were generated by crossing loxUCP2 mice with mice expressing rat insulin promoter-driven Cre recombinase. Several in vitro and in vivo parameters were measured, including respiration rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, islet ATP content, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), glucagon secretion, glucose and insulin tolerance, and plasma hormone levels. RESULTS UCP2BKO β-cells displayed mildly increased glucose-induced mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization but unchanged rates of uncoupled respiration and islet ATP content. UCP2BKO islets had elevated intracellular ROS levels that associated with enhanced GSIS. Surprisingly, UCP2BKO mice were glucose-intolerant, showing greater α-cell area, higher islet glucagon content, and aberrant ROS-dependent glucagon secretion under high glucose conditions. CONCLUSIONS Using a novel β-cell–specific UCP2KO mouse model, we have shed light on UCP2 function in primary β-cells. UCP2 does not behave as a classical metabolic uncoupler in the β-cell, but has a more prominent role in the regulation of intracellular ROS levels that contribute to GSIS amplification. In addition, β-cell UCP2 contributes to the regulation of intraislet ROS signals that mediate changes in α-cell morphology and glucagon secretion. PMID:21984579

  15. Persistent Mitochondrial Hyperpolarization, Increased Reactive Oxygen Intermediate Production, and Cytoplasmic Alkalinization Characterize Altered IL-10 Signaling in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus1

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Peter; Niland, Brian; Gonchoroff, Nick; Pullmann, Rudolf; Phillips, Paul E.; Perl, Andras

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal death signaling in lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been associated with elevation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) and increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). The resultant ATP depletion sensitizes T cells for necrosis that may significantly contribute to inflammation in patients with SLE. In the present study, the role of mitochondrial signal processing in T cell activation was investigated. CD3/CD28 costimulation of PBL elicited transient mitochondrial hyperpolarization and intracellular pH (pHi) elevation, followed by increased ROI production. Baseline Δψm, ROI production, and pHi were elevated, while T cell activation-induced changes were blunted in 15 patients with SLE in comparison with 10 healthy donors and 10 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Similar to CD3/CD28 costimulation, treatment of control PBL with IL-3, IL-10, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ led to transient Δψm elevation. IL-10 had diametrically opposing effects on mitochondrial signaling in lupus and control donors. Unlike healthy or rheumatoid arthritis PBL, cells of lupus patients were resistant to IL-10-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization. By contrast, IL-10 enhanced ROI production and cell death in lupus PBL without affecting ROI levels and survival of control PBL. Ab-mediated IL-10 blockade or stimulation with antagonistic lymphokine IL-12 normalized baseline and CD3/CD28-induced changes in ROI production and pHi with no impact on Δψm of lupus PBL. The results suggest that mitochondrial hyperpolarization, increased ROI production, and cytoplasmic alkalinization play crucial roles in altered IL-10 responsiveness in SLE. PMID:12097418

  16. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi; Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio; Takahara, Kazuhiko; Inaba, Kayo

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  17. The Effects of Molecular Hydrogen and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid on Paraquat-Induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and TNF-α in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaoyang; Wu, Xizi; Chen, Yao; Zeng, Renqing; Zhao, Yangzi; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Danna; Zhao, Qianwen; Deng, Yunlei; Li, Yongqing; Alam, Hasan B; Chong, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on paraquat (PQ)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in macrophages. First, the PQ optimal concentration was determined in RAW264.7 macrophage by treating serum-starved cells with PQ at 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mM. We evaluated at 1, 2 and 8 h (1) cell viability (by means of trypan blue exclusion method), (2) intracellular ROS levels (with a fluorescent DCFH-DA probe), and (3) TNF-α level in the culture media (determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA). Subsequently, mouse RAW267.4 macrophages were treated with PQ in combination with SAHA and/or H2 for 8 h. PQ exerted a significant stimulatory but nontoxic effect on RAW267.4 macrophages at 0.1 mM. This PQ concentration was used in the subsequent experiments. H2 and H2 combined with SAHA evoked a greater reduction in PQ-induced ROS production than SAHA alone, especially at 2 and 8 h. At 1 and 2 h, treatments involving H2 caused a greater decrease in PQ-induced production of TNF-α than the corresponding treatments without H2. However, at 8 h, treatment with SAHA evoked more pronounced effects on TNF-α than treatment without SAHA. H2 decreases PQ-induced ROS production and attenuates early PQ-induced TNF-α production whereas SAHA reduces the late phase of the PQ-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. The effects are enhanced by the combination of H2 and SAHA.

  18. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  19. Red wine polyphenols alone or in association with ethanol prevent hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and production of reactive oxygen species in the insulin-resistant fructose-fed rat.

    PubMed

    Al-Awwadi, Najim A; Bornet, Aurélie; Azay, Jacqueline; Araiz, Caroline; Delbosc, Sandrine; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Linck, Nathalie; Cros, Gérard; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2004-09-08

    The effects of a red wine polyphenolic extract (RWPE), ethanol, or both combined were evaluated in insulin resistant rats. Rats were fed for 6 weeks with fructose (60%)-enriched food and force-fed with (a) water only (F group), (b) aqueous solution of RWPE (100 mg/kg, FP group), (c) 10% (v/v) mixture of ethanol and water (FE group), or (d) solution containing the same amount of the RWPE and ethanol (FPE group). Animals fed a standard chow (C group) were used for comparison purpose. After 6 weeks, blood pressure was higher in F (130.0 x b1 1.7 mm Hg) than in C animals (109.6 x b1 0.9 mm Hg) and similar to the C group in all other fructose-fed treatment groups. Relative heart weight was higher in F (3.10 x b1 0.05) than in C (2.78 x b1 0.07) and significantly lower in FP (2.92 x b1 0.04) and FPE (2.87 x b1 0.08 mg/g) than in F animals. Left ventricle and aorta productions of reactive oxygen species (O2*-) were higher in F than in C groups and lowered by the RWPE but not by the ethanol treatment. Ethanol but not the RWPE treatment reduced the degree of insulin resistance in the fructose-fed rats. In summary, our study showed that polyphenols are able to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and production of reactive oxygen species in the insulin resistant fructose-fed rat.

  20. Atmospheric photochemical reactivity and ozone production at two sites in Hong Kong: Application of a Master Chemical Mechanism-photochemical box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Z. H.; Guo, H.; Lam, S. H. M.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, T.

    2014-09-01

    A photochemical box model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2), constrained with a full suite of measurements, was developed to investigate the photochemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds at a semirural site (Mount Tai Mo Shan (TMS)) and an urban site (Tsuen Wan (TW)) in Hong Kong. The levels of ozone (O3) and its precursors, and the magnitudes of the reactivity of O3 precursors, revealed significant differences in the photochemistry at the two sites. Simulated peak hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) mixing ratios were similar at TW and TMS (p = 0.05), while the simulated hydroxyl radical (OH) mixing ratios were much higher at TW (p < 0.05), suggesting different cycling processes between OH and HO2 at the two sites. The higher OH at TW was due to high-NO mixing ratios, which shifted the HOx (OH + HO2) balance toward OH by the propagation of HO2 and alkyl peroxy radicals (RO2) with NO. HOx production was dominated by O3 photolysis at TMS, but at TW, both HCHO and O3 photolyses were found to be major contributors. By contrast, radical-radical reactions governed HOx radical losses at TMS, while at TW, the OH + NO2 reaction was found to dominate in the morning and the radical-radical reactions at noon. Overall, the conversion of NO to NO2 by HO2 dictated the O3 production at the two sites, while O3 destruction was dominated by the OH + NO2 reaction at TW, and at TMS, O3 photolysis and the O3 + HO2 reaction were the major mechanisms. The longer OH chain length at TMS indicated that more O3 was produced for each radical that was generated at this site.

  1. Small angle x-ray scattering: Instrument development and studies of protein aggregation, cellulose hydrolysis, and the production of nanoporous metals using surfactact templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuelos, Jose Leobardo

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to obtain structural insights into protein aggregation, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, and the structural evolution of surfactant-templated nanoporous palladium and platinum systems during their synthesis. SAXS is bulk technique that allows probing the nanometer-scale morphology, interactions, density, and distribution of a variety of nonperiodic systems in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. A 10-meter Small Angle Scattering camera, originally at ORNL, was assembled. During its re-commissioning, several upgrades were made including new data acquisition software built using National Instrument's Labview development environment, as well as portability to use analysis tools in wide use in scattering community. The Multiple Energy Diffractometer Using Small, medium and wide Angles (MEDUSA) was designed and built, its development will be discussed. The ability of proteins to change their conformation in response to changes in pressure, temperature, the presence of other molecular species, and ionic concentration in the solvents they are found, is a remarkable phenomenon that allows living cells to function properly. When proteins irreversibly unfold or mis-fold and aggregate this gives rise to severely debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Protein aggregation was measured using SAXS on aqueous solutions of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, and cellulase enzymes. Understanding how cellulose can be broken down into fermentable sugars is an important step in the development of strategies for producing alternative energy from biomass. The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was studied using both small angle neutron scattering and SAXS. One result from these investigations was finding supporting evidence that nanopores within the cellulose fibril matrix allow biologically active enzymes access to digest parts of the fibers. The production of mesoporous materials for hydrogen storage applications was

  2. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters.

  3. CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots in Cooperation with Other Materials for Direct and Indirect Production of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hong Dinh; Park, Hyun; Rhee, Jong Il

    2016-03-01

    In this present work, CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were exploited in the oxidation reactions of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and glutamate (GLU) for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Fast and highly efficient oxidation reactions of ALA to produce the hydroxyl radicals (HO*) and of GLU to produce the superoxide anion (O2*-) were observed in the cooperation of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) capped-CdSe/ZnS QDs (MPA-QDs) under LED irradiation. Whereas, binding between MPA-QDs and coumarin-derived dendrimer (CdD)-captured silica particles (SiCdDs) through sol-gel GA enhanced singlet oxygen production under LED irradiation by about 80% as compared to that achieved using QDs only. Confocal fluorescent microscopic images of the size and morphology of HeLa cells confirmed the ROS production from ALA, GLU in cooperation with CdSe/ZnS QDs or QDs-coated SiCdDs under LED irradiation.

  4. Neutrophils from patients with SAPHO syndrome show no signs of aberrant NADPH oxidase-dependent production of intracellular reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wekell, Per; Björnsdottir, Halla; Björkman, Lena; Sundqvist, Martina; Christenson, Karin; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Fasth, Anders; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if aberrant intracellular production of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils is a disease mechanism in the autoinflammatory disease SAPHO syndrome, characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, as has previously been suggested based on a family with SAPHO syndrome-like disease. Methods. Neutrophil function was explored in a cohort of four patients with SAPHO syndrome, two of whom were sampled during both inflammatory and non-inflammatory phase. Intracellular neutrophil ROS production was determined by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Results. Cells from all patients produced normal amounts of ROS, both intra- and extracellularly, when compared with internal controls as well as with a large collection of healthy controls assayed in the laboratory over time (showing an extensive inter-personal variability in a normal population). Further, intracellular production of ROS increased during the inflammatory phase. Neutrophil activation markers were comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion. Dysfunctional generation of intracellular ROS in neutrophils is not a generalizable feature in SAPHO syndrome. Secondly, serum amyloid A appears to be a more sensitive inflammatory marker than CRP during improvement and relapses in SAPHO syndrome. PMID:27121779

  5. Protection of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by β-hydroxybutyrate involves the preservation of energy levels and decreased production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Montiel, Teresa; Soto-Tinoco, Eva; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Massieu, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in brain but in certain circumstances such as prolonged fasting and the suckling period alternative substrates can be used such as the ketone bodies (KB), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetoacetate. It has been shown that KB prevent neuronal death induced during energy limiting conditions and excitotoxicity. The protective effect of KB has been mainly attributed to the improvement of mitochondrial function. In the present study, we have investigated the protective effect of D-BHB against neuronal death induced by severe noncoma hypoglycemia in the rat in vivo and by glucose deprivation (GD) in cortical cultures. Results show that systemic administration of D-BHB reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in distinct cortical areas and subregions of the hippocampus and efficiently prevents neuronal death in the cortex of hypoglycemic animals. In vitro results show that D-BHB stimulates ATP production and reduces ROS levels, while the nonphysiologic isomer of BHB, L-BHB, has no effect on energy production but reduces ROS levels. Data suggest that protection by BHB, not only results from its metabolic action but is also related to its capability to reduce ROS, rendering this KB as a suitable candidate for the treatment of ischemic and traumatic injury. PMID:25649993

  6. Integration of pharmacokinetic and NRF2 system biology models to describe reactive oxygen species production and subsequent glutathione depletion in liver microfluidic biochips after flutamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Eric; Hamon, Jeremy; Legendre, Audrey; Bois, Frederic Y

    2014-10-01

    We present a systems biology analysis of rat primary hepatocytes response after exposure to 10 μM and 100 μM flutamide in liver microfluidic biochips. We coupled an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK) model of flutamide to a system biology model of its reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging by the Nrf2 regulated glutathione production. The PK model was calibrated using data on flutamide kinetics, hydroxyflutamide and glutathione conjugates formation in microfluidic conditions. The parameters of Nrf2-related gene activities and the subsequent glutathione depletion were calibrated using microarray data from our microfluidic experiments and literature information. Following a 10 μM flutamide exposure, the model predicted a recovery time to baseline levels of glutathione (GSH) and ROS in agreement with our experimental observations. At 100 μM, the model predicted that metabolism saturation led to an important accumulation of flutamide in cells, a high ROS production and complete GSH depletion. The high levels of ROS predicted were consistent with the necrotic switch observed by transcriptomics, and the high cell mortality we had experimentally observed. The model predicted a transition between recoverable GSH depletion and deep GSH depletion at about 12.5 μM of flutamide (single perfusion exposure). Our work shows that in vitro biochip experiments can provide supporting information for complex in silico modeling including data from extra cellular and intra cellular levels. We believe that this approach can be an efficient strategy for a global integrated methodology in predictive toxicology.

  7. Reactive oxygen species production by human dendritic cells involves TLR2 and dectin-1 and is essential for efficient immune response against Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, María Mercedes; Basile, Juan Ignacio; Corra Feo, Laura; López, Beatriz; Ritacco, Viviana; Alemán, Mercedes

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis remains the single largest infectious disease with 10 million new cases and two million deaths that are estimated to occur yearly, more than any time in history. The intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and its spread from the lungs to other sites occur before the development of adaptive immune responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells whose maturation is critical for the onset of the protective immune response against tuberculosis disease and may vary depending on the nature of the cell wall of Mtb strain. Here, we describe the role of the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on DC maturation and expansion of Mtb-specific lymphocytes. Here, we show that Mtb induces DC maturation through TLR2/dectin-1 by generating of ROS and through Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN) in a ROS independently manner. Based on the differences observed in the ability to induce DC maturation, ROS production and lymphocyte proliferation by those Mtb families widespread in South America, i.e., Haarlem and Latin American Mediterranean and the reference strain H37Rv, we propose that variance in ROS production might contribute to immune evasion affecting DC maturation and antigen presentation.

  8. Spatiotemporal Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by NADPH Oxidase Is Critical for Tapetal Programmed Cell Death and Pollen Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong-Tao; Wan, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Male sterility in angiosperms has wide applications in agriculture, particularly in hybrid crop breeding and gene flow control. Microspores develop adjacent to the tapetum, a layer of cells that provides nutrients for pollen development and materials for pollen wall formation. Proper pollen development requires programmed cell death (PCD) of the tapetum, which requires transcriptional cascades and proteolytic enzymes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) also affect tapetal PCD, and failures in ROS scavenging cause male sterility. However, many aspects of tapetal PCD remain unclear, including what sources generate ROS, whether ROS production has a temporal pattern, and how the ROS-producing system interacts with the tapetal transcriptional network. We report here that stage-specific expression of NADPH oxidases in the Arabidopsis thaliana tapetum contributes to a temporal peak of ROS production. Genetic interference with the temporal ROS pattern, by manipulating RESPIRATORY-BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG (RBOH) genes, affected the timing of tapetal PCD and resulted in aborted male gametophytes. We further show that the tapetal transcriptional network regulates RBOH expression, indicating that the temporal pattern of ROS production intimately connects to other signaling pathways regulated by the tapetal transcriptional network to ensure the proper timing of tapetal PCD. PMID:24808050

  9. Teaching the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and the production and detection of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria fulfill a number of biological functions which inherently depend on ATP and O2−•/H2O2 production. Both ATP and O2−•/H2O2 are generated by electron transfer reactions. ATP is the product of oxidative phosphorylation whereas O2−• is generated by singlet electron reduction of di-oxygen (O2). O2−• is then rapidly dismutated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) producing H2O2. O2−•/H2O2 were once viewed as unfortunately by-products of aerobic respiration. This characterization is fitting considering over production of O2−•/H2O2 by mitochondria is associated with range of pathological conditions and aging. However, O2−•/H2O2 are only dangerous in large quantities. If produced in a controlled fashion and maintained at a low concentration, cells can benefit greatly from the redox properties of O2−•/H2O2. Indeed, low rates of O2−•/H2O2 production are required for intrinsic mitochondrial signaling (e.g. modulation of mitochondrial processes) and communication with the rest of the cell. O2−•/H2O2 levels are kept in check by anti-oxidant defense systems that sequester O2−•/H2O2 with extreme efficiency. Given the importance of O2−•/H2O2 in cellular function, it is imperative to consider how mitochondria produce O2−•/H2O2 and how O2−•/H2O2 genesis is regulated in conjunction with fluctuations in nutritional and redox states. Here, I discuss the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and emerging knowledge on the 11 potential sources of mitochondrial O2−•/H2O2 in tandem with their significance in contributing to overall O2−•/H2O2 emission in health and disease. The potential for classifying these different sites in isopotential groups, which is essentially defined by the redox properties of electron donator involved in O2−•/H2O2 production, as originally suggested by Brand and colleagues is also surveyed in detail. In addition, redox signaling mechanisms that control O2−•/H2O2

  10. Structural insights into 2,2'-azino-Bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)-mediated degradation of reactive blue 21 by engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and characterization of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Kenzom, T; Srivastava, P; Mishra, S

    2014-12-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated.

  11. Structural Insights into 2,2′-Azino-Bis(3-Ethylbenzothiazoline-6-Sulfonic Acid) (ABTS)-Mediated Degradation of Reactive Blue 21 by Engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and Characterization of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Kenzom, T.; Srivastava, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated. PMID:25261507

  12. Reactive scattering calculations for {sup 87}Rb+{sup 87}RbHe→Rb{sub 2}({sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +},v)+He from ultralow to intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Cantano, Rocío; González-Lezana, Tomás; Prosmiti, Rita; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo; Villarreal, Pablo; Jellinek, Julius

    2015-04-28

    We investigate atom-diatom reactive collisions, as a preliminary step, in order to assess the possibility of forming Rb{sub 2} molecules in their lowest triplet electronic state by cold collisions of rubidium atoms on the surface of helium nanodroplets. A simple model related to the well-known Rosen treatment of linear triatomic molecules [N. Rosen, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 319 (1933)] in relative coordinates is used, allowing to estimate reactive probabilities for different values of the total angular momentum. The best available full dimensional potential energy surface [Guillon et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 174307 (2012)] is employed through the calculations. Noticeable values of the probabilities in the ultracold regime, which numerically fulfill the Wigner threshold law, support the feasibility of the process. The rubidium dimer is mainly produced at high vibrational states, and the reactivity is more efficient for a bosonic helium partner than when the fermion species is considered.

  13. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone.

  14. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; ...

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K– production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K– favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. Whilemore » the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K– results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.« less

  15. Benidipine, a dihydropyridine-calcium channel blocker, prevents lysophosphatidylcholine-induced injury and reactive oxygen species production in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhide

    2005-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) is a component of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs), which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined whether benidipine hydrochloride (benidipine), a dihydropyridine-calcium channel blocker with antioxidant activity, prevents lysoPC (C 16:0)-induced injury of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Treatment of HAECs with lysoPC changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Additionally, lysoPC species containing palmitoyl (C 16:0) or stearoyl (C 18:0), which are the major components of oxLDLs, stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and induced caspase-3/7-like activity in HAECs, but lysoPC species with short acyl chains did not affect either ROS production or caspase-3/7-like activity. Pretreatment with benidipine (0.3-3 micromol/L) for 24 h protected against lysoPC-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells and the drug inhibited both lysoPC-stimulated ROS production and caspase-3/7-like activation with a similar potency. Since caspase-3/7 is involved in executing the apoptotic process, the reduction of the activity of this enzyme by benedipine may explain the anti-apoptotic effect of the drug. However, benidipine did not suppress lysoPC-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Ca2+ influx in HAECs. These results suggest that the anti-oxidant properties of benidipine may be responsible for its ability to inhibit ROS production, resulting in reduced activation of caspase-3/7. In conclusion, benidipine suppresses lysoPC-induced endothelial dysfunction through inhibition of ROS production, which is due at least in part to its antioxidant effect, and not through the inhibition of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.

  16. Acute hypercapnic hyperoxia stimulates reactive species production in the caudal solitary complex of rat brain slices but does not induce oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Dean, Jay B

    2016-12-01

    Central CO2 chemoreceptive neurons in the caudal solitary complex (cSC) are stimulated by hyperoxia via a free radical mechanism. Hyperoxia has been shown to increase superoxide and nitric oxide in the cSC, but it remains unknown how changes in Pco2 during hyperoxia affect the production of O2-dependent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) downstream that can lead to increased levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress, cellular excitability, and, potentially, dysfunction. We used real-time fluorescence microscopy in rat brain slices to determine how hyperoxia and hypercapnic acidosis (HA) modulate one another in the production of key RONS, as well as colorimetric assays to measure levels of oxidized and nitrated lipids and proteins. We also examined the effects of CO2 narcosis and hypoxia before euthanasia and brain slice harvesting, as these neurons are CO2 sensitive and hypothesized to employ CO2/H(+) mechanisms that exacerbate RONS production and potentially oxidative stress. Our findings show that hyperoxia ± HA increases the production of peroxynitrite and its derivatives, whereas increases in Fenton chemistry are most prominent during hyperoxia + HA. Using CO2 narcosis before euthanasia modulates cellular sensitivity to HA postmortem and enhances the magnitude of the peroxynitrite pathway, but blunts the activity of Fenton chemistry. Overall, hyperoxia and HA do not result in increased production of markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress as expected. We postulate this is due to antioxidant and proteosomal removal of damaged lipids and proteins to maintain cell viability and avoid death during protracted hyperoxia.

  17. Production of reactive oxygen species in decoupled, Ca(2+)-depleted PSII and their use in assigning a function to chloride on both sides of PSII.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII) in the absence of a chelator inhibits O2 evolution without significant inhibition of the light-dependent reduction of the exogenous electron acceptor, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) on the reducing side of PSII. The phenomenon is known as "the decoupling effect" (Semin et al. Photosynth Res 98:235-249, 2008). Extraction of Cl(-) from Ca(2+)-depleted membranes (PSII[-Ca]) suppresses the reduction of DCPIP. In the current study we investigated the nature of the oxidized substrate and the nature of the product(s) of the substrate oxidation. After elimination of all other possible donors, water was identified as the substrate. Generation of reactive oxygen species HO, H2O2, and O 2 (·-) , as possible products of water oxidation in PSII(-Ca) membranes was examined. During the investigation of O 2 (·-) production in PSII(-Ca) samples, we found that (i) O 2 (·-) is formed on the acceptor side of PSII due to the reduction of O2; (ii) depletion of Cl(-) does not inhibit water oxidation, but (iii) Cl(-) depletion does decrease the efficiency of the reduction of exogenous electron acceptors. In the absence of Cl(-) under aerobic conditions, electron transport is diverted from reducing exogenous acceptors to reducing O2, thereby increasing the rate of O 2 (·-) generation. From these observations we conclude that the product of water oxidation is H2O2 and that Cl(-) anions are not involved in the oxidation of water to H2O2 in decoupled PSII(-Ca) membranes. These results also indicate that Cl(-) anions are not directly involved in water oxidation by the Mn cluster in the native PSII membranes, but possibly provide access for H2O molecules to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and/or facilitate the release of H(+) ions into the lumenal space.

  18. Antiplatelet Effect of Catechol Is Related to Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase, Reactive Oxygen Species, ERK/p38 Signaling and Thromboxane A2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong-Mei; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Catechol (benzenediol) is present in plant-derived products, such as vegetables, fruits, coffee, tea, wine, areca nut and cigarette smoke. Because platelet dysfunction is a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effect of catechol and its mechanisms. The effects of catechol on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38 phosphorylation were determined in rabbit platelets. In addition, its effect on IL-1β-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by fibroblasts was determined. The ex vivo effect of catechol on platelet aggregation was also measured. Catechol (5-25 µM) suppressed AA-induced platelet aggregation and inhibited TXB2 production at concentrations of 0.5–5 µM; however, it showed little cytotoxicity and did not alter U46619-induced platelet aggregation. Catechol (10–50 µM) suppressed COX-1 activity by 29–44% and COX-2 activity by 29–50%. It also inhibited IL-1β-induced PGE2 production, but not COX-2 expression of fibroblasts. Moreover, catechol (1–10 µM) attenuated AA-induced ROS production in platelets and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Exposure of platelets to catechol decreased AA-induced ERK and p38 phosphorylation. Finally, intravenous administration of catechol (2.5–5 µmole/mouse) attenuated ex vivo AA-induced platelet aggregation. These results suggest that catechol exhibited anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effects, which were mediated by inhibition of COX, ROS and TXA2 production as well as ERK/p38 phosphorylation. The anti-platelet effect of catechol was confirmed by ex vivo analysis. Exposure to catechol may affect platelet

  19. Areca nut components stimulate ADAM17, IL-1α, PGE2 and 8-isoprostane production in oral keratinocyte: role of reactive oxygen species, EGF and JAK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Chan, Chiu-Po; Chen, Yi-Jane; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Chang, Ya-Ching; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is an etiologic factor of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and oral cancer. There are 600 million BQ chewers worldwide. The mechanisms for the toxic and inflammatory responses of BQ are unclear. In this study, both areca nut (AN) extract (ANE) and arecoline stimulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) production of gingival keratinocytes (GKs), whereas only ANE can stimulate a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane production. ANE-induced EGF production was inhibited by catalase. Addition of anti-EGF neutralizing antibody attenuated ANE-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), mature ADAM9 expression and PGE2 and 8-isoprostane production. ANE-induced IL-1α production was inhibited by catalase, anti-EGF antibody, PD153035 (EGF receptor antagonist) and U0126 (MEK inhibitor) but not by α-naphthoflavone (cytochrome p450-1A1 inhibitor). ANE-induced ADAM17 production was inhibited by pp2 (Src inhibitor), U0126, α-naphthoflavone and aspirin. AG490 (JAK inhibitor) prevented ANE-stimulated ADAM17, IL-1α, PGE2 production, COX-2 expression, ADAM9 maturation, and the ANE-induced decline in keratin 5 and 14, but showed little effect on cdc2 expression and EGF production. Moreover, ANE-induced 8-isoprostane production by GKs was inhibited by catalase, anti-EGF antibody, AG490, pp2, U0126, α-naphthoflavone, Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and aspirin. These results indicate that AN components may involve in BQ-induced oral cancer by induction of reactive oxygen species, EGF/EGFR, IL-1α, ADAMs, JAK, Src, MEK/ERK, CYP1A1, and COX signaling pathways, and the aberration of cell cycle and differentiation. Various blockers against ROS, EGF, IL-1α, ADAM, JAK, Src, MEK, CYP1A1, and COX can be used for prevention or treatment of BQ chewing-related diseases. PMID:26919242

  20. Antiplatelet effect of catechol is related to inhibition of cyclooxygenase, reactive oxygen species, ERK/p38 signaling and thromboxane A2 production.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Wang, Tong-Mei; Chan, Chiu-Po; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Catechol (benzenediol) is present in plant-derived products, such as vegetables, fruits, coffee, tea, wine, areca nut and cigarette smoke. Because platelet dysfunction is a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effect of catechol and its mechanisms. The effects of catechol on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38 phosphorylation were determined in rabbit platelets. In addition, its effect on IL-1β-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by fibroblasts was determined. The ex vivo effect of catechol on platelet aggregation was also measured. Catechol (5-25 µM) suppressed AA-induced platelet aggregation and inhibited TXB2 production at concentrations of 0.5-5 µM; however, it showed little cytotoxicity and did not alter U46619-induced platelet aggregation. Catechol (10-50 µM) suppressed COX-1 activity by 29-44% and COX-2 activity by 29-50%. It also inhibited IL-1β-induced PGE2 production, but not COX-2 expression of fibroblasts. Moreover, catechol (1-10 µM) attenuated AA-induced ROS production in platelets and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Exposure of platelets to catechol decreased AA-induced ERK and p38 phosphorylation. Finally, intravenous administration of catechol (2.5-5 µmole/mouse) attenuated ex vivo AA-induced platelet aggregation. These results suggest that catechol exhibited anti-platelet and anti-inflammatory effects, which were mediated by inhibition of COX, ROS and TXA2 production as well as ERK/p38 phosphorylation. The anti-platelet effect of catechol was confirmed by ex vivo analysis. Exposure to catechol may affect platelet function and thus

  1. Gamma ray production cross section from energetic neutron inelastic scattering for methodical improvements in planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, C.M.; Gearhart, R.; Sanii, B.; Englert, P.A.J.; Drake, D.M.; Reedy, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    Planetary Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to chemically analyze the top soil from planets in future planetary missions. The production from inelastic neutron interaction plays an effective role in the determination on the C and H at the surface. The gamma ray production cross section from the strongest lines excited in the neutron bombardment of Fe have been measured by the use of a time analyzed quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam and a high purity germanium detector. The results from En=6.5, 32, 43, and 65 MeV are presented.

  2. Wood dusts induce the production of reactive oxygen species and caspase-3 activity in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pylkkänen, Lea; Stockmann-Juvala, Helene; Alenius, Harri; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai

    2009-08-21

    Wood dusts are associated with several respiratory symptoms, e.g. impaired lung function and asthma, in exposed workers. However, despite the evidence from epidemiological studies, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated different wood dusts for their capacity to induce cytotoxicity and production of radical oxygen species (ROS) as well as activation of the apoptotic caspase-3 enzyme in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). Dusts from three different tree species widely used in wood industry were studied; birch and oak represented hardwood species, and pine a common softwood species. All the experiments were carried out in three different concentrations (10, 50, and 500 microg/ml) and the analysis was performed after 0.5, 2, 6, and 24h exposure. All wood dusts studied were cytotoxic to human bronchial epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner after 2 and 6h treatment. Exposure to pine, birch, or oak dust had a significant stimulating effect on the production of ROS. Also an induction in caspase-3 protease activity, one of the central components of the apoptotic cascade, was seen in BEAS-2B cells after 2 and 6h exposure to each of the wood dusts studied. In summary, we demonstrate that dusts from pine, birch and oak are cytotoxic, able to increase the production of ROS and the apoptotic response in human broncho-epithelial cells in vitro. Thus, our current data suggest oxidative stress by ROS as an important mechanism likely to function in wood dust related pulmonary toxicity although details of the cellular targets and cell-particle interactions remain to be solved. It is though tempting to speculate that redox-regulated transcription factors such as NFkappaB or AP-1 may play a role in this wood dust-evoked process leading to apparently induced apoptosis of target cells.

  3. Multi-TASTE Assessment of the Quality and Evolution of Envisat Reactive and Greenhouse Gas Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Hubert, D.; Granville, J.; Hendrick, F.; Verhoelst, T.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2016-08-01

    This work reports on the use of the Multi-TASTE QA/validation system in support to the continuous evolution of operational Envisat data products on ozone, greenhouse gases, and temperature. The focus is on the latest upgrades of GOMOS (IPF V5 to IPF V6), MIPAS (IPF V5 to ML2PP V7), and SCIAMACHY (SGP V3 to SGP V6) processors. The studies conclude with altitude and latitude-resolved estimates of bias, spread, and long-term stability of those latest versions.

  4. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, February 22, 1993--May 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.M.

    1993-06-01

    Effort over the past 3 months was directed at increasing manufacturing capacity (ball milling) and improving product quality. Orders for the powder have increased, mainly for plasma spray powders. NiAl is an excellent coat between a metal and a ceramic, and its use instead of cobalt should extending operating range for carbide tools. The feather phase in the sintered Ni{sub 3}Al was identified to be a Ni-rich phase nucleated on the grain boundaries with 10 wt % Al composition. The ductile to brittle temperature of powder extruded NiAl was found to be between 500 and 600 C, and shows a 50% elongation at 600 C.

  5. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cytokine production and cytotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers in J774A.1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naha, Pratap C.; Davoren, Maria; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2010-07-15

    The immunotoxicity of three generations of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G-4, G-5 and G-6) was evaluated in mouse macrophage cells in vitro. Using the Alamar blue and MTT assays, a generation dependent cytotoxicity of the PAMAM dendrimers was found whereby G-6 > G-5 > G-4. The toxic response of the PAMAM dendrimers correlated well with the number of surface primary amino groups, with increasing number resulting in an increase in toxic response. An assessment of intracellular ROS generation by the PAMAM dendrimers was performed by measuring the increased fluorescence as a result of intracellular oxidation of Carboxy H{sub 2}DCFDA to DCF both quantitatively using plate reader and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The inflammatory mediators macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6, (IL-6) were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) following exposure of mouse macrophage cells to PAMAM dendrimers. A generation dependent ROS and cytokine production was found, which correlated well with the cytotoxicological response and therefore number of surface amino groups. A clear time sequence of increased ROS generation (maximum at {approx} 4 h), TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 secretion (maximum at {approx} 24 h), MIP-2 levels and cell death ({approx} 72 h) was observed. The intracellular ROS generation and cytokine production induced cytotoxicity point towards the mechanistic pathway of cell death upon exposure to PAMAM dendrimers.

  7. Enhancing Saccharomyces cerevisiae reactive oxygen species and ethanol stress tolerance for high-level production of protopanoxadiol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fanglong; Du, Yanhui; Bai, Peng; Liu, Jingjing; Lu, Wenyu; Yuan, Yingjin

    2017-03-01

    Protopanaxadiol (PPD) is an active compound in Panax ginseng. Recently, an optimized PPD synthesis pathway contained a ROS releasing step (a P450-type PPD synthase, PPDS) was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here reported a synergistic effect of PPDS-CPR (CPR, cytochrome P450 reductase) uncoupling and ethanol stress on ROS releasing, which reduced cells viability. To build a robust strain, a cell wall integrity associated gene SSD1 was high-expressed to improve ethanol tolerance, and ROS level decreased for 24.7%. Then, regulating the expression of an oxidative stress regulation gene YBP1 decreased 75.2% of ROS releasing, and improved cells viability from 71.3±1.3% to 88.3±1.4% at 84h. Increased cells viability enables yeast to produce more PPD through feeding additional ethanol. In 5L fermenter, PPD production of W3a-ssPy reached to 4.25±0.18g/L (19.48±0.28mg/L/OD600), which is the highest yield reported so far. This work makes the industrial production of PPD possible by microbial fermentation.

  8. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H(+) channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H(+) channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na(+) and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na(+)-dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg(2+), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H(+) channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H(+) channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H(+) channels may help ROS production.

  9. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  10. Seed Priming Alters the Production and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Rice Seedlings Grown under Sub-optimal Temperature and Nutrient Supply.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Wu, Lishu; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    The production and detoxification of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in the plant response to nutrient and environmental stresses. The present study demonstrated the behavior of growth, ROIs-production and their detoxification in primed and non-primed rice seedlings under chilling stress (18°C) and nitrogen-(N), phosphorus-(P), or potassium-(K) deprivation. The results revealed that chilling stress as well as deprivation of any mineral nutrient severely hampered the seedling growth of rice, however, seed priming treatments (particularly selenium- or salicylic acid-priming), were effective in enhancing the rice growth under stress conditions. The N-deprivation caused the maximum reduction in shoot growth, while the root growth was only decreased by P- or K-deprivation. Although, N-deprivation enhanced the root length of rice, the root fresh weight was unaffected. Rate of lipid peroxidation as well as the production of ROIs, was generally increased under stress conditions; the K-deprived seedlings recorded significantly lower production of ROIs than N- or P-deprived seedlings. The responses of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in rice seedlings to chilling stress were variable with nutrient management regime. All the seed priming were found to trigger or at least maintain the antioxidant defense system of rice seedlings. Notably, the levels of ROIs were significantly reduced by seed priming treatments, which were concomitant with the activities of ROIs-producing enzymes (monoamine oxidase and xanthine oxidase), under all studied conditions. Based on these findings, we put forward the hypothesis that along with role of ROIs-scavenging enzymes, the greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings can also be due to the reduced activity of ROIs-producing enzymes.

  11. Proteomic Phenotyping of Novosphingobium nitrogenifigens Reveals a Robust Capacity for Simultaneous Nitrogen Fixation, Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production, and Resistance to Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Strabala, Timothy J.; Peng, Lifeng; Rawson, Pisana; Lloyd-Jones, Gareth; Jordan, T. William

    2012-01-01

    Novosphingobium nitrogenifigens Y88T (Y88) is a free-living, diazotrophic Alphaproteobacterium, capable of producing 80% of its biomass as the biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). We explored the potential utility of this species as a polyhydroxybutyrate production strain, correlating the effects of glucose, nitrogen availability, dissolved oxygen concentration, and extracellular pH with polyhydroxybutyrate production and changes in the Y88 proteomic profile. Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 217 unique proteins from six growth conditions. We observed reproducible, characteristic proteomic signatures for each of the physiological states we examined. We identified proteins that changed in abundance in correlation with either nitrogen fixation, dissolved oxygen concentration, or acidification of the growth medium. The proteins that correlated with nitrogen fixation were identified either as known nitrogen fixation proteins or as novel proteins that we predict play roles in aspects of nitrogen fixation based on their proteomic profiles. In contrast, the proteins involved in central carbon and polyhydroxybutyrate metabolism were constitutively abundant, consistent with the constitutive polyhydroxybutyrate production that we observed in this species. Three proteins with roles in detoxification of reactive oxygen species were identified in this obligate aerobe. The most abundant protein in all experiments was a polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein, phasin. The full-length isoform of this protein has a long, intrinsically disordered Ala/Pro/Lys-rich N-terminal segment, a feature that appears to be unique to sphingomonad phasins. The data suggest that Y88 has potential as a PHB production strain due to its aerobic tolerance and metabolic orientation toward polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation, even in low-nitrogen growth medium. PMID:22582058

  12. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death.

  13. Differential effect of sulfonylureas on production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in cultured pancreatic beta-cell line, MIN6.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Fumi; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sasaki, Shuji; Fujii, Masakazu; Maeda, Yasutaka; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    Sulfonylureas are considered to cause beta-cell apoptosis. However, it is unclear how this occurs and whether there is a difference in such effects among various sulfonylureas. Here, we examined the effects of various sulfonylureas and a short-acting insulin secretagogue, nateglinide, on oxidative stress and apoptosis using the beta-cell line MIN6. After cultured MIN6 cells were exposed to various concentrations of sulfonylureas (glibenclamide, glimepiride, and gliclazide) or nateglinide, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by staining with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. The effect of these agents on apoptosis was also evaluated by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling technique. Exposure of beta-cells to glibenclamide, glimepiride, and nateglinide significantly increased intracellular ROS production in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-10 micromol/L). These effects were completely blocked by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] oxidase inhibitors (diphenylene iodonium or apocynin) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (calphostin C). After exposure to these agents for 48 hours, the numbers of apoptotic cells were also significantly increased. These effects were significantly blocked by apocynin and antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, exposure to any concentrations of gliclazide did not affect either intracellular ROS production or the numbers of apoptotic cells. Sulfonylureas (glibenclamide and glimepiride, but not gliclazide) and nateglinide stimulated ROS production via protein kinase C-dependent activation of NAD(P)H oxidase and consequently caused beta-cell apoptosis in vitro. Because of the lack of such adverse effects, gliclazide may have a benefit in the preservation of functional beta-cell mass.

  14. Pycnogenol® inhibits lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes with the modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production associated with antioxidant enzyme responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok-Hwan; Seo, Min-Jung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2012-03-01

    Pycnogenol® is a group of flavonoids with antioxidant effects. Adipogenesis is the process of adipocyte differentiation. It causes the increase of lipids as well as ROS (reactive oxygen species). Lipid accumulation and ROS production were determined in 3 T3-L1 adipocyte, and the effect of Pycnogenol® was evaluated. Lipid accumulation was elevated in adipocyte treated with hydrogen peroxide, one of the ROS. Pycnogenol® showed an inhibitory effect on the lipid accumulation and ROS production during the adipogenesis. We also investigated the molecular events associated with ROS production and lipid accumulation. Our results showed that Pycnogenol® inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-oxidant enzymes, such as NOX4 (NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen) oxidase 4), and the NADPH-producing G6PDH (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) enzyme. In addition, Pycnogenol® suppressed the mRNA abundance of adipogenic transcription factors, PPAR-γ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) and C/EBP-α (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α), and their target gene, aP2 (adipocyte protein 2) responsible for fatty acid transportation. On the other hand, Pycnogenol® increased the abundance of antioxidant proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD (copper-zinc superoxide dismutase), Mn-SOD (manganese superoxide dismutase), GPx (glutathione peroxidase) and GR (glutathione reductase). Our results suggest that Pycnogenol® inhibits lipid accumulation and ROS production by regulating adipogenic gene expression and pro-/antioxidant enzyme responses in adipocytes.

  15. Seed Priming Alters the Production and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Rice Seedlings Grown under Sub-optimal Temperature and Nutrient Supply

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saddam; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Wu, Lishu; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    The production and detoxification of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) play an important role in the plant response to nutrient and environmental stresses. The present study demonstrated the behavior of growth, ROIs-production and their detoxification in primed and non-primed rice seedlings under chilling stress (18°C) and nitrogen-(N), phosphorus-(P), or potassium-(K) deprivation. The results revealed that chilling stress as well as deprivation of any mineral nutrient severely hampered the seedling growth of rice, however, seed priming treatments (particularly selenium- or salicylic acid-priming), were effective in enhancing the rice growth under stress conditions. The N-deprivation caused the maximum reduction in shoot growth, while the root growth was only decreased by P- or K-deprivation. Although, N-deprivation enhanced the root length of rice, the root fresh weight was unaffected. Rate of lipid peroxidation as well as the production of ROIs, was generally increased under stress conditions; the K-deprived seedlings recorded significantly lower production of ROIs than N- or P-deprived seedlings. The responses of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in rice seedlings to chilling stress were variable with nutrient management regime. All the seed priming were found to trigger or at least maintain the antioxidant defense system of rice seedlings. Notably, the levels of ROIs were significantly reduced by seed priming treatments, which were concomitant with the activities of ROIs-producing enzymes (monoamine oxidase and xanthine oxidase), under all studied conditions. Based on these findings, we put forward the hypothesis that along with role of ROIs-scavenging enzymes, the greater tolerance of primed rice seedlings can also be due to the reduced activity of ROIs-producing enzymes. PMID:27092157

  16. Vaccination with cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 antibodies and inactivated influenza enhances vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, interferon-γ production and cross-strain reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Soo Hoo, W; Jensen, E R; Saadat, A; Nieto, D; Moss, R B; Carlo, D J; Moll, T

    2006-01-01

    Influenza virus causes a contagious and potentially serious infection of the upper respiratory tract. While neutralizing antibodies are protective against infection, the problem of antigenic drift remains, requiring the constant monitoring and development of new vaccines. The magnitude of this situation is underscored by the emergence of new potentially human pathogenic influenza strains, avian H5N1 being the most recent example. We present evidence that antibodies against T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1), a recently identified immunomodulatory molecule, stimulate cellular immunity against influenza viruses and cross-strain immune reactivity. To determine potential immunostimulatory properties of anti-TIM-1, mice were vaccinated with inactivated influenza virus in the presence or absence of TIM-1-specific monoclonal antibodies. Development of cellular immunity against both the influenza strain used for immunization and serotypically distinct virus strains was monitored 3 weeks after vaccination by determining antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Results show that TIM-1 antibodies enhance antigen-specific cellular proliferation (P < 0·05) and interferon (IFN)-γ production (P < 0·01). Using blocking anti-CD4 and CD8 antibodies, it was observed that antigen-specific cellular proliferation is CD4-dependent and that the majority of proliferating cells are CD4+. Finally, vaccination with inactivated influenza virus with TIM-1 antibody results in the significant (P < 0·001) induction of proliferation and IFN-γ production upon stimulation with one of three serologically distinct strains. TIM-1 antibodies demonstrate an adjuvant effect promoting antigen-specific cellular proliferation and IFN-γ production, which are important for the promotion of cell-mediated immunity. These results are the first to suggest that TIM-1 antibody may serve as a potent adjuvant in the development of new influenza virus vaccines. PMID:16792682

  17. Increased reactive oxygen species production down-regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha pathway in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Agatha; Alegret, Marta; Sanchez, Rosa M; Adzet, Tomas; Laguna, Juan C; Carrera, Manuel Vazquez

    2002-03-22

    Generation of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases involving intracellular lipid accumulation. To explore the mechanisms leading to these pathologies we tested the effects of etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which contains a fatty acid-derived structure, in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Etomoxir treatment for 24 h resulted in a down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) mRNA expression, achieving an 87% reduction at 80 microm etomoxir. The mRNA levels of most of the PPARalpha target genes studied were reduced at 100 microm etomoxir. By using several inhibitors of de novo ceramide synthesis and C(2)-ceramide we showed that they were not involved in the effects of etomoxir. Interestingly, the addition of triacsin C, a potent inhibitor of acyl-CoA synthetase, to etomoxir-treated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells did not prevent the down-regulation in PPARalpha mRNA levels, suggesting that the active form of the drug, etomoxir-CoA, was not involved. Given that saturated fatty acids may generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), we determined whether the addition of etomoxir resulted in ROS generation. Etomoxir increased ROS production and the activity of the well known redox transcription factor NF-kappaB. In the presence of the pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity, etomoxir did not down-regulate PPARalpha mRNA in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. These results indicate that ROS generation and NF-kappaB activation are responsible for the down-regulation of PPARalpha and may provide a new mechanism by which intracellular lipid accumulation occurs in skeletal muscle cells.

  18. Biofilm-Grown Burkholderia cepacia Complex Cells Survive Antibiotic Treatment by Avoiding Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Sass, Andrea; Bazzini, Silvia; De Roy, Karen; Udine, Claudia; Messiaen, Thomas; Riccardi, Giovanna; Boon, Nico; Nelis, Hans J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Coenye, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The presence of persister cells has been proposed as a factor in biofilm resilience. In the present study we investigated whether persister cells are present in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) biofilms, what the molecular basis of antimicrobial tolerance in Bcc persisters is, and how persisters can be eradicated from Bcc biofilms. After treatment of Bcc biofilms with high concentrations of various antibiotics often a small subpopulation survived. To investigate the molecular mechanism of tolerance in this subpopulation, Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms were treated with 1024 µg/ml of tobramycin. Using ROS-specific staining and flow cytometry, we showed that tobramycin increased ROS production in treated sessile cells. However, approximately 0.1% of all sessile cells survived the treatment. A transcriptome analysis showed that several genes from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and genes involved in the electron transport chain were downregulated. In contrast, genes from the glyoxylate shunt were upregulated. These data indicate that protection against ROS is important for the survival of persisters. To confirm this, we determined the number of persisters in biofilms formed by catalase mutants. The persister fraction in ΔkatA and ΔkatB biofilms was significantly reduced, confirming the role of ROS detoxification in persister survival. Pretreatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with itaconate, an inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (ICL), the first enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt, reduced the persister fraction approx. 10-fold when the biofilms were subsequently treated with tobramycin. In conclusion, most Bcc biofilms contain a significant fraction of persisters that survive treatment with high doses of tobramycin. The surviving persister cells downregulate the TCA cycle to avoid production of ROS and at the same time activate an alternative pathway, the glyoxylate shunt. This pathway may present a novel target for combination therapy. PMID:23516582

  19. ESEEM of industrial silica-bearing powders: reactivity of defects during wet processing in the ceramics production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, Maurizio; Di Benedetto, Francesco; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Pardi, Luca A.; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    A study is undertaken to ascertain whether changes in the speciation of inorganic radicals are occurring during the ceramic industrial production that involves abundant silica powders as raw material. Industrial dusts were sampled in two ceramic firms, immediately after the wet mixing stage, performed with the aid of a relevant pressure. The dusts were then characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, analysis of the trace elements through chemical methods, granulometry, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. The results of the characterisation point to a relevant change in the speciation of the two samples; namely, a prevailing contribution due to an inorganic radical different from that pertaining to pure quartz is pointed out. The combined interpretation of EPR and ESEEM data suggests the attribution of the main paramagnetic contribution to the A-centre in kaolinite, a constituent that is added to pure quartz at the initial stage of the ceramic production. In one of the two samples, a second weak EPR signal is attributed to the quartz's hAl species. By taking into account the relative quantities of quartz and kaolinite mixed in the two samples, and the relative abundances of the two radical species, we propose that the partial or complete suppression of the hAl species in favour of the A-centre of kaolinite has occurred. Although this change is apparently fostered by the mixture between quartz and another radical-bearing raw material, kaolinite, the suppression of the hAl centre of quartz is ascribed to the role played by the pressure and the wet environment during the industrial mixing procedure. This suppression provides a net change of radical speciation associated with quartz, when this phase is in contact with workers' respiratory system.

  20. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  1. Measurement of the nu(mu) Charged Current pi+ Production to Quasi-elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Jaroslaw A.; /Louisiana State U.

    2009-09-01

    Using high statistics samples of charged current interactions, MiniBooNE reports a model independent measurement of the single charged pion production to quasi-elastic cross section ratio on mineral oil without corrections for pion re-interactions in the target nucleus [1]. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < E < 2.4 GeV with 11% precision in the region of highest statistics.

  2. Insights on the antitumor effects of kahweol on human breast cancer: Decreased survival and increased production of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Kahweol inhibits growth and attachment-independent proliferation of tumor cells. • Kahweol induces apoptosis in MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells. • Kahweol-induced apoptosis involves caspase activation and cytochrome c release. • Kahweol does not protect against hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. • Kahweol increases hydrogen peroxide production by human breast cancer cells. - Abstract: The present study aims to identify the modulatory effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene present in coffee beans, on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Kahweol inhibits tumor cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induces apoptosis in several kinds of human tumor cells. In the estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB231 human breast cancer, the mentioned effects are accompanied by caspases 3/7 and 9 activation and cytochrome c release. On the other hand, kahweol increases the production of reactive oxygen species and their cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells but not in normal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that kahweol is an antitumor compound with inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth and survival, especially against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

  3. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  4. The production of reactive oxygen species is a universal action mechanism of Amphotericin B against pathogenic yeasts and contributes to the fungicidal effect of this drug.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Román, Elvira; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique; Argüelles, Juan Carlos; Pla, Jesús; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB) is an antifungal drug that binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, causing the loss of ions. In addition, AMB induces the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and although these molecules have multiple deleterious effects on fungal cells, their specific role in the action mechanism of AMB remains unknown. In this work, we studied the role of ROS in the action mechanism of AMB. We determined the intracellular induction of ROS in 44 isolates of different pathogenic yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii). We also characterized the production of ROS in AMB-resistant isolates. We found that AMB induces the formation of ROS in all the species tested. The inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by rotenone blocked the induction of ROS by AMB and provided protection from the killing action of the antifungal. Moreover, this phenomenon was absent in strains that displayed resistance to AMB. These strains showed an alteration in the respiration rate and mitochondrial membrane potential and also had higher catalase activity than that of the AMB-susceptible strains. Consistently, AMB failed to induce protein carbonylation in the resistant strains. Our data demonstrate that the production of ROS by AMB is a universal and important action mechanism that is correlated with the fungicidal effect and might explain the low rate of resistance to the molecule. Finally, these data provide an opportunity to design new strategies to improve the efficacy of this antifungal.

  5. Biochemical analysis of reactive oxygen species production and antioxidative responses in unripe avocado (Persea americana Mill var Hass) fruits in response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Castro-Mercado, E; Martinez-Diaz, Y; Roman-Tehandon, N; Garcia-Pineda, E

    2009-03-01

    We analyzed the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of detoxifying enzymes and enzymes of the ascorbate (ASC) acid cycle in avocado fruit (Pesea Americana Mill cv Hass) in response to wounding. The levels of superoxide anion (O(2-), hydroxyl radicals (OH.) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increased at 15 min and 2 and 15 h post-wounding. Peroxidase (POD) activity had increased to high levels 24 h after wounding; in contrast, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels hat decreased significantly at 24 h post-treatment. Basic POD was the major POD form induced, and the levels of at least three apoplastic POD isozymes -increased following wounding. Using specific inhibitors, we characterized one MnSOD and two CuZnSOD isozymes. CuZnSOD activities decreased notably 12 h after treatment. The activities of dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase increased dramatically following the wounding treatment, possibly as a means to compensate for the redox changes due to ROS production.

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases during the life-cycles of staple food production in China and their mitigation potential.

    PubMed

    Xia, Longlong; Ti, Chaopu; Li, Bolun; Xia, Yongqiu; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-15

    Life-cycle analysis of staple food (rice, flour and corn-based fodder) production and assessments of the associated greenhouse gas (GHG) and reactive nitrogen (Nr) releases, from environmental and economic perspectives, help to develop effective mitigation options. However, such evaluations have rarely been executed in China. We evaluated the GHG and Nr releases per kilogram of staple food production (carbon and Nr footprints) and per unit of net economic benefit (CO2-NEB and Nr-NEB), and explored their mitigation potential. Carbon footprints of food production in China were obviously higher than those in some developed countries. There was a high spatial variation in the footprints, primarily attributable to differences in synthetic N use (or CH4 emissions) per unit of food production. Provincial carbon footprints had a significant linear relationship with Nr footprints, attributed to large contribution of N fertilizer use to both GHG and Nr releases. Synthetic N fertilizer applications and CH4 emissions dominated the carbon footprints, while NH3 volatilization and N leaching were the main contributors to the Nr footprints. About 564 (95% uncertainty range: 404-701) TgCO2eqGHG and 10 (7.4-12.4) Tg Nr-N were released every year during 2001-2010 from staple food production. This caused the total damage costs of 325 (70-555) billion ¥, equivalent to nearly 1.44% of the Gross Domestic Product of China. Moreover, the combined damage costs and economic input costs, accounted for 66%-80% of the gross economic benefit generated from food production. A reduction of 92.7TgCO2eqyr(-1) and 2.2TgNr-Nyr(-1) could be achieved by reducing synthetic N inputs by 20%, increasing grain yields by 5% and implementing off-season application of straw and mid-season drainage practices for rice cultivation. In order to realize these scenarios, an ecological compensation scheme should be established to incentivize farmers to gradually adopt knowledge-based managements.

  7. Control of Insulin Secretion by Production of Reactive Oxygen Species: Study Performed in Pancreatic Islets from Fed and 48-Hour Fasted Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Patrícia; Simões, Daniel; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and NADPH oxidase are important sources of reactive oxygen species in particular the superoxide radical (ROS) in pancreatic islets. These molecules derived from molecular oxygen are involved in pancreatic β-cells signaling and control of insulin secretion. We examined the involvement of ROS produced through NADPH oxidase in the leucine- and/or glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets from fed or 48-hour fasted rats. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in isolated islets was evaluated at low (2.8 mM) or high (16.7 mM) glucose concentrations in the presence or absence of leucine (20 mM) and/or NADPH oxidase inhibitors (VAS2870–20 μM or diphenylene iodonium—DPI—5 μM). ROS production was determined in islets treated with dihydroethidium (DHE) or MitoSOX Red reagent for 20 min and dispersed for fluorescence measurement by flow cytometry. NADPH content variation was examined in INS-1E cells (an insulin secreting cell line) after incubation in the presence of glucose (2.8 or 16.7 mM) and leucine (20 mM). At 2.8 mM glucose, VAS2870 and DPI reduced net ROS production (by 30%) and increased GSIS (by 70%) in a negative correlation manner (r = -0.93). At 16.7 mM glucose or 20 mM leucine, both NADPH oxidase inhibitors did not alter insulin secretion neither net ROS production. Pentose phosphate pathway inhibition by treatment with DHEA (75 μM) at low glucose led to an increase in net ROS production in pancreatic islets from fed rats (by 40%) and induced a marked increase (by 144%) in islets from 48-hour fasted rats. The NADPH/NADP+ ratio was increased when INS-1E cells were exposed to high glucose (by 4.3-fold) or leucine (by 3-fold). In conclusion, increased ROS production through NADPH oxidase prevents the occurrence of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions, however, in the presence of high glucose or high leucine levels, the increased production of NADPH and the consequent enhancement of the activity of the antioxidant defenses

  8. Λ scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    The CHY representation of scattering amplitudes is based on integrals over the moduli space of a punctured sphere. We replace the punctured sphere by a double-cover version. The resulting scattering equations depend on a parameter Λ controlling the opening of a branch cut. The new representation of scattering amplitudes possesses an enhanced redundancy which can be used to fix, modulo branches, the location of four punctures while promoting Λ to a variable. Via residue theorems we show how CHY formulas break up into sums of products of smaller (off-shell) ones times a propagator. This leads to a powerful way of evaluating CHY integrals of generic rational functions, which we call the Λ algorithm.

  9. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2− were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2−, and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2− generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:26656460

  10. Taxifolin and Fucoidin Abolish the Irradiation-Induced Increase in the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Arutyunyan, T V; Korystova, A F; Kublik, L N; Levitman, M Kh; Shaposhnikova, V V; Korystov, Yu N

    2016-03-01

    We studied changes in ROS content in the aorta of Wistar rats at early terms after irradiation in doses equal to single fraction used in tumor radiotherapy and the effects of taxifolin and fucoidin, blockers of leukocyte adhesion to endothelium, on ROS content. Male rats were exposed to X-rays (200 kW) in doses of 1-7.5 Gy. ROS production in aorta segments was measured in 1-48 h after irradiation by dichlorodihydrofluorescein oxidation. The content of ROS in the aorta of rats exposed to radiation in doses of 1-2.5 Gy increased in 1-24 h after irradiation, the peak ROS content was found in 2 h after irradiation. Taxifolin (100 μg/kg dihydroquercetin once a day with drinking water) and fucoidin (10 mg/kg, i.v.) abolished ROS accumulation. The content of ROS in rat aorta increased in 1-24 h after irradiation in doses used for tumor radiotherapy and this increase can be determined by leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium.

  11. Acupuncture elicits neuroprotective effect by inhibiting NAPDH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production in cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xue-Rui; Yan, Chao-Qun; He, Tian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Wen; Du, Si-Qi; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-10

    In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether NADPH oxidase, a major ROS-producing enzyme, was involved in the antioxidant effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment after cerebral ischaemia. The cognitive function, infract size, neuron cell loss, level of superoxide anion and expression of NADPH oxidase subunit in hippocampus of two-vessel occlusion (2VO) rats were determined after 2-week acupuncture. Furthermore, the cognitive function and production of O2(-) were determined in the presence and absence of NADPH oxidase agonist (TBCA) and antagonist (Apocynin). The effect of acupuncture on cognitive function after cerebral ischaemia in gp91phox-KO mice was evaluated by Morris water maze. Acupuncture reduced infarct size, attenuated overproduction of O2(-), and reversed consequential cognitive impairment and neuron cell loss in 2VO rats. The elevations of gp91phox and p47phox after 2VO were significantly decreased after acupuncture treatment. However, no differences of gp91phox mRNA were found among any experimental groups. Furthermore, these beneficial effects were reversed by TBCA, whereas apocynin mimicked the effect of acupuncture by improving cognitive function and decreasing O2(-) generation. Acupuncture failed to improve the memory impairment in gp91phox KO mice. Full function of the NADPH oxidase enzyme plays an important role in neuroprotective effects against cognitive impairment via inhibition of NAPDH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  12. Reactivity of Ir(III) carbonyl complexes with water: alternative by-product formation pathways in catalytic methanol carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul I P; Haak, Susanne; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Sunley, Glenn J; Haynes, Anthony

    2013-12-21

    The reactions of water with a number of iridium(III) complexes relevant to the mechanism for catalytic methanol carbonylation are reported. The iridium acetyl, [Ir(CO)2I3(COMe)](-), reacts with water under mild conditions to release CO2 and CH4, rather than the expected acetic acid. Isotopic labeling and kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism involving nucleophilic attack by water on a terminal CO ligand of [Ir(CO)2I3(COMe)](-) to give an (undetected) hydroxycarbonyl species. Subsequent decarboxylation and elimination of methane gives [Ir(CO)2I2](-). Similar reactions with water are observed for [Ir(CO)2I3Me](-), [Ir(CO)2(NCMe)I2(COMe)] and [Ir(CO)3I2Me] with the neutral complexes exhibiting markedly higher rates. The results demonstrate that CO2 formation during methanol carbonylation is not restricted to the conventional water gas shift mechanism mediated by [Ir(CO)2I4](-) or [Ir(CO)3I3], but can arise directly from key organo-iridium(III) intermediates in the carbonylation cycle. An alternative pathway for methane formation not involving the intermediacy of H2 is also suggested. A mechanism is proposed for the conversion MeOH + CO → CO2 + CH4, which may account for the similar rates of formation of the two gaseous by-products during iridium-catalysed methanol carbonylation.

  13. Toll-like receptor 4 upregulation by angiotensin II contributes to hypertension and vascular dysfunction through reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    De Batista, Priscila R; Palacios, Roberto; Martín, Angela; Hernanz, Raquel; Médici, Cindy T; Silva, Marito A S C; Rossi, Emilly M; Aguado, Andrea; Vassallo, Dalton V; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María J

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is considered as a low-grade inflammatory disease, with adaptive immunity being an important mediator of this pathology. TLR4 may have a role in the development of several cardiovascular diseases; however, little is known about its participation in hypertension. We aimed to investigate whether TLR4 activation due to increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to hypertension and its associated endothelial dysfunction. For this, we used aortic segments from Wistar rats treated with a non-specific IgG (1 µg/day) and SHRs treated with losartan (15 mg/kg·day), the non-specific IgG or the neutralizing antibody anti-TLR4 (1 µg/day), as well as cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from Wistar and SHRs. TLR4 mRNA levels were greater in the VSMC and aortas from SHRs compared with Wistar rats; losartan treatment reduced those levels in the SHRs. Treatment of the SHRs with the anti-TLR4 antibody: 1) reduced the increased blood pressure, heart rate and phenylephrine-induced contraction while it improved the impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation; 2) increased the potentiation of phenylephrine contraction after endothelium removal; and 3) abolished the inhibitory effects of tiron, apocynin and catalase on the phenylephrine-induced response as well as its enhancing effect of acetylcholine-induced relaxation. In SHR VSMCs, angiotensin II increased TLR4 mRNA levels, and losartan reduced that increase. CLI-095, a TLR4 inhibitor, mitigated the increases in NAD(P)H oxidase activity, superoxide anion production, migration and proliferation that were induced by angiotensin II. In conclusion, TLR4 pathway activation due to increased RAS activity is involved in hypertension, and by inducing oxidative stress, this pathway contributes to the endothelial dysfunction associated with this pathology. These results suggest that TLR4 and innate immunity may play a role in hypertension and its associated end-organ damage.

  14. Induction of necrosis and apoptosis to KB cancer cells by sanguinarine is associated with reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.-C.; Chan, C.-P.; Wang, Y.-J.; Lee, P.-H.; Chen, L.-I; Tsai, Y.-L.; Lin, B.-R.; Wang, Y.-L.; Jeng, J.-H. . E-mail: huei@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzopheanthridine alkaloid present in the root of Sanguinaria canadensis L. and Chellidonium majus L. In this study, sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) exhibited cytotoxicity to KB cancer cells by decreasing MTT reduction to 83% and 52% of control after 24-h of exposure. Sanguinarine also inhibited the colony forming capacity (> 52-58%) and growth of KB cancer cells at concentrations higher than 0.5-1 {mu}M. Short-term exposure to sanguinarine (> 0.5 {mu}M) effectively suppressed the adhesion of KB cells to collagen and fibronectin (FN). Sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) induced evident apoptosis as indicated by an increase in sub-G0/G1 populations, which was detected after 6-h of exposure. Only a slight increase in cells arresting in S-phase and G2/M was noted. Induction of KB cell apoptosis and necrosis by sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) was further confirmed by Annexin V-PI dual staining flow cytometry and the presence of DNA fragmentation. The cytotoxicity by sanguinarine was accompanied by an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential as indicated by single cell flow cytometric analysis of DCF and rhodamine fluorescence. NAC (1 and 3 mM) and catalase (2000 U/ml) prevented the sanguinarine-induced ROS production and cytotoxicity, whereas dimethylthiourea (DMT) showed no marked preventive effect. These results suggest that sanguinarine has anticarcinogenic properties with induction of ROS production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, which mediate cancer cell death.

  15. Paclitaxel therapy potentiates cold hyperalgesia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats through enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and TRPA1 sensitization.

    PubMed

    Barrière, David André; Rieusset, Jennifer; Chanteranne, Didier; Busserolles, Jérôme; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Chapuis, Laëtitia; Salles, Jérôme; Dubray, Claude; Morio, Béatrice

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes comorbidities include disabling peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and an increased risk of developing cancer. Antimitotic drugs, such as paclitaxel, are well known to facilitate the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy. Practitioners frequently observe the development or co-occurrence of enhanced DPN, especially cold sensitivity, in diabetic patients during chemotherapy. Preclinical studies showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cold activate transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) cation channels, which are involved in cold-evoked pain transduction signaling in DPN. Additionally, paclitaxel treatment has been associated with an accumulation of atypical mitochondria in the sensory nerves of rats. We hypothesized that paclitaxel might potentiate cold hyperalgesia by increasing mitochondrial injuries and TRPA1 activation. Thus, the kinetics of paclitaxel-induced cold hyperalgesia, mitochondrial ROS production, and TRPA1 expression were evaluated in dorsal root ganglia of normoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, paclitaxel significantly enhanced cold hyperalgesia in comparison to normoglycemic paclitaxel-treated control rats. These effects were prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine, a reducing agent, and by HC030031, an antagonist of TRPA1. In diabetic and control rats, paclitaxel treatment was associated with an accumulation of atypical mitochondria and a 2-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS production. Moreover, mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase 4 and glutathione-S-reductase were significantly lower in diabetic groups treated with paclitaxel. Finally, TRPA1 gene expression was enhanced by 45% in diabetic rats. Paclitaxel potentiation of cold hyperalgesia in diabetes may result from the combination of increased mitochondrial ROS production and poor radical detoxification induced by paclitaxel treatment and diabetes-related overexpression of TRPA1.

  16. Central role of endogenous Toll-like receptor-2 activation in regulating inflammation, reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent neointimal formation after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Tetsuro . E-mail: Tetsuro_Shishido@URMC.Rochester.edu; Nozaki, Naoki; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yo; Abe, Jun-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2006-07-14

    Background: It is now evident that inflammation after vascular injury has significant impact on the restenosis after revascularization procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass grafting. However, the mechanisms that regulate inflammation and repair after vascular injury are incompletely understood. Here, we report that vascular injury-mediated cytokine expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as subsequent neointimal formation requires Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway in vivo. Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by cuff-placement around the femoral artery in non-transgenic littermates (NLC) and TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2KO) mice. After cuff-placement in NLC mice, expression of TLR-2 was significantly increased in both smooth muscle medial layer and adventitia. Interestingly, we found that inflammatory genes expression such as tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were markedly decreased in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. In addition, ROS production after vascular injury was attenuated in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. Since we observed the significant role of endogenous TLR-2 activation in regulating inflammatory responses and ROS production after vascular injury, we determined whether inhibition of endogenous TLR-2 activation can inhibit neointimal proliferation after vascular injury. Neointimal hyperplasia was markedly suppressed in TLR-2KO mice compared with WT mice at both 2 and 4 weeks after vascular injury. Conclusions: These findings suggested that endogenous TLR-2 activation might play a central role in the regulation of vascular inflammation as well as subsequent neointimal formation in injured vessels.

  17. Imbalanced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Antioxidant SOD2 in Fabry Disease-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Differentiated Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lien; Chou, Shih-Jie; Chiang, Huai-Chih; Wang, Mong-Lien; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wang, Chien-Ying; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Liu, Yung-Yang; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Lin, Shing-Jong; Yu, Wen-Chung

    2017-03-13

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by α-galactosidase A (GLA) deficiency. Progressive intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) is considered to be pathogenically responsible for the phenotype variability of FD that causes cardiovascular dysfunction; however, molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of FD-associated cardiovascular tissues remain unclear. In this study, we reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from peripheral blood cells of patients with FD (FD-iPSCs); subsequently differentiated them into vascular endothelial-like cells (FD-ECs) expressing CD31, VE-cadherin, and vWF; and investigated their ability to form vascular tube-like structures. FD-ECs recapitulated the FD pathophysiological phenotype exhibiting intracellular Gb3 accumulation under a transmission electron microscope. Moreover, compared with healthy control iPSC-derived endothelial cells (NC-ECs), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production considerably increased in FD-ECs. Microarray analysis was performed to explore the possible mechanism underlying Gb3 accumulation-induced ROS production in FD-ECs. Our results revealed that superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), a mitochondrial antioxidant, was significantly downregulated in FD-ECs. Compared with NC-ECs, AMPK activity was significantly enhanced in FD-ECs. Furthermore, to investigate the role of Gb3 in these effects, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with Gb3. After Gb3 treatment, we observed that SOD2 expression was suppressed and AMPK activity was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that excess accumulation of Gb3 suppressed SOD2 expression, increased ROS production, enhanced AMPK activation, and finally caused vascular endothelial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that dysregulated mitochondrial ROS may be a potential target for treating FD.

  18. Long-term non-isothermal reactive transport model of compacted bentonite, concrete and corrosion products in a HLW repository in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Alba; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Fernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories envisages engineered barriers such as carbon-steel canisters, compacted bentonite and concrete liners. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyper-alkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyper-alkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport model of the long-term (1 Ma) interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. Model results show that magnetite is the main corrosion product. Its precipitation reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The reduction of the porosity becomes especially relevant at t = 104 years. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces at 1 Ma are approximately equal to 1 and 3.3 cm thick, respectively. The hyper-alkaline front (pH > 8.5) spreads 2.5 cm into the clay formation after 1 Ma. Our simulation results share the key features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces; 2) Narrow alteration zones; and 3) Limited smectite dissolution after 1 Ma.

  19. Long-term non-isothermal reactive transport model of compacted bentonite, concrete and corrosion products in a HLW repository in clay.

    PubMed

    Mon, Alba; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Fernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in deep geological repositories envisages engineered barriers such as carbon-steel canisters, compacted bentonite and concrete liners. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyper-alkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyper-alkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport model of the long-term (1Ma) interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. Model results show that magnetite is the main corrosion product. Its precipitation reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The reduction of the porosity becomes especially relevant at t=10(4)years. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces at 1Ma are approximately equal to 1 and 3.3cm thick, respectively. The hyper-alkaline front (pH>8.5) spreads 2.5cm into the clay formation after 1Ma. Our simulation results share the key features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite and concrete-clay interfaces; 2) Narrow alteration zones; and 3) Limited smectite dissolution after 1Ma.

  20. Hyperbaric Oxygen Reduces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neutrophils from Polytraumatized Patients Yielding in the Inhibition of p38 MAP Kinase and Downstream Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Windolf, Joachim; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Trauma represents the leading cause of death among young people in western countries. Among the beneficial role of neutrophils in host defence, excessive priming and activation of neutrophils after major trauma lead to an overwhelming inflammatory response and secondary host tissue injury due to the release of toxic metabolites and enzymes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been proposed to possess antiinflammatory effects and might represent an appropriate therapeutic option to lower inflammation in a broad range of patients. Here, we studied the effects of HBO on the activity of neutrophils isolated from severely injured patients (days 1–2 after trauma), in fact on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We found exposure to HBO therapy to significantly diminish phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in neutrophils isolated from patients and healthy volunteers. At the same time, marked decrease in NETs release was found in control cells and a less pronounced reduction in patient neutrophils. Impaired ability to produce ROS following exposure to HBO was demonstrated to be linked to a strong downregulation of the activity of p38 MAPK. Only slight suppression of ERK activity could be found. In addition, HBO did not influence neutrophil chemotaxis or apoptosis, respectively. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that HBO therapy suppresses ROS production in inflammatory human neutrophils, and thus might impair ROS-dependent pathways, e.g. kinases activation and NETs release. Thus, HBO might represent a feasible therapy for patients suffering from systemic inflammation, including those with multiple trauma. PMID:27529549

  1. Reactive Nitrogen, Ozone and Ozone Production in the Arctic Troposphere and the Impact of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Q.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Douglass, A. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Apel, E.; Bian, H.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P. R.; daSilva, A.; Diskin, G. S.; Duncan, B. N.; Huey, L. C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Nielsen, J. E.; Olson, J. R.; Pawson, S.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the aircraft observations obtained during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellite (ARCTAS) mission together with the GEOS-5 CO simulation to examine O3 and NOy in the Arctic and sub-Arctic region and their source attribution. Using a number of marker tracers and their probability density distributions, we distinguish various air masses from the background troposphere and examine their contribution to NOx, O3, and O3 production in the Arctic troposphere. The background Arctic troposphere has mean O3 of approximately 60 ppbv and NOx of approximately 25 pptv throughout spring and summer with CO decreases from approximately 145 ppbv in spring to approximately 100 ppbv in summer. These observed CO, NOx and O3 mixing ratios are not notably different from the values measured during the 1988 ABLE-3A and the 2002 TOPSE field campaigns despite the significant changes in the past two decades in processes that could have changed the Arctic tropospheric composition. Air masses associated with stratosphere-troposphere exchange are present throughout the mid and upper troposphere during spring and summer. These air masses with mean O3 concentration of 140-160 ppbv are the most important direct sources of O3 in the Arctic troposphere. In addition, air of stratospheric origin is the only notable driver of net O3 formation in the Arctic due to its sustainable high NOx (75 pptv in spring and 110 pptv in summer) and NOy (approximately 800 pptv in spring and approximately 1100 pptv in summer) levels. The ARCTAS measurements present observational evidence suggesting significant conversion of nitrogen from HNO3 to NOx and then to PAN (a net formation of approximately 120 pptv PAN) in summer when air of stratospheric origin is mixed with tropospheric background during stratosphere-to-troposphere transport. These findings imply that an adequate representation of stratospheric O3 and NOy input are essential in accurately simulating O3

  2. Reactive oxygen species generated by a heat shock protein (Hsp) inducing product contributes to Hsp70 production and Hsp70-mediated protective immunity in Artemia franciscana against pathogenic vibrios.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Linayati, Linayati; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The cytoprotective role of heat shock protein (Hsp70) described in a variety of animal disease models, including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals, suggests that new protective strategies relying upon the use of compounds that selectively turn on Hsp genes could be developed. The product Tex-OE® (hereafter referred to as Hspi), an extract from the skin of the prickly pear fruit, Opuntia ficus indica, was previously shown to trigger Hsp70 synthesis in a non-stressful situation in a variety of animals, including in a gnotobiotically (germ-free) cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana model system. This model system offers great potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of compounds that have health benefit effects. By using this model system, we aimed to disclose the underlying cause behind the induction of Hsp70 by Hspi in the shrimp host, and to determine whether the product affects the shrimp in inducing resistance towards pathogenic vibrios. We provide unequivocal evidences indicating that during the pretreatment period with Hspi, there is an initial release of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide anion), generated by the added product, in the rearing water and associated with the host. The reactive molecules generated are the triggering factors responsible for causing Hsp70 induction within Artemia. We have also shown that Hspi acts prophylactically at an optimum dose regimen to confer protection against pathogenic vibrios. This salutary effect was associated with upregulation of two important immune genes, prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase of the innate immune system. These findings suggest that inducers of stress protein (e.g. Hsp70) are potentially important modulator of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to cultured shrimp against Vibrio infection.

  3. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  4. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  5. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  6. Surface reactivity and in vitro toxicity on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) of nanomaterials intermediates of the production of titania-based composites.

    PubMed

    Vergaro, Viviana; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Fenoglio, Ivana; Marucco, Arianna; Carlucci, Claudia; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured worldwide in large quantities for use in a wide range of applications. Evaluating the hazards associated with TiO2 NPs is crucial as it enables risk assessment related to human and environmental exposure. In this study the in vitro human toxicity of a set of TiO2 NPs modified with acetic, oleic and boric acids were studied in order to assess the hazard in view of a future scale-up of the synthesis. The surface reactivity of the powders under simulated solar illumination and in the dark has been evaluated by means of EPR spectroscopy. Human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) have been chosen as a model for lung epithelium. Cytotoxicity has been assessed by measuring the cells membrane integrity by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, and the inflammatory response evaluated as nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α production, and oxidative stress measured as intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, and induced lipoperoxidation. Aeroxide P25 was used for comparison. The results demonstrated a low photoreactivity and toxic effects lower than Aeroxide P25 of the nano-TiO2 powders, probably as a consequence of the presence of acidic moieties at the surface.

  7. Dose-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production from particulate matter exposure: comparison to oxidative potential and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuet, Wing Y.; Fok, Shierly; Verma, Vishal; Tagle Rodriguez, Marlen S.; Grosberg, Anna; Champion, Julie A.; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-11-01

    Elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations have been associated with cardiopulmonary risks. In this study, alveolar macrophages and ventricular myocytes were exposed to PM extracts from 104 ambient filters collected in multiple rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area. PM-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were measured to investigate the effect of chemical composition and determine whether chemical assays are representative of cellular responses. For summer samples, the area under the ROS/RNS dose-response curve per volume of air (AUCvolume) was significantly correlated with dithiothreitol (DTT) activity, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), brown carbon, titanium, and iron, while a relatively flat response was observed for winter samples. EC50 was also correlated with max response for all filters investigated, which suggests that certain PM constituents may be involved in cellular protective pathways. Although few metal correlations were observed, exposure to laboratory-prepared metal solutions induced ROS/RNS production, indicating that a lack of correlation does not necessarily translate to a lack of response. Collectively, these results suggest that complex interactions may occur between PM species. Furthermore, the strong correlation between organic species and ROS/RNS response highlights a need to understand the contribution of organic aerosols, especially photochemically driven secondary organic aerosols (SOA), to PM-induced health effects.

  8. Production of reactive oxygen species by phagocytic cells after exposure to glass wool and stone wool fibres - effect of fibre preincubation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zoller, T; Zeller, W J

    2000-04-03

    The potential of four man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) (glass wool Code A, stone wool Code G, HT-N and MMVF 21) and of two natural mineral fibres (crocidolite, erionite) to induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by differentiated HL-60 cells (HL-60-M cells) was investigated by determination of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). Quartz served as positive control. The same system was used to uncover possible influences of fibre preincubation in aqueous solutions on the ROS-generating potential. Following preincubation in unbuffered saline over about 4 weeks, Code A and G fibres showed decreased ROS-generating potential as compared to freshly suspended fibres. On the other hand, MMVF 21 and HT-N fibres as well as crocidolite and erionite showed no decreased CL after incubation in aqueous solutions. The observed decrease of the ROS-generating potential of Code A and G fibres after preincubation may be an expression of fibre surface alterations (leaching, initiation of dissolution) that influences the response of exposed phagocytic cells. After incubation of both fibres in buffered solutions at different pH values (5.0, 7.4) a reduced ROS-generating potential was still discernible as compared to freshly suspended fibres.

  9. Reactive oxygen production induced by near-infrared radiation in three strains of the Chl d-containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Lars; Staal, Marc; Cristescu, Simona M; Harren, Frans JM; Schliep, Martin; Larkum, Anthony WD; Kühl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria in the genus Acaryochloris have largely exchanged Chl a with Chl d, enabling them to harvest near-infrared-radiation (NIR) for oxygenic photosynthesis, a biochemical pathway prone to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, ROS production under different light conditions was quantified in three Acaryochloris strains (MBIC11017, HICR111A and the novel strain CRS) using a real-time ethylene detector in conjunction with addition of 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutyric acid, a substrate that is converted to ethylene when reacting with certain types of ROS. In all strains, NIR was found to generate less ROS than visible light (VIS). More ROS was generated if strains MBIC11017 and HICR111A were adapted to NIR and then exposed to VIS, while strain CRS demonstrated the opposite behavior. This is the very first study of ROS generation and suggests that Acaryochloris can avoid a considerable amount of light-induced stress by using NIR instead of VIS for its photosynthesis, adding further evolutionary arguments to their widespread appearance. PMID:24555034

  10. MIF-driven activation of macrophages induces killing of intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi dependent on endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cutrullis, Romina A; Petray, Patricia B; Corral, Ricardo S

    2017-02-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key player in innate immunity. MIF has been considered critical for controlling acute infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our study aimed to analyze whether MIF could favor microbicidal activity of the macrophage, a site where T. cruzi grows and the initial effector cell against this parasite. Using murine macrophages infected in vitro, we examined the effect of MIF on their parasiticidal ability and attempted to identify inflammatory agents involved in MIF-induced protection. Our findings show that MIF is readily secreted from peritoneal macrophages upon T. cruzi infection. MIF activates both primary and J774 phagocytes boosting the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling, as well as the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, leading to enhanced pathogen elimination. MIF can also potentiate the effect of interferon-gamma on T. cruzi killing by J774 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, rendering these cells more competent in reducing intracellular parasite burden. The present results unveil a novel innate immune pathway that contributes to host defense and broaden our understanding of the regulation of inflammatory mediators implicated in early parasite containment that is decisive for resistance to T. cruzi infection.

  11. Enhanced poly(γ-glutamic acid) production by H2 O2 -induced reactive oxygen species in the fermentation of Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bao; Zhang, Dan; Li, Sha; Xu, Zongqi; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell growth and poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) synthesis were studied by adding hydrogen peroxide to a medium of Bacillus subtilis NX-2. After optimizing the addition concentration and time of H2 O2 , a maximum concentration of 33.9 g/L γ-PGA was obtained by adding 100 µM H2 O2 to the medium after 24 H. This concentration was 20.6% higher than that of the control. The addition of diphenyleneiodonium chloride (ROS inhibitor) can interdict the effect of H2 O2 -induced ROS. Transcriptional levels of the cofactors and relevant genes were also determined under ROS stress to illustrate the possible metabolic mechanism contributing to the improve γ-PGA production. The transcriptional levels of genes belonging to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transfer chain system were significantly increased by ROS, which decreased the NADH/NAD(+) ratio and increased the ATP levels, thereby providing more reducing power and energy for γ-PGA biosynthesis. The enhanced γ-PGA synthetic genes also directly promoted the formation of γ-PGA. This study was the first to use the ROS control strategy for γ-PGA fermentation and provided valuable information on the possible mechanism by which ROS regulated γ-PGA biosynthesis in B. subtilis NX-2.

  12. Reactivation of IgG-switched memory B cells by BCR-intrinsic signal amplification promotes IgG antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Johannes; Dittmann, Kai; Bösl, Michael R; Winkler, Thomas H; Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Secondary antibody responses are marked by faster kinetics, improved antibody affinity and a switch from IgM to other immunoglobulin isotypes, most notably IgG, compared with primary responses. These changes protect from reinfection and represent the principle of most vaccination strategies. Yet, the molecular mechanisms that underlie B-cell memory responses are unclear. Here we show, by inactivating the immunoglobulin tail tyrosine (ITT) signalling motif of membrane-bound IgG1 in the mouse, that the ITT facilitates maintenance and reactivation of IgG-switched memory B cells in vivo. The ITT motif equips IgG-switched cells with enhanced BCR signalling capacity, which supports their competitiveness in secondary immune reactions and drives the formation of IgG-secreting plasma cells even in the absence of T-cell help. Our results demonstrate that ITT signalling promotes the vigorous production of IgG antibodies and thus provide a molecular basis for humoral immunological memory. PMID:26815242

  13. Jaridonin, a novel ent-kaurene diterpenoid from Isodon rubescens, inducing apoptosis via production of reactive oxygen species in esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Cheng; Ke, Yu; Zi, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wen; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Hong-Min

    2013-07-01

    Isodon rubescens, a Chinese herb, has been used as a folk, botanical medicine in China for inflammatory diseases and cancer treatment for many years. Recently, we isolated a new ent-kaurene diterpenoid, named Jaridonin, from Isodon rubescens. The chemical structure of Jaridonin was verified by infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectrum (MS) data as well as X-ray spectra. Jaridonin potently reduced viabilities of several esophageal cancer cell lines, including EC109, EC9706 and EC1. Jaridonin treatment resulted in typical apoptotic morphological characteristics, increased the number of annexin V-positive staining cells, as well as caused a G2/M arrest in cell cycle progression. Furthermore, Jaridonin resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, and then activation of Caspase-9 and -3, leading to activation of the mitochondria mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, these effects of Jaridonin were accompanied by marked reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and increased expression of p53, p21(waf1/Cip1) and Bax, whereas two ROS scavengers, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (LNAC) and Vitamin C, significantly attenuated the effects of Jaridonin on the mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, expression of p53 and p21(waf1/Cip1) and reduction of cell viabilities. Taken together, our results suggest that a natural ent-kaurenoid diterpenoid, Jaridonin, is a novel apoptosis inducer and deserves further investigation as a new chemotherapeutic strategy for patients with esophageal cancer.

  14. Fisetin-induced apoptosis of human oral cancer SCC-4 cells through reactive oxygen species production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, caspase-, and mitochondria-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen-Hsuan; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lu, Kung-Wen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Ma, Yi-Shih; Yang, Jiun-Long; Chu, Yung-Lin; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Liu, Kuo-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-02-09

    Oral cancer is one of the cancer-related diseases in human populations and its incidence rates are rising worldwide. Fisetin, a flavonoid from natural products, has been shown to exhibit anticancer activities in many human cancer cell lines but the molecular mechanism of fisetin-induced apoptosis in human oral cancer cells is still unclear; thus, in this study, we investigated fisetin-induced cell death and associated signal pathways on human oral cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. We examined cell morphological changes, total viable cells, and cell cycle distribution by phase contrast microscopy and flow cytometry assays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca(2+) , mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm ), and caspase-8, -9, and -3 activities were also measured by flow cytometer. Results indicate that fisetin induced cell death through the cell morphological changes, caused G2/M phase arrest, induction of apoptosis, promoted ROS and Ca(2+) production, and decreased the level of ΔΨm and increased caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities in SCC-4 cells. DAPI staining and DNA gel electrophoresis were also used to confirm fisetin-induced cell apoptosis in SCC-4 cells. Western blotting also found out that Fisetin increased the proapoptotic proteins such as Bax and Bid and decreased the antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2. Furthermore, results also showed that Fisetin increased the cytochrome c, AIF, and Endo G release from mitochondria in SCC-4 cells. We also used ATF-6α, ATF-6β, GADD153, and GRP78 which indicated that fisetin induced cell death through ER stress. Based on those observations, we suggest that fisetin induced cell apoptosis through ER stress, mitochondria-, and caspase-dependent pathways.

  15. Insulin improves in vitro survival of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue and reduces reactive oxygen species production after culture.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, F L N; Lunardi, F O; Lima, L F; Rocha, R M P; Bruno, J B; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Cibin, F W S; Rodrigues, A P R; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of insulin concentration on the in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles enclosed in ovarian tissue. Ovarian tissue samples were immediately fixed (noncultured control) or cultured for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, or 10 μg/mL insulin. Ovarian tissues were processed and analyzed by classical histology. Culture medium samples were collected after 1 and 7 days of culture for steroid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) analyses. The percentage of morphologically normal follicles was greater (P < 0.001) in insulin-treated groups after 1 day of culture; likewise, more (P < 0.02) normal follicles were observed after 7 days of culture in medium supplemented with 10-ng/mL insulin. Furthermore, an increase (P < 0.01) in developing (transition, primary, and secondary) follicles between Days 1 and 7 of culture was observed only with the 10-ng/mL insulin treatment. ROS production after 1 or 7 days of culture was lower (P < 0.0001) in medium with 10-ng/mL insulin than the other treatments. Ovarian tissues containing preantral follicles were able to produce estradiol and progesterone after 1 and 7 days of culture; however, treatments did not differ in steroid production. In conclusion, the use of a physiological concentration (10 ng/mL) of insulin rather than the previously reported concentration (10 μg/mL) for in vitro culture of equine preantral follicles improved follicular survival and growth and lowered oxidative stress. Results from this study shed light on new perspectives for producing an appropriate medium to improve equine preantral follicle in vitro survival and growth.

  16. Isolation of Terpenoids from the Stem of Ficus aurantiaca Griff and their Effects on Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Chemotactic Activity of Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mawa, Shukranul; Jantan, Ibrahim; Husain, Khairana

    2016-01-05

    Three new triterpenoids; namely 28,28,30-trihydroxylupeol (1); 3,21,21,26-tetrahydroxy-lanostanoic acid (2) and dehydroxybetulinic acid (3) and seven known compounds; i.e., taraxerone (4); taraxerol (5); ethyl palmitate (6); herniarin (7); stigmasterol (8); ursolic acid (9) and acetyl ursolic acid (10) were isolated from the stem of Ficus aurantiaca Griff. The structures of the compounds were established by spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis by using the Boyden chamber technique and on human whole blood and neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by using a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay. Among the compounds tested, compounds 1-4, 6 and 9 exhibited strong inhibition of PMN migration towards the chemoattractant N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) with IC50 values of 6.8; 2.8; 2.5; 4.1; 3.7 and 3.6 μM, respectively, comparable to that of the positive control ibuprofen (6.7 μM). Compounds 2-4, 6, 7 and 9 exhibited strong inhibition of ROS production of PMNs with IC50 values of 0.9; 0.9; 1.3; 1.1; 0.5 and 0.8 μM, respectively, which were lower than that of aspirin (9.4 μM). The bioactive compounds might be potential lead molecules for the development of new immunomodulatory agents to modulate the innate immune response of phagocytes.

  17. Simulations of Carbon Dioxide Storage and Methane Production from Guest Molecule Exchange of Hydrates Using Reactive Transport Modeling and Gibbs Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate guest molecule exchange of hydrates as a method for simultaneous carbon dioxide storage and methane production. We simulate N2/CO2 binary gas mixture injection into marine and terrestrial methane hydrate bearing sediments. Different compositions of the injected gas can lead to four possible outcomes: 1) Injected gas flows downstream past methane hydrate and does not alter the methane hydrate, 2) Injected gas causes complete dissociation of methane hydrate, which creates a gas mixture of methane and injected gas that flows downstream, 3) Injected gas causes complete dissociation of methane hydrate with flow of methane gas downstream and all injected gas replaces methane in the hydrate cage, 4) Injected gas causes partial dissociation of methane hydrate with some replacement of methane in the hydrate cage and downstream flow of a methane and injected gas mixture. We focus on how composition of injected gas affects the outcome of the injection process, and then determine the optimal injection mixture of N2/CO2 for carbon dioxide storage and methane production. Our simulations combine dynamic flash calculations using the Gibbs energy minimization of Ballard and Sloan (2004) with 1-d reactive transport modeling. This work provides insight into the efficiency of the guest molecule exchange process in methane hydrate systems. Our results can be directly incorporated into simulations of more complex geometries and field settings such as the Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial. ReferencesBallard, A. L., and Sloan, E. D. (2004). The next generation of hydrate prediction: Part III. Gibbs energy minimization formalism. Fluid phase equilibria, 218(1), 15-31.

  18. The Production of Reactive Oxygen Species Is a Universal Action Mechanism of Amphotericin B against Pathogenic Yeasts and Contributes to the Fungicidal Effect of This Drug

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Román, Elvira; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique; Argüelles, Juan Carlos; Pla, Jesús; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AMB) is an antifungal drug that binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, causing the loss of ions. In addition, AMB induces the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and although these molecules have multiple deleterious effects on fungal cells, their specific role in the action mechanism of AMB remains unknown. In this work, we studied the role of ROS in the action mechanism of AMB. We determined the intracellular induction of ROS in 44 isolates of different pathogenic yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii). We also characterized the production of ROS in AMB-resistant isolates. We found that AMB induces the formation of ROS in all the species tested. The inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by rotenone blocked the induction of ROS by AMB and provided protection from the killing action of the antifungal. Moreover, this phenomenon was absent in strains that displayed resistance to AMB. These strains showed an alteration in the respiration rate and mitochondrial membrane potential and also had higher catalase activity than that of the AMB-susceptible strains. Consistently, AMB failed to induce protein carbonylation in the resistant strains. Our data demonstrate that the production of ROS by AMB is a universal and important action mechanism that is correlated with the fungicidal effect and might explain the low rate of resistance to the molecule. Finally, these data provide an opportunity to design new strategies to improve the efficacy of this antifungal. PMID:25155595

  19. How reactants polarization can be used to change and unravel chemical reactivity.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, Jesús; de Miranda, Marcelo P; Haigh, James M; Kendrick, Brian K; Saez-Rabanos, V; Aoiz, F Javier

    2005-07-21

    This article presents theoretical methods for the description of the directional effect of reactant rotation on the reactivity of atom-diatom systems and suggests an experiment that could be used to test theoretical predictions. The theory can be used in conjunction with both quantum reactive scattering and quasiclassical trajectory calculations, and is stated in general terms, which allows it to deal with arbitrary reactant polarizations. The illustrative results obtained for the benchmark H + D2 reaction are also presented and show that under experimentally achievable conditions one can largely control reactive cross sections and product state distributions, while at the same time gaining valuable and at times surprising information on the reaction mechanism.

  20. p-Cresol Affects Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, Cytotoxicity and Inflammation/Atherosclerosis-Related Modulators Production in Endothelial Cells and Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Tseng, Wan-Yu; Tseng, Shui-Kuan; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cresols are present in antiseptics, coal tar, some resins, pesticides, and industrial solvents. Cresol intoxication leads to hepatic injury due to coagulopathy as well as disturbance of hepatic circulation in fatal cases. Patients with uremia suffer from cardiovascular complications, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hemolysis, and bleeding, which may be partly due to p-cresol toxicity and its effects on vascular endothelial and mononuclear cells. Given the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in vascular thrombosis, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-cresol on endothelial and mononuclear cells. Methods EA.hy926 (EAHY) endothelial cells and U937 cells were exposed to different concentrations of p-cresol. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 -diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and trypan blue dye exclusion technique, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Endothelial cell migration was studied by wound closure assay. ROS level was measured by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and uPA production were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results Exposure to 100–500 µM p-cresol decreased EAHY cell number by 30–61%. P-cresol also decreased the viability of U937 mononuclear cells. The inhibition of EAHY and U937 cell growth by p-cresol was related to induction of S-phase cell cycle arrest. Closure of endothelial wounds was inhibited by p-cresol (>100 µM). P-cresol (>50 µM) also stimulated ROS production in U937 cells and EAHY cells but to a lesser extent. Moreover, p-cresol markedly stimulated PAI-1 and suPAR, but not PGF2α, and uPA production in EAHY cells. Conclusions p-Cresol may contribute to atherosclerosis and thrombosis in patients with

  1. Macrophage Polarization Modulates FcγR- and CD13-Mediated Phagocytosis and Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Independently of Receptor Membrane Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Ortega, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    In response to microenvironmental cues, macrophages undergo a profound phenotypic transformation acquiring distinct activation phenotypes ranging from pro-inflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory (M2). To study how activation phenotype influences phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by receptors for IgG antibodies (Fcγ receptors) and by CD13, human monocyte-derived macrophages were polarized to distinct phenotypes using IFN-γ (Mϕ-IFN-γ), IL-4 (Mϕ-IL-4), or IL-10 (Mϕ-IL-10). Phenotypically, Mϕ-IFN-γ were characterized as CD14+CD80+CD86+ cells, Mϕ-IL-4 as CD209highCD206+CD11b+CD14low, and Mϕ-IL-10 as CD16+CD163+ cells. Compared to non-polarized macrophages, FcγRI expression increased in Mϕ-IFN-γ and Mϕ-IL-10 and FcγRIII expression increased in Mϕ-IL-10. None of the polarizing cytokines modified FcγRII or CD13 expression. Functionally, we found that cytokine-mediated activation significantly and distinctively affected FcγR- and CD13-mediated phagocytosis and ROS generation. Compared to non-polarized macrophages, FcγRI-, FcγRII-, and CD13-mediated phagocytosis was significantly increased in Mϕ-IL-10 and decreased in Mϕ-IFN-γ, although both cytokines significantly upregulated FcγRI expression. IL-10 also increased phagocytosis of Escherichia coli, showing that the effect of IL-10 on macrophage phagocytosis is not specific for a particular receptor. Interestingly, Mϕ-IL-4, which showed poor FcγR- and CD13-mediated phagocytosis, showed very high phagocytosis of E. coli and zymosan. Coupled with phagocytosis, macrophages produce ROS that contribute to microbial killing. As expected, Mϕ-IFN-γ showed significant production of ROS after FcγRI-, FcγRII-, or CD13-mediated phagocytosis. Unexpectedly, we found that Mϕ-IL-10 can also produce ROS after simultaneous stimulation through several phagocytic receptors, as coaggregation of FcγRI/FcγRII/CD13 induced a belated but significant ROS production. Together, these

  2. Measurement of the cross section for high-pT hadron production in the scattering of 160-GeV/c muons off nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novakova, C.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmïden, H.; Schmitt, L.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-11-01

    The differential cross section for the production of charged hadrons with high transverse momenta in the scattering of 160GeV/c muons off nucleons at low photon virtualities has been measured at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The results, which cover transverse momenta from 1.1GeV/c to 3.6GeV/c, are compared to a perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) calculation, in order to evaluate the applicability of pQCD to this process in the kinematic domain of the experiment. The shape of the calculated differential cross section as a function of transverse momentum is found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, but the absolute scale is underestimated by next-to-leading order pQCD. The inclusion of all-order resummation of large logarithmic threshold corrections reduces the discrepancy from a factor of 3 to 4 to a factor of 2. The dependence of the cross section on the pseudorapidity and on the virtual photon energy fraction is investigated. Finally the dependence on the charge of the hadrons is discussed.

  3. Comparative embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of the herbicide diuron and its metabolites in early life stages of Crassostrea gigas: Implication of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Daphné; Rouxel, Julien; Burgeot, Thierry; Akcha, Farida

    2016-06-01

    Herbicides are one of the major classes of pollutants contaminating coastal waters over the world. Among them, diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a phenylurea herbicide frequently detected in oyster-producing area, known to be toxic for this important exploited non-target species. With the aim to investigate the mechanisms by which diuron displays its toxicity in oyster, the implication of both biotransformation and oxygen reactive species (ROS) production was studied considering embryotoxicity and genotoxicity as endpoints. Comparative embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of diuron and its main metabolites (DCPMU, DCPU and 3,4-DCA) were thus studied on oyster larvae by the embryo-larval bioassay on D larvae and the comet assay on trochophore larvae, respectively. Exposures were also performed in presence and absence of known ROS scavenger compounds - ascorbic acid and N-acetylcysteine, to evaluate the involvement of oxyradicals in the toxic responses. In the case of diuron, the production of ROS on exposed oyster larvae was also measured using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as a probe for flow cytometric analysis. The results we obtained showed the embryotoxicity and genotoxicity of diuron and its metabolites in early life stages of the Pacific oyster. For concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.5μgL(-1), diuron appeared significantly more embryotoxic than DCPMU and DCPU (p<0.001). Embryotoxicity decreased with diuron metabolism as follows: diuron≥DCPMU=DCPU, highlighting that biotransformation can constitute a true detoxication pathways in oyster larvae by decreasing the toxicity of the parent compound. In the opposite, no difference was observed between diuron and its metabolites concerning larval development when considering a lower and more environmentally realistic range of concentrations (0.002-0.050μgL(-1)). 3,4-DCA was the only compound that did not show any sign of embryotoxicity, even at concentrations up to 5μgL(-1

  4. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  5. Recombinant Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Prevents Aberrant Ca2+ Leakage through the Ryanodine Receptor by Suppressing Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Induced by Isoproterenol in Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Takehisa; Nanno, Takuma; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kato, Takayoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus enhancing diastolic Ca2+ leakage through the ryanodine receptor during heart failure (HF). However, little is known regarding the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on ROS generation and Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which an exogenous ANP exerts cardioprotective effects during HF. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricles of a canine tachycardia-induced HF model and sham-operated vehicle controls. The degree of mitochondrial oxidized DNA was evaluated by double immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using an anti-VDAC antibody for the mitochondria and an anti-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine antibody for oxidized DNA. The effect of ANP on ROS was investigated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, diastolic Ca2+ sparks assessed by confocal microscopy using Fluo 4-AM, and the survival rate of myocytes after 48 h. The double IHC study revealed that isoproterenol (ISO) markedly increased oxidized DNA in the mitochondria in HF and that the ISO-induced DNA damage was markedly i