Science.gov

Sample records for reactor demo goals

  1. Design of the DEMO Fusion Reactor Following ITER

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.; McFadden, Geoffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Runs of the NSTAB nonlinear stability code show there are many three-dimensional (3D) solutions of the advanced tokamak problem subject to axially symmetric boundary conditions. These numerical simulations based on mathematical equations in conservation form predict that the ITER international tokamak project will encounter persistent disruptions and edge localized mode (ELMS) crashes. Test particle runs of the TRAN transport code suggest that for quasineutrality to prevail in tokamaks a certain minimum level of 3D asymmetry of the magnetic spectrum is required which is comparable to that found in quasiaxially symmetric (QAS) stellarators. The computational theory suggests that a QAS stellarator with two field periods and proportions like those of ITER is a good candidate for a fusion reactor. For a demonstration reactor (DEMO) we seek an experiment that combines the best features of ITER, with a system of QAS coils providing external rotational transform, which is a measure of the poloidal field. We have discovered a configuration with unusually good quasisymmetry that is ideal for this task. PMID:27504224

  2. Design of the DEMO Fusion Reactor Following ITER.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Paul R; McFadden, Geoffrey B

    2009-01-01

    Runs of the NSTAB nonlinear stability code show there are many three-dimensional (3D) solutions of the advanced tokamak problem subject to axially symmetric boundary conditions. These numerical simulations based on mathematical equations in conservation form predict that the ITER international tokamak project will encounter persistent disruptions and edge localized mode (ELMS) crashes. Test particle runs of the TRAN transport code suggest that for quasineutrality to prevail in tokamaks a certain minimum level of 3D asymmetry of the magnetic spectrum is required which is comparable to that found in quasiaxially symmetric (QAS) stellarators. The computational theory suggests that a QAS stellarator with two field periods and proportions like those of ITER is a good candidate for a fusion reactor. For a demonstration reactor (DEMO) we seek an experiment that combines the best features of ITER, with a system of QAS coils providing external rotational transform, which is a measure of the poloidal field. We have discovered a configuration with unusually good quasisymmetry that is ideal for this task.

  3. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    PubMed

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  4. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R.

    2014-02-15

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  5. Overview of the Russian DEMO plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    1994-12-31

    The activities on conceptual study of fusion DEMO-reactor were started in Russia in 1992. The goal of the study is to establish the engineering and plasma physics parameters and technical characteristics of DEMO-reactor. Design of DEMO-reactor is to be based with reasonable extrapolation on the technical and physical basis of ITER. The requirements of the DEMO-reactor would allow to specify ITER test program and its technical and operational characteristics. Two options of DEMO reactor are under consideration: DEMO-P with pulsed mode of operation and DEMO-S for steady state operation. Main design efforts are put on the study of DEMO-P rector with R=6.95 m, a=2.1 m, k(95%)=1.8, B=6.86 T, P=3345 MW, F=2.91 MW/m{sup 2}. Mainly plasma physics study of the feasibility of DEMO-S with the current drive due to the bootstrap current was done. Its parameters are R=9.0 m, a=2.0 m, B=9.0 T, P=3760 MW, I=9.3 MA.

  6. Selected transport studies of a tokamak-based DEMO fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Wenninger, R.; Kemp, R.

    2017-02-01

    As a next-step in the tokamak-based fusion programme, the DEMO fusion reactor is foreseen to produce relevant output electricity, in the order of  ∼500 MW delivered to the network. The scenarios that are being presently investigated consist of a pulsed device, called DEMO1, and a steady-state device, called DEMO2. In this work, which is focused on the pulsed device DEMO1, scenarios are studied from the point of view of core transport, to assess plasma performance and limitations due to core microinstabilities. The role of radiated power, aspect ratio, and height of temperature pedestal are assessed as they impact both core energy and particle transport. Open issues in this framework are also discussed.

  7. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump to avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.

  8. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2015-03-25

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump tomore » avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet.« less

  9. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2014-08-21

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and γ–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  10. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is -0.349% for the HCPB blanket and -0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  11. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2015-12-10

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is −0.349% for the HCPB blanket and −0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  12. Development of fusion blanket technology for the DEMO reactor.

    PubMed

    Colling, B R; Monk, S D

    2012-07-01

    The viability of various materials and blanket designs for use in nuclear fusion reactors can be tested using computer simulations and as parts of the test blanket modules within the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) facility. The work presented here focuses on blanket model simulations using the Monte Carlo simulation package MCNPX (Computational Physics Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2010) and FISPACT (Forrest, 2007) to evaluate the tritium breeding capability of a number of solid and liquid breeding materials. The liquid/molten salt breeders are found to have the higher tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and are to be considered for further analysis of the self sufficiency timing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Considerations for the development of neutral beam injection for fusion reactors or DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.; Boilson, D.

    2017-08-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) has been the most successful heating scheme applied to fusion devices, the majority of which have been based on the acceleration and neutralization in a gas target of accelerated positive ions. For large fusion devices such as ITER, DEMO and fusion reactors, beam energies of the order of 0.5 MeV per nucleon or higher are required to penetrate deeply into the fusing plasma, and thus to heat the plasma in the most important region, i.e. near the poloidal axis of the device, and to drive current in the plasma. Because the efficiency of neutralization of positive ions in a gas target becomes unacceptably low at energies above ≈100 keV/nucleon, future injectors will be based on the neutralization of negative ions, either in a gas target, by photons or in a plasma target. So far only two systems based on negative ions have been used on fusion devices, at JT-60U and at LHD, both based on neutralization in a gas target. The injectors for ITER will also use a gas target, but the energy and operating environment are reactor and DEMO relevant. Also the ITER injectors will have to operate for pulse lengths orders of magnitude higher than all previous NBI systems. In this paper the R&D required for an NBI system for a reactor, or DEMO, is considered against the background of the ITER NBI system development, and the main elements of the required R&D are identified.

  14. Materials for DEMO and reactor applications—boundary conditions and new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Antusch, S.; Aumann, M.; Biel, W.; Du, J.; Engels, J.; Heuer, S.; Houben, A.; Hoeschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Koch, F.; Linke, J.; Litnovsky, A.; Mao, Y.; Neu, R.; Pintsuk, G.; Riesch, J.; Rasinski, M.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.; Terra, A.; Unterberg, B.; Weber, Th; Wegener, T.; You, J.-H.; Linsmeier, Ch

    2016-02-01

    DEMO is the name for the first stage prototype fusion reactor considered to be the next step after ITER towards realizing fusion. For the realization of fusion energy especially, materials questions pose a significant challenge already today. Heat, particle and neutron loads are a significant problem to material lifetime when extrapolating to DEMO. For many of the issues faced, advanced materials solutions are under discussion or already under development. In particular, components such as the first wall and the divertor of the reactor can benefit from introducing new approaches such as composites or new alloys into the discussion. Cracking, oxidation as well as fuel management are driving issues when deciding for new materials. Here {{{W}}}{{f}}/{{W}} composites as well as strengthened CuCrZr components together with oxidation resilient tungsten alloys allow the step towards a fusion reactor. In addition, neutron induced effects such as transmutation, embrittlement and after-heat and activation are essential. Therefore, when designing a component an approach taking into account all aspects is required.

  15. Status of EC solid breeder blanket designs and R&D for DEMO fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dalle Donne, M.; Anziedi, L.A.; Kwast, H.

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of the European Community Fusion Technology Program four blanket concepts for a DEMO reactor are being investigated. DEMO is the next step after ITER. It should ensure tritium self-sufficiency and operate at coolant temperatures high enough to have a reasonable plant efficiency. Further requirements have been specified for the four concepts, namely an average neutron wall load of 2.2 MW/m{sup 2}, a blanket lifetime of 20000 hours and the capability of the blanket segment to withstand the forces caused by a rapid distribution of the plasma current (20 MA to zero in 20 ms), so that after the disruption the segment can still allow a comparison of the various options, in view of reducing this number to two in 1995 and to design and develop modules and articles representative of the chosen blankets to be tested in ITER. The present paper deals with two solid breeder concepts. They have many features in common: both use high pressure helium as coolant and helium to purge the tritium from the breeder material, martensitic steel as structural material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. The configuration of the two blankets are however different: in the B.I.T. (Breeder Inside Tube) concept the breeder material is LiAlO{sub 2} or LiZrO{sub 3} in the form of annular pellets contained in tubes surrounded by beryllium blocks, the coolant helium being outside the tubes, whereas in the B.O.T. (Breeder out of Tube) the breeder and multiplier material are Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and beryllium pebbles forming a mixed bed placed outside the tubes containing the coolant helium.

  16. Mitigation of the divertor heat load in DEMO reactor by impurity seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes integrated numerical modeling applied to DEMO discharges with tungsten wall in slab geometry, rather than the full X-point geometry of the DEMO design, using the COREDIV code. Calculations are performed for inductive DEMO scenario with Ne, Ar and Ni seeding for different radial diffusion coefficients in the SOL region, and different pinch velocities for impurities in the core. Simulations show only for Ar and Ni, with high enough radial diffusion in the SOL, it is possible to achieve H-mode plasma operation (power to the SOL > L-H transition threshold power) with acceptable level of the power to the target plates. For neon seeding such regime of operation seems not to be possible.

  17. Neutronic design studies of a conceptual DCLL fusion reactor for a DEMO and a commercial power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutronic analyses or, more widely, nuclear analyses have been performed for the development of a dual-coolant He/LiPb (DCLL) conceptual design reactor. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model has been examined and optimized. The design is based on the plasma parameters and functional materials of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) model C. The initial radial-build for the detailed model has been determined according to the dimensions established in a previous work on an equivalent simplified homogenized reactor model. For optimization purposes, the initial specifications established over the simplified model have been refined on the detailed 3D design, modifying material and dimension of breeding blanket, shield and vacuum vessel in order to fulfil the priority requirements of a fusion reactor in terms of the fundamental neutronic responses. Tritium breeding ratio, energy multiplication factor, radiation limits in the TF coils, helium production and displacements per atom (dpa) have been calculated in order to demonstrate the functionality and viability of the reactor design in guaranteeing tritium self-sufficiency, power efficiency, plasma confinement, and re-weldability and structural integrity of the components. The paper describes the neutronic design improvements of the DCLL reactor, obtaining results for both DEMO and power plant operational scenarios.

  18. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin, V. L.

    2013-02-15

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  19. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  20. Methods and strategies for future reactor safety goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Steven Andrew

    There have been significant discussions over the past few years by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and others as to the adequacy of the NRC safety goals for use with the next generation of nuclear power reactors to be built in the United States. The NRC, in its safety goals policy statement, has provided general qualitative safety goals and basic quantitative health objectives (QHOs) for nuclear reactors in the United States. Risk metrics such as core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF) have been used as surrogates for the QHOs. In its review of the new plant licensing policy the ACRS has looked at the safety goals, as has the NRC. A number of issues have been raised including what the Commission had in mind when it drafted the safety goals and QHOs, how risk from multiple reactors at a site should be combined for evaluation, how the combination of a new and old reactor at the same site should be evaluated, what the criteria for evaluating new reactors should be, and whether new reactors should be required to be safer than current generation reactors. As part of the development and application of the NRC safety goal policy statement the Commissioners laid out the expectations for the safety of a nuclear power plant but did not address the risk associated with current multi-unit sites, potential modular reactor sites, and hybrid sites that could contain current generation reactors, new passive reactors, and/or modular reactors. The NRC safety goals and the QHOs refer to a "nuclear power plant," but do not discuss whether a "plant" refers to only a single unit or all of the units on a site. There has been much discussion on this issue recently due to the development of modular reactors. Additionally, the risk of multiple reactor accidents on the same site has been largely ignored in the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) done to date, and in most risk

  1. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for the tritium breeding ratio of a DEMO fusion reactor with a helium cooled pebble bed blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunnenmann, Elena; Fischer, Ulrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2017-09-01

    An uncertainty analysis was performed for the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of a fusion power plant of the European DEMO type using the MCSEN patch to the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The breeding blanket was of the type Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB), currently under development in the European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) programme for a fusion power demonstration reactor (DEMO). A suitable 3D model of the DEMO reactor with HCPB blanket modules, as routinely used for blanket design calculations, was employed. The nuclear cross-section data were taken from the JEFF-3.2 data library. For the uncertainty analysis, the isotopes H-1, Li-6, Li-7, Be-9, O-16, Si-28, Si-29, Si-30, Cr-52, Fe-54, Fe-56, Ni-58, W-182, W-183, W-184 and W-186 were considered. The covariance data were taken from JEFF-3.2 where available. Otherwise a combination of FENDL-2.1 for Li-7, EFF-3 for Be-9 and JENDL-3.2 for O-16 were compared with data from TENDL-2014. Another comparison was performed with covariance data from JEFF-3.3T1. The analyses show an overall uncertainty of ± 3.2% for the TBR when using JEFF-3.2 covariance data with the mentioned additions. When using TENDL-2014 covariance data as replacement, the uncertainty increases to ± 8.6%. For JEFF-3.3T1 the uncertainty result is ± 5.6%. The uncertainty is dominated by O-16, Li-6 and Li-7 cross-sections.

  2. R&D around a photoneutralizer-based NBI system (Siphore) in view of a DEMO Tokamak steady state fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, A.; Achard, Jocelyn; Achkasov, K.; Bechu, S.; Baudouin, C.; Baulaigue, O.; Blondel, C.; Boeuf, J. P.; Bresteau, D.; Cartry, G.; Chaibi, W.; Drag, C.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Fiorucci, D.; Fubiani, G.; Furno, I.; Futtersack, R.; Garibaldi, P.; Gicquel, A.; Grand, C.; Guittienne, Ph.; Hagelaar, G.; Howling, A.; Jacquier, R.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Lemoine, D.; Lepetit, B.; Minea, T.; Odic, E.; Revel, A.; Soliman, B. A.; Teste, P.

    2015-11-01

    Since the signature of the ITER treaty in 2006, a new research programme targeting the emergence of a new generation of neutral beam (NB) system for the future fusion reactor (DEMO Tokamak) has been underway between several laboratories in Europe. The specifications required to operate a NB system on DEMO are very demanding: the system has to provide plasma heating, current drive and plasma control at a very high level of power (up to 150 MW) and energy (1 or 2 MeV), including high performances in term of wall-plug efficiency (η  >  60%), high availability and reliability. To this aim, a novel NB concept based on the photodetachment of the energetic negative ion beam is under study. The keystone of this new concept is the achievement of a photoneutralizer where a high power photon flux (~3 MW) generated within a Fabry-Perot cavity will overlap, cross and partially photodetach the intense negative ion beam accelerated at high energy (1 or 2 MeV). The aspect ratio of the beam-line (source, accelerator, etc) is specifically designed to maximize the overlap of the photon beam with the ion beam. It is shown that such a photoneutralized based NB system would have the capability to provide several tens of MW of D0 per beam line with a wall-plug efficiency higher than 60%. A feasibility study of the concept has been launched between different laboratories to address the different physics aspects, i.e. negative ion source, plasma modelling, ion accelerator simulation, photoneutralization and high voltage holding under vacuum. The paper describes the present status of the project and the main achievements of the developments in laboratories.

  3. Conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO Neutral Beam Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Fantz, U.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Simonin, A.; Tran, M. Q.

    2016-12-01

    DEMO (DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant) is a proposed nuclear fusion power plant that is intended to follow the ITER experimental reactor. The main goal of DEMO will be to demonstrate the possibility to produce electric energy from the fusion reaction. The injection of high energy neutral beams is one of the main tools to heat the plasma up to fusion conditions. A conceptual design of the Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor, is currently being developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. High efficiency and low recirculating power, which are fundamental requirements for the success of DEMO, have been taken into special consideration for the DEMO NBI. Moreover, particular attention has been paid to the issues related to reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability. A conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO NBI is here presented featuring 20 sub-sources (two adjacent columns of 10 sub-sources each), following a modular design concept, with each sub-source featuring its radio frequency driver, capable of increasing the reliability and availability of the DEMO NBI. Copper grids with increasing size of the apertures have been adopted in the accelerator, with three main layouts of the apertures (circular apertures, slotted apertures and frame-like apertures for each sub-source). This design, permitting to significantly decrease the stripping losses in the accelerator without spoiling the beam optics, has been investigated with a self-consistent model able to study at the same time the magnetic field, the electrostatic field and the trajectory of the negative ions. Moreover, the status on the R&D carried out in Europe on the ion sources is presented.

  4. Computer aided design of operational units for tritium recovery from Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} blanket of a DEMO fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malara, C.

    1995-03-01

    The problem of tritium recovery from Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} blanket of a DEMO fusion reactor is analyzed with the objective of limiting tritium permeation into the cooling water to acceptable levels. To this aim, a mathematical model describing the tritium behavior in blanket/recovery unit circuit has been formulated. By solving the model equations, tritium permeation rate into the cooling water and tritium inventory in the blanket are evaluated as a function of dimensionless parameters describing the combined effects of overall resistance for tritium transfer from Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} alloy to cooling water, circulating rate of the molten alloy in blanket/recovery unit circuit and extraction efficiency of tritium recovery unit. The extraction efficiency is, in turn, evaluated as a function of the operating conditions of recovery unit. The design of tritium recovery unit is then optimized on the basis of the above parametric analysis and the results are herein reported and discussed for a tritium permeation limit of 10 g/day into the cooling water. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  6. Diagnostic systems in DEMO: Engineering design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, T. N.

    2014-08-21

    The diagnostic systems of DEMO that are mounted on or near the torus, whether intended for the monitoring and control functions of the engineering aspects or the physics behaviour of the machine, will have to be designed to suit the hostile nuclear environment. This will be necessary not just for their survival and correct functioning but also to satisfy the pertinent regulatory bodies, especially where any of them relate to machine protection or the prevention or mitigation of accidents foreseen in the safety case. This paper aims to indicate the more important of the reactor design considerations that are likely to apply to diagnostics for DEMO, drawn from experience on JET, the provisions in hand for ITER and modelling results for the wall erosion and neutron damage effects in DEMO.

  7. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  8. Plant Models for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonnier, David

    2008-03-01

    The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs for commercial fusion power plants. It focused on five power plant models, named PPCS A, B, AB, C and D, which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. The PPCS study highlighted the need for specific design and R&D activities as well as the need to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first fusion power plant. An assessment of the PPCS models with limited extrapolations has led to the clarification of the objectives of DEMO. Many parameters will have to be controlled in DEMO in order (1) to control the machine, (2) to satisfy the testing requirements, (3) to satisfy regulatory requirements (primarily safety), and (4) to protect the investment. On the other, DEMO will ulilise one or two plasma scenarios only.

  9. Plant Models for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Maisonnier, David

    2008-03-12

    The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs for commercial fusion power plants. It focused on five power plant models, named PPCS A, B, AB, C and D, which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. The PPCS study highlighted the need for specific design and R and D activities as well as the need to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first fusion power plant. An assessment of the PPCS models with limited extrapolations has led to the clarification of the objectives of DEMO. Many parameters will have to be controlled in DEMO in order (1) to control the machine, (2) to satisfy the testing requirements, (3) to satisfy regulatory requirements (primarily safety), and (4) to protect the investment. On the other, DEMO will ulilise one or two plasma scenarios only.

  10. Advances in the physics basis for the European DEMO design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Angioni, C.; Artaud, J.-F.; Bernert, M.; Fable, E.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Jenko, F.; Maget, P.; Mattei, M.; Maviglia, F.; Poli, E.; Ramogida, G.; Reux, C.; Schneider, M.; Sieglin, B.; Villone, F.; Wischmeier, M.; Zohm, H.

    2015-06-01

    In the European fusion roadmap, ITER is followed by a demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO), for which a conceptual design is under development. This paper reports the first results of a coherent effort to develop the relevant physics knowledge for that (DEMO Physics Basis), carried out by European experts. The program currently includes investigations in the areas of scenario modeling, transport, MHD, heating & current drive, fast particles, plasma wall interaction and disruptions.

  11. Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, Randy; Mays, Gary T; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Poore III, Willis P

    2013-12-01

    This analysis identifies candidate locations, in a broad sense, where there are high concentrations of federal government agency use of electricity, which are also suitable areas for near-term SMRs. Near-term SMRs are based on light-water reactor (LWR) technology with compact design features that are expected to offer a host of safety, siting, construction, and economic benefits. These smaller plants are ideally suited for small electric grids and for locations that cannot support large reactors, thus providing utilities or governement entities with the flexibility to scale power production as demand changes by adding additional power by deploying more modules or reactors in phases. This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights to assist the federal government in meeting federal clean energy goals.

  12. The Federal Republic of Germany an example of implementing the reactor safety goals

    SciTech Connect

    Schoels, H.

    1993-12-31

    The conerstone of the nuclear safety concept is the danger potentials hidden in the fission products. The main goal is the protection of the public and personnel from radiation. Four safety levels implemented in the Federal Republic of germany`s reactor safety program are described. The particular physics laws of the fission process make our technology a highly dangerous one whose use calls for extraordinary intellectual and technical efforts as well as investments.

  13. Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David A.; Phillips, Prudence

    1985-01-01

    Presents two discussions which focus on the rationale for and goals of teaching electrochemistry at high school and college levels. The first is "Electrochemistry" by Ronald Perkins and the second is "Goals in Teaching Electrochemistry" by J. T. Maloy. (JN)

  14. Overview of the Demo III UGV program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Chuck M.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    1998-08-01

    Planning for future military capabilities assumes the availability of highly mobile, agile, rapidly deployable forces. Incorporation of robotic systems into future force structure to reduce casualties, increase tactical reach, counter battle fatigue, and reduce logistics burdens for rapid reaction forces offers one potential pathway for achieving this goal. The Demo III Unmanned Ground Vehicle Program is designed to advance and demonstrate the technology required to develop future unmanned ground combat vehicles through three major thrusts: (1) concerted technology development; (2) modeling, simulation and experimentation; and (3) technology integration and evaluation with users. Demo III focuses on demonstration of technology that will enable the development of small, highly agile, unmanned vehicles capable of off-road, semi- autonomous operation at speeds of up to 32 km/hr during daylight and 16 km/hr at night by summer 2001.

  15. Organic loading rate and food-to-microorganism ratio shape prokaryotic diversity in a demo-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Araújo, Juliana C; Almeida, Paulo G S; Chernicharo, Carlos A L; Sanz, José L; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the microbial community in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating domestic wastewater (DW) during two different periods of organic loading rate (OLR) and food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratio. 16S rDNA clone libraries were generated, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses were performed. Fluctuations in the OLR and F/M ratio affected the abundance and the composition of the UASB prokaryotic community, mainly at the species level, as well as the performance of the UASB reactor. The qPCR analysis suggested that there was a decrease in the bacterial cell number during the rainy season, when the OLR and F/M ratio were lower. However, the bacterial diversity was higher during this time, suggesting that the community degraded more diversified substrates. The diversity and the abundance of the archaeal community were higher when the F/M ratio was lower. Shifts in the methanogenic community composition might have influenced the route of methane production, with methane produced by acetotrophic methanogens (dry season), and by hydrogenotrophic, methylotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens (rainy season). This study revealed higher levels of bacterial diversity, metabolic specialization and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of the DW UASB reactor during the rainy season.

  16. Availability Considerations in the Design of K-DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas; Im, Kim; Kessel, Charles; Kim, K.; Neilson, George H.; Park, J-S.; Titus, Peter

    2014-09-01

    A DEMO device has been considered the next step following ITER as a near-term prototypical reactor design that is tritium self-sufficient and produces a limited amount of net electricity. The machine maintenance approach and planned configuration concept plays a major role in establishing the design point. DEMO will also need to show that adequate operating availability can be achieved over a reasonable time period, as a last step before full-scale electricity production. The ability to operate with high availability/reliability plays a key ingredient in defining the DEMO configuration, fostering the need for rapid removal/replacement of limited-life in-vessel components. DEMO pre-conceptual studies are being carried out by South Korea (with US participation) and other countries. The device designs span a range of maintenance approaches from full radial extraction of large in-vessel modules through all TF horizontal openings to vertical maintenance of segmented in-vessel components. Progress made on the S. Korea's K-DEMO design will be provided with emphasis on the design choices identified to promote high availability.

  17. UGV/Demo II Program: status through Demo C and Demo II preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkeby, Steve H.; Spofford, John R.

    1996-05-01

    The unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) demonstration C was completed in July of 1995. This was the third of four planned UGV/Demo II demonstrations. Demonstration C highlighted multivehicle premission planning, mission execution monitoring, multivehicle mobility cooperation, target detection from moving and stationary platforms, obstacle avoidance, obstacle map sharing, stealthy movement, autonomous turnaround, formation control/zone security, cooperative reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition, and hill cresting. This demonstration was the first to have two autonomous vehicles working cooperatively while performing a militarily relevant mission. This paper begins with a background of the UGV program and then focuses on Demo C. The paper finishes with an overview of the Demo II missions.

  18. The DEMO wall load challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m‑2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m‑2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m‑2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6–0.8 MW m‑2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  19. Fast wave current drive in DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eestera, D.; Messiaen, A.; Collaboration: EFDA-PPPT Contributors

    2014-02-12

    The ability to non-inductively drive a large fraction of the toroidal plasma current in magnetically confined plasmas is an essential requirement for steady state fusion reactors such as DEMO. Besides neutral beam injection (NBI), electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and lower hybrid wave heating (LH), ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a promising candidate to drive current, in particular at the high temperatures expected in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the current drive (CD) efficiencies calculated with coupled ICRF wave / CD numerical codes for the DEMO-1 design case (R{sub 0}=9m, B{sub 0}=6.8T, a{sub p}=2.25m) [1] are presented. It will be shown that although promising CD efficiencies can be obtained in the usual ICRF frequency domain (20-100MHz) by shifting the dominant ion-cyclotron absorption layers to the high-field side, operation at higher frequencies (100-300MHz) has a stronger CD potential, provided the parasitic RF power absorption of the alpha particles can be minimized.

  20. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  1. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  2. Reliability and availability requirements analysis for DEMO: fuel cycle system

    SciTech Connect

    Pinna, T.; Borgognoni, F.

    2015-03-15

    The Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) will be a fusion reactor prototype designed to demonstrate the capability to produce electrical power in a commercially acceptable way. Two of the key elements of the engineering development of the DEMO reactor are the definitions of reliability and availability requirements (or targets). The availability target for a hypothesized Fuel Cycle has been analysed as a test case. The analysis has been done on the basis of the experience gained in operating existing tokamak fusion reactors and developing the ITER design. Plant Breakdown Structure (PBS) and Functional Breakdown Structure (FBS) related to the DEMO Fuel Cycle and correlations between PBS and FBS have been identified. At first, a set of availability targets has been allocated to the various systems on the basis of their operating, protection and safety functions. 75% and 85% of availability has been allocated to the operating functions of fuelling system and tritium plant respectively. 99% of availability has been allocated to the overall systems in executing their safety functions. The chances of the systems to achieve the allocated targets have then been investigated through a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis and Reliability Block Diagram analysis. The following results have been obtained: 1) the target of 75% for the operations of the fuelling system looks reasonable, while the target of 85% for the operations of the whole tritium plant should be reduced to 80%, even though all the tritium plant systems can individually reach quite high availability targets, over 90% - 95%; 2) all the DEMO Fuel Cycle systems can reach the target of 99% in accomplishing their safety functions. (authors)

  3. Terrain Perception for DEMO III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, R.; Bellutta, P.; Matthies, L.; Owens, K.; Rankin, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Demo III program has as its primary focus the development of autonomous mobility for a small rugged cross country vehicle. In this paper we report recent progress on both stereo-based obstacle detection and terrain cover color-based classification.

  4. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  5. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-01

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper.

  6. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper.

  7. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the DEMO FW module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igitkhanov, Yu; Fetzer, R.; Boccaccini, L.; Bazylev, B.

    2015-10-01

    Thermomechanical performance of the first wall (FW) W/EUROFER sandwich type module is analyzed under DEMO reactor conditions. Engineering heat loads to the FW panels are estimated for steady state operation with the edge localized modes (ELMs). Calculations carried out by MEMOS code show the inhomogeneity of the material temperature due to discrete location of the water cooling tubes embedded into EUROFER. The hot spots are formed in the W armor and EUROFER between the cooling sectors and depend on the distance of their mutual locations. The bending stress due to vertical temperature gradients in W and EUROFER layers is calculated and remains smaller than the ultimate tensile stress for expected temperatures. Calculations show that under the Type I ELMs expected in DEMO the W surface melts at the ELMs peak positions and solidifies between ELMs. There is no temperature difference found between hot and cool spots during ELMs.

  8. Compact DEMO, SlimCS: design progress and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Enoeda, M.; Kawashima, H.; Kurita, G.; Tanigawa, H.; Nakamura, H.; Honda, M.; Saito, A.; Sato, S.; Hayashi, T.; Asakura, N.; Sakurai, S.; Nishitani, T.; Ozeki, T.; Ando, M.; Ezato, K.; Hamamatsu, K.; Hirose, T.; Hoshino, T.; Ide, S.; Inoue, T.; Isono, T.; Liu, C.; Kakudate, S.; Kawamura, Y.; Mori, S.; Nakamichi, M.; Nishi, H.; Nozawa, T.; Ochiai, K.; Ogiwara, H.; Oyama, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Seki, Y.; Shibama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Tsuru, D.; Yamanishi, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2009-07-01

    The design progress in a compact low aspect ratio (low A) DEMO reactor, 'SlimCS', and its design issues are reported. The design study focused mainly on the torus configuration including the blanket, divertor, materials and maintenance scheme. For continuity with the Japanese ITER-TBM, the blanket is based on a water-cooled solid breeder blanket. For vertical stability of the elongated plasma and high beta access, the blanket is segmented into replaceable and permanent blankets and a sector-wide conducting shell is arranged inbetween these blankets. A numerical calculation indicates that fuel self-sufficiency can be satisfied when the blanket interior is ideally fabricated. An allowable heat load to the divertor plate should be 8 MW m-2 or lower, which can be a critical constraint for determining a handling power of DEMO.

  9. Experimental Measurements of the Demo Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    JB Fahnline; W Holmberg; G Seeger; RL Campbell; SA Hambric

    2004-02-05

    The ''demo enclosure'' is a small box constructed at ARL/PSU to simulate the basic characteristics of an equipment enclosure, but without the complexity of an actual enclosure. In the general case, an equipment enclosure can house a variety of electrical equipment, including transformers, card racks, etc., usually mounted on shelves. They are primarily interested in investigating the best way to mount the shelves in the enclosure to mitigate sound radiation due to the excitation from the electrical equipment. A secondary goal is to assess methods for modeling the structural properties of interconnected shelves and cabinets along with the electrical equipment. In this report, they will concentrate on the extensive experimental measurements made during the investigation.

  10. Conceptual design of the DEMO neutral beam injectors: main developments and R&D achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Cismondi, F.; Fantz, U.; Fassina, A.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Hopf, C.; Jenkins, I.; Sartori, E.; Tran, M. Q.; Varje, J.; Vincenzi, P.; Zanotto, L.

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of the nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, to be built after the ITER experimental reactor, are usually understood to lie somewhere between those of ITER and a ‘first of a kind’ commercial plant. Hence, in DEMO the issues related to efficiency and RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) are among the most important drivers for the design, as the cost of the electricity produced by this power plant will strongly depend on these aspects. In the framework of the EUROfusion Work Package Heating and Current Drive within the Power Plant Physics and Development activities, a conceptual design of the neutral beam injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor has been developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. In order to improve efficiency and RAMI aspects, several innovative solutions have been introduced in comparison to the ITER NBI, mainly regarding the beam source, neutralizer and vacuum pumping systems.

  11. Thomson scattering for core plasma on DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, E. E.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Litvinov, A. E.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Semenov, V. V.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Andrew, P.

    2014-08-21

    This paper describes the challenges of Thomson scattering implementation for core plasma on DEMO and evaluates the capability to measure extremely high electron temperature range 0.5-40keV. A number of solutions to be developed for ITER diagnostics are suggested in consideration of their realization for DEMO. New approaches suggested for DEMO may also be of interest to ITER and currently operating magnetic confinement devices.

  12. Diagnostics and control for the steady state and pulsed tokamak DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsitto, F. P.; Villari, R.; Moro, F.; Todd, T. N.; Lilley, S.; Jenkins, I.; Felton, R.; Biel, W.; Silva, A.; Scholz, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Duran, I.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Morlock, C.; Federici, G.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper is devoted to a first assessment of the DEMO diagnostics systems and controls in the context of pulsed and steady state reactor design under study in Europe. In particular, the main arguments treated are: (i) The quantities to be measured in DEMO and the requirements for the measurements; (ii) the present capability of the diagnostic and control technology, determining the most urgent gaps, and (iii) the program and strategy of the research and development (R&D) needed to fill the gaps. Burn control, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and basic machine protection require improvements to the ITER technology, and moderated efforts in R&D can be dedicated to infrared diagnostics (reflectometry, electron cyclotron emission, polarimetry) and neutron diagnostics. Metallic Hall sensors appear to be a promising candidate for magnetic measurements in the high neutron fluence and long/steady state discharges of DEMO.

  13. Design concept of K-DEMO for near-term implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Im, K.; Kim, H. C.; Oh, S.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.; Lee, Y. S.; Yeom, J. H.; Lee, C.; Lee, G.-S.; Neilson, G.; Kessel, C.; Brown, T.; Titus, P.; Mikkelsen, D.; Zhai, Y.

    2015-05-01

    A Korean fusion energy development promotion law (FEDPL) was enacted in 2007. As a following step, a conceptual design study for a steady-state Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) was initiated in 2012. After the thorough 0D system analysis, the parameters of the main machine characterized by the major and minor radii of 6.8 and 2.1 m, respectively, were chosen for further study. The analyses of heating and current drives were performed for the development of the plasma operation scenarios. Preliminary results on lower hybrid and neutral beam current drive are included herein. A high performance Nb3Sn-based superconducting conductor is adopted, providing a peak magnetic field approaching 16 T with the magnetic field at the plasma centre above 7 T. Pressurized water is the prominent choice for the main coolant of K-DEMO when the balance of plant development details is considered. The blanket system adopts a ceramic pebble type breeder. Considering plasma performance, a double-null divertor is the reference configuration choice of K-DEMO. For a high availability operation, K-DEMO incorporates a design with vertical maintenance. A design concept for K-DEMO is presented together with the preliminary design parameters.

  14. Jefferson Laboratory IR Demo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    1997-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 5 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power for Navy defense and industrial applications. The accelerator system for this IR demo includes a 10 MeV photocathode-based injector, a 32 MeV CEBAF-style superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport that accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Following commissioning, the laser output will be extended to an operating range of 3-to-6.6 microns, and distributed to six labs in a user facility built with funds from the Commonwealth of Virginia. A description of the machine and facility and the project status are presented.

  15. Design of the helium cooled lithium lead breeding blanket in CEA: from TBM to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, G.; Aubert, J.; Forest, L.; Jaboulay, J.-C.; Li Puma, A.; Boccaccini, L. V.

    2017-04-01

    The helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) blanket concept was originally developed in CEA at the beginning of 2000: it is one of the two European blanket concepts to be tested in ITER in the form of a test blanket module (TBM) and one of the four blanket concepts currently being considered for the DEMOnstration reactor that will follow ITER. The TBM is a highly optimized component for the ITER environment that will provide crucial information for the development of the DEMO blanket, but its design needs to be adapted to the DEMO reactor. With respect to the TBM design, reduction of the steel content in the breeding zone (BZ) is sought in order to maximize tritium breeding reactions. Different options are being studied, with the potential of reaching tritium breeding ratio (TBR) values up to 1.21. At the same time, the design of the back supporting structure (BSS), which is a DEMO specific component that has to support the blanket modules inside the vacuum vessel (VV), is ongoing with the aim of maximizing the shielding power and minimizing pumping power. This implies a re-engineering of the modules’ attachment system. Design changes however, will have an impact on the manufacturing and assembly sequences that are being developed for the HCLL-TBM. Due to the differences in joint configurations, thicknesses to be welded, heat dissipation and the various technical constraints related to the accessibility of the welding tools and implementation of non-destructive examination (NDE), the manufacturing procedure should be adapted and optimized for DEMO design. Laser welding instead of TIG could be an option to reduce distortions. The time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) technique is being investigated for NDE. Finally, essential information expected from the HCLL-TBM program that will be needed to finalize the DEMO design is discussed.

  16. Quantification of the inert chemical oxygen demand of raw wastewater and evaluation of soluble microbial product production in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Sergio F; Gloria, Roberto M; Silva, Silvana Q; Chernicharo, Carlos A L

    2009-06-01

    This paper investigates the production of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in demonstration-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors operated under different conditions and fed with raw wastewater. The results showed that 9.2 +/- 1.3% of the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be considered inert to anaerobic treatment and that the amount of COD produced by biomass varied from 30 to 70 mg x L(-1), accounting for 45 to 63% of the soluble effluent COD. The accumulation of SMP appeared to be dependent on the hydraulic retention time (HRT) applied to the reactors, with a larger accumulation of SMP observed at the lowest HRT (5 hours); this may have been due to stress conditions caused by high upflow velocity (1.1 m x h(-1)). In terms of residual COD characterization, ultrafiltration results showed that higher amounts of high molecular weight compounds were found when HRT was the lowest (5 hours), and that the molecular weight distribution depended on the operational condition of the reactors. Biodegradability tests showed that the low and high molecular weight SMPs were only partially degraded anaerobically (10 to 60%) and that the high molecular weight SMPs were difficult to degrade aerobically.

  17. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  18. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  19. Development of an object-oriented dynamics simulator for a LFR DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Ponciroli, R.; Bortot, S.; Lorenzi, S.; Cammi, A.

    2012-07-01

    A control-oriented dynamics simulator for a Generation IV Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) demonstrator (DEMO) has been developed aimed at providing a flexible, simple and fast-running tool allowing to perform design-basis transient and stability analyses, and to lay the foundations for the study of the system control strategy. For such purposes, a model representing a compromise between accuracy and straightforwardness has been necessarily sought, and in this view an object-oriented approach based on the Modelica language has been adopted. The reactor primary and secondary systems have been implemented by assembling both component models already available in a specific thermal-hydraulic library, and ad hoc developed nuclear component models suitably modified according to the specific DEMO configuration. The resulting overall plant simulator, incorporating also the balance of plant, consists in the following essential parts: core, integrated steam generator/primary pump block, cold and hot legs, primary coolant cold pool, turbine, heat sink, secondary coolant pump. Afterwards, the reactor response to typical transient initiators has been investigated: feedwater mass flow rate and temperature enhancement, turbine admission valve coefficient variation, increase of primary coolant mass flow rate, and transient of overpower have been simulated; results have been compared with the outcomes of analogous analyses performed by employing a lumped-parameter DEMO plant model. (authors)

  20. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  1. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  2. European DEMO design strategy and consequences for materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, G.; Biel, W.; Gilbert, M. R.; Kemp, R.; Taylor, N.; Wenninger, R.

    2017-09-01

    Demonstrating the production of net electricity and operating with a closed fuel-cycle remain unarguably the crucial steps towards the exploitation of fusion power. These are the aims of a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) proposed to be built after ITER. This paper briefly describes the DEMO design options that are being considered in Europe for the current conceptual design studies as part of the Roadmap to Fusion Electricity Horizon 2020. These are not intended to represent fixed and exclusive design choices but rather ‘proxies’ of possible plant design options to be used to identify generic design/material issues that need to be resolved in future fusion reactor systems. The materials nuclear design requirements and the effects of radiation damage are briefly analysed with emphasis on a pulsed ‘low extrapolation’ system, which is being used for the initial design integration studies, based as far as possible on mature technologies and reliable regimes of operation (to be extrapolated from the ITER experience), and on the use of materials suitable for the expected level of neutron fluence. The main technical issues arising from the plasma and nuclear loads and the effects of radiation damage particularly on the structural and heat sink materials of the vessel and in-vessel components are critically discussed. The need to establish realistic target performance and a development schedule for near-term electricity production tends to favour more conservative technology choices. The readiness of the technical (physics and technology) assumptions that are being made is expected to be an important factor for the selection of the technical features of the device.

  3. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  4. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  5. The potential role of Neutral Beam Injection in EU DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, Pietro; Artaud, Jean-Francois; Bolzonella, Tommaso; Giruzzi, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    EU DEMO studies for pulsed (DEMO1) and steady-state (DEMO2) concepts are currently in the pre-conceptual phase. Present DEMO1 design is based on ITER baseline H-mode scenario, while DEMO2 is based on advanced scenarios with moderate reversed q profile sustained by non-inductive currents. One of the possible flattop heating power systems currently considered is Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). In this work the role of NBI in DEMO1 and DEMO2 is investigated by means of integrated simulations of DEMO scenarios using METIS fast tokamak modelling tool. Limitations, requirements and benefits of the use of a NBI system are discussed. For DEMO1 pulsed concept, the role of NBI is mainly central plasma heating for scenario stability (high fusion power H-mode). As a by-product of the tangential injection, NBI is capable of current drive, which is favorable in order to extend the discharge duration. Regarding a steady-state DEMO2 concept, in addition to plasma heating, NBI becomes a direct actuator for the advanced scenario by driving a considerable part of the plasma current. This requires more than 100MW with off-axis injection. The effect of an increase of the injection energy on the driven current density profile is also presented for DEMO2.

  6. Potential of ion cyclotron resonance frequency current drive via fast waves in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.

    2015-02-01

    For the continuous operation of future tokamak-reactors like DEMO, non-inductively driven toroidal plasma current is needed. Bootstrap current, due to the pressure gradient, and current driven by auxiliary heating systems are currently considered as the two main options. This paper addresses the current drive (CD) potential of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system in DEMO-like plasmas. Fast wave CD scenarios are evaluated for both the standard midplane launch and an alternative case of exciting the waves from the top of the machine. Optimal ICRF frequencies and parallel wave numbers are identified to maximize the CD efficiency. Limitations of the high frequency ICRF CD operation are discussed. A simplified analytical method to estimate the fast wave CD efficiency is presented, complemented with the discussion of its dependencies on plasma parameters. The calculated CD efficiency for the ICRF system is shown to be similar to those for the negative neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  7. Thermohydraulic responses of a water-cooled tokamak fusion DEMO to loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Tobita, K.; Someya, Y.; Utoh, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Gulden, W.

    2015-11-01

    Major in- and ex-vessel loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) of a water-cooled tokamak fusion DEMO reactor have been analysed. Analyses have identified responses of the DEMO systems to these accidents and pressure loads to confinement barriers for radioactive materials. As for the in-VV LOCA, we analysed the multiple double-ended break of the first wall cooling pipes around the outboard toroidal circumference. As for the ex-VV LOCA, we analysed the double-ended break of the primary cooling pipe. The thermohydraulic analysis results suggest that the in- and ex-vessel LOCAs crucially threaten integrity of the primary and final confinement barriers, respectively. Mitigations of the loads to the confinement barriers are also discussed.

  8. Tritium production assessment for the DCLL EUROfusion DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Iole; Rapisarda, David; Fernández-Berceruelo, Iván; Ibarra, Angel

    2016-10-01

    The viability of a fusion reactor is preeminently conditioned by the tritium self-sufficiency. An assessment of different parameters representing the tritium production, as the tritium breeding ratio (TBR), the tritium production rate (TPR) density and their poloidal and radial variations along the PbLi breeder zones has been performed for the last DCLL DEMO designs developed in the frame of the EUROfusion Programme. The final overall value of 1.104 obtained allows accomplishing the fuel self-sufficiency requirement. This TBR value includes not only the contribution of the breeding blanket (BB) modules but also of the back supporting structure (BSS). The BSS design resulted fundamental to reach the 1.1 criterion. Lastly, the influence of the integration in the reactor of the heating and current drive (H&CD) systems that will penetrate the breeder volume has been evaluated. Assuming different configurations for them, the TBR loss has been determined. All the calculations have entailed the use of the particle transport Monte Carlo code MCNP5.

  9. Fuelling and density control for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, P.; Koechl, F.; Garzotti, L.; King, D. B.; Tindale, E.; Bolzonella, T.; Lang, P. T.; Pegourié, B.; Romanelli, M.; Wenninger, R.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma fuelling and density control are an open issue regarding EU DEMO studies and solutions may be different from present day experiments. The present paper addresses through JINTRAC core transport code simulations the feasibility of different fuelling methods such as gas puff and pellet injection and the influence of neoclassical and anomalous inward pinch in the edge transport barrier in order to achieve and control the target DEMO density. Given the expected high fusion power production, He accumulation in the plasma core is a critical issue, and an estimation of the influence of impurities (He, Ar, and W) on core fuelling and plasma dilution is given together with a discussion on D-T core balance. The DEMO reference scenario investigated in this work is characterized by a peaked density profile, which requires a careful core fuelling. Due to the large pedestal temperature gradient, gas puff may not be a feasible option for core density control, unless assuming a large anomalous inward pinch in the edge transport barrier of more than ~2 m s-1. Pellet injection from the high field side of the torus, on the contrary, may represent a viable solution for core fuelling and D-T ratio control. The effect of pellet mass, speed, and injection geometry is also discussed in the present paper. Regardless, core fuelling efficiency with pellet injection is almost entirely determined by the presence of E  ×  B drift.

  10. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  11. Throttling Characteristics of the RL10 Derivative Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine -- Demo 1.6 and 1.7 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devine, Matthew K.; Hulka, James; Adamski, Walt; Brown, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) is a deep throttling cryogenic Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) technology development demonstrator based on the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) RL10 engine. Previous testing on this engine occurred during 2006 as Demo 1.0, then Demo 1.5 in 2007, Demo 1.6 in 2008 and finally Demo 1.7 in 2010. A review of Demo 1.0, 1.5, and preliminary results of 1.6 were reported in previous JANNAF papers. Demo 1.6 was tested at the PWR E-6 test facility in November 2008. The primary goal of this series was to mitigate low frequency combustion instability observed at low power levels. To mitigate the chug, the Demo 1.6 injector was modified from the previous configurations to include an approximately 0.050 inch thick teflon-type spray-on insulation to reduce heat transfer to the LOX manifold, which was believed to be a significant contributor to the low power instability. In addition, gaseous helium injection into the LOX manifold was used as a means to stabilize the system. Also explored in this test series was mitigation for a low power 1 Hz fuel system oscillation caused by sub-critical hydrogen boiling in the chamber cooling jacket. Reduced area gas venturis were utilized to avoid the 1 Hz fuel-size oscillation by keeping the cooling jacket supercritical down to lower engine power levels. Demo 1.7 began testing in March 2010. Its primary objectives were to demonstrate closed loop control capability on mixture ratio and chamber pressure, start to lower power levels and increased throttling ramp rates. Secondary test objectives that are discussed include multiple engine starts, higher mixture ratio excursions and additional time at low power level. While the complete test series and data reduction is not yet complete for Demo 1.7, an overview and up-to-date status is provided.

  12. Throttling Characteristics of the RL10 Derivative Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine -- Demo 1.6 and 1.7 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devine, Matthew K.; Hulka, James; Adamski, Walt; Brown, Corey

    2010-01-01

    The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) is a deep throttling cryogenic Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) technology development demonstrator based on the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) RL10 engine. Previous testing on this engine occurred during 2006 as Demo 1.0, then Demo 1.5 in 2007, Demo 1.6 in 2008 and finally Demo 1.7 in 2010. A review of Demo 1.0, 1.5, and preliminary results of 1.6 were reported in previous JANNAF papers. Demo 1.6 was tested at the PWR E-6 test facility in November 2008. The primary goal of this series was to mitigate low frequency combustion instability observed at low power levels. To mitigate the chug, the Demo 1.6 injector was modified from the previous configurations to include an approximately 0.050 inch thick teflon-type spray-on insulation to reduce heat transfer to the LOX manifold, which was believed to be a significant contributor to the low power instability. In addition, gaseous helium injection into the LOX manifold was used as a means to stabilize the system. Also explored in this test series was mitigation for a low power 1 Hz fuel system oscillation caused by sub-critical hydrogen boiling in the chamber cooling jacket. Reduced area gas venturis were utilized to avoid the 1 Hz fuel-size oscillation by keeping the cooling jacket supercritical down to lower engine power levels. Demo 1.7 began testing in March 2010. Its primary objectives were to demonstrate closed loop control capability on mixture ratio and chamber pressure, start to lower power levels and increased throttling ramp rates. Secondary test objectives that are discussed include multiple engine starts, higher mixture ratio excursions and additional time at low power level. While the complete test series and data reduction is not yet complete for Demo 1.7, an overview and up-to-date status is provided.

  13. Assessment of the LH wave for demo in pulsed and steady state scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Barbato, E.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Marinucci, M.; Mirizzi, F.; Panaccione, L.; Ravera, G. L.; Santini, F.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) has been analysed in DEMO tokamak plasma in the "pulsed and steady state regime" considering two plasma scenarios characterized, respectively, by flat density profile and peaked density profiles. We have obtained LH deposition profiles in cases of neglecting the effect of spectral broadening produced by PI at the edge. By comparing the Power Deposition Profiles for both DEMO scenarios ("flat" and "peaked"), the SOL of DEMO does not play any role in the absorption of the LH wave. In all cases the deposition is localized inside the separatrix layer r/a≤1. By lowering the parallel wave-number peak of the power spectrum from 1.8 to 1.5, the accessibility condition in both case prevents the power from reaching the deposition layer apart from a small fraction which pertains to the higher n∥ of the power spectrum. The spectrum centred at 1.8 is suggested to be useful in DEMO. More realistically, as supported by available data of LHCD in a wide range of operating densities, the effect of parametric decay instability (PDI) can produce a spectral broadening which should be included in the simulations. Further studies would be necessary for assessing the temperature profiles in the SOL at reactor-graded conditions. This is because, if the SOL temperature is at least of the order of 50 to 100 eV, the effect of PDI broads the spectrum up to n∥≤10, and the deposition profile is slightly wider but not much shifted outwards.

  14. Assessment of the LH wave for demo in pulsed and steady state scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A.; Barbato, E.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Marinucci, M.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Panaccione, L.; Santini, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) has been analysed in DEMO tokamak plasma in the 'pulsed and steady state regime' considering two plasma scenarios characterized, respectively, by flat density profile and peaked density profiles. We have obtained LH deposition profiles in cases of neglecting the effect of spectral broadening produced by PI at the edge. By comparing the Power Deposition Profiles for both DEMO scenarios ('flat' and 'peaked'), the SOL of DEMO does not play any role in the absorption of the LH wave. In all cases the deposition is localized inside the separatrix layer r/a≤1. By lowering the parallel wave-number peak of the power spectrum from 1.8 to 1.5, the accessibility condition in both case prevents the power from reaching the deposition layer apart from a small fraction which pertains to the higher n∥ of the power spectrum. The spectrum centred at 1.8 is suggested to be useful in DEMO. More realistically, as supported by available data of LHCD in a wide range of operating densities, the effect of parametric decay instability (PDI) can produce a spectral broadening which should be included in the simulations. Further studies would be necessary for assessing the temperature profiles in the SOL at reactor-graded conditions. This is because, if the SOL temperature is at least of the order of 50 to 100 eV, the effect of PDI broads the spectrum up to n∥≤10, and the deposition profile is slightly wider but not much shifted outwards.

  15. Diagnostics for machine protection of DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felton, R.

    2014-08-01

    DEMO aims to (i) integrate, demonstrate and validate all relevant technology necessary to convert fusion energy to electrical energy and (ii) that the machine and its operations are economically and environmentally acceptable. To maintain the efficiency and availability of the machine, there are several physics and combined physics/technology issues as well as the engineering issues. Machine Protection (also known as Protection of Investment) addresses both the risks to plant (to avoid costly repair or replacement) and the risks to normal operating time (to avoid loss of productivity and the return on investment). The plasma-related Machine Protection issues involve measurement and control of plasma stability, plasma purity, and plasma-wall interactions. Machine Protection aims to avoid hitting catastrophic limits by using early warning alarm systems, and controlled termination or avoidance, involving coordinated actions of the magnets, gas and auxiliary heating or current-drive systems. This article outlines the key processes, some of which are used in present-day tokamaks and some of which are new specifically for DEMO (e.g. First wall and divertor power handling) and reveals the need to research and develop new science and technology for Machine Protections in DEMO's high radiation and thermal fields. This work was funded by the RCUK Energy Programme under grant EP/I501045 and the European Communities under the contract of Association between EURATOM and CCFE and conducted partly under EFDA PPPT (WP13-DAS04). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  16. Diagnostics for machine protection of DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, R.

    2014-08-21

    DEMO aims to (i) integrate, demonstrate and validate all relevant technology necessary to convert fusion energy to electrical energy and (ii) that the machine and its operations are economically and environmentally acceptable. To maintain the efficiency and availability of the machine, there are several physics and combined physics/technology issues as well as the engineering issues. Machine Protection (also known as Protection of Investment) addresses both the risks to plant (to avoid costly repair or replacement) and the risks to normal operating time (to avoid loss of productivity and the return on investment). The plasma-related Machine Protection issues involve measurement and control of plasma stability, plasma purity, and plasma-wall interactions. Machine Protection aims to avoid hitting catastrophic limits by using early warning alarm systems, and controlled termination or avoidance, involving coordinated actions of the magnets, gas and auxiliary heating or current-drive systems. This article outlines the key processes, some of which are used in present-day tokamaks and some of which are new specifically for DEMO (e.g. First wall and divertor power handling) and reveals the need to research and develop new science and technology for Machine Protections in DEMO's high radiation and thermal fields. This work was funded by the RCUK Energy Programme under grant EP/I501045 and the European Communities under the contract of Association between EURATOM and CCFE and conducted partly under EFDA PPPT (WP13-DAS04). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  17. Demos: Teaching the Demography Unit through Computer Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the uses of DEMOS, a set of demographic computer simulations which can be used to improve instruction in introductory sociology courses. Gives examples of both interactive and noninteractive exercises, concluding that DEMOS is easy to use and enjoyable, with approximately 90 percent of students recommending its continued use. (GEA)

  18. Status of DEMO-FNS development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Shpanskiy, Yu. S.; DEMO-FNS Team

    2017-07-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid facility based on superconducting tokamak DEMO-FNS is developed in Russia for integrated commissioning of steady-state and nuclear fusion technologies at the power level up to 40 MW for fusion and 400 MW for fission reactions. The project status corresponds to the transition from a conceptual design to an engineering one. This facility is considered, in RF, as the main source of technological and nuclear science information, which should complement the ITER research results in the fields of burning plasma physics and control.

  19. Lithium Ceramic Blankets for Russian Fusion Reactors and Influence of Breeding Operation Mode on Parameters of Reactor Tritium Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapyshev, Victor K.; Chernetsov, Mikhail Yu.; Zhevotov, Sergej I.; Kersnovskij, Alexandr Yu.; Kolbasov, Boris N.; Kovalenko, Victor G.; Paltusov, Nikolaj P.; Sernyaev, Georgeij A.; Sterebkov, Juri S.; Zyryanov, Alexej P.

    2005-07-15

    Russian controlled fusion program supposes development of a DEMO reactor design and participation in ITER Project. A solid breeder blanket of DEMO contains a ceramic lithium orthosilicate breeder and a beryllium multiplier. Test modules of the blanket are developed within the scope of ITER activities. Experimental models of module tritium breeding zones (TBZ), materials and fabrication technology of the TBZ, tritium reactor systems to analyse and process gas released from lithium ceramics are being developed. Two models of tritium breeding and neutron multiplying elements of the TBZ have been designed, manufactured and tested in IVV-2M nuclear reactor. Initial results of the in-pile experiments and outcome of lithium ceramics irradiation in a water-graphite nuclear reactor are considered to be a data base for development of the test modules and initial requirements for DEMO tritium system design. Influence of the tritium release parameters and hydrogen concentration in a purge gas on parameters of reactor system are discussed.

  20. ISS Update: The Role of OSO in Dragon's Demo Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Office commentator Pat Ryan talks with Brandon Moncla, Lead Operations Support Officer (OSO) for the SpaceX Dragon Demo Mission, about preparations for the Dragon berthing and h...

  1. Progress in Developing the K-DEMO Device Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Tom

    2013-06-27

    K-DEMO is being studied by South Korean researchers as a follow-on to ITER and the next step toward the construction of a commercial fusion power plant. The K-DEMO mission defines a staged approach targeting operation with an initial testing phase for plasma facing components and critical operating systems to be followed by a second phase which centers on upgrading the in-vessel components for operation at 200 to 600 MWe with a planned 70% availability.

  2. International Perspectives on a Path to MFE DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, George H.; Abdou, M.; Federici, Gianfranco; Garofalo, A. M.; Kamendje, R.; Kaw, Predhiman K.; Kim, Keeman; Kurtz, Richard J.; Kuteev, Boris V.; Ward, David; Yamada, Hiroshi; Zohm, Hartmut

    2013-01-07

    The establishment of the ITER project marks a transition in the world fusion program to one increasingly focused on the demonstration of electricity generation from fusion, or DEMO. In recent years, planning and design activities for next steps toward DEMO have intensified in many countries, and international discussions have identified both needs and opportunities for greater international collaboration in developing a DEMO Programme. The scientific and technical issues for fusion are well known and, while there is no agreement on a single roadmap to fusion, there is substantial scope to add value through international cooperation, particularly in promoting a coordinated DEMO programme. The International Atomic Energy Agency, as a world organization dedicated to fostering international collaboration in the development of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, is well suited to provide auspices for an activity promoting an international exchange of technical information and strategic thinking that would benefit all parties. Accordingly, an IAEA DEMO Programme Workshop series focus on the scientific and technical issues for fusion development toward DEMO has been established. The first workshop will be held 15-18 October 2012 in the U.S.A.

  3. Self-consistent modeling of DEMOs with 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisitsorasak, A.; Somjinda, B.; Promping, J.; Onjun, T.

    2017-02-01

    Self-consistent simulations of four DEMO designs proposed by teams from China, Europe, India, and Korea are carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code in which theory-based models are used, for both core transport and boundary conditions. In these simulations, a combination of the NCLASS neoclassical transport and multimode (MMM95) anomalous transport model is used to compute a core transport. The boundary is taken to be at the top of the pedestal, where the pedestal values are described using a pedestal temperature model based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization, pedestal width scaling and an infinite- n ballooning pressure gradient model and a pedestal density model based on a line average density. Even though an optimistic scenario is considered, the simulation results suggest that, with the exclusion of ELMs, the fusion gain Q obtained for these reactors is pessimistic compared to their original designs, i.e. 52% for the Chinese design, 63% for the European design, 22% for the Korean design, and 26% for the Indian design. In addition, the predicted bootstrap current fractions are also found to be lower than their original designs, as fractions of their original designs, i.e. 0.49 (China), 0.66 (Europe), and 0.58 (India). Furthermore, in relation to sensitivity, it is found that increasing values of the auxiliary heating power and the electron line average density from their design values yield an enhancement of fusion performance. In addition, inclusion of sawtooth oscillation effects demonstrate positive impacts on the plasma and fusion performance in European, Indian and Korean DEMOs, but degrade the performance in the Chinese DEMO.

  4. Systematic cavity design approach for a multi-frequency gyrotron for DEMO and study of its RF behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Kalaria, P. C. Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2016-09-15

    High frequency (>230 GHz) megawatt-class gyrotrons are planned as RF sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in DEMOnstration fusion power plants (DEMOs). In this paper, for the first time, a feasibility study of a 236 GHz DEMO gyrotron is presented by considering all relevant design goals and the possible technical limitations. A mode-selection procedure is proposed in order to satisfy the multi-frequency and frequency-step tunability requirements. An effective systematic design approach for the optimal design of a gradually tapered cavity is presented. The RF-behavior of the proposed cavity is verified rigorously, supporting 920 kW of stable output power with an interaction efficiency of 36% including the considerations of realistic beam parameters.

  5. Quasi-linear modeling of lower hybrid current drive in ITER and DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A. Cesario, R.; Panaccione, L.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-10

    First pass absorption of the Lower Hybrid waves in thermonuclear devices like ITER and DEMO is modeled by coupling the ray tracing equations with the quasi-linear evolution of the electron distribution function in 2D velocity space. As usually assumed, the Lower Hybrid Current Drive is not effective in a plasma of a tokamak fusion reactor, owing to the accessibility condition which, depending on the density, restricts the parallel wavenumber to values greater than n{sub ∥crit} and, at the same time, to the high electron temperature that would enhance the wave absorption and then restricts the RF power deposition to the very periphery of the plasma column (near the separatrix). In this work, by extensively using the “ray{sup star}” code, a parametric study of the propagation and absorption of the LH wave as function of the coupled wave spectrum (as its width, and peak value), has been performed very accurately. Such a careful investigation aims at controlling the power deposition layer possibly in the external half radius of the plasma, thus providing a valuable aid to the solution of how to control the plasma current profile in a toroidal magnetic configuration, and how to help the suppression of MHD mode that can develop in the outer part of the plasma. This analysis is useful not only for exploring the possibility of profile control of a pulsed operation reactor as well as the tearing mode stabilization, but also in order to reconsider the feasibility of steady state regime for DEMO.

  6. Activation, decay heat, and waste classification studies of the European DEMO concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Eade, T.; Bachmann, C.; Fischer, U.; Taylor, N. P.

    2017-04-01

    Inventory calculations have a key role to play in designing future fusion power plants because, for a given irradiation field and material, they can predict the time evolution in chemical composition, activation, decay heat, gamma-dose, gas production, and even damage (dpa) dose. For conceptual designs of the European DEMO fusion reactor such calculations provide information about the neutron shielding requirements, maintenance schedules, and waste disposal prospects; thereby guiding future development. Extensive neutron-transport and inventory calculations have been performed for a reference DEMO reactor model with four different tritium-breeding blanket concepts. The results have been used to chart the post-operation variation in activity and decay heat from different vessel components, demonstrating that the shielding performance of the different blanket concepts—for a given blanket thickness—varies significantly. Detailed analyses of the simulated nuclide inventories for the vacuum vessel (VV) and divertor highlight the most dominant radionuclides, potentially suggesting how changes in material composition could help to reduce activity. Minor impurities in the raw composition of W used in divertor tiles, for example, are shown to produce undesirable long-lived radionuclides. Finally, waste classifications, based on UK regulations, and a recycling potential limit, have been applied to estimate the time-evolution in waste masses for both the entire vessel (including blanket modules, VV, divertor, and some ex-vessel components) and individual components, and also to suggest when a particular component might be suitable for recycling. The results indicate that the large mass of the VV will not be classifiable as low level waste on the 100 year timescale, but the majority of the divertor will be, and that both components will be potentially recyclable within that time.

  7. RF H and CD systems for DEMO - Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, T.; Wenninger, R.; Barbato, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cesario, R.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Eester, D. V.; Lerche, E.

    2014-02-12

    The aim of driving a sufficient amount of plasma current with an appropriate radial current density profile is considered as one of the key challenges for a tokamak fusion power plant in steady state operation. Furthermore, efficient heating to enable transition to regime of enhanced confinement and to achieve breakeven plasma temperatures as well as MHD control and plasma breakdown assistance are required. In the framework of the EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) activities, the ability of the Electron cyclotron (EC), Ion Cyclotron (IC) and Lower Hybrid (LH) systems to fulfil these requirements, was studied for a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO). As boundary condition, a 1D description of the plasma for a pulsed DEMO based on system code studies combined with transport analysis was developed. The predicted 1D plasma parameters were used to calculate the current drive (CD) efficiency of each system and eventually optimised it. As an example, the EC current drive efficiency could be increased strongly by top launch compared to equatorial launch at least by a factor of two. For the IC system, two possible windows of operation for standard and higher frequencies were highlighted, whereby again top launch leads to higher CD-efficiencies. The efficiencies predicted for DEMO for the RF current drive systems will be presented. Finally, gaps in the feasibility of RF systems under DEMO relevant conditions will be identified.

  8. Massively Clustered CubeSats NCPS Demo Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.; Young, David; Kim, Tony; Houts, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Technologies under development for the proposed Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) will require an un-crewed demonstration mission before they can be flight qualified over distances and time frames representative of a crewed Mars mission. In this paper, we describe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform, possibly comprising hundreds of CubeSats, as the main payload of the NCPS demo mission. This platform would enable a mechanism for cost savings for the demo mission through shared support between NASA and other government agencies as well as leveraged commercial aerospace and academic community involvement. We believe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform should be an obvious first choice for the NCPS demo mission when one considers that cost and risk of the payload can be spread across many CubeSat customers and that the NCPS demo mission can capitalize on using CubeSats developed by others for its own instrumentation needs. Moreover, a demo mission of the NCPS offers an unprecedented opportunity to invigorate the public on a global scale through direct individual participation coordinated through a web-based collaboration engine. The platform we describe would be capable of delivering CubeSats at various locations along a trajectory toward the primary mission destination, in this case Mars, permitting a variety of potential CubeSat-specific missions. Cameras on various CubeSats can also be used to provide multiple views of the space environment and the NCPS vehicle for video monitoring as well as allow the public to "ride along" as virtual passengers on the mission. This collaborative approach could even initiate a brand new Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program for launching student developed CubeSat payloads beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) on future deep space technology qualification missions. Keywords: Nuclear Propulsion, NCPS, SLS, Mars, CubeSat.

  9. Ion source development for a photoneutralization based NBI system for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, A.; Esch, H. P. L. de; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Bechu, S.; Bès, A.; Lacoste, A.

    2015-04-08

    The next step after ITER is to demonstrate the viability and generation of electricity by a future fusion reactor (DEMO). The specifications required to operate an NBI system on DEMO are very demanding. The system has to provide a very high level of power and energy, ~100MW of D° beam at 1MeV, including high wall-plug efficiency (η > 60%). For this purpose, a new injector concept, called Siphore, is under investigation between CEA and French universities. Siphore is based on the stripping of the accelerated negative ions by photo-detachment provided by several Fabry-Perot cavities (3.5MW of light power per cavity) implemented along the D{sup −} beam. The beamline is designed to be tall and narrow in order that the photon flux overlaps the entire negative ion beam. The paper will describe the present R and D at CEA which addresses the development of an ion source and pre-accelerator prototypes for Siphore, the main goal being to produce an intense negative ion beam sheet. The negative ion source Cybele is based on a magnetized plasma column where hot electrons are emitted from the source center. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize the plasma and to compare with numerical models being developed in French universities.

  10. Ion source development for a photoneutralization based NBI system for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, A.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Bechu, S.; Bès, A.; Lacoste, A.

    2015-04-01

    The next step after ITER is to demonstrate the viability and generation of electricity by a future fusion reactor (DEMO). The specifications required to operate an NBI system on DEMO are very demanding. The system has to provide a very high level of power and energy, ~100MW of D° beam at 1MeV, including high wall-plug efficiency (η > 60%). For this purpose, a new injector concept, called Siphore, is under investigation between CEA and French universities. Siphore is based on the stripping of the accelerated negative ions by photo-detachment provided by several Fabry-Perot cavities (3.5MW of light power per cavity) implemented along the D- beam. The beamline is designed to be tall and narrow in order that the photon flux overlaps the entire negative ion beam. The paper will describe the present R&D at CEA which addresses the development of an ion source and pre-accelerator prototypes for Siphore, the main goal being to produce an intense negative ion beam sheet. The negative ion source Cybele is based on a magnetized plasma column where hot electrons are emitted from the source center. Parametric studies of the source are performed using Langmuir probes in order to characterize the plasma and to compare with numerical models being developed in French universities.

  11. Role of the lower hybrid spectrum in the current drive modeling for DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Galli, A.; Mirizzi, F.; Napoli, F.; Panaccione, L.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The active control of the radial current density profile is one of the major issues of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on magnetic confinement. The lower hybrid current drive could in principle be used as an efficient tool. However, previous understanding considered the electron temperature envisaged in a reactor at the plasma periphery too large to allow penetration of the coupled radio frequency (RF) power due to strong Landau damping. In this work, we present new numerical results based on quasilinear theory, showing that the injection of power spectra with different {n}// widths of the main lobe produce an RF-driven current density profile spanning most of the outer radial half of the plasma ({n}// is the refractive index in a parallel direction to the confinement magnetic field). Plasma kinetic profiles envisaged for the DEMO reactor are used as references. We demonstrate the robustness of the modeling results concerning the key role of the spectral width in determining the lower hybrid-driven current density profile. Scans of plasma parameters are extensively carried out with the aim of excluding the possibility that any artefact of the utilised numerical modeling would produce any novelty. We neglect here the parasitic effect of spectral broadening produced by linear scattering due to plasma density fluctuations, which mainly occurs for low magnetic field devices. This effect will be analyzed in other work that completes the report on the present breakthrough.

  12. Demo III processing architecture trades and preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothard, Benny M.; Cory, Phil; Peterman, Pete

    1999-01-01

    This paper will provide a summary of the methodology, metrics, analysis, and trade study efforts for the preliminary design o the Vetronics Processing Architecture (PA) system based on the Demo III Experimental Unmanned Ground Vehicle (XUV) program requirements. We will document and describe both the provided and analytically derived system requirements expressed by the proposal. Our experience based on previous mobility and Reconnaissance, Surveillance, Targeting, Acquisition systems designed and implemented for Demo II Semi-Autonomous Surrogate Vehicle and Mobile Detection, Assessment and Response System will be used to describe lessons learned as applied to the XUV in PA architecture, Single Board Computers, Card Cage Buses, Real-Time and Non Real-Time processor and Card Cage to Card Cage Communications, and Imaging and Radar pre-processors selection and choices. We have selected an initial architecture methodology.

  13. Progress in conceptual design of EU DEMO EC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garavaglia, Saul; Bruschi, Alex; Franke, Thomas; Granucci, Gustavo; Grossetti, Giovanni; Jelonnek, John; Moro, Alessandro; Poli, Emanuele; Rispoli, Natale; Strauss, Dirk; Tran, Quang Minh

    2017-07-01

    Since 2014 under the umbrella of EUROfusion Consortium the Work Package Heating and Current Drive (WPHCD) is performing the engineering design and R&D for the electron cyclotron (EC), ion cyclotron and neutral beam systems of the future fusion power plant DEMO. This presentation covers the activities performed in the last two years on the EC system conceptual design, as part of the WPHCD, focusing on launchers, transmission lines, system reliability and architecture.

  14. ChemDemos II Videodisc: Abstract of Special Issue 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.; Houston Jetzer, Kelly; Gilbert, George; Mattes, Fred; Phillips, David; Lisensky, George; Zweerink, Gerald

    1996-09-01

    Literature Cited Moore, J. W., Jacobsen, J. J., Hunsberger, L. R., Gammon, S. D., Jetzer, K. H., Zimmerman, J. ChemDemos Videodisc, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1995, Special Issue 8. Jacobsen, J. J. Videodisc Browser 2.0, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1995, 7C, No. 2. Jacobsen, J. J. Videodisc Browser 2.0, J. Chem. Educ.: Software, 1996, 3D, No. 2. HyperCard, Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA 65014-2084. ToolBook, Asymetrics Corp., Bellevue, WA 98004.

  15. The Fluid Dynamics Demo Kit: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Underhill, Patrick; Prestridge, Kathy

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a fluid dynamics demonstration/experiment kit that can be used by professors and graduate students at high school outreach events. The demonstrations in the kit will be easy to use and true crowd pleasers in order to inspire understanding and pique curiosity about the physics of flow. The kits will be inexpensive, containing readily available materials so that teachers can duplicate the demonstrations and experiments. The kits will be left with the teachers as a gift from the American Physics Society. The experiments and demonstrations cover the concepts of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, Bernoulli's equation, frictional losses and the ideal gas law. For each experiment, the teachers will receive presentation material, access to instructional videos, plus a worksheet that can be used in a high school physics classroom. This kit has been developed through the efforts of the APS-DFD Mentoring and Outreach Committee and has received funding from the APS-DFD. Work funded by the APS-DFD.

  16. Normal operation and maintenance safety lessons from the ITER US PbLi test blanket module program for a US FNSF and DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; C. P. C. Wong; M. Abdou; B. B. Morely; B.J Merrill

    2014-10-01

    A leading power reactor breeding blanket candidate for a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO) being pursued by the US Fusion Community is the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) concept. The safety hazards associated with the DCLL concept as a reactor blanket have been examined in several US design studies. These studies identify the largest radiological hazards as those associated with the dust generation by plasma erosion of plasma blanket module first walls, oxidation of blanket structures at high temperature in air or steam, inventories of tritium bred in or permeating through the ferritic steel structures of the blanket module and blanket support systems, and the 210Po and 203Hg produced in the PbLi breeder/coolant. What these studies lack is the scrutiny associated with a licensing review of the DCLL concept. An insight into this process was gained during the US participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Test Blanket Module (TBM) Program. In this paper we discuss the lessons learned during this activity and make safety proposals for the design of a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) or a DEMO that employs a lead lithium breeding blanket.

  17. MOTIVATION: Goals and Goal Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Goal setting has great impact on a team's performance. Goals enable a team to synchronize their efforts to achieve success. In this article, the author talks about goals and goal setting. This articles complements Domain 5--Teaching and Communication (p.14) and discusses one of the benchmarks listed therein: "Teach the goal setting process and…

  18. MOTIVATION: Goals and Goal Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Goal setting has great impact on a team's performance. Goals enable a team to synchronize their efforts to achieve success. In this article, the author talks about goals and goal setting. This articles complements Domain 5--Teaching and Communication (p.14) and discusses one of the benchmarks listed therein: "Teach the goal setting process and…

  19. 77 FR 51849 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT Demo Lab, Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT Demo Lab, Clinical Innovation Study: Implementation of a Patient Centered Medical Home for OEF/OIF Veterans With PTSD: Bridging... INFORMATION: Titles: PACT Demo Lab, Clinical Innovation Study: Implementation of a Patient Centered Medical...

  20. Demos as an Explanatory Lens in Teacher Educators' Elusive Search for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni M.; Brock, Cynthia H.; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Pennington, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    Borrowing insights from the Ancient Greek ideal conceptions of a democratic civic space (demos), this article examines the applicability of this framework to four teacher educators' journey to implement social justice in their programs. It is proposed that the three constitutive dimensions of demos (freedom of speech, equality to vote and hold…

  1. The Role of Community Colleges in Advancing Upward Mobility: A Demos Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huelsman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a short background on Demos, a public policy organization that works on issues of political and economic inequality. Demos views community colleges as a linchpin in the American higher education system, and it has worked over several years to research ways to increase state support for higher education and direct support…

  2. The Role of Community Colleges in Advancing Upward Mobility: A Demos Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huelsman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a short background on Demos, a public policy organization that works on issues of political and economic inequality. Demos views community colleges as a linchpin in the American higher education system, and it has worked over several years to research ways to increase state support for higher education and direct support…

  3. Demos as an Explanatory Lens in Teacher Educators' Elusive Search for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni M.; Brock, Cynthia H.; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Pennington, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    Borrowing insights from the Ancient Greek ideal conceptions of a democratic civic space (demos), this article examines the applicability of this framework to four teacher educators' journey to implement social justice in their programs. It is proposed that the three constitutive dimensions of demos (freedom of speech, equality to vote and hold…

  4. Results of availability imposed configuration details developed for K-DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Tom; Titus, Peter; Brooks, Art; Zhang, Han; Neilson, Hutch; Im, Kihak; Kim, Keeman

    2016-02-05

    We completed a two year study using the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) where we looked at key Tokamak components and configuration options in preparation of a conceptual design phase. A key part of a device configuration centers on defining an arrangement that enhances the ability to reach high availability values by defining design solutions that foster simplified maintenance operations. In order to maximize the size and minimize the number of in-vessel components enlarged TF coils were defined that incorporate a pair of windings within each coil to mitigate pressure drop issues and to reduce the cost of the coils. Furthermore, we defined a semi-permanent shield structure in order to develop labyrinth interfaces between double-null plasma contoured shield modules, provide an entity to align blanket components and provide support against disruption loads—with a load path that equilibrates blanket, TF and PF loads through a base structure. Blanket piping services and auxiliary systems that interface with in-vessel components have played a major role in defining the overall device arrangement—concept details will be presented along with general arrangement features and preliminary results obtained from disruption analysis.

  5. Results of availability imposed configuration details developed for K-DEMO

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Tom; Titus, Peter; Brooks, Art; ...

    2016-02-05

    We completed a two year study using the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) where we looked at key Tokamak components and configuration options in preparation of a conceptual design phase. A key part of a device configuration centers on defining an arrangement that enhances the ability to reach high availability values by defining design solutions that foster simplified maintenance operations. In order to maximize the size and minimize the number of in-vessel components enlarged TF coils were defined that incorporate a pair of windings within each coil to mitigate pressure drop issues and to reduce the cost of the coils.more » Furthermore, we defined a semi-permanent shield structure in order to develop labyrinth interfaces between double-null plasma contoured shield modules, provide an entity to align blanket components and provide support against disruption loads—with a load path that equilibrates blanket, TF and PF loads through a base structure. Blanket piping services and auxiliary systems that interface with in-vessel components have played a major role in defining the overall device arrangement—concept details will be presented along with general arrangement features and preliminary results obtained from disruption analysis.« less

  6. Overview of EU activities on DEMO liquid metal breeder blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.

    1994-12-31

    The European test-blanket development programme, started in 1988, is aiming at the selection by 1995 of two DEMO-relevant blanket lines to be tested in ITER. At present, four lines of blanket are under development, two of them using solid and the other two liquid breeder materials. As far as liquid breeders are concerned, two lines of blankets have been selected within the European Union, the water-cooled lithium-lead (the eutectic Pb-17Li) blankets and the dual-coolant Pb-17Li blankets. Designs have been developed considering an agreed set of DEMO specifications, such as, for instance, a fusion power of 2,200 MW, a neutron wall-loading of 2MW/m{sup 2}, a life-time of 20,000 hours, and the use of martensitic steel as a structural material. Moreover, an experimental program has been set up in order to address the main critical issues for each line. The present paper gives an overview of both design and experimental activities within the European Union concerning these two lines of liquid breeder blankets.

  7. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  8. Maximal design basis accident of fusion neutron source DEMO-TIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    When analyzing the safety of nuclear (including fusion) facilities, the maximal design basis accident at which the largest release of activity is expected must certainly be considered. Such an accident is usually the failure of cooling systems of the most thermally stressed components of a reactor (for a fusion facility, it is the divertor or the first wall). The analysis of safety of the ITER reactor and fusion power facilities (including hybrid fission-fusion facilities) shows that the initial event of such a design basis accident is a large-scale break of a pipe in the cooling system of divertor or the first wall outside the vacuum vessel of the facility. The greatest concern is caused by the possibility of hydrogen formation and the inrush of air into the vacuum chamber (VC) with the formation of a detonating mixture and a subsequent detonation explosion. To prevent such an explosion, the emergency forced termination of the fusion reaction, the mounting of shutoff valves in the cooling systems of the divertor and the first wall or blanket for reducing to a minimum the amount of water and air rushing into the VC, the injection of nitrogen or inert gas into the VC for decreasing the hydrogen and oxygen concentration, and other measures are recommended. Owing to a continuous feed-out of the molten-salt fuel mixture from the DEMO-TIN blanket with the removal period of 10 days, the radioactivity release at the accident will mainly be determined by tritium (up to 360 PBq). The activity of fission products in the facility will be up to 50 PBq.

  9. Maximal design basis accident of fusion neutron source DEMO-TIN

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2015-12-15

    When analyzing the safety of nuclear (including fusion) facilities, the maximal design basis accident at which the largest release of activity is expected must certainly be considered. Such an accident is usually the failure of cooling systems of the most thermally stressed components of a reactor (for a fusion facility, it is the divertor or the first wall). The analysis of safety of the ITER reactor and fusion power facilities (including hybrid fission–fusion facilities) shows that the initial event of such a design basis accident is a large-scale break of a pipe in the cooling system of divertor or the first wall outside the vacuum vessel of the facility. The greatest concern is caused by the possibility of hydrogen formation and the inrush of air into the vacuum chamber (VC) with the formation of a detonating mixture and a subsequent detonation explosion. To prevent such an explosion, the emergency forced termination of the fusion reaction, the mounting of shutoff valves in the cooling systems of the divertor and the first wall or blanket for reducing to a minimum the amount of water and air rushing into the VC, the injection of nitrogen or inert gas into the VC for decreasing the hydrogen and oxygen concentration, and other measures are recommended. Owing to a continuous feed-out of the molten-salt fuel mixture from the DEMO-TIN blanket with the removal period of 10 days, the radioactivity release at the accident will mainly be determined by tritium (up to 360 PBq). The activity of fission products in the facility will be up to 50 PBq.

  10. Impurity accumulation and performance of ITER and DEMO plasmas in the presence of transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatthong, B.; Promping, J.; Onjun, T.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the impurity accumulations and their performance in the presence of both ITB and ETB in ITER and DEMO plasmas are investigated using a BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code. In these simulations, a combination of a neoclassical transport model NCLASS and an anomalous transport model Mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm is used. The boundary condition is described at the top of the pedestal, which is calculated theoretically based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization pedestal width scaling and an infinite-n ballooning pressure gradient model. The toroidal flow is calculated based on the NTV (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) toroidal velocity model. The time evolution of plasma temperature and density profiles of ITER and DEMO (Korean K-DEMO and Japanese DEMO models A, B and C) plasmas are simulated in H-mode scenario with and without ITB formation. It is found that Japanese DEMO model C yields highest plasma temperature; while Korean DEMO yields the best plasma performance among those designs considered. Impurity accumulation is found to be highest in Japanese DEMO model B.

  11. Toxicology Information Program (TIP) Files Demo Disk (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M.

    1988-05-09

    The Toxicology Information Program (TIP) Files Demo Disk is an interactive, microcomputer demonstration of the CHEMLINE, TOXLINE, TOXLIT, RTECS, HSDB, CCRIS, and DIRLINE files. It is designed to acquaint new users with the content and search capabilities of these data bases. There is a section on each data base containing a brief description of the file and several sample searches. The program is written in PILOTplus authoring language for implementation on IBM-PC, PC-XT, PC-AT,PS/2 and fully compatible computers, using DOS2.0 or higher operating system. It requires 256K RAM memory and one disk drive. It supports most monochrome, color-graphics, and enhanced color graphics displays.

  12. Demo III: Department of Defense testbed for unmanned ground mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Chuck M.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Myers, Scott D.; Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Robotics has been identified by numerous recent Department of Defense (DOD) studies as a key enabling technology for future military operational concepts. The Demo III Program is a multiyear effort encompassing technology development and demonstration on testbed platforms, together with modeling simulation and experimentation directed toward optimization of operational concepts to employ this technology. Primary program focus is the advancement of capabilities for autonomous mobility through unstructured environments, concentrating on both perception and intelligent control technology. The scout mission will provide the military operational context for demonstration of this technology, although a significant emphasis is being placed upon both hardware and software modularity to permit rapid extension to other military missions. The Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV) is a small (approximately 1150 kg, V-22 transportable) technology testbed vehicle designed for experimentation with multiple military operational concepts. Currently under development, the XUV is scheduled for roll-out in Summer 1999, with an initial troop experimentation to be conducted in September 1999. Though small, and relatively lightweight, modeling has shown the chassis capable of automotive mobility comparable to the current Army lightweight high-mobility, multipurpose, wheeled vehicle (HMMWV). The XUV design couples multisensor perception with intelligent control to permit autonomous cross-country navigation at speeds of up to 32 kph during daylight and 16 kph during hours of darkness. A small, lightweight, highly capable user interface will permit intuitive control of the XUV by troops from current-generation tactical vehicles. When it concludes in 2002, Demo III will provide the military with both the technology and the initial experience required to develop and field the first generation of semi-autonomous tactical ground vehicles for combat, combat support, and logistics applications.

  13. Development of DEMO-FNS tokamak for fusion and hybrid technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Alexeev, P. N.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The history of fusion-fission hybrid systems based on a tokamak device as an extremely efficient DT-fusion neutron source has passed through several periods of ample research activity in the world since the very beginning of fusion research in the 1950s. Recently, a new roadmap of the hybrid program has been proposed with the goal to build a pilot hybrid plant (PHP) in Russia by 2030. Development of the DEMO-FNS tokamak for fusion and hybrid technologies, which is planned to be built by 2023, is the key milestone on the path to the PHP. This facility is in the phase of conceptual design aimed at providing feasibility studies for a full set of steady state tokamak technologies at a fusion energy gain factor Q ˜ 1, fusion power of ˜40 MW and opportunities for testing a wide range of hybrid technologies with the emphasis on continuous nuclide processing in molten salts. This paper describes the project motivations, its current status and the key issues of the design.

  14. Influence of the divertor plate material on the plasma performance in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes integrated numerical modeling applied to DEMO discharges with different divertor plate materials (nickel, molybdenum and tungsten) in a slab geometry, using the COREDIV code. Calculations are performed for the inductive DEMO scenario with argon seeding. Simulations shown that for Mo and Ni, it is possible to achieve H-mode plasma operation (power to SOL > power threshold for L-H transition) with acceptable levels of power to the target plates.

  15. Dynamic outgassing of deuterium, helium and nitrogen from plasma-facing materials under DEMO relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, S.; Matveev, D.; Martynova, Y.; Unterberg, B.; Rasinski, M.; Wegener, T.; Kreter, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    In confined plasma magnetic fusion devices significant amounts of the hydrogen isotopes used for the fusion reaction can be stored in the plasma-facing materials by implantation. The desorption of this retained hydrogen was seen to follow a t α law with α  ≈  -0.7 in tokamaks. For a pulsed fusion reactor this outgassing can define the inter-pulse waiting time. This work presents new experimental data on the dynamic outgassing in ITER grade tungsten exposed under the well-defined conditions of PSI-2 to pure and mixed D2 plasmas. A peak ion flux of 1022 D+ m-2 s is applied for up to 6 h at sample temperatures of up to 900 K. Pure D2 and mixed D2  +  He, D2  +  N2 and D2  +  He  +  N2 plasmas are applied to the sample at 68 V bias. The D2, He, N outgassing at 293 K and 580 k are observed via in-vacuo quadrupole mass spectrometry covering the range of 40 s-200 000 s after exposure. The outgassing decay follows a single power law with exponents α  =  -0.7  to  -1.1 at 293 K, but at 580 K a drop from α  =  -0.25 to  -2.35 is found. For DEMO a pump-down time to 0.5 mPa in the order of 1-5 h can be expected. The outgassing is in all cases dominated by D2.

  16. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Adam; Dazeley, Steve; Dobie, Doug; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, Jim; Gerling, Mark; Sumner, Matthew; Sweany, Melinda

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  17. Overall goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George; Heyman, Joseph S.; Madaras, Eric; Salkowski, Charles; Weston, Bert; Woodis, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Space transportation propulsion systems symposium is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: overall goals; main issues; materials characterization; reduction of manufacturing defects; standards and certification; advanced NDE techniques; designing for inspectability; candidate programs/milestones; and NDE technology potentials.

  18. Recent ASDEX Upgrade research in support of ITER and DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Zohmthe ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-10-01

    Recent experiments on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak aim at improving the physics base for ITER and DEMO to aid the machine design and prepare efficient operation. Type I edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) has been shown at low pedestal collisionality (νped\\ast <0.4) . In contrast to the previous high ν* regime, suppression only occurs in a narrow RMP spectral window, indicating a resonant process, and a concomitant confinement drop is observed due to a reduction of pedestal top density and electron temperature. Strong evidence is found for the ion heat flux to be the decisive element for the L-H power threshold. A physics based scaling of the density at which the minimum PLH occurs indicates that ITER could take advantage of it to initiate H-mode at lower density than that of the final Q = 10 operational point. Core density fluctuation measurements resolved in radius and wave number show that an increase of R/LTe introduced by off-axis electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) mainly increases the large scale fluctuations. The radial variation of the fluctuation level is in agreement with simulations using the GENE code. Fast particles are shown to undergo classical slowing down in the absence of large scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) events and for low heating power, but show signs of anomalous radial redistribution at large heating power, consistent with a broadened off-axis neutral beam current drive current profile under these conditions. Neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) suppression experiments using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) with feedback controlled deposition have allowed to test several control strategies for ITER, including automated control of (3,2) and (2,1) NTMs during a single discharge. Disruption mitigation studies using massive gas injection (MGI) can show an increased fuelling efficiency with high field side injection, but a saturation of the fuelling efficiency is observed at high injected

  19. Cost goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoag, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cost goal activities for the point focusing parabolic dish program are reported. Cost goals involve three tasks: (1) determination of the value of the dish systems to potential users; (2) the cost targets of the dish system are set out; (3) the value side and cost side are integrated to provide information concerning the potential size of the market for parabolic dishes. The latter two activities are emphasized.

  20. UAS-NAS Project Demo - Mini HITL Week 2 Stats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Fern, Lisa C.; Rorie, Robert C.; Shively, Robert; Jovic, Srboljub

    2016-01-01

    The UAS-NAS Project demo will showcase recent research efforts to ensure the interoperability between proposed UAS detect and avoid (DAA) human machine interface requirements (developed within RTCA SC-228) and existing collision avoidance displays. Attendees will be able to view the current state of the art of the DAA pilot traffic, alerting and guidance displays integrated with Traffic advisory and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) II in the UAS-NAS Project's research UAS ground control station (developed in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory). In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the research UAS ground control station and "fly" encounters, using the DAA and TCAS II displays to avoid simulated aircraft. The display of the advisories will be hosted on a laptop with an external 30" monitor, running the Vigilant Spirit system. DAA advisories will be generated by the JADEM software tool, connected to the system via the LVC Gateway. A repeater of the primary flight display will be shown on a 55" monitor mounted on a stand at the back of the booth to show the pilot interaction to the passersby.

  1. Analysis of DEMO scenarios with the CRONOS suite of codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2008-07-01

    The CRONOS suite of codes and the GLF23 theory-based transport model are used to perform a 1.5D analysis of the DEMO design. The study uses plasma parameters similar to those obtained in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study in the case of a scenario with moderate inductive current, high bootstrap current fraction, relatively small major radius R = 7.5 m and minor radius a = 2.5 m and high elongation and triangularity. It is shown how it is possible to obtain a high fusion power of 2600 MW and high fusion gain Q = 26.5 by adding 98 MW off-axis neutral beam at a moderately high Greenwald fraction of 1.2. A non-inductive current fraction of 88% is obtained mainly from the bootstrap current at the plasma edge, where a high pedestal of 7.8 keV has been considered in order to optimize the alpha power. It is also shown how by adding 66 MW of electron cyclotron waves to the previous scenario a 100% non-inductive current steady-state scenario can be obtained with a reversed q profile. However, in this case the fusion gain drops to 17.2 due to the higher input power. The application of LH waves is also discussed.

  2. Optical modeling of the Jefferson Laboratory IR demo FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Davidson, Paul C.; Kloeppel, Peter K.

    1997-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 3 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power and wavelength for industrial and Navy defense applications. The accelerator system for this IR demo includes a 10 MeV photocathode-based injector, a 32 MeV CEBAF-style superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport which accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The electron and optical beam time structure in the design consists of a train of picosecond pulses at 37.425 MHz pulse repetition rate. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Future upgrades of the system will increase the power and shorten the operating wavelength, and utilize a more advanced resonator system capable of scaling to high powers. The optical system of the laser has been modeled using the GLADR code by using a Beer's-law region to mimic the FEL interaction. Effects such as mirror heating have been calculated and compared with analytical treatments. The magnitude of the distortion for several materials and wavelengths has been estimated. The advantages as well as the limitations of this approach are discussed.

  3. X-ray diagnostic developments in the perspective of DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Causa, F.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Choe, W.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, S.; Jang, J.; Hong, J.; Jeon, T.; Lee, H.

    2014-08-21

    studied in the laboratory both as imaging optical device (full lens) or to define a line of sight (cylinder lens); the preliminary results are encouraging toward the goal of using these lenses to transport X-ray radiation far from the reactor. Reflective or diffractive X-ray optics can be also an option for tomography. A GEM detector has been installed at KSTAR and in the next future hopefully the other approaches will be tested there: once their feasibility will be demonstrated, the issue of the improvement of the radiation tolerance will be faced and the development of algorithms for data analysis as well.

  4. X-ray diagnostic developments in the perspective of DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Causa, F.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Choe, W.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, S.; Jang, J.; Hong, J.; Jeon, T.; Lee, H.

    2014-08-01

    laboratory both as imaging optical device (full lens) or to define a line of sight (cylinder lens); the preliminary results are encouraging toward the goal of using these lenses to transport X-ray radiation far from the reactor. Reflective or diffractive X-ray optics can be also an option for tomography. A GEM detector has been installed at KSTAR and in the next future hopefully the other approaches will be tested there: once their feasibility will be demonstrated, the issue of the improvement of the radiation tolerance will be faced and the development of algorithms for data analysis as well.

  5. Alloying and coating strategies for improved Pb-Li compatibility in DEMO-type fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, K. A.; Pint, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Two strategies were explored to improve the Pb-16Li compatibility of Fe-base alloys for a fusion energy blanket system. The use of thin (∼50 μm) Al-rich diffusion coatings on Grade 92 (9Cr-2W) substrates significantly reduced the mass loss in static Pb-Li capsule tests for up to 5000 h at 600 °C and 700 °C. However, significant Al loss was observed at 700 °C. Thicker coatings with Fe-Al intermetallic layers partially spalled after exposure at 700 °C, suggesting that coating strategies are limited to lower temperatures. To identify compositions for further alloy development, model FeCrAlY alloys with 10-20 wt.%Cr and 3-5%Al were exposed for 1000 h at 700 °C. There was little effect on mass change of varying the Cr content, however, alloys with <5% Al showed mass losses in these experiments. For both coatings and FeCrAl alloys, the surface reaction product was LiAlO2 after exposure and cleaning.

  6. Workshop Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet

    2004-01-01

    The goals are: 1. Report and document recent progress on radiation belt model and plasma model development. Metrics for past and current programs. 2. Complete a roadmap for the development of new standard radiation belt and space plasma models for spacecraft engineering: input to agencies for future investments, interagency cooperation.

  7. Review of SRC-II process product hydrotreating data, for completeness and applicability to the demo plant

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, G.C.; Faruqi, A.

    1981-03-01

    The SRC-II product naphtha, gas oil, and whole liquid product hydrotreating data base was reviewed for completeness and applicability to the design of the SRC-II Demonstration Plant. Primary data sources were the Chevron and the UOP experimental hydrotreating work and the PNL bioassay investigations on UOP hydrotreated samples. Secondary data were the hydrotreating data for both the EDS and the H-Coal liquid products. The SRC-II product hydrotreating data are sparse at this point, but in view of the fact that these data can be supplemented through correlation with the corresponding data for the EDS and H-Coal liquid fractions, it is concluded that a sufficient data base exists for the closure of a hydrotreating plant material balance at least in the hydrotreating severity range of the Phase 0 design goals. Little thermal property data appear in the literature for coal-derived liquids; thus it will be necessary to draw upon correlations developed in the petroleum industry for closure of the plant energy balance unless experimental thermal property data are forthcoming. An area of uncertainty and concern at this time is the extent to which the Demo Plant product mutagenicity would be reduced by hydrotreatment. Although bioassay tests were conducted on both moderately and severely hydrotreated SRC-II Pilot Plant gas oil, the Demo Plant product is expected to contain an appreciable fraction of 800/sup 0/F/sup +/ material, compared with the Pilot Plant product, which contained essentially no material in this higher boiling range.

  8. Proposal of the confinement strategy of radioactive and hazardous materials for the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. Z.; Carloni, D.; Stieglitz, R.; Ciattaglia, S.; Johnston, J.; Taylor, N.

    2017-04-01

    Confinement of radioactive and hazardous materials is one of the fundamental safety functions in a nuclear fusion facility, which has to limit the mobilisation and dispersion of sources and hazards during normal, abnormal and accidental situations. In a first step energy sources and radioactive source have been assessed for a conceptual DEMO configuration. The confinement study for the European DEMO has been investigated for the main systems at the plant breakdown structure (PBS) level 1 taking a bottom-up approach. Based on the identification of the systems possessing a confinement function, a confinement strategy has been proposed, in which DEMO confinement systems and barriers have been defined. In addition, confinement for the maintenance has been issued as well. The assignment of confinement barriers to the identified sources under abnormal and accidental conditions has been performed, and the DEMO main safety systems have been proposed as well. Finally, confinement related open issues have been pointed out, which need to be resolved in parallel with DEMO development.

  9. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  10. An Assessment of the Penetrations in the First Wall Required for Plasma Measurments for Control of an Advanced Tokamak Plasma Demo

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2010-02-22

    A Demonstration tokamak (Demo) is an essential next step toward a magnetic-fusion based reactor. One based on advanced-tokamak (AT) plasmas is especially appealing because of its relative compactness. However, it will require many plasma measurements to provide the necessary signals to feed to ancillary systems to protect the device and control the plasma. This note addresses the question of how much intrusion into the blanket system will be required to allow the measurements needed to provide the information required for plasma control. All diagnostics will require, at least, the same shielding designs as planned for ITER, while having the capability to maintain their calibration through very long pulses. Much work is required to define better the measurement needs and the quantity and quality of the measurements that will have to be made, and how they can be integrated into the other tokamak structures.

  11. A program toward a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebut, P.-H.; Watkins, M. L.; Gambier, D. J.; Boucher, D.

    1991-08-01

    Near breakeven conditions have been attained in the JET tokamak [Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)], with beryllium as the first-wall material. A fusion triple product (nDτETi) of 8-9×1020 m-3 sec keV has been reached (within a factor of 8 of that required in a fusion reactor). However, this has only been achieved transiently. At high heating powers, an influx of impurities still limits the achievement of better performance and steady-state operation. In parallel, an improved quantitative understanding of fusion plasmas has emerged from the development of a particular plasma model. Good quantitative agreement is obtained between the model and JET data. The main predictions are also consistent with statistical scaling laws. With such a model, a predictive capability begins to emerge to define the parameters and operating conditions of a DEMO, including impurity levels. Present experimental results and model predictions suggest that impurity dilution is a major threat to a reactor. A divertor concept must be developed further to ensure impurity control before a DEMO can be constructed. A New Phase for JET is planned in which an axisymmetric pumped divertor configuration will be used to address the problems of impurity control, plasma fueling, and helium ash exhaust. It should demonstrate a concept of impurity control and the operational domain for such a device. A single Next Step facility (ITER) is a high risk strategy in terms of physics, technology, and management, since it does not provide a sufficiently sound foundation for a DEMO. A Next Step program is proposed, which could comprise several complementary facilities, each optimized with respect to specific clear objectives. In a minimum program, there could be two Next Step tokamaks, and a Materials Test Facility. Such a program would allow division of effort and sharing of risk across the various scientific and technical problems, permit cross comparison, and ensure continuity of results. It could even be

  12. Research on DEMO Physics Issues at High Density on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    Conceptual design studies of DEMO, the step that should bridge the gap between ITER and an FPP, heavily rely on the physics assumptions for its operational scenario. Usual DEMO designs exceed the parameters of the ITER Q = 10 baseline scenario in a number of points, such as βN, n /nGW and frad , core =Prad , core /Ptot . Research on present day devices cannot address these issues simultaneously at the high density and low collisionality that will occur in ITER or DEMO. In the last years, work on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has therefore mainly focused on the high density regime, consistent with the operational range set by the unique all-W wall of ASDEX Upgrade. In this contribution, we will report in particular on the following results: ELM mitigation with magnetic perturbation coils at high densities: ASDEX Upgrade has demonstrated reliable ELM mitigation using n = 1, n = 2 and n = 4 coil configurations at high density with no loss in confinement, in contrast to RMP ELM suppression at low density in DIII-D. We will discuss differences and commonalities. H-Mode operation at line averaged density well above the empirical Greenwald limit: small ELM regimes, lead to good pellet fuelling efficiency and have allowed achieving stationary H-modes at n /nGW = 1.5 with peaked density, the pedestal top density staying below nGW. These findings may open a route to operation of DEMO beyond the empirical Greenwald limit. Upper density limit for H-mode operation: recent studies reveal the coupling of an energy loss and the saturation of the density increase, which lead to the degeneration of the H-mode at high edge densities. Hence, also this limit can be viewed as an edge density limit. Exhaust at high Psep / R or high frad , core : both ITER and DEMO will have to operate with (semi)detached divertor at Psep / R >= 15 MW/m to stay in H-mode. We show stationary operation at 7 MW/m with average divertor heat flux below 5 MW/m2 and Te , div ~ 5 eV by simultaneous feedback control

  13. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  14. Optimization process for the design of the DCLL blanket for the European DEMOnstration fusion reactor according to its nuclear performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Iole; Rapisarda, David; Fernández-Berceruelo, Iván; Ibarra, Angel

    2017-07-01

    The research study focuses on the neutronic design analysis and optimization of one of the options for a fusion reactor designed as DCLL (dual coolant lithium-lead). The main objective has been to develop an efficient and technologically viable modular DCLL breeding blanket (BB) using the DEMO generic design specifications established within the EUROfusion Programme. The final neutronic design has to satisfy the requirements of: tritium self-sufficiency; BB thermal efficiency; preservation of plasma confinement; temperature limits imposed by materials; and radiation limits to guarantee the largest operational life for all the components. Therefore, a 3D fully heterogeneous DCLL neutronic model has been developed for the DEMO baseline 2014 determining its behaviour under the real operational conditions of the DEMO reactor. Consequent actions have been adopted to improve its performances. Neutronic assessments have specially addressed tritium breeding ratio, multiplication energy factor, power density distributions, damage and shielding responses. The model has then been adapted to the subsequent DEMO baseline 2015 (with a more powerful and bigger plasma, smaller divertor and bigger blanket segments), implying new design choices to improve the reactor nuclear performances.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  16. Modelling of ICRF heating in DEMO with special emphasis on bulk ion heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gallart, Dani; Mantsinen, Mervi; Kazakov, Yevgen

    2015-12-10

    Ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating is one of the auxiliary heating schemes presently envisaged for ITER and DEMO. In this paper we analyse the potential of ICRF waves to heat the fuel ions in DEMO. Our analysis is carried out for the DEMO1 Reference Scenario from October 2013 (B = 6.8 T, I = 18.6 MA, R = 9.25 m, a = 2.64 m) optimized for a maximum pulse length of 2.3 hrs using the ICRF modelling codes PION and TORIC. We focus on second harmonic heating of tritium and fundamental minority heating of {sup 3}He ions (with a few percent of {sup 3}He) in a 50%:50% D-T plasma. The dependence of the ICRF characteristics and the ICRF-accelerated ions on the ICRF and plasma parameters is investigated, giving special attention to the DEMO design point at a core plasma temperature of 30 keV and an electron density of 1.2·10{sup 20} m{sup −3}.

  17. An analysis of AMTEC, multi-cell ground-demo for the Pluto/Express mission

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, J.M.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    Results of recent tests of an 8-cell, AMTEC ground-demo are analyzed and the performance of individual cells compared. The ground-demo produced a peak electric power of 27 W{sub e} at an output voltage of 16 V, when tested at hot and cold side temperatures of 1123 K and 553 K. The electric power output and terminal voltage of the individual cells, however, differed by as much as 25%, from 2.94 to 3.76 W{sub e}, and 1.73 to 2.21 V, respectively. These variations were attributed to differences in: (a) contact resistance between electrode / BASE / current collector; (b) current (or electrons) leakage between anode and cathode electrodes through the metal-ceramic braze joint between BASE tubes and support plate; and (c) the charge-exchange polarization losses. Model's predictions compared very well with measured voltage and electric power output of individual cells and of the ground-demo. At the operating conditions for the Pluto/Express spacecraft (T{sub hot} {approximately} 1200 K, T{sub cd} {approximately} 573 K), the best performing ground-demo cell would have delivered 5 W{sub e} at an output voltage of 3 V. These values, however, are still significantly lower than those needed to meet the Pluto/Express mission power requirements (8.2 W{sub e} at 3.5 V, per cell).

  18. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis, part II: repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Alberto; Negrini, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO). To be valid, a classification needs to overcome the repeatability issue which is inherent both in the used classificatory system and in the measured object. Aim The aim of this study is to present procedures and results obtained within the repeatability of 3-DEMO classification for scoliosis analysis. Method We acquired the data of 100 pathological and 20 normal spines with an optoelectronic system (AUSCAN) and of two dummies with simulated spine deformity. On the obtained 3D reconstruction of the spine, we considered the coronal view with a spinal reference system (Top View) and its three related parameters, defined in part I, constituting the 3-DEMO classification. We calculated the repeatability coefficient for the subjects (two acquisitions for each subject with a time interval of 26 ± 12 sec), whereas we evaluated the system measurement error calculating the standard deviation of 50 consecutive acquisitions for each dummy. Results Comparing the results of the two types of acquisition, it emerged that the main part of parameters variability was due to postural adjustments The proportion of agreement for the 3-DEMO parameters gives a k value above 0.8; almost 10% of patients changed classification because of postural adjustments, but none had a "mirror-like" variation nor a change in more of one parameter at a time Repeatability coefficient is lower than the previously calculated normative limits. Discussion The 3-DEMO classification has a high repeatability when evaluated with an optoelectronic system such as the AUSCAN System, whose systematic error is very low. This means that the implied physiological phenomenon is consistent and overcomes the postural variability inherent in the measured object (normal or pathological subject). PMID:17184548

  19. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis, part II: Repeatability.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Alberto; Negrini, Stefano

    2006-12-21

    In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO). To be valid, a classification needs to overcome the repeatability issue which is inherent both in the used classificatory system and in the measured object. The aim of this study is to present procedures and results obtained within the repeatability of 3-DEMO classification for scoliosis analysis. We acquired the data of 100 pathological and 20 normal spines with an optoelectronic system (AUSCAN) and of two dummies with simulated spine deformity. On the obtained 3D reconstruction of the spine, we considered the coronal view with a spinal reference system (Top View) and its three related parameters, defined in part I, constituting the 3-DEMO classification. We calculated the repeatability coefficient for the subjects (two acquisitions for each subject with a time interval of 26 +/- 12 sec), whereas we evaluated the system measurement error calculating the standard deviation of 50 consecutive acquisitions for each dummy. Comparing the results of the two types of acquisition, it emerged that the main part of parameters variability was due to postural adjustments The proportion of agreement for the 3-DEMO parameters gives a k value above 0.8; almost 10% of patients changed classification because of postural adjustments, but none had a "mirror-like" variation nor a change in more of one parameter at a time Repeatability coefficient is lower than the previously calculated normative limits. The 3-DEMO classification has a high repeatability when evaluated with an optoelectronic system such as the AUSCAN System, whose systematic error is very low. This means that the implied physiological phenomenon is consistent and overcomes the postural variability inherent in the measured object (normal or pathological subject).

  20. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  1. Remote Reactor Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, Jim; Gerling, Mark; Roecker, Caleb; Sumner, Matthew; Sweany, Melinda

    2014-09-01

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors.

  2. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  5. Reduction of poloidal magnetic flux consumption during plasma current ramp-up in DEMO relevant plasma regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Hayashi, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Sakamoto, Y.; Ide, S.; Kubo, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The method for reducing a poloidal magnetic flux consumption of external coils is investigated to reduce the size of the central solenoid (CS) in the DEMO reactor. The reduction of the poloidal magnetic flux consumption during a plasma current ramp-up phase by electron cyclotron (EC) heating is investigated using an integrated modeling code suite, TOPICS. A strongly reversed shear q profile tends to be produced if intense off-axis EC heating is applied to obtain a large reduction of the flux consumption. In order to overcome this tendency, we find a method to obtain the optimum temperature profile which minimizes the poloidal flux consumption for a wide range of the q profile. We try to reproduce the optimum temperature profile for a weakly reversed shear q profile using six EC rays of 20 MW. As a result, the resistive flux consumption during the current ramp-up can be reduced by 63% from the estimation using the Ejima constant of 0.45 and the total flux consumption can be reduced by 20% from the conventional estimation. In addition, we find that the resistive flux consumption is closely related to the volume averaged electron temperature and not to the profile shape. Using this relation, the required heating power is estimated to be 31 MW based on a well established global confinement scaling, ITER L-89P. As a result, it is clarified that the poloidal magnetic flux consumption can be reduced by 20% using 20-31 MW of EC heating for a weakly reversed shear q profile. This reduction of the flux consumption accounts for 10% reduction of the CS radius.

  6. Advanced MMI/MP for Demo III XUVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirsky, Stephen B.; Salonish, Michael J.; Allen, Swati D.; Messina, Elena; Salinas, Jose

    1998-08-01

    This paper outlines the goals and work accomplished thus far for both the man-machine interface and mission planning elements of the experimental unmanned vehicle program. It is the gaol of the XUV program to make available to the user an interface and tools that will allow for seamless transition between mission planning, rehearsal, and execution on multiple collaborating autonomous vehicles in a platoon group.

  7. Diagnostics and required R and D for control of DEMO grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon K.

    2014-08-21

    Even if the diagnostics of ITER performs as expected, installation and operation of the diagnostic systems in Demo device will be much harsher than those of the present ITER device. In order to operate the Demo grade plasmas, which may have a higher beta limit, safely with very limited number of simple diagnostic system, it requires a well defined predictable plasma modelling in conjunction with the reliable control system for burn control and potential harmful instabilities. Development of such modelling in ITER is too risky and the logical choice would be utilization of the present day steady state capable devices such as KSTAR and EAST. In order to fulfill this mission, sophisticated diagnostic systems such as 2D/3D imaging systems can validate the physics in the theoretical modeling and challenge the predictable capability.

  8. Applicability of tungsten/EUROFER blanket module for the DEMO first wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igitkhanov, Yu.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Boccaccini, L.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we analyse a sandwich-type blanket configuration of W/EUROFER for DEMO first wall under steady-state normal operation and off-normal conditions, such as vertical displacements and runaway electrons. The heat deposition and consequent erosion of the tungsten armour is modelled under condition of helium cooling of the first wall blanket module and by taking into account the conversion of the magnetic energy stored in the runaway electron current into heat through the ohmic dissipation of the return current induced in the metallic armour structure. It is shown that under steady-state DEMO operation the first wall sandwich type module will tolerate heat loads up to ˜14 MW/m2. It will also sustain the off-normal events, apart from the hot vertical displacement events, which will melt the tungsten armour surface.

  9. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  10. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  11. Physics and Engineering Assessmetns of the K-DEMO Magnet Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, George H.; Brown, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Increased attention is being given now to studies of next-step fusion facilities with nuclear missions. Among these, South Korea's K DEMO is unique in its focus on a high toroidal magnetic field, large major radius, steady-state tokamak design for the core of a facility to test fusion nuclear components in Phase I and, after upgrades, produce 500 MW of electricity in a Phase II. Innovative features of the K DEMO magnet set include the use of two toroidal field (TF) coil winding packs with conductor grading and a machine configuration designed for vertical maintenance. The magnet arrangement features large TF coils and widely spaced poloidal field (PF) coils to accommodate removal of in-vessel components as large modules. Physics and engineering assessments of the pre-conceptual K-DEMO magnet configuration are reported, including: 1) design point and operating space assessment, 2) conductor assessment, and 3) structural assessment. It is found that a reference design point at 6.8 m major radius and 7.4 T toroidal field provides sufficient operating margins for the 500 MWe Phase II mission. Analyses of candidate cable-in-conduit conductors provide predictions of critical current degradation, both in the initial load cycle and an additionally with cyclic loading. A first-pass global analysis of the magnet system found minimal out-of-plane deformations of the TF coil, but an overstress condition in the inner leg of the TF coil. However an analysis taking into account elastic-plastic behavior, frictional sliding, and displacement shows that the structure can safely carry the load. Although the design evolution is still at an early stage, these assessments support the design point choices to date and the expectation that a feasible solution for the high-field K DEMO magnet system can be found.

  12. The physics and technology basis entering European system code studies for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R.; Kembleton, R.; Bachmann, C.; Biel, W.; Bolzonella, T.; Ciattaglia, S.; Cismondi, F.; Coleman, M.; Donné, A. J. H.; Eich, T.; Fable, E.; Federici, G.; Franke, T.; Lux, H.; Maviglia, F.; Meszaros, B.; Pütterich, T.; Saarelma, S.; Snickers, A.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Wolff, D.; Zohm, H.

    2017-01-01

    A large scale program to develop a conceptual design for a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) has been initiated in Europe. Central elements are the baseline design points, which are developed by system codes. The assessment of the credibility of these design points is often hampered by missing information. The main physics and technology content of the central European system codes have been published (Kovari et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 3054-69, 2016 Fusion Eng. Des. 104 9-20, Reux et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 073011). In addition, this publication discusses key input parameters for the pulsed and conservative design option \\tt{EU DEMO1 2015} and provides justifications for the parameter choices. In this context several DEMO physics gaps are identified, which need to be addressed in the future to reduce the uncertainty in predicting the performance of the device. Also the sensitivities of net electric power and pulse duration to variations of the input parameters are investigated. The most extreme sensitivity is found for the elongation ( Δ {κ95}=10 % corresponds to Δ {{P}\\text{el,\\text{net}}}=125 % ).

  13. Garage Demos: Using Physical Models to Illustrate Dynamic Aspects of Microscopic Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Roca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Colorful PowerPoint presentations with detailed drawings, micrographs, and short animations have become the standard format for illustrating the fundamental features of cell biology in large introductory classes. In this essay, we describe a low-tech tool that can be included in a standard lecture to help students visualize, understand, and remember the dynamic aspects of microscopic cell biological processes. This approach involves use of common objects, including pipe insulation and a garden hose, to illustrate basic processes such as protein folding and cloning, hence the appellation “garage demos.” The demonstrations are short, minimizing displacement of course content, easy to make, and provide an avenue for increasing student–faculty interaction in a large lecture hall. Student feedback over the past 4 years has been overwhelmingly positive. In an anonymous postclass survey in 2007, 90% of the respondents rated garage demos as having been very or somewhat helpful for understanding course concepts. Direct measurements of learning gains on specific concepts illustrated by garage demos are the focus of an ongoing study. PMID:19487500

  14. Use cases and DEMO: aligning functional features of ICT-infrastructure to business processes.

    PubMed

    Maij, E; Toussaint, P J; Kalshoven, M; Poerschke, M; Zwetsloot-Schonk, J H M

    2002-11-12

    The proper alignment of functional features of the ICT-infrastructure to business processes is a major challenge in health care organisations. This alignment takes into account that the organisational structure not only shapes the ICT-infrastructure, but that the inverse also holds. To solve the alignment problem, relevant features of the ICT-infrastructure should be derived from the organisational structure and the influence of this envisaged ICT to the work practices should be pointed out. The objective of our study was to develop a method to solve this alignment problem. In a previous study we demonstrated the appropriateness of the business process modelling methodology Dynamic Essential Modelling of Organizations (DEMO). A proven and widely used modelling language for expressing functional features is Unified Modelling Language (UML). In the context of a specific case study at the University Medical Centre Utrecht in the Netherlands we investigated if the combined use of DEMO and UML could solve the alignment problem. The study demonstrated that the DEMO models were suited as a starting point in deriving system functionality by using the use case concept of UML. Further, the case study demonstrated that in using this approach for the alignment problem, insight is gained into the mutual influence of ICT-infrastructure and organisation structure: (a) specification of independent, re-usable components-as a set of related functionalities-is realised, and (b) a helpful representation of the current and future work practice is provided for in relation to the envisaged ICT support.

  15. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Nightingale, M.

    2011-12-01

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n∥ is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n∥ can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n∥ launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n∥). Note however that the n∥ upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with α-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n∥ slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  16. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis – Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). Aim To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. Methods 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 ± 3.1, 37.4 ± 12.5° Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Results Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. Discussion These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably

  17. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis - Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-03-19

    In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 +/- 3.1, 37.4 +/- 12.5 degrees Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably be calculated.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  19. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  20. Metallic fuels for advanced reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Porter, D. L.; Chang, Y. I.; Hayes, S. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Burkes, D. E.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Somers, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. This paper presents an evaluation of metallic alloy fuels. Early US fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high fissile density and compatibility with sodium. The goal of fast reactor fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. This will provide a mechanism for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels are candidates for this application, based on documented performance of metallic fast reactor fuels and the early results of tests currently being conducted in US and international transmutation fuel development programs.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  2. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  4. The role of risk management in the design of diagnostics for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ingesson, L. C.; Collaboration: F4E Diagnostic Project Team

    2014-08-21

    A project-oriented approach is beneficial for the selection and design of viable diagnostics for fusion reactors because of the associated complex physical and organizational environment. The project-oriented approach includes rigorous risk management. The nature and impact of risks related to technical, organizational and commercial aspects in relation to the development of ITER diagnostics under EU responsibility are analyzed. The majority of risks are related to organizational aspects and technical feasibility issues. The experience with ITER is extrapolated to DEMO and beyond. It should not be taken for granted that technical solutions will be found, while a risk analysis of various diagnostic techniques with quantitative assessments undertaken early in the design of DEMO would be beneficial.

  5. A fusion nuclear science facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

    DOE PAGES

    Garofalo, A. M.; Abdou, M. A.; Canik, John M.; ...

    2014-04-24

    An accelerated fusion energy development program, a fast-track approach, requires proceeding with a nuclear and materials testing program in parallel with research on burning plasmas, ITER. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) would address many of the key issues that need to be addressed prior to DEMO, including breeding tritium and completing the fuel cycle, qualifying nuclear materials for high fluence, developing suitable materials for the plasma-boundary interface, and demonstrating power extraction. The Advanced Tokamak (AT) is a strong candidate for an FNSF as a consequence of its mature physics base, capability to address the key issues, and the directmore » relevance to an attractive target power plant. The standard aspect ratio provides space for a solenoid, assuring robust plasma current initiation,and for an inboard blanket, assuring robust tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 for FNSF tritium self-sufficiency and building of inventory needed to start up DEMO. An example design point gives a moderate sized Cu-coil device with R/a = 2.7 m/0.77 κ = 2.3, BT= 5.4 T, IP = 6.6 MA, βN = 2.75, Pfus = 127 MW. The modest bootstrap fraction of fBS = 0.55 provides an opportunity to develop steady state with sufficient current drive for adequate control. Lastly, proceeding with a FNSF in parallel with ITER provides a strong basis to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q ~ 10 in ITER.« less

  6. A fusion nuclear science facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, A. M.; Abdou, M. A.; Canik, John M.; Chan, Vincent S.; Hyatt, A. W.; Hill, D. N.; Morley, N. B.; Navratil, G. A.; Sawan, M. E.; Taylor, T. S.; Wong, C. P. C.; Wu, W.; Ying, Alice

    2014-04-24

    An accelerated fusion energy development program, a fast-track approach, requires proceeding with a nuclear and materials testing program in parallel with research on burning plasmas, ITER. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) would address many of the key issues that need to be addressed prior to DEMO, including breeding tritium and completing the fuel cycle, qualifying nuclear materials for high fluence, developing suitable materials for the plasma-boundary interface, and demonstrating power extraction. The Advanced Tokamak (AT) is a strong candidate for an FNSF as a consequence of its mature physics base, capability to address the key issues, and the direct relevance to an attractive target power plant. The standard aspect ratio provides space for a solenoid, assuring robust plasma current initiation,and for an inboard blanket, assuring robust tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 for FNSF tritium self-sufficiency and building of inventory needed to start up DEMO. An example design point gives a moderate sized Cu-coil device with R/a = 2.7 m/0.77 κ = 2.3, BT= 5.4 T, IP = 6.6 MA, βN = 2.75, Pfus = 127 MW. The modest bootstrap fraction of fBS = 0.55 provides an opportunity to develop steady state with sufficient current drive for adequate control. Lastly, proceeding with a FNSF in parallel with ITER provides a strong basis to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q ~ 10 in ITER.

  7. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  8. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  9. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg ofmore » 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.« less

  10. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-30

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. In conclusion, a rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  11. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-28

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg of 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.

  12. Antineutrino monitoring of thorium reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A.; Bernstein, Adam; Norman, Eric B.

    2016-09-28

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuel types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring. Thorium molten salt reactors breed 233U, that if diverted constitute a direct use material as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of 233U has been estimated for the first time, and the feasibility of detecting the diversion of 8 kg ofmore » 233U, within a 30 day timeliness goal has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos at a 25 m standoff. It was found that the diversion of a significant quantity of 233U could not be detected within the current IAEA timeliness detection goal using either tests. A rate-time based analysis exceeded the timeliness goal by 23 days, while a spectral based analysis exceeds this goal by 31 days.« less

  13. Compact Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-01

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  14. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  16. Vicarious goal satiation.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Kathleen C; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M; Chua, Sook Ning; Albarracín, Dolores

    2011-05-01

    A signature feature of self-regulation is that once a goal is satiated, it becomes deactivated, thereby allowing people to engage in new pursuits. The present experiments provide evidence for vicarious goal satiation, a novel phenomenon in which individuals experience "post-completion goal satiation" as a result of unwittingly taking on another person's goal pursuit and witnessing its completion. In Experiments 1 and 2, the observation of a goal being completed (vs. not completed) led to less striving by the observer on the same task. Given that an actor's strength of commitment affects goal contagion, we hypothesized that such commitment would be an important boundary condition for vicarious goal satiation. The results of Experiment 2 showed that observing stronger (vs. weaker) goal commitment lowered accessibility of goal-related words, but only when the goal being observed was completed. Implications of vicarious goal satiation for goal pursuit in everyday environments are discussed.

  17. Vicarious goal satiation

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Kathleen C.; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M.; Chua, Sook Ning; Albarracín, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    A signature feature of self-regulation is that once a goal is satiated, it becomes deactivated, thereby allowing people to engage in new pursuits. The present experiments provide evidence for vicarious goal satiation, a novel phenomenon in which individuals experience “post-completion goal satiation” as a result of unwittingly taking on another person's goal pursuit and witnessing its completion. In Experiments 1 and 2, the observation of a goal being completed (vs. not completed) led to less striving by the observer on the same task. Given that an actor's strength of commitment affects goal contagion, we hypothesized that such commitment would be an important boundary condition for vicarious goal satiation. The results of Experiment 2 showed that observing stronger (vs. weaker) goal commitment lowered accessibility of goal-related words, but only when the goal being observed was completed. Implications of vicarious goal satiation for goal pursuit in everyday environments are discussed. PMID:23606756

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  1. Reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul

    1981-01-01

    A reactor apparatus for hydrocracking a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the hydrocarbonaceous feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst.

  2. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  4. Reactor Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lema, Juan M.; López, Carmen; Eibes, Gemma; Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    In this chapter, the engineering aspects of processes catalyzed by peroxidases will be presented. In particular, a discussion of the existing technologies that utilize peroxidases for different purposes, such as the removal of recalcitrant compounds or the synthesis of polymers, is analyzed. In the first section, the essential variables controlling the process will be investigated, not only those that are common in any enzymatic system but also those specific to peroxidative reactions. Next, different reactor configurations and operational modes will be proposed, emphasizing their suitability and unsuitability for different systems. Finally, two specific reactors will be described in detail: enzymatic membrane reactors and biphasic reactors. These configurations are especially valuable for the treatment of xenobiotics with high and poor water solubility, respectively.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  7. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  11. Integrated modelling of DEMO-FNS current ramp-up scenario and steady-state regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Kuteev, B. V.; Bykov, A. S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Sychugov, D. Yu.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    An approach to the integrated modelling of plasma regimes in the projected neutron source DEMO-FNS based on different codes is developed. The consistency check of the steady-state regime is carried out, namely, the possibility of the plasma current ramp-up, acceptance of growth rates of MHD modes in the steady-state regime, heat loads to the wall and divertor plates and neutron yield value. The following codes are employed for the integrated modelling. ASTRA transport code for calculation of plasma parameters in the steady-state regime, NUBEAM Monte Carlo code for NBI incorporated into the ASTRA code, DINA free boundary equilibrium and evolution code, SPIDER free boundary equilibrium and equilibrium reconstruction code, KINX ideal MHD stability code, TOKSTAB rigid shift vertical stability code, edge and divertor plasma B2SOLPS5.2 code and Semi-analytic Hybrid Model (SHM) code for self-consistent description of the core, edge and divertor plasmas based on the experimental scaling laws. The consistent steady-state regime for the DEMO-FNS plasma and the plasma current ramp-up scenario are developed using the integrated modelling approach. Passive copper coils are suggested to reduce the plasma vertical instability growth rate to below ˜30 s-1.The outer divertor operation in the ‘high-recycling’ regime is numerically demonstrated with a maximal heat flux density of 7-9 MW m-2 that is technically acceptable.

  12. Thermo-hydraulic analyses associated with a CEA design proposal for a DEMO TF conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallcorba, R.; Lacroix, B.; Ciazynski, D.; Torre, A.; Nunio, F.; Zani, L.; Le Coz, Q.; Lewandowska, M.; Coleman, M.

    2016-12-01

    The future DEMO Toroidal Field (TF) magnets are likely to feature cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) cooled by forced flow of supercritical helium. Design activities were carried out at CEA to provide a winding pack compatible with DEMO plant requirements. The CEA proposal comprises, for each of the 16 D-shaped windings, 10 double-pancakes (2 × 392 m long) wound in 10 turns. The conductor is a square-shaped Nb3Sn double channel conductor with a central spiral, carrying a nominal current of 95.5 kA. We present a thermo-hydraulic analyses focused on the central, most critical pancake, where the maximum field is reached, aiming at evaluating the integrity of the proposed conductor design. Both normal and off-normal simulations were performed using detailed electromagnetic and neutron heating load maps as input, and evaluating operational quantities such as the temperature margin in burn conditions, and the hot spot temperature in quench conditions. We assessed the sensitivity of these quantities to some driving parameters, notably mass flow rate and the choice of friction factor correlation for the temperature margin, and quench initiation features for the hot spot temperature. Furthermore, the influence of the casing cooling on the temperature margin is analyzed. The study is carried out using two thermohydraulic models.

  13. Endogenising demographic variables in demo-economic models: the Bachue experience.

    PubMed

    Wery, R; Rodgers, G

    1980-01-01

    The attempt is made in this discussion to describe and draw lessons from the treatment of behavioral demographic variables in the Bachue demo-economic models constructed for the Philippines, Kenya, Brazil and Yugoslavia. Focus is on certain theoretical, technical and practical problems encountered in inserting demographic variables in the system as a whole; how they have been measured in the various applications of the Bachue models, how they are behaviorally explained and linked to the other elements in the system, the data sources used, and some issues of econometric estimates and modelling. 8 issues are dealt with: population accounting and lag structure; fertility; mortality; migration; nuptiality; household formation; schooling; and labor force participation. In each case model structure, dependent and explanatory variables, and empirical strategy are discussed. Summary tables compare the approaches of the different models. The specifics of each country situation rule out the identification of the best solution. Some suggestions regarding more promising approaches are included with respect to choice of variables and the estimation of behavioral models. The endogenous nature of certain demographic elements of a demo-economic model are clear, but construction of the Bachue models has shown that there are no exact rules valid for all cases. There is considerable variety in the way characteristics of the population have been represented in the various applications.

  14. First Observations of GNSS Ionospheric Scintillations From DemoGRAPE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, L.; Cilliers, P. J.; Romano, V.; Hunstad, I.; Correia, E.; Linty, N.; Dovis, F.; Terzo, O.; Ruiu, P.; Ward, J.; Riley, P.

    2016-10-01

    The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia leads an international project funded by the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research, called Demonstrator of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Research and Application for Polar Environment (DemoGRAPE), in partnership with Politecnico di Torino, Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, and with South African National Space Agency and the Brazilian National Institute of Space Physics, as key collaborators. DemoGRAPE is a new prototype of support for the satellite navigation in Antarctica. Besides the scientific interest, the accuracy of satellite navigation in Antarctica is of paramount importance since there is always the danger that people and vehicles can fall into a crevasse during a snowstorm, when visibility is limited and travel is restricted to following specified routes using satellite navigation systems. The variability of ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillation are two of the primary factors which affect the accuracy of satellite navigation. The project will provide a demonstrator of cutting edge technology for the empirical assessment of the ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillations in the polar regions. The scope of the project includes new equipment for the recording and dissemination of GNSS data and products installed at the South African and Brazilian bases in Antarctica. The new equipment will facilitate the exchange of software and derived products via the Cloud computing technology infrastructure. The project portal is accessible at www.demogrape.net. We report the first Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal scintillations observed in Antarctica.

  15. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  16. Archimede solar energy molten salt parabolic trough demo plant: Improvements and second year of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccari, Augusto; Donnola, Sandro; Matino, Francesca; Tamano, Shiro

    2016-05-01

    Since July 2013, the first stand-alone Molten Salt Parabolic Trough (MSPT) demo plant, which was built in collaboration with Archimede Solar Energy and Chiyoda Corporation, is in operation, located adjacent to the Archimede Solar Energy (ASE) manufacturing plant in Massa Martana (Italy). During the two year's operating time frame, the management of the demo plant has shown that MSPT technology is a suitable and reliable option. Several O&M procedures and tests have been performed, as Heat Loss and Minimum Flow Test, with remarkable results confirming that this technology is ready to be extended to standard size CSP plant, if the plant design takes into account molten salt peculiarities. Additionally, the plant has been equipped on fall 2014 with a Steam Generator system by Chiyoda Corporation, in order to test even this important MSPT plant subsystem and to extend the solar field active time, overcoming the previous lack of an adequate thermal load. Here, a description of the plant improvements and the overall plant operation figures will be presented.

  17. On the core deuterium-tritium fuel ratio and temperature measurements in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiptily, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Comparing with ITER, the experimental fusion machine under construction, the next-step test fusion power plant, DEMO will be characterized by a very long pulse/steady-state operation and much higher plasma volume and fusion power. The substantially increased level of neutron and gamma fluxes will require reducing the physical access to the plant. It means some conventional diagnostics for the fusion plasma control will not be suitable in DEMO. Development of diagnostics along with the machine design is a primary task for the test plant. The deuterium-tritium fuel ratio and temperature are among important parameters, which should be under control. In this paper, a novel technique for the core fuel ratio and temperature diagnostics is proposed. It is based on measurements and comparison of the rates T(p, γ)4He and D(T, γ)5He nuclear reactions that take place in the hot deuterium-tritium plasma. Based on detection of high-energy gamma-rays, this diagnostic is robust, efficient and does not require direct access to the plasma. It could be included in the loop of the burning plasma control system. A feasibility of the diagnostic in experiments on JET and ITER is also discussed.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  19. Goals are not selfish.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, William; von Hippel, Frank A

    2014-04-01

    The metaphor of selfish goals is misguided. Organisms can be considered vessels that further the interests of their genes, but not vessels that further the interests of their goals. Although goals can act at cross-purposes to each other and to longevity, such trade-offs are predicted by evolutionary theory. The metaphor of selfish goals provides no purchase on this problem.

  20. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Advanced Reactors Around the World

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Debu

    2003-09-01

    At the end of 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were operating around the globe and providing 17% of the world's electricity. Although the rate of population growth has slowed, recent United Nations data suggest that two billion more people will be added to the world by 2050. A special report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that electricity demand would grow almost eight-fold from 2000 to 2050 in a high economic grown scenario and more than double in a low-growth scenario. There is also a global aspiration to keep the environment pristine. Because of these reasons, it is expected that a large number of new nuclear reactors may be operating by 2050. Realization of this has created an impetus for the development of a new generation of reactors in several countries. The goal is to make nuclear power cost-competitive with other resources and to enhance safety to a level that no evacuation outside a plant site would be necessary. It should also generate less waste, prevent materials diversion for weapons production, and be sustainable. This article discusses the status of next-generation reactors under development around the world. Specifically highlighted are efforts related to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and its six reactor concepts for research and development: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR); Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR); Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR); and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). Also highlighted are nuclear activities specific to Russia and India.

  2. Use of the Research Vessel Savannah in Support of 2015 ONR S and T Demo, Project ID: 104458

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-26

    infrastructure inspection. The 21 day cruise was carried out in the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay, and successfully met objectives. 1S...each vehicle were presented to all ONR S&T Demo participants including Navy Rear Admiral M. Winter. The RJV Savannah spent its last day recovering

  3. Learning Communities: Strengthening Lifelong Learning through Practice. A Demos/Learning and Skills Development Agency Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Development Agency, London (England).

    This paper details the work of Demos and the Learning and Skills Development Agency to examine how new institutional structures for supporting lifelong learning can develop in ways that best support community-based learning activities in the United Kingdom. Three seminar background papers and notes are provided, each followed by seminar notes.…

  4. Variable-retention harvests in the Pacific Northwest: a review of short-term findings from the DEMO study

    Treesearch

    K.B. Aubry; C.B. Halpern; C.E. Peterson

    2009-01-01

    In the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the contiguous United States, retention of live (green) trees in harvest units is an integral part of forest management practices on federal lands, yet the ecological benefits that result from various levels or patterns of retained trees remain speculative. The Demonstration of Ecosystem Management Options (DEMO) study was...

  5. People Demos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Hicks, Jim

    1983-01-01

    Describes demonstrations in which individuals participate in activities to illustrate physics concepts. No equipment other than the individuals participating is required. Demonstrations are provided for the topics of gas laws, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, optics, acoustics, kinematics, and dynamics. (JN)

  6. Dynamic Demos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sae, Andy S. W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 27 chemical demonstrations involving inexpensive, readily available materials that illustrate the following concepts: acid/base properties, gas properties, characteristics of carbon dioxide, chemiluminescence, freezing point depression, heat of vaporization; density, polymers, surface tension, polarity/nonpolarity, UV absorption,…

  7. Dynamic Demos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sae, Andy S. W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 27 chemical demonstrations involving inexpensive, readily available materials that illustrate the following concepts: acid/base properties, gas properties, characteristics of carbon dioxide, chemiluminescence, freezing point depression, heat of vaporization; density, polymers, surface tension, polarity/nonpolarity, UV absorption,…

  8. People Demos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Hicks, Jim

    1983-01-01

    Describes demonstrations in which individuals participate in activities to illustrate physics concepts. No equipment other than the individuals participating is required. Demonstrations are provided for the topics of gas laws, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, optics, acoustics, kinematics, and dynamics. (JN)

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1957-10-01

    A reactor of the type which preferably uses plutonium as the fuel and a liquid moderator, preferably ordinary water, and which produces steam within the reactor core due to the heat of the chain reaction is described. In the reactor shown the fuel elements are essentially in the form of trays and are ventically stacked in spaced relationship. The water moderator is continuously supplied to the trays to maintain a constant level on the upper surfaces of the fuel element as it is continually evaporated by the heat. The steam passes out through the spaces between the fuel elements and is drawn off at the top of the core. The fuel elements are clad in aluminum to prevent deterioration thereof with consequent contamimation of the water.

  12. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  14. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  15. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  16. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  19. Integral Fast Reactor concept inherent safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: (1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, (2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, (3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS).

  20. Integral fast reactor concept inherent safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFT development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: 1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, 2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, 3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and 4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS).

  1. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  2. Set Goals & Select Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This phase of the Local Climate Action Framework will help users articulate the goals for their climate, energy, and sustainability programs, as well as to identify the actions that are most appropriate to help meet those goals.

  3. State Goals Overview

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation includes information on Best System of Emission Reduction (BSER), state flexibility and compliance options, examples of how to determine and calculate goals, on-the-way reductions, and a walk through of state goal derivation.

  4. De-Orbit Sail Design for TechDemoSat-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Stephen; Kingston, Jennifer; Roberts, Peter; Juanes, Clara; Sewell, Richard; Snapir, Boris; Robinson, Fraser; Vigili Llop, Josep; Hobbs, John; Patel, Manish

    2013-08-01

    Space debris mitigation guidelines are widely accepted and increasingly implemented. The guidelines require satellites to be removed from the LEO region within 25 years of their end of mission. This article describes the design of a payload, Icarus, to achieve this for the UK's TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) mission. Icarus was completed well within a year using limited resources. Its design was adapted to enable this while still meeting the requirements. An important driver was the need to pose no significant risk to TDS-1. The baseline design is for a randomly tumbling spacecraft with nominal orbit height of 686 km. Additional studies have been made to evaluate how this performance can be improved using active attitude control. The paper discusses issues raised in the development of this low-cost drag sail as a practical example of debris mitigation now waiting for launch on TDS-1.

  5. DeMO: An Ontology for Discrete-event Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Gregory A; Miller, John A; Hybinette, Maria; Baramidze, Gregory; York, William S

    2011-01-01

    Several fields have created ontologies for their subdomains. For example, the biological sciences have developed extensive ontologies such as the Gene Ontology, which is considered a great success. Ontologies could provide similar advantages to the Modeling and Simulation community. They provide a way to establish common vocabularies and capture knowledge about a particular domain with community-wide agreement. Ontologies can support significantly improved (semantic) search and browsing, integration of heterogeneous information sources, and improved knowledge discovery capabilities. This paper discusses the design and development of an ontology for Modeling and Simulation called the Discrete-event Modeling Ontology (DeMO), and it presents prototype applications that demonstrate various uses and benefits that such an ontology may provide to the Modeling and Simulation community. PMID:22919114

  6. DeMO: An Ontology for Discrete-event Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Gregory A; Miller, John A; Hybinette, Maria; Baramidze, Gregory; York, William S

    2011-09-01

    Several fields have created ontologies for their subdomains. For example, the biological sciences have developed extensive ontologies such as the Gene Ontology, which is considered a great success. Ontologies could provide similar advantages to the Modeling and Simulation community. They provide a way to establish common vocabularies and capture knowledge about a particular domain with community-wide agreement. Ontologies can support significantly improved (semantic) search and browsing, integration of heterogeneous information sources, and improved knowledge discovery capabilities. This paper discusses the design and development of an ontology for Modeling and Simulation called the Discrete-event Modeling Ontology (DeMO), and it presents prototype applications that demonstrate various uses and benefits that such an ontology may provide to the Modeling and Simulation community.

  7. A Demo opto-electronic power source based on single-walled carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunhua; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Luzhuo; Meng, Chuizhou; Fan, Shoushan

    2010-08-24

    It is known that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) strongly absorb light, especially in the near-infrared (NIR) region, and convert it into heat. In fact, SWNTs also have considerable ability to convert heat into electricity. In this work, we show that SWNT sheets made from as-grown SWNT arrays display a large positive thermoelectric coefficient (p-type). We designed a simple SWNT device to convert illuminating NIR light directly into a notable voltage output, which was verified by experimental tests. Furthermore, by a simple functionalization step, the p- to n-type transition was conveniently achieved for the SWNT sheets. By integrating p- and n-type elements in series, we constructed a novel NIR opto-electronic power source, which outputs a large voltage that sums over the output of every single element. Additionally, the output of the demo device has shown a good linear relationship with NIR light power density, favorable for IR sensors.

  8. 3-DEMO classification of scoliosis: a useful understanding of the 3(rd) dimension of the deformity.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Stefano; Atanasio, Salvatore; Fusco, Claudia; Zaina, Fabio; Negrini, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The third-dimension of scoliosis represent a great challenge for clinicians used to think in two dimensions due to the classical radiographic representation of the deformity. This caused problems in everyday clinical approaches, and led to the development of new bidimensional classifications (King, Lenke) who tried in different ways to face these problems, mainly in a surgical perspective. Recently, some three-dimensional classifications have been proposed, all developed in laboratory by bioengineers. In this paper we present the existing classifications of scoliosis, both bi-dimensional and three-dimensional and we thoroughly discuss the 3-DEMO (3-D Easy Morphological) that has been first presented years ago, and recently thoroughly published; this classification has been developed by clinicians with the main aim of being understandable and easily applicable to everyday clinical life.

  9. Transient Mirror Heating Theory and Experiment in the Jefferson Lab IR Demo FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.; Michelle D. Shinn.; Neil, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    During commissioning of the IR Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab, we noticed that the FEL exhibited a rapid power drop with time when the first set of 3 mu-m mirrors was used. Thought the rate of power drop was unexpected, it was thought that it could be due to a distortion of the mirrors during a time short compared to a the thermal diffusion time. This transient distortion might affect the laser more than the steady state distortion. This paper presents some analysis of the transient mirror heating problem and some recent experimental results using different mirror substrates and coatings. It is found that the behavior of the first mirror set cannot be reconciled with the observed power fall-off if a linear absorption is assumed. The power drop in more recent experiments is consistent with linear thermal analysis. No anomalous transient effects are seen.

  10. Evaluation of Demo 1C composite flywheel rotor burst test and containment design

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; McKeever, J.W.; Akerman, M.A.; Goranson, P.L.; Litherland, P.S.; O`Kain, D.U.

    1998-07-01

    Laboratory-Directed funds were provided in FY 1995 for research to develop flywheel containment specifications and to consider concepts that could satisfy these specifications and produce a prototype small, lightweight, inexpensive, mobile flywheel containment. Research activities have included an analytical and pictorial review of the Demo 1C flywheel failure test, which provided significant insight about radial and axial failure modes; calculations of the thickness of ultra-conservative pressure vessel containment; entertainment of advanced containment concepts using lightweight materials and armor literature; consideration of fabrication assembly procedures; and participation in a Flywheel Energy Storage Workshop during which additional flywheel failure experiences were discussed. Based on these activities, calculations, and results, a list of conclusions concerning flywheel containment and its relation to the flywheel are presented followed by recommendations for further research.

  11. Student Goals: Psychological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Brent; Little, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The paper will discuss research insights into student academic goals. Cognitive psychologists have found that effective goal setting procedures involves establishing specific and challenging learning objectives. Students who set difficult goals must be persistent while facing the risk of potential failure that could diminish their intrinsic…

  12. Tokamak DEMO-FNS: Concept of magnet system and vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizov, E. A.; Ananyev, S. S.; Belyakov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, E. N.; Voronova, A. A.; Golikov, A. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Zapretilina, E. R.; Ivanov, D. P.; Kavin, A. A.; Kedrov, I. V.; Klischenko, A. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.; Krasnov, S. V.; Krylov, A. I.; Krylov, V. A.; Kuzmin, E. G.; Kuteev, B. V.; Labusov, A. N.; Lukash, V. E.; Maximova, I. I.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Mineev, A. B.; Muratov, V. P.; Petrov, V. S.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Tanchuk, V. N.; Trofimov, V. A.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Khokhlov, M. V.; Shpanskiy, Yu. S.

    2016-12-01

    The level of knowledge accumulated to date in the physics and technologies of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) makes it possible to begin designing fusion—fission hybrid systems that would involve a fusion neutron source (FNS) and which would admit employment for the production of fissile materials and for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel. Modern Russian strategies for CTF development plan the construction to 2023 of tokamak-based demonstration hybrid FNS for implementing steady-state plasma burning, testing hybrid blankets, and evolving nuclear technologies. Work on designing the DEMO-FNS facility is still in its infancy. The Efremov Institute began designing its magnet system and vacuum chamber, while the Kurchatov Institute developed plasma-physics design aspects and determined basic parameters of the facility. The major radius of the plasma in the DEMO-FNS facility is R = 2.75 m, while its minor radius is a = 1 m; the plasma elongation is k 95 = 2. The fusion power is P FUS = 40 MW. The toroidal magnetic field on the plasma-filament axis is B t0 = 5 T. The plasma current is I p = 5 MA. The application of superconductors in the magnet system permits drastically reducing the power consumed by its magnets but requires arranging a thick radiation shield between the plasma and magnet system. The central solenoid, toroidal-field coils, and poloidal-field coils are manufactured from, respectively, Nb3Sn, NbTi and Nb3Sn, and NbTi. The vacuum chamber is a double-wall vessel. The space between the walls manufactured from 316L austenitic steel is filled with an iron—water radiation shield (70% of stainless steel and 30% of water).

  13. Tokamak DEMO-FNS: Concept of magnet system and vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Azizov, E. A. Ananyev, S. S.; Belyakov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, E. N.; Voronova, A. A.; Golikov, A. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Zapretilina, E. R.; Ivanov, D. P.; Kavin, A. A.; Kedrov, I. V.; Klischenko, A. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.; Krasnov, S. V.; Krylov, A. I.; Krylov, V. A.; Kuzmin, E. G.; Kuteev, B. V.; Labusov, A. N.; and others

    2016-12-15

    The level of knowledge accumulated to date in the physics and technologies of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) makes it possible to begin designing fusion—fission hybrid systems that would involve a fusion neutron source (FNS) and which would admit employment for the production of fissile materials and for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel. Modern Russian strategies for CTF development plan the construction to 2023 of tokamak-based demonstration hybrid FNS for implementing steady-state plasma burning, testing hybrid blankets, and evolving nuclear technologies. Work on designing the DEMO-FNS facility is still in its infancy. The Efremov Institute began designing its magnet system and vacuum chamber, while the Kurchatov Institute developed plasma-physics design aspects and determined basic parameters of the facility. The major radius of the plasma in the DEMO-FNS facility is R = 2.75 m, while its minor radius is a = 1 m; the plasma elongation is k{sub 95} = 2. The fusion power is P{sub FUS} = 40 MW. The toroidal magnetic field on the plasma-filament axis is B{sub t0} = 5 T. The plasma current is I{sub p} = 5 MA. The application of superconductors in the magnet system permits drastically reducing the power consumed by its magnets but requires arranging a thick radiation shield between the plasma and magnet system. The central solenoid, toroidal-field coils, and poloidal-field coils are manufactured from, respectively, Nb{sub 3}Sn, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn, and NbTi. The vacuum chamber is a double-wall vessel. The space between the walls manufactured from 316L austenitic steel is filled with an iron—water radiation shield (70% of stainless steel and 30% of water).

  14. Study on the quality and stability of compost through a Demo Compost Plant.

    PubMed

    Hasan, K M M; Sarkar, G; Alamgir, M; Bari, Q H; Haedrich, G

    2012-11-01

    This study is concerned with the performance of a Demo Compost Plant for the development of acceptable composting technology in Bangladesh. The Demo Compost Plant was setup at the adjacent area of an existing compost plant located at Khulna city in Bangladesh. Four different composting technologies were considered, where Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) were used as a raw material for composting, collected from the adjacent areas of the plant. Initially the whole composting system was conducted through two experimental setups. In the 1st setup three different types of aerators (horizontal and vertical passively aerator and forced aerator) were selected. For a necessary observation four piles, using only MSW as the input materials in the first three compost pile, the fourth one was the existing Samadhan's compost pile. Based on the analysis of the experimental findings, the horizontal passively aerated composting technique is suitable for Bangladesh as it had better performance for reducing composting period than that of the others. It was being observed from the quality parameters of compost in the both 1st and 2nd setup that as the waste directly come from kitchen, degradation rate of waste shows a positive result for reducing this waste and there is no possibility of toxic contamination, when it would be used as a soil conditioner. Though there is no significant improvement in the quality of the final product in the 2nd setup as comparing with the 1st setup but it fulfills one of the main objectives of this study is to reduce the whole composting period as well as immediate management of the increasing amount of waste and reducing load on landfill. Selfheating tests reveal that degree of stability of compost with respect to maturation period was remained in the acceptable level, which was further accelerated due to the use of organic additives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Find the weakest link. A comparison between demographic, genetic and demo-genetic metapopulation extinction times

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the ultimate causes of most species extinctions are environmental, environmental constraints have various secondary consequences on evolutionary and ecological processes. The roles of demographic, genetic mechanisms and their interactions in limiting the viabilities of species or populations have stirred much debate and remain difficult to evaluate in the absence of demography-genetics conceptual and technical framework. Here, I computed projected times to metapopulation extinction using (1) a model focusing on the effects of species properties, habitat quality, quantity and temporal variability on the time to demographic extinction; (2) a genetic model focusing on the dynamics of the drift and inbreeding loads under the same species and habitat constraints; (3) a demo-genetic model accounting for demographic-genetic processes and feedbacks. Results Results indicate that a given population may have a high demographic, but low genetic viability or vice versa; and whether genetic or demographic aspects will be the most limiting to overall viability depends on the constraints faced by the species (e.g., reduction of habitat quantity or quality). As a consequence, depending on metapopulation or species characteristics, incorporating genetic considerations to demographically-based viability assessments may either moderately or severely reduce the persistence time. On the other hand, purely genetically-based estimates of species viability may either underestimate (by neglecting demo-genetic interactions) or overestimate (by neglecting the demographic resilience) true viability. Conclusion Unbiased assessments of the viabilities of species may only be obtained by identifying and considering the most limiting processes (i.e., demography or genetics), or, preferentially, by integrating them. PMID:21929788

  16. Find the weakest link. A comparison between demographic, genetic and demo-genetic metapopulation extinction times.

    PubMed

    Robert, Alexandre

    2011-09-19

    While the ultimate causes of most species extinctions are environmental, environmental constraints have various secondary consequences on evolutionary and ecological processes. The roles of demographic, genetic mechanisms and their interactions in limiting the viabilities of species or populations have stirred much debate and remain difficult to evaluate in the absence of demography-genetics conceptual and technical framework. Here, I computed projected times to metapopulation extinction using (1) a model focusing on the effects of species properties, habitat quality, quantity and temporal variability on the time to demographic extinction; (2) a genetic model focusing on the dynamics of the drift and inbreeding loads under the same species and habitat constraints; (3) a demo-genetic model accounting for demographic-genetic processes and feedbacks. Results indicate that a given population may have a high demographic, but low genetic viability or vice versa; and whether genetic or demographic aspects will be the most limiting to overall viability depends on the constraints faced by the species (e.g., reduction of habitat quantity or quality). As a consequence, depending on metapopulation or species characteristics, incorporating genetic considerations to demographically-based viability assessments may either moderately or severely reduce the persistence time. On the other hand, purely genetically-based estimates of species viability may either underestimate (by neglecting demo-genetic interactions) or overestimate (by neglecting the demographic resilience) true viability. Unbiased assessments of the viabilities of species may only be obtained by identifying and considering the most limiting processes (i.e., demography or genetics), or, preferentially, by integrating them.

  17. Three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis, part I.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto; Atanasio, Salvatore; Santambrogio, Giorgio C

    2006-12-05

    While scoliosis has, for a long time, been defined as a three-dimensional (3D) deformity, morphological classifications are confined to the two dimensions of radiographic assessments. The actually existing 3-D classification proposals have been developed in research laboratories and appear difficult to be understood by clinicians. The aim of this study was to use the results of a 3D evaluation to obtain a simple and clinically oriented morphological classification (3-DEMO) that might make it possible to distinguish among different populations of scoliotic patients. We used a large database of evaluations obtained through an optoelectronic system (AUSCAN) that gives a 3D reconstruction of the spine. The horizontal view was used, with a spinal reference system (Top View). An expert clinician evaluated the morphological reconstruction of 149 pathological spines in order to find parameters that could be used for classificatory ends. These were verified in a mathematical way and through computer simulations: some parameters had to be excluded. Pathological data were compared with those of 20 normal volunteers. We found three classificatory parameters, which are fully described and discussed in this paper: Direction, the angle between spinal pathological and normal AP axis; Shift, the co-ordinates of the barycentre of the Top View ; Phase, the parameter describing the spatial evolution of the curve. Using these parameters it was possible to distinguish normal and pathological spines, to classify our population and to differentiate scoliotic patients with identical AP classification but different 3D behaviors. The 3-DEMO classification offers a new and simple way of viewing the spine through an auxiliary plane using a spinal reference system. Further studies are currently under way to compare this new system with the existing 3-D classifications, to obtain it using everyday clinical and x-rays data, and to develop a triage for clinical use.

  18. Three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis, part I

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto; Atanasio, Salvatore; Santambrogio, Giorgio C

    2006-01-01

    Background While scoliosis has, for a long time, been defined as a three-dimensional (3D) deformity, morphological classifications are confined to the two dimensions of radiographic assessments. The actually existing 3-D classification proposals have been developed in research laboratories and appear difficult to be understood by clinicians. Aim of the study The aim of this study was to use the results of a 3D evaluation to obtain a simple and clinically oriented morphological classification (3-DEMO) that might make it possible to distinguish among different populations of scoliotic patients. Method We used a large database of evaluations obtained through an optoelectronic system (AUSCAN) that gives a 3D reconstruction of the spine. The horizontal view was used, with a spinal reference system (Top View). An expert clinician evaluated the morphological reconstruction of 149 pathological spines in order to find parameters that could be used for classificatory ends. These were verified in a mathematical way and through computer simulations: some parameters had to be excluded. Pathological data were compared with those of 20 normal volunteers. Results We found three classificatory parameters, which are fully described and discussed in this paper: Direction, the angle between spinal pathological and normal AP axis; Shift, the co-ordinates of the barycentre of the Top View ; Phase, the parameter describing the spatial evolution of the curve. Using these parameters it was possible to distinguish normal and pathological spines, to classify our population and to differentiate scoliotic patients with identical AP classification but different 3D behaviors. Conclusion The 3-DEMO classification offers a new and simple way of viewing the spine through an auxiliary plane using a spinal reference system. Further studies are currently under way to compare this new system with the existing 3-D classifications, to obtain it using everyday clinical and x-rays data, and to develop a

  19. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  20. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  3. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  4. Materials issues in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, A. K.; Krishnamurthy, N.; Batra, I. S.

    2010-02-01

    The world scientific community is presently engaged in one of the toughest technological tasks of the current century, namely, exploitation of nuclear fusion in a controlled manner for the benefit of mankind. Scientific feasibility of controlled fusion of the light elements in plasma under magnetic confinement has already been proven. International efforts in a coordinated and co-operative manner are presently being made to build ITER - the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - to test, in this first step, the concept of 'Tokamak' for net fusion energy production. To exploit this new developing option of making energy available through the route of fusion, India too embarked on a robust fusion programme under which we now have a working tokamak - the Aditya and a steady state tokamak (SST-1), which is on the verge of functioning. The programme envisages further development in terms of making SST-2 followed by a DEMO and finally the fusion power reactor. Further, with the participation of India in the ITER program in 2005, and recent allocation of half - a - port in ITER for placing our Lead - Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) based Test Blanket Module (TBM), meant basically for breeding tritium and extracting high grade heat, the need to understand and address issues related to materials for these complex systems has become all the more necessary. Also, it is obvious that with increasing power from the SST stages to DEMO and further to PROTOTYPE, the increasing demands on performance of materials would necessitate discovery and development of new materials. Because of the 14.1 MeV neutrons that are generated in the D+T reaction exploited in a tokamak, the materials, especially those employed for the construction of the first wall, the diverter and the blanket segments, suffer crippling damage due to the high He/dpa ratios that result due to the high energy of the neutrons. To meet this challenge, the materials that need to be developed for the tokamaks

  5. Dynamic behavior of chemical exchange column in a water detritiation system for a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, T.; Iwai, Y.

    2008-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a CECE column used for a demonstration reactor (DEMO) plant has been studied. In the case where the column was filled with natural water, the time required to achieve steady state was almost the same as that for the column operated under the total reflux mode. The manipulated variables were flow rate of the bottom stream for the control of the bottom tritium concentration, and flow rate of the hydrogen stream for the control of the top tritium concentration. For both the variables, the response curve was expressed by the first-order lag system, and a PID controller could be applied. (authors)

  6. Transmutation analysis of realistic low-activation steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF

    SciTech Connect

    Cabellos, O; Sanz, J; Garc?a-Herranz, N; D?az, S; Reyes, S; Piedloup, S

    2005-11-22

    A comprehensive transmutation study for steels considered in the selection of structural materials for magnetic and inertial fusion reactors has been performed in the IFMIF neutron irradiation scenario, as well as in the ITER and DEMO ones for comparison purposes. An element-by-element transmutation approach is used in the study, addressing the generation of: (1) H and He and (2) solid transmutants. The IEAF-2001 activation library and the activation code ACAB were applied to the IFMIF transmutation analysis, after proving the applicability of ACAB for transmutation calculations of this kind of intermediate energy systems.

  7. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  9. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  11. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOEpatents

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  12. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  14. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Warren R.

    1978-05-30

    A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A core structure for neutronic reactors adapted for the propulsion of aircraft and rockets is offered. The core is designed for cooling by gaseous media, and comprises a plurality of hollow tapered tubular segments of a porous moderating material impregniated with fissionable fuel nested about a common axis. Alternate ends of the segments are joined. In operation a coolant gas passes through the porous structure and is heated.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

    1961-12-01

    An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

  18. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  19. Space reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranken, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in design studies and technology for the SP-100 Project - successor to the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Project - is reported for the period October 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982. The basis for selecting a high-temperature, UO2-fueled, heat-pipe-cooled reactor with a thermoelectric conversion system as the 100/kW-sub e/ reference design has been reviewed. Although no change has been made in the general concept, design studies have been done to investigate various reactor/conversion system coupling methods and core design modifications. Thermal and mechanical finite element modeling and three dimensional Monte Carlo analysis of a core with individual finned fuel elements are reported. Studies of unrestrained fuel irradiation data are discussed that are relevant both to the core modeling work and to the design and fabrication of the first in-pile irradiation test, which is also reported. Work on lithium-filled core heat pipe development is described, including the attainment of 15.6 kW/sub t/ operation at 1525 K for a 2-m-long heat pipe with a 15.7-mm outside diameter. The successful operation of a 5.5-m-long, lightweight potassium/titanium heat pipe at 760 K is described, and test results of a thermoelectric module with GaP-modified SiGe thermoelectric elements are presented.

  20. The Selfish Goal

    PubMed Central

    Bargh, John A.; Green, Michelle; Fitzsimons, Gráinne

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments tested the hypothesis that consciously intended goal pursuits have unintended consequences for social judgment and behavior. From evolutionary theory (Dawkins 1976/2006) and empirical evidence of a nonconscious mode of goal pursuit (Bargh, 2005) we derive the hypothesis that most human goal pursuits are open-ended in nature: Once active, goals will operate on goal-relevant content in the environment, even if that content is not the intended focus of the conscious goal. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that goals to evaluate a job applicant for either a waiter or crime reporter position also shape impressions of incidental bystanders in the situation, such that the bystander is later liked or disliked not on his own merits, but on how well his behavior matches the criteria consciously applied in evaluating the job applicant. Experiment 3 finds that a goal to help a specific target person spills over to influence actions toward incidental bystanders, but only while active. Implications of these findings for goal pursuit in everyday life are discussed. PMID:19081795

  1. Recent activities related to the development of the plasma facing components for the ITER and fusion DEMO plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Ezato, Koichiro; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji; Hirose, Takanori; Mori, Seiji; Enoeda, Mikio

    2009-12-01

    In the ITER procurement, the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) will procure the divertor outer vertical target (OVT). The qualification of the manufacture of the components has been started by validating JADA's technical capability. JADA has developed vertical target qualification prototypes that cover most of the critical technical issues in the series production. The prototypes have been high heat flux tested under effective coordination by the ITER organization (IO) and showed sufficient durability. JADA has successfully obtained the certification to conduct the procurement of the OVT by the IO. Development of a breeding blanket is one of the most important issues to realize the DEMO. Test blanket module (TBM) testing is a key milestone toward the DEMO. In JAEA, R&D on the water-cooled blanket has been performed. As a result, a full-scale TBM first wall mock-up has successfully been developed. This mock-up showed sound thermal performance in preliminary testing.

  2. DTT: a divertor tokamak test facility for the study of the power exhaust issues in view of DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, R.; WPDTT2 Team; DTT Project Proposal Contributors, the

    2017-01-01

    In parallel with the programme to optimize the operation with a conventional divertor based on detached conditions to be tested on the ITER device, a project has been launched to investigate alternative power exhaust solutions for DEMO, aimed at the definition and the design of a divertor tokamak test facility (DTT). The DTT project proposal refers to a set of parameters selected so as to have edge conditions as close as possible to DEMO, while remaining compatible with DEMO bulk plasma performance in terms of dimensionless parameters and given constraints. The paper illustrates the DTT project proposal, referring to a 6 MA plasma with a major radius of 2.15 m, an aspect ratio of about 3, an elongation of 1.6-1.8, and a toroidal field of 6 T. This selection will guarantee sufficient flexibility to test a wide set of divertor concepts and techniques to cope with large heat loads, including conventional tungsten divertors; liquid metal divertors; both conventional and advanced magnetic configurations (including single null, snow flake, quasi snow flake, X divertor, double null); internal coils for strike point sweeping and control of the width of the scrape-off layer in the divertor region; and radiation control. The Poloidal Field system is planned to provide a total flux swing of more than 35 Vs, compatible with a pulse length of more than 100 s. This is compatible with the mission of studying the power exhaust problem and is obtained using superconducting coils. Particular attention is dedicated to diagnostics and control issues, especially those relevant for plasma control in the divertor region, designed to be as compatible as possible with a DEMO-like environment. The construction is expected to last about seven years, and the selection of an Italian site would be compatible with a budget of 500 M€.

  3. Healthcare Access and PrEP Continuation in San Francisco and Miami After the US PrEP Demo Project.

    PubMed

    Doblecki-Lewis, Susanne; Liu, Albert; Feaster, Daniel; Cohen, Stephanie E; Cardenas, Gabriel; Bacon, Oliver; Andrew, Erin; Kolber, Michael A

    2017-04-15

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for prevention of HIV infection has demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials and in demonstration projects. For PrEP implementation to result in significant reductions in HIV incidence for men who have sex with men in the United States, sufficient access to PrEP care and continued engagement outside of demonstration projects is required. We report the results of a follow-up survey of 173 former participants from the Miami and San Francisco sites of the US PrEP Demo Project, administered 4-6 months after study completion. Survey respondents continued to frequently access medical care and had a high incidence of sexually transmitted infections after completion of the Demo Project, indicating ongoing sexual risk behavior. Interest in continuing PrEP was high with 70.8% indicating that they were "very interested" in continuing PrEP. Among respondents, 39.9% reported continuation of PrEP after completion of the Demo Project, largely through their primary care providers and frequently at low or no cost. Variability in access and engagement was seen, with participants from the San Francisco site, those with medical insurance, and those with a primary care provider at the end of the Demo Project more likely to successfully obtain PrEP medication. Two respondents reported HIV seroconversion in the period between study completion and the follow-up survey. Additional effort to increase equitable access to PrEP outside of demonstration projects is needed to realize the potential impact of this evidence-based prevention intervention.

  4. THE GOALS OF INTEGRATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANDLIN, OSCAR

    THE LACK OF CLEARLY DEFINED GOALS WITHIN THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IS IMPEDING ITS TACTICS AND MOMENTUM. THE STATED GOAL OF INTEGRATION ACTUALLY HAS TWO ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATIONS--FULL LEGAL EQUALITY AND RACIAL BALANCE. THE NEWER STRESS ON RACIAL BALANCE RESTS ON THE FALLACIOUS ASSUMPTIONS THAT THE NEGRO'S SITUATION IS UNIQUE BECAUSE OF SLAVERY…

  5. Goal Setting and Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Katie; Reivich, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The science behind the mechanisms and mediators that lead to successful goal accomplishment has been a focus of research since the 1970s. When an individual desires to make a change or accomplish an outcome, research shows that he or she will be more successful if he or she attends to a number of variables that are key in goal setting.…

  6. Goal-Directed Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Marc F.; Troisi, Thomas J.; Pompilio, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of every school district is to help students succeed academically and personally. But does every district leverage its most valuable resource, its teachers, to meet that goal? At the Valley Stream Central High School District in Nassau County, New York, these authors know how important teacher commitment is to student success, so they…

  7. Can Goals Motivate Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Alexandra; Kober, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of six papers by the Center on Education Policy exploring issues related to students' motivation to learn. This paper examines various programs that use test performance or postsecondary attendance as motivational goals and the effects of these goals on students. How do policies surrounding assessments and college…

  8. Goals of genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Biesecker, B B

    2001-11-01

    The goals of genetic counseling have differed over the past three decades. Two schools of thought are prominent in reviewing past literature. One upholds the goal of preventing birth defects and genetic disorders while the other promotes a goal of improved psychological well-being in client adaptation to a genetic condition or risk. Both types of goals emphasize that clients should make their own reproductive decisions; however, the former relies on clients making decisions that will reduce the impact of genetic disorders. The differences in the types of goals may be due to the training and orientation of genetics health care providers, socio-cultural views, or priorities of health care settings. Regardless, there are ample reasons to dismiss the prevention of birth defects as a goal. This mini-review recommends use of genetic counseling sub-specialties as a framework for considering different client needs and thus different counseling goals and specific aims in the reproductive, pediatric/adult, and common disease settings. Given the extent of new genetic information, technologies, and the need to evaluate genetic counseling practice, genetics health care providers should work toward arriving at consensus on the goals of genetic counseling, and in doing so, the needs of clients should be considered.

  9. Goal Setting and Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Katie; Reivich, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The science behind the mechanisms and mediators that lead to successful goal accomplishment has been a focus of research since the 1970s. When an individual desires to make a change or accomplish an outcome, research shows that he or she will be more successful if he or she attends to a number of variables that are key in goal setting.…

  10. Goals of Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The reading teacher needs to choose students' reading goals carefully. This paper considers some of these possible goals, and states that, in the reading curriculum, the teacher needs to guide pupils to move upward on the cognitive level of objectives. The paper also states that pupils need to achieve well in the affective dimension of objectives,…

  11. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  12. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  13. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  14. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  15. NIFFTE Overview and Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Scott

    2008-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) will make fission cross section measurements for next generation nuclear reactors using a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Collaborating institutions are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Georgia Institute of Technology, Abilene Christian University, Oregon State University, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Colorado School of Mines, and Ohio University. It is funded under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in order to increase the precision needed for the design of a new generation of fast neutron reactors. The TPC is a new tool to improve the existing measurements that used fission chambers. The TPC will allow an overall view of the fission event and will distinguish it from background processes; primarily alpha decay. The experiments are planned at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) utilizing neutron beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV where existing fission cross sections have typical uncertainties of 5%.

  16. Assessment of candidate reactor technologies for the new production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) has reviewed and assessed reactor technologies as candidates for new reactor capacity to produce tritium (and possibly plutonium) to meet US requirements for nuclear weapons materials. In its assessment, the Board emphasized the equal and primary importance of producing goal quantities of tritium when needed and doing so in a safe and environmentally sound manner. Particular strengths and weaknesses of each technology were evaluated in six areas (Technology Base, Safety and Environmental, Schedule, Costs, Industrial Base, and Institutional Acceptance). The ERAB evaluation has found that Heavy Water Reactor technology is the most mature technology for tritium production at the present time. Each of the technologies considered could meet the mission requirements for new production capacity with varying degrees of risk as to cost and schedule. The Board found that, with early planning, there is an opportunity to gain revenues to offset costs by the sale of steam at the site boundary for power production. Safety is a primary consideration in the design, construction, and operation of the new reactor capacity and is of major importance to the technology selection. The Board believes that the design should take full advantage of the results of safety research to date, and that proposed safety goals and a sound safety review process will provide a level of safety that is at least equivalent to that of the best of current commercial power plants.

  17. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  19. ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1960-04-19

    An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

  20. REACTOR COMPONETN

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor fuel element comprised of a slug of fissionable material disposed in a sheath of corrosion resistantmaterial is described. The sheath is in the form of a tubular container closed at one end and is in tight-fitting engagement with the peripheral sunface of the slug. An inner cap is insented into the open end of the sheath against the slug, which end is then bent around the inner cap and welded thereto. An outer cap is then welded around its peripheny to the bent portion of the container.

  1. Photocatalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

    1999-01-19

    A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation for bioethanol production using corncobs at lab, PDU and demo scales.

    PubMed

    Koppram, Rakesh; Nielsen, Fredrik; Albers, Eva; Lambert, Annika; Wännström, Sune; Welin, Lars; Zacchi, Guido; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2013-01-14

    While simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) is considered to be a promising process for bioconversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethanol, there are still relatively little demo-plant data and operating experiences reported in the literature. In the current work, we designed a SSCF process and scaled up from lab to demo scale reaching 4% (w/v) ethanol using xylose rich corncobs. Seven different recombinant xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were evaluated for their fermentation performance in hydrolysates of steam pretreated corncobs. Two strains, RHD-15 and KE6-12 with highest ethanol yield and lowest xylitol yield, respectively were further screened in SSCF using the whole slurry from pretreatment. Similar ethanol yields were reached with both strains, however, KE6-12 was chosen as the preferred strain since it produced 26% lower xylitol from consumed xylose compared to RHD-15. Model SSCF experiments with glucose or hydrolysate feed in combination with prefermentation resulted in 79% of xylose consumption and more than 75% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose in lab and PDU scales. The results suggest that for an efficient xylose conversion to ethanol controlled release of glucose from enzymatic hydrolysis and low levels of glucose concentration must be maintained throughout the SSCF. Fed-batch SSCF in PDU with addition of enzymes at three different time points facilitated controlled release of glucose and hence co-consumption of glucose and xylose was observed yielding 76% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose at 7.9% water insoluble solids (WIS). With a fed-batch SSCF in combination with prefermentation and a feed of substrate and enzymes 47 and 40 g l-1 of ethanol corresponding to 68% and 58% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose were produced at 10.5% WIS in PDU and demo scale, respectively. The strain KE6-12 was able to completely consume

  3. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation for bioethanol production using corncobs at lab, PDU and demo scales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) is considered to be a promising process for bioconversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethanol, there are still relatively little demo-plant data and operating experiences reported in the literature. In the current work, we designed a SSCF process and scaled up from lab to demo scale reaching 4% (w/v) ethanol using xylose rich corncobs. Results Seven different recombinant xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were evaluated for their fermentation performance in hydrolysates of steam pretreated corncobs. Two strains, RHD-15 and KE6-12 with highest ethanol yield and lowest xylitol yield, respectively were further screened in SSCF using the whole slurry from pretreatment. Similar ethanol yields were reached with both strains, however, KE6-12 was chosen as the preferred strain since it produced 26% lower xylitol from consumed xylose compared to RHD-15. Model SSCF experiments with glucose or hydrolysate feed in combination with prefermentation resulted in 79% of xylose consumption and more than 75% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose in lab and PDU scales. The results suggest that for an efficient xylose conversion to ethanol controlled release of glucose from enzymatic hydrolysis and low levels of glucose concentration must be maintained throughout the SSCF. Fed-batch SSCF in PDU with addition of enzymes at three different time points facilitated controlled release of glucose and hence co-consumption of glucose and xylose was observed yielding 76% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose at 7.9% water insoluble solids (WIS). With a fed-batch SSCF in combination with prefermentation and a feed of substrate and enzymes 47 and 40 g l-1 of ethanol corresponding to 68% and 58% of the theoretical ethanol yield on available glucose and xylose were produced at 10.5% WIS in PDU and demo scale, respectively. The strain KE6-12 was able to

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. European ceramic B.I.T. blanket for DEMO: Recent development for the zirconate version

    SciTech Connect

    Bielak, B.; Eid, M.; Fuetterer, M.

    1994-12-31

    Within the framework of the European test-blanket program, CEA and ENEA are jointly developing a DEMO-relevant, helium-cooled, Breeder-Inside-Tube (BIT) ceramic blanket. Two ceramics are possible breeder material candidate: LiAlO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Despite the design has been originally developed for aluminate, the CEA has recently focused its work on zirconate. This concept blanket segments are made by a directly-cooled vacuum-tight steel box which contains banana-shaped poloidal breeder modules arranged in rows (6 rows in an outboard segment and 4 rows in an inboard one). A breeder module consists of a pressure vessel containing a bundle of breeder rods surrounded by baffles. Each one of the rods is made-up of a steel tube containing a stack of annular pellets of sintered lithium-zirconate, through which flows helium (the tritium purge gas). The thermo-mechanical analysis has shown that the thermal gradient in the ceramics can be kept at acceptable levels despite the poorer out-of-pile thermo-mechanical properties of zirconate compared to aluminate. Moreover, the neutronic analysis has shown that, besides the maintained tritium-breeding self-sufficiency capability of this blanket, the lower lithium burn-up could be an indication that the zirconate characteristics remains more stable after long term irradiation (i.e., close to the end-of-life fluence of 5 MWa/m{sup 2}).

  7. Conceptual design of divertor and first wall for DEMO-FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. Yu.; Kuteev, B. V.; Bykov, A. S.; Gervash, A. A.; Glazunov, D. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Klishchenko, A. V.; Lukash, V. E.; Mazul, I. V.; Molchanov, P. A.; Petrov, V. S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Shpanskiy, Yu. S.; Sivak, A. B.; Skokov, V. G.; Spitsyn, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Key issues of design of the divertor and the first wall of DEMO-FNS are presented. A double null closed magnetic configuration was chosen with long external legs and V-shaped corners. The divertor employs a cassette design similar to that of ITER. Water-cooled first wall of the tokamak is made of Be tiles and CuCrZr-stainless steel shells. Lithium injection and circulation technologies are foreseen for protection of plasma facing components. Simulations of thermal loads onto the first wall and divertor plates suggest a possibility to distribute heat loads making them less than 10 MW m-2. Evaluations of sputtering and evaporation of plasma-facing materials suggest that lithium may protect the first wall. To prevent Be erosion at the outer divertor plates either the full detached divertor operation or arrangement of the renewal lithium flow on targets should be implemented. Test bed experiments on the Tsefey-M facility with the first wall mockup coated by Ве tiles and cooled by water are presented. The temperature of the surface of tiles reached 280-300 °С at 5 MW m-2 and 600-650 °С at 10.5 MW m-2. The mockup successfully withstood 1000 cycles with the lower thermal loading and 100 cycles with higher thermal loading.

  8. Simulating local adaptation to climate of forest trees with a Physio-Demo-Genetics model

    PubMed Central

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Davi, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    One challenge of evolutionary ecology is to predict the rate and mechanisms of population adaptation to environmental variations. The variations in most life history traits are shaped both by individual genotypic and by environmental variation. Forest trees exhibit high levels of genetic diversity, large population sizes, and gene flow, and they also show a high level of plasticity for life history traits. We developed a new Physio-Demo-Genetics model (denoted PDG) coupling (i) a physiological module simulating individual tree responses to the environment; (ii) a demographic module simulating tree survival, reproduction, and pollen and seed dispersal; and (iii) a quantitative genetics module controlling the heritability of key life history traits. We used this model to investigate the plastic and genetic components of the variations in the timing of budburst (TBB) along an elevational gradient of Fagus sylvatica (the European beech). We used a repeated 5 years climatic sequence to show that five generations of natural selection were sufficient to develop nonmonotonic genetic differentiation in the TBB along the local climatic gradient but also that plastic variation among different elevations and years was higher than genetic variation. PDG complements theoretical models and provides testable predictions to understand the adaptive potential of tree populations. PMID:24822080

  9. Characterisation of NEXT-DEMO using xenon Kα X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorca, D.; Martín-Albo, J.; Laing, A.; Ferrario, P.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Liubarsky, I.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.

    2014-10-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe in a high-pressure xenon gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. Understanding the response of the detector is imperative in achieving a consistent and well understood energy measurement. The abundance of xenon K-shell X-ray emission during data taking has been identified as a multitool for the characterisation of the fundamental parameters of the gas as well as the equalisation of the response of the detector. The NEXT-DEMO prototype is a ~ 1.5 kg volume TPC filled with natural xenon. It employs an array of 19 PMTs as an energy plane and of 256 SiPMs as a tracking plane with the TPC light tube and SiPM surfaces being coated with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) which acts as a wavelength shifter for the VUV scintillation light produced by xenon. This paper presents the measurement of the properties of the drift of electrons in the TPC, the effects of the EL production region, and the extraction of position dependent correction constants using Kα X-ray deposits. These constants were used to equalise the response of the detector to deposits left by gammas from 22Na.

  10. Validation of a FAST model of the Statoil-Hywind Demo floating wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Frederick; Jonkman, Jason; Robertson, Amy; Sirnivas, Senu; Skaare, Bjorn; Nielsen, Finn Gunnar

    2016-10-13

    To assess the accuracy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) FAST simulation tool for modeling the coupled response of floating offshore wind turbines under realistic open-ocean conditions, NREL developed a FAST model of the Statoil Hywind Demo floating offshore wind turbine, and validated simulation results against field measurements. Field data were provided by Statoil, which conducted a comprehensive test measurement campaign of its demonstration system, a 2.3-MW Siemens turbine mounted on a spar substructure deployed about 10 km off the island of Karmoy in Norway. A top-down approach was used to develop the FAST model, starting with modeling the blades and working down to the mooring system. Design data provided by Siemens and Statoil were used to specify the structural, aerodynamic, and dynamic properties. Measured wind speeds and wave spectra were used to develop the wind and wave conditions used in the model. The overall system performance and behavior were validated for eight sets of field measurements that span a wide range of operating conditions. The simulated controller response accurately reproduced the measured blade pitch and power. In conclusion, the structural and blade loads and spectra of platform motion agree well with the measured data.

  11. Participation as Post-Fordist Politics: Demos, New Labour, and Science Policy.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Charles

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, British science policy has seen a significant shift 'from deficit to dialogue' in conceptualizing the relationship between science and the public. Academics in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have been influential as advocates of the new public engagement agenda. However, this participatory agenda has deeper roots in the political ideology of the Third Way. A framing of participation as a politics suited to post-Fordist conditions was put forward in the magazine Marxism Today in the late 1980s, developed in the Demos thinktank in the 1990s, and influenced policy of the New Labour government. The encouragement of public participation and deliberation in relation to science and technology has been part of a broader implementation of participatory mechanisms under New Labour. This participatory program has been explicitly oriented toward producing forms of social consciousness and activity seen as essential to a viable knowledge economy and consumer society. STS arguments for public engagement in science have gained influence insofar as they have intersected with the Third Way politics of post-Fordism.

  12. Validation of a FAST model of the Statoil-Hywind Demo floating wind turbine

    DOE PAGES

    Driscoll, Frederick; Jonkman, Jason; Robertson, Amy; ...

    2016-10-13

    To assess the accuracy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) FAST simulation tool for modeling the coupled response of floating offshore wind turbines under realistic open-ocean conditions, NREL developed a FAST model of the Statoil Hywind Demo floating offshore wind turbine, and validated simulation results against field measurements. Field data were provided by Statoil, which conducted a comprehensive test measurement campaign of its demonstration system, a 2.3-MW Siemens turbine mounted on a spar substructure deployed about 10 km off the island of Karmoy in Norway. A top-down approach was used to develop the FAST model, starting with modeling themore » blades and working down to the mooring system. Design data provided by Siemens and Statoil were used to specify the structural, aerodynamic, and dynamic properties. Measured wind speeds and wave spectra were used to develop the wind and wave conditions used in the model. The overall system performance and behavior were validated for eight sets of field measurements that span a wide range of operating conditions. The simulated controller response accurately reproduced the measured blade pitch and power. In conclusion, the structural and blade loads and spectra of platform motion agree well with the measured data.« less

  13. Simulating local adaptation to climate of forest trees with a Physio-Demo-Genetics model.

    PubMed

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Davi, Hendrik

    2014-04-01

    One challenge of evolutionary ecology is to predict the rate and mechanisms of population adaptation to environmental variations. The variations in most life history traits are shaped both by individual genotypic and by environmental variation. Forest trees exhibit high levels of genetic diversity, large population sizes, and gene flow, and they also show a high level of plasticity for life history traits. We developed a new Physio-Demo-Genetics model (denoted PDG) coupling (i) a physiological module simulating individual tree responses to the environment; (ii) a demographic module simulating tree survival, reproduction, and pollen and seed dispersal; and (iii) a quantitative genetics module controlling the heritability of key life history traits. We used this model to investigate the plastic and genetic components of the variations in the timing of budburst (TBB) along an elevational gradient of Fagus sylvatica (the European beech). We used a repeated 5 years climatic sequence to show that five generations of natural selection were sufficient to develop nonmonotonic genetic differentiation in the TBB along the local climatic gradient but also that plastic variation among different elevations and years was higher than genetic variation. PDG complements theoretical models and provides testable predictions to understand the adaptive potential of tree populations.

  14. Participation as Post-Fordist Politics: Demos, New Labour, and Science Policy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, British science policy has seen a significant shift ‘from deficit to dialogue’ in conceptualizing the relationship between science and the public. Academics in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have been influential as advocates of the new public engagement agenda. However, this participatory agenda has deeper roots in the political ideology of the Third Way. A framing of participation as a politics suited to post-Fordist conditions was put forward in the magazine Marxism Today in the late 1980s, developed in the Demos thinktank in the 1990s, and influenced policy of the New Labour government. The encouragement of public participation and deliberation in relation to science and technology has been part of a broader implementation of participatory mechanisms under New Labour. This participatory program has been explicitly oriented toward producing forms of social consciousness and activity seen as essential to a viable knowledge economy and consumer society. STS arguments for public engagement in science have gained influence insofar as they have intersected with the Third Way politics of post-Fordism. PMID:21258426

  15. Goals and Objectives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The five goals related to the Border 2020 program: reducing air pollution, access to clean and safe water, promoting clean waste management, emergency preparedness and response, compliance assurance.and environmental stewardship

  16. International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leopando, Leonardo; Warnecke, Ernst

    2008-01-15

    Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

  17. Control Means for Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J. H.

    1961-06-27

    An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

  18. A RE-LOOK AT THE US NRC SAFETY GOALS

    SciTech Connect

    mubayi v.

    2013-09-22

    Since they were adopted in 1986, the US NRC’s Safety Goals have played a valuable role as a de facto risk acceptance criterion against which the predicted performance of a commercial nuclear power reactor can be evaluated and assessed. The current safety goals are cast in terms of risk metrics called quantitative health objectives (QHOs), limiting numerical values of the risks of the early and latent health effects of accidental releases of radioactivity to the offsite population. However, while demonstrating compliance with current safety goals has been an important step in assessing the acceptance of the risk posed by LWRs, new or somewhat different goals may be needed that go beyond the current early fatality and latent cancer fatality QHOs in assessing reactor risk. Natural phenomena such as hurricanes seem to be suitable candidates for establishing a background rate to derive a risk goal as their order of magnitude cost of damages is similar to those estimated in severe accident Level 3 PRAs done for nuclear power plants. This paper obtains a risk goal that could have a wider applicability, compared to the current QHOs, as a technology-neutral goal applicable to future reactors and multi-unit sites.

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1962-12-18

    A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    McGarry, R.J.

    1958-04-22

    Fluid-cooled nuclear reactors of the type that utilize finned uranium fuel elements disposed in coolant channels in a moderater are described. The coolant channels are provided with removable bushings composed of a non- fissionable material. The interior walls of the bushings have a plurality of spaced, longtudinal ribs separated by grooves which receive the fins on the fuel elements. The lands between the grooves are spaced from the fuel elements to form flow passages, and the size of the now passages progressively decreases as the dlstance from the center of the core increases for the purpose of producing a greater cooling effect at the center to maintain a uniform temperature throughout the core.

  2. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    DOEpatents

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  3. Reactor and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  5. Science Goals to Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard SpaceFlight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545): This short course will present the science goals for a variety of types of imaging and spectral measurements, the thermal requirements that these goals impose on the instruments designed to obtain the measurements, and some of the types of trades that can be made among instrument subsystems to ensure the required performance is maintained. Examples of thermal system evolution from initial concept to final implementation will be given for several actual systems.

  6. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovsky, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; Havlíčková, E.; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; Horáček, J.; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Kočan, M.; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovič, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagôrski, R.; MAST, the; NBI Teams

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the pedestal highlights the potential roles of micro-tearing modes and kinetic ballooning modes for the pedestal formation. Mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation has been demonstrated for toroidal mode numbers n = 3, 4, 6 with an ELM frequency increase by up to a factor of 9, compatible with pellet fuelling. The peak heat flux of mitigated and natural ELMs follows the same linear trend with ELM energy loss and the first ELM-resolved Ti measurements in the divertor region are shown. Measurements of flow shear and turbulence dynamics during L-H transitions show filaments erupting from the plasma edge whilst the full flow shear is still present. Off-axis neutral beam injection helps to strongly reduce the redistribution of fast-ions due to fishbone modes when compared to on-axis injection. Low-k ion-scale turbulence has been measured in L-mode and compared to global gyro-kinetic simulations. A statistical analysis of principal turbulence time scales shows them to be of comparable magnitude and reasonably correlated with turbulence decorrelation time. Te inside the island of a neoclassical tearing mode allow the analysis of the island evolution without assuming specific models for the heat flux. Other results include the discrepancy of the current profile evolution during the current ramp-up with solutions of the poloidal field diffusion equation, studies of the anomalous Doppler resonance compressional Alfvén eigenmodes, disruption mitigation studies and modelling of the new divertor design for MAST Upgrade. The novel 3D electron Bernstein synthetic imaging shows promising first data sensitive to the edge current profile and flows.

  7. Assessment of GPS Reflectometry from TechDemoSat-1 for Scatterometry and Altimetry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Hajj, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The value of GPS reflectometry for scatterometry and altimetry applications has been a topic of investigation for the past two decades. TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1), a technology demonstration satellite launched in July of 2014, with an instrument to collect GPS reflections from 4 GPS satellites simultaneously, provide the first extensive data that allows for validation and evaluation of GPS reflectometry from space against more established techniques. TDS-1 uses a high gain (~13 dBi) L1 antenna pointing 6 degrees off nadir with a 60ohalf-beam width. Reflected GPS L1 signals are processed into Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) inside the receiver and made available (through Level-1b) along with metadata describing the bistatic geometry, antenna gain, etc., on a second-by-second basis for each of the 4 GPS tracks recorded at any given time. In this paper we examine level-1b data from TDS-1 for thousands of tracks collected over the span of Jan.-Feb., 2015. This data corresponds to reflections from various types of surfaces throughout the globe including ice, deserts, forests, oceans, lakes, wetlands, etc. Our analysis will consider how the surface type manifests itself in the DDMs (e.g., coherence vs. non-coherence reflection) and derivable physical quantities. We will consider questions regarding footprint resolution, waveform rise time and corresponding bistatic range accuracy, and level of precision for altimetry (sea surface height) and scatterometry (significant wave height and sea surface wind). Tracks from TDS-1 that coincide with Jason-1 or 2 tracks will be analyzed, where the latter can be used as truth for comparison and validation. Where coincidences are found, vertical delay introduced by the media as measured by Jason will be mapped to bistatic propagation path to correct for neutral atmospheric and ionospheric delays.

  8. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth; Porton, Michael

    2011-09-26

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D{sup -} beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  9. Reactor safety method

    DOEpatents

    Vachon, Lawrence J.

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  10. Student Educational Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidos, Marianne

    In an effort to inform program assessment efforts and provide more accurate indicators of student outcomes, Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC), in Pennsylvania, conducted a study of student educational objectives. Responses to questions related to goals on the college registration form were analyzed for 9,927 students enrolling in spring…

  11. RTT Goals Challenge Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Ambitious student-achievement targets turn up the heat, as winners of the $4 billion federal grant effort push to deliver. Winners of the $4 billion Race to the Top jackpot committed to grand goals in using the federal grants to raise student achievement, as measured by higher test scores, narrowed achievement gaps, and increased graduation and…

  12. Materialistic Values and Goals.

    PubMed

    Kasser, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Materialism comprises a set of values and goals focused on wealth, possessions, image, and status. These aims are a fundamental aspect of the human value/goal system, standing in relative conflict with aims concerning the well-being of others, as well as one's own personal and spiritual growth. Substantial evidence shows that people who place a relatively high priority on materialistic values/goals consume more products and incur more debt, have lower-quality interpersonal relationships, act in more ecologically destructive ways, have adverse work and educational motivation, and report lower personal and physical well-being. Experimentally activating materialistic aims causes similar outcomes. Given these ills, researchers have investigated means of decreasing people's materialism. Successful interventions encourage intrinsic/self-transcendent values/goals, increase felt personal security, and/or block materialistic messages from the environment. These interventions would likely be more effective if policies were also adopted that diminished contemporary culture's focus on consumption, profit, and economic growth.

  13. The Role of Goal Attainment Expectancies in Achievement Goal Pursuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senko, Corwin; Hulleman, Chris S.

    2013-01-01

    The current studies introduce the goal attainment expectancy construct to achievement goal theory. Three studies, 2 in college classrooms and the other using a novel math task in the laboratory, converged on the same finding. For mastery-approach goals and performance-approach goals alike, the harder the goal appeared to attain, the less likely…

  14. Selfish goals serve more fundamental social and biological goals.

    PubMed

    Becker, D Vaughn; Kenrick, Douglas T

    2014-04-01

    Proximate selfish goals reflect the machinations of more fundamental goals such as self-protection and reproduction. Evolutionary life history theory allows us to make predictions about which goals are prioritized over others, which stimuli release which goals, and how the stages of cognitive processing are selectively influenced to better achieve the aims of those goals.

  15. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  16. Advances in Process Intensification through Multifunctional Reactor Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the knowledge and tools required to develop and scale a novel multiphase pulse-flow, catalytic reactor for acid catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation, to industrial dimensions.

  17. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  18. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

  19. Tokamak reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features.

  20. Goal directed fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Desai, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    The cornerstone of treating patients with shock remains as it has for decades, intravenous fluids. Surprisingly, dosing intravenous fluid during resuscitation of shock remains largely empirical. Recent data suggests that early aggressive resuscitation of critically ill patients may limit and/or reverse tissue hypoxia, progression to organ failure and improve outcome. However, overzealous fluid resuscitation has been associated with increased complications, increased length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay and increased mortality. This review focuses on methods to assess fluid responsiveness and the application of these methods for goal directed fluid therapy in critically ill and peri-operative patients.

  1. CBM with Goal Setting: Impacting Students' Understanding of Reading Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Kristine D.

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study investigated if goal setting with curriculum-based measurement (CBM) was effective in increasing student awareness of goal knowledge and if students could set realistic daily reading goals. Nineteen 6th and 7th grade students with learning disabilities participated in a goal setting treatment group or a control group. During the…

  2. Assessment of Electron-Cyclotron-Current-Drive-Assisted Operation in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, E.; Fable, E.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Porte, L.

    2012-09-01

    The achievable efficiency for external current drive through electron-cyclotron (EC) waves in a demonstration tokamak reactor is discussed. Two possible reactor designs, one for steady state and one for pulsed operation, are considered. It is found that for midplane injection the achievable current drive efficiency is limited by secondharmonic absorption at levels consistent with previous studies. Propagation through the second-harmonic region can be reduced by moving the launch position to the high-field side (this can be obtained by injecting the beam from an upper port in the vacuum vessel). In this case, beam tracing calculations deliver values for the EC current drive efficiency approaching those usually reported for neutral beam current drive.

  3. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lelevkin, V. M. Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V.

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  4. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  5. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  6. Classroom Management in Pre-Service Teachers' Teaching Practice Demo Lessons: A Comparison to Actual Lessons by In-Service English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkut, Perihan

    2017-01-01

    The pre-service teachers find the chance to practice their classroom management skills during their practicum as they present demo lessons under supervision of their university instructors and mentor teachers. It had been discovered in a previous study, however, that the interactional features during the classroom management episodes in…

  7. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1962-12-25

    This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

  9. A lithium-cooled reactor - Brayton turboelectric power converter design for 100-kWe class space reactor electric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1984-08-01

    The conceptual design of a 100-kWe space reactor electric system to satisfy the design goals of the Tri-Agency SP-100 Program has been completed. The system was selected from an initial field of over 500 potential choices covering a wide range of reactor, power converter, shield, heat transport, and radiator subsystems. The selected system -- a lithium-cooled, UN-fueled, refractory-clad reactor coupled to a redundant pair of 110-kWe (gross) Brayton turboelectric power converters -shows strong promise of not only meeting the SP-100 Program design goals but also of providing for substantial growth in power levels for potential future needs.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  11. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  15. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  16. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  17. Efficient Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    High-purity silicon efficiently produced and transferred by continuous two-cycle reactor. New reactor operates in relatively-narrow temperature rate and uses large surfaces area to minimize heat expenditure and processing time in producing silicon by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane. Two cycles of reactor consists of silicon production and removal.

  18. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  19. Reactor vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Holley, John C.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  20. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  1. Thorium fueled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipaun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current development in thorium fueled reactors shows that they can be designed to operate in the fast or thermal spectrum. The thorium/uranium fuel cycle converts fertile thorium-232 into fissile uranium-233, which fissions and releases energy. This paper analyses the characteristics of thorium fueled reactors and discusses the thermal reactor option. It is found that thorium fuel can be utilized in molten salt reactors through many configurations and designs. A balanced assessment on the feasibility of adopting one reactor technology versus another could lead to optimized benefits of having thorium resource.

  2. Accuracy and convergence of coupled finite-volume/Monte Carlo codes for plasma edge simulations of nuclear fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoos, K.; Dekeyser, W.; Samaey, G.; Börner, P.; Baelmans, M.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma and neutral transport in the plasma edge of a nuclear fusion reactor is usually simulated using coupled finite volume (FV)/Monte Carlo (MC) codes. However, under conditions of future reactors like ITER and DEMO, convergence issues become apparent. This paper examines the convergence behaviour and the numerical error contributions with a simplified FV/MC model for three coupling techniques: Correlated Sampling, Random Noise and Robbins Monro. Also, practical procedures to estimate the errors in complex codes are proposed. Moreover, first results with more complex models show that an order of magnitude speedup can be achieved without any loss in accuracy by making use of averaging in the Random Noise coupling technique.

  3. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  4. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  5. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  6. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  7. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  8. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  9. RF Behavior and Launcher Design for a Fast Frequency Step-tunable 236 GHz Gyrotron for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, P. C.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Jin, J.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2017-03-01

    As part of the EUROfusion project, the conceptual design of a 1 MW 236 GHz hollow-cavity gyrotron is ongoing at IHM, KIT for a DEMOnstration Power Plant (DEMO), along with a 2 MW coaxial-cavity design concept. Fast frequency-tunable gyrotrons (tuning within a few seconds) are recommended for plasma stabilization using a non-steerable antenna. In this work, the mode-selection approach for such a frequency-tunable gyrotron is presented and suitable operating modes for fast frequency tunability are suggested. Magnetic field tuning has been studied as an effective technique to tune the gyrotron operating frequency. The step-tunability of the 236 GHz gyrotron within the frequency range of ±10 GHz in steps of 2-3 GHz is demonstrated in numerical simulations. A hybrid-type Quasi-Optical Launcher (QOL) has been designed for a step-frequency tunable gyrotron with sufficiently high Fundamental Gaussian Mode Content (FGMC).

  10. Demonstrating soil moisture remote sensing with observations from the UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Clara; Shah, Rashmi; Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Masters, Dallas; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of spaceborne Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) bistatic radar receivers to sense changes in soil moisture is investigated using observations from the low Earth orbiting UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1). Previous studies using receivers on aircraft or towers have shown that ground-reflected GNSS signals are sensitive to changes in soil moisture, though the ability to sense this variable from space has yet to be quantified. Data from TDS-1 show a 7 dB sensitivity of reflected signals to temporal changes in soil moisture. If the effects of surface roughness and vegetation on the reflected signals can be quantified, spaceborne GNSS bistatic radar receivers could provide soil moisture on relatively small spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Methane and hydrogen sulfide emissions in UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Souza, C L; Chernicharo, C A L; Melo, G C B

    2012-01-01

    The release of CH(4) and H(2)S in UASB reactors was evaluated with the aim to quantify the emissions from the liquid surfaces (three-phase separator and settler compartment) and also from the reactor's discharge hydraulic structures. The studies were carried out in two pilot- (360 L) and one demo-scale (14 m(3)) UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater. As expected, the release rates were much higher across the gas/liquid interfaces of the three-phase separators (5.4-9.7 kg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 23.0-35.8 g S m(-2) d(-1)) as compared with the quiescent settler surfaces (11.0-17.8 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 0.21 to 0.37 g S m(-2) d(-1)). The decrease of dissolved methane and dissolved hydrogen sulfide was very large in the discharging hydraulic structures very close to the reactor (>60 and >80%, respectively), largely due to the loss to the atmosphere, indicating that the concentration of these compounds will probably fall to values close to zero in the near downstream structures. The emission factors due to the release of dissolved methane in the discharge structure amounted to around 0.040 g CH(4) g COD(infl)(-1) and 0.060 g CH(4) g COD(rem)(-1), representing around 60% of the methane collected in the three-phase separator.

  12. IRIS Responsiveness to Generation IV Road-map Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Carelli, M.D.; Paramonov, D.V.; Petrovic, B.

    2002-07-01

    The DOE Generation IV road-map process is in its second and final year. Almost one hundred concepts submitted from all over the world have been reviewed against the Generation IV goals of resources sustainability; safety and reliability; and, economics. Advanced LWRs are taken as the reference point. IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure), a 100-335 MWe integral light water reactor being developed by a vast international consortium led by Westinghouse, is one on the concepts being considered in the road-map and is perhaps the most visible representative of the concept set known as Integral Primary System Reactors (IPSR). This paper presents how IRIS satisfies the prescribed goals. The first goal of resource sustainability includes criteria like utilization of fuel resources, amount and toxicity of waste produced, environmental impact, proliferation and sabotage resistance. As a thermal reactor IRIS does not have the same fuel utilization as fast reactors. However, it has a significant flexibility in fuel cycles as it is designed to utilize either UO{sub 2} or MOX with straight burn cycles of 4 to 10 years, depending on the fissile content. High discharge burnup and Pu recycling result in good fuel utilization and lower waste; IRIS has also attractive proliferation resistance characteristics, due to the reduced accessibility of the fuel. The safety and reliability goal include reliability, workers' exposure, robust safety features, models with well characterized uncertainty, source term and mechanisms of energy release, robust mitigation of accidents. IRIS is significantly better than advanced LWRs because of its safety by design which eliminates a variety of accidents such as LOCAs, its containment vessel coupled design which maintains the core safely covered during the accident sequences, its design simplification features such as no (or reduced) soluble boron, internal shielding and four-year refueling/maintenance interval which significantly reduce

  13. Punishment goals of crime victims.

    PubMed

    Orth, Uli

    2003-04-01

    Research on subjective punishment goals has focused on the perspective of third-party observers of criminal offenses and neglected the perspective of victims. This study investigates punishment goals among 174 adult crime victims (rape and nonsexual assault) for each participant's real criminal case. Scales measuring support for punishment goals are constructed by factor analysis of an 18-item list. Results show that 5 highly supported goals can be distinguished: retaliation, recognition of victim status, confirmation of societal values, victim security, and societal security. Analysis of relations between punishment goal scales and personal variables, situational variables, and demanded punishment severity corroborates the view that the punishment goals revealed can be classified according to the two independent dichotomies of moral versus instrumental goals, and micro versus macro goals.

  14. Alcohol breeds empty goal commitments.

    PubMed

    Sevincer, A Timur; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2009-08-01

    According to alcohol-myopia theory (C. M. Steele & R. A. Josephs, 1990), alcohol leads individuals to disproportionally focus on the most salient aspects of a situation and to ignore peripheral information. The authors hypothesized that alcohol leads individuals to strongly commit to their goals without considering information about the probability of goal attainment. In Study 1, participants named their most important interpersonal goal, indicated their expectations of successfully attaining it, and then consumed either alcohol or a placebo. In contrast to participants who consumed a placebo, intoxicated participants felt strongly committed to their goals despite low expectations of attaining them. In Study 2, goal-directed actions were measured over time. Once sober again, intoxicated participants with low expectations did not follow up on their strong commitments. Apparently, when prospects are bleak, alcohol produces empty goal commitments, as commitments are not based on individuals' expectations of attaining their goals and do not foster goal striving over time.

  15. Chandrayaan-1: Science goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, N.

    2005-12-01

    be released to land on the Moon during the mission. Salient features of the mission are described here. The ensemble of instruments onboard Chandrayaan-1 should enable us to accomplish the science goals defined for this mission.

  16. Neutron fluxes in test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Communicate the fact that high-power water-cooled test reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) cannot provide fast flux levels as high as sodium-cooled fast test reactors. The memo first presents some basics physics considerations about neutron fluxes in test reactors and then uses ATR, HFIR and JHR as an illustration of the performance of modern high-power water-cooled test reactors.

  17. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  18. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Reactor Analysis: A Web-Based Reactor Design Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orbey, Nese; Clay, Molly; Russell, T.W. Fraser

    2014-01-01

    An approach to explain chemical engineering through a Web-based interactive game design was developed and used with college freshman and junior/senior high school students. The goal of this approach was to demonstrate how to model a lab-scale experiment, and use the results to design and operate a chemical reactor. The game incorporates both…

  19. Physics methods development for the NCSU PULSTAR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.B.; Mayo, C.W.; Giavedoni, E.

    1996-12-31

    The safety analysis reports (SARs) of all university research reactors include analyses that determine reactor physics parameters. The initial SAR analyses utilized numerical models, codes, cross-section libraries, and computing platforms available at the time. Advances and updates in all of these contributing areas make it difficult or impractical to resort to the earlier methodologies for meeting current analysis needs. Many facilities updated their physics methods during the high-enrichment uranium (HEU) to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) conversion effort. These facilities updated their SAR with current methodologies. The North Carolina State University`s (NCSU`s) PULSTAR research reactor was designed to use low-enrichment (4%) fuel, and as a result, the facility did not update the reactor physics analyses during the HEU-to-LEU conversion program. An effort is currently under way at NCSU to develop new and updated methods for reactor physics calculations. Currently planned physics calculations for the PULSTAR reactor support both reactor licensing and experimental facility development goals. These goals include the following: 1. Increase excess reactivity by introducing beryllium reflector assemblies and a mixed-enrichment core. 2. Characterize various experimental facilities in support of neutron transmutation doping, prompt gamma analysis, and neutron depth profiling. 3. Establish core loading patterns that optimize characteristics for experimental facilities. Two and three-dimensional, multigroup models utilizing the DANT-SYS and MCNP codes have been developed in support of these goals. Results and lessons learned with the DANT-SYS code are presented in this paper.

  20. Iterative Goal Refinement for Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    from Figure 3 (bottom). The M- ARTUE system (Wilson et al, 2013) takes a direct approach to the goal formulation step, in which all possible goals are...with a single score by which all goals are compared. A preliminary study of M- ARTUE showed that it reached performance comparable to the use of

  1. Personal Finance. Common Curriculum Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document provides the common curriculum goals for the state of Oregon in personal finance, an area of study that relates basic economic concepts and practices to the financial concerns of consumers. These goals were designed to define what should be taught in all public school settings. The common curriculum goals in personal finance are…

  2. Goal salience affects infants' goal-directed gaze shifts.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Ivanina; Elsner, Claudia; Elsner, Birgit; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2012-01-01

    Around their first year of life, infants are able to anticipate the goal of others' ongoing actions. For instance, 12-month-olds anticipate the goal of everyday feeding actions and manual actions such as reaching and grasping. However, little is known whether the salience of the goal influences infants' online assessment of others' actions. The aim of the current eye-tracking study was to elucidate infants' ability to anticipate reaching actions depending on the visual salience of the goal object. In Experiment 1, 12-month-old infants' goal-directed gaze shifts were recorded as they observed a hand reaching for and grasping either a large (high-salience condition) or a small (low-salience condition) goal object. Infants exhibited predictive gaze shifts significantly earlier when the observed hand reached for the large goal object compared to when it reached for the small goal object. In addition, findings revealed rapid learning over the course of trials in the high-salience condition and no learning in the low-salience condition. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the results could not be simply attributed to the different grip aperture of the hand used when reaching for small and large objects. Together, our data indicate that by the end of their first year of life, infants rely on information about the goal salience to make inferences about the action goal.

  3. Goal Salience Affects Infants’ Goal-Directed Gaze Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Henrichs, Ivanina; Elsner, Claudia; Elsner, Birgit; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2012-01-01

    Around their first year of life, infants are able to anticipate the goal of others’ ongoing actions. For instance, 12-month-olds anticipate the goal of everyday feeding actions and manual actions such as reaching and grasping. However, little is known whether the salience of the goal influences infants’ online assessment of others’ actions. The aim of the current eye-tracking study was to elucidate infants’ ability to anticipate reaching actions depending on the visual salience of the goal object. In Experiment 1, 12-month-old infants’ goal-directed gaze shifts were recorded as they observed a hand reaching for and grasping either a large (high-salience condition) or a small (low-salience condition) goal object. Infants exhibited predictive gaze shifts significantly earlier when the observed hand reached for the large goal object compared to when it reached for the small goal object. In addition, findings revealed rapid learning over the course of trials in the high-salience condition and no learning in the low-salience condition. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the results could not be simply attributed to the different grip aperture of the hand used when reaching for small and large objects. Together, our data indicate that by the end of their first year of life, infants rely on information about the goal salience to make inferences about the action goal. PMID:23087658

  4. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  5. High energy reactor neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raper, Neill

    We present the first measurement of a nonzero reactor neutrino flux with energies above 8 MeV. Measurements are taken with the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiments detectors, using the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station as a source. Disagreement between data and theory regarding rate and shape of reactor neutrino spectra have made the need for direct measurement clear. Data are especially useful at high energies, where far fewer isotopes contribute. Neutrino candidates are correlated to reactor power and reactor power is extrapolated to zero in order to separate neutrino events from background. We find evidence of reactor neutrinos up to ˜12.5 MeV at 1.92 sigma above 0 and include a survey of isotopes likely to be contributing neutrinos in this energy range.

  6. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  7. Reactor safety for the Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, Terry E.

    1991-01-01

    A task force was created by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to conduct a 90-day study to support efforts to determine requirements to meet the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative. The task force identified the need for a nuclear reactor to provide the electrical power required as the outpost power demands on the moon and Mars evolve into hundreds of kilowatts. A preliminary hazards analysis has been performed to examine safety aspects of nuclear reactor power systems for representative missions to the moon and Mars. Mission profiles were defined for reference lunar and Martian flights. Potential alternatives to each mission phase were also defined. Accident scenarios were qualitatively defined for the mission phases. The safety issues decay heat removal, reactor control, disposal, criticality, end-of-mission shutdown, radiation exposure, the Martian environment, high speed impact on the surfaces of the moon or Mars, and return flyby trajectories were identified.

  8. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  9. Reactor safety for the Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, Terry E.

    1991-01-01

    A task force was created by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to conduct a 90-day study to support efforts to determine requirements to meet the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative. The task force identified the need for a nuclear reactor to provide the electrical power required as the outpost power demands on the moon and Mars evolve into hundreds of kilowatts. A preliminary hazards analysis has been performed to examine safety aspects of nuclear reactor power systems for representative missions to the moon and Mars. Mission profiles were defined for reference lunar and Martian flights. Potential alternatives to each mission phase were also defined. Accident scenarios were qualitatively defined for the mission phases. The safety issues decay heat removal, reactor control, disposal, criticality, end-of-mission shutdown, radiation exposure, the Martian environment, high speed impact on the surfaces of the moon or Mars, and return flyby trajectories were identified.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  11. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Dreffin, R.S.

    1959-12-15

    A control means for a nuclear reactor is described. Particularly a device extending into the active portion of the reactor consisting of two hollow elements coaxially disposed and forming a channel therebetween, the cross sectional area of the channel increasing from each extremity of the device towards the center thereof. An element of neutron absorbing material is slidably positionable within the inner hollow element and a fluid reactor poison is introduced into the channel defined by the two hollow elements.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Goett, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A system is described which includes a neutronic reactor containing a dispersion of fissionable material in a liquid moderator as fuel and a conveyor to which a portion of the dispersion may be passed and wherein the self heat of the slurry evaporates the moderator. Means are provided for condensing the liquid moderator and returning it to the reactor and for conveying the dried fissionable material away from the reactor.

  14. FLOW SYSTEM FOR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1963-06-11

    A reactor is designed with means for terminating the reaction when returning coolant is below a predetermined temperature. Coolant flowing from the reactor passes through a heat exchanger to a lower reservoir, and then circulates between the lower reservoir and an upper reservoir before being returned to the reactor. Means responsive to the temperature of the coolant in the return conduit terminate the chain reaction when the temperature reaches a predetermined minimum value. (AEC)

  15. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. W.D. Reece

    1999-09-01

    The University Reactor Sharing Program provides funding for reactor experimentation to institutions that do not normally have access to a research reactor. Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material to producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding also gives small colleges and universities the opportunity to use the facility for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy.

  16. Integrated modeling of high poloidal beta scenario for a next-step reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Meneghini, O.; Smith, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    In order to fill the scientific and technological gaps between ITER and a nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, a next-step integrated nuclear test facility is critical. A high poloidal beta tokamak regime investigated in recent DIII-D experiments is a promising candidate for steady state operation in such a next-step device because the large bootstrap current fraction (~ 80 %) reduces the demands on the external current drive. Despite the large values of q95 ~10, the normalized fusion performance observed in the experiments meet the target for an economically attractive fusion power plant such as ARIES-ACT2. In this work, we will project the performance for a conducting and superconducting coil next-step steady state reactor using theory-based 0-D modeling and full 1.5D transport modeling. Work supported by U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. On Having a Goal: Goals as Representations or Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ramnerö, Jonas; Törneke, Niklas

    The present article discusses the concepts of having a goal and of goal-directed behavior from a behavior-analytic perspective. In clinical psychology as well as in the study of human behavior at large, goals delineate an important area of investigation when it comes to health, well-being, and behavioral change. While concepts like goals and goal-directed behavior may be more frequently used outside the theoretical boundaries of behavior analysis, we argue that by incorporating recent behavior analytic research on verbal behavior, new and fruitful ways open up for approaching the phenomenon of having a goal. A behavior-analytic approach thereby may increase both precision in understanding and the potential for influencing essential aspects of human behavior. This analysis starts with the concept of rule-governed behavior and develops that analysis by using the concept of derived relational responding.

  18. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  19. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  20. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  1. Membrane reactors at Degussa.

    PubMed

    Wöltinger, Jens; Karau, Andreas; Leuchtenberger, Wolfgang; Drauz, Karlheinz

    2005-01-01

    The review covers the development of membrane reactor technologies at Degussa for the synthesis of fine chemicals. The operation of fed-batch or continuous biocatalytic processes in the enzyme membrane reactor (EMR) is well established at Degussa. Degussa has experience of running EMRs from laboratory gram scale up to a production scale of several hundreds of tons per year. The transfer of the enzyme membrane reactor from biocatalysis to chemical catalysis in the chemzyme membrane reactor (CMR) is discussed. Various homogeneous catalysts have been investigated in the CMR, and the scope and limitation of this new technique is discussed.

  2. Goal certainty modulates infants' goal-directed gaze shifts.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Ivanina; Elsner, Claudia; Elsner, Birgit; Wilkinson, Nick; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether 12-month-old infants rely on information about the certainty of goal selection in order to predict observed reaching actions. Infants' goal-directed gaze shifts were recorded as they observed action sequences in a multiple-goals design. We found that 12-month-old infants exhibited gaze shifts significantly earlier when the observed hand reached for the same goal object in all trials (frequent condition) compared with when the observed hand reached for different goal objects across trials (nonfrequent condition). Infants in the frequent condition were significantly more accurate at predicting the action goal than infants in the nonfrequent condition. In addition, findings revealed rapid learning in the case of certainty and no learning in the case of uncertainty of goal selection over the course of trials. Together, our data indicate that by the end of their first year of life, infants rely on information about the certainty of goal selection to make inferences about others' action goals. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. New Goals for Atomic Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsegian, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    There should be a "shifting of emphasis from fossil fuel to nuclear systems as quickly as possible," but with a major change in the design of reactor systems to enable more efficient use of the total energy produced. Waste heat may be used for agriculture. (AL)

  4. New Goals for Atomic Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsegian, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    There should be a "shifting of emphasis from fossil fuel to nuclear systems as quickly as possible," but with a major change in the design of reactor systems to enable more efficient use of the total energy produced. Waste heat may be used for agriculture. (AL)

  5. ERDA Recasts Nation's Energy Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes five major policy changes of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), one of which sharply decreased its emphasis on breeder reactors and another which elevated solar-generated electricity to a new high priority as a long-range energy source. (BR)

  6. ERDA Recasts Nation's Energy Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes five major policy changes of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), one of which sharply decreased its emphasis on breeder reactors and another which elevated solar-generated electricity to a new high priority as a long-range energy source. (BR)

  7. Goal-discrepant situations prime goal-directed actions if goals are temporarily or chronically accessible.

    PubMed

    Custers, Ruud; Aarts, Henk

    2007-05-01

    This research tested the hypothesis that perception of goal-discrepant situations automatically (i.e., without conscious intent) facilitates access to representations of instrumental actions if goal representations are mentally accessible. Employing a probe-recognition paradigm, Experiment 1 established that sentences describing situations that are discrepant with the goal of "looking well-groomed" (e.g., having dirty shoes) automatically increased the accessibility of representations of appropriate instrumental actions (e.g., polishing) in comparison to control situations, but only when participants frequently pursued the goal. Experiments 2a and 2b suggest that this effect was due to chronic accessibility of the goal representation and demonstrate that the same effects occur if the accessibility of the goal is temporarily enhanced (by subliminal priming) for people that nonfrequently pursue the goal.

  8. Investigation of heat transfer in liquid-metal flows under fusion-reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Poddubnyi, I. I.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Aleskovskiy, K. V.; Obukhov, D. M.

    2016-12-15

    The effect discovered in studying a downward liquid-metal flow in vertical pipe and in a channel of rectangular cross section in, respectively, a transverse and a coplanar magnetic field is analyzed. In test blanket modules (TBM), which are prototypes of a blanket for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) and which are intended for experimental investigations at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), liquid metals are assumed to fulfil simultaneously the functions of (i) a tritium breeder, (ii) a coolant, and (iii) neutron moderator and multiplier. This approach to testing experimentally design solutions is motivated by plans to employ, in the majority of the currently developed DEMO blanket projects, liquid metals pumped through pipes and/or rectangular channels in a transvers magnetic field. At the present time, experiments that would directly simulate liquid-metal flows under conditions of ITER TBM and/or DEMO blanket operation (irradiation with thermonuclear neutrons, a cyclic temperature regime, and a magnetic-field strength of about 4 to 10 T) are not implementable for want of equipment that could reproduce simultaneously the aforementioned effects exerted by thermonuclear plasmas. This is the reason why use is made of an iterative approach to experimentally estimating the performance of design solutions for liquid-metal channels via simulating one or simultaneously two of the aforementioned factors. Therefore, the investigations reported in the present article are of considerable topical interest. The respective experiments were performed on the basis of the mercury magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) loop that is included in the structure of the MPEI—JIHT MHD experimental facility. Temperature fields were measured under conditions of two- and one-sided heating, and data on averaged-temperature fields, distributions of the wall temperature, and statistical fluctuation features were obtained. A substantial effect of counter thermo gravitational

  9. Investigation of heat transfer in liquid-metal flows under fusion-reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubnyi, I. I.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Leshukov, A. Yu.; Aleskovskiy, K. V.; Obukhov, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect discovered in studying a downward liquid-metal flow in vertical pipe and in a channel of rectangular cross section in, respectively, a transverse and a coplanar magnetic field is analyzed. In test blanket modules (TBM), which are prototypes of a blanket for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) and which are intended for experimental investigations at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), liquid metals are assumed to fulfil simultaneously the functions of (i) a tritium breeder, (ii) a coolant, and (iii) neutron moderator and multiplier. This approach to testing experimentally design solutions is motivated by plans to employ, in the majority of the currently developed DEMO blanket projects, liquid metals pumped through pipes and/or rectangular channels in a transvers magnetic field. At the present time, experiments that would directly simulate liquid-metal flows under conditions of ITER TBM and/or DEMO blanket operation (irradiation with thermonuclear neutrons, a cyclic temperature regime, and a magnetic-field strength of about 4 to 10 T) are not implementable for want of equipment that could reproduce simultaneously the aforementioned effects exerted by thermonuclear plasmas. This is the reason why use is made of an iterative approach to experimentally estimating the performance of design solutions for liquid-metal channels via simulating one or simultaneously two of the aforementioned factors. Therefore, the investigations reported in the present article are of considerable topical interest. The respective experiments were performed on the basis of the mercury magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) loop that is included in the structure of the MPEI—JIHT MHD experimental facility. Temperature fields were measured under conditions of two- and one-sided heating, and data on averaged-temperature fields, distributions of the wall temperature, and statistical fluctuation features were obtained. A substantial effect of counter thermo gravitational

  10. Patient Self-Defined Goals.

    PubMed

    Schellinger, Sandra Ellen; Anderson, Eric Worden; Frazer, Monica Schmitz; Cain, Cindy Lynn

    2017-01-01

    This research, a descriptive qualitative analysis of self-defined serious illness goals, expands the knowledge of what goals are important beyond the physical-making existing disease-specific guidelines more holistic. Integration of goals of care discussions and documentation is standard for quality palliative care but not consistently executed into general and specialty practice. Over 14 months, lay health-care workers (care guides) provided monthly supportive visits for 160 patients with advanced heart failure, cancer, and dementia expected to die in 2 to 3 years. Care guides explored what was most important to patients and documented their self-defined goals on a medical record flow sheet. Using definitions of an expanded set of whole-person domains adapted from the National Consensus Project (NCP) Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care, 999 goals and their associated plans were deductively coded and examined. Four themes were identified-medical, nonmedical, multiple, and global. Forty percent of goals were coded into the medical domain; 40% were coded to nonmedical domains-social (9%), ethical (7%), family (6%), financial/legal (5%), psychological (5%), housing (3%), legacy/bereavement (3%), spiritual (1%), and end-of-life care (1%). Sixteen percent of the goals were complex and reflected a mix of medical and nonmedical domains, "multiple" goals. The remaining goals (4%) were too global to attribute to an NCP domain. Self-defined serious illness goals express experiences beyond physical health and extend into all aspects of whole person. It is feasible to elicit and record serious illness goals. This approach to goals can support meaningful person-centered care, decision-making, and planning that accords with individual preferences of late life.

  11. Teachers' Goal Orientations: Effects on Classroom Goal Structures and Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui; Hall, Nathan C.; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prior research has shown teachers' goal orientations to influence classroom goal structures (Retelsdorf "et al.," 2010, "Learning and Instruction, 20," 30) and to also impact their emotions (Schutz "et al.," 2007, "Emotion in Education," Academic Press, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). However,…

  12. Teachers' Goal Orientations: Effects on Classroom Goal Structures and Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui; Hall, Nathan C.; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prior research has shown teachers' goal orientations to influence classroom goal structures (Retelsdorf "et al.," 2010, "Learning and Instruction, 20," 30) and to also impact their emotions (Schutz "et al.," 2007, "Emotion in Education," Academic Press, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). However,…

  13. Achieving the Goals. Goal 4: Teacher Education and Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Goal 4 of the National Education Goals envisions that teachers will have access to programs for the continued improvement of their professional skills. This book examines what federal agencies are doing to enhance teacher preparation, presents information on career-long development, and offers program descriptions and contact names. The first…

  14. Achievement goals affect metacognitive judgments

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kenji; Yue, Carole L.; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of achievement goals on metacognitive judgments, such as judgments of learning (JOLs) and metacomprehension judgments, and actual recall performance. We conducted five experiments manipulating the instruction of achievement goals. In each experiment, participants were instructed to adopt mastery-approach goals (i.e., develop their own mental ability through a memory task) or performance-approach goals (i.e., demonstrate their strong memory ability through getting a high score on a memory task). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 showed that JOLs of word pairs in the performance-approach goal condition tended to be higher than those in the mastery-approach goal condition. In contrast, cued recall performance did not differ between the two goal conditions. Experiment 3 also demonstrated that metacomprehension judgments of text passages were higher in the performance-approach goal condition than in the mastery-approach goals condition, whereas test performance did not differ between conditions. These findings suggest that achievement motivation affects metacognitive judgments during learning, even when achievement motivation does not influence actual performance.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1959-02-10

    A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

  16. REFLECTOR FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.

    1963-08-01

    A reflector for nuclear reactors that comprises an assembly of closely packed graphite rods disposed with their major axes substantially perpendicular to the interface between the reactor core and the reflector is described. Each graphite rod is round in transverse cross section at (at least) its interface end and is provided, at that end, with a coaxial, inwardly tapering hole. (AEC)

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR BURIAL ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-05-01

    A burial assembly is shown whereby an entire reactor core may be encased with lead shielding, withdrawn from the reactor site and buried. This is made possible by a five-piece interlocking arrangement that may be easily put together by remote control with no aligning of bolt holes or other such close adjustments being necessary.

  18. N Reactor hydrogen control

    SciTech Connect

    Shuford, D.H.; Kripps, L.J.

    1988-08-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power reactor in the Soviet Union, a number of reviews were conducted of the N Reactor. Hydrogen generation during postulates severe accidents and the possibility of resulting hydrogen deflagrations/detonations that could affect confinement integrity were issues raised in several reviews, along with recommendations for adding hydrogen mitigation features. To respond to these reviews, an N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program and a subsequent Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program were initiated to address all post-Chernobyl N Reactor review findings. The Safety Enhancement Program and Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program efforts involving hydrogen control included the following: Calculate the potential hydrogen source for a range of severe accidents at the N Reactor to establish an acceptable design basis for the hydrogen mitigation system; Analyze the N Reactor confinement hydrogen mixing capability to identify areas of concern and to the verify effectiveness of the hydrogen mitigation system; Select, design, and construct a hydrogen mitigation system to enhance the N Reactor capability to accommodate possible hydrogen generation from postulated severe accidents; Provide post-accident hydrogen monitoring as an operator aid in assessing confinement conditions. In additions, it was necessary to verify that incorporation of the hydrogen mitigation system had no adverse impact N Reactor safety (e.g., radiological consequence analyses). 77 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  20. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  2. Light water reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  3. Tokamak confinement projections and performance goals

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    One key quantity to be determined in the design of burning-plasma devices (CIT, ITER, reactors, etc.) is the level of plasma current (I) required to meet the desired plasma performance goals (ignition, high Q, etc.) and device objectives (fusion power, wall loading, current drive power, etc.). It is shown that these goals and objectives can be expressed in terms of the ''figure-of-merit'' parameter IA/sup alpha//R/sup x/(/approximately/f(LB/sup y/), where A is the aspect ratio, R is the major radius, L(= R, a) is the characteristic length, B is the toroidal magnetic field on axis, and the exponents ..cap alpha.. /approximately/ 1 +- 0.5 and x /approximately/ 0-0.5 (y /approximately/ 1-2) depend on the confinement assumptions and operational limits. To reach ignition or high Q, the main goal is to optimize IA/sup alpha//R/sup x/, subject to other engineering design constraints. In a CIT-like device (with R /approximately/ 2 m, kappa /approximately/ 2, q/sub psi/ greater than or equal to 3), the ignition requirements is I(A/3)/sup alpha/ /approximately/ 9-15 MA for ''enhanced'' L-mode (H-mode) confinement scaling expressions; an ITER-like device (with R /approximately/ 5-6 m, kappa /approximately/ 2, q/sub psi/ greater than or equal to 3) would require I(A/3)/sup alpha/ /approximately/ 15-25 MA. These requirements are embodied in the present CIT (with I /approximately/ 11 MA, A /approximately 3.25) and ITER (with I /approximately/ 18-22, A /approximately/ 3.1-2.6) designs. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Status of French reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  5. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  6. Reactor Operations Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.D.

    1991-12-05

    The K-Reactor last operated in April 1988. At that time, K-Reactor was one of three operating reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Following an incident in P-Reactor in August 1988, it was decided to discontinue SRS reactor operation and conduct an extensive program to upgrade operating practices and plant hardware prior to restart of any of the reactors. The K-reactor was the first of three reactors scheduled to resume production. At the present time, it is the only reactor with planned restart. WSRC assumed management of SRS on April 1, 1989. WSRC established the Safety Basis for Restart and a listing of the actions planned to satisfy the Safety Basis. In consultation with DOE, it was determined that proper management of the restart activities would require a single plan that integrated the numerous activities. The plan was entitled the Reactor Operations Management Plan and is referred to simply as the ROMP. The initial version of ROMP was produced in July of 1989. Subsequent modifications led to Revision 3 which was approved by DOE in May, 1990. Other changes were made in a formal change process, resulting in the latest version, Revision 5, being issued in October, 1990. The ROMP contains three key parts: first, the Restart Safety Basis; second, a description of the process for addressing new technical issues and a listing of the established workscope and the associated acceptance criteria; and three, a schedule for executing the work. I will discuss the first two areas, along with the closure process used to assure the intent of ROMP was met. The ROMP activities are all complete and I will not discuss schedule further.

  7. Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.

    SciTech Connect

    Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-01

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage

  8. Kindergarten Goals for the Seventies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yawkey, Thomas D.; Silvern, Steven B.

    This paper presents an outline of kindergarten goals for the seventies along with specific suggestions for supporting classroom activities. The kindergarten goals are divided into four developmental areas: (1) Cognitive or Intellectual Development (with emphasis on concept development, or "content skills" and mastery or "process skills"); (2)…

  9. Assessment of Personal Goal Hierarchies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Marlene; Ford, Donald H.

    1983-01-01

    Developed a new method for measuring goal hierarchies, called the Adult Intentional and Motivational Systems Chart, by interviewing 53 men and constructing a system summarizing their goals. Results suggested the continued use of the chart for research on self-direction and adult development as well as intervention. (LLL)

  10. Goals and Personality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, M. L.; Ugarte, M. D.; Lumbreras, M. Victoria; Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of personality factors in the value allotted by adolescents to various groups of goals. For this purpose, the "Cuestionario de Personalidad Situacional, CPS" (Situational Personality Questionnaire) and the "Cuestionario de Metas para Adolescentes, CMA" (Goals for…

  11. Goals in Teaching About Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klass, Dennis; Gordon, Audrey

    This guide provides a set of goals and guidelines for teachers who are introducing "death and dying" into the school curriculum. These goals are: (1) to provide factual information concerning legal, medical, and sociological practices; (2) to give insight into personal feelings and family dynamics when death occurs; (3) to provide consumer…

  12. Theme: Achieving 2020 Goal 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue focuses on the Reinventing Agricultural Education 2020 Project's goal of partnerships and strategic alliances, which serves as a catalyst to ensure that the other goals are accomplished and sustained. Eleven articles discuss establishing partnerships at local, state, and national levels and balancing old alliances with new connections.…

  13. Goals and Personality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz de Acedo Lizarraga, M. L.; Ugarte, M. D.; Lumbreras, M. Victoria; Sanz de Acedo Baquedano, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of personality factors in the value allotted by adolescents to various groups of goals. For this purpose, the "Cuestionario de Personalidad Situacional, CPS" (Situational Personality Questionnaire) and the "Cuestionario de Metas para Adolescentes, CMA" (Goals for…

  14. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    GOAL, is a test engineer oriented language designed to be used to standardize procedure terminology and as the test programming language to be used for ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. The material presented concerning GOAL includes: (1) a historical review, (2) development objectives and requirements, (3) language scope and format, and (4) language capabilities.

  15. Goal Making for English Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Henry B., Ed.

    Originally presented at a series of NCTE Spring Institutes on the topic "Behavioral Objectives/Humanistic Goals: Bridging the Gap," the papers in this monograph are divided into four sections. Sections one contains personal credos on the goals of English teaching: "McNamara's Band and the Educational Edsel" by Charles Weingartner; "English…

  16. Goal Setting to Achieve Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Both districts and individual schools have a very clear set of goals and skills for their students to achieve and master. In fact, except in rare cases, districts and schools develop very detailed goals they wish to pursue. In most cases, unfortunately, only the teachers and staff at a particular school or district-level office are aware of the…

  17. Goal!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of his son, Joshua Pauls. Josh is an energetic young man who learned at a very young age not to let anything stop him from achieving his dreams. Born with a birth defect known as bilateral bibia hemimelia, which means he was born without his tibia bone in both of his legs, Josh was only 10 months old…

  18. Goal!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of his son, Joshua Pauls. Josh is an energetic young man who learned at a very young age not to let anything stop him from achieving his dreams. Born with a birth defect known as bilateral bibia hemimelia, which means he was born without his tibia bone in both of his legs, Josh was only 10 months old…

  19. Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David A.; Phillips, Prudence

    1984-01-01

    Presents viewpoints of two teachers about the importance of kinetics and how it contributes to students' understanding of chemistry. Discusses reaction rates, concentration effects, and temperature effects related to an understanding of dynamic equilibrium, molecular structure, and control of reacting systems. (JM)

  20. Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David A., Ed.; Phillips, Prudence, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are two brief articles related to teaching the history of chemistry in college chemistry, "Utilizing a Historical Perspective in the Teaching of Chemistry" (Joseph W. Kamsar), and "History of Chemistry" (George B. Kauffman). (RH)

  1. Microfluidic reactors for diagnostics applications.

    PubMed

    McCalla, Stephanie E; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2011-08-15

    Diagnostic assays are an important part of health care, both in the clinic and in research laboratories. In addition to improving treatments and clinical outcomes, rapid and reliable diagnostics help track disease epidemiology, curb infectious outbreaks, and further the understanding of chronic illness. Disease markers such as antigens, RNA, and DNA are present at low concentrations in biological samples, such that the majority of diagnostic assays rely on an amplification reaction before detection is possible. Ideally, these amplification reactions would be sensitive, specific, inexpensive, rapid, integrated, and automated. Microfluidic technology currently in development offers many advantages over conventional benchtop reactions that help achieve these goals. The small reaction volumes and energy consumption make reactions cheaper and more efficient in a microfluidic reactor. Additionally, the channel architecture could be designed to perform multiple tests or experimental steps on one integrated, automated platform. This review explores the current research on microfluidic reactors designed to aid diagnostic applications, covering a broad spectrum of amplification techniques and designs.

  2. REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING WATER PIPES, COOLING AIR DUCTS, AND SHIELDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 776. Unknown Photographer, 10/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Tritium self-sufficiency time and inventory evolution for solid-type breeding blanket materials for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, L. W.; Pampin, R.; Zheng, S.

    2011-10-01

    One of the primary functions of a fusion blanket is to generate enough tritium to make a fusion power plant (FPP) self-sufficient. To ensure that there is satisfactory tritium production in a real plant the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in the blanket must be greater than 1 + M, where M is the breeding margin. For solid-type blanket designs, the initial TBR must be significantly higher than 1 + M, since the blanket TBR will be reduced over time as the lithium fuel is consumed. The rate of TBR reduction will impact on the overall blanket self-sufficiency time, the time in which the net tritium inventory of the system is positive. DEMO relevant blanket materials, Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2TiO 3, are investigated by computational simulation using radiation transport tools coupled with time-dependent inventory calculations. The results include tritium inventory assessments and depletion of breeding materials over time, which enable self-sufficiency times and maximum surplus tritium inventories to be evaluated, which are essential quantities to determine to allow one to design a credible FPP using solid-type breeding material concepts. The blanket concepts investigated show self-sufficiency times of several years in some cases and maximum surplus inventories of up to a few tens of kg.

  4. First spaceborne phase altimetry over sea ice using TechDemoSat-1 GNSS-R signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Cardellach, Estel; Fabra, Fran; Rius, Antonio; Ribó, Serni; Martín-Neira, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    A track of sea ice reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal collected by the TechDemoSat-1 mission is processed to perform phase altimetry over sea ice. High-precision carrier phase measurements are extracted from coherent GNSS reflections at a high angle of elevation (>57°). The altimetric results show good consistency with a mean sea surface (MSS) model, and the root-mean-square difference is 4.7 cm with an along-track sampling distance of ˜140 m and a spatial resolution of ˜400 m. The difference observed between the altimetric results and the MSS shows good correlation with the colocated sea ice thickness data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity. This is consistent with the reflecting surface aligned with the bottom of the ice-water interface, due to the penetration of the GNSS signal into the sea ice. Therefore, these high-precision altimetric results have potential to be used for determination of sea ice thickness.

  5. Sea Ice Detection Based on Differential Delay-Doppler Maps from UK TechDemoSat-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongchao; Yu, Kegen; Zou, Jingui; Wickert, Jens

    2017-07-12

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be exploited to remotely sense atmosphere and land and ocean surface to retrieve a range of geophysical parameters. This paper proposes two new methods, termed as power-summation of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PS-D) and pixel-number of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PN-D), to distinguish between sea ice and sea water using differential Delay-Doppler Maps (dDDMs). PS-D and PN-D make use of power-summation and pixel-number of dDDMs, respectively, to measure the degree of difference between two DDMs so as to determine the transition state (water-water, water-ice, ice-ice and ice-water) and hence ice and water are detected. Moreover, an adaptive incoherent averaging of DDMs is employed to improve the computational efficiency. A large number of DDMs recorded by UK TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) over the Arctic region are used to test the proposed sea ice detection methods. Through evaluating against ground-truth measurements from the Ocean Sea Ice SAF, the proposed PS-D and PN-D methods achieve a probability of detection of 99.72% and 99.69% respectively, while the probability of false detection is 0.28% and 0.31% respectively.

  6. Sea Ice Detection Based on Differential Delay-Doppler Maps from UK TechDemoSat-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongchao; Yu, Kegen; Zou, Jingui; Wickert, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be exploited to remotely sense atmosphere and land and ocean surface to retrieve a range of geophysical parameters. This paper proposes two new methods, termed as power-summation of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PS-D) and pixel-number of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PN-D), to distinguish between sea ice and sea water using differential Delay-Doppler Maps (dDDMs). PS-D and PN-D make use of power-summation and pixel-number of dDDMs, respectively, to measure the degree of difference between two DDMs so as to determine the transition state (water-water, water-ice, ice-ice and ice-water) and hence ice and water are detected. Moreover, an adaptive incoherent averaging of DDMs is employed to improve the computational efficiency. A large number of DDMs recorded by UK TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) over the Arctic region are used to test the proposed sea ice detection methods. Through evaluating against ground-truth measurements from the Ocean Sea Ice SAF, the proposed PS-D and PN-D methods achieve a probability of detection of 99.72% and 99.69% respectively, while the probability of false detection is 0.28% and 0.31% respectively. PMID:28704948

  7. Spaceborne GNSS reflectometry for ocean winds: First results from the UK TechDemoSat-1 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Gommenginger, Christine; Jales, Philip; Unwin, Martin; Shaw, Andrew; Robertson, Colette; Roselló, Josep

    2015-07-01

    First results are presented for ocean surface wind speed retrieval from reflected GPS signals measured by the low Earth orbiting UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1). Launched in July 2014, TDS-1 provides the first new spaceborne Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) data since the pioneering UK-Disaster Monitoring Mission (UK-DMC) experiment in 2003. Examples of onboard-processed delay-Doppler maps reveal excellent data quality for winds up to 27.9 m/s. Collocated Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) winds are used to develop and evaluate a wind speed algorithm based on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the bistatic radar equation. For SNRs greater than 3 dB, wind speed is retrieved without bias and a precision around 2.2 m/s between 3 and 18 m/s even without calibration. Exploiting lower SNR signals, however, requires good knowledge of the antenna beam, platform attitude, and instrument gain setting. This study demonstrates the capabilities of low-cost, low-mass, and low-power GNSS-R receivers ahead of their launch on the NASA Cyclone GNSS (CYGNSS) constellation in 2016.

  8. Landscape refuges delay resistance of the European corn borer to Bt-maize: a demo-genetic dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Tyutyunov, Yuri; Zhadanovskaya, Ekaterina; Bourguet, Denis; Arditi, Roger

    2008-08-01

    We constructed a reaction-diffusion model of the development of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt crops in pest populations. Kostitzin's demo-genetic model describes local interactions between three competing pest genotypes with alleles conferring resistance or susceptibility to transgenic plants, the spatial spread of insects being modelled by diffusion. This new approach makes it possible to combine a spatial demographic model of population dynamics with classical genetic theory. We used this model to examine the effects of pest dispersal and of the size and shape of the refuge on the efficiency of the "high-dose/refuge" strategy, which was designed to prevent the development of resistance in populations of insect pests, such as the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera, Crambidae). We found that, with realistic combinations of refuge size and pest dispersal, the development of resistance could be considerably delayed. With a small to medium-sized farming area, contiguous refuge plots are more efficient than a larger number of smaller refuge patches. We also show that the formal coupling of classical Fisher-Haldane-Wright population genetics equations with diffusion terms inaccurately describes the development of resistance in a spatially heterogeneous pest population, notably overestimating the speed with which Bt resistance is selected in populations of pests targeted by Bt crops.

  9. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  10. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  11. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. Goals Analysis Procedure Guidelines for Applying the Goals Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motley, Albert E., III

    2000-01-01

    One of the key elements to successful project management is the establishment of the "right set of requirements", requirements that reflect the true customer needs and are consistent with the strategic goals and objectives of the participating organizations. A viable set of requirements implies that each individual requirement is a necessary element in satisfying the stated goals and that the entire set of requirements, taken as a whole, is sufficient to satisfy the stated goals. Unfortunately, it is the author's experience that during project formulation phases' many of the Systems Engineering customers do not conduct a rigorous analysis of the goals and objectives that drive the system requirements. As a result, the Systems Engineer is often provided with requirements that are vague, incomplete, and internally inconsistent. To complicate matters, most systems development methodologies assume that the customer provides unambiguous, comprehensive and concise requirements. This paper describes the specific steps of a Goals Analysis process applied by Systems Engineers at the NASA Langley Research Center during the formulation of requirements for research projects. The objective of Goals Analysis is to identify and explore all of the influencing factors that ultimately drive the system's requirements.

  13. Career Goals in Young Adults: Personal Resources, Goal Appraisals, Attitudes, and Goal Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haratsis, Jessica M.; Hood, Michelle; Creed, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model based on the dual-process framework that assessed the relationships among personal resources, career goal appraisals, career attitudes, and career goal management, which have not been previously assessed together. The model (tested on a sample of 486 young adults: 74% female, M[subscript]age = 22 years) proposed that personal…

  14. Career Goals in Young Adults: Personal Resources, Goal Appraisals, Attitudes, and Goal Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haratsis, Jessica M.; Hood, Michelle; Creed, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested a model based on the dual-process framework that assessed the relationships among personal resources, career goal appraisals, career attitudes, and career goal management, which have not been previously assessed together. The model (tested on a sample of 486 young adults: 74% female, M[subscript]age = 22 years) proposed that personal…

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1958-10-14

    Methods of controlling reactors are presented. Specifically, a plurality of neutron absorber members are adjustably disposed in the reactor core at different distances from the center thereof. The absorber members extend into the core from opposite faces thereof and are operated by motive means coupled in a manner to simultaneously withdraw at least one of the absorber members while inserting one of the other absorber members. This feature effects fine control of the neutron reproduction ratio by varying the total volume of the reactor effective in developing the neutronic reaction.

  17. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mitrovski, Svetlana M

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  18. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  19. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  20. COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Binner, C.R.; Wilkie, C.B.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to a design for a reactor of the type in which a fluid coolant is flowed through the active portion of the reactor. This design provides for the cooling of the shielding material as well as the reactor core by the same fluid coolant. The core structure is a solid moderator having coolant channels in which are disposed the fuel elements in rod or slug form. The coolant fluid enters the chamber in the shield, in which the core is located, passes over the inner surface of said chamber, enters the core structure at the center, passes through the coolant channels over the fuel elements and out through exhaust ducts.

  1. REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeill, J.H.; Estabrook, J.Y.

    1960-05-10

    A reactor control system including a continuous tape passing through a first coolant passageway, over idler rollers, back through another parallel passageway, and over motor-driven rollers is described. Discrete portions of fuel or poison are carried on two opposed active sections of the tape. Driving the tape in forward or reverse directions causes both active sections to be simultaneously inserted or withdrawn uniformly, tending to maintain a more uniform flux within the reactor. The system is particularly useful in mobile reactors, where reduced inertial resistance to control rod movement is important.

  2. Retrofit Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, W.

    1993-04-01

    A likely source for enriched uranium for production of a gun-type bomb might be a research reactor. A state or terrorist organization would find the technical process for separating uranium from the reactor fuel plates is simple and well-published. An unguarded research reactor could be found in the former Soviet Union. Russia and the former republics have seen an increasing number of terrorist incidents, including hijackings and bombings. Recognizing the danger, Russia and the U.S. have explored means of safeguarding former Soviet weapons materials. This article describes some of the plans to reduce the risk of nuclear materials being obtained for illicit weapons production.

  3. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  4. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  5. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  6. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  7. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. ); Schenter, R.E. )

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  8. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Schenter, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  9. Space rocket engine on the base of the reactor-pumped laser for the interplanetary flights and earth orbital applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevich, Andrey V.; Dyachenko, Peter P.; Kukharchuk, Oleg F.; Zrodnikov, Anatoly V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the concept of vehicle-based reactor-laser engine for long time interplanetary and interorbital (LEO to GEO) flights is proposed. Reactor-pumped lasers offer the perspective way to create on the base of modern nuclear and lasers technologies the low mass and high energy density, repetitively pulsed vehicle-based laser of average power 100 kW. Nowadays the efficiency of nuclear-to-optical energy conversion reached the value of 2-3%. The demo model of reactor-pumped laser facility is under construction in Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk, Russia). It enable us to hope that using high power laser on board of the vehicle could make the effective space laser engine possible. Such engine may provide the high specific impulse ~1000-2000 s with the thrust up to 10-100 n. Some calculation results of the characteristics of vehicle-based reactor-laser thermal engine concept are also presented. .

  10. Science Goal Monitor: Science Goal Driven Automation for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jung, John; Pell, Melissa; Matusow, David; Bailyn, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Infusion of automation technologies into NASA s future missions will be essential because of the need to: (1) effectively handle an exponentially increasing volume of scientific data, (2) successfully meet dynamic, opportunistic scientific goals and objectives, and (3) substantially reduce mission operations staff and costs. While much effort has gone into automating routine spacecraft operations to reduce human workload and hence costs, applying intelligent automation to the science side, i.e., science data acquisition, data analysis and reactions to that data analysis in a timely and still scientifically valid manner, has been relatively under-emphasized. In order to introduce science driven automation in missions, we must be able to: capture and interpret the science goals of observing programs, represent those goals in machine interpretable language; and allow spacecrafts onboard systems to autonomously react to the scientist's goals. In short, we must teach our platforms to dynamically understand, recognize, and react to the scientists goals. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a prototype software tool being developed to determine the best strategies for implementing science goal driven automation in missions. The tools being developed in SGM improve the ability to monitor and react to the changing status of scientific events. The SGM system enables scientists to specify what to look for and how to react in descriptive rather than technical terms. The system monitors streams of science data to identify occurrences of key events previously specified by the scientist. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the scientist s desired reactions. Through SGM, we will improve om understanding about the capabilities needed onboard for success, develop metrics to understand the potential increase in science returns, and develop an operational prototype so that the perceived risks associated

  11. Theme: Achieving 2020 Goal 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Includes six articles: "Accomplishing Goal II through Learning Networks" (Murphy); "Agricultural Education in the Elementary Classroom" (Needham); "Investment for Today in Tomorrow's Agricultural Leaders" (Franklin, Portillo); "Experience--The Real Teacher" (Moore); "4-H: Offering Lifelong, Seamless…

  12. Goal Congruence in the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Lily; Neumann, Yoram

    1983-01-01

    A questionnaire administered to 150 undergraduates and 90 faculty members compared their relative levels of goal congruence with those of their university. Programs in medicine, social sciences, and engineering were studied. (JW)

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1961-10-24

    A reactor core, comprised of vertical stacks of hexagonal blocks of beryllium oxide having axial cylindrical apertures extending therethrough and cylindrical rods of a sintered mixture of uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide, is described. (AEC)

  14. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  15. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-10

    Uranium-aluminum alloys in which boron is homogeneously dispersed by adding it as a nickel boride are described. These compositions have particular utility as fuels for neutronic reactors, boron being present as a burnable poison.

  17. Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    New Fixed-Bed Catalyst System Provides Significant Reduction in Energy and Hazard Exposure. Hydrogenation is an essential industrial reaction that is often performed using a slurry catalyst system in large stirred-tank reactors.

  18. Molten metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  19. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  20. K-Reactor readiness

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.D.

    1991-12-04

    This document describes some of the more significant accomplishments in the reactor restart program and details the magnitude and extent of the work completed to bring K-Reactor to a state of restart readiness. The discussion of restart achievements is organized into the three major categories of personnel, programs, and plant. Also presented is information on the scope and extent of internal and external oversight of the efforts, as well as some details on the startup plan.

  1. Future reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-15

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  2. K-Reactor readiness

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.D.

    1991-12-04

    This document describes some of the more significant accomplishments in the reactor restart program and details the magnitude and extent of the work completed to bring K-Reactor to a state of restart readiness. The discussion of restart achievements is organized into the three major categories of personnel, programs, and plant. Also presented is information on the scope and extent of internal and external oversight of the efforts, as well as some details on the startup plan.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Weills, J.T.

    1960-03-15

    A method is given for operating a nuclear reactor having a negative coefficient of reactivity to compensate for the change in reactor reactivity due to the burn-up of the xenon peak following start-up of the reactor. When it is desired to start up the reactor within less than 72 hours after shutdown, the temperature of the reactor is lowered prior to start-up, and then gradually raised after start-up.

  4. F Reactor Inspection

    ScienceCinema

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2016-07-12

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  5. F Reactor Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-10-29

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  6. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  7. Moon base reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  8. Moon base reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  9. Preliminary Design For Conventional and Compact Secondary Heat Exchanger in a Molten Salt Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Ali Siahpush; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-07-01

    The strategic goal of the Advance Reactors such as AHTR is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy in the United States by producing power to meet growing energy demands and demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not being served by light water reactors

  10. Neutron scattering at Australia's replacement research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. A.; Kennedy, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    On August 25 1999, the Australian government gave final approval to build a research reactor to replace the existing HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights. The replacement reactor, which will commence operation in 2005, will be multipurpose in function, with capabilities for both neutron-beam research and radioisotope production. Regarding beams, cold and thermal neutron sources are to be installed and the intent is to use supermirror guides, with coatings with critical angles up to 3 times that of natural Ni, to transport cold and thermal neutron beams into a large modern guide hall. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP, SE and subcontractors in a turnkey contract. The goal is to have at least eight leading-edge neutron-beam instruments ready in 2005, and they will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations, in consultation with the Australian user community and interested overseas parties. A review of the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a status report on the activities so far is given.

  11. Status and problems of fusion reactor development.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, U

    2001-03-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium constitutes an enormous potential for a safe, environmentally compatible and sustainable energy supply. The fuel source is practically inexhaustible. Further, the safety prospects of a fusion reactor are quite favourable due to the inherently self-limiting fusion process, the limited radiologic toxicity and the passive cooling property. Among a small number of approaches, the concept of toroidal magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas has achieved most impressive scientific and technical progress towards energy release by thermonuclear burn of deuterium-tritium fuels. The status of thermonuclear fusion research activity world-wide is reviewed and present solutions to the complicated physical and technological problems are presented. These problems comprise plasma heating, confinement and exhaust of energy and particles, plasma stability, alpha particle heating, fusion reactor materials, reactor safety and environmental compatibility. The results and the high scientific level of this international research activity provide a sound basis for the realisation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of a fusion energy source for peaceful purposes.

  12. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray; Poston, David Irvin; Dasari, Venkateswara Rao; Reid, Robert Stowers

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  13. Initial Experiments on Fuzzy Control for Nuclear Reactor Operations at the Belgian Reactor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Da Ruan

    2003-08-15

    The application of fuzzy logic control (FLC) in the domain of the nuclear industry presents a tremendous challenge. The main reason for this is the public awareness of the risks of nuclear reactors and the very strict safety regulations in force for nuclear power plants. The very same regulations prevent a researcher from quickly introducing novel control methods into this field. On the other hand, the application of FLC has, despite the ominous sound of the word 'fuzzy' to nuclear engineers, a number of very desirable advantages over classical control, e.g., its robustness and the capability to include human experience into the controller. In this paper an FLC for controlling the power level of a nuclear reactor is described. The study is intended to assess the applicability of FLC in this domain. The final goal is to develop an optimized and intrinsically safe controller. After reviewing some available literature on FLC in nuclear reactors, an FLC is proposed and first tested by comparing it with the classical controller of the Belgian reactor 1 (BR1). In the next step the BR1 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN) was used as a test bed to implement a programmable logic controller-based hardware controller. The BR1 reactor is internationally regarded as a nuclear calibration reference. It therefore provides an excellent environment for this type of experiment because over the years considerable knowledge of the static and dynamic properties of the reactor has been accumulated. The project (1995-1999) aimed at investigating the added value and technical limits of FLC for nuclear reactor operations. The progress made in these experiments including closed-loop experiments are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. Estimation of demo-genetic model probabilities with Approximate Bayesian Computation using linear discriminant analysis on summary statistics.

    PubMed

    Estoup, Arnaud; Lombaert, Eric; Marin, Jean-Michel; Guillemaud, Thomas; Pudlo, Pierre; Robert, Christian P; Cornuet, Jean-Marie

    2012-09-01

    Comparison of demo-genetic models using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) is an active research field. Although large numbers of populations and models (i.e. scenarios) can be analysed with ABC using molecular data obtained from various marker types, methodological and computational issues arise when these numbers become too large. Moreover, Robert et al. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011, 108, 15112) have shown that the conclusions drawn on ABC model comparison cannot be trusted per se and required additional simulation analyses. Monte Carlo inferential techniques to empirically evaluate confidence in scenario choice are very time-consuming, however, when the numbers of summary statistics (Ss) and scenarios are large. We here describe a methodological innovation to process efficient ABC scenario probability computation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on Ss before computing logistic regression. We used simulated pseudo-observed data sets (pods) to assess the main features of the method (precision and computation time) in comparison with traditional probability estimation using raw (i.e. not LDA transformed) Ss. We also illustrate the method on real microsatellite data sets produced to make inferences about the invasion routes of the coccinelid Harmonia axyridis. We found that scenario probabilities computed from LDA-transformed and raw Ss were strongly correlated. Type I and II errors were similar for both methods. The faster probability computation that we observed (speed gain around a factor of 100 for LDA-transformed Ss) substantially increases the ability of ABC practitioners to analyse large numbers of pods and hence provides a manageable way to empirically evaluate the power available to discriminate among a large set of complex scenarios. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. DEMO-II trial. Aerobic exercise versus stretching exercise in patients with major depression-a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Jesper; Videbech, Poul; Thomsen, Carsten; Gluud, Christian; Nordentoft, Merete

    2012-01-01

    The effect of referring patients from a clinical setting to a pragmatic exercise intervention for depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and metabolic variables has yet to be determined. Outpatients with major depression (DSM-IV) were allocated to supervised aerobic or stretching exercise groups during a three months period. The primary outcome was the Hamilton depression score (HAM-D(17)). Secondary outcomes were cognitive function, cardiovascular risk markers, and employment related outcomes. 56 participants were allocated to the aerobic exercise intervention versus 59 participants to the stretching exercise group. Post intervention the mean difference between groups was -0.78 points on the HAM-D(17) (95% CI -3.2 to 1.6; P = .52). At follow-up, the participants in the aerobic exercise group had higher maximal oxygen uptake (mean difference 4.4 l/kg/min; 95% CI 1.7 to 7.0; P = .001) and visuospatial memory on Rey's Complex Figure Test (mean difference 3.2 points; 95% CI 0.9 to 5.5; P = .007) and lower blood glucose levels (mean difference 0.2 mmol/l; 95% CI 0.0 to 0.5; P = .04) and waist circumference (mean difference 2.2 cm; 95% CI 0.3 to 4.1; P = .02) compared with the stretching exercise group. The results of this trial does not support any antidepressant effect of referring patients with major depression to a three months aerobic exercise program. Due to lower recruitment than anticipated, the trial was terminated prior to reaching the pre-defined sample size of 212 participants; therefore the results should be interpreted in that context. However, the DEMO-II trial does suggest that an exercise program for patients with depression offer positive short-term effects on maximal oxygen uptake, visuospatial memory, fasting glucose levels, and waist circumference. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00695552.

  16. Reaching the Goals. Goal 2: High School Completion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Programs for the Improvement of Practice.

    The second of the National Education Goals, adopted following a summit meeting held in 1989 between the U.S. President and 50 governors, states that, by the year 2000, the high school graduation rate will increase to at least 90%. This document, an abridged version of a report produced by a work group on school completion, is an examination of…

  17. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    SciTech Connect

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  18. Science Goal Monitor: science goal driven automation for NASA missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jung, John; Pell, Melissa; Matusow, David; Bailyn, Charles

    2004-09-01

    Infusion of automation technologies into NASA's future missions will be essential because of the need to: (1) effectively handle an exponentially increasing volume of scientific data, (2) successfully meet dynamic, opportunistic scientific goals and objectives, and (3) substantially reduce mission operations staff and costs. While much effort has gone into automating routine spacecraft operations to reduce human workload and hence costs, applying intelligent automation to the science side, i.e., science data acquisition, data analysis and reactions to that data analysis in a timely and still scientifically valid manner, has been relatively under-emphasized. In order to introduce science driven automation in missions, we must be able to: capture and interpret the science goals of observing programs, represent those goals in machine interpretable language; and allow spacecrafts' onboard systems to autonomously react to the scientist's goals. In short, we must teach our platforms to dynamically understand, recognize, and react to the scientists' goals. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a prototype software tool being developed to determine the best strategies for implementing science goal driven automation in missions. The tools being developed in SGM improve the ability to monitor and react to the changing status of scientific events. The SGM system enables scientists to specify what to look for and how to react in descriptive rather than technical terms. The system monitors streams of science data to identify occurrences of key events previously specified by the scientist. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the scientist's desired reactions. Through SGM, we will improve our understanding about the capabilities needed onboard for success, develop metrics to understand the potential increase in science returns, and develop an "operational" prototype so that the perceived risks

  19. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  20. Progress Toward National Aeronautics Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carlo J.; Sehra, Arun K.

    1999-01-01

    NASA has made definitive progress towards achieving several bold U.S. goals in aeronautics related to air breathing engines. The advanced technologies developed towards these goals span applications from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The proof of successful technology development is demonstrated through successful technology transfer to U.S. industry and projected fleet impact. Specific examples of progress are discussed that quantifies the achievement towards these goals. In addition, a more detailed vision for NASA aeronautics is defined and key strategic issues are explored which invite international and national debate and involvement especially in reduced environmental impact for subsonic and supersonic aircraft, dramatic new capabilities in general aviation engines, and reduced development cycle time and costs.

  1. Goal-based ultimatum game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaibidi, Nerda Zura; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal

    2014-09-01

    This research investigates the human decision-making in ultimatum game in the context of neuroscience theories that give more insight into decision-making process by humans. Based on this approach, a new model of human decision-making has been developed by using Goal Programming approach. The satisficing and egalitarian philosophies on which weighted and Chebyshev Goal Programming (GP) rely; seem to offer an adequate and natural way for modeling human decision processes in at least the single-shot games of coordination. The simulation of ultimatum games gives the distribution of proposers' offer which shows some similarity with the distribution from the experiments with real subjects. The sensitivity analyses of this model are also presented. The solutions returned by the proposed GP approach aim to strike the right balance on several dimensions of conflicting goal that are set by players themselves.

  2. Goal Setting as Teacher Development Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This article explores goal setting as a teacher development practice in higher education. It reports on a study of college teacher goal setting informed by goal setting theory. Analysis of study participants' goal setting practices and their experiences with goal pursuit offers a framework for thinking about the kinds of goals teachers might set…

  3. Space station prototype Sabatier reactor design verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A six-man, flight prototype carbon dioxide reduction subsystem for the SSP ETC/LSS (Space Station Prototype Environmental/Thermal Control and Life Support System) was developed and fabricated for the NASA-Johnson Space Center between February 1971 and October 1973. Component design verification testing was conducted on the Sabatier reactor covering design and off-design conditions as part of this development program. The reactor was designed to convert a minimum of 98 per cent hydrogen to water and methane for both six-man and two-man reactant flow conditions. Important design features of the reactor and test conditions are described. Reactor test results are presented that show design goals were achieved and off-design performance was stable.

  4. EBT reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Santoro, R. T.; Spong, D. A.; Uckan, T.; Owen, L. W.; Barnes, J. M.; McBride, J. B.

    1983-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with <..beta../sub core/> approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density.

  5. REACTOR AND NOVEL METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-06-24

    A nuclear reactor of the type which uses a liquid fuel and a method of controlling such a reactor are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a tank for containing the liquid fuel such as a slurry of discrete particles of fissionnble material suspended in a heavy water moderator, and a control means in the form of a disc of neutron absorbirg material disposed below the top surface of the slurry and parallel thereto. The diameter of the disc is slightly smaller than the diameter of the tank and the disc is perforated to permit a flow of the slurry therethrough. The function of the disc is to divide the body of slurry into two separate portions, the lower portion being of a critical size to sustain a nuclear chain reaction and the upper portion between the top surface of the slurry and the top surface of the disc being of a non-critical size. The method of operation is to raise the disc in the reactor until the lower portion of the slurry has reached a critical size when it is desired to initiate the reaction, and to lower the disc in the reactor to reduce the size of the lower active portion the slurry to below criticality when it is desired to stop the reaction.

  6. Robotic system for remote maintenance of a pulsed nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thunborg, S.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines recently established for occupational radiation exposure specify that exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable. In conformance with these guidelines, SNL has developed a remote maintenance robot (RMR) system for use in the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR III) facility. The RMR should reduce occupational radiation exposure by a factor of 4 and decrease reactor downtime. Other goals include developing a technology base for a more advanced pulse reactor and for the nuclear fuel cycle programs of the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The RMR has five major subsystems: (a) a chain-driven cart to bring the system into the reactor room; (b) a Puma 560 robot to perform dextrous operations; (c) a programmable turntable to orient the robot to any of the reactor's four sides; (d) a programmable overhead hoist for lifting components weighing up to 400 lb onto or off of the reactor; and (e) a supervisory control console for the system operator. Figure 1 is a schematic diagram of the turntable, hoist, and robot system in position around the SPR III reactor.

  7. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOEpatents

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  8. Impact of magnetic field inhomogeneity on electron cyclotron radiative loss in tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Minashin, P. V.; Polevoi, A. R.

    2012-03-15

    The potential importance of electron cyclotron (EC) emission in the local electron power balance in the steady-state regimes of ITER operation with high temperatures, as well as in the DEMO reactor, requires accurate calculation of the one-dimensional (over magnetic surfaces) distribution of the net radiated power density, P{sub EC}({rho}). When the central electron temperature increases to {approx}30 keV, the local EC radiative loss comprises a substantial fraction of the heating power from fusion alphas and is close to the total auxiliary NBI heating power, P{sub EC}(0) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.3P{sub {alpha}}(0) Asymptotically-Equal-To P{sub aux}(0). In the present paper, the model of EC radiative transport in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is extended to the case of an inhomogeneous magnetic field B(R, Z). The impact of such inhomogeneity on local and total power losses is analyzed in the framework of this model by using the CYNEQ code. It is shown that, for the magnetic field B, temperature T{sub e}, density n{sub e}, and wall reflection coefficient R{sub w} expected in ITER and DEMO, accurate simulations of the EC radiative loss require self-consistent 1.5D transport analysis (i.e., one-dimensional simulations of plasma transport and two-dimensional simulations of plasma equilibrium). It is shown that EC radiative transport can be described with good accuracy in the 1D approximation with the surface-averaged magnetic field, B({rho}) = Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket B(R, Z) Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {sub ms}. This makes it possible to substantially reduce the computational time required for time-dependent self-consistent 1.5D transport analysis. Benchmarking of the CYNEQ results with available results of the RAYTEC, EXACTEC, and CYTRAN codes is performed for various approximations of the magnetic field.

  9. Health Education. Common Curriculum Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This guide presents the common curriculm goals for health education developed by the Oregon State Department of Education. Four content strands--safe living, stressor/risk-taking management, physical fitness, and nutrition--are a synthesis of the traditional health education and health promotion objectives. Knowledge and skills objectives are…

  10. Androgyny: A Goal for Counseling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1985-01-01

    Although psychological androgyny is a useful and attractive concept for many counselors, a review of the literature suggests that androgyny cannot now serve as a concrete goal for sex-role counseling. It may also pose its own problems for individuals. (Author)

  11. We Have Goals. Now What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensimon, Estela Mara; Dowd, Alicia C.; Longanecker, David; Witham, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The nation is in an era of policy reform aimed at improving the productivity and effectiveness of higher education. Major philanthropies and policy groups have converged around variations of the ambitious college completion goals announced by President Obama at the beginning of his administration. But at the same time, many state governments,…

  12. We Have Goals. Now What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensimon, Estela Mara; Dowd, Alicia C.; Longanecker, David; Witham, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The nation is in an era of policy reform aimed at improving the productivity and effectiveness of higher education. Major philanthropies and policy groups have converged around variations of the ambitious college completion goals announced by President Obama at the beginning of his administration. But at the same time, many state governments,…

  13. FOUR PROCESS GOALS OF EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEATHERS, GLEN

    IT IS HELD THAT THE ESSENCE OF EDUCATION IS FOUND PRIMARILY IN THE PROCESSES OF ACQUIRING AND USING KNOWLEDGE, AND SECONDARILY IN THE COMMAND OF BODIES OF INFORMATION AND IDEAS. THE FOUR "PROCESS GOALS" WHICH APPLY TO ANY DISCIPLINE ARE--TOOL SKILLS SUCH AS ARITHMETIC AND READING, PROBLEM-SOLVING, THINKING, OR INQUIRY, SELF-INSTRUCTION, AND…

  14. Androgyny: A Goal for Counseling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1985-01-01

    Although psychological androgyny is a useful and attractive concept for many counselors, a review of the literature suggests that androgyny cannot now serve as a concrete goal for sex-role counseling. It may also pose its own problems for individuals. (Author)

  15. Goals for a Changing University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anello, Michael; And Others

    Today's college executive is forced to deal with conflict that is built into the system because of the different goals, values, and priorities expressed by the constituent bodies both on and off the campus. How does a president, dean, or department head under pressure to change focus on new targets decide what targets to focus on? What kind of…

  16. Goals for Education in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Eleven goals for public education are set forth by the Colorado State Department of Education: (1) command of the knowledge, skills, habits, and attitudes essential for effective learning throughout life; (2) understanding of man and society and the determination to strive for the welfare of all people; (3) knowledge of self, understanding of…

  17. A Goal for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcinkiw, Karen L.

    2003-01-01

    Culturally competent nurses enable clients to feel respected, valued, and motivated to achieve health goals. A model for nursing education should develop cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills; provide cultural immersion experiences; and foster the desire to work with diverse clients. (Contains 48 references.) (SK)

  18. Efficient goal-directed exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Y.; Koenig, S.; Veloso, M.M.; Simmons, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    If a state space is not completely known in advance, then search algorithms have to explore it sufficiently to locate a goal state and a path leading to it, performing therefore what we call goal-directed exploration. Two paradigms of this process are pure exploration and heuristic-driven exploitation: the former approaches explore the state space using only knowledge of the physically visited portion of the domain, whereas the latter approaches totally rely on heuristic knowledge to guide the search towards goal states. Both approaches have disadvantages: the first one does not utilize available knowledge to cut down the search effort, and the second one relies too much on the knowledge, even if it is misleading. We have therefore developed a framework for goal-directed exploration, called VECA, that combines the advantages of both approaches by automatically switching from exploitation to exploration on parts of the state space where exploitation does not perform well. VECA provides better performance guarantees than previously studied heuristic-driven exploitation algorithms, and experimental evidence suggests that this guarantee does not deteriorate its average-case performance.

  19. The Fallacies of Numerical Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the problems inherent in the federal government's statistical method of determining and enforcing goals for the hiring and composition of faculty of colleges and universities with federal contracts. Stress is on the need for revision of the program to correct flaws and eliminate red tape. (Editor/JT)

  20. Radical Transformation of Organizational Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, J. Craig

    1977-01-01

    The recent emergence of a novel form of social-change activity, professionalized reform, is studied using the National Council of Churches as an example. A revised theory of organizational transformation is advanced, specifying the conditions under which oligarchy emerges and supports a transformation of organizational goals in a radical…