Science.gov

Sample records for reactor kinetics

  1. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    SciTech Connect

    JEFFERY,; LEWINS, D.

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computing Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)

  2. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computingmore » Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)« less

  3. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  4. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  5. Kinetics for a membrane reactor reducing perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Lokesh; Rainwater, Ken; Jackson, W Andrew; Morse, Audra

    2007-02-01

    The major objectives of this work were to operate and construct an autohydrogenotrophic reactor and estimate perchlorate degradation kinetics. The results show that autohydrogenotrophic bacteria were cultured in the reactor and capable of removing 3.6 mg/d of perchlorate in the presence of excess hydrogen (99% removal). The reactor was successful in treating the average influent perchlorate concentration of 532 microg/L to the level of 3 microg/L. A first-order relationship was obtained between the concentration of active biomass in the reactor and the hydraulic retention time for the given amount of substrate. During the kinetic loading study, perchlorate removal ranged from 100 to 50%. The kinetic rate of perchlorate degradation observed in this study was 1.62 hr(-1). The significant degradation of perchlorate in these samples indicates the ubiquity of perchlorate-reducing organisms. Additionally, nitrate was simultaneously removed during water treatment (greater than 90% removal). Because of the excess levels of hydrogen, simultaneous removal of nitrate was not believed to significantly affect perchlorate removal. The area of concern was the lack of complete control over biological treatment. The growth of sulfate-reducing organisms in the reactor negatively affected perchlorate removal efficiency. There were no significant effects observed on the dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids concentration of the effluent, suggesting that the treatment did not produce a large amount of biomass washout.

  6. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Renewed interest in space nuclear applications has motivated the study of a specialized reactor kinetics model. Consideration of a kinetics model favorable for study of the feasibility of automatic control of these devices is warranted. The need to bridge this gap between reactor kinetics and automatic control in conjunction with the control drum design characteristic of next generation paper space reactors inspired the development of a new Reflected Kinetics (RK) model. An extension of the conventional point-kinetics (PK) model was done in order to explicitly correlate reactivity and the reflector/absorber control drums characteristic of space nuclear reactor designs. Open-loop computations and numerical comparison to analytic PK equations indicated that the RK model is a functional alternative to equivalent bare point kinetics in the analysis of moderate transients. Variations in the RK reflector-to-core transfer probabilities and coolant flow rate do indeed drive the transient differently than the lumped insertion of equivalent reactivity amounts in the core. These computations illustrated the potential importance of the utilization of variable coolant flow rate to aid control in space reactor systems limited by minimal drum reactivity worth. Additionally the Doppler reactivity shutdown mechanism was concluded to be the primarily reliable means of safety shutdown in such systems. The structure of the RK equations proved to be advantageous for integration of automatic control.

  7. Detailed kinetics modeling of indium phosphide films in MOCVD reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, M.; Cavallotti, C.; Radaelli, G.; Carra, S.

    1998-12-31

    The deposition kinetics of InP in MOCVD reactors is presented. The proposed chemical mechanism involves both gas phase and surface reactions. The fundamental hypothesis adopted in deriving the mechanism was a dual site dissociative adsorption of the precursors on the growing surface. In any case, all the rate constants either were taken from the literature or estimated through thermochemical methods. In addition, the deposition reactor was simulated by means of a monodimensional model that accounts for the main reactor features through the boundary layer theory.

  8. Coupled reactor kinetics and heat transfer model for heat pipe cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Houts, Michael

    2001-02-01

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). This paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities. .

  9. Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

    2000-11-22

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

  10. Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2009-06-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

  11. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  12. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  13. Kinetics of thermophilic anaerobes in fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2001-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate growth kinetic constants and the concentration of "active" attached biomass in two anaerobic thermophilic reactors which contain different initial sizes of immobilized anaerobic mixed cultures and decompose distillery wastewater. This paper studies the substrate decomposition in two lab-scale fixed-bed reactors operating at batch conditions with corrugated tubes as support media. It can be demonstrated that high micro-organisms-substrate ratios favor the degradation activity of the different anaerobic cultures, allowing the stable operation without lag-phases and giving better quality in effluent. The kinetic parameters obtained--maximum specific growth rates (mu(max)), non-biodegradable substrate (S(NB)) and "active or viable biomass" concentrations (X(V0))--were obtained by applying the Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz], with COD as substrate and methane (CH4) as the main product of the anaerobic process. This method is suitable to calculate and to differentiate the main kinetic parameters of both the total anaerobic mixed culture and the methanogenic population. Comparison of experimental measured concentration of volatile attached solids (VS(att)) in both reactors with the estimated "active" biomass concentrations obtained by applying Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz] shows that a large amount of inert matter is present in the fixed-bed reactor. PMID:11513409

  14. Animal Guts as Ideal Reactors: An Open-Ended Project for a Course in Kinetics and Reactor Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric D.; Gast, Alice P.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an open-ended project tailored for a senior kinetics and reactor design course in which basic reactor design equations are used to model the digestive systems of several animals. Describes the assignment as well as the results. (DDR)

  15. Kinetics of biodegradation of phenolic wastewater in a biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Hsien, Tzu-Yang

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical model to describe the biodegradation of phenolic wastewater in a fixed-biofilm process. The model incorporates diffusive mass transport and Haldane kinetics mechanisms. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A laboratory-scale column reactor was employed to verify the model. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to determine biokinetic parameters for the model simulation with the initial biofilm thickness assumed. The model simulated the phenol effluent concentration results well. Removal efficiency for phenol was approximately 94-96.5% for different hydraulic retention times at a steady-state condition. Model simulations results are in agreement with experimental results. The approaches of model and experiments presented in this paper could be used to design a pilot-scale or full-scale fixed-biofilm reactor system for the biodegradation of phenolic wastewater from petrochemical and oil refining plants.

  16. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  17. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H B; Mladenovska, Z; Ahring, B K

    2008-02-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, Amax, and the half saturation constant, Km, were initially estimated by applying the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. Amax was in the range from 22.8 to 29.1 micromol gVS(-1) h(-1) while Km was in the range from 0.46-0.95 mM. In general, Amax gave a good reflection of the reactor performances. Secondly, the accuracy of the applied method was evaluated by use of radiotracer methodology. Amax was found to be 14-15% lower in the substrate-depletion experiment than in the radioisotope experiment due to endogenous propionate production. By including the endogenous propionate production, a 42-49% lower Km was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors.

  18. Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2000-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

  19. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  20. Developing the reaction kinetics for a biodiesel reactor.

    PubMed

    Slinn, Matthew; Kendall, Kevin

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the kinetics of the biodiesel reaction in order to find out how best to reach 96.5% methyl ester. The purity of the biodiesel product was examined using gas chromatography to the EN14214 FAME standard and real-time optical microscopy was used to observe the reaction. The problem was the reaction does not reach completion and the mechanism is not understood. It was observed that droplet size had a major influence on reaction end point and that the reaction was mass-transfer limited. This observation was confirmed by developing a mass-transfer based reaction model using the data from the batch reactor which agreed with results from other researchers. The model predicted better conversion with more mixing intensity. The results show that significant improvements could be made to the conventional FAME process.

  1. Kinetics of chlorite dismutase in a perchlorate degrading reactor sludge.

    PubMed

    Nadaraja, Anupama Vijaya; Veetil, Prajeesh Gangadharan Puthiya; Vidyadharan, Athira; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of chlorite dismutase (CD), the terminal enzyme involved in the perchlorate (ClO4(-)) reduction pathway, in a ClO4(-)-degrading bioreactor are reported in this study. Enzyme activity was determined from dissolved oxygen released during disproportionation of chlorite (ClO2(-)). CD activity was in the range 29.8-36.4 U/mg dry weight sludge, and kinetic constants Vmax and K(m) of the enzyme were 37.83 U/mg dry weight and 0.28 mM, respectively. Among reactor operational conditions, enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 6.0. Redox potential in the range -50 to +120mV and NaCl up to 3.5 g/L had no significant effect on CD activity. However, co-occurring pollutants such as ammonium at 10 ppm, nitrite at 50 ppm and EDTA at 100 microM reduced CD activity substantially. The present study highlights ideal bioreactor conditions to avoid ClO2(-) toxicity, while indicating the buffering potential of a mixed microbial system against inhibiting factors to maintain stable CD activity in bioreactors.

  2. Bioreaction engineering. Vol. 1: Fundamentals, thermodynamics, formal kinetics, idealized reactor types and operation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Schugeri, K.

    1987-01-01

    This volume, provides view of the current state of bioreaction engineering, the science of the reaction engineering of cells and microorganisms. Topics covered include the modus operandi of bioreactors, basic types, reactors circuits, formal kinetics of cell growth and product formation, growth in idealized reactors, substrate-limited growth, operation modes in stirred reactors, discontinuous (batch) operation, continuous operation, dynamic behavior of open and closed loop reactors, and more.

  3. RNA–protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Ridgeway, William K.; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA–protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic ‘Riboreactor’ has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA–protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA–protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome. PMID:19759214

  4. RNA-protein binding kinetics in an automated microfluidic reactor.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, William K; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Phillips, Rob; Williamson, James R

    2009-11-01

    Microfluidic chips can automate biochemical assays on the nanoliter scale, which is of considerable utility for RNA-protein binding reactions that would otherwise require large quantities of proteins. Unfortunately, complex reactions involving multiple reactants cannot be prepared in current microfluidic mixer designs, nor is investigation of long-time scale reactions possible. Here, a microfluidic 'Riboreactor' has been designed and constructed to facilitate the study of kinetics of RNA-protein complex formation over long time scales. With computer automation, the reactor can prepare binding reactions from any combination of eight reagents, and is optimized to monitor long reaction times. By integrating a two-photon microscope into the microfluidic platform, 5-nl reactions can be observed for longer than 1000 s with single-molecule sensitivity and negligible photobleaching. Using the Riboreactor, RNA-protein binding reactions with a fragment of the bacterial 30S ribosome were prepared in a fully automated fashion and binding rates were consistent with rates obtained from conventional assays. The microfluidic chip successfully combines automation, low sample consumption, ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection and a high degree of reproducibility. The chip should be able to probe complex reaction networks describing the assembly of large multicomponent RNPs such as the ribosome.

  5. Kinetics and fixed-bed reactor modeling of butane oxidation to maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Cresswell, D.L. ); Newson, E.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on selective oxidation kinetics of n-butane to maleic anhydride in air studied over a commercial, fixed-bed vanadium-phosphor oxide catalyst. The temperature range was 573-653 K with butane concentrations up to 3 mol % in the feed, which is within flammability limits but below ignition temperatures. The rate data were modeled using power law kinetics with product inhibition and included total oxidation and decomposition reactions. Kinetic parameters were estimated using a multiresponse, nonlinear regression algorithm showing intercorrelation effects. The kinetics were combined with independent measurements of catalyst diffusivity and reactor heat transfer using a one- dimensional heterogeneous reactor model.

  6. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-09-01

    Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors.

  7. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors. PMID:24065871

  8. Sensitivity Analysis for Reactor Period Induced by Positive Reactivity Using One-point Adjoint Kinetic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, G.; Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2014-04-01

    In order to better predict a kinetic behavior of a nuclear fission reactor, an improvement of the delayed neutron parameters is essential. The present paper specifies important nuclear data for a reactor kinetics: Fission yield and decay constant data of 86Ge, some bromine isotopes, 94Rb, 98mY and some iodine isotopes. Their importance is quantified as sensitivities with a help of the adjoint kinetic equation, and it is found that they are dependent on an inserted reactivity (or a reactor period). Moreover, dependence of sensitivities on nuclear data files is also quantified using the latest files. Even though the currently evaluated data are used, there are large differences among different data files from a view point of the delayed neutrons.

  9. 3-D kinetics simulations of the NRU reactor using the DONJON code

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, T. C.; Atfield, M. D.; Koclas, J.

    2006-07-01

    The NRU reactor is highly heterogeneous, heavy-water cooled and moderated, with online refuelling capability. It is licensed to operate at a maximum power of 135 MW, with a peak thermal flux of approximately 4.0 x 10{sup 18} n.m{sup -2} . s{sup -1}. In support of the safe operation of NRU, three-dimensional kinetics calculations for reactor transients have been performed using the DONJON code. The code was initially designed to perform space-time kinetics calculations for the CANDU{sup R} power reactors. This paper describes how the DONJON code can be applied to perform neutronic simulations for the analysis of reactor transients in NRU, and presents calculation results for some transients. (authors)

  10. A Kinetic and Mass Transfer Model for Glycerol Hydrogenolysis in a Trickle-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Yaoyan; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, John G.; Oberg, Aaron A.; Jackson, James E.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2010-11-15

    A detailed model of glycerol hydrogenolysis in a trickle-bed reactor is presented that includes a mechanistically based kinetic rate expression, energy transport, mass transport across the gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces, intraparticle catalyst mass transfer, and partial wetting of the bed. Optimal kinetic parameters for the glycerol hydrogenolysis rate expression were determined via nonlinear regression analysis on the basis of experiments conducted in a laboratory-scale trickle-bed reactor over a broad range of operating conditions. Model predictions agree well with experimental data and accurately predict trends in reactor performance with liquid flow rate, temperature, hydrogen pressure, and base promoter concentration. The model is thus a useful tool for predicting laboratory reactor performance and for design of commercial-scale trickle-bed systems.

  11. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater.

  12. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  13. Optimization of the activated sludge anoxic reactor configuration as a means to control nutrient removal kinetically.

    PubMed

    Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2007-04-01

    Factors influencing the determination of optimum reactor configuration for activated sludge denitrification are investigated in this paper. A kinetic optimization method is presented to evaluate optimal pre- and post-denitrification bioreactor stages. Applying the method developed, simulation studies were carried out to investigate the impacts of the ratio of the influent readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable substrates and the oxygen entering the denitrification zones on the optimal anoxic reactor configuration. In addition, the paper describes the effects of the slowly biodegradable substrate on the denitrification efficiency using external substrate dosing, and it demonstrates kinetic considerations concerning the hydrolysis process. It has been shown that as a function of the biodegradable substrate composition, the stage system design with three optimized reactor compartments can effectively increase reaction rates in the denitrification zones, and can provide flexibility for varying operation conditions. PMID:17321565

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  15. Basic dye decomposition kinetics in a photocatalytic slurry reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Hsing; Chang, Hung-Wei; Chern, Jia-Ming

    2006-09-01

    Wastewater effluent from textile plants using various dyes is one of the major water pollutants to the environment. Traditional chemical, physical and biological processes for treating textile dye wastewaters have disadvantages such as high cost, energy waste and generating secondary pollution during the treatment process. The photocatalytic process using TiO2 semiconductor particles under UV light illumination has been shown to be potentially advantageous and applicable in the treatment of wastewater pollutants. In this study, the dye decomposition kinetics by nano-size TiO2 suspension at natural solution pH was experimentally studied by varying the agitation speed (50-200 rpm), TiO2 suspension concentration (0.25-1.71 g/L), initial dye concentration (10-50 ppm), temperature (10-50 degrees C), and UV power intensity (0-96 W). The experimental results show the agitation speed, varying from 50 to 200 rpm, has a slight influence on the dye decomposition rate and the pH history; the dye decomposition rate increases with the TiO2 suspension concentration up to 0.98 g/L, then decrease with increasing TiO2 suspension concentration; the initial dye decomposition rate increases with the initial dye concentration up to a certain value depending upon the temperature, then decreases with increasing initial dye concentration; the dye decomposition rate increases with the UV power intensity up to 64 W to reach a plateau. Kinetic models have been developed to fit the experimental kinetic data well. PMID:16563618

  16. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt. PMID:27054727

  17. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt.

  18. Kinetics study of palm oil hydrolysis using immobilized lipase Candida rugosa in packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Min, C S; Bhatia, S; Kamaruddin, A H

    1999-01-01

    Continuous hydrolysis of palm oil triglyceride in organic solvent using immobilized Candida rugosa on the Amberlite MB-1 as a source of immobilized lipase was studied in packed bed reactor. The enzymatic kinetics of hydrolysis reaction was studied by changing the substrate concentration, reaction temperature and residence time(tau) in the reactor. At 55 degrees C, the optimum water concentration was found to be 15 % weight per volume of solution (%w/v). The Michaelis-Menten kinetic model was used to obtain the reaction parameters, Km(app) and V max(app). The activation energies were found to be quite low indicating that the lipase-catalyzed process is controlled by diffusion of substrates. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic model was found to be suitable at low water concentration 10-15 %w/v of solution. At higher water concentration, substrate inhibition model was used for data analysis. Reactor operation was found to play an important role in the palm oil hydrolysis kinetic.

  19. The kinetics of nitrogen removal and biogas production in an anammox non-woven membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Lee, Po-Heng; Sung, Shihwu

    2010-08-01

    The anammox non-woven membrane reactor (ANMR) is a novel reactor configuration to culture the slowly growing anammox bacteria. Different mathematical models were used to study the process kinetics of the nitrogen removal in the ANMR. The kinetics of nitrogen gas production of anammox process was first evaluated in this paper. For substrate removal kinetics, the modified Stover-Kincannon model and the Grau second-order model were more applicable to the ANMR than the first-order model and the Monod model. For nitrogen gas production kinetics, the Van der Meer and Heertjes model was more appropriate than the modified Stover-Kincannon model. Model evaluation was carried out by comparing experimental data with predicted values calculated from suitable models. Both model kinetics study and model testing showed that the Grau second-order model and the Van der Meer and Heertjes model seemed to be the best models to describe the nitrogen removal and nitrogen gas production in the ANMR, respectively.

  20. Graphene liquid marbles as photothermal miniature reactors for reaction kinetics modulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Hobley, Jonathan; Liu, Tianxi; Phang, In Yee; Ling, Xing Yi

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the fabrication of graphene liquid marbles as photothermal miniature reactors with precise temperature control for reaction kinetics modulation. Graphene liquid marbles show rapid and highly reproducible photothermal behavior while maintaining their excellent mechanical robustness. By tuning the applied laser power, swift regulation of graphene liquid marble's surface temperature between 21-135 °C and its encapsulated water temperature between 21-74 °C are demonstrated. The temperature regulation modulates the reaction kinetics in our graphene liquid marble, achieving a 12-fold superior reaction rate constant for methylene blue degradation than at room temperature.

  1. Production of Biodiesel at Kinetic Limit Achieved in a Centrifugal Reactor/Separator

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Jennings, Hal L; Pahmer Boitrago, Amy M; Terpstra, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the transesterification of soybean oil has been investigated in a centrifugal reactor at temperatures from 45 to 80 C and pressures up to 2.6 bar using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The yields of product methyl esters were quantified using IR, proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H1NMR), and viscosity measurements and were found to achieve 90% of the yield in 2 min; however, to meet ASTM specifications with one pass through the reactor, a 15 min residence time was needed. Performance was improved by sequential reactions, allowing separation of by-product glycerine and injection of additional small aliquots of methanol. The kinetics was modeled using a three-step mechanism of reversible reactions, which was used to predict performance at commercial scale. The mechanism correctly predicted the exponential decline in reaction rate as the concentration of the products allowed significant reverse reactions to occur.

  2. Kinetic study of copper precipitates under VVER-type reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhman, A.; Boehmert, J.; Ulbricht, A.

    2003-11-01

    The copper-rich cluster evolution in the neutron-irradiated VVER steels is investigated beginning at the nucleation stage. For this, typical VVER-type reactor conditions are considered. The cluster dynamics approach is used for calculation of the density distribution of copper precipitates related to the number of Cu-atoms or radius, mean radius, volume content, number density of precipitates and the concentration of free Cu-atoms in dependence on the irradiation time. The results for time of one year are compared with the results of small angle neutron scattering experiments which were carried out on specimens irradiated at the surveillance positions of VVER reactors. It has revealed the intermediate type of the evolution kinetics between diffusion and interfacial kinetics limited regimes. The duration of the nucleation and deterministic stages is estimated. The coarsening stage does not occur.

  3. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency.

  4. Photolytic treatment of atrazine-contaminated water: products, kinetics, and reactor design.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuejun; Chen, Daniel; Li, Kuyen; Wang, Bin; Hopper, Jack

    2007-08-01

    This study investigates the products, kinetics, and reactor design of atrazine photolysis under 254-nm ultraviolet-C (UVC) irradiation. With an initial atrazine concentration of 60 microg/L (60 ppbm), only two products remain in detectable levels. Up to 77% of decomposed atrazine becomes hydroxyatrazine, the major product. Both atrazine and hydroxyatrazine photodecompose following the first-order rate equation, but the hydroxyatrazine photodecomposition rate is significantly slower than that of atrazine. For atrazine photodecomposition, the rate constant is proportional to the square of UVC output, but inversely proportional to the reactor volume. For a photochemical reactor design, a series of equations are proposed to calculate the needed UVC output power, water treatment capacity, and atrazine outlet concentration.

  5. Characteristics and kinetics of cattle litter pyrolysis in a tubing reactor.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of cattle litter were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cattle litter was pyrolyzed in a tubing reactor at 340, 360 and 380 degrees C with various retention times from 4 to 20 min. The influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the product yields was also examined. The maximum yields of gas and liquid products, 16.1 and 17.2 wt%, respectively, were obtained after pyrolysis at 380 degrees C for 20 min. The gas products were mainly C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons. The experimental results of the product distribution were well fitted with the lumped kinetic model. The reaction pathway was investigated based on the calculated kinetic constants. PMID:19592241

  6. Characteristics and kinetics of cattle litter pyrolysis in a tubing reactor.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic parameters for the pyrolysis of cattle litter were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cattle litter was pyrolyzed in a tubing reactor at 340, 360 and 380 degrees C with various retention times from 4 to 20 min. The influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the product yields was also examined. The maximum yields of gas and liquid products, 16.1 and 17.2 wt%, respectively, were obtained after pyrolysis at 380 degrees C for 20 min. The gas products were mainly C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons. The experimental results of the product distribution were well fitted with the lumped kinetic model. The reaction pathway was investigated based on the calculated kinetic constants.

  7. Kinetics of psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating flushed dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Yu, Liang; Frear, Craig; Zhao, Quanbao; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Shulin

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a new strategy, improving biomass retention with fiber material present within the dairy manure as biofilm carriers, was evaluated for treating flushed dairy manure in a psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). A kinetic study was carried out for process control and design by comparing four microbial growth kinetic models, i.e. first order, Grau, Monod and Chen and Hashimoto models. A volumetric methane production rate of 0.24L/L/d of and a specific methane productivity of 0.19L/gVSloaded were achieved at 6days HRT. It was proved that an ASBR using manure fiber as support media not only improved methane production but also reduced the necessary HRT and temperature to achieve a similar treating efficiency compared with current technologies. The kinetic model can be used for design and optimization of the process.

  8. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-01

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  9. Kinetics of organic removal in fixed-bed aerobic biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Borghei, S M; Sharbatmaleki, M; Pourrezaie, P; Borghei, G

    2008-03-01

    The process kinetics of a lab-scale upflow aerobic immobilized biomass (UAIB) reactor using simulated sugar-manufacturing wastewater as feed was investigated. The experimental unit consisted of a 22l reactor filled with high porosity pumice stone. The UAIB reactor was tested under different organic loads and different hydraulic retention times (HRT) and the substrate loading removal rate was compared with prediction of Stover-Kincannon model, second-order model and the first order substrate removal model. After obtaining steady-state conditions, organic loading rate was increased from 750 to 4500 g COD/m(3) day to resemble wastewater from sugar production lines, and hydraulic retention time was decreased from 1 to 0.5 days, stepwise. Nine different operational conditions were applied changing these two parameters in a certain program. As a result of the calculations, Stover-Kincannon model and second-order model known as "Grau" model were found to be the most appropriate models for this reactor. Stover-Kincannon model and Grau second-order model gave high correlation coefficients, which were 99.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Therefore, these models could be used in predicting the behavior or design of the UAIB reactors.

  10. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    SciTech Connect

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-30

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  11. A new approach for development of kinetics of wastewater treatment in aerobic biofilm reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Sarkar, S.; Mazumder, D.

    2016-02-01

    Biofilm process is widely used for the treatment of a variety of wastewater especially containing slowly biodegradable substances. It provides resistance against toxic environment and is capable of retaining biomass under continuous operation. Development of kinetics is very much pertinent for rational design of a biofilm process for the treatment of wastewater with or without inhibitory substances. A simple approach for development of such kinetics for an aerobic biofilm reactor has been presented using a novel biofilm model. The said biofilm model is formulated from the correlations between substrate concentrations in the influent/effluent and at biofilm liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness complying Monod's growth kinetics. The methodology for determining the kinetic coefficients for substrate removal and biomass growth has been demonstrated stepwise along with graphical representations. Kinetic coefficients like K, k, Y, b t, b s, and b d are determined either from the intercepts of X- and Y-axis or from the slope of the graphical plots.

  12. Development and analysis of some versions of the fractional-order point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Vishwesh A.; Nataraj, P. S. V.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we report the development and analysis of some novel versions and approximations of the fractional-order (FO) point reactor kinetics model for a nuclear reactor with slab geometry. A systematic development of the FO Inhour equation, Inverse FO point reactor kinetics model, and fractional-order versions of the constant delayed neutron rate approximation model and prompt jump approximation model is presented for the first time (for both one delayed group and six delayed groups). These models evolve from the FO point reactor kinetics model, which has been derived from the FO Neutron Telegraph Equation for the neutron transport considering the subdiffusive neutron transport. Various observations and the analysis results are reported and the corresponding justifications are addressed using the subdiffusive framework for the neutron transport. The FO Inhour equation is found out to be a pseudo-polynomial with its degree depending on the order of the fractional derivative in the FO model. The inverse FO point reactor kinetics model is derived and used to find the reactivity variation required to achieve exponential and sinusoidal power variation in the core. The situation of sudden insertion of negative reactivity is analyzed using the FO constant delayed neutron rate approximation. Use of FO model for representing the prompt jump in reactor power is advocated on the basis of subdiffusion. Comparison with the respective integer-order models is carried out for the practical data. Also, it has been shown analytically that integer-order models are a special case of FO models when the order of time-derivative is one. Development of these FO models plays a crucial role in reactor theory and operation as it is the first step towards achieving the FO control-oriented model for a nuclear reactor. The results presented here form an important step in the efforts to establish a step-by-step and systematic theory for the FO modeling of a nuclear reactor.

  13. Kinetic studies and performance evaluation of an anaerobic fixed-film reactor treating fuel alcohol wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This study was part of an extensive treatability study of the fuel alcohol wastewater generated at the OSU Agricultural Engineering Fuel Alcohol Research Facility. A bench-scale fixed-film upflow anaerobic reactor was operated for a period of over two years in order to collect the appropriate data for reliable design and operation of a full-scale fixed film anaerobic system. The biological kinetic constants for substrate removal, total gas production, and methane production were developed in terms of BOD{sub 5}, COD, and TOC, at two different temperatures, 36C and 25C. Shock loads studies were also performed, including organic shock loads, low temperature shocks, and shut-down (no feeding) periods. The alcohol wastewater can be easily treated using fixed-film upflow anaerobic reactor. The substrate removal characteristics were a function of the applied mass substrate loading. For applied mass substrate loading rates higher than 27 lbs BOD{sub 5} per day per 1000 sq. ft., the treatment efficiency and the gas production deteriorated, mainly due to accumulation of volatile fatty acids. The methane content of the gas decreased and the carbon dioxide content increased as the applied mass loading rates were increased up to around 12 lbs BOD{sub 5}/day/1000 sq. ft. at which point they leveled out 59% and 39%, respectively. The total gas production and the methane production were also a function of the applied mass substrate loading rate. The substrate removal kinetics and the gas kinetics were considerably different at the two temperatures. The reactor was able to successfully accommodate organic and low temperature shock loads, as well as, shut-down or no feeding periods.

  14. Optimization of chemical reactor feed by simulations based on a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Guinand, Charles; Dabros, Michal; Roduit, Bertrand; Meyer, Thierry; Stoessel, Francis

    2014-10-01

    Chemical incidents are typically caused by loss of control, resulting in runaway reactions or process deviations in different stages of the production. In the case of fed-batch reactors, the problem generally encountered is the accumulation of heat. This is directly related to the temperature of the process, the reaction kinetics and adiabatic temperature rise, which is the maximum temperature attainable in the event of cooling failure. The main possibility to control the heat accumulation is the use of a well-controlled adapted feed. The feed rate can be adjusted by using reaction and reactor dynamic models coupled to Model Predictive Control. Thereby, it is possible to predict the best feed profile respecting the safety constraints.

  15. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  16. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A.

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  17. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W,; Huckaby, Ernest D.; Shadle, Lawrence J; Spenik, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.

  18. Process of inorganic nitrogen transformation and design of kinetics model in the biological aerated filter reactor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Gang; Xu, Xia; Yao, Lirong; Lu, Liqiao; Zhao, Tingting; Zhang, Wenyi

    2011-04-01

    As one of the plug-flow reactors, biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor was divided into four sampling sectors to understand the characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation during the reaction process, and then the different characteristics of elemental nitrogen transformation caused by different NH(3)-N loadings, biological quantities and activities in each section were obtained. The results showed that the total transformation ratio in the nitrifying reactor was more than 90% in the absence of any organic carbon resource, at the same time, more than 65% NH(3)-N in the influent were nitrified at the filter height of 70 cm below under the conditions of the influent runoff 9-19 L/h, the gas-water ratio 4-5:1, the dissolved oxygen 3.0-5.8 mg/L and the NH(3)-N load 0.28-0.48 kg NH(3)-N/m(3) d. On the base of the Eckenfelder mode, the kinetics equation of the NH(3)-N transformation along the reactor was S(e)=S(0) exp(-0.0134D/L(1.2612)).

  19. [Performance and substrate inhibition kinetics model of nitritation process in inverse turbulent bed reactor].

    PubMed

    Jin, Ren-Cun; Yang, Guang-Feng; Ma, Chun; Zheng, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a nitritation inverse turbulent bed (ITB) reactor was tested and the substrate inhibition kinetics characteristics of the reactor were analyzed. The results showed that a rapid reactor startup could be realized within 20 d with a strategy that combined the biofilm attachment method named "precoating carrier treatment" and "rapid suspending sludge discharge", with the feeding strategy named "low strength, high load". When operated at a hydraulic retention time of 3 h and influent NH4(+) -N of 700 mg x L(-1), corresponding to a nitrogen loading rate of 5.60 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), a maximum NH4(+) -N removal rate of 4.25 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) was observed. The maximum NO2(-) -N production rate was as high as 3.70 kg x (m3 x d)(-1). Four inhibition kinetic models (Haldane, Edwards, Aiba and Luong) were analyzed through non-linear regression to represent the inhibitions caused by substrate of nitritation process and the parameters of models were gained, which were r(max) of 1.84 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), K(IH) of 97.4 mg x L(-1) and K(m) of 0.188 mg x L(-1) for Haldane model, and r(max) of 1.83 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) and K(IA) of 114 mg x L(-1) for Aiba model. It was proposed that Haldane and Aiba models well fitted the process data harvested in the ITB reactor.

  20. Application of convergence acceleration to the reactor kinetic equations: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Picca, P.; Furfaro, R.; Ganapol, B. D.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation provides a comparison of two methodologies for the solution of reactor kinetic equations, namely for a standard finite difference and a semi-analytical approach. The above-mentioned methods are implemented in a convergence acceleration framework to enhance their efficiency and a comparative study is reported to verify whether it is more convenient to use a rudimentary but fast algorithm (finite difference) with respect to the more refined but computationally intense approach of the semi-analytical method. Performance on several test cases from the literature are compared. (authors)

  1. A model based on equations of kinetics to study nitrogen dioxide behavior within a plasma discharge reactor.

    PubMed

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi; Ganjovi, Alireza; Shojaei, Fahimeh; Hassani, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a zero-dimensional kinetics model is used to study the temporal behavior of different species such as charged particles, radicals and excited states inside a Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma reactor. It is shown that, the reactor significantly reduces the concentration of nitrogen monoxide as an environmental pollutant. After a drastic increase, a decrease in the concentration of the NO2 molecules inside the reactor is seen. Nitrogen monoxide molecules with a very low concentration are produced inside the reactor and its quick conversion to other products is proved. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings, whenever possible.

  2. Kinetics of electrooxidation of landfill leachate in a three-dimensional carbon bed electrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Nageswara Rao, Neti; Rohit, Misra; Nitin, Gedam; Parameswaran, P N; Astik, J K

    2009-08-01

    The electrooxidation of high strength leachate from an industrial solid waste landfill site was carried out in a three-dimensional carbon bed electrode reactor (TDR). This paper discusses the kinetics and mechanism of electrooxidation on the basis of time course variation of COD, TOC and TKN (total Kjeldahl nitrogen) from the raw leachate. The batch experiments were run at different applied currents (1-3 A) for a period of 6h. A two-stage pseudo-first order reaction kinetics model was developed based on the initial rapid removal of pollutants (Phase I) followed by slow oxidation kinetics (Phase II). About 60-64% COD was removed within 1h with a rate constant 5.83 x 10(-3) min(-1) in Phase I, which was near 5-7 times greater than that of Phase II (0.81-1.03 x 10(-3)min(-1)). The mineralization efficiency was found to be significant in the range 0.83-0.84. The apparent faradic efficiency and specific energy consumption for COD removal were also estimated. The mechanism of electrooxidation was discussed with the help of adsorption, kinetic and SEM results.

  3. Bio-kinetic analysis on treatment of textile dye wastewater using anaerobic batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Gnanapragasam, G; Senthilkumar, M; Arutchelvan, V; Velayutham, T; Nagarajan, S

    2011-01-01

    An anaerobic digestion technique was applied to textile dye wastewater aiming at the colour and COD removal. Pet bottles of 5 L capacity were used as reactor which contains methanogenic sludge of half a liter capacity which was used for the treatment of combined synthetic textile dye and starch wastewater at different mixing ratios of 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50 and 60:40 with initial COD concentrations as 3520, 3440, 3360, 3264 and 3144 mg L(-1), respectively. The reactor was maintained at room temperature (30±3°C) with initial pH of 7. The maximum COD and colour removal were 81.0% and 87.3% at an optimum mixing ratio of 30:70 of textile dye and starch wastewaters. Both Monod's and Haldane's models were adopted in this study. The kinetic constants of cell growth under Haldane's model were satisfactory when compared to Monod's model. The kinetic constants obtained by Haldane's model were found to be in the range of μmax=0.037-0.146 h(-1), Ks=651.04-1372.88 mg L(-1) and Ki=5681.81-18727.59 mg L(-1).

  4. Biodegradation and kinetics of aerobic granules under high organic loading rates in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Liang, David Tee; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2008-05-01

    Biodegradation, kinetics, and microbial diversity of aerobic granules were investigated under a high range of organic loading rate 6.0 to 12.0 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-3) day(-1) in a sequencing batch reactor. The selection and enriching of different bacterial species under different organic loading rates had an important effect on the characteristics and performance of the mature aerobic granules and caused the difference on granular biodegradation and kinetic behaviors. Good granular characteristics and performance were presented at steady state under various organic loading rates. Larger and denser aerobic granules were developed and stabilized at relatively higher organic loading rates with decreased bioactivity in terms of specific oxygen utilization rate and specific growth rate (muoverall) or solid retention time. The decrease of bioactivity was helpful to maintain granule stability under high organic loading rates and improve reactor operation. The corresponding biokinetic coefficients of endogenous decay rate (kd), observed yield (Yobs), and theoretical yield (Y) were measured and calculated in this study. As the increase of organic loading rate, a decreased net sludge production (Yobs) is associated with an increased solid retention time, while kd and Y changed insignificantly and can be regarded as constants under different organic loading rates.

  5. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto,; Budiyono

    2015-12-29

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration.

  6. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-01

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration.

  7. Kinetics and characterization of bismuth molybdate catalysts. 1. A gradientless partial oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, P.M.; Schuit, G.C.A.; Bicschoff, K.B. ); Koch, T.A. Du Pont Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE )

    1990-12-01

    A gradientless laboratory fixed bed reactor was designed for studying the partial oxidation of 1-butene to 1,3-butadiene over bismuth-molybdate catalysts. By dilution of the catalyst bed with inert silicon carbide, axial catalyst bed temperature gradients were routinely reduced to 2 K or less over the temperature range 650-740 K for the exothermic model reaction. A systematic experimental procedure was developed and used to show that potential transport 'disguises' did not significantly influence the intrinsic rate of butadiene formation measured under both integral and differential conditions. For one Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} catalyst system, rate of butadiene formation data over the temperature range 700-740 K were fit to pseudo first-order (in butene) kinetics. Analytical solutions of the governing equations describing fixed bed reactor transport disguises for first-order catalytic reactions were used to confirm that the reactor operated in a near gradientless fashion, in agreement with experiment.

  8. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Korup, O; Geske, M; Zavyalova, U; Oprea, I; Schlögl, R

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with microm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated alpha-Al(2)O(3) foam supports. PMID:20590252

  9. Comprehensive kinetic studies of acidic oil continuous esterification by cation-exchange resin in fixed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Feng, Yaohui; Ren, Yanbiao; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Aoran; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    Biodiesel produced by esterification from molar ratio of methanol to free fatty acid (FFA) as 25:1 in presence of triglyceride was carried out with cation-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst in three different scales of fixed bed reactors from minireactor (6.8 mm × 110 mm) to pilot scale reactor (70 mm × 1260 mm) at 338 K. The kinetic study of esterification was undertaken in terms of pseudo-homogeneous mechanism and performed as a first order reaction with elimination of the solid-liquid internal and external mass transfer resistances. Moreover, a kinetic model of FFA esterification was developed to illustrate the relationship between the FFA conversion and the catalyst bed height of fixed bed reactor. The model was also suitable for various resins in fixed bed reactor. The theoretical predictions were in agreement with the experimental data with root mean square (RMS) errors <10.

  10. Application of a diffusion-reaction kinetic model for the removal of 4-chlorophenol in continuous tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Murcia, M D; Gómez, M; Bastida, J; Hidalgo, A M; Montiel, M C; Ortega, S

    2014-08-01

    A continuous tank reactor was used to remove 4-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions, using immobilized soybean peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The influence of operational variables (enzyme and substrate concentrations and spatial time) on the removal efficiency was studied. By using the kinetic law and the intrinsic kinetic parameters obtained in a previous work with a discontinuous tank reactor, the mass-balance differential equations of the transient state reactor model were solved and the theoretical conversion values were calculated. Several experimental series were used to obtain the values of the remaining model parameters by numerical calculation and using an error minimization algorithm. The model was checked by comparing the results obtained in some experiments (not used for the determination of the parameters) and the theoretical ones. The good concordance between the experimental and calculated conversion values confirmed that the design model can be used to predict the transient behaviour of the reactor.

  11. [Kinetics on dimethoate aqueous solution degradation in ultrasonic airlift loop Reactor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-nan; Lü, Xiao-ping; Han, Ping-fang

    2008-06-01

    The kinetic rules of degradation were studied in ultrasonic airlift loop reactor (UALR) in which O3 was introduced as oxidant and the organophosphorus pesticide dimethoate was used as typical contaminant. It was found that the dimethoate degradations under the individual ultrasonic radiation treatment without O3 (US), the oxidation of O3 gas (O3) and the synergetic effect of UALR and O3 (UALR/O3) were all consonant with the apparent first-order reaction by the kinetics investigations. The dimethoate removal rates of US, O3 and UALR/O3 methodologies under the conditions of dimethoate initial concentration of 50 mg/L, initial solution pH of 6.0, dimethoate solution volume of 80 mL, ultrasonic intensity of 0.5 W/cm2, O3 flow of 200 L/h, temperature of 20 degrees C and the treatment time of 4 h were 27%, 15% and 90%, respectively. Under these conditions, the rate constant enhancement factor of dimethoate degradation reached 4.816. Furthermore, a simplified mechanistic kinetic model was derived from the degradation mechanism of the synergetic effect of US, O3 and hydroxyl free radical (*OH) in the UALR/O3 system.

  12. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of oak trees using thermogravimetric analyzer and micro-tubing reactor.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Hun; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Young-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    In this work, pyrolysis characteristics were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at heating rates of 5-20 degrees C/min. Most of the materials were decomposed between 330 degrees C and 370 degrees C at each heating rate. The average activation energy was 236.2 kJ/mol when the pyrolytic conversion increased from 5% to 70%. The pyrolysis kinetics of oak trees was also investigated experimentally and mathematically. The experiments were carried out in a tubing reactor at a temperature range of 330-370 degrees C with a reaction time of 2-8 min. A lump model of combined series and parallel reactions for bio-oil and gas formation was proposed. The kinetic parameters were determined by nonlinear least-squares regression from the experimental data. It was found from the reaction kinetic constants that the predominant reaction pathway from the oak trees was to bio-oil formation rather than to gas formation at the investigated temperature range.

  13. Microbial ureolysis in the seawater-catalysed urine phosphorus recovery system: Kinetic study and reactor verification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Tao; Dai, Ji; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-12-15

    Our previous study has confirmed the feasibility of using seawater as an economical precipitant for urine phosphorus (P) precipitation. However, we still understand very little about the ureolysis in the Seawater-based Urine Phosphorus Recovery (SUPR) system despite its being a crucial step for urine P recovery. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of microbial ureolysis in the seawater-urine system. Indigenous bacteria from urine and seawater exhibited relatively low ureolytic activity, but they adapted quickly to the urine-seawater mixture during batch cultivation. During cultivation, both the abundance and specific ureolysis rate of the indigenous bacteria were greatly enhanced as confirmed by a biomass-dependent Michaelis-Menten model. The period for fully ureolysis was decreased from 180 h to 2.5 h after four cycles of cultivation. Based on the successful cultivation, a lab-scale SUPR reactor was set up to verify the fast ureolysis and efficient P recovery in the SUPR system. Nearly complete urine P removal was achieved in the reactor in 6 h without adding any chemicals. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that the predominant groups of bacteria in the SUPR reactor likely originated from seawater rather than urine. Moreover, batch tests confirmed the high ureolysis rates and high phosphorus removal efficiency induced by cultivated bacteria in the SUPR reactor under seawater-to-urine mixing ratios ranging from 1:1 to 9:1. This study has proved that the enrichment of indigenous bacteria in the SUPR system can lead to sufficient ureolytic activity for phosphate precipitation, thus providing an efficient and economical method for urine P recovery. PMID:26378727

  14. Microbial ureolysis in the seawater-catalysed urine phosphorus recovery system: Kinetic study and reactor verification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Tao; Dai, Ji; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-12-15

    Our previous study has confirmed the feasibility of using seawater as an economical precipitant for urine phosphorus (P) precipitation. However, we still understand very little about the ureolysis in the Seawater-based Urine Phosphorus Recovery (SUPR) system despite its being a crucial step for urine P recovery. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of microbial ureolysis in the seawater-urine system. Indigenous bacteria from urine and seawater exhibited relatively low ureolytic activity, but they adapted quickly to the urine-seawater mixture during batch cultivation. During cultivation, both the abundance and specific ureolysis rate of the indigenous bacteria were greatly enhanced as confirmed by a biomass-dependent Michaelis-Menten model. The period for fully ureolysis was decreased from 180 h to 2.5 h after four cycles of cultivation. Based on the successful cultivation, a lab-scale SUPR reactor was set up to verify the fast ureolysis and efficient P recovery in the SUPR system. Nearly complete urine P removal was achieved in the reactor in 6 h without adding any chemicals. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that the predominant groups of bacteria in the SUPR reactor likely originated from seawater rather than urine. Moreover, batch tests confirmed the high ureolysis rates and high phosphorus removal efficiency induced by cultivated bacteria in the SUPR reactor under seawater-to-urine mixing ratios ranging from 1:1 to 9:1. This study has proved that the enrichment of indigenous bacteria in the SUPR system can lead to sufficient ureolytic activity for phosphate precipitation, thus providing an efficient and economical method for urine P recovery.

  15. Growth kinetics of calcium fluoride at high supersaturation in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, K; Zhou, K G; Yang, Y C; Du, H

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization process in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been regarded as an environmentally friendly technology for the removal and recovery of fluoride from industrial wastewater. The growth kinetics of calcium fluoride at high supersaturation was studied for design, control, and operation of an FBR. The main variables, including supersaturation, superficial velocity, pH value, and particle size of seed that influenced the crystal growth were investigated. Then, a growth model was used to predict the linear growth rate of calcium fluoride at a high influent concentration of fluoride. The pressure difference in the FBR was used as a feature to characterize the growth rate of calcium fluoride. The aggregation and adsorption between seeds and fine particles were proven to be a possible mechanism for growth of calcium fluoride.

  16. A KINETIC MODEL FOR H2O2/UV PROCESS IN A COMPLETELY MIXED BATCH REACTOR. (R825370C076)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dynamic kinetic model for the advanced oxidation process (AOP) using hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation (H2O2/UV) in a completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) is developed. The model includes the known elementary chemical and photochemical reac...

  17. Water gas shift reaction kinetics and reactor modeling for fuel cell grade hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of the water gas shift reaction was studied to evaluate existing reaction mechanisms, test various rate expressions and simulate the performance in a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Sud-Chemie Cu/ZnO/Al 2O 3 catalyst between 120 and 250 °C with a range of feed rates and compositions. Using non-linear least squares optimization, the parameters in five rate expressions were fit to the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. Numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model was used for this parameter fitting. An empirical rate expression, rCO= kPCOPH 2O (1- β) with activation energy of 47.4 kJ/mol was also obtained from the experimental data. Reactor performance was simulated to determine catalyst loadings required to achieve specific CO conversions as a function of temperature and water feed rate. These results are useful in studying the design trade offs available to reformer systems.

  18. Modeling of an aerobic biofilm reactor with double-limiting substrate kinetics: bifurcational and dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model of an aerobic biofilm reactor is presented to investigate the bifurcational patterns and the dynamical behavior of the reactor as a function of different key operating parameters. Suspended cells and biofilm are assumed to grow according to double limiting kinetics with phenol inhibition (carbon source) and oxygen limitation. The model presented by Russo et al. is extended to embody key features of the phenomenology of the granular-supported biofilm: biofilm growth and detachment, gas-liquid oxygen transport, phenol, and oxygen uptake by both suspended and immobilized cells, and substrate diffusion into the biofilm. Steady-state conditions and stability, and local dynamic behavior have been characterized. The multiplicity of steady states and their stability depend on key operating parameter values (dilution rate, gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient, biofilm detachment rate, and inlet substrate concentration). Small changes in the operating conditions may be coupled with a drastic change of the steady-state scenario with transcritical and saddle-node bifurcations. The relevance of concentration profiles establishing within the biofilm is also addressed. When the oxygen level in the liquid phase is <10% of the saturation level, the biofilm undergoes oxygen starvation and the active biofilm fraction becomes independent of the dilution rate. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2011.

  19. Evaluation of microfluidics reactor technology on the kinetics of virus inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark R; Chen, Dayue; Emery, Warren R; Lambooy, Peter K; Nolting, Juliana; Quertinmont, Michelle T; Shamlou, Parviz A

    2008-04-15

    Mammalian cell lines constitute an important part in the manufacture of therapeutic proteins. However, their susceptibility to virus contamination is a potential risk to patient safety and productivity, and has led to the development of a repertoire of virus inactivation techniques. From a process development viewpoint, the challenge is to demonstrate the required log reduction in virus content without a significant loss in product titer or quality. The balance between the two is dictated by the kinetics of virus inactivation and protein degradation, both of which are critically affected by process parameters. In this study we describe a commercially available microchannel reactor (MCR) and demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate the impact of temperature on the kinetics of virus inactivation and protein product degradation. Virus spiking experiments are reported using Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus and REOvirus, into buffers in the absence and presence of a therapeutic protein currently under development at Lilly. The results demonstrate that the MCR is an ideal platform for evaluation of fast reactive systems and reactions that are particularly sensitive to small changes to process conditions. These conditions include heat inactivation of a virus in a mammalian cell culture process stream used in the manufacture of therapeutic proteins and antibodies. PMID:18023056

  20. Evaluation of microfluidics reactor technology on the kinetics of virus inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark R; Chen, Dayue; Emery, Warren R; Lambooy, Peter K; Nolting, Juliana; Quertinmont, Michelle T; Shamlou, Parviz A

    2008-04-15

    Mammalian cell lines constitute an important part in the manufacture of therapeutic proteins. However, their susceptibility to virus contamination is a potential risk to patient safety and productivity, and has led to the development of a repertoire of virus inactivation techniques. From a process development viewpoint, the challenge is to demonstrate the required log reduction in virus content without a significant loss in product titer or quality. The balance between the two is dictated by the kinetics of virus inactivation and protein degradation, both of which are critically affected by process parameters. In this study we describe a commercially available microchannel reactor (MCR) and demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate the impact of temperature on the kinetics of virus inactivation and protein product degradation. Virus spiking experiments are reported using Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus and REOvirus, into buffers in the absence and presence of a therapeutic protein currently under development at Lilly. The results demonstrate that the MCR is an ideal platform for evaluation of fast reactive systems and reactions that are particularly sensitive to small changes to process conditions. These conditions include heat inactivation of a virus in a mammalian cell culture process stream used in the manufacture of therapeutic proteins and antibodies.

  1. Kinetics of acetaminophen degradation by Fenton oxidation in a fluidized-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Mark Daniel G; Briones, Rowena M; Su, Chia-Chi; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (ACT), an analgesic and antipyretic substance, is one of the most commonly detected pharmaceutical compound in surface waters and wastewaters. In this study, fluidized-bed Fenton (FB-Fenton) was used to decompose ACT into its final degradation products. The 1.45-L cylindrical glass reactor had inlet, outlet and recirculating sections. SiO(2) carrier particles were supported by glass beads with 2-4 mm in diameter. ACT concentration was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). During the first 40 min of reaction, a fast initial ACT removal was observed and the "two-stage" ACT degradation conformed to a pseudo reaction kinetics. The effects of ferrous ion dosage and [Fe(2+)]/[H(2)O(2)] (FH ratio) were integrated into the derived pseudo second-order kinetic model. A reaction pathway was proposed based on the intermediates detected through SPME/GC-MS. The aromatic intermediates identified were hydroquinone, benzaldehydes and benzoic acids while the non-aromatic substances include alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Rapid initial ACT degradation rate can be accomplished by high initial ferrous ion concentration and/or low FH ratio.

  2. Ozonation kinetics of winery wastewater in a pilot-scale bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marco S; Peres, José A; Lan, Bing Yan; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2009-04-01

    The degradation of organic substances present in winery wastewater was studied in a pilot-scale, bubble column ozonation reactor. A steady reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was observed under the action of ozone at the natural pH of the wastewater (pH 4). At alkaline and neutral pH the degradation rate was accelerated by the formation of radical species from the decomposition of ozone. Furthermore, the reaction of hydrogen peroxide (formed from natural organic matter in the wastewater) and ozone enhances the oxidation capacity of the ozonation process. The monitoring of pH, redox potential (ORP), UV absorbance (254 nm), polyphenol content and ozone consumption was correlated with the oxidation of the organic species in the water. The ozonation of winery wastewater in the bubble column was analysed in terms of a mole balance coupled with ozonation kinetics modeled by the two-film theory of mass transfer and chemical reaction. It was determined that the ozonation reaction can develop both in and across different kinetic regimes: fast, moderate and slow, depending on the experimental conditions. The dynamic change of the rate coefficient estimated by the model was correlated with changes in the water composition and oxidant species.

  3. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  4. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  5. Real-time monitoring of mass-transport-related enzymatic reaction kinetics in a nanochannel-array reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Juan; Wang, Chen; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xu, Jing-Juan; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    To understand the fundamentals of enzymatic reactions confined in micro-/nanosystems, the construction of a small enzyme reactor coupled with an integrated real-time detection system for monitoring the kinetic information is a significant challenge. Nano-enzyme array reactors were fabricated by covalently linking enzymes to the inner channels of a porous anodic alumina (PAA) membrane. The mechanical stability of this nanodevice enables us to integrate an electrochemical detector for the real-time monitoring of the formation of the enzyme reaction product by sputtering a thin Pt film on one side of the PAA membrane. Because the enzymatic reaction is confined in a limited nanospace, the mass transport of the substrate would influence the reaction kinetics considerably. Therefore, the oxidation of glucose by dissolved oxygen catalyzed by immobilized glucose oxidase was used as a model to investigate the mass-transport-related enzymatic reaction kinetics in confined nanospaces. The activity and stability of the enzyme immobilized in the nanochannels was enhanced. In this nano-enzyme reactor, the enzymatic reaction was controlled by mass transport if the flux was low. With an increase in the flux (e.g., >50 microL min(-1)), the enzymatic reaction kinetics became the rate-determining step. This change resulted in the decrease in the conversion efficiency of the nano-enzyme reactor and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant with an increase in substrate flux. This nanodevice integrated with an electrochemical detector could help to understand the fundamentals of enzymatic reactions confined in nanospaces and provide a platform for the design of highly efficient enzyme reactors. In addition, we believe that such nanodevices will find widespread applications in biosensing, drug screening, and biochemical synthesis.

  6. Pentachlorophenol aerobic removal in a sequential reactor: start-up procedure and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Domenica Mosca; Tomei, M Concetta

    2015-01-01

    This study has demonstrated the applicability of a simple technology such as the sequencing batch reactor (SBR), operated with suspended biomass, to the aerobic biodegradation of a highly toxic compound, the pentachlorophenol (PCP). An enrichment of a microbial consortium, originated from the biomass of an urban wastewater treatment plant, was performed and 70 days were sufficient to achieve removal efficiencies of ∼90% with the compound fed as only carbon and energy source Once completed the start-up period, the SBR was operated with the acclimatized biomass for 60 days at a feed concentration of PCP in the range of 10-20 mg L(-1). Improved performance was observed at increased influent concentration and the reached removal efficiency for the highest concentrations was stable at values≥90%. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of the acclimated biomass was performed with biodegradation tests carried out in the bioreactor during the reaction phase. The classical and a modified four-parameter forms of the Haldane equation were applied to model the substrate inhibited kinetics. Both models provided reliable predictions with high correlation coefficients (>0.99). The biomass characterization was completed with the evaluation of the growth yield coefficient, Y (0.075 on chemical oxygen demand base) and endogenous respiration rate, b (0.054 d(-1)). The aerobic SBR, operated in the metabolic mode with a mixed culture, showed superior performance in comparison to continuous systems applied in the same range of PCP influent loads and achieved removal rates are suitable for application.

  7. Biodegradation of 4-nitrophenol in a two-phase sequencing batch reactor: concept demonstration, kinetics and modelling.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Annesini, M Cristina; Rita, Sara; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of this work were to demonstrate the potential of a two-phase sequencing batch reactor in degrading xenobiotics and to evaluate the kinetic parameters leading to a mathematical model of the system. 4-Nitrophenol (4NP), a typical representative of substituted phenols, was selected as the target xenobiotic; this compound has never been remediated in a two-phase bioreactor before. Partition tests were conducted to determine the most appropriate partitioning solvent, and among the three investigated solvents (1-undecanol, 2-undecanone and oleyl alcohol), 2-undecanone was chosen because of its favourable partition coefficient and its negligible emulsion-forming tendencies. Moreover, the selected solvent showed satisfactory biocompatibility characteristics with respect to the biomass, with only minor effects on the intrinsic microbial kinetics. Kinetic tests were then performed in a sequencing batch reactor (2-l volume) operated in both conventional one- and two-phase configurations, with the two-phase system showing a significant improvement in the process kinetics in terms of reduced inhibition and increased maximum removal rate. The obtained kinetic parameters suggest that the two-phase sequencing batch system may find full-scale application, as the maximum removal rate k(max) (approximately 3 mg 4NP mgVSS(-1) day(-1)) is of the same order of magnitude of heterotrophic bacteria operating in wastewater treatment plants.

  8. Simulated sugar factory wastewater remediation kinetics using algal-bacterial raceway reactor promoted by polyacrylate polyalcohol.

    PubMed

    Memon, Abdul Rehman; Andresen, John; Habib, Muddasar; Jaffar, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The remediation kinetics of simulated sugar factory wastewater (SFW) using an algal-bacterial culture (ABC) of Chlorella vulgaris in association with Pseudomonas putida in a raceway reactor was found to be enhanced by 89% with the addition of 80ppm of copolymer Polyacrylate polyalcohol (PAPA). This was achieved by efficient suspension of the ABC throughout the water body maintaining optimum pH and dissolved oxygen that led to rapid COD removal and improved algal biomass production. The suspension of the ABC using the co-polymer PAPA maintained a DO of 8-10mgl(-1) compared to 2-3mgl(-1) when not suspended. As a result, the non-suspended ABC only achieved a 50% reduction in COD after 96h compared to a 89% COD removal using 80ppm PAPA suspension. In addition, the algae biomass increased from 0.4gl(-1)d(-1) for the non-suspended ABC to 1.1gl(-1)d(-1) when suspended using 80ppm PAPA. PMID:24530948

  9. Simulated sugar factory wastewater remediation kinetics using algal-bacterial raceway reactor promoted by polyacrylate polyalcohol.

    PubMed

    Memon, Abdul Rehman; Andresen, John; Habib, Muddasar; Jaffar, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The remediation kinetics of simulated sugar factory wastewater (SFW) using an algal-bacterial culture (ABC) of Chlorella vulgaris in association with Pseudomonas putida in a raceway reactor was found to be enhanced by 89% with the addition of 80ppm of copolymer Polyacrylate polyalcohol (PAPA). This was achieved by efficient suspension of the ABC throughout the water body maintaining optimum pH and dissolved oxygen that led to rapid COD removal and improved algal biomass production. The suspension of the ABC using the co-polymer PAPA maintained a DO of 8-10mgl(-1) compared to 2-3mgl(-1) when not suspended. As a result, the non-suspended ABC only achieved a 50% reduction in COD after 96h compared to a 89% COD removal using 80ppm PAPA suspension. In addition, the algae biomass increased from 0.4gl(-1)d(-1) for the non-suspended ABC to 1.1gl(-1)d(-1) when suspended using 80ppm PAPA.

  10. Process kinetics of an activated-sludge reactor system treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ting-Hsun; Huang, Ju-Sheng; Huang, Yu-I

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective was to generate the essential kinetic parameters for model simulation and operation management of an activated-sludge reactor (ASR) system treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. By varying four different mean cell residence times (theta(c) = 4.6-24.3 d), the ASR system (26 degrees C) removed effectively 93.5%-97.2% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from wastewater. Ifa high COD removal efficiency and a low effluent volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration are of great concern, a theta(c) of 15-24 d or a food to microorganism (F/M) ratio of 0.3-0.7 kg COD/kg VSS-d is suggested; if resource sustainability and enhanced operation of the ASR system are of great concern, a theta(c) of 9 d or an F/M ratio of 0.9 kg COD/kg VSS-d is suggested. The COD residual concentrations and COD removal efficiencies calculated by using the Monod model agreed well with the experimental results. When the parameters k and Ks (deltaP/P) were respectively varied from -100% to +100%, the parametric sensitivity analysis showed that the COD residual concentration change (deltaS/S) was highly sensitive to k in the deltaP/P range between 0% and -40%, causing a marked increase in COD residual concentration.

  11. Characterization and kinetics of sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Moraes, B S; Souza, T S O; Foresti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification is an advantageous alternative over heterotrophic denitrification, and may have potential for nitrogen removal of low-strength wastewaters, such as anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. This study evaluated the fundamentals and kinetics of this process in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells. Batch tests were performed for different NOx-/S2- ratios and using nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors. Autotrophic denitrification was observed for both electron acceptors, and NOx-/S2- ratios defined whether sulfide oxidation was complete or not. Kinetic parameter values obtained for nitrate were higher than for nitrite as electron acceptor. Zero-order models were better adjusted to profiles obtained for suspended cell reactors, whereas first-order models were more adequate for immobilized cell reactors. However, in the latter, mass transfer physical phenomena had a significant effect on kinetics based on biochemical reactions. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification can be successfully established for low-strength wastewaters and have potential for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. PMID:22097054

  12. Kinetics, mass transfer and hydrodynamics in a packed bed aerobic reactor fed with anaerobically treated domestic sewage.

    PubMed

    Fazolo, A; Pasotto, M B; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-10-01

    This study presents an assessment of the kinetic, mass transfer and hydrodynamic parameters of a pilot-scale fixed bed reactor containing immobilized biomass in polyurethane matrices and fed with the effluent of a horizontal-flow fixed bed anaerobic reactor, which was used to treat domestic sewage. It was found that the liquid-solid and intra-particle mass transfer resistances significantly affected the overall oxygen consumption rate and that mechanical agitation could minimize such resistances. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) values for superficial air velocities between 8.4 cm min(-1) and 57.0 cm min(-1) varied from 20.8 h(-1) to 58.8 h(-1) for tap water, and 16.8 h(-1) to 53.0 h(-1) for the anaerobic pre-treated effluent. The intrinsic oxygen uptake rate was estimated to be 19.9 mgO2 gVSS(-1) h(-1). A first-order kinetic model with residual concentration was considered to adequately represent the COD removal rate, whereas nitrogen conversion was considered to be well represented by a model of pseudo-first-order reaction in series. It was also found that the ammonium conversion to nitrite was the limiting step of the overall nitrogen conversion rate. The hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor was represented by three to four completely mixed reactors in series.

  13. Kinetic modelling and characterization of microbial community present in a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery effluent.

    PubMed

    Enitan, Abimbola M; Kumari, Sheena; Swalaha, Feroz M; Adeyemo, J; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2014-02-01

    The performance of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastewater was investigated by microbial analysis and kinetic modelling. The microbial community present in the granular sludge was detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and further confirmed using polymerase chain reaction. A group of 16S rRNA based fluorescent probes and primers targeting Archaea and Eubacteria were selected for microbial analysis. FISH results indicated the presence and dominance of a significant amount of Eubacteria and diverse group of methanogenic Archaea belonging to the order Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales within in the UASB reactor. The influent brewery wastewater had a relatively high amount of volatile fatty acids chemical oxygen demand (COD), 2005 mg/l and the final COD concentration of the reactor was 457 mg/l. The biogas analysis showed 60-69% of methane, confirming the presence and activities of methanogens within the reactor. Biokinetics of the degradable organic substrate present in the brewery wastewater was further explored using Stover and Kincannon kinetic model, with the aim of predicting the final effluent quality. The maximum utilization rate constant U max and the saturation constant (K(B)) in the model were estimated as 18.51 and 13.64 g/l/day, respectively. The model showed an excellent fit between the predicted and the observed effluent COD concentrations. Applicability of this model to predict the effluent quality of the UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater was evident from the regression analysis (R(2) = 0.957) which could be used for optimizing the reactor performance.

  14. Ultraviolet inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in annular reactors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Z; Koutchma, T; Parisi, B; Larkin, J; Forney, L J

    2007-06-01

    Terrorist threats have precipitated the need for information on the ultraviolet (UV) resistance of potential biothreat agents in food processing, such as Yersinia pestis. The objective of this study was to characterize the resistance of the Yersinia species to UV treatment using a single-lamp annular UV reactor. A novel method is proposed to measure the inactivation kinetics of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, a surrogate of Y. pestis. This proposed method can overcome the disadvantages of the traditional collimated beam approach for liquids with high absorptive properties, such as liquid foods. As a reference, an inactivation rate of Escherichia coli K12 in caramel model solutions was measured first. Both first-order and series-event inactivation models were used to fit UV inactivation data. For the series-event model, an inactivation constant of k(SE)= 0.675 cm(2)/mJ and threshold n= 4 were obtained for E. coli K12 with the coefficient of determination R(2)= 0.987 and the standard deviation of log(10) reductions sigma(y)= 0.133. For Y. pseudotuberculosis, k(SE)= 0.984 cm(2)/mJ and n= 3 were obtained with R(2)= 0.972 and sigma(y)= 0.212. In contrast, for the first-order inactivation model, the first-order inactivation constant k(1)= 0.325 cm(2)/mJ with R(2)= 0.907 and sigma(y)= 0.354 was found for E. coli; and k(1)= 0.557 cm(2)/mJ with R(2)= 0.916 and sigma(y)= 0.402 was obtained for Y. pseudotuberculosis. Based on R(2), sigma(y), and the maximum absolute and relative errors, the series-event inactivation model describes the UV inactivation kinetics of Y. pseudotuberculosis and E. coli better than the first-order model. It is apparent that Y. pseudotuberculosis is less resistant to UV light than E. coli K12.

  15. Elucidating reactivity regimes in cyclopentane oxidation: Jet stirred reactor experiments, computational chemistry, and kinetic modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Al Rashidi, Mariam J.; Thion, Sebastien; Togbe, Casimir; Dayma, Guillaume; Mehl, Marco; Dagaut, Philippe; Pitz, William J.; Zador, Judit; Sarathy, S. Mani

    2016-05-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and quantification of species generated during the combustion of cyclopentane in a jet stirred reactor (JSR). Experiments were carried out for temperatures between 740 and 1250 K, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 3.0, and at an operating pressure of 10 atm. The fuel concentration was kept at 0.1% and the residence time of the fuel/O2/N2 mixture was maintained at 0.7 s. The reactant, product, and intermediate species concentration profiles were measured using gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The concentration profiles of cyclopentane indicate inhibition of reactivity between 850-1000 K for φ=2.0more » and φ=3.0. This behavior is interesting, as it has not been observed previously for other fuel molecules, cyclic or non-cyclic. A kinetic model including both low- and high-temperature reaction pathways was developed and used to simulate the JSR experiments. The pressure-dependent rate coefficients of all relevant reactions lying on the PES of cyclopentyl + O2, as well as the C-C and C-H scission reactions of the cyclopentyl radical were calculated at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The simulations reproduced the unique reactivity trend of cyclopentane and the measured concentration profiles of intermediate and product species. Furthermore, sensitivity and reaction path analyses indicate that this reactivity trend may be attributed to differences in the reactivity of allyl radical at different conditions, and it is highly sensitive to the C-C/C-H scission branching ratio of the cyclopentyl radical decomposition.« less

  16. Kinetic analysis of microbial sulfate reduction by desulfovibrio desulfuricans in an anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C I; Mueller, R F; Griebe, T

    1994-02-20

    An anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor was designed to study the kinetics and stoichiometry of hydrogen sulfide production by the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 5575) as the first step for the modeling and control of formation souring (H(2)S) in oil field porous media. The reactor was a packed bed (50 x 5.5 cm) tubular reactor. Sea sand (140 to 375 mum) was used as the porous media. The initial indication of souring was the appearance of well-separated black spots (precipitates of iron sulfide) in the sand bed. The blackened zones expanded radially and upward through the column. New spots also appeared and expanded into the cone shapes. Lactate (substrate) was depleted and hydrogen sulfide appeared in the effluent.Analysis of the pseudo-steady state column shows that there were concentration gradients for lactate and hydrogen sulfide along the column. The results indicate that most of the lactate was consumed at the front part of the column. Measurements of SRB biomass on the solid phase (sand) and in the liquid phase indicate that the maximum concentration of SRB biomass resided at the front part of the column while the maximum in the liquid phase occurred further downstream. The stoichiometry regarding lactate consumption and hydrogen sulfide production observed in the porous media reactor was different from that in a chemostat. After analyzing the radial dispersion coefficient for the SRB in porous media and kinetics of microbial growth, it was deduced that transport phenomena dominate the souring process in our porous media reactor system. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Kinetic analysis of microbial sulfate reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in an anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chingi; Mueller, R.F.; Griebe, T. . National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-02-20

    An anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor was designed to study the kinetics and stoichiometry of hydrogen sulfide production by the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 5575) as the first step for the modeling and control of formation souring (H[sub 2]S) in oil field porous media. The initial indication of souring was the appearance of well-separated black spots (precipitates of iron sulfide) in the sand bed. Analysis of the pseudo-steady state column shows that there were concentration gradients for lactate and hydrogen sulfide along the column. The results indicate that most of the lactate was consumed at the front part of the column. Measurements of SRB biomass on the solid phase (sand) and in the liquid phase indicate that the maximum concentration of SRB biomass resided at the front part of the column while the maximum in the liquid phase occurred further downstream. The stoichiometry regarding lactate consumption and hydrogen sulfide production observed in the porous media reactor was different from that in a chemostat. After analyzing the radial dispersion coefficient for the SRB in porous media and kinetics of microbial growth, it was deduced that transport phenomena dominate the souring process in the porous media reactor system.

  18. Bioelectrochemical Reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO in a Biofilm Electrode Reactor: Performance, Mechanism, and Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yinfeng; Zhao, Jingkai; Li, Meifang; Zhang, Shihan; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    A biofilm electrode reactor (BER) is proposed to effectively regenerate Fe(II)EDTA, a solvent for NOx removal from flue gas, from Fe(II)EDTA-NO, a spent solution. In this study, the performance, mechanism, and kinetics of the bioelectrochemical reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO were investigated. The pathways of Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction were investigated via determination of nitrogen element balance in the BER and an abiotic electrode reactor. The experimental results indicate that the chelated NO (Fe(II)EDTA-NO) is reduced to N2 with N2O as an intermediate. However, the oxidation of NO occurred in the absence of Fe(II)EDTA in abiotic reactors. Furthermore, the accumulation of N2O was suppressed with the help of electricity. The preponderant electron donor for reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO was also confirmed via analysis of the electron conservation. About 87% of Fe(II)EDTA-NO was reduced using Fe(II)EDTA as the electron donor in the presence of both glucose and cathode electrons while the cathode electrons were utilized for the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA to Fe(II)EDTA. Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants of bioelectrochemical reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO were also calculated. The maximum reduction rate of Fe(II)EDTA-NO was 13.04 mol m(-3) h(-1), which is 50% higher than that in a conventional biofilter.

  19. Start-up of membrane bioreactor and hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; Poyatos, J M

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBR) system was studied as an alternative solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. This paper shows the results obtained from three laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants working in parallel in the start-up and steady states. The first wastewater treatment plant was a MBR, the second one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system containing carriers both in anoxic and aerobic zones of the bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBRa), and the last one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system which contained carriers only in the aerobic zone (hybrid MBBR-MBRb). The reactors operated with a hydraulic retention time of 30.40 h. A kinetic study for characterizing heterotrophic biomass was carried out and organic matter and nutrients removals were evaluated. The heterotrophic biomass of the hybrid MBBR-MBRb showed the best kinetic performance in the steady state, with yield coefficient for heterotrophic biomass=0.30246 mg volatile suspended solids per mg chemical oxygen demand, maximum specific growth rate for heterotrophic biomass=0.00308 h(-1) and half-saturation coefficient for organic matter=3.54908 mg O2 L(-1). The removal of organic matter was supported by the kinetic study of heterotrophic biomass.

  20. Utilization of moving bed biofilm reactor for industrial wastewater treatment containing ethylene glycol: kinetic and performance study.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Amir Hessam; Borghei, Seyed Mehdi; Samadyar, Hassan; Ghanbari, Bastam

    2014-01-01

    One of the requirements for environmental engineering, which is currently being considered, is the removal of ethylene glycol (EG) as a hazardous environmental pollutant from industrial wastewater. Therefore, in a recent study, a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was applied at pilot scale to treat industrial effluents containing different concentrations of EG (600, 800, 1200, and 1800 mg L-1 ). The removal efficiency and kinetic analysis of the system were examined at different hydraulic retention times of 6, 8, 10, and 12 h as well as influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) ranged between values of 1000 and 3000mg L-1. In minimum and maximum COD Loadings, the MBBR showed 95.1% and 60.7% removal efficiencies, while 95.9% and 66.2% EG removal efficiencies were achieved in the lowest and highest EG concentrations. The results of the reactor modelling suggested compliance of the well-known modified Stover-Kincannon model with the system. PMID:24600890

  1. Utilization of moving bed biofilm reactor for industrial wastewater treatment containing ethylene glycol: kinetic and performance study.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Amir Hessam; Borghei, Seyed Mehdi; Samadyar, Hassan; Ghanbari, Bastam

    2014-01-01

    One of the requirements for environmental engineering, which is currently being considered, is the removal of ethylene glycol (EG) as a hazardous environmental pollutant from industrial wastewater. Therefore, in a recent study, a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was applied at pilot scale to treat industrial effluents containing different concentrations of EG (600, 800, 1200, and 1800 mg L-1 ). The removal efficiency and kinetic analysis of the system were examined at different hydraulic retention times of 6, 8, 10, and 12 h as well as influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) ranged between values of 1000 and 3000mg L-1. In minimum and maximum COD Loadings, the MBBR showed 95.1% and 60.7% removal efficiencies, while 95.9% and 66.2% EG removal efficiencies were achieved in the lowest and highest EG concentrations. The results of the reactor modelling suggested compliance of the well-known modified Stover-Kincannon model with the system.

  2. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  3. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  4. Combustion of n-heptane in a shock tube and in a stirred reactor: A detailed kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffuri, P.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1995-04-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is used to study the oxidation of n-heptane under several classes of conditions. Experimental results from ignition behind reflected shock waves and in a rapid compression machine were used to develop and validate the reaction mechanism at relatively high temperatures, while data from a continuously stirred tank reactor (cstr) were used to refine the low temperature portions of the reaction mechanism. In addition to the detailed kinetic modeling, a global or lumped kinetic mechanism was used to study the same experimental results. The lumped model was able to identify key reactions and reaction paths that were most sensitive in each experimental regime and provide important guidance for the detailed modeling effort. In each set of experiments, a region of negative temperature coefficient (NTC) was observed. Variation in pressure from 5 to 40 bars were found to change the temperature range over which the NTC region occurred. Both the lumped and detailed kinetic models reproduced the measured results in each type of experiments, including the features of the NTC region, and the specific elementary reactions and reaction paths responsible for this behavior were identified and rate expressions for these reactions were determined.

  5. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR. PMID:25127066

  6. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-10-15

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3+/-0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  7. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR.

  8. The kinetics of inhibitor production resulting from hydrothermal deconstruction of wheat straw studied using a pressurised microwave reactor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of a microwave synthesis reactor has allowed kinetic data for the hydrothermal reactions of straw biomass to be established from short times, avoiding corrections required for slow heating in conventional reactors, or two-step heating. Access to realistic kinetic data is important for predictions of optimal reaction conditions for the pretreatment of biomass for bioethanol processes, which is required to minimise production of inhibitory compounds and to maximise sugar and ethanol yields. Results The gravimetric loss through solubilisation of straw provided a global measure of the extent of hydrothermal deconstruction. The kinetic profiles of furan and lignin-derived inhibitors were determined in the hydrothermal hydrolysates by UV analysis, with concentrations of formic and acetic acid determined by HPLC. Kinetic analyses were either carried out by direct fitting to simple first order equations or by numerical integration of sequential reactions. Conclusions A classical Arrhenius activation energy of 148 kJmol−1 has been determined for primary solubilisation, which is higher than the activation energy associated with historical measures of reaction severity. The gravimetric loss is primarily due to depolymerisation of the hemicellulose component of straw, but a minor proportion of lignin is solubilised at the same rate and hence may be associated with the more hydrophilic lignin-hemicellulose interface. Acetic acid is liberated primarily from hydrolysis of pendant acetate groups on hemicellulose, although this occurs at a rate that is too slow to provide catalytic enhancement to the primary solubilisation reactions. However, the increase in protons may enhance secondary reactions leading to the production of furans and formic acid. The work has suggested that formic acid may be formed under these hydrothermal conditions via direct reaction of sugar end groups rather than furan breakdown. However, furan degradation is found to be significant

  9. Photocatalytic mineralization of commercial herbicides in a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor: photoreactor modeling and reaction kinetics constants independent of radiation field.

    PubMed

    Colina-Márquez, Jose; Machuca-Martínez, Fiderman; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2009-12-01

    The six-flux absorption-scattering model (SFM) of the radiation field in the photoreactor, combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models, has proved to be suitable to describe the degradation of water pollutants in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactors, combining simplicity and accuracy. In this study, the above approach was extended to model the photocatalytic mineralization of a commercial herbicides mixture (2,4-D, diuron, and ametryne used in Colombian sugar cane crops) in a solar, pilot-scale, compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor using a slurry suspension of TiO(2). The ray-tracing technique was used jointly with the SFM to determine the direction of both the direct and diffuse solar photon fluxes and the spatial profile of the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) in the CPC reactor. Herbicides mineralization kinetics with explicit photon absorption effects were utilized to remove the dependence of the observed rate constants from the reactor geometry and radiation field in the photoreactor. The results showed that the overall model fitted the experimental data of herbicides mineralization in the solar CPC reactor satisfactorily for both cloudy and sunny days. Using the above approach kinetic parameters independent of the radiation field in the reactor can be estimated directly from the results of experiments carried out in a solar CPC reactor. The SFM combined with reaction kinetics and fluid-dynamic models proved to be a simple, but reliable model, for solar photocatalytic applications.

  10. Incorporation of Reaction Kinetics into a Multiphase, Hydrodynamic Model of a Fischer Tropsch Slurry Bubble Column Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Guillen, PhD; Anastasia Gribik; Daniel Ginosar, PhD; Steven P. Antal, PhD

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process in a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). The CMFD model is fundamentally based which allows it to be applied to different industrial processes and reactor geometries. The NPHASE CMFD solver [1] is used as the robust computational platform. Results from the CMFD model include gas distribution, species concentration profiles, and local temperatures within the SBCR. This type of model can provide valuable information for process design, operations and troubleshooting of FT plants. An ensemble-averaged, turbulent, multi-fluid solution algorithm for the multiphase, reacting flow with heat transfer was employed. Mechanistic models applicable to churn turbulent flow have been developed to provide a fundamentally based closure set for the equations. In this four-field model formulation, two of the fields are used to track the gas phase (i.e., small spherical and large slug/cap bubbles), and the other two fields are used for the liquid and catalyst particles. Reaction kinetics for a cobalt catalyst is based upon values reported in the published literature. An initial, reaction kinetics model has been developed and exercised to demonstrate viability of the overall solution scheme. The model will continue to be developed with improved physics added in stages.

  11. Comparative Kinetic Studies and Performance Evaluation of Biofilm and Biomass Characteristics of Pseudomonas fluorescens in Degrading Synthetic Phenolic Effluent in Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Begum, S Sabarunisha; Radha, K V

    2016-05-01

    The bioremediation potential of Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied in an Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor under batch recirculation conditions using synthetic phenolic effluent of various concentrations (400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1200 mg/l). The performance of the reactor was investigated and the characteristics of biomass and biofilm were determined by evaluating biofilm dry density and thickness, bioparticle density, suspended and attached biomass concentration, chemical oxygen demand and phenol removal efficiency. Biodegradation kinetics had been studied for suspended biomass culture and biofilm systems with respect to its specific growth and substrate consumption rates. Suspended biomass followed substrate inhibition kinetics and the experimental data fitted well with the Haldane model. The degradation kinetic behavior of biofilm revealed that a well adapted biofilm system with effective control of biofilm thickness in an inverse fluidized bed biofilm reactor overcomes substrate inhibition effects by tolerating higher phenol concentration and fitted well to the Monod model.

  12. Removal of oxytetracycline (OTC) in a synthetic pharmaceutical wastewater by a sequential anaerobic multichamber bed reactor (AMCBR)/completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system: biodegradation and inhibition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Çelebi, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    An anaerobic multichamber bed reactor (AMCBR) was effective in removing both molasses-chemical oxygen demand (COD), and the antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC). The maximum COD and OTC removals were 99% in sequential AMCBR/completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at an OTC concentration of 300 mg L(-1). 51%, 29% and 9% of the total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) was composed of acetic, propionic acid and butyric acids, respectively. The OTC loading rates at between 22.22 and 133.33 g OTC m(-3) d(-1) improved the hydrolysis of molasses-COD (k), the maximum specific utilization of molasses-COD (k(mh)) and the maximum specific utilization rate of TVFA (k(TVFA)). The direct effect of high OTC loadings (155.56 and -177.78 g OTC m(-3) d(-1)) on acidogens and methanogens were evaluated with Haldane inhibition kinetic. A significant decrease of the Haldane inhibition constant was indicative of increases in toxicity at increasing loading rates.

  13. Kinetic evaluation and process performance of an upflow anaerobic filter reactor degrading terephthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Davutluoglu, Orkun I; Seckin, Galip

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of terephthalic acid (TA) as the sole organic carbon source was studied in an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) reactor. The reactor was seeded with biomass obtained from a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor and was used to treat wastewater from a petrochemical facility producing dimethyl terephthalate. The UAF reactor was operated for 252 d with a constant hydraulic retention time of 24 h, and the organic loading rate (OLR) was gradually increased from 1 to 10 g-chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L d. After a lag period of approximately 40 d, the COD removal efficiency increased exponentially and high removal rate values (≈90%) were obtained, except for at highest OLR (10 g-COD/L d). The high removal rates and the robustness of the reactor performance could be attributed to the formation of biofilm as well as granular sludge. The methane production rates (0.22 to 2.15 L/d) correlated well with the removed OLRs (0.3 to 6.8 g-COD/L d) during the various phases of treatment, indicating that the main mechanism of TA degradation occurs via methanogenic reactions. The average methane content of the produced biogas was 70.3%. The modified Stover-Kincannon model was found to be applicable for the anaerobic degradation of TA in UAFs (Umax = 64.5, KB = 69.1 g-COD/L d and Ymax = 0.27 L-CH4/g-CODremoved). These results suggest that UAF reactors are among the most effective reactor configurations for the anaerobic degradation of TA.

  14. Kinetics of para-nitrophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal from synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic migrating blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Kuşçu, Ozlem Selçuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-30

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was operated at different HRTs (1-10.38 days) in order to determine the para-nitrophenol (p-NP) and COD removal kinetic constants. The reactor was fed with 40 mg L(-1)p-NP and 3000 mg L(-1) glucose-COD. Modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data. The predicted p-NP and COD concentrations were calculated using the kinetic constants. It was found that these data were in better agreement with the observed ones in the modified Stover-Kincannon compared to Grau second-order model. The kinetic constants calculated according to Stover-Kincannon model are as follows: the saturation value constant (K(B)) and maximum utilization rate constants (R(max)) were found as 31.55 g CODL(-1)day(-1), 29.49 g CODL(-1)day(-1) for COD removal and 0.428 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1), 0.407 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1) for p-NP removal, respectively (R(2)=1). The values of (a) and (b) were found to be 0.096 day and 1.071 (dimensionless) with high correlation coefficients of R(2)=0.85 for COD removal. Kinetic constants for specific gas production rate were evaluated using modified Stover-Kincannon, Van der Meer and Heerrtjes and Chen and Hasminoto models. It was shown that Stover-Kincannon model is more appropriate for calculating the effluent COD, p-NP concentrations in AMBR compared to the other models. The maximum specific biogas production rate, G(max), and proportionality constant, G(B), were found to be 1666.7 mL L(-1) day(-1) and 2.83 (dimensionless), respectively in modified Stover-Kincannon gas model. The bacteria had low Haldane inhibition constants (K(ID)=14 and 23 mg L(-1)) for p-NP concentrations higher than 40 mg L(-1) while the half velocity constant (K(s)) increased from 10 to 60 and 118 mg L(-1) with increasing p-NP concentrations from 40 to 85 and 125 mg L(-1). PMID:18515004

  15. Kinetics of para-nitrophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal from synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic migrating blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Kuşçu, Ozlem Selçuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-30

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was operated at different HRTs (1-10.38 days) in order to determine the para-nitrophenol (p-NP) and COD removal kinetic constants. The reactor was fed with 40 mg L(-1)p-NP and 3000 mg L(-1) glucose-COD. Modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data. The predicted p-NP and COD concentrations were calculated using the kinetic constants. It was found that these data were in better agreement with the observed ones in the modified Stover-Kincannon compared to Grau second-order model. The kinetic constants calculated according to Stover-Kincannon model are as follows: the saturation value constant (K(B)) and maximum utilization rate constants (R(max)) were found as 31.55 g CODL(-1)day(-1), 29.49 g CODL(-1)day(-1) for COD removal and 0.428 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1), 0.407 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1) for p-NP removal, respectively (R(2)=1). The values of (a) and (b) were found to be 0.096 day and 1.071 (dimensionless) with high correlation coefficients of R(2)=0.85 for COD removal. Kinetic constants for specific gas production rate were evaluated using modified Stover-Kincannon, Van der Meer and Heerrtjes and Chen and Hasminoto models. It was shown that Stover-Kincannon model is more appropriate for calculating the effluent COD, p-NP concentrations in AMBR compared to the other models. The maximum specific biogas production rate, G(max), and proportionality constant, G(B), were found to be 1666.7 mL L(-1) day(-1) and 2.83 (dimensionless), respectively in modified Stover-Kincannon gas model. The bacteria had low Haldane inhibition constants (K(ID)=14 and 23 mg L(-1)) for p-NP concentrations higher than 40 mg L(-1) while the half velocity constant (K(s)) increased from 10 to 60 and 118 mg L(-1) with increasing p-NP concentrations from 40 to 85 and 125 mg L(-1).

  16. Detailed Reaction Kinetics for CFD Modeling of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Coating for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Francine

    2008-11-29

    The research project was related to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and was in direct alignment with advancing knowledge in the area of Nuclear Fuel Development related to the use of TRISO fuels for high-temperature reactors. The importance of properly coating nuclear fuel pellets received a renewed interest for the safe production of nuclear power to help meet the energy requirements of the United States. High-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors use fuel in the form of coated uranium particles, and it is the coating process that was of importance to this project. The coating process requires four coating layers to retain radioactive fission products from escaping into the environment. The first layer consists of porous carbon and serves as a buffer layer to attenuate the fission and accommodate the fuel kernel swelling. The second (inner) layer is of pyrocarbon and provides protection from fission products and supports the third layer, which is silicon carbide. The final (outer) layer is also pyrocarbon and provides a bonding surface and protective barrier for the entire pellet. The coating procedures for the silicon carbide and the outer pyrocarbon layers require knowledge of the detailed kinetics of the reaction processes in the gas phase and at the surfaces where the particles interact with the reactor walls. The intent of this project was to acquire detailed information on the reaction kinetics for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon and silicon carbine on uranium fuel pellets, including the location of transition state structures, evaluation of the associated activation energies, and the use of these activation energies in the prediction of reaction rate constants. After the detailed reaction kinetics were determined, the reactions were implemented and tested in a computational fluid dynamics model, MFIX. The intention was to find a reduced mechanism set to reduce the computational time for a simulation, while still providing accurate results

  17. The preliminary analysis on the steady-state and kinetic features of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, B.; Lu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A novel design concept of molten salt pebble-bed reactor with an ultra-simplified integral primary circuit called 'Nuclear Hot Spring' has been proposed, featured by horizontal coolant flow in a deep pool pebble-bed reactor, providing 'natural safety' features with natural circulation under full power operation and less expensive primary circuit arrangement. In this work, the steady-state physical properties of the equilibrium state of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor are calculated by using the VSOP code, and the steady-state thermo-hydraulic analysis is carried out based on the approximation of absolutely horizontal flow of the coolant through the core. A new concept of 2-dimensional, both axial and radial, multi-pass on-line fuelling scheme is presented. The result reveals that the radial multi-pass scheme provides more flattened power distribution and safer temperature distribution than the one-pass scheme. A parametric analysis is made corresponding to different pebble diameters, the key parameter of the core resistance and the temperature at the pebble center. It is verified that within a wide range of pebble diameters, the maximum pebble center temperatures are far below the safety limit of the fuel, and the core resistance is considerably less than the buoyant force, indicating that the natural circulation under full power operation is achievable and the ultra-simplified integral primary circuit without any pump is possible. For the kinetic properties, it is verified that the negative temperature coefficient is achieved in sufficient under-moderated condition through the preliminary analysis on the temperature coefficients of fuel, coolant and moderator. The requirement of reactivity compensation at the shutdown stages of the operation period is calculated for the further studies on the reactivity control. The molten salt pebble-bed reactor with horizontal coolant flow can provide enhanced safety and economical features. (authors)

  18. An improved external recycle reactor for determining gas-solid reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    These improvements in the recycle system effectively eliminate initial concentration variation by two modifications: (1) a vacuum line connection to the recycle loop which permits this loop to be evacuated and then filled with the test gas mixture to slightly above atmospheric pressure; and (2) a bypass line across the reactor which permits the reactor to be held under vacuum while the rest of the recycle loop is filled with test gas. A three-step procedure for bringing the feed gas mixture into contact with the catalyst at time zero is described.

  19. Spectroscopy and Kinetics of Organic Peroxy Radicals Measured Using a Laser Photolysis / CW Cavity Ring-down Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    A new type of reactor system is used to examine the spectra and gas phase reaction kinetics of atmospherically relevant organic peroxy radicals (RO2). The reactor uses the recently developed continuous wave laser excitation cavity ring-down (CWCRD) spectroscopic technique to detect the near-infrared (NIR) absorptions of peroxy radicals produced by laser photolysis. Preliminary spectroscopic and kinetic results for the methyl peroxy (CH3O2) and ethyl peroxy (C2H5O2) radicals are presented. Organic peroxy radicals are formed as reaction intermediates in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Peroxy radicals react with NO, NO2, HO2, or other organic peroxy radicals in the troposphere to produce a variety of atmospherically important products, including ozone. The reactor uses the conventional slow flow/photolysis approach and is capable of accessing pressures between 5 and 1000 torr and temperatures between 275 and 400 K. Methyl or ethyl radicals are generated from suitable precursors via 193nm laser photolysis, and are reacted with excess oxygen to form methyl peroxy or ethyl peroxy radicals respectively. The peroxy radical concentrations are then monitored by their NIR absorptions near 1.3μ m using CWCRD spectroscopy. The spectra are consistent with those originally published [Hunziker and Wendt, 1976] and with the more recently reported results implementing the pulsed cavity ring-down technique [Pushkarsky et al., 2000]. The kinetics of the radical's self-reactions, the oxidation reaction with nitric oxide, and the prototypical cross-reaction between methyl peroxy and ethyl peroxy will be presented. All rate coefficients obtained to date are in good agreement with recommended values, lending credence to the new methodology. Hunziker, H.E., and Wendt, H.R., Electronic Absorption Spectra of Organic Peroxy Radical in the Near-Infrared, J. Chem. Phys., 64, 3488-3490, 1976. Pushkarsky, M.B., Zalyubovsky, S.J., and

  20. Waste lubricating oil removal in a batch reactor by mixed bacterial consortium: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Munna; Guchhait, Sugata; Biswas, Dipa; Datta, Sriparna

    2015-11-01

    The growth kinetics and biodegradation of two waste lubricating oil samples including waste engine oil (WEO) and waste transformer oil (WTO) were studied using pure isolates and mixed culture of Ochrobactrum sp. C1 and Bacillus sp. K1. The mixed culture significantly influenced degradation efficiency of the pure isolates through bioaugmentation process. In particular, the mixed culture was capable of growing on various n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and was able to tolerate unusually high concentrations of waste lubricants (WEO-86.0 g/L and WTO-81.5 g/L). The initial concentration of waste lubricating oils has been varied in the range of 1-10 % (v/v). Under this experimental range, the bacterial growth has been observed to follow Haldane-type kinetics characterizing the presence of substrate inhibition. Haldane model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μ max = 0.078 h(-1), K S = 23.101 g/L, K i = 43.844 g/L for WEO; and μ max = 0.044 h(-1), K S = 10.662 g/L, K i = 58.310 g/L for WTO. The values of intrinsic kinetic parameters, like specific growth rate μ max, half saturation constant, K S, inhibition constant, K i and the maximum substrate concentration, S max and growth yield coefficient Y x/s , have been determined using each model hydrocarbon and their mixture as limiting substrate. Relative changes in the values of the kinetic parameters have been correlated to the number of carbon atoms present in n-alkanes. The metabolites from degradation of model hydrocarbon compounds have been identified by GC-MS to elucidate the possible pathway of waste lubricating oil degradation process.

  1. Degradation kinetics of the main carbohydrates in birch wood during hot water extraction in a batch reactor at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borrega, Marc; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-11-01

    Hot water extraction of wood at elevated temperatures may be a suitable method to produce hemicellulose-lean pulps and to recover xylan-derived products from the water extract. In this study, water extractions of birch wood were conducted at temperatures between 180 and 240 °C in a batch reactor. Xylan was extensively removed, whereas cellulose was partly degraded only at temperatures above 180 °C. Under severe extraction conditions, acetic acid content in the water extract was higher than the corresponding amount of acetyl groups in wood. In addition to oligo- and monosaccharides, considerable amounts of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were recovered from the extracts. After reaching a maximum, the furfural yield remained constant with increasing extraction time. This maximum slightly decreased with increasing extraction temperature, suggesting the preferential formation of secondary degradation products from xylose. Kinetic models fitting experimental data are proposed to explain degradation and conversion reactions of xylan and glucan.

  2. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  3. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  4. Treatment of Slaughter House Wastewater in a Sequencing Batch Reactor: Performance Evaluation and Biodegradation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Pradyut; Debsarkar, Anupam; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2013-01-01

    Slaughterhouse wastewater contains diluted blood, protein, fat, and suspended solids, as a result the organic and nutrient concentration in this wastewater is vary high and the residues are partially solubilized, leading to a highly contaminating effect in riverbeds and other water bodies if the same is let off untreated. The performance of a laboratory-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) has been investigated in aerobic-anoxic sequential mode for simultaneous removal of organic carbon and nitrogen from slaughterhouse wastewater. The reactor was operated under three different variations of aerobic-anoxic sequence, namely, (4+4), (5+3), and (3+5) hr. of total react period with two different sets of influent soluble COD (SCOD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) level 1000 ± 50 mg/L, and 90 ± 10 mg/L, 1000 ± 50 mg/L and 180 ± 10 mg/L, respectively. It was observed that from 86 to 95% of SCOD removal is accomplished at the end of 8.0 hr of total react period. In case of (4+4) aerobic-anoxic operating cycle, a reasonable degree of nitrification 90.12 and 74.75% corresponding to initial NH4+-N value of 96.58 and 176.85 mg/L, respectively, were achieved. The biokinetic coefficients (k, Ks, Y, kd) were also determined for performance evaluation of SBR for scaling full-scale reactor in future operation. PMID:24027751

  5. Treatment of slaughter house wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor: performance evaluation and biodegradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pradyut; Debsarkar, Anupam; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2013-01-01

    Slaughterhouse wastewater contains diluted blood, protein, fat, and suspended solids, as a result the organic and nutrient concentration in this wastewater is vary high and the residues are partially solubilized, leading to a highly contaminating effect in riverbeds and other water bodies if the same is let off untreated. The performance of a laboratory-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) has been investigated in aerobic-anoxic sequential mode for simultaneous removal of organic carbon and nitrogen from slaughterhouse wastewater. The reactor was operated under three different variations of aerobic-anoxic sequence, namely, (4+4), (5+3), and (3+5) hr. of total react period with two different sets of influent soluble COD (SCOD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) level 1000 ± 50 mg/L, and 90 ± 10 mg/L, 1000 ± 50 mg/L and 180 ± 10 mg/L, respectively. It was observed that from 86 to 95% of SCOD removal is accomplished at the end of 8.0 hr of total react period. In case of (4+4) aerobic-anoxic operating cycle, a reasonable degree of nitrification 90.12 and 74.75% corresponding to initial NH4(+)-N value of 96.58 and 176.85 mg/L, respectively, were achieved. The biokinetic coefficients (k, K(s), Y, k(d)) were also determined for performance evaluation of SBR for scaling full-scale reactor in future operation.

  6. Treatment of agro based industrial wastewater in sequencing batch reactor: performance evaluation and growth kinetics of aerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Lim, J X; Vadivelu, V M

    2014-12-15

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a working volume of 8 L and an exchange ratio of 25% was used to enrich biomass for the treatment of the anaerobically treated low pH palm oil mill effluent (POME). The influent concentration was stepwise increased from 5000 ± 500 mg COD/L to 11,500 ± 500 mg COD/L. The performance of the reactor was monitored at different organic loading rates (OLRs). It was found that approximately 90% of the COD content of the POME wastewater was successfully removed regardless of the OLR applied to the SBR. Cycle studies of the SBR show that the oxygen uptake by the biomass while there is no COD reduction may be due to the oxidation of the storage product by the biomass. Further, the growth kinetic parameters of the biomass were determined in batch experiments using respirometer. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was estimated to be 1.143 day(-1) while the half saturation constant (Ks) with respect to COD was determined to be 0.429 g COD/L. The decay coefficient (bD) and biomass yield (Y) were found to be 0.131 day(-1) and 0.272 mg biomass/mg COD consumed, respectively.

  7. Enzymatic biodiesel production kinetics using co-solvent and an anhydrous medium: a strategy to improve lipase performance in a semi-continuous reactor.

    PubMed

    Azócar, Laura; Navia, Rodrigo; Beroiz, Leticia; Jeison, David; Ciudad, Gustavo

    2014-09-25

    Enzymatic biodiesel production kinetics under previously optimized conditions were investigated. Waste frying oil (WFO) was used as the raw material, Novozym 435 as catalyst, methanol as acyl acceptor and tert-butanol as co-solvent. To investigate pure transesterification kinetics improving product properties, 3Å molecular sieves were incorporated into the reaction to provide an anhydrous medium avoiding the side reactions of hydrolysis and esterification. The effects of either WFO or methanol on the reaction rate were analyzed separately. The reaction was described by a Ping Pong mechanism and competitive inhibition by methanol. The results obtained in the kinetics study were applied in the operation of a semi-continuous reactor for biodiesel production. The operational conditions of each reaction cycle were: methanol-to-oil ratio 8/1 (mol/mol), 15% (wt) Novozym 435, 0.75% (v/v) of tert-butanol, 44.5°C, 200 rpm and 4h of reaction time. The enzymes were successively reused by remaining in the reactor during all the cycles. Under these conditions, biodiesel production yields higher than 80% over 7 reaction cycles were observed. Both the kinetics study and the reactor operation showed that Novozym 435 was not inhibited at high methanol concentrations and that the kinetics of the proposed enzymatic process could be comparable to the conventional chemical process.

  8. A simple kinetic analysis of syngas during steam hydrogasification of biomass using a novel inverted batch reactor with instant high pressure feeding.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin; Liu, Zhongzhe; Norbeck, Joseph M; Park, Chan S

    2016-01-01

    A newly designed inverted batch reactor equipped with a pressure-driven feeding system was built for investigating the kinetics of syngas during the steam hydrogasification (SHR) of biomass. The system could instantly load the feedstock into the reactor at high temperature and pressure, which simulated the way to transport the feedstock into a hot and pressurized gasifier. Experiments were conducted from 600°C to 700°C. The inverted reactor showed very high heating rate by enhancing the carbon conversion and syngas production. The kinetic study showed that the rates of CH4, CO and CO2 formation during SHR were increased when the gasification temperature went up. SHR had comparatively lower activation energy for CH4 production. The activation energies of CH4, CO and CO2 during SHR were 42.8, 51.8 and 14kJ/mol, respectively.

  9. A simple kinetic analysis of syngas during steam hydrogasification of biomass using a novel inverted batch reactor with instant high pressure feeding.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin; Liu, Zhongzhe; Norbeck, Joseph M; Park, Chan S

    2016-01-01

    A newly designed inverted batch reactor equipped with a pressure-driven feeding system was built for investigating the kinetics of syngas during the steam hydrogasification (SHR) of biomass. The system could instantly load the feedstock into the reactor at high temperature and pressure, which simulated the way to transport the feedstock into a hot and pressurized gasifier. Experiments were conducted from 600°C to 700°C. The inverted reactor showed very high heating rate by enhancing the carbon conversion and syngas production. The kinetic study showed that the rates of CH4, CO and CO2 formation during SHR were increased when the gasification temperature went up. SHR had comparatively lower activation energy for CH4 production. The activation energies of CH4, CO and CO2 during SHR were 42.8, 51.8 and 14kJ/mol, respectively. PMID:26562689

  10. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  11. Modeling of Late Blooming Phases and Precipitation Kinetics in Aging Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-09-01

    The principle work at the atomic scale is to develop a predictive quantitative model for the microstructure evolution of RPV steels under thermal aging and neutron radiation. We have developed an AKMC method for the precipitation kinetics in bcc-Fe, with Cu, Ni, Mn and Si being the alloying elements. In addition, we used MD simulations to provide input parameters (if not available in literature). MMC simulations were also carried out to explore the possible segregation/precipitation morphologies at the lattice defects. First we briefly describe each of the simulation algorithms, then will present our results.

  12. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-31

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  13. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-01

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  14. Calculation of Reactor Kinetics Parameters βeff and Λ with Monte Carlo Differential Operator Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2014-06-01

    The methods to calculate the kinetics parameters of βeff and Λ with the differential operator sampling have been reviewed. The comparison of the results obtained with the differential operator sampling and iterated fission probability approaches has been performed. It is shown that the differential operator sampling approach gives the same results as the iterated fission probability approach within the statistical uncertainty. In addition, the prediction accuracy of the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 for the measured βeff/Λ and βeff values is also examined. It is shown that JENDL-4.0 gives a good prediction except for the uranium-233 systems. The present results imply the need for revisiting the uranium-233 nuclear data evaluation and performing the detailed sensitivity analysis.

  15. Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nopharatana, Annop; Pullammanappallil, Pratap C.; Clarke, William P.

    2007-07-01

    A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

  16. Influence of chemical kinetics on postcolumn reaction in a capillary Taylor reactor with catechol analytes and photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-02-15

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-microm-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three characteristic times for a given reaction process can be predicted using simple physical and chemical parameters. Two of these times are the homogenization time, which governs how long it takes the molecules in the analyte and reagent streams to mix, and the reaction time, which governs how long the molecules in a homogeneous solution take to react. The third characteristic time is an adjustment to the reaction time called the start time, which represents an estimate of the average time the analyte stream spends without exposure to reagent. In this study, laser-induced fluorescence monitored the extent of the postcolumn reaction (reduction of Os(bpy)3(3+) by analyte to the photoluminescent Os(bpy)3(2+)) in a CTR. The reaction time depends on the reaction rates. Analysis of product versus time data yielded second-order reaction rate constants between the PFET reagent, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)osmium, and standards ((ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium cation and p-hydroquinone) or catechols (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The extent of the reactions in a CTR were then predicted from initial reaction conditions and compared to experimental results. Both the theory and experimental results suggested the reactions of catechols were generally kinetically controlled, while those of the standards were controlled by mixing time (1-2 s). Thus, the extent of homogenization can be monitored in a CTR using the relatively fast reaction of the reagent and p

  17. Kinetics of selenate sorption in soil as influenced by biotic and abiotic conditions: a stirred flow-through reactor study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, L; Loffredo, N; Mounier, S; Martin-Garin, A; Coppin, F

    2014-12-01

    This study (i) quantified the kinetics of selenate sorption and (ii) measured the influence of biotic processes in soil selenate stabilisation. Stirred flow-through reactor experiments were conducted on samples of a silty clay soil (pH = 8, Eh = 240-300 mV) from Bure (France) in both non-sterile and sterile conditions. Parameters of the proposed two-site sorption model (EK), adapted from van Genuchten and Wagenet (1989), were estimated by nonlinear regression. Fast selenate sorption on type-1 sites was moderate, with an equilibrium constant of 25.5 and 39.1 L/kg for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites increased with time, and was predominant for longer periods of time in non-sterile conditions. At equilibrium, it would represent over 96% of the sorbed inventory, with mean sorption times of 17 h and 191 h for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Our results showed for Bure soil that (i) selenate sorption in flowing and mildly-oxidising conditions was strongly kinetically controlled, especially in non-sterile conditions, (ii) selenate desorption was much slower than sorption, which suggests its pseudo-irreversible stabilisation, and (iii) microbial activity increased the contribution of rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites, for which it increased sorption rate by a factor 7 but also facilitated its reversibility. This work stresses the limits of the Kd approach to represent selenate sorption in flowing conditions and supports an alternative formulation like the EK model, but also points out that biotic conditions are significant sources of variability for sorption parameters. PMID:25151638

  18. Kinetics of selenate sorption in soil as influenced by biotic and abiotic conditions: a stirred flow-through reactor study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, L; Loffredo, N; Mounier, S; Martin-Garin, A; Coppin, F

    2014-12-01

    This study (i) quantified the kinetics of selenate sorption and (ii) measured the influence of biotic processes in soil selenate stabilisation. Stirred flow-through reactor experiments were conducted on samples of a silty clay soil (pH = 8, Eh = 240-300 mV) from Bure (France) in both non-sterile and sterile conditions. Parameters of the proposed two-site sorption model (EK), adapted from van Genuchten and Wagenet (1989), were estimated by nonlinear regression. Fast selenate sorption on type-1 sites was moderate, with an equilibrium constant of 25.5 and 39.1 L/kg for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites increased with time, and was predominant for longer periods of time in non-sterile conditions. At equilibrium, it would represent over 96% of the sorbed inventory, with mean sorption times of 17 h and 191 h for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Our results showed for Bure soil that (i) selenate sorption in flowing and mildly-oxidising conditions was strongly kinetically controlled, especially in non-sterile conditions, (ii) selenate desorption was much slower than sorption, which suggests its pseudo-irreversible stabilisation, and (iii) microbial activity increased the contribution of rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites, for which it increased sorption rate by a factor 7 but also facilitated its reversibility. This work stresses the limits of the Kd approach to represent selenate sorption in flowing conditions and supports an alternative formulation like the EK model, but also points out that biotic conditions are significant sources of variability for sorption parameters.

  19. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  20. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase chemical kinetics under tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow reactor for simulating the interaction in the troposphere is set forth. A first reactant mixed with a carrier gas is delivered from a pump and flows through a duct having louvers therein. The louvers straighten out the flow, reduce turbulence and provide laminar flow discharge from the duct. A second reactant delivered from a source through a pump is input into the flowing stream, the second reactant being diffused through a plurality of small diffusion tubes to avoid disturbing the laminar flow. The commingled first and second reactants in the carrier gas are then directed along an elongated duct where the walls are spaced away from the flow of reactants to avoid wall interference, disturbance or turbulence arising from the walls. A probe connected with a measuring device can be inserted through various sampling ports in the second duct to complete measurements of the first and second reactants and the product of their reaction at selected XYZ locations relative to the flowing system.

  1. Novel photocatalytic reactor for the destruction of airborne pollutants reaction kinetics and quantum yields

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, H.; Lasa, H. de

    1999-09-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of a model pollutant (toluene) is studied in a newly designed batch photoreactor, called Photo-CREC-Air. In this unit TiO{sub 2} is supported on a filter mesh with good contact with near UV light, TiO{sub 2}, and air. Photo-CREC-Air is designed with special features including a Venturi section and a heated perforated plate. The heated perforated plate minimizes water adsorption on the mesh and consequently water effects on the reaction rate. The system performance is examined for different toluene concentrations and two humidity levels. After assessing the insignificant toluene adsorption observed under the selected operating conditions, a pseudohomogeneous model is postulated for kinetics modeling. Initial photodegradation rates of toluene at 100 C in Photo-CREC-Air, in the range of model pollutant concentrations and humidity level studied, were 0.005--0.05 {mu}mol/(gcat s). Apparent quantum yields were estimated to be in many cases greater than 100% and as high as 450%.

  2. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion-exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Ahn, Chang Hoon; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Roberts, Deborah J; Lehman, S Geno; Adham, Samer S; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2008-09-01

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (30-45 g/L) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g Nm(-2)d(-1) and 5.0 g ClO(4)m(-2)d(-1), respectively, and these values are similar to values obtained with freshwater MBfRs. Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes decreased with increasing salinity. The nitrate fluxes were roughly first order in H(2) pressure, but roughly zero-order with nitrate concentration. Perchlorate reduction rates were higher with lower nitrate loadings, compared to high nitrate loadings; this is a sign of competition for H(2). Nitrate and perchlorate reduction rates depended strongly on the inoculum. An inoculum that was well acclimated (years) to nitrate and perchlorate gave markedly faster removal kinetics than cultures that were acclimated for only a few months. These results underscore that the most successful MBfR bioreduction of nitrate and perchlorate in ion-exchange brine demands a well-acclimated inoculum and sufficient hydrogen availability.

  3. The influence of TiO2 and aeration on the kinetics of electrochemical oxidation of phenol in packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhang; Zhao, Yuemin; Fu, Jianfeng

    2008-12-30

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic wastewater in a lab-scale reactor, packed into granular activated carbon (GAC) with Ti/SnO2 anodes and stainless steel cathodes, was interpreted in this study. GAC saturated rapidly if it was only used as sorbent, but application of suitable electric energy for the system simultaneously could recover the adsorption ability of GAC and maintain the continuous running effectively. The titanium dioxide (TiO2) as catalyst and airflow were also applied to the electrochemical reactor to examine the enhancement for phenol oxidation process. Results revealed that the electrochemical degradation of phenol could be reasonably described by first-order kinetics. In addition, it was illustrated that acid region, increased voltage, more dosage of TiO2 and higher aeration intensity were all beneficial parameters for phenol oxidation rates. By inspecting the relationship between the rate constants (k) and influencing factors, respectively, an overall kinetic model for phenol oxidation was proposed. The kinetics obtained from the experiments under corresponding electrochemical conditions could provide an accurate estimation of phenol concentration effluent and better design of the packed bed reactor.

  4. Identical full-scale biogas-lift reactors (Blrs) with anaerobic granular sludge and residual activated sludge for brewery wastewater treatment and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fu; Huang, Zhenxing; Miao, Hengfeng; Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Mingxing; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-10-01

    Two identical full-scale biogas-lift reactors treating brewery wastewater were inoculated with different types of sludge to compare their operational conditions, sludge characteristics, and kinetic models at a mesophilic temperature. One reactor (R1) started up with anaerobic granular sludge in 12 weeks and obtained a continuously average organic loading rate (OLR) of 7.4 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m3 x day), COD removal efficiency of 80%, and effluent COD of 450 mg/L. The other reactor (R2) started up with residual activated sludge in 30 weeks and granulation accomplished when the reactor reached an average OLR of 8.3 kg COD/(m3 x day), COD removal efficiency of 90%, and effluent COD of 240 mg/L. Differences in sludge characteristics, biogas compositions, and biogas-lift processes may be accounted for the superior efficiency of the treatment performance of R2 over R1. Grau second-order and modified StoverKincannon models based on influent and effluent concentrations as well as hydraulic retention time were successfully used to develop kinetic parameters of the experimental data with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.95), which further showed that R2 had higher treatment performance than R1. These results demonstrated that residual activated sludge could be used effectively instead of anaerobic granular sludge despite the need for a longer time.

  5. On the interpretation of the inverted kinetics equation and space-time calculations of the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizin, M. N.; Ivanov, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to analyze the accuracy of calculating the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system by means of the inverted solution of the kinetics equation (ISKE). In the numerical studies in the intellectual ShIPR software system, the actuation of the reactor scram system with the possible jamming of one of the two most effective rods is simulated. First, the connection of functionals calculated in the space-time computation in different approximations with the kinetics equation is considered on the theoretical level. The formulas are presented in a manner facilitating their coding. Then, the results of processing of several such functions by the ISKE are presented. For estimating the effectiveness of the VVER-1000 reactor scram system, it is proposed to use the measured currents of ionization chambers (IC) jointly with calculated readings of IC imitators. In addition, the integral of the delayed neutron (DN) generation rate multiplied by the adjoint DN source over the volume of the reactor, calculated for the instant of time when insertion of safety rods ends, is used. This integral is necessary for taking into account the spatial reactivity effects. Reasonable agreement was attained for the considered example between the effectiveness of the scram system evaluated by this method and the values obtained by steady-state calculations as the difference of the reciprocal effective multiplication factors with withdrawn and inserted control rods. This agreement was attained with the use of eight-group DN parameters.

  6. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  7. Kinetic of carbonaceous substrate in an upflow anaerobic sludge sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating 2,4 dichlorophenol (2,4 DCP).

    PubMed

    Sponza, Delia Teresa; Uluköy, Ayşen

    2008-01-01

    The performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating 2,4 dichlorophenol (2,4 DCP) was evaluated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) using synthetic wastewater in order to obtain the growth substrate (glucose-COD) and 2,4 DCP removal kinetics. Treatment efficiencies of the UASB reactor were investigated at different hydraulic retention times (2-20 h) corresponding to a food to mass (F/M) ratio of 1.2-1.92 g-COD g(-1) VSS day(-1). A total of 65-83% COD removal efficiencies were obtained at HRTs of 2-20 h. In all, 83% and 99% 2,4 DCP removals were achieved at the same HRTs in the UASB reactor. Conventional Monod, Grau Second-order and Modified Stover-Kincannon models were applied to determine the substrate removal kinetics of the UASB reactor. The experimental data obtained from the kinetic models showed that the Monod kinetic model is more appropriate for correlating the substrate removals compared to the other models for the UASB reactor. The maximum specific substrate utilization rate (k) (mg-COD mg(-1) SS day(-1)), half-velocity concentration (K(s)) (mg COD l(-1)), growth yield coefficient (Y) (mg mg(-1)) and bacterial decay coefficient (b) (day(-1)) were 0.954 mg-COD mg(-1) SS day(-1), 560.29 mg-COD l(-1), 0.78 mg-SS g(-1)-COD, 0.093 day(-1) in the Conventional Monod kinetic model. The second-order kinetic coefficient (k(2)) was calculated as 0.26 day(-1) in the Grau reaction kinetic model. The maximum COD removal rate constant (U(max)) and saturation value (K(B)) were calculated as 7.502 mg CODl(-1)day(-1) and 34.56 mg l(-1)day(-1) in the Modified Stover-Kincannon Model. The (k)(mg-2,4 DCP mg(-1) SS day(-1)), (K(s)) (mg 2,4 DCPl(-1)), (Y) (mg SS mg(-1) 2,4 DCP) and (k(d)) (day(-1)) were 0.0041 mg-2,4 DCP mg(-1) SS day(-1), 2.06 mg-COD l(-1), 0.0017 mg-SS mg(-1) 2,4 DCP and 3.1 x 10(-5) day(-1) in the Conventional Monod kinetic model for 2,4 DCP degradation. The second-order kinetic coefficient (k(2)) was calculated as 0.30 day

  8. Systematic evaluation of nitrate and perchlorate bioreduction kinetics in groundwater using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Ziv-El, Michal C; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the simultaneous reduction kinetics of the oxidized compounds, we treated nitrate-contaminated groundwater (approximately 9.4 mg-N/L) containing low concentrations of perchlorate (approximately 12.5 microg/L) and saturated with dissolved oxygen (approximately 8 mg/L) in a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). We systematically increased the hydrogen availability and simultaneously varied the surface loading of the oxidized compounds on the biofilm in order to provide a comprehensive, quantitative data set with which to evaluate the relationship between electron donor (H(2)) availability, surface loading of the electron acceptors (oxidized compounds), and simultaneous bioreduction of the electron acceptors. Increasing the H(2) pressure delivered more H(2) gas, and the total H(2) flux increased linearly from approximately 0.04 mg/cm(2)-d for 0.5 psig (0.034 atm) to 0.13 mg/cm(2)-d for 9.5 psig (0.65 atm). This increased rate of H(2) delivery allowed for continued reduction of the acceptors as their surface loading increased. The electron acceptors had a clear hydrogen-utilization order when the availability of hydrogen was limited: oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, and then perchlorate. Spiking the influent with perchlorate or nitrate allowed us to identify the maximum surface loadings that still achieved more than 99.5% reduction of both oxidized contaminants: 0.21 mg NO(3)-N/cm(2)-d and 3.4 microg ClO(4)/cm(2)-d. Both maximum values appear to be controlled by factors other than hydrogen availability.

  9. Use of a packed-bed airlift reactor with net draft tube to study kinetics of naphthalene degradation by Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Jalilnejad, Elham; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradation of naphthalene by Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) in a packed-bed airlift reactor with net draft tube (PBALR-nd) was studied; the Kissiris pieces were the packing material. The reactor hydrodynamics has been characterized under abiotic conditions and the dependencies of the superficial gas velocity (U G) on the gas holdup (εG), liquid mixing time, and mass transfer coefficient were determined. The improving role of the net draft tube in this small column reactor (height 42 cm, ID 5 cm) was confirmed. The flow regime was described using the εG α U G (n) expression, and bubbly flow was observed in PBALR-nd at U G < 2.83 cm/s. In the second step of the present work, the kinetics of biodegradation was modeled using the Haldane and Aiba equations. The fitting of the experimental results to the models were done according to the nonlinear least square regression technique. The biokinetic constants (q m, K s, and K i) were estimated and q m as the specific biodegradation rate was equaled to 0.415 and 0.24 mgnaph./mgcell h for the Haldane and Aiba equations, respectively. The goodness of fit reported as R (2) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) showed the adequate fitness of the Haldane and Aiba models in predicting naphthalene biodegradation kinetics. On the basis of the HPLC results, a hypothetical pathway for the biodegradation was presented.

  10. Degradation of pharmaceuticals in UV (LP)/H₂O₂ reactors simulated by means of kinetic modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Harmsen, D J H; Wanders-Dijk, J; Beerendonk, E F; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2015-05-15

    UV/H2O2 treatment is a well-established technique to degrade organic micropollutants. A CFD model in combination with an advanced kinetic model is presented to predict the degradation of organic micropollutants in UV (LP)/H2O2 reactors, accounting for the hydraulics, fluence rate, complex (photo)chemical reactions in the water matrix and the interactions between these processes. The model incorporates compound degradation by means of direct UV photolysis, OH radical and carbonate radical reactions. Measurements of pharmaceutical degradations in pilot-scale UV/H2O2 reactors are presented under different operating conditions. A comparison between measured and modeled degradation for a group of 35 pharmaceuticals resulted in good model predictions for most of the compounds. The research also shows that the degradation of organic micropollutants can be dependent on temperature, which is relevant for full-scale installations that are operated at different temperatures over the year.

  11. A Nodal Kinetics and Thermohydraulics Analysis (NOKTA) Code for Analyzing Rod-Ejection Accidents and Other Transients in Nuclear Power Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Sadi; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2000-01-15

    For analyzing nuclear power reactor core transients, a three-dimensional nodal kinetics and thermohydraulics code, NOKTA, was developed. Nodal kinetics calculation is based on a one-group neutron diffusion approach. Thermal-hydraulics analysis is handled as in the COBRA-IV-I code. The NOKTA code was designed for analyzing especially large reactivity accidents, such as sudden rod ejection. It can also analyze intermediate transients, such as sharp power changes that may initiate xenon oscillations, and slow transients, such as boric acid density changes in the flow. The code dimensions are set at 125 subchannels and 30 axial levels. Calculation starts with a saturated xenon density, one-group neutronics parameters, and a flux profile, which is required as an input. Initially, k{sub eff} of each computation cell is set to unity.

  12. Treatment of wastewater from coffee bean processing in anaerobic fixed bed reactors with different support materials: performance and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Fia, Fátima R L; Matos, Antonio T; Borges, Alisson C; Fia, Ronaldo; Cecon, Paulo R

    2012-10-15

    An evaluation was performed of three upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactors for the treatment of wastewater from coffee bean processing (WCP). The supports used were: blast furnace cinders, polyurethane foam and crushed stone with porosities of 53, 95 and 48%, respectively. The testing of these 139.5 L reactors consisted of increasing the COD of the influent (978; 2401 and 4545 mg L(-1)), while maintaining the retention time of 1.3 days. For the maximum COD applied, the reactor filled with foam presented removals of 80% (non-filtered samples) and 83% (filtered samples). The greater performance of the reactor filled with foam is attributed to its porosity, which promoted greater collection of biomass. From the results, it could be concluded that the reactors presented satisfactory performance, especially when using the foam as a support. Furthermore, the modified Stover-Kincannon and second order for multicomponent substrate degradation models were successfully used to develop a model of the experimental data.

  13. Kinetics of nitrification in a fixed biofilm reactor using dewatered sludge-fly ash composite ceramic particle as a supporting medium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mong-Chuan; Lin, Yen-Hui; Yu, Huang-Wei

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model system was derived to describe the kinetics of ammonium nitrification in a fixed biofilm reactor using dewatered sludge-fly ash composite ceramic particle as a supporting medium. The model incorporates diffusive mass transport and Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A batch test was conducted to observe the nitrification of ammonium-nitrogen ([Formula: see text]-N) and the growth of nitrifying biomass. The compositions of nitrifying bacterial community in the batch kinetic test were analyzed using PCR-DGGE method. The experimental results show that the most staining intensity abundance of bands occurred on day 2.75 with the highest biomass concentration of 46.5 mg/L. Chemostat kinetic tests were performed independently to evaluate the biokinetic parameters used in the model prediction. In the column test, the removal efficiency of [Formula: see text]-N was approximately 96 % while the concentration of suspended nitrifying biomass was approximately 16 mg VSS/L and model-predicted biofilm thickness reached up to 0.21 cm in the steady state. The profiles of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of different microbial communities demonstrated that indigenous nitrifying bacteria (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) existed and were the dominant species in the fixed biofilm process.

  14. Comparison of three combined sequencing batch reactor followed by enhanced Fenton process for an azo dye degradation: Bio-decolorization kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Azizi, A; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Maknoon, R; Kowsari, E

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this research was to compare three combined sequencing batch reactor (SBR) - Fenton processes as post-treatment for the treatment of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Three combined treatment systems (CTS1, CTS2 and CTS3) were operated to investigate the biomass concentration, COD removal, AR18 dye decolorization and kinetics study. The MLSS concentration of CTS2 reached 7200 mg/L due to the use of external feeding in the SBR reactor of CTS2. The COD concentration remained 273 mg/L and 95 mg/L (initial COD=3270 mg/L) at the end of alternating anaerobic-aerobic SBR with external feeding (An-A MSBR) and CTS2, respectively, resulting in almost 65% of Fenton process efficiency. The dye concentration of 500 mg/L was finally reduced to less than 10mg/L in all systems indicating almost complete AR18 decolorization, which was also confirmed by UV-vis analysis. The dye was removed following two successive parts as parts 1 and 2 with pseudo zero-order and pseudo first-order kinetics, respectively, in all CTSs. Higher intermediate metabolites degradation was obtained using HPLC analysis in CTS2. Accordingly, a combined treatment system can be proposed as an appropriate and environmentally-friendly system for the treatment of the azo dye AR18 in wastewater.

  15. Enzymatic synthesis of farnesyl laurate in organic solvent: initial water activity, kinetics mechanism, optimization of continuous operation using packed bed reactor and mass transfer studies.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N K; Kamaruddin, A H; Uzir, M H

    2011-08-01

    The influence of water activity and water content was investigated with farnesyl laurate synthesis catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM. Lipozyme RM IM activity depended strongly on initial water activity value. The best results were achieved for a reaction medium with an initial water activity of 0.11 since it gives the best conversion value of 96.80%. The rate constants obtained in the kinetics study using Ping-Pong-Bi-Bi and Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanisms with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid were compared. The corresponding parameters were found to obey the Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid. Kinetic parameters were calculated based on this model as follows: V (max) = 5.80 mmol l(-1) min(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,A) = 0.70 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,B) = 115.48 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (i) = 11.25 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1). The optimum conditions for the esterification of farnesol with lauric acid in a continuous packed bed reactor were found as the following: 18.18 cm packed bed height and 0.9 ml/min substrate flow rate. The optimum molar conversion of lauric acid to farnesyl laurate was 98.07 ± 0.82%. The effect of mass transfer in the packed bed reactor has also been studied using two models for cases of reaction limited and mass transfer limited. A very good agreement between the mass transfer limited model and the experimental data obtained indicating that the esterification in a packed bed reactor was mass transfer limited.

  16. Optimization of the moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) to control aeration time by kinetic computational modeling: Simulated sugar-industry wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Faridnasr, Maryam; Ghanbari, Bastam; Sassani, Ardavan

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach was applied for optimization of a moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) to treat sugar-industry wastewater (BOD5=500-2500 and COD=750-3750 mg/L) at 2-4 h of cycle time (CT). Although the experimental data showed that MBSBR reached high BOD5 and COD removal performances, it failed to achieve the standard limits at the mentioned CTs. Thus, optimization of the reactor was rendered by kinetic computational modeling and using statistical error indicator normalized root mean square error (NRMSE). The results of NRMSE revealed that Stover-Kincannon (error=6.40%) and Grau (error=6.15%) models provide better fits to the experimental data and may be used for CT optimization in the reactor. The models predicted required CTs of 4.5, 6.5, 7 and 7.5 h for effluent standardization of 500, 1000, 1500 and 2500 mg/L influent BOD5 concentrations, respectively. Similar pattern of the experimental data also confirmed these findings.

  17. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor: investigation of yields, kinetics, and enzymatic digestibilities of solids.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Farmer, Jody; Newman, Millie; McMillan, James D

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited the ability to perform technoeconomic modeling to guide research. To better characterize pretreatment and assess its kinetics, we pretreated corn stover in a continuous 1 t/d reactor. Corn stover was pretreated at 20% (w/w) solids concentration over a range of conditions encompassing residence times of 3-12 min, temperatures of 165- 195 degrees C, and H2SO4 concentrations of 0.5-1.4% (w/w). Xylan conversion yield and carbon mass balance data were collected at each run condition. Performance results were used to estimate kinetic model parameters assuming biphasic hemicellulose hydrolysis and a hydrolysis mechanism incorporating formation of intermediate xylo-oligomers. In addition, some of the pretreated solids were tested in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to measure the reactivity of their cellulose component to enzymatic digestion by cellulase enzymes. Monomeric xylose yields of 69-71% and total xylose yields (monomers and oligomers) of 70-77% were achieved with performance level depending on pretreatment severity. Cellulose conversion yields in SSF of 80-87% were obtained for some of the most digestible pretreated solids.

  18. Performance and kinetic process analysis of an Anammox reactor in view of application for landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Chys, Michael; Audenaert, Wim; He, Yanling; Van Hulle, Stijn W H

    2014-01-01

    Anammox has shown its promise and low cost for removing nitrogen from high strength wastewater such as landfill leachate. A reactor was inoculated with nitrification-denitrification sludge originating from a landfill leachate treating waste water treatment plant. During the operation, the sludge gradually converted into red Anammox granular sludge with high and stable Anammox activity. At a maximal nitrogen loading rate of 0.6 g N l(-1) d(-1), the reactor presented ammonium and nitrite removal efficiencies of above 90%. In addition, a modified Stover-Kincannon model was applied to simulate and assess the performance of the Anammox reactor. The Stover-Kincannon model was appropriate for the description of the nitrogen removal in the reactor with the high regression coefficient values (R2 = 0.946) and low Theil's inequality coefficient (TIC) values (TIC < 0.3). The model results showed that the maximal N loading rate of the reactor should be 3.69 g N l(-1) d(-).

  19. The transesterification of rapeseed and waste sunflower oils: Mass-transfer and kinetics in a laboratory batch reactor and in an industrial-scale reactor/separator setup.

    PubMed

    Klofutar, B; Golob, J; Likozar, B; Klofutar, C; Zagar, E; Poljansek, I

    2010-05-01

    We have investigated the transesterification of rapeseed (RO) and waste sunflower (SO) oils with methanol in the presence of potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. The transesterification of tri-acylglycerols was first conducted in a batch reactor. The effect of the temperature on the reaction rates was studied at a constant molar ratio of the alcohol to tri-acylglycerols (6:1) and for a constant concentration of the catalyst (1.0wt%). Size-exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to quantitatively monitor the transesterification reaction. The mass-transfer coefficients of the tri-acylglycerols during the initial transesterification stage were found to be 0.2-1.2x10(-5)mmin(-1), depending on the type of oil and the temperature. Calculated activation energies implied that at higher temperatures the formation of mono-acylglycerols and glycerole was favored for the SO (93kJ/mol for the forward and 48kJ/mol for the backward reaction) and the RO (47kJ/mol for the forward and 36kJ/mol for the backward reaction), respectively. For the continuous industrial reactor/separator setup, the optimum methanol recycle ratio was established as 0.0550.

  20. KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY ON FLY ASH PARTICLES IN AN ENTRAINED FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental studies were performed to investigate the interactions of elemental mercury vapor with entrained fly ash particles from coal combustion in a flow reactor. The rate of transformation of elemental mercury on fly ash particles was evauated over the temperature range fro...

  1. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (3-4.5% salinity) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g N ...

  2. Kinetic Study of Methyl Acetate Oxidation in a Pt/Al2O3 Fixed-Bed Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, Michael; Li, K. Y.; Li, Jeffrey S.; Chen, S. M.; Yaws, C. L.; Chu, H. W.; Simon, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    To support technology development for future long-term missions, a metabolic simulator will be used in a closed chamber to test the functions of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Methyl acetate (MA) was selected as the fuel because its metabolic respiratory quotient is near that of humans. A kinetic study of the catalytic oxidation of MA over Pt/Al203 was then conducted to support the design and operation of the simulator. Kinetic data were obtained as a conversion percentage of MA versus retention time. The reaction was studied at one atmosphere and temperatures from 220 to 340 deg. C. The inlet MA concentration was varied from 100 to 2000 ppm with retention times from 0.01 to 10 sec. A first-order rate law and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation were tested by nonlinear regression of the kinetic data to estimate rate constants in the rate law. Regression results of the L-H equation explain the kinetic data better than the results of the first-order rate law. A Taguchi experimental design was used to study the effects of temperature, retention time, and concentrations of MA, CO2, and O2 on the conversion of MA. Results indicate that temperature has greatest effect, followed by retention time, and finally MA concentration. It was further determined that the effects of CO2 and O2 concentrations, and the cross effects, are negligible.

  3. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the

  4. Hydraulic retention time impact of treated recirculated leachate on the hydrolytic kinetic rate of coffee pulp in an acidogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Houbron, E; González-López, G I; Cano-Lozano, V; Rustrían, E

    2008-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the impact of HRT of treated leachate recirculation on hydrolysis solubilization rate of coffee pulp in an acidogenic reactor. Coffee pulp presents more than 70% of organic matter and around of 30% of lignin and cellulose. Five lab scale reactors of 20 litres were used. Each reactor was fed with 5 kg of fresh coffee pulp and anaerobic sludge was used as inoculate. HRT of 0.5, 1, 3 and 10 days were applied. Each experiment shows that Total, Soluble and VFA COD appear rapidly in the removed leachate. HRT have a great impact on hydrolytic rate with an optimal value of 32,000 mg x L(-1) x d(-1).Low HRT increases hydrolysis rate and in consequence reduces duration of the hydrolytic phase. Also composition and concentration of VFA are influenced by HRT. Low ones favour acetic acid production and high ones permit the production of butyric. Low HRT generates leachate more easily fermentable. Efficiency of solubilization and acidification are independent of the HRT and present average values of 78% and 65% respectively. By batch feeding solid and continuous recirculation of treated leachate, HRT and SRT could be dissociated, where solid had a very high retention without problems of load, mixing and inhibition, and liquid could be recirculated with a very high rate. Under these low HRT condition, the first reactor of a two stage anaerobic system could reduces the hydrolysis duration of organic solid waste like coffee pulp and generate an optimal leachate for the methanization process.

  5. Fluorocarbon waste plasma destruction with a high temperature spouted-bed reactor: Kinetics, GC/MS analysis, chemical and mass balance for CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}CaO systems

    SciTech Connect

    Al Ayoubi, S.; Amouroux, J.; Renou-Gonnord, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of a plasma process for removing organic and hazardous substances has to account for pollutant emission by effluent gases. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using a plasma spouted-bed reactor for waste destruction, an efficient analytical procedure has been developed. CF{sub 4} has been chosen as a model molecule in both experimental work and in kinetic calculations.

  6. Application and kinetic evaluation of upflow anaerobic biofilm reactor for nitrogen removal from wastewater by Anammox process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The lab-scale upflow anaerobic biofilm reactor was successfully operated for the treatment of synthetic wastewater with high nitrogen load by Anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process. During the entire period of operation, the reactor temperature was kept at 35±1°C. The operational strategy consisted of both increasing the ammonium and nitrite concentrations from 60 to 700mgN/L and from 80 to 920 mgN/L, respectively and decreasing the hydraulic retention time from 24 to 6 h, at each step. The highest achieved removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite were 91 and 93%, respectively. Consequently, due to their acceptable performance for nitrogen removal in previous researches, modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order models were used in this study. According to the experiment results, the model validity testing showed that the Stover-Kincannon model was a little more appropriate for the description of nitrogen removal in the reactor, even though both models gave high correlation coefficients (R2=0.999). PMID:23414202

  7. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of in situ generation of ammonia from urea in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning of thermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, J.N.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C.

    2009-03-15

    Ammonia has long been known to be useful in the treatment of flue/tail/stack gases from industrial furnaces, incinerators, and electric power generation industries. In this study, urea hydrolysis for production of ammonia, in different application areas that require safe use of ammonia at in situ condition, was investigated in a batch reactor. The equilibrium and kinetic study of urea hydrolysis was done in a batch reactor at reaction pressure to investigate the effect of reaction temperature, initial feed concentration, and time on ammonia production. This study reveals that conversion increases exponentially with an increase in temperature but with increases in initial feed concentration of urea the conversion decreases marginally. Further, the effect of time on conversion has also been studied; it was found that conversion increases with increase in time. Using collision theory, the temperature dependency of forward rate constant developed from which activation energy of the reaction and the frequency factor has been calculated. The activation energy and frequency factor of urea hydrolysis reaction at atmospheric pressure was found to be 73.6 kJ/mol and 2.89 x 10{sup 7} min{sup -1}, respectively.

  8. Kinetic studies on degradation of Reactive Red 120 dye in immobilized packed bed reactor by Bacillus cohnii RAPT1.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, V C; Geed, Sachin RameshRao; Achary, Anant; Singh, R S

    2016-08-01

    The degradation of Reactive Red 120 using Bacillus cohnii RAPT1 immobilized on polyurethane was studied. Initial experiments indicated that the percentage removal of dye in immobilized batch was significantly higher than batch (without immobilization). The optimum process parameters such as effect of dye concentration, time of immobilization on Poly Urethane Foam, initial inoculum size, pH and temperature for removal of dye were investigated and was found as 200ppm, 36h, 300*10(6) colony forming units/ml, 8.0 and 35°C respectively. Under optimum conditions, 100% removal of dye was obtained within 4h. The kinetics of biodegradation for the batch with free cells and immobilised packed batch was found to be IInd order with kinetic constant and initial rate of reaction as 0.0408, 0.084L/(mgday) and 1632, 3360 (mg/Lday) respectively. PMID:26968121

  9. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, C-O and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of O-H, C-H(n), C=O, C-O, and C-C gradually disappeared from 400 °C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident. PMID:26093253

  10. Two-step nitrification in a pure moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment: nitrifying and denitrifying microbial populations and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; González-Martínez, A; Muñío, M M; Poyatos, J M

    2015-12-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBBR-MBR) is a novel solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. In this study, a pure MBBR-MBR was studied. The pure MBBR-MBR mainly had attached biomass. The bioreactor operated with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.5 h. The kinetic parameters for heterotrophic and autotrophic biomasses, mainly nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), were evaluated. The analysis of the bacterial community structure of the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), NOB, and denitrifying bacteria (DeNB) from the pure MBBR-MBR was carried out by means of pyrosequencing to detect and quantify the contribution of the nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in the total bacterial community. The relative abundance of AOB, NOB, and DeNB were 5, 1, and 3%, respectively, in the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS), and these percentages were 18, 5, and 2%, respectively, in the biofilm density (BD) attached to carriers. The pure MBBR-MBR had a high efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) removal of 71.81±16.04%, which could reside in the different bacterial assemblages in the fixed biofilm on the carriers. In this regard, the kinetic parameters for autotrophic biomass had values of YA=2.3465 mg O2 mg N(-1), μm, A=0.7169 h(-1), and KNH=2.0748 mg NL(-1).

  11. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, C-O and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of O-H, C-H(n), C=O, C-O, and C-C gradually disappeared from 400 °C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident.

  12. Ligand-substitution mode capillary electrophoretic reactor: extending capillary electrophoretic reactor toward measurement of slow dissociation kinetics with a half-life of hours.

    PubMed

    Iki, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Mariko; Takahashi, Toru; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    2009-09-15

    A method employing capillary electrophoresis (CE) was developed to determine the rate constant of the very slow spontaneous dissociation of a complex species. The method uses a CE reactor (CER) to electrophoretically separate components from a complex zone and, thus, spontaneously dissociate a complex. The dissociation is accelerated by ligand substitution (LS) involving a competing ligand added to the electrophoretic buffer. The LS-CER method is validated using the dissociation of a Ti(IV)-catechin complex and EDTA as a competing ligand. There is good agreement between the spontaneous dissociation rate constant (k(d) = (1.64 +/- 0.63) x 10(-4) s(-1)) and the rate constant obtained by a conventional batchwise LS reaction (k(d) = (1.43 +/- 0.04) x 10(-4) s(-1)). Furthermore, the usefulness of the method is demonstrated using a Ti(IV)-tiron complex, for which k(d) = (0.51 +/- 0.43) x 10(-4) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life (t(1/2)) of 3.8 h. Notably, a single run of LS-CER for the Ti(IV) complex is completed within 40 min, implying that LS-CER requires a considerably shorter measurement time (roughly equal to t(1/2)) than conventional CER. LS-CER can be widely applied to determine the spontaneous dissociation rates of inorganic diagnostic and therapeutic reagents as well as of biomolecular complexes.

  13. Reduction Kinetics of Manganese Dioxide by Geobacter Sulfurreducens and Associated Biofilm Morphology in a Flow-Through Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, E.; Werth, C. J.; Valocchi, A. J.; Sanford, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical interactions have been investigated extensively to characterize natural nutrient cycling and predict contaminant transport in surface and groundwater. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, many of which form biofilms, play an important role in reducing a variety of metals in these systems. It has been shown that biofilm morphology is impacted by flow conditions, but there has been little work that explores how reduction kinetics change as a result of these different morphologies. Different flow rates may affect physical properties of the biofilm that influence the rate of substrate reduction. We introduce an approach to calculate changes in Monod kinetic parameters while simultaneously evaluating biofilm morphologies under different flow rates. A vertical, cylindrical flow cell with removable glass slide sections coated in manganese dioxide (electron acceptor) was used to grow a biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the electron donor under both high (50 mL/hr) and low (5 mL/h) flow rates. The removable sections allowed for visualization of the biofilm at different time points with a confocal microscope, and quantification of the biomass on the surface using a combination of a protein assay and image analysis. Data collected from the experiments was used to determine yield and specific growth rate at the different flow rates, and a simple numerical model was used to estimate the half saturation constant of manganese dioxide at both flow rates. A smaller half saturation constant was estimated at the higher flow rate, indicating that the biofilm was more efficient in the high flow system, but a strong correlation between morphology and the faster reduction rate was not observed. Monod kinetic parameters are important for the development of accurate nutrient cycling and contaminant transport models in natural environments, and understanding how they are impacted by flow will be important for the development of new, improved models.

  14. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  15. Understanding the performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based packed bed reactor by growth kinetics study and microbial profiling.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2016-07-15

    A novel marine waste extract (MWE) as alternative nitrogen source was explored for the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Variation of sulfate and nitrogen (MWE) showed that SRB growth follows an uncompetitive inhibition model. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of 0.085 and 0.124 h(-1) and inhibition constants (Ki) of 56 and 4.6 g/L were observed under optimized sulfate and MWE concentrations, respectively. The kinetic data shows that MWE improves the microbial growth by 27%. The packed bed bioreactor (PBR) under optimized sulfate and MWE regime showed sulfate removal efficiency of 62-66% and metals removal efficiency of 66-75% on using mine wastewater. The microbial community analysis using DGGE showed dominance of SRB (87-89%). The study indicated the optimum dosing of sulfate and cheap organic nitrogen to promote the growth of SRB over other bacteria.

  16. Understanding the performance of sulfate reducing bacteria based packed bed reactor by growth kinetics study and microbial profiling.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Roy, Shantonu; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2016-07-15

    A novel marine waste extract (MWE) as alternative nitrogen source was explored for the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Variation of sulfate and nitrogen (MWE) showed that SRB growth follows an uncompetitive inhibition model. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of 0.085 and 0.124 h(-1) and inhibition constants (Ki) of 56 and 4.6 g/L were observed under optimized sulfate and MWE concentrations, respectively. The kinetic data shows that MWE improves the microbial growth by 27%. The packed bed bioreactor (PBR) under optimized sulfate and MWE regime showed sulfate removal efficiency of 62-66% and metals removal efficiency of 66-75% on using mine wastewater. The microbial community analysis using DGGE showed dominance of SRB (87-89%). The study indicated the optimum dosing of sulfate and cheap organic nitrogen to promote the growth of SRB over other bacteria. PMID:27085153

  17. Photonic crystal fibre as an optofluidic reactor for the measurement of photochemical kinetics with sub-picomole sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth O S; Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J; Jones, Anita C

    2012-09-21

    Photonic crystal fibre constitutes an optofluidic system in which light can be efficiently coupled into a solution-phase sample, contained within the hollow core of the fibre, over long path-lengths. This provides an ideal arrangement for the highly sensitive monitoring of photochemical reactions by absorption spectroscopy. We report here the use of UV/vis spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of the photochemical and thermal cis-trans isomerisation of sub-picomole samples of two azo dyes within the 19-μm diameter core of a photonic crystal fibre, over a path length of 30 cm. Photoisomerisation quantum yields are the first reported for "push-pull" azobenzenes in solution at room temperature; such measurements are challenging because of the fast thermal isomerisation process. Rate constants obtained for thermal isomerisation are in excellent agreement with those established previously in conventional cuvette-based measurements. The high sensitivity afforded by this intra-fibre method enables measurements in solvents in which the dyes are too insoluble to permit conventional cuvette-based measurements. The results presented demonstrate the potential of photonic crystal fibres as optofluidic elements in lab-on-a-chip devices for photochemical applications.

  18. Assessment of segregation kinetics in water-moderated reactors pressure vessel steels under long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Saltykov, M. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Khodan, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    In reactor pressure vessel (RPV) bcc-lattice steels temper embrittlement is developed under the influence of both operating temperature of ∼300 °C and neutron irradiation. Segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) begin to play a special role in the assessment of the safe operation of the RPV in case of its lifetime extension up to 60 years or more. The most reliable information on the RPV material condition can be obtained by investigating the surveillance specimens (SS) that are exposed to operational factors simultaneously with the RPV itself. In this paper the GB composition in the specimens with different thermal exposure time at the RPV operating temperature as well as irradiated by fast neutrons (E ≥ 0.5 MeV) to different fluences (20-71)·1022 m-2 was studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) including both impurity and main alloying elements content. The data obtained allowed to trace the trend of the operating temperature and radiation-stimulated diffusion influence on the overall segregants level in GB. The revealed differences in the concentration levels of GB segregants in different steels, are due to the different chemical composition of the steels and also due to different grain boundary segregation levels in initial (unexposed) state. The data were used to estimate the RPV steels working capacity for 60 years. The estimation was carried out using both the well-known Langmuir-McLean model and the one specially developed for RPV steels, which takes into account the structure and phase composition of VVER-1000 RPV steels, as well as the long-term influence of operational factors.

  19. Neutron and hard X-ray diffraction studies of the isothermal transformation kinetics in the research reactor fuel candidate U–8 wt%Mo

    PubMed Central

    Säubert, Steffen; Jungwirth, Rainer; Zweifel, Tobias; Hofmann, Michael; Hoelzel, Markus; Petry, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Exposing uranium–molybdenum alloys (UMo) retained in the γ phase to elevated temperatures leads to transformation reactions during which the γ-UMo phase decomposes into the thermal equilibrium phases, i.e. U2Mo and α-U. Since α-U is not suitable for a nuclear fuel exposed to high burn-up, it is necessary to retain the γ-UMo phase during the production process of the fuel elements for modern high-performance research reactors. The present work deals with the isothermal transformation kinetics in U–8 wt%Mo alloys for temperatures between 673 and 798 K and annealing durations of up to 48 h. Annealed samples were examined at room temperature using either X-ray or neutron diffraction to determine the phase composition after thermal treatment, and in situ annealing studies disclosed the onset of phase decomposition. While for temperatures of 698 and 673 K the start of decomposition is delayed, for higher temperatures the first signs of transformation are already observable within 3 h of annealing. The typical C-shaped curves in a time–temperature–transformation (TTT) diagram for both the start and the end of phase decomposition could be determined in the observed temperature regime. Therefore, a revised TTT diagram for U–8 wt%Mo between 673 and 798 K and annealing durations of up to 48 h is proposed. PMID:27275139

  20. Advanced oxidation processes. Test of a kinetic model for the oxidation of organic compounds with ozone and hydrogen peroxide in a semibatch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Glaze, W.H.; Kang, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data are presented to test a kinetic model of the OE/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process in a semibatch reactor. The effect of bicarbonate and carbonate ions is measured and found to be in concurrence with model predictions. The effect of pH in the ozone mass-transfer-limited region was examined in bicarbonate-spiked distilled water. Since the reaction is mass transfer limited, the primary effect above pH 7 is the result of changes in the distribution of inorganic carbon species which are OH-radical scavengers. Below pH 7, there is a lag period during which ozone and peroxide increase until the chain reaction begins. The effects of chloride ion and the concentration of radical scavengers other than carbonate species in ground waters are also measured. The mass-transfer/reaction rate model has been used to estimate rate constants for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with trichloroethylene, 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, carbon tetrachloride, and two bicyclic alcohols, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin. While the model developed for the distilled water system was successful in predicting the rate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) oxidation and the concentration of residual ozone and peroxide in regions I and III, respectively, there are several features of the model that remain unresolved when the matrix is changed to a real surface or ground water. This and subsequent papers will investigate these effects.

  1. Kinetics study of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with erucic acid using an ATR-IR flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chunbo; Hiltner, Joseph; Pham, Hai; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-01

    The ozone initiated heterogeneous oxidation of erucic acid (EA) thin film was investigated using a flow system combined with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) over wide ranges of ozone concentrations (0.25-60 ppm), thin film thickness (0.1-1.0 μm), temperatures (263-298 K), and relative humidities (0-80% RH) for the first time. Pseudo-first-order rate constants, kapp, and overall reactive uptake coefficients, γ, were obtained through changes in the absorbance of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching bands at 1695 cm(-1), which is assigned to the carbonyl group in carboxylic acid. Results showed that the reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and kapp was largely dominated by surface reaction over bulk phase reaction. In addition, both the kapp and the γ values showed very strong temperature dependences (∼two orders of magnitude) over the temperature range; in contrast, they only slightly increased with increasing RH values from 0-80%. According to the kapp values as a function of temperature, the activation energy for the heterogeneous reaction was estimated to be 80.6 kJ mol(-1). Our results have suggested that heterogeneous reactions between ozone and unsaturated solid surfaces likely have a substantially greater temperature dependence than liquid ones. Moreover, the hygroscopic properties of EA thin films before and after exposure to ozone were also studied by measurement of water uptake. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the insignificant RH effect on reaction kinetics was probably due to the relatively weak water uptake by the unreacted and reacted EA thin films.

  2. Exploring the controls of soil biogeochemistry in a restored coastal wetland using object-oriented computer simulations of uptake kinetics and thermodynamic optimization in batch reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payn, R. A.; Helton, A. M.; Poole, G.; Izurieta, C.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Burgin, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to predict patterns of biogeochemical redox reactions based on the availability of electron donors and acceptors and the thermodynamic theory of chemistry. Our objective was to develop a computer model that would allow us to test various alternatives of these hypotheses against data gathered from soil slurry batch reactors, experimental soil perfusion cores, and in situ soil profile observations from the restored Timberlake Wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. Software requirements to meet this objective included the ability to rapidly develop and compare different hypothetical formulations of kinetic and thermodynamic theory, and the ability to easily change the list of potential biogeochemical reactions used in the optimization scheme. For future work, we also required an object pattern that could easily be coupled with an existing soil hydrologic model. These requirements were met using Network Exchange Objects (NEO), our recently developed object-oriented distributed modeling framework that facilitates simulations of multiple interacting currencies moving through network-based systems. An initial implementation of the object pattern was developed in NEO based on maximizing growth of the microbial community from available dissolved organic carbon. We then used this implementation to build a modeling system for comparing results across multiple simulated batch reactors with varied initial solute concentrations, varied biogeochemical parameters, or varied optimization schemes. Among heterotrophic aerobic and anaerobic reactions, we have found that this model reasonably predicts the use of terminal electron acceptors in simulated batch reactors, where reactions with higher energy yields occur before reactions with lower energy yields. However, among the aerobic reactions, we have also found this model predicts dominance of chemoautotrophs (e.g., nitrifiers) when their electron donor (e.g., ammonium) is abundant, despite the

  3. A kinetic study of methanol synthesis in a slurry reactor using a CuO/ZnO/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Adwani, H.A.

    1992-05-01

    A kinetic model that describes the methanol production rate over a CuO/ZnO/AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} catalyst (United Catalyst L-951) at typical industrial operating conditions is developed using a slurry reactor. Different experiments are conducted in which the H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio is equal to 2, 1, and 0.5, respectively, while the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio is held constant at 9. At each H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio the space velocity is set at four different values in the range of 3000-13,000 1/hr kg{sub cat}. The effect of H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio and space velocity on methanol production rate, conversions, and product composition is further investigated. The results indicate that the highest methanol production rate can be achieved at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1 followed by H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2 respectively. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide conversions decrease with increasing space velocity for all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios tested. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2. On the other hand, carbon dioxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1. At all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios, the extent of the reverse water gas shift reaction decreases with increasing space velocity. The effect of temperature on the kinetics is examined by using the same experimental approach at 508 K. It is found that a different reaction sequence takes place at each temperature. Also, a time on stream study is conducted simultaneously in order to investigate the characteristic of catalyst deactivation with time on stream. During the first 150 hours of time on stream, the catalyst loses approximately 2/3 of its initial activity before reaching a steady state activity.

  4. A kinetic study of methanol synthesis in a slurry reactor using a CuO/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Adwani, H.A.

    1992-05-01

    A kinetic model that describes the methanol production rate over a CuO/ZnO/AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} catalyst (United Catalyst L-951) at typical industrial operating conditions is developed using a slurry reactor. Different experiments are conducted in which the H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio is equal to 2, 1, and 0.5, respectively, while the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio is held constant at 9. At each H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio the space velocity is set at four different values in the range of 3000-13,000 1/hr kg{sub cat}. The effect of H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio and space velocity on methanol production rate, conversions, and product composition is further investigated. The results indicate that the highest methanol production rate can be achieved at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1 followed by H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2 respectively. The hydrogen and carbon monoxide conversions decrease with increasing space velocity for all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios tested. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 0.5 and 2. On the other hand, carbon dioxide hydrogenation appears to be the main route to methanol at H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratio of 1. At all H{sub 2}/(CO+CO{sub 2}) ratios, the extent of the reverse water gas shift reaction decreases with increasing space velocity. The effect of temperature on the kinetics is examined by using the same experimental approach at 508 K. It is found that a different reaction sequence takes place at each temperature. Also, a time on stream study is conducted simultaneously in order to investigate the characteristic of catalyst deactivation with time on stream. During the first 150 hours of time on stream, the catalyst loses approximately 2/3 of its initial activity before reaching a steady state activity.

  5. Kinetic Study of Heterogeneous Reaction of Deliquesced NaCI Particles with Gaseous HNO3 Using Particle-on-Substrate Stagnation Flow Reactor Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Cain, Jeremy P.; Wang, Hai; Laskin, Alexander

    2007-10-11

    Heterogeneous reaction kinetics of gaseous nitric acid with deliquesced sodium chloride particles were investigated with a novel Particle-on-Substrate Stagnation Flow Reactor (PS-SFR) approach under conditions, including particle size, relative humidity and reaction time, directly relevant to the atmospheric chemistry of sea salt particles. Particles deposited onto an electron microscopy grid substrate were exposed to the reacting gas at atmospheric pressure and room temperature by impingement via a stagnation flow inside the reactor. The reactor design and choice of flow parameters were guided by computational fluid dynamics results to ensure uniformity of the diffusion flux to all particles undergoing reaction. The chloride depletion in the particles was followed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). The validity of the current approach was examined first by conducting experiments with median dry particle diameter = 0.82 μm, 80% relative humidity, particle loading densities 4×104 ≤ Ns ≤ 7×106 cm–2 and free stream HNO3 concentrations 2, 7 and 22 ppb. Upon deliquescence the droplet diameter approximately doubles. The apparent, pseudo first-order rate constant determined in these experiments varied with particle loading and HNO3 concentration in a manner consistent with a diffusion-kinetic analysis reported earlier (Laskin, A.; Wang, H.; Robertson, W. H.; Cowin, J. P.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 10619). The intrinsic, second-order rate constant was obtained as kII = 5.7×10–15 cm3molecule–1s–1 in the limit of zero particle loading and by assuming that the substrate is inert to HNO3. Under this loading condition the experimental, net reaction uptake coefficient was found to be γnet = 0.11 with an uncertainty factor of 3. Additional experiments examined the variations of HNO3 uptake on pure NaCl, a sea salt-like mixture of NaCl and MgCl2 (Mg

  6. Expanding the scope of CE reactor to ssDNA-binding protein-ssDNA complexes as exemplified for a tool for direct measurement of dissociation kinetics of biomolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Ohtsuka, Kei-Ichirou; Tomiya, Yoriyuki; Iki, Nobuhiko; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    2009-09-01

    CE reactor (CER), which was developed as a tool for direct measurement of the dissociation kinetics of metal complexes, was successfully applied to the complexes of Escherichia coli ssDNA-binding protein (SSB) with ssDNA. The basic concept of CER is the application of CE separation process as a dissociation kinetic reactor for the complex, and the observation of the on-capillary dissociation reaction profile of the complex as the decrease of the peak height of the complex with increase of the migration time. The peak height of [SSB-ssDNA] decreases as the migration time increases since the degree of the decrease of [SSB-ssDNA] through the on-capillary dissociation reaction is proportional to the degree of the decrease of the peak height of [SSB-ssDNA]. The dissociation degree-time profiles for the complexes are quantitatively described by analyzing a set of electropherograms with different migration times. Dissociation rate constants of [SSB-ssDNA] consisting of 20-mer, 25-mer and 31-mer ssDNA were directly determined to be 3.99x10(-4), 4.82x10(-4) and 1.50x10(-3)/s, respectively. CER is a concise and effective tool for dissociation kinetic analysis of biomolecular complexes.

  7. Reactivity Transients in Nuclear Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    Version 01 AIREMOD-RR is a point kinetics code which can simulate fast transients in nuclear research reactor cores. It can also be used for theoretical reactor dynamics studies. It is used for research reactor kinetic analysis and provides a point neutron kinetic capability. The thermal hydraulic behavior is governed by a one-dimensional heat balance equation. The calculations are restricted to a single equivalent unit cell which consists of fuel, clad and coolant.

  8. Kinetics studies of p-cresol biodegradation by using Pseudomonas putida in batch reactor and in continuous bioreactor packed with calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Mathur, A K; Bala, Shashi; Majumder, C B; Sarkar, S

    2010-01-01

    Present study deals with the biodegradation of p-cresol by using Pseudomonas putida in a batch reactor and a continuous bioreactor packed with calcium alginate beads. The maximum specific growth rate of 0.8121 h(-1) was obtained at 200 mg L(-1) concentration of p-cresol in batch reactor. The maximum p-cresol degradation rate was obtained 6.598 mg L(-1) h(-1) at S(o)=200 mg L(-1) and 62.8 mg L(-1) h(-1) at S(o)=500 mg L(-1) for batch reactor and a continuous bioreactor, respectively. The p-cresol degradation rate of continuous bioreactor was 9 to 10-fold higher than those of the batch reactor. It shows that the continuous bioreactor could tolerate a higher concentration of p-cresol. A Haldane model was also used for p-cresol inhibition in batch reactor and a modified equation similar to Haldane model for continuous bioreactor. The Haldane parameters were obtained as µ(max) 0.3398 h(-1), K(s) 110.9574 mg L(-1), and K(I) 497.6169 mg L(-1) in batch reactor. The parameters used in continuous bioreactor were obtained as D(max) 91.801 mg L(-1) h(-1), K(s) 131.292 mg L(-1), and K(I) 1217.7 mg L(-1). The value K(I) of continuous bioreactor is approximately 2.5 times higher than the batch reactor. Higher K(I) value of continuous bioreactor indicates P. putida can grow at high range of p-cresol concentration. The ability of tolerance of higher p-cresol concentrations may be one reason for biofilm attachment on the packed bed in the continuous operation.

  9. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Developments in Analytical Chemistry: Acoustically Levitated Drop Reactors for Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Detection of Toxic Organic Phosphonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Christopher Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Developments in analytical chemistry were made using acoustically levitated small volumes of liquid to study enzyme reaction kinetics and by detecting volatile organic compounds in the gas phase using single-walled carbon nanotubes. Experience gained in engineering, electronics, automation, and software development from the design and…

  11. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  12. Adsorption with biodegradation for decolorization of reactive black 5 by Funalia trogii 200800 on a fly ash-chitosan medium in a fluidized bed bioreactor-kinetic model and reactor performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Lin, Wen-Fan; Jhang, Kai-Ning; Lin, Pei-Yu; Lee, Mong-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) by Funalia trogii (F. trogii) ATCC 200800 biofilm on fly ash-chitosan bead in the fluidized bed process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included adsorption by fly ash-chitosan beads, biodegradation by F. trogii cells and mass transport diffusion. Batch kinetic tests were independently performed to determine surface diffusivity of RB5, adsorption parameters for RB5 and biokinetic parameters of F. trogii ATCC 200800. A column test was conducted using a continuous-flow fluidized bed reactor with a recycling pump to approximate a completely-mixed flow reactor for model verification. The experimental results indicated that F. trogii biofilm bioregenerated the fly ash-chitosan beads after attached F. trogii has grown significantly. The removal efficiency of RB5 was about 95 % when RB5 concentration in the effluent was approximately 0.34 mg/L at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended F. trogii cells reached up to about 1.74 mg/L while the thickness of attached F. trogii cells was estimated to be 80 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The comparisons of experimental data and model prediction show that the model system for adsorption and biodegradation of RB5 can predict the experimental results well. The approaches of experiments and mathematical modeling in this study can be applied to design a full-scale fluidized bed process to treat reactive dye in textile wastewater.

  13. Modeling chlorophenols degradation in sequencing batch reactors with instantaneous feed-effect of 2,4-DCP presence on 4-CP degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dilek, Filiz B

    2007-08-01

    Two instantaneously fed sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), one receiving 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) (SBR4) only and one receiving mixture of 4-CP and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) (SBRM), were operated with increasing chlorophenols concentrations in the feed. Complete degradation of chlorophenols and high-Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were observed throughout the reactors operation. Only a fraction of biomass (competent biomass) was thought to be responsible for the degradation of chlorophenols due to required unique metabolic pathways. Haldane model developed based on competent biomass concentration fitted reasonably well to the experimental data at different feed chlorophenols concentrations. The presence of 2,4-DCP competitively inhibited 4-CP degradation and its degradation began only after complete removal of 2,4-DCP. Based on the experimental results, the 4-CP degrader's fraction in SBRM was estimated to be higher than that in SBR4 since 2,4-DCP degraders were also capable of degrading 4-CP due to similarity in the degradation pathways of both compounds.

  14. Continuous esterification to produce biodiesel by SPES/PES/NWF composite catalytic membrane in flow-through membrane reactor: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Cao, Yuping; Li, Jianxin; Yan, Feng; Cui, Zhenyu; Zou, Zhiqun; Guo, Shiwei; Qian, Xiaomin

    2013-02-01

    A novel composite catalytic membrane (CCM) was prepared from sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) and polyethersulfone (PES) blend supported by non-woven fabrics, as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from continuous esterification of oleic acid with methanol in a flow-through mode. A kinetic model of esterification was established based on a plug-flow assumption. The effects of the CCM structure (thickness, area, porosity, etc.), reaction temperature and the external and internal mass transfer resistances on esterification were investigated. The results showed that the CCM structure had a significant effect on the acid conversion. The external mass transfer resistance could be neglected when the flow rate was over 1.2 ml min(-1). The internal mass transfer resistance impacted on the conversion when membrane thickness was over 1.779 mm. An oleic acid conversion kept over 98.0% for 500 h of continuous running. The conversions obtained from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Flow injection analysis combined with a hydrothermal flow reactor: application to kinetic determination of trace amounts of iridium using a water-soluble porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Ikoma, Keisuke; Igarashi, Shukuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Yao, Toshio

    2011-06-15

    A new type of flow injection analysis (FIA) system combined with an extremely high temperature reactor, namely hydrothermal flow injection analysis (HT-FIA), has been successfully constructed for the first time. Fundamental characteristics of HT-FIA system, such as limit temperature, pressure, and flow rate, were examined as an analytical tool. To demonstrate the potential of HT-FIA, the catalytic activity of Ir(IV) for the degradation of a water-soluble porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinetetrasulfonic acid (TPPS), was applied for the determination of trace amounts of Ir(IV). Although the indicator reaction is very slow at room temperature, HT-FIA system enables to accelerate the reaction. A linear calibration curve was acquired at 10(-8)M level of Ir(IV) and the interferences of platinum group metal ions were examined. The detection limit of Ir(IV) was 5.8 × 10(-9)M and a fairly high-throughput analysis, of which more than 30 samples can be analyzed within 80 min, was achieved.

  16. Determination of the fractions of syntrophically oxidized acetate in a mesophilic methanogenic reactor through an (12)C and (13)C isotope-based kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tito; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    In order to accurately describe the carbon flow in anaerobic digestion processes, this work investigates the acetate degradation pathways through the use of stable carbon isotope analysis and a mathematical model. Batch assays using labeled (13)C acetate were employed to distinguish the acetate consumption through methanogenic Archaea and acetate-oxidizing Bacteria. Suspended and sessile biomass, with over 400 days of retention time, from a mesophilic (36.5 °C) upflow anaerobic filter was used as inocula in these assays. A three-process model for acetoclastic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) was developed to allow for a precise quantification of the SAO contribution. The model distinguishes carbon atoms in light and heavy isotopes, (12)C and (13)C, respectively, which permitted the simulation of the isotope ratios variation in addition to gas production, gas composition and acetate concentrations. The model indicated oxidized fractions of acetate between 7 and 18%. Due to the low free ammonia inhibition potential for the acetoclastic methanogens in these assays these findings point to the biomass retention times as a driven factor for the SAO pathway. The isotope-based kinetic model developed here also describes the δ(13)C variations in unlabeled assays accurately and has the potential to determine biological (13)C fractionation factors.

  17. Determination of the fractions of syntrophically oxidized acetate in a mesophilic methanogenic reactor through an (12)C and (13)C isotope-based kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tito; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    In order to accurately describe the carbon flow in anaerobic digestion processes, this work investigates the acetate degradation pathways through the use of stable carbon isotope analysis and a mathematical model. Batch assays using labeled (13)C acetate were employed to distinguish the acetate consumption through methanogenic Archaea and acetate-oxidizing Bacteria. Suspended and sessile biomass, with over 400 days of retention time, from a mesophilic (36.5 °C) upflow anaerobic filter was used as inocula in these assays. A three-process model for acetoclastic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) was developed to allow for a precise quantification of the SAO contribution. The model distinguishes carbon atoms in light and heavy isotopes, (12)C and (13)C, respectively, which permitted the simulation of the isotope ratios variation in addition to gas production, gas composition and acetate concentrations. The model indicated oxidized fractions of acetate between 7 and 18%. Due to the low free ammonia inhibition potential for the acetoclastic methanogens in these assays these findings point to the biomass retention times as a driven factor for the SAO pathway. The isotope-based kinetic model developed here also describes the δ(13)C variations in unlabeled assays accurately and has the potential to determine biological (13)C fractionation factors. PMID:27390036

  18. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  19. Kinetic study approach of remazol black-B use for the development of two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor for decolorization/biodegradation of azo dyes by activated bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Dafale, Nishant; Wate, Satish; Meshram, Sudhir; Nandy, Tapas

    2008-11-30

    The laboratory-isolated strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus circulance, NAD 1 and NAD 6 were observed to be predominant in the bacterial consortium responsible for effective decolorization of the azo dyes. The kinetic characteristics of azo dye decolorization by bacterial consortium were determined quantitatively using reactive vinyl sulfonated diazo dye, remazol black-B (RB-B) as a model substrate. Effects of substrate (RB-B) concentration as well as different substrates (azo dyes), environmental parameters (temperature and pH), glucose and other electron donor/co-substrate on the rate of decolorization were investigated to reveal the key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorization. The activation energy (E(a)) and frequency factor (K(0)) based on the Arrhenius equation was calculated as 11.67 kcal mol(-1) and 1.57 x 10(7)mg lg MLSS(-1)h(-1), respectively. The Double-reciprocal or Lineweaver-Burk plot was used to evaluate V(max), 15.97 h(-1) and K(m), 85.66 mg l(-1). The two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor system has proved to be successful in achieving significant decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by specific developed bacterial consortium with a removal of 84% color and 80% COD for real textile effluents vis-à-vis >or=90% color and COD removal for synthetic dye solution.

  20. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage.

    PubMed

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Lindmark, Amanda; Skyllberg, Ulf; Danielsson, Asa; Svensson, Bo H

    2014-03-30

    The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼ 20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes.

  1. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage.

    PubMed

    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr; Lindmark, Amanda; Skyllberg, Ulf; Danielsson, Asa; Svensson, Bo H

    2014-03-30

    The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼ 20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes. PMID:24576559

  2. A variable-order time-dependent neutron transport method for nuclear reactor kinetics using analytically-integrated space-time characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new time-dependent neutron transport method based on the method of characteristics (MOC) has been developed. Whereas most spatial kinetics methods treat time dependence through temporal discretization, this new method treats time dependence by defining the characteristics to span space and time. In this implementation regions are defined in space-time where the thickness of the region in time fulfills an analogous role to the time step in discretized methods. The time dependence of the local source is approximated using a truncated Taylor series expansion with high order derivatives approximated using backward differences, permitting the solution of the resulting space-time characteristic equation. To avoid a drastic increase in computational expense and memory requirements due to solving many discrete characteristics in the space-time planes, the temporal variation of the boundary source is similarly approximated. This allows the characteristics in the space-time plane to be represented analytically rather than discretely, resulting in an algorithm comparable in implementation and expense to one that arises from conventional time integration techniques. Furthermore, by defining the boundary flux time derivative in terms of the preceding local source time derivative and boundary flux time derivative, the need to store angularly-dependent data is avoided without approximating the angular dependence of the angular flux time derivative. The accuracy of this method is assessed through implementation in the neutron transport code DeCART. The method is employed with variable-order local source representation to model a TWIGL transient. The results demonstrate that this method is accurate and more efficient than the discretized method. (authors)

  3. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  4. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  8. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  9. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  11. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  12. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Buksa, J.; Houts, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  15. Reactor building

    SciTech Connect

    Hista, J. C.

    1984-09-18

    Reactor building comprising a vessel shaft anchored in a slab which is peripherally locked. This reactor building comprises a confinement enclosure within which are positioned internal structures constituted by an internal structure floor, a vessel shaft, a slab being positioned between the general floor and the internal structure floor, the vesse

  16. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  17. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  19. Using thermal balance model to determine optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed in a laboratory-scale composting reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiang; Pang, Li; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Yuansheng; Zhou, Kexun; Luo, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive model of thermal balance and degradation kinetics was developed to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material. Biological heat production and five channels of heat loss were considered in the thermal balance model for a representative reactor. Degradation kinetics was developed to make the model applicable to different types of substrates. Simulation of the model showed that the internal energy accumulation of compost was the significant heat loss channel, following by heat loss through reactor wall, and latent heat of water evaporation. Lower proportion of heat loss occurred through the reactor wall when the reactor volume was larger. Insulating materials with low densities and low conductive coefficients were more desirable for building small reactor systems. Model developed could be used to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed before the fabrication of a lab-scale composting system.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  2. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  7. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  12. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  13. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  15. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1957-10-01

    A reactor of the type which preferably uses plutonium as the fuel and a liquid moderator, preferably ordinary water, and which produces steam within the reactor core due to the heat of the chain reaction is described. In the reactor shown the fuel elements are essentially in the form of trays and are ventically stacked in spaced relationship. The water moderator is continuously supplied to the trays to maintain a constant level on the upper surfaces of the fuel element as it is continually evaporated by the heat. The steam passes out through the spaces between the fuel elements and is drawn off at the top of the core. The fuel elements are clad in aluminum to prevent deterioration thereof with consequent contamimation of the water.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  18. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  19. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  20. Catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  5. Turbulent hydrocarbon combustions kinetics - Stochastic modeling and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Farmer, R. C.; Tucker, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Idealized reactors, that are designed to ensure perfect mixing and are used to generate the combustion kinetics for complex hydrocarbon fuels, may depart from the ideal and influence the kinetics model performance. A complex hydrocarbon kinetics model that was established by modeling a jet-stirred combustor (JSC) as a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), is reevaluated with a simple stochastic process in order to introduce the unmixedness effect quantitatively into the reactor system. It is shown that the comparisons of the predictions and experimental data have improved dramatically with the inclusion of the unmixedness effect in the rich combustion region. The complex hydrocarbon kinetics is therefore verified to be mixing effect free and be applicable to general reacting flow calculations.

  6. Mathematical modeling of maltose hydrolysis in different types of reactor.

    PubMed

    Findrik, Zvjezdana; Presecki, Ana Vrsalović; Vasić-Racki, Durda

    2010-03-01

    A commercial enzyme Dextrozyme was tested as catalyst for maltose hydrolysis at two different temperatures: 40 and 65 degrees C at pH 5.5. Its operational stability was studied in different reactor types: batch, repetitive batch, fed-batch and continuously operated enzyme membrane reactor. Dextrozyme was more active at 65 degrees C, but operational stability decay was observed during the prolonged use in the reactor at this temperature. The reactor efficiencies were compared according to the volumetric productivity, biocatalyst productivity and enzyme consumption. The best reactor type according to the volumetric productivity for maltose hydrolysis is batch and the best reactor type according to the biocatalyst productivity and enzyme consumption is continuously operated enzyme membrane reactor. The mathematical model developed for the maltose hydrolysis in the different reactors was validated by the experiments at both temperatures. The Michaelis-Menten kinetics describing maltose hydrolysis was used.

  7. Reactor modeling of the oxidative coupling of methane in membranes reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Ramachandra, A.; Ma, Y.H.

    1994-12-31

    A reactor model has been developed to analyze the performance of membrane reactors for the high temperature oxidative coupling of methane and to compare their operation with fixed bed reactors. Three reactor configurations of the shell and tube type were this study: a conventional fixed bed reactor, a tubular porous membrane reactor, dense membrane reactor. For the membrane reactors, oxygen is fed on the shell side and methane into the tube side, and the catalyst is present only inside the tube. Both streams are diluted with helium and the feed ratio is maintained at a methane to oxygen ratio of 2:1 for all three configurations. The ratio of the volumetric flow rate of each reactant to the amount of catalyst is kept the same for the three configurations. Kinetic equations for the oxidative coupling of methane have been taken from the simplified mechanism on Li/MgO proposed by Tung and Lobban, where C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are the reaction products considered. The modeling study indicates an improved performance of the membrane reactors over the conventional packed bed reactor. For the porous membrane reactor, a 4 angstrom pore size membrane gives higher C{sub 2}H{sub 6} selectivities and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yields than a 40 Angstrom pore size membrane. For the dense membrane reactor, a lower oxygen permeability gives higher C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yield. Of the three types of reactors, the dense membrane reactor offers the highest C{sub 2}H{sub 6} yields but a longer reactor length is needed because of the lower permeation rate of oxygen from the shell to the tube side, and hence the lower oxygen partial pressure and lower reaction rate on the tube side.

  8. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  9. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  11. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1962-12-25

    A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  14. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation. PMID:27573503

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-09-27

    A unit assembly is described for a neutronic reactor comprising a tube and plurality of spaced parallel sandwiches in the tube extending lengthwise thereof, each sandwich including a middle plate having a central opening for plutonium and other openings for fertile material at opposite ends of the plate.

  16. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  19. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOEpatents

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  1. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  2. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  3. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Warren R.

    1978-05-30

    A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

    1961-12-01

    An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

  5. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A core structure for neutronic reactors adapted for the propulsion of aircraft and rockets is offered. The core is designed for cooling by gaseous media, and comprises a plurality of hollow tapered tubular segments of a porous moderating material impregniated with fissionable fuel nested about a common axis. Alternate ends of the segments are joined. In operation a coolant gas passes through the porous structure and is heated.

  8. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  9. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules: Reactor Dynamics, RD-1 and RD-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    The objective of the Reactor Dynamics Module, RD-1, is to obtain the kinetics equation without feedback and solve the kinetics equations numerically for one to six delayed neutron groups for time varying reactivity insertions. The computer code FUMOKI (Fundamental Mode Kinetics) will calculate the power as a function of time for either uranium or…

  10. Detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.

    1997-04-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation has been developed and validated against a variety of experimental data sets. Laminar flame speed data obtained from a constant volume bomb, ignition delay data behind reflected shock waves, and ethanol oxidation product profiles from a turbulent flow reactor were used in this study. Very good agreement was found in modeling the data sets obtained from the three different experimental systems. The computational modeling results show that high temperature ethanol oxidation exhibits strong sensitivity to the fall-off kinetics of ethanol decomposition, branching ratio selection for c2h5oh+oh=products, and reactions involving the hydroperoxyl (HO2) radical.

  11. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  12. NASA-EPA automotive thermal reactor technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Hibbard, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The status of the NASA-EPA automotive thermal reactor technology program is summarized. This program is concerned primarily with materials evaluation, reactor design, and combustion kinetics. From engine dynamometer tests of candidate metals and coatings, two ferritic iron alloys (GE 1541 and Armco 18-SR) and a nickel-base alloy (Inconel 601) offer promise for reactor use. None of the coatings evaluated warrant further consideration. Development studies on a ceramic thermal reactor appear promising based on initial vehicle road tests. A chemical kinetic study has shown that gas temperatures of at least 900 K to 1000 K are required for the effective cleanup of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, but that higher temperatures require shorter combustion times and thus may permit smaller reactors.

  13. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  14. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  15. REACTOR COMPONETN

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor fuel element comprised of a slug of fissionable material disposed in a sheath of corrosion resistantmaterial is described. The sheath is in the form of a tubular container closed at one end and is in tight-fitting engagement with the peripheral sunface of the slug. An inner cap is insented into the open end of the sheath against the slug, which end is then bent around the inner cap and welded thereto. An outer cap is then welded around its peripheny to the bent portion of the container.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  17. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  18. RETRAC: A program for the analysis of materials test reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baggoura, B.; Hamidouche, T.; Bousbia-Salah, A. . Lab. des Analyses de Surete)

    1994-09-01

    REactor TRansient Analysis Code (RETRAC) is a computer code specially developed for the analysis of materials test reactor (MTR) cores. The RETRAC code uses a set of coupled neutron point-kinetics equations and thermal-hydraulic conservation laws to simulate nuclear reactor core behavior under transient or accident conditions. The reactor core is represented by a single equivalent unit cell composed of three regions: fuel, clad, and moderator (coolant). Validation tests of the RETRAC code were performed by using the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores, for protected transients. Further assessment studies are in progress using experimental data. The code was developed on a VAX-4000 working station.

  19. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  20. Evaluation of the intrinsic photocatalytic oxidation kinetics of indoor air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Salvadó-Estivill, Ignasi; Hargreaves, David M; Puma, Gianluca Li

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents a methodology for the evaluation of the intrinsic photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) kinetics of indoor air pollutants. It combines computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the fluid flow in the reactor with radiation field modeling and photocatalytic reaction kinetics to yield a rigorous model of a flat-plate, single-pass, flow-through photocatalytic reactor for indoor air purification. This method was applied to model the PCO of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humidified air and to derive kinetic parameters directly from kinetic data in an integral flow reactor. Steady-state PCO experiments of TCE over irradiated TiO2 (Degussa P25) thin films immobilized on glass supports were carried out at different radiation intensities, flow rates, and inlet substrate concentrations. The oxidation rate of TCE was found to be first-order on the incident photon flux and to follow a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type reaction kinetics rate law. Mass transfer resistances were observed at Reynolds numbers less than 46. Apparent quantum yields were found to be up to 0.97 mol Einstein(-1). A comparison of the model prediction with the experimental results in an integral reactor yielded pollutant-specific kinetic rate parameters which were independent of reactor geometry, radiation field, and fluid-dynamics. The kinetic parameters would,therefore, be more universally applicable to the design and scale-up of photocatalytic reactors for indoor air purification.

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  3. Control Means for Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J. H.

    1961-06-27

    An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

  4. Updated Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of the General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code has become available. A prior version of LSENS was described in "Program Helps to Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms" (LEW-15758), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 5 (May 1995), page 66. To recapitulate: LSENS solves complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems (e.g., combustion of fuels) that are represented by sets of many coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations. LSENS has been designed for flexibility, convenience, and computational efficiency. The present version of LSENS incorporates mathematical models for (1) a static system; (2) steady, one-dimensional inviscid flow; (3) reaction behind an incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; (4) a perfectly stirred reactor; and (5) a perfectly stirred reactor followed by a plug-flow reactor. In addition, LSENS can compute equilibrium properties for the following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. For static and one-dimensional-flow problems, including those behind an incident shock wave and following a perfectly stirred reactor calculation, LSENS can compute sensitivity coefficients of dependent variables and their derivatives, with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate-coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1957-09-17

    A reactor of the type having coolant liquid circulated through clad fuel elements geometrically arranged in a solid moderator, such as graphite, is described. The core is enclosed in a pressure vessel and suitable shielding, wherein means is provided for circulating vapor through the core to superheat the same. This is accomplished by drawing off the liquid which has been heated in the core due to the fission of the fuel, passing it to a nozzle within a chamber where it flashes into a vapor, and then passing the vapor through separate tubes extending through the moderator to pick up more heat developed in the core due to the fission of the fuel, thereby producing superheated vapor.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1962-12-18

    A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

  8. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  9. Reactor Controllability of 3-Region-Core Molten Salt Reactor System - A Study on Load Following Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Takahisa Yamamoto; Koshi Mitachi; Masatoshi Nishio

    2006-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) systems are liquid-fueled reactors that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). Thorium (Th) and uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) are fertile and fissile of the MSR systems, and dissolved in a high-temperature molten fluoride salt (fuel salt) with a very high boiling temperature (up to 1650 K), that is both the reactor nuclear fuel and the coolant. The MSR system is one of the six advanced reactor concepts identified by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as a candidate for cooperative development. In the MSR system, fuel salt flows through a fuel duct constructed around a reactor core and fuel channel of a graphite moderator accompanied by fission reaction and heat generation, and flows out to an external-loop system consisted of a heat exchanger and a circulation pump. Due to the motion of fuel salt, delayed neutron precursors that are one of the source of neutron production make to change their position between the fission reaction and neutron emission events and decay even occur in the external loop system. Hence the reactivity and effective delayed neutron precursor fraction of the MSR system are lower than those of solid fuel reactor systems such as Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWRs). Since all of the presently operating nuclear power reactors utilize solid fuel, little attention had been paid to the MSR analysis of the reactivity loss and reactor characteristics change caused by the fuel salt circulation. Sides et al. and Shimazu et al. developed MSR analytical models based on the point reactor kinetics model to consider the effect of fuel salt flow. Their models represented a reactor as having six zones for fuel salt and three zones for the graphite moderator. Since their models employed the point reactor kinetics model and the rough temperature approximation, their results were not sufficiently accurate to

  10. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  11. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-12-17

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics.

  12. A kinetic study of lipase-catalyzed reversible kinetic resolution involving verification at miniplant-scale.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, W R; Gendrot, G; Freund, A; Reuss, M

    2006-12-01

    Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemates is a popular method for synthesis of chiral synthons. Most of these resolutions are reversible equilibrium limited reactions. For the first time, an extensive kinetic model is proposed for kinetic resolution reactions, which takes into account the full reversibility of the reaction, substrate inhibition by an acyl donor and an acyl acceptor as well as alternative substrate inhibition by each enantiomer. For this purpose, the reversible enantioselective transesterification of (R/S)-1-methoxy-2-propanol with ethyl acetate catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B (CAL-B) is investigated. The detailed model presented here is valid for a wide range of substrate and product concentrations. Following model discrimination and the application of Haldane equations to reduce the degree of freedom in parameter estimation, the 11 free parameters are successfully identified. All parameters are fitted to the complete data set simultaneously. Six types of independent initial rate studies provide a solid data basis for the model. The effect of changes in substrate and product concentration on reaction kinetics is discussed. The developed model is used for simulations to study the behavior of reaction kinetics in a fixed bed reactor. The typical plot of enantiomeric excess versus conversion of substrate and product is evaluated at various initial substrate mixtures. The model is validated by comparison with experimental results obtained with a fixed bed reactor, which is part of a fully automated state-of-the-art miniplant.

  13. Reactor safety method

    DOEpatents

    Vachon, Lawrence J.

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR MANIPULATING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1962-08-01

    A cable connecting a control rod in a reactor with a motor outside the reactor for moving the rod, and a helical conduit in the reactor wall, through which the cable passes are described. The helical shape of the conduit prevents the escape of certain harmful radiations from the reactor. (AEC)

  15. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  16. Exploring Kinetics of Phenol Biodegradation by Cupriavidus taiwanesis 187

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu-Hong; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Chang, Shan-Ming; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2010-01-01

    Phenol biodegradation in batch systems using Cupriavidus taiwanesis 187 has been experimentally studied. To determine the various parameters of a kinetic model, combinations of rearranged equations have been evaluated using inverse polynomial techniques for parameter estimation. The correlations between lag phase and phase concentration suggest that considering phenol inhibition in kinetic analysis is helpful for characterizing phenol degradation. This study proposes a novel method to determine multiplicity of steady states in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) in order to identify the most appropriate kinetics to characterize the dynamics of phenol biodegradation. PMID:21614192

  17. Design options for a bunsen reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles

    2013-10-01

    This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

  18. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  19. REACTION KINETICS OF CA-BASED SORBENTS WITH HC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of the reaction between CaO and HCl were investigated under conditions that minimize bulk mass transfer and pore diffusion limitations. Reactivity data from 0.2- to 1-s exposure to 5000 ppm HCl in a fixed bed reactor were analyzed by a shrinking core model of diffusi...

  20. Kinetics of carbothermal reduction of quartz under vacuum.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalafalla, S. E.; Haas, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the kinetics of carbothermal reduction of quartz in a batch reactor between 0.25 torr and 1 microtorr. The effects of temperature, CO partial pressure, SiO2 phase transformation, and alkali and alkaline-earth oxide additives on the rate of reaction are reported. The results are consistent with a model based on a transitory phase intermediate.

  1. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  2. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, December 25, 1993--March 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-15

    A comparison study was made between a quartz tube non-porous packed bed reactor and a 40 Angstrom pore size porous VYCOR membrane reactor using two different methane coupling catalysts. Comparisons of reactor performance of the two reactors were made on the basis of amount of methane converted, C{sub 2} selectivities and the total C{sub 2} yields. Identical flow and temperature conditions were maintained for the two reactor systems for this study. These studies appear to indicate that improved performance can be obtained in VYCOR membrane reactors. The product stream from the tube side effluent of the porous VYCOR membrane reactor was superior to that from the quartz tube non-porous reactor in terms of improved C{sub 2} selectivity. At the present stage of research, the total effluent from the membrane reactor compared slightly less favorably to the effluent from a non-porous reactor, but studies are continuing on devising a reactor configuration which increases methane throughput in the tube side of the membrane reactor which is expected to demonstrate the overall superiority of the membrane reactor. Simulation results obtained by doing a parameter study for different reactor systems showed that, for the methane coupling reaction, where the desired product formation had a lower kinetic order with respect to oxygen, improved C{sub 2} yields could be achieved in membrane reactors if the residence times were sufficiently high.

  3. Generalization of the analytical solution of neutron point kinetics equations with time-dependent external source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidi, M.; Behnia, S.; Khodabakhsh, R.

    2014-09-01

    Point reactor kinetics equations with one group of delayed neutrons in the presence of the time-dependent external neutron source are solved analytically during the start-up of a nuclear reactor. Our model incorporates the random nature of the source and linear reactivity variation. We establish a general relationship between the expectation values of source intensity and the expectation values of neutron density of the sub-critical reactor by ignoring the term of the second derivative for neutron density in neutron point kinetics equations. The results of the analytical solution are in good agreement with the results obtained with numerical solution.

  4. Network topology and Turing instabilities in small arrays of diffusively coupled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsthemke, Werner; Lam, Kwan; Moore, Peter K.

    2004-08-01

    We study the effect of the network structure on the diffusion-induced instability to nonuniform steady states in arrays of diffusively coupled reactors. The kinetics is given by the Lengyel-Epstein model, and we derive the conditions for Turing instabilities in all arrays of two, three, and four reactors.

  5. The Fast-Flow Discharge Reactor as an Undergraduate Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provencher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A fast-flow discharge reactor has been used in an analytical chemistry demonstration of gas phase titration, in inorganic preparative chemistry, and in physical chemistry as a "practice" vacuum line, kinetic reactor, and spectroscopic source as well as an undergraduate research tool. (SK)

  6. A Special Topic From Nuclear Reactor Dynamics for the Undergraduate Physics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevenich, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an intuitive derivation of the point reactor equations followed by formulation of equations for inverse and direct kinetics which are readily programmed on a digital computer. Suggests several computer simulations involving the effect of control rod motion on reactor power. (MLH)

  7. Code System for the Analysis of Material Test Reactor (MTR) Cores.

    1995-03-24

    Version 00 The RETRAC code uses a set of coupled neutron point-kinetics equations and thermal-hydraulic conservation laws to simulate nuclear reactor core behavior under transient or accident conditions. The reactor core is represented by a single equivalent unit cell composed of three regions: fuel, clad, and moderator (coolant).

  8. FRINK - A Code to Evaluate Space Reactor Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.; Marcille, Thomas F.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.

    2007-01-30

    One of the biggest needs for space reactor design and development is detailed system modeling. Most proposed space fission systems are very different from previously operated fission power systems, and extensive testing and modeling will be required to demonstrate integrated system performance. There are also some aspects of space reactors that make them unique from most terrestrial application, and require different modeling approaches. The Fission Reactor Integrated Nuclear Kinetics (FRINK) code was developed to evaluate simplified space reactor transients (note: the term ''space reactor'' inherently includes planetary and lunar surface reactors). FRINK is an integrated point kinetic/thermal-hydraulic transient analysis FORTRAN code - ''integrated'' refers to the simultaneous solution of the thermal and neutronic equations. In its current state FRINK is a very simple system model, perhaps better referred to as a reactor model. The ''system'' only extends to the primary loop power removal boundary condition; however this allows the simulation of simplified transients (e.g. loss of primary heat sink, loss of flow, large reactivity insertion, etc.), which are most important in bounding early system conceptual design. FRINK could then be added to a complete system model later in the design and development process as system design matures.

  9. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lelevkin, V. M. Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V.

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  10. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  11. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  12. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1962-12-25

    This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

  14. Reactor System Transient Code.

    1999-07-14

    RELAP3B describes the behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactors during postulated accidents or power transients, such as large reactivity excursions, coolant losses or pump failures. The program calculates flows, mass and energy inventories, pressures, temperatures, and steam qualities along with variables associated with reactor power, reactor heat transfer, or control systems. Its versatility allows one to describe simple hydraulic systems as well as complex reactor systems.

  15. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  16. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  17. Efficient Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    High-purity silicon efficiently produced and transferred by continuous two-cycle reactor. New reactor operates in relatively-narrow temperature rate and uses large surfaces area to minimize heat expenditure and processing time in producing silicon by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane. Two cycles of reactor consists of silicon production and removal.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  1. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  2. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Some topics in applied electrochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, E.J.; Coleman, J.R.; Adams, W.A.

    1980-07-01

    The designer of an electrochemical reactor attempts to minimize the inevitable energy losses associated with irreversible processes. The slow steps, which are the greatest offenders, have to be identified. Fortunately, diagnostic techniques have arisen from developments in electrochemical kinetics -- not only for electrode processes but also for the mass-transfer and phase-separation processes which occur in series and parallel in every electrochemical reactor. Although electroplating, anodizing and electromachining, electrowinning and electrosynthesis are acknowledged as activities also of great importance to Canadian life, in this paper the examples will be drawn from the authors' work on batteries and fuel cells, i.e. from attempts to identify the slow steps and the wasteful side reactions, and to design around them. The mutual influence of theoretical ideas and practical achievements is the unifying theme of this lecture.

  4. Integrated safety analysis based on spatial kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemann, H.; Drescher, G.

    1994-12-31

    The continuing progress in computer technology, characterized by the ever-increasing calculational speed of various computer architectures, enables the direct coupling of up to recently separate code systems. As a consequence different areas of analysis like reactor physics, core thermal hydraulics, and plant dynamics can be integrated to increase the accuracy of simulation over that obtained from imposing conservative boundary conditions at the interfaces. The coupling of thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis with nodal space-time kinetics calculations is an important step toward an even more extensive integration of complex code systems. In this paper we present some results of a transient departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) calculation integrated in the nodal kinetics code PANBOX.

  5. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  6. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant).

  7. PHOTOCATALYTIC REACTORS AND KINETICS FOR CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS [POSTER PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has been tested at a potential technology for synthesizing alcohols, ketones and aldehydes from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. The technology couples UV light with photocatalyst overcoming many of the drawbacks of conventional reacors. Various hydr...

  8. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  9. Reactor vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Holley, John C.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  10. Beyond kinetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truskinovsky, Lev; Vainchtein, Anna

    2010-09-01

    We introduce the concept of kinetic or rate equations for moving defects representing a natural extension of the more conventional notion of a kinetic relation. Algebraic kinetic relations, widely used to model dynamics of dislocations, cracks and phase boundaries, link the instantaneous value of the velocity of a defect with an instantaneous value of the driving force. The new approach generalizes kinetic relations by implying a relation between the velocity and the driving force which is nonlocal in time. To make this relation explicit one may need to integrate a system of kinetic equations. We illustrate the difference between kinetic relation and kinetic equations by working out in full detail a prototypical model of an overdamped defect in a one-dimensional discrete lattice. We show that the minimal nonlocal kinetic description, containing now an internal time scale, is furnished by a system of two ordinary differential equations coupling the spatial location of defect with another internal parameter that describes configuration of the core region.

  11. Three-dimensional developing flow model for photocatalytic monolith reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Md.M.; Raupp, G.B.; Hay, S.O.; Obee, T.N.

    1999-06-01

    A first-principles mathematical model describes performance of a titania-coated honeycomb monolith photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactor for air purification. The single-channel, 3-D convection-diffusion-reaction model assumes steady-state operation, negligible axial dispersion, and negligible homogeneous reaction. The reactor model accounts rigorously for entrance effects arising from the developing fluid-flow field and uses a previously developed first-principles radiation-field submodel for the UV flux profile down the monolith length. The model requires specification of an intrinsic photocatalytic reaction rate dependent on local UV light intensity and local reactant concentration, and uses reaction-rate expressions and kinetic parameters determined independently using a flat-plate reactor. Model predictions matched experimental pilot-scale formaldehyde conversion measurements for a range of inlet formaldehyde concentrations, air humidity levels, monolith lengths, and for various monolith/lamp-bank configurations. This agreement was realized without benefit of any adjustable photocatalytic reactor model parameters, radiation-field submodel parameters, or kinetic submodel parameters. The model tends to systematically overpredict toluene conversion data by about 33%, which falls within the accepted limits of experimental kinetic parameter accuracy. With further validation, the model could be used in PCO reactor design and to develop quantitative energy utilization metrics.

  12. Kinetics methods for clinical epidemiology problems

    PubMed Central

    Corlan, Alexandru Dan; Ross, John

    2015-01-01

    Calculating the probability of each possible outcome for a patient at any time in the future is currently possible only in the simplest cases: short-term prediction in acute diseases of otherwise healthy persons. This problem is to some extent analogous to predicting the concentrations of species in a reactor when knowing initial concentrations and after examining reaction rates at the individual molecule level. The existing theoretical framework behind predicting contagion and the immediate outcome of acute diseases in previously healthy individuals is largely analogous to deterministic kinetics of chemical systems consisting of one or a few reactions. We show that current statistical models commonly used in chronic disease epidemiology correspond to simple stochastic treatment of single reaction systems. The general problem corresponds to stochastic kinetics of complex reaction systems. We attempt to formulate epidemiologic problems related to chronic diseases in chemical kinetics terms. We review methods that may be adapted for use in epidemiology. We show that some reactions cannot fit into the mass-action law paradigm and solutions to these systems would frequently exhibit an antiportfolio effect. We provide a complete example application of stochastic kinetics modeling for a deductive meta-analysis of two papers on atrial fibrillation incidence, prevalence, and mortality. PMID:26578757

  13. Kinetics methods for clinical epidemiology problems.

    PubMed

    Corlan, Alexandru Dan; Ross, John

    2015-11-17

    Calculating the probability of each possible outcome for a patient at any time in the future is currently possible only in the simplest cases: short-term prediction in acute diseases of otherwise healthy persons. This problem is to some extent analogous to predicting the concentrations of species in a reactor when knowing initial concentrations and after examining reaction rates at the individual molecule level. The existing theoretical framework behind predicting contagion and the immediate outcome of acute diseases in previously healthy individuals is largely analogous to deterministic kinetics of chemical systems consisting of one or a few reactions. We show that current statistical models commonly used in chronic disease epidemiology correspond to simple stochastic treatment of single reaction systems. The general problem corresponds to stochastic kinetics of complex reaction systems. We attempt to formulate epidemiologic problems related to chronic diseases in chemical kinetics terms. We review methods that may be adapted for use in epidemiology. We show that some reactions cannot fit into the mass-action law paradigm and solutions to these systems would frequently exhibit an antiportfolio effect. We provide a complete example application of stochastic kinetics modeling for a deductive meta-analysis of two papers on atrial fibrillation incidence, prevalence, and mortality.

  14. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  15. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  16. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  17. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  18. Modelling of an EGSB treating sugarcane vinasse using first-order variable kinetics.

    PubMed

    López, Iván; Borzacconi, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    An expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) anaerobic reactor treating sugar cane vinasse was modelled using a simple model with two steps (acidogenesis and methanogenesis), two populations, two substrates and completely mixed conditions. A first-order kinetic equation for both steps with time-variant kinetic coefficients was used. An observer system was used to estimate the evolution of kinetic constants over time. The model was validated by comparing methane flow predictions with experimental values. An estimation of evolution of populations of microorganisms was also performed. This approach allows calculation of specific kinetic constants that reflect biological activity of microorganisms. Variation of specific kinetic constants reflects the influence of the fraction of raw vinasse in the feed. High salt concentrations in the reactor may have inhibited the process. PMID:22105132

  19. Options: the JADE reactor and heat transfer by heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.E.; Massey, J.V.

    1981-08-10

    The JADE reactor is a new Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) concept which maintains advantages of liquid metal walls and addresses some of their problems. The concept envisions a porous medium, called the jade, of specific geometry lining the reactor cavity. The jade is designed to convert the kinetic energy of the fluid to thermal energy before it reaches the first wall. Finally, its particular geometric shape is used to minimize reaction forces on the first wall due to blow-off caused by soft x-rays and debris, to provide empty spaces for fluid expansion after neutron energy deposition where droplets collide with droplets cancelling their kinetic energies, and to provide large surface areas for rapid condensation of vapor. LLNL also suggested that heat pipes might be used to eliminate portions of the primary or secondary coolant loops, thereby reducing pumping requirements found in current reactor designs.

  20. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  1. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  2. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale.

  3. Prediction of inclusion body solubilization from shaken to stirred reactors.

    PubMed

    Walther, Cornelia; Mayer, Sabrina; Trefilov, Alexandru; Sekot, Gerhard; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois; Dürauer, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were solubilized in a µ-scale system using shaking microtiter plates or a stirred tank reactor in a laboratory setting. Characteristic dimensionless numbers for mixing, the Phase number Ph and Reynolds number Re did not correlate with the kinetics and equilibrium of protein solubilization. The solubilization kinetics was independent of the mixing system, stirring or shaking rate, shaking diameter, and energy input. Good agreement was observed between the solubilization kinetics and yield on the µ-scale and laboratory setting. We show that the IB solubilization process is controlled predominantly by pore diffusion. Thus, for the process it is sufficient to keep the IBs homogeneously suspended, and additional power input will not improve the process. The high-throughput system developed on the µ-scale can predict solubilization in stirred reactors up to a factor of 500 and can therefore be used to determine optimal solubilization conditions on laboratory and industrial scale. PMID:23860724

  4. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  5. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  6. Modelling of biofilm reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Grasmick, A.; Elmaleh, S.

    1982-10-01

    Comprehensive models of biofilm reactors are developed. Model I assumes a zero-order reaction of a limiting substrate and a diffusional mass transport through the biofilm; in the diffusion-controlled regime the model is fully characterized by one parameter alpha. From this model the conversion of substrate or reactor efficiency can be calculated, for continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and plug flow reactors respectively, as follows: EA = )alpha(alpha + 2)) 1/2 - alpha; and Ep = (2 alpha) 1/2 - alpha/2: Validation of the model is tested for different experimental systems. Model II includes liquid film mass transfer resistance. The conversion gap between plug flow reactors and CSTRs is always lower than 25% and, as a first approximation, the biofilm reactor design does not then require accurate residence time distribution measurements. (Refs. 23).

  7. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  8. Thermionic space reactors overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wetch, J.R.; Britt, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Rasor, N.S.

    1983-08-01

    The multi-national development of thermionic reactor systems is summarized in the context of the past general space nuclear reactor program and the recent renewed interest in space nuclear power. Comparison of various alternate reactor space power systems indicates that only the in-core thermionic reactor approach has the performance and growth potential required to provide the power levels potentially needed for shuttle-launchable systems by the year 2000 at reactor coolant and system temperatures that are near the current state-of-the-art. It is concluded that all shuttle- launchable high power space reactor systems require high-temperature, long-endurance nuclear fuels, and that high priority characterization and development of such fuels is essential to successfully realize power systems that can enable the space missions presently being considered.

  9. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Ozone kinetics is quite well established at atmospheric pressure, due to the importance of ozone in atmospheric chemistry and to the development of industrial ozone reactors. However, as the pressure is decreased and the dominant three-body reactions lose importance, the main mechanisms involved in the creation and destruction of ozone are still surrounded by important uncertainties. In this work we develop a self-consistent model for a pulsed discharge and its afterglow operating in a Pyrex reactor with inner radius 1 cm, at pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents of 40-120 mA. The model couples the electron Boltzmann equation with a system of equations for the time evolution of the heavy particles. The calculations are compared with time-dependent measurements of ozone and atomic oxygen. Parametric studies are performed in order to clarify the role of vibrationally excited ozone in the overall kinetics and to establish the conditions where ozone production on the surface may become important. It is shown that vibrationally excited ozone does play a significant role, by increasing the time constants of ozone formation. Moreover, an upper limit for the ozone formation at the wall in these conditions is set at 10(-4).

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Dreffin, R.S.

    1959-12-15

    A control means for a nuclear reactor is described. Particularly a device extending into the active portion of the reactor consisting of two hollow elements coaxially disposed and forming a channel therebetween, the cross sectional area of the channel increasing from each extremity of the device towards the center thereof. An element of neutron absorbing material is slidably positionable within the inner hollow element and a fluid reactor poison is introduced into the channel defined by the two hollow elements.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Goett, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A system is described which includes a neutronic reactor containing a dispersion of fissionable material in a liquid moderator as fuel and a conveyor to which a portion of the dispersion may be passed and wherein the self heat of the slurry evaporates the moderator. Means are provided for condensing the liquid moderator and returning it to the reactor and for conveying the dried fissionable material away from the reactor.

  12. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  13. THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1960-01-12

    A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

  14. FLOW SYSTEM FOR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1963-06-11

    A reactor is designed with means for terminating the reaction when returning coolant is below a predetermined temperature. Coolant flowing from the reactor passes through a heat exchanger to a lower reservoir, and then circulates between the lower reservoir and an upper reservoir before being returned to the reactor. Means responsive to the temperature of the coolant in the return conduit terminate the chain reaction when the temperature reaches a predetermined minimum value. (AEC)

  15. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  16. A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

  17. Kinetics of Hydrolysis of Acetic Anhydride by In-Situ FTIR Spectroscopy: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haji, Shaker; Erkey, Can

    2005-01-01

    A reaction kinetics experiment for the chemical engineering undergraduate laboratory course was developed in which in-situ Fourier Transfer Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure reactant and product concentrations. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride was determined by experiments carried out in a batch reactor. The results…

  18. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Seiser, R; Bozzelli, J W; Seshadri, K; Chen, C-J; Da Costa, I; Fournet, R; Billaud, F; Battin-Leclerc, F; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-17

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + 0 reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and nonpremixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under nonpremixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in nonpremixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and nonpremixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in nonpremixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  19. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  20. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  1. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  2. Reactor optimization for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.H.; Gharpuray, M.M.; Fan, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose furnishes sugar which can be subsequently fermented to ethanol. The production of such sugar at relatively low cost is essential for commercially viable production of ethanol. Many processes have been developed for converting cellulosic materials to sugar, and their economic feasibility has been analyzed; however, relatively little has been done to optimize such processes. A comprehensive mechanistic kinetic model for enzymatic degradation was established previously; it takes into account the structure of cellulose, mode of action of celluloytic enzyme, and mode of interaction between the enzyme and the cellulosic substrate. In the present work this model has been applied to the optimal design of cellulose hydrloysis reactors. Both batch and continously stirred reactors have been considered for this purpose. The fractional contributions of various cost parameters to the production cost have been estimated. The sensitivity of sugar cost to the important cost parameters, such as raw material and enzyme costs, have been examined. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  3. Dynamic Simulation of Batch Photocatalytic Reactor (BPR) for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Reactive dyes discharged from dyehouse causes a serious environmental problem. UV/TiO2 photocatalysis has been employed effectively for these organic dyes removal from dye-house effluent. This process produces less amount of non-toxic final product. In this paper a photocatalytic reactor has been designed for Reactive red 198 (RR198) removal from aqueous solution. The reactor is operating in batch mode. After each batch, TiO2 catalyst has been separated and recycled in the next batch. Mathematical model equation of this batch photocatalytic reactor (BPR) has been developed considering Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. Simulation of BPR has been carried out using fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK) method and fifth order RK method (Butcher method). This simulation results can be used to develop an automatic photocatlytic reactor for industrial wastewater treatment. Catalyst activity decay and its effect on each batch have been incorporated in this model.

  4. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  5. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis and devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Research continued on coal devolatilization. Results are presented for rapid devolatilization experiments performed with the 20 -- 30 micron size cut of the reference coal - PSOC 1451D - a high volatile bituminous, Appalachian Province coal. In agreement with behavior observed in rapid, radiant transient heating experiments -flash lamp - and moderate heating rate - heated grid - experiments for the same coal, the devolatilization process is observed to occur in four distinct phases: intraparticle heavy hydrocarbon detachment and transport; heavy hydrocarbon desorption; low temperature reformation reactions producing light gases; high temperature secondary reactions of tars and char degassing. Mass fraction yields light fast yields and tar and char characteristics are presented for a range of reactor temperatures which support the phenomenological picture. A phenomenological model is presented which indicates the distinct phases of devolatilization and the importance of heat transfer conditions on both the overall rate of particle mass loss and the observable volatiles product distribution. The approach taken to model heat transfer conditions in each of the devolatilization reactors employed in the overall investigation is outlined. Predicted weight loss results are shown for three different sets of overall devolatilization kinetic parameters given heat transfer conditions in the UTRC Hot Wall - Hot Gas reactor. 47 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis and devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on coal pyrolysis and devolatilization. The effects of reaction process on the transient temperature history of a particle have been examined. The reaction process is found to significantly reduce the temperature gradient across a burning particle relative to a nonreactive particle. The pyrolysis process, on the other hand, does not severely affect the temperature history of a heating particle for the kinetic parameters employed. Devolatilization experiments have been performed on various size cuts on an HVA Bituminous coal in entrained flow and heated grid reactors. Weight loss measurements were made in the entrained flow reactor (EFR) and tar yields and molecular weight distributions were measured for the heated grid reactor (HGR) experiments. The results imply the initial phase of the devolatilization of the HVA Bituminous coal is heat transfer controlled because the rate of tar information and evolution is heat transfer controlled. The invariance in EFR ultimate weight loss and low pressure tar yields and characteristics with change in particle size can be explained by morphological considerations of the parent coal particles. The non-symmetric, irregular shapes of the coal particles result in an intraparticle mass distribution much nearer an interphase surface area than that of an equivalent sphere or cube. 5 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  8. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1959-02-10

    A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

  10. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  11. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Light water reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  13. Operating US power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.G.

    1982-07-01

    The operation of US power reactors during March and April 1982 is summarized. Events of special note are discussed in the text, and the operational performance of all licensed power reactors is presented. These data are taken from the monthly Operating Units Status Report prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  14. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  15. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  16. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  18. Status of French reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  19. Reactor neutrino monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuillier, D.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear reactors are the most intense man-controlled sources of antineutrinos and as such have hosted number of key physics experiments, from the antineutrino discovery to modern oscillation measurements. At the present time, both detection technology and understanding of fundamental physics are mature enough to think about antineutrinos as a new tool for reactor monitoring. We describe below how antineutrinos can provide online information on reactor operation and amount of plutonium accumulated in the core. Reactors are the only sources of plutonium on earth and this element can be chemically separated from the rest of the nuclear fuel and diverted into nuclear weapons. We present in the next sections the unique features antineutrino detectors could provide to safeguards agencies such as IAEA. We review the worldwide efforts to develop small ( 1m scale) antineutrino detectors dedicated to automated and non-intrusive reactor monitoring.

  20. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:26051088

  1. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  2. Waste tyre pyrolysis: modelling of a moving bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Aylón, E; Fernández-Colino, A; Murillo, R; Grasa, G; Navarro, M V; García, T; Mastral, A M

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a new model for waste tyre pyrolysis in a moving bed reactor. This model comprises three different sub-models: a kinetic sub-model that predicts solid conversion in terms of reaction time and temperature, a heat transfer sub-model that calculates the temperature profile inside the particle and the energy flux from the surroundings to the tyre particles and, finally, a hydrodynamic model that predicts the solid flow pattern inside the reactor. These three sub-models have been integrated in order to develop a comprehensive reactor model. Experimental results were obtained in a continuous moving bed reactor and used to validate model predictions, with good approximation achieved between the experimental and simulated results. In addition, a parametric study of the model was carried out, which showed that tyre particle heating is clearly faster than average particle residence time inside the reactor. Therefore, this fast particle heating together with fast reaction kinetics enables total solid conversion to be achieved in this system in accordance with the predictive model.

  3. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  4. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  5. Kinetic modelling and simulation of laccase catalyzed degradation of reactive textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Cristóvão, Raquel O; Tavares, Ana P M; Ribeiro, Adriano S; Loureiro, José M; Boaventura, Rui A R; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2008-07-01

    A kinetic model based on Michaelis-Menten equation was developed to simulate the dye decolourisation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Blue 114 (RB114), Reactive Yellow 15 (RY15), Reactive Red 239 (RR239) and Reactive Red 180 (RR180) dyes by commercial laccase. The unusual kinetic behavior of some of these reactions suggests that the kinetic model must consider the activation of the laccase-mediator system. Several reactions at different concentrations of each dye were performed in batch reactors and time courses were obtained. A LSODE code to solve the differential equation obtained from the batch reactor was combined with an optimization Fortran program to obtain the theoretical time courses. The time courses obtained from the developed program were compared with the experimentally obtained ones to estimate the kinetic constants that minimized the difference between them. The close correlation between the predicted and the experimental results seems to support the reliability of the established models.

  6. Improved kinetic model for the activity of industrial sulfuric acid catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Adlkofer, J.; Agar, D.W.; Hiller, K.H.; Kautz, G.; Lebert, U.; Schlimper, H.U.

    1986-01-01

    An industrial SO/sub 2/ oxidation reactor was simulated using an improved kinetic model developed by BASF. This Model is one of the few taking into account all the important physical processes occurring in the system, e.g. the diffusion with the SLPC-structure. As a result of this, it was also possible to use the model to compare the behavior of new and used catalyst in an industrial reactor.

  7. Maltodextrin hydrolysis in a fluidized-bed immobilized enzyme reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vallat, I.; Monsan, P.; Riba, J.P.

    1986-02-01

    The present work deals with maltodextrin hydrolysis by glucoamylase immobilized onto corn stover in a fluidized bed reactor. An industrial enzyme preparation was convalently grafted onto corn stover, yielding an activity of up to 372 U/g and 1700 U/g for support particle sizes of 0.8 and 0.2 mm, respectively. A detailed kinetic study, using a differntial reactor, allowed the characterization of the influence of mass transfer resistance on the reaction catalyzed by immobilized glucoamylase. A simple and general mathematical model was then developed to describe the experimental conversion data and found to be vaild.

  8. Kinetic theory viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, secondly, the geometry of the mean flow.

  9. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  10. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  12. Benchmarking NSP Reactors with CORETRAN-01

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, Donald D.; Grow, Rodney L.; Agee, Lance J

    2004-10-15

    As part of an overall verification and validation effort, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRIs) CORETRAN-01 has been benchmarked against Northern States Power's Prairie Island and Monticello reactors through 12 cycles of operation. The two Prairie Island reactors are Westinghouse 2-loop units with 121 asymmetric 14 x 14 lattice assemblies utilizing up to 8 wt% gadolinium while Monticello is a General Electric 484 bundle boiling water reactor. All reactor cases were executed in full core utilizing 24 axial nodes per assembly in the fuel with 1 additional reflector node above, below, and around the perimeter of the core. Cross-section sets used in this benchmark effort were generated by EPRI's CPM-3 as well as Studsvik's CASMO-3 and CASMO-4 to allow for separation of the lattice calculation effect from the nodal simulation method. These cases exercised the depletion-shuffle-depletion sequence through four cycles for each unit using plant data to follow actual operations. Flux map calculations were performed for comparison to corresponding measurement statepoints. Additionally, start-up physics testing cases were used to predict cycle physics parameters for comparison to existing plant methods and measurements.These benchmark results agreed well with both current analysis methods and plant measurements, indicating that CORETRAN-01 may be appropriate for steady-state physics calculations of both the Prairie Island and Monticello reactors. However, only the Prairie Island results are discussed in this paper since Monticello results were of similar quality and agreement. No attempt was made in this work to investigate CORETRAN-01 kinetics capability by analyzing plant transients, but these steady-state results form a good foundation for moving in that direction.

  13. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  14. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to study experimentally. The realistic implementation of such models requires reliable experimentally derived data on the kinetics of denitrification. Here we undertook measurements of denitrification kinetics as a function of nitrate concentration and in the presence and absence of oxygen, in carefully controlled flow through reactor experiments on sediments taken from six shallow coastal sites in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. The results showed that denitrification commenced rapidly (within 30 min) after the onset of anoxia and the kinetics could be well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with half saturation constants (apparent Km) ranging between 1.5 and 19.8 μM, and maximum denitrification rate (Vmax) were in the range of 0.9-7.5 nmol mL-1 h-1. The production of N2 through anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) was generally found to be less than 10% that of denitrification. Vmax were in the same range as previously reported in cohesive sediments despite organic carbon contents one order of magnitude lower for the sediments studied here. The ratio of sediment O2 consumption to Vmax was in the range of 0.02-0.09, and was on average much lower than the theoretical ratio of 0.8. The most likely explanation for this is that the microbial community is not able to instantaneously shift or optimally use a particular electron acceptor in the highly dynamic redox environment experienced in permeable sediments. Consistent with this explanation, subsequent longer-term experiments over 5 days showed that denitrification rates increased by a factor of 10 within 3 days of the permanent onset of anoxia. In contrast to previous studies, we did not observe any significant

  15. Spatial Kinetics Calculations of MOX Fueled Core: Variant 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-11

    This work is part of a Joint US/Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover; overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve; and the boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop.

  16. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  17. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  18. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  19. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  20. REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeill, J.H.; Estabrook, J.Y.

    1960-05-10

    A reactor control system including a continuous tape passing through a first coolant passageway, over idler rollers, back through another parallel passageway, and over motor-driven rollers is described. Discrete portions of fuel or poison are carried on two opposed active sections of the tape. Driving the tape in forward or reverse directions causes both active sections to be simultaneously inserted or withdrawn uniformly, tending to maintain a more uniform flux within the reactor. The system is particularly useful in mobile reactors, where reduced inertial resistance to control rod movement is important.

  1. COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Binner, C.R.; Wilkie, C.B.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to a design for a reactor of the type in which a fluid coolant is flowed through the active portion of the reactor. This design provides for the cooling of the shielding material as well as the reactor core by the same fluid coolant. The core structure is a solid moderator having coolant channels in which are disposed the fuel elements in rod or slug form. The coolant fluid enters the chamber in the shield, in which the core is located, passes over the inner surface of said chamber, enters the core structure at the center, passes through the coolant channels over the fuel elements and out through exhaust ducts.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  3. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  4. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1958-10-14

    Methods of controlling reactors are presented. Specifically, a plurality of neutron absorber members are adjustably disposed in the reactor core at different distances from the center thereof. The absorber members extend into the core from opposite faces thereof and are operated by motive means coupled in a manner to simultaneously withdraw at least one of the absorber members while inserting one of the other absorber members. This feature effects fine control of the neutron reproduction ratio by varying the total volume of the reactor effective in developing the neutronic reaction.

  6. Designing reverse-flow packed bed reactors for stable treatment of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Fan Liang; Keith, Jason M

    2006-02-01

    Reverse-flow packed bed reactors can be used to treat gaseous pollutants from chemical plants. This article describes the design and operation of a modified reverse-flow reactor (MRFR) which has a recuperator on each end of the reactor and a reaction zone in the middle. The recuperators have low thermal dispersion and the reaction zone has a high thermal dispersion, obtained by placing metal inserts into the bed, parallel with the gas flow. Performance of the MRFR during extended lean and rich conditions is determined with analytical analysis and compares well with numerical simulations of CO oxidation; however, the theory is expected to be useful for any reaction kinetics. A major advantage of this MRFR design is an extended time for the reactor to extinguish during lean conditions. This work also describes MRFR performance with internal reactor cooling, which can be used as a control mechanism to maintain reactor temperature for proper removal of volatile organic compounds.

  7. Monosaccharide production in an acid sulfite process: kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rueda, C; Fernández-Rodríguez, J; Ruiz, G; Llano, T; Coz, A

    2015-02-13

    Spent sulfite liquor is a lignocellulosic waste obtained after the sulfite pulping process. It is mainly formed by sugars and lignosulfonates which are isolated from the pulp during the cooking process. The current work investigates the kinetic modeling of the sulfite process from a biorefinery point of view since monosaccharides present in the spent liquor can be used as a raw material in further biorefinery processes to produce other value-added products. Kinetic parameters of carbohydrate degradation have been determined following sugar and inhibitors from wood to spent liquor, using laboratory scale reactors and different temperatures, 130, 140 and 150 °C. Three types of reaction schemes were developed. Kinetic parameters were obtained for each one using first and n order reactions, using Aspen Custom Modeler. Results show that the best temperature to be used in the process is 130 °C, giving the maximum sugar conversion, 33.91 mol% and obtaining 13.81 mol% of decomposition products.

  8. Long tail kinetics in biophysics?

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F

    1992-01-01

    Long tail kinetics describe a variety of data from complex, disordered materials that cannot be described by conventional kinetics. It is suggested that the kinetics of diffusive motion in complex biological media, such as cytoplasm or biomembranes, might also have long tails. The effects of long tail kinetics are investigated for two standard biophysical measurements, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It is shown that long tail kinetic data would yield significantly distorted and misleading results when analyzed assuming conventional kinetics. PMID:1420883

  9. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  10. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel. PMID:18541367

  11. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  12. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1961-10-24

    A reactor core, comprised of vertical stacks of hexagonal blocks of beryllium oxide having axial cylindrical apertures extending therethrough and cylindrical rods of a sintered mixture of uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide, is described. (AEC)

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-10

    Uranium-aluminum alloys in which boron is homogeneously dispersed by adding it as a nickel boride are described. These compositions have particular utility as fuels for neutronic reactors, boron being present as a burnable poison.

  15. NON-NRC FUNDED RELAP5-3D VERSION 4.x.x SOFTWARE REACTOR EXCURSION AND LEAK ANALYSIS PACKAGE - THREE DIMENSIONAL

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-26

    The RELAP5-3D Version 3.x code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of nuclear reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, Soviet-designed reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal and molten salt cooled reactors, and even fusion reactors. Numerical models include multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, 1- and 2-D heat transfer in metal walls, 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-D neutron kinetics, trips, and control systems. Secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.

  16. NON-NRC FUNDED RELAP5-3D VERSION 4.x.x SOFTWARE REACTOR EXCURSION AND LEAK ANALYSIS PACKAGE - THREE DIMENSIONAL

    2012-03-26

    The RELAP5-3D Version 3.x code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of nuclear reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems including pressurized watermore » reactors, boiling water reactors, Soviet-designed reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal and molten salt cooled reactors, and even fusion reactors. Numerical models include multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, 1- and 2-D heat transfer in metal walls, 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-D neutron kinetics, trips, and control systems. Secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  17. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  18. Molten metal reactors

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  19. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  20. Future reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-15

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  2. F Reactor Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-10-29

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  3. F Reactor Inspection

    ScienceCinema

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2016-07-12

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  4. Moon base reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Weills, J.T.

    1960-03-15

    A method is given for operating a nuclear reactor having a negative coefficient of reactivity to compensate for the change in reactor reactivity due to the burn-up of the xenon peak following start-up of the reactor. When it is desired to start up the reactor within less than 72 hours after shutdown, the temperature of the reactor is lowered prior to start-up, and then gradually raised after start-up.

  6. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  7. The removal of nitrogen and organics in vertical flow wetland reactors: predictive models.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Tanveer; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-01-01

    Three kinetic models, for predicting the removal of nitrogen and organics in vertical flow wetlands, have been developed and evaluated. These models were established by combining first-order, Monod and multiple Monod kinetics with continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) flow pattern. Critical evaluations of these models using three statistical parameters, coefficient of determination, relative root mean square error and model efficiency, indicated that when the Monod/multiple Monod kinetics was combined with CSTR flow pattern it allowed close match between theoretical prediction and experiment data of nitrogen and organics removal. The kinetic coefficients (derived from Monod/multiple Monod kinetics) was found to increase with pollutant loading, indicating that the coefficients may vary based on different factors, such as influent pollutant concentration, hydraulic loading, and water depth. Overall, this study demonstrated the validity of combining Monod and multiple Monod kinetics with CSTR flow pattern for the modelling and design of vertical flow wetland systems.

  8. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  9. Kinetic analysis of complex reactions using FEMLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-06-07

    A finite element method software FEMALB has been implemented to the kinetic analysis of complex reaction systems. The established protocol provides fast solutions to the coupled differential-algebraic equations. It shows significant advantages over the conventional coding process with the standard implicit Runge-Kutta (IRK) method. The accuracy and high efficiency have been demonstrated in the simulation of the reaction processes such as glucose/fructose hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of gasoil. As model validation, the numerical results showed satisfactory agreement with the exact solutions. With the powerful capability of solving large matrixes of differential equations (both ODE and PDE) with nonlinear algebraic constrains, such an algorithm has greatly reduced the coding labor in reaction mechanistic studies and provided a unique tool in reactor design and optimization.

  10. An Introductory Level Kinetics Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, J. E. B.; Knipe, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of the reactions commonly used for introductory kinetics studies. These reactions illustrate the kinetics concepts of rate law, rate constant, and reaction order. Describes a kinetic study of the hydrolysis of 3-bromo-3-phenylpropanoic acid which offers many educational advantages. (CS)

  11. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor) subassembly types

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel.

  12. Decomposition of chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes in an electron beam generated plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    An electron beam generated plasma reactor (EBGPR) is used to determine the plasma chemistry kinetics, energetics and decomposition pathways of six chlorinated ethylenes and ethanes: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, ethyl chloride, trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. A traditional chemical kinetic and chemical engineering analysis of the data from the EBGPR is performed, and the following hypothesis was verified: The specific energy required for chlorinated VOC decomposition in the electron beam generated plasma reactor is determined by the electron attachment coefficient of the VOC and the susceptibility of the molecule to radical attack. The technology was demonstrated at the Hanford Reservation to remove VOCs from soils.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the synthesis of a novel protein-based plastic using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoez, Wael; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the intermolecular mechanism and kinetics of the synthesis of a novel biodegradable protein-based plastic from bovine serum albumin under subcritical water conditions using batch reactors. The reaction mechanism could be viewed as a chain reaction stabilized by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. The kinetic analysis was based on non-steady-state kinetics using a theoretical model developed in one of our previous works. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor were found to be 7.2 kJ/mol and 0.9 s-1, respectively. These low values signify that the reaction is relatively temperature-insensitive with some diffusion limitation.

  14. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol: kinetics of phenol uptake.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Yustos, P; Durbán, B; García-Ochoa, F

    2001-07-01

    Catalytic phenol oxidation in aqueous phase under intermediate temperature and pressure has been carried out in order to determine the kinetic model of phenol uptake rate. The catalyst employed here was a commercial one based on copper supplied by Engelhard (Cu-0203T). Operational variables have been studied in the following ranges: temperature from 127 to 180 degrees C, oxygen pressure from 3.2 to 16 bar, initial phenol concentration from 680 to 1200 ppm, and catalyst concentration from 0 to 1550 g/L of liquid phase. Because of the wide interval here employed for the catalyst concentration, two experimental setups have been used: a basket stirred tank reactor (BSTR) with the liquid phase in batch and an integral fixed-bed reactor (FBR) with co-current upflow of gas and liquid phases. An important influence of the reaction in the bulk liquid was obtained in both types of reactor. This fact has been taken into account in the kinetic model according to different approaches. The first approach was a breakup of the reaction rate in two kinetic expressions, considering the homogeneous and heterogeneous contribution separately; the second approach was empirical where the reaction rate is a potential function of the catalyst concentration. It was found that the extent of reaction in the bulk liquid is also influenced by the catalyst concentration and that the first approach is not able to adequately predict the experimental results. Finally a kinetic model, based on the second approach, was discriminated, with a power law for the catalyst concentration with an order about 0.4. This model fits quite well the experimental data obtained in both experimental setups, BSTR and FBR, throughout the wide range of variables studied.

  15. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  16. Uncertainty in bulk-liquid hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics creates uncertainties in biofilm reactor design.

    PubMed

    Boltz, J P; Daigger, G T

    2010-01-01

    While biofilm reactors may be classified as one of seven different types, the design of each is unified by fundamental biofilm principles. It follows that state-of-the art design of each biofilm reactor type is subject to the same uncertainties (although the degree of uncertainty may vary). This paper describes unifying biofilm principles and uncertainties of importance in biofilm reactor design. This approach to biofilm reactor design represents a shift from the historical approach which was based on empirical criteria and design formulations. The use of such design criteria was largely due to inherent uncertainty over reactor-scale hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics, which correlate with biofilm thickness, structure and function. An understanding of two fundamental concepts is required to rationally design biofilm reactors: bioreactor hydrodynamics and biofilm dynamics (with particular emphasis on mass transfer resistances). Bulk-liquid hydrodynamics influences biofilm thickness control, surface area, and development. Biofilm dynamics influences biofilm thickness, structure and function. While the complex hydrodynamics of some biofilm reactors such as trickling filters and biological filters have prevented the widespread use of fundamental biofilm principles and mechanistic models in practice, reactors utilizing integrated fixed-film activated sludge or moving bed technology provide a bulk-liquid hydrodynamic environment allowing for their application. From a substrate transformation perspective, mass transfer in biofilm reactors defines the primary difference between suspended growth and biofilm systems: suspended growth systems are kinetically (i.e., biomass) limited and biofilm reactors are primarily diffusion (i.e., biofilm growth surface area) limited.

  17. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  18. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  19. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    SciTech Connect

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  20. Advances in process intensification through multifunctional reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hern, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    This project was designed to advance the art of process intensification leading to a new generation of multifunctional chemical reactors. Experimental testing was performed in order to fully characterize the hydrodynamic operating regimes critical to process intensification and implementation in commercial applications. Physics of the heat and mass transfer and chemical kinetics and how these processes are ultimately scaled were investigated. Specifically, we progressed the knowledge and tools required to scale a multifunctional reactor for acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation to industrial dimensions. Understanding such process intensification strategies is crucial to improving the energy efficiency and profitability of multifunctional reactors, resulting in a projected energy savings of 100 trillion BTU/yr by 2020 and a substantial reduction in the accompanying emissions.

  1. Reactor modeling in heterogeneous photocatalysis: toxicity and biodegradability assessment.

    PubMed

    Satuf, M L; José, S; Paggi, J C; Brandi, R J; Cassano, A E; Alfano, O M

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalysis employing titanium dioxide is a useful method to degrade a wide variety of organic and inorganic pollutants from water and air. However, the application of this advanced oxidation process at industrial scale requires the development of mathematical models to design and scale-up photocatalytic reactors. In the present work, intrinsic kinetic expressions previously obtained in a laboratory reactor are employed to predict the performance of a bench scale reactor of different configuration and operating conditions. 4-Chlorophenol was chosen as the model pollutant. The toxicity and biodegradability of the irradiated mixture in the bench photoreactor was also assessed. Good agreement was found between simulation and experimental data. The root mean square error of the estimations was 9.9%. The photocatalytic process clearly enhances the biodegradability of the reacting mixture, and the initial toxicity of the pollutant was significantly reduced by the treatment.

  2. Non-equilibrium plasma reactors for organic solvent destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.L.; Beltran, M.R.; Kravets, Z.

    1997-12-31

    Two non-equilibrium plasma reactors were evaluated for their ability to destroy three widely used organic solvents, i.e., 2-butanone, toluene and ethyl acetate. The catalyzed plasma reactor (CPR) with 6 mm glass beads destroys 98% of 50 ppm toluene in air at 24 kV/cm and space velocities of 1,400 v/v/hr. Eighty-five percent of ethyl acetate and 2-butanone are destroyed under the same conditions. The tubular plasma reactor (TPR) has an efficiency of 10% to 20% lower than that of a CPR under the same conditions. The 1,400 v/v/hr in a CPR is equal to a residence time of 2.6 seconds in a TPR. The operating temperatures, corona characteristics, as well as the kinetics of VOC destruction in both TPR and CPR were studied.

  3. Coupled simulation of the reactor core using CUPID/MASTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. R.; Cho, H. K.; Yoon, H. Y.; Jeong, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The CUPID is a component-scale thermal hydraulics code which is aimed for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components such as the reactor vessel, steam generator, containment. This code adopts a three-dimensional, transient, two-phase and three-field model, and includes physical models and correlations of the interfacial mass, momentum, and energy transfer for the closure. In the present paper, a multi-physics simulation was performed by coupling CUPID with a three dimensional neutron kinetics code, MASTER. MASTER is merged into CUPID as a dynamic link library (DLL). The APR1400 reactor core during a control rod drop/ejection accident was simulated as an example by adopting a porous media approach to employ a fuel assembly. The following sections present the numerical modeling for the reactor core, coupling of the kinetics code, and the simulation results. And also, a preliminary study for multi-scale simulation between CUPID and system-scaled thermal hydraulics code, MARS will be introduced as well. (authors)

  4. Kinetics of Reactive Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    YOST, FREDERICK G.

    1999-09-09

    The importance of interfacial processes in materials joining has a long history. A significant amount of work has suggested that processes collateral to wetting can affect the extent of wetting and moderate or retard wetting rate. Even very small additions of a constituent, known to react with the substrate, cause pronounced improvement in wetting and are exploited in braze alloys, especially those used for joining to ceramics. The wide diversity of processes, such as diffusion, chemical reaction, and fluxing, and their possible combinations suggest that various rate laws should be expected for wetting kinetics depending on the controlling processes. These rate laws are expected to differ crucially from the standard fluid controlled wetting models found in the literature. Voitovitch et al. and Mortensen et al. have shown data that suggests diffusion control for some systems and reaction control for others. They also presented a model of wetting kinetics controlled by the diffusion of a constituent contained by the wetting fluid. In the following a model will be constructed for the wetting kinetics of a small droplet of metal containing a constituent that diffuses to the wetting line and chemically reacts with a flat, smooth substrate. The model is similar to that of Voitovitch et al. and Mortensen et al. but incorporates chemical reaction kinetics such that the result contains both diffusion and reaction kinetics. The model is constructed in the circular cylinder coordinate system, satisfies the diffusion equation under conditions of slow flow, and considers diffusion and reaction at the wetting line to be processes in series. This is done by solving the diffusion equation with proper initial and boundary conditions, computing the diffusive flux at the wetting line and equating this to both the convective flux and reaction flux. This procedure is similar to equating the current flowing in components of a series circuit. The wetting rate will be computed versus time

  5. EBT reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Santoro, R. T.; Spong, D. A.; Uckan, T.; Owen, L. W.; Barnes, J. M.; McBride, J. B.

    1983-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with <..beta../sub core/> approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m/sup 2/, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density.

  6. REACTOR AND NOVEL METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-06-24

    A nuclear reactor of the type which uses a liquid fuel and a method of controlling such a reactor are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a tank for containing the liquid fuel such as a slurry of discrete particles of fissionnble material suspended in a heavy water moderator, and a control means in the form of a disc of neutron absorbirg material disposed below the top surface of the slurry and parallel thereto. The diameter of the disc is slightly smaller than the diameter of the tank and the disc is perforated to permit a flow of the slurry therethrough. The function of the disc is to divide the body of slurry into two separate portions, the lower portion being of a critical size to sustain a nuclear chain reaction and the upper portion between the top surface of the slurry and the top surface of the disc being of a non-critical size. The method of operation is to raise the disc in the reactor until the lower portion of the slurry has reached a critical size when it is desired to initiate the reaction, and to lower the disc in the reactor to reduce the size of the lower active portion the slurry to below criticality when it is desired to stop the reaction.

  7. Effect of temperature on the nucleation kinetics of α L-glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenberg, Christian; Mazzotti, Marco

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the nucleation kinetics of α L-glutamic acid is determined on the basis of induction time measurements. L-Glutamic acid is precipitated by pH-shift in a stirred batch reactor. The induction times are measured at different supersaturations using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), and applying a previously developed method [J. Schöll, L. Vicum, M. Müller, M. Mazzotti, Precipitation of L-glutamic acid: Determination of nucleation kinetics. Chemical Engineering & Technology 29(2) (2006) 257-264]. Moreover, the effect of temperature on the induction time is studied. Together with independently measured growth kinetics, the nucleation rates are determined. Finally, the nucleation kinetics is used to calculate the interfacial energies. The analysis of the estimated kinetics parameters and of the calculated interfacial energies indicates a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism.

  8. Kinetics of the reversible reaction of struvite crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Crutchik, D; Garrido, J M

    2016-07-01

    The crystallisation of struvite could be a sustainable and economical alternative for recovering phosphorus from wastewater streams with high phosphate concentrations. Knowledge regarding the kinetics and thermodynamics that are involved in the crystallisation of struvite is the key to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining an efficient process. This study was conducted in a continuous stirred batch reactor. Different sets of experiments were performed in which struvite was either dissolved (undersaturated) or precipitated (oversaturated). These experiments were conducted at different temperatures (25, 30 and 35 °C) and pH values (8.2, 8.5 and 8.8) to determine the kinetics of struvite precipitation and dissolution. Struvite crystallisation was modelled as a reversible reaction. The kinetic rate parameters of struvite precipitation were 1.03·10(-4), 1.25·10(-4) and 1.54·10(-4) mol m(-2) min(-1) at 25, 30 and 35 °C, respectively. Similar kinetic rate parameters were determined for struvite dissolution. Struvite heterogeneous crystallisation can be represented by a first-order kinetic model that fitted well the experimental data. PMID:27085317

  9. Kinetics of cobalt cementation on zinc powder

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, A.M.; Palmas, S.; Dernini, S.

    1995-09-01

    The cementation process may be considered an interesting method to treat dilute solutions containing metal ions. The aim of the process may be either the removal of pollutant metals or the recovery of economically valuable metals such as Ag from spent photographic liquors. The kinetics of cobalt cementation on Zn powder from zinc sulfate concentrated solutions in the presence of copper and antimony ions was investigated in stirred tank reactors. The composition of the solutions was in the range usually utilized in industrial zinc electrowinning plants. The results showed that the reaction occurs by means of the formation of crystallization nuclei of noble metals on the zinc powder, followed by the cementation of cobalt ions on these newly-formed nuclei. Mass transfer to the reaction surface is shown to be the controlling step in copper and antimony reduction, and an equation correlating mass transfer coefficients has been determined. A kinetic equation, which interprets the influence of stirring speed and solution composition on cobalt cementation, has also been proposed.

  10. Kinetic Modeling of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxin and Dibenzofuran Formation Based on Carbon Degradation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion experiments in a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor were performed to determine the role of temperature and time in PCDD/F formation allowing a global kinetic expression to be written for PCDD/F formation due to soot oxidation in fly ash deposits. Rate constants were c...

  11. A Computer Graphics Approach to the Use of the Integral Method in Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skattes, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer program which was written to analyze batch reactor data by the integral method. Discusses how the program is structured and used by students in engineering kinetics. An example problem is included along with the computer's solution. (TW)

  12. PHYTO-REMOVAL OF TRINITROTOLUENE FROM WATER WITH BATCH KINETIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of batch reactor studies were conducted to obtain kinetic data for optimizing phyto-treatment of water contaminated with trinitrotoluene (TNT). A plant screening study indicated that stonewort and parrotfeather were the most effective among the plants tested; parrotfeath...

  13. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOEpatents

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  14. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased. PMID:21723581

  15. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased.

  16. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  17. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  18. A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, E.A.; Vandenberg, L.B.

    1959-09-01

    A nuclear reactor for producing thermoelectric power is described. The reactor core comprises a series of thermoelectric assemblies, each assembly including fissionable fuel as an active element to form a hot junction and a thermocouple. The assemblies are disposed parallel to each other to form spaces and means are included for Introducing an electrically conductive coolant between the assemblies to form cold junctions of the thermocouples. An electromotive force is developed across the entire series of the thermoelectric assemblies due to fission heat generated in the fuel causing a current to flow perpendicular to the flow of coolant and is distributed to a load outside of the reactor by means of bus bars electrically connected to the outermost thermoelectric assembly.

  19. Dynamic bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stormo, K.E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix. 27 figs.

  20. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  1. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Stormo, Keith E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  2. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Lazarus, Jonathan D.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extends from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  3. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  4. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

  5. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  6. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Graham, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A wholly mechanical compact control device is designed for automatically rendering the core of a fission reactor subcritical in response to core temperatures in excess of the design operating temperature limit. The control device comprises an expansible bellows interposed between the base of a channel in a reactor core and the inner end of a fuel cylinder therein which is normally resiliently urged inwardly. The bellows contains a working fluid which undergoes a liquid to vapor phase change at a temperature substantially equal to the design temperature limit. Hence, the bellows abruptiy expands at this limiting temperature to force the fuel cylinder outward and render the core subcritical. The control device is particularly applicable to aircraft propulsion reactor service. (AEC)

  7. Merchant Marine Ship Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sankovich, M. F.; Mumm, J. F.; North, Jr, D. C.; Rock, H. R.; Gestson, D. K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor for use in a merchant marine ship is described. The reactor is of pressurized, light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements that are confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass. (AEC)

  8. MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

  9. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 4, Reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the following for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR): reactor pressure vessel, nozzles and safe-ends, reactor internals, in-vessel portions of fluid systems (including reactor internal pumps (Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) piping and spargers), nuclear fuel, and the control rods and control rod drive system (including hydraulic supply and accumulators). Special tools required for reactor system maintenance, inspection and testing are also covered.

  10. Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and Repossessed Uranium in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  11. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  12. Analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    In order to validate methods and cross sections used in the neutronic design of compact fast-spectrum reactors for generating electric power in space, an analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor was made. For this reactor the transport analysis gave generally satisfactory results. The calculated multiplication factor for the most detailed calculation was only 0.7-percent Delta k too high. Calculated reactivity worth of the control drums was $11.61 compared to measurements of $11.58 by the inverse kinetics methods and $11.98 by the inverse counting method. Calculated radial and axial power distributions were in good agreement with experiment.

  13. McCARD for Neutronics Design and Analysis of Research Reactor Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Ho Jin; Kwon, Soonwoo; Seo, Geon Ho; Hyo Kim, Chang

    2014-06-01

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO, and YALINA.

  14. Electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis for controlling reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianwen; Tian, Wenda; Wu, Jie; Rutledge, Gregory C; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-01-28

    We report a method to control reaction kinetics using electrochemically responsive heterogeneous catalysis (ERHC). An ERHC system should possess a hybrid structure composed of an electron-conducting porous framework coated with redox-switchable catalysts. In contrast to other types of responsive catalysis, ERHC combines all the following desired characteristics for a catalysis control strategy: continuous variation of reaction rates as a function of the magnitude of external stimulus, easy integration into fixed-bed flow reactors, and precise spatial and temporal control of the catalyst activity. Herein we first demonstrate a facile approach to fabricating a model ERHC system that consists of carbon microfibers with conformal redox polymer coating. Second, using a Michael reaction whose kinetics depends on the redox state of the redox polymer catalyst, we show that use of different electrochemical potentials permits continuous adjustment of the reaction rates. The dependence of the reaction rate on the electrochemical potential generally agrees with the Nernstian prediction, with minor discrepancies due to the multilayer nature of the polymer film. Additionally, we show that the ERHC system can be employed to manipulate the shape of the reactant concentration-time profile in a batch reactor through applying customized potential-time programs. Furthermore, we perform COMSOL simulation for an ERHC-integrated flow reactor, demonstrating highly flexible manipulation of reactant concentrations as a function of both location and time.

  15. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position, and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  17. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  18. Perspectives on reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Haskin, F.E.; Camp, A.L.

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1957-10-15

    Gas-cooled solid-moderator type reactors wherein the fissionable fuel and moderator materials are each in the form of solid pebbles, or discrete particles, and are substantially homogeneously mixed in the proper proportion and placed within the core of the reactor are described. The shape of these discrete particles must be such that voids are present between them when mixed together. Helium enters the bottom of the core and passes through the voids between the fuel and moderator particles to absorb the heat generated by the chain reaction. The hot helium gas is drawn off the top of the core and may be passed through a heat exchanger to produce steam.

  1. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein.

  2. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position,more » and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.« less

  3. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  4. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  5. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  6. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  7. THERMAL NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fenning, F.W.; Jackson, R.F.

    1957-09-24

    Nuclear reactors of the graphite moderated air cooled type in which canned slugs or rods of fissile material are employed are discussed. Such a reactor may be provided with a means for detecting dust particles in the exhausted air. The means employed are lengths of dust absorbent cord suspended in vertical holes in the shielding structure above each vertical coolant flow channel to hang in the path of the cooling air issuing from the channels, and associated spindles and drive motors for hauling the cords past detectors, such as Geiger counters, for inspecting the cords periodically. This design also enables detecting the individual channel in which a fault condition may have occurred.

  8. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Orsitto, Francesco Paolo

    2012-06-19

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  9. Modelling cometabolic biotransformation of organic micropollutants in nitrifying reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Carballa, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2014-11-15

    Cometabolism is the ability of microorganisms to degrade non-growth substrates in the presence of primary substrates, being the main removal mechanism behind the biotransformation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. In this paper, a cometabolic Monod-type kinetics, linking biotransformation of micropollutants with primary substrate degradation, was applied to a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) reactor operated under different operational conditions (hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrifying activity). A dynamic model of the bioreactor was built taking into account biotransformation, sorption and volatilization. The micropollutant transformation capacity (Tc), the half-saturation constant (Ksc) and the solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (Kd) of several organic micropollutants were estimated at 25 °C using an optimization algorithm to fit experimental data to the proposed model with the cometabolic Monod-type biotransformation kinetics. The cometabolic Monod-type kinetic model was validated under different HRTs (1.0-3.7 d) and nitrification rates (0.12-0.45 g N/g VSS d), describing more accurately the fate of those compounds affected by the biological activity of nitrifiers (ibuprofen, naproxen, erythromycin and roxithromycin) compared to the commonly applied pseudo-first order micropollutant biotransformation kinetics, which does not link biotransformation of micropollutants to consumption of primary substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to the pseudo-first order biotransformation constant (k(biol)), the proposed cometabolic kinetic coefficients are independent of operational conditions such as the nitrogen loading rate applied. Also, the influence of the kinetic parameters on the biotransformation efficiency of NAS reactors, defined as the relative amount of the total inlet micropollutant load being biotransformed, was assessed considering different HRTs and nitrification rates.

  10. Modelling cometabolic biotransformation of organic micropollutants in nitrifying reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Carballa, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2014-11-15

    Cometabolism is the ability of microorganisms to degrade non-growth substrates in the presence of primary substrates, being the main removal mechanism behind the biotransformation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. In this paper, a cometabolic Monod-type kinetics, linking biotransformation of micropollutants with primary substrate degradation, was applied to a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) reactor operated under different operational conditions (hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrifying activity). A dynamic model of the bioreactor was built taking into account biotransformation, sorption and volatilization. The micropollutant transformation capacity (Tc), the half-saturation constant (Ksc) and the solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (Kd) of several organic micropollutants were estimated at 25 °C using an optimization algorithm to fit experimental data to the proposed model with the cometabolic Monod-type biotransformation kinetics. The cometabolic Monod-type kinetic model was validated under different HRTs (1.0-3.7 d) and nitrification rates (0.12-0.45 g N/g VSS d), describing more accurately the fate of those compounds affected by the biological activity of nitrifiers (ibuprofen, naproxen, erythromycin and roxithromycin) compared to the commonly applied pseudo-first order micropollutant biotransformation kinetics, which does not link biotransformation of micropollutants to consumption of primary substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to the pseudo-first order biotransformation constant (k(biol)), the proposed cometabolic kinetic coefficients are independent of operational conditions such as the nitrogen loading rate applied. Also, the influence of the kinetic parameters on the biotransformation efficiency of NAS reactors, defined as the relative amount of the total inlet micropollutant load being biotransformed, was assessed considering different HRTs and nitrification rates. PMID:25150522

  11. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  12. Kinetics of levulinic acid and furfural production from Miscanthus × giganteus.

    PubMed

    Dussan, K; Girisuta, B; Haverty, D; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of acid hydrolysis of the cellulose and hemicellulose in Miscanthus to produce levulinic acid and furfural under mild temperature and high acid concentration. Experiments were carried out in an 8L-batch reactor with 9%-wt. biomass loading, acid concentrations between 0.10 and 0.53 M H2SO4, and at temperatures between 150 and 200°C. The concentrations of xylose, glucose, furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid were used in two mechanistic kinetic models for the prediction of the performance of ideal continuous reactors for the optimisation of levulinic acid and the concurrent production of furfural. A two-stage arrangement was found to maximise furfural in the first reactor (PFR - 185°C, 0.5M H2SO4, 27.3%-mol). A second stage leads to levulinic acid yields between 58% and 72%-mol at temperatures between 160 and 200°C.

  13. Kinetics of phenol degradation in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.H.; Lee, K.K.

    2006-06-15

    A mathematical model was developed to describe phenol degradation in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process. The model incorporates the mechanisms of diffusive mass transport and Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A pilot-scale column reactor was used to verify the model. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to determine the biokinetic parameters used in the model, while shear loss and initial thickness of biofilm were assumed so that the model simulated the substrate concentration results well. The removal efficiency for phenol was approximately 98.5% at a steady-state condition. The model accurately described the effluent substrate concentrations and the sequence of biodegradation in the reactor. The model simulations are in agreement with the experimental results. The approaches presented in this paper could be used to design full-scale anaerobic fixed-biofilm reactor systems for the biodegradation of phenolic substrates.

  14. LSENS, The NASA Lewis Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    2000-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS (the NASA Lewis kinetics and sensitivity analysis code), are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include: static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; incident-shock initiated reaction in a shock tube; and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method (LSODE, the Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations), which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reactions, is used to solve the "stiff" ordinary differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, the code uses the decoupled direct method to calculate sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters. Solution methods for the equilibrium and post-shock conditions and for perfectly stirred reactor problems are either adapted from or based on the procedures built into the NASA code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium and Applications).

  15. Kinetics of reactive wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    2000-04-14

    The importance of interfacial processes in materials joining has a long history. A significant amount of work has suggested that processes collateral to wetting can affect the extent of wetting and moderate or retard wetting rate. Even very small additions of a constituent, known to react with the substrate, cause pronounced improvement in wetting and are exploited in braze alloys, especially those used for joining to ceramics. In the following a model will be constructed for the wetting kinetics of a small droplet of metal containing a constituent that diffuses to the wetting line and chemically reacts with a flat, smooth substrate. The model is similar to that of Voitovitch et al. and Mortensen et al. but incorporates chemical reaction kinetics such that the result contains both diffusion and reaction kinetics. The model is constructed in the circular cylinder coordinate system, satisfies the diffusion equation under conditions of slow flow, and considers diffusion and reaction at the wetting line to be processes in series. This is done by solving the diffusion equation with proper initial and boundary conditions, computing the diffusive flux at the wetting line, and equating this to both the convective flux and reaction flux. This procedure is similar to equating the current flowing in components of a series circuit. The wetting rate will be computed versus time for a variety of diffusion and reaction conditions. A transition is observed from nonlinear (diffusive) to linear (reactive) behavior as the control parameters (such as the diffusion coefficient) are modified. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The adequacy of the slow flow condition, used in this type of analysis, is discussed and an amended procedure is suggested.

  16. Potassium kinetics during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Agar, Baris U; Culleton, Bruce F; Fluck, Richard; Leypoldt, John K

    2015-01-01

    Hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients is associated with high mortality, but prescription of low dialysate potassium concentrations to decrease serum potassium levels is associated with a high incidence of sudden cardiac arrest or sudden death. Improved clinical outcomes for these patients may be possible if rapid and substantial intradialysis decreases in serum potassium concentration can be avoided while maintaining adequate potassium removal. Data from kinetic modeling sessions during the HEMO Study of the dependence of serum potassium concentration on time during hemodialysis treatments and 30 minutes postdialysis were evaluated using a pseudo one-compartment model. Kinetic estimates of potassium mobilization clearance (K(M)) and predialysis central distribution volume (V(pre)) were determined in 551 hemodialysis patients. The studied patients were 58.8 ± 14.4 years of age with predialysis body weight of 72.1 ± 15.1 kg; 306 (55.4%) of the patients were female and 337 (61.2%) were black. K(M) and V(pre) for all patients were non-normally distributed with values of 158 (111, 235) (median [interquartile range]) mL/min and 15.6 (11.4, 22.8) L, respectively. K(M) was independent of dialysate potassium concentration (P > 0.2), but V(pre) was lower at higher dialysate potassium concentration (R = -0.188, P < 0.001). For patients with dialysate potassium concentration between 1.6 and 2.5 mEq/L (N = 437), multiple linear regression of K(M) and V(pre) demonstrated positive association with predialysis body weight and negative association with predialysis serum potassium concentration. Potassium kinetics during hemodialysis can be described using a pseudo one-compartment model.

  17. An HPLC chromatographic reactor approach for investigating the hydrolytic stability of a pharmaceutical compound.

    PubMed

    Skrdla, Peter J; Abrahim, Ahmed; Wu, Yan

    2006-06-01

    The solution-phase hydrolysis kinetics of the Aprepitant (Emend) prodrug, Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine, were investigated using an HPLC chromatographic reactor approach. The term 'chromatographic reactor' refers to the use of an analytical-scale column as both a flow-through reactor and, simultaneously, as separation medium for the reactant(s) and product(s). Recently, we reported a novel mathematical treatment for the kinetic data obtained from chromatographic reactors, which we believe is superior to other treatments in terms of its accuracy, robustness and ease of implementation. In this work, we demonstrate that our treatment may be applied equally well to HPLC reactors, as previously we studied only GC reactors. It is found that the hydrolysis of Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine (FD) has an apparent activation energy of 107 kJ/mol when the reaction is investigated on-column, using the gradient elution conditions of the validated HPLC impurity profile method for this compound. For comparison, the activation energy determined for the same reaction occurring in a quiescent solution consisting of a fixed ratio of acetonitrile-0.1% v/v aqueous H3PO4 (50:50, v/v) is 91 kJ/mol, calculated using direct application of the Arrhenius equation. The data presented show that, when used as a screening tool, chromatographic reactors may be feasible for use in the pharmaceutical industry to quickly gauge the relative stabilities of various compounds with similar degradation pathways. PMID:16524680

  18. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  19. Kinetics of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation into linear nanostructures, notably amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, is a common form of behaviour exhibited by a range of peptides and proteins. This process was initially discovered in the context of the aetiology of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but has recently been recognised to of general significance and has been found at the origin of a number of beneficial functional roles in nature, including as catalytic scaffolds and functional components in biofilms. This talk discusses our ongoing efforts to study the kinetics of linear protein self-assembly by using master equation approaches combined with global analysis of experimental data.

  20. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.