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Sample records for reactor program quarterly

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April- June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-09-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL} from April1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory {INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  2. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-11-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  3. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  4. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S K

    1981-04-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  5. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-03-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  6. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report January - March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. M

    1980-10-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  7. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-12-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  8. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy, and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

  9. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1982-11-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  10. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1982-07-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  11. Light water reactor safety research program. Volume 12: quarterly report, Apr-Jun 79

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program during the 2nd quarter of 1979. Specifically, the report summarizes progress in five major areas of research. They are: (1) the molten core/concrete interactions study; (2) steam explosion research phenomena; (3) statistical LOCA analysis; (4) UHI model development; (5) two-phase jet loads.

  12. Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1983-04-01

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized-water-reactor steam-generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the bahavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  13. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1983. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1983-12-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from April 1 through June 30, 1983, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior or full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including fuel rod deformation and severe fuel damage tests for the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  14. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1983. Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1984-05-01

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include investigating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway; and fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

  15. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February, and March 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release.

  16. Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S.K.

    1983-03-01

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions.

  17. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  18. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  19. Light Water Reactor Safety Technology Program. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    Information on LWR safety is presented concerning the Technology Management Center support programs; risk methods utilization; improved safety systems;man-machine interaction; safety data; and progress reports for each of the research project areas.

  20. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, J.L.

    1980-03-01

    The programs include: ultimate heat sink performance measurement; experimental verification of steady state codes: Task A - irradiation results and Task C - code development; graphite nondestructive testing; acoustic emission-flaw relationship for in-service monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels; fuel subassembly procurement and irradiation test program; report of resident engineer at Cadarache, France; core thermal model development; integration of nondestructive examination reliability and fracture mechanics; and steam generator tube integrity.

  1. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  2. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  3. Light water reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  4. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. W.D. Reece

    1999-09-01

    The University Reactor Sharing Program provides funding for reactor experimentation to institutions that do not normally have access to a research reactor. Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material to producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding also gives small colleges and universities the opportunity to use the facility for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy.

  5. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  6. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  7. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2009-01-30

    Current research projects have focused Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP) talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene, low-dose ionizing radiation (gamma and neutron) and alpha radiation from plutonium. Trichloroethylene research has been conducted as a joint collaborative effort with the University of Georgia. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Laboratory work has been completed on several trichloroethylene risk assessment projects, and these projects have been brought to a close. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the remaining trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A comprehensive manuscript on the scientific basis of trichloroethylene risk assessment is in preparation. Work on the low-dose radiation risk assessment projects is also progressing at a slowed rate as a result of funding uncertainties. It has been necessary to restructure the proponency and performance schedule of these projects, with the project on Low-Dose Radiation: Epidemiology Risk Models transferred to DOE Office of Science proponency under a separate funding instrument. Research on this project will continue under the provisions of the DOE Office of Science funding instrument, with progress reported in accordance with the requirements of that funding instrument. Progress on that project will no longer be reported in quarterly reports for DE-FC09-02CH11109. Following a meeting at the Savannah River Site on May 8, 2008, a plan was submitted for development of an epidemiological cohort study and prospective medical surveillance system for the assessment of disease rates among workers at the Savannah River

  9. University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    W.D. Reese

    2004-02-24

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center.

  10. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program (NERI) Quarterly Progress Report; New Design Equations for Swelling and Irradiation Creep in Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W G; Surh, M P; Garner, F A; Chrzan, D C; Schaldach, C; Sturgeon, J B

    2003-02-13

    The objectives of this research project are to significantly extend the theoretical foundation and the modeling of radiation-induced microstructural changes in structural materials used in Generation IV nuclear reactors, and to derive from these microstructure models the constitutive laws for void swelling, irradiation creep and stress-induced swelling, as well as changes in mechanical properties. The need for the proposed research is based on three major developments and advances over the past two decades. First, new experimental discoveries have been made on void swelling and irradiation creep which invalidate previous theoretical models and empirical constitutive laws for swelling and irradiation creep. Second, recent advances in computational methods and power make it now possible to model the complex processes of microstructure evolution over long-term neutron exposures. Third, it is now required that radiation-induced changes in structural materials over extended lifetimes be predicted and incorporated in the design of Generation IV reactors. Our approach to modeling and data analysis is a dual one in accord with both the objectives to simulate the evolution of the microstructure and to develop design equations for macroscopic properties. Validation of the models through data analysis is therefore carried out at both the microscopic and the macroscopic levels. For the microstructure models, we utilize the transmission electron microscopy results from steels irradiated in reactors and from model materials irradiated by neutrons as well as ion bombardments. The macroscopic constitutive laws will be tested and validated by analyzing density data, irradiation creep data, diameter changes of fuel elements, and post-irradiation tensile data. Validation of both microstructure models and macroscopic constitutive laws is a more stringent test of the internal consistency of the underlying science for radiation effects in structural materials for nuclear reactors.

  11. Calorimetry exchange program quarterly data report, fourth quarter CY92

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, T.M.

    1992-12-31

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) discuss measurement differences (2) review and improve analytical measurements and methods (3) discuss new measurement capabilities (4) provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper- receiver differences (5) provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants (6) provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis A sample Of PUO2 powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. The data report includes summary tables for each measurement and charts showing the performance of each laboratory. Comparisons are made to the accepted values for the exchange sample and to data previously reported by that laboratory. This information is presented, in the form of quarterly reports as this document provides and as annual reports, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.

  12. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2008-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  13. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  14. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2007-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative

  15. Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction. Seventh quarterly report for the period 1 April--30 June 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1993-08-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of Optimization of Reactor Configuration in Coal Liquefaction during the period April 1 - June 30, 1993, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1993 and has been extended to December 31, 1993. The overall objective of the program is to achieve a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillates product slate at reduced cost of about $25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Support, Laboratory Scale Operations, Technical Assessment, and Project Management.

  16. Oak Ridge Research Reactor quarterly report, April, May, and June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, S.S. III; Lance, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The ORR operated at an average power level of 29.8 MW for 90.7% of the time during April, May, and June 1981. The reactor was shut down on eight occasions, one of which was unscheduled. Reactor downtime needed for refueling, maintenance, and checks was normal, with the reactor remaining available for operation 91.6% of the time. Maintenance activities, both mechanical and instrument, were essentially routine in nature. In-service inspection completed during the quarter is described.

  17. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    SciTech Connect

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-02-14

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given.

  18. New Production Reactors Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Part I of this New Production Reactors (NPR) Program Plan: describes the policy basis of the NPR Program; describes the mission and objectives of the NPR Program; identifies the requirements that must be met in order to achieve the mission and objectives; and describes and assesses the technology and siting options that were considered, the Program's preferred strategy, and its rationale. The implementation strategy for the New Production Reactors Program has three functions: Linking the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities to policies requirements, and the process for selecting options. The development of an implementation strategy ensures that activities and procedures are consistent with the rationale and analysis underlying the Program. Organization of the Program. The strategy establishes plans, organizational structure, procedures, a budget, and a schedule for carrying out the Program. By doing so, the strategy ensures the clear assignment of responsibility and accountability. Management and monitoring of the Program. Finally, the strategy provides a basis for monitoring the Program so that technological, cost, and scheduling issues can be addressed when they arise as the Program proceeds. Like the rest of the Program Plan, the Implementation Strategy is a living document and will be periodically revised to reflect both progress made in the Program and adjustments in plans and policies as they are made. 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Program status 3. quarter -- FY 1990: Confinement systems programs

    SciTech Connect

    1990-07-24

    Highlights of the DIII-D Research Operations task are: completed five weeks tokamak operations; initiated summer vent; achievement of 10.7% beta; carried out first dimensionless transport scaling experiment; completed IBW program; demonstrated divertor heat reduction with gas puffing; field task proposals presented to OFE; presentation of DIII-D program to FPAC; made presentation to Admiral Watkins; and SAN safety review. Summaries are given on research programs, operations, program development, hardware development, operations support and collaborative efforts. Brief summaries of progress on the International Cooperation task include: TORE SUPRA, ASDEX, JFT-2M, and JET. Funding for work on CIT physics was received this quarter. Several physics R and D planning tasks were initiated. Earlier in FY90, a poloidal field coil shaping system (PFC) was found for DIGNITOR. This quarter more detailed analysis has been done to optimize the design of the PFC system.

  20. Physics of reactor safety. Quarterly report, July-September 1980. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This Quarterly progress report summarizes work done during the months of July-September 1980 in Argonne National Laboratory's Applied Physics and Components Technology Divisions for the Division of Reactor Safety Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work in the Applied Physics Division includes reports on reactor safety modeling and assessment by members of the Reactor Safety Appraisals Section. Work on reactor core thermal-hydraulics is performed in ANL's Components Technology Division, emphasizing 3-dimensional code development for LMFBR accidents under natural convection conditions. An executive summary is provided including a statement of the findings and recommendations of the report.

  1. ORNL breeder reactor safety quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, M H; Wantland, J L

    1981-01-01

    Six tasks are reported upon: THORS (Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety) program, environmental assessment of alternate FBR fuels, model evaluation of breeder reactor radioactivity releases, nuclear safety information center activities, breeder reactor reliability data analysis center activities, and central data base for breeder reactor safety codes. (DLC)

  2. Stockpile Management Program quarterly report. 2. quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this program is to ensure the safety and reliability of the enduring nuclear weapons stockpile by: (1) maintaining robust nuclear facilities that comprise the infrastructure needed to conduct the various laboratory programs; (2) maintaining capabilities and qualified personnel needed to successfully implement the Program and ensure availability of competencies; (3) meeting present and future production and surveillance requirements to support the enduring stockpile and other programmatic deliverables; and (4) capturing and maintaining expertise and competency in the processes and technologies required to build a complete physics package. Summaries of accomplishments are presented for approximately 30 projects managed under this program.

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  4. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - First Quarter 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-22

    The first quarter 2010 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT - OCTOBER 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program provides credible performance data for commercial-ready environmental technologies to speed their implementation for the benefit of vendors, purchasers, permitters, and the public. The ETV Quarterly Reports provide...

  6. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - Fourth Quarter 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2009-12-31

    The Fourth Quarter 2009 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT - OCTOBER 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program provides credible performance data for commercial-ready environmental technologies to speed their implementation for the benefit of vendors, purchasers, permitters, and the public. The ETV Quarterly Reports provide...

  8. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs.

  9. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-04

    The objectives of the EHAP program are to: Develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management and risk communication; Develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and; Identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter of year two (January-March, 1994) of the grant. To better accomplish objectives, grant efforts are organized into three major elements: The Crossroads of Humanity Series; Research, Science and Education Programs; and Program Management. The Crossroads of Humanity Series charted a new course, incorporating lessons learned during previous quarters into a series of programs designed to address environmental issues in a real world setting. Reports are included on the various research programs with milestones and deliverables from the third quarter.

  10. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  11. Engineering development of slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) technology. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Toseland, B.A.

    1997-12-31

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors. Progress is summarized.

  12. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance.

  13. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report describes activities and reports on progress for the second quarter (October 93 - December 93) of the second year of the grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). It reports progress against grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant.

  14. Engineering development of slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) technology. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Progress is summarized for the following tasks: Task 2 -- Component diagnostics development; Task 3 -- Model selection and development; Task 4 -- SBCR experimental program; and Task 6 -- Data processing.

  15. Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Quarterly report, fourth quarter, October 1-December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The document contains environmental compliance data collected in the fourth quarter of 1991, contents of reports on compliance data submitted to regulatory agencies, and supplemental analytical results from retorted shale pile runoff water collected following a storm event during the third quarter of 1991.

  16. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  17. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  18. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  19. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  20. Environmental surveillance program. Quarterly progress report, July--September, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.W.; Hall, L.F.; Downs, J.

    1996-02-01

    This report contains data developed from monitoring site measurements and laboratory analyses of environmental samples that were collected during the period of July-September, 1993. Because some laboratory procedures are lengthy and could adversely affect the desired timeliness of reports, results of some analyses from this time period will be included in the next quarterly report. Quarterly reports, then, will be routine periodic documents that present continually updated information concerning the potential presence of environmental contaminants in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During the third calendar quarter of 1993, Environmental Surveillance Program (ESP) measurements did not reveal unexpected levels of contaminants in any environmental samples measured or analyzed. Most of the results reported in this document are related to off-site air and ground water measurements. Future reports will include results of monitoring at additional locations and for additional environmental materials. Annual reports from the ESP will contain data generated during the previous four calendar quarters, and will display measurement trends for various combinations of locations, contaminants and environmental media. The annual report will also include more interpretive material and discussions than will normally be found in quarterly reports.

  1. N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    This N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan is structured to provide the basic methodology required to place N Reactor and supporting facilities {center_dot} in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition such that they can be decommissioned at a later date. Deactivation will be in accordance with facility transfer criteria specified in Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidance. Transition activities primarily involve shutdown and isolation of operational systems and buildings, radiological/hazardous waste cleanup, N Fuel Basin stabilization and environmental stabilization of the facilities. The N Reactor Deactivation Program covers the period FY 1992 through FY 1997. The directive to cease N Reactor preservation and prepare for decommissioning was issued by DOE to WHC on September 20, 1991. The work year and budget data supporting the Work Breakdown Structure in this document are found in the Activity Data Sheets (ADS) and the Environmental Restoration Program Baseline, that are prepared annually.

  2. Defense programs occurrence analysis report for third quarter CY-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The quarterly Defense Programs Occurrence Analysis Report (DPOAR) is compiled by the Office of Self-Assessment and Emergency Management (DP-9). It utilizes the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) data to assess the quality and effectiveness of the reporting process and the significance of the occurrences. In addition, areas where further improvement and corrective actions are necessary is fully demonstrated by an analysis of the data. The results of the assessment may also be used as the basis for conducting other evaluations such as the diagnostic and augmented evaluations. This quarterly report provides feedback to DOE/DP and contractor management to improve the control of operations and achieve a higher standard of excellence. The report analyzes one year of ORPS data at the end of each calendar quarter, therefore, the performance of DP Field Offices and facilities will be continuously compared to their past quarter and yearly performances. During this assessment from 1 October 1990 through 30 September 1991, there were a number of initiatives that were undertaken by Field Office management to improve the overall performance and the quality of the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System. These initiatives include the training of their staff for self-assessment activities. These intiatives can be found in the programs implemented according to the DOE Conduct of Operations and Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information Orders. These initiatives were found to be, based on the ORPS data, stronger at Albuquerque, Nevada, Oak Ridge Field Offices and Richland DP facilities.

  3. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    BOWEN, W.W.

    1999-11-08

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This document reflects the 1 Oct 1999 baseline.

  4. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-01-12

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FETF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This revision reflects the 19 Oct 1999 baseline.

  5. Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Quarterly report, third quarter, July 1-September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-30

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The document contains nine compliance reports and results of comprehensive and supplemental environmental monitoring conducted during the third quarter of 1991.

  6. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  9. Oil shale programs. Sixteenth quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A. L.

    1980-06-01

    This document is the sixteenth in a continuing series of quarterly reports, and describes the Sandia National Laboratories oil shale activities during the period between October 1, 1979 and December 31, 1979. Sandia's major responsibility to the DOE in situ oil shale program is to provide a quantitative evaluation to DOE of the various field projects being supported by DOE in the development of commercial in situ oil shale processes. This requires the deployment of instrumentation systems and analysis techniques to evaluate key procedures and operations. In order to fulfill this responsibility, it is necessary to develop new and advanced instrumentation systems and associated deployment, recording and analysis techniques that are unique to the field projects. In addition, a rock mechanics program provides material properties, material response models, and computational methods to support the design and evaluation functions. This report describes detailed activities in these project areas over the last quarter.

  10. Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2004-12-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  11. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-06-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation s need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

  12. Second Quarter Report Environmental Biosciences Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2002-10-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  13. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2003-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  14. Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.

    2003-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  15. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-01

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  16. FY 80 heavy oil program. First quarterly report, January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.; Wayland, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    Evaluation testing of packers and computational analysis of well bore insulation for heavy oil steam recovery injection wells have been investigated this quarter. An experimental program to measure downhole steam quality is under development. Initial examination of the application of the DOE downhole steam generator program to heavy oil reservoirs has commenced. The examination of alternate extraction concepts of heavy oil has been initiated. An overburden replacement technique was evaluated both computationally and in a laboratory scale experiment. Microwave heating and in situ hydrogenation are being analyzed.

  17. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program.

  18. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D. )

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  19. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D. )

    1992-10-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

  20. Space reactor power system programs overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1992-01-01

    The present development history and current development status evaluation of space reactor power system technologies gives attention to subsystem and component readiness and performance, and assesses the technology data base available in each case. This data base characterization gives attention to the most compatible reactor-power conversion system combinations for prospective DOD and commercial missions, as well as NASA missions. Candidate systems for near, middle, and far term application are selected and prioritized on the basis of technical risk. The programs covered encompass SNAPs 1, 2, 8, and 10A, SNAP 50, and SP-100.

  1. SERI biofuels program. Quarterly technical report, second and third quarters, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, S.R.; Lowenstein, M.Z.; McIntosh, R.P.

    1985-07-01

    Highlights of progress accomplished during the second and third quarters of FY 1985 in the areas of aquatic species, anaerobic digestion and photobiological hydrogen production research are summarized. The following accomplishments were attained in aquatic species research: evaluation of the growth of marine species in desert saline waters; preliminary evaluation of potential gains in productivity from utilization of light modulation; determined the relationship between the initial carbohydrate accumulation and subsequent lipid synthesis in Ankistrodesmus; completed designs and analysis of three outdoor systems; completed evaluations on the use of immobilized systems for the production of fuels; completed economic and technical evaluation of two harvesting schemes for microalgae; and completed evaluation of macroalgal production concepts and submit research plan. In the area of anaerobic digestion research, the following tasks were accomplished: received final report on autohydrolysis; received final report on genetic engineering of methanogens; completed computerized data based on commercial anaerobic digesters; completed analysis of anaerobic digestion for energy and submitted draft white paper to DOE program managers; and made presentations on ''Anaerobic Digestion for Energy'' and ''Potential for Improvement of Anaerobic Digestion Technology'' to DOE program managers. In photobiological hydrogen production, program wrap-up was completed and a final draft of the program report was submitted.

  2. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-31

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards, both chemical and radiation, on the health and well-being of all; (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes the progress made this quarter in the following areas: public and professional outreach; science programs; clinical programs; and information support and access systems.

  3. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-31

    This report describes activities and reports on progress for the first quarter (July--September) of the fourth year of the grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) at the Medical University of South Carolina. It reports progress against the grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. The objectives of EHAP stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health-oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

  4. Calorimetry exchange program quarterly data report, 2nd quarter CY93

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are to: discuss measurement differences; review and improve analytical measurements and methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the exchange for analysis. The data report includes summary tables for each measurement and charts showing the performance of each laboratory. Comparisons are made to the accepted values for the exchange sample and to data previously reported by that laboratory. This information is presented, in the form of quarterly and annual reports, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods.

  5. DOE Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) Third Quarter FY 2001 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, L.S.

    2001-09-17

    The Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) retrieved 69 packaging- or transportation-related occurrences from the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) during the period from April 1 through June 30, 2001. Only those incidents that occur in preparation for transport, during transport, and during unloading of hazardous material are considered as packaging- or transportation-related occurrences. Other incidents with packaging and transportation (P and T) significance but not involving hazardous material (such as vehicle accidents or empty packagings) are not rated to the SMIP criteria, but are archived in the SMIP Subsidiary Database of occurrences, a sub-database of the main SMIP P and T Occurrence Database. Fifty-one of the originally-selected 69 occurrences were appropriate for classification to the SMIP criteria, 26 of which have offsite applicability. Eight of the original 69 reports are archived in a subsidiary database because they either do not involve the transport of hazardous material or they do not involve transport by vehicle, plane, boat, or rail. The others were either deleted because more thorough review revealed that they were not strictly related to P and T or they were canceled by the reporting site and removed from the ORPS. The number and severity of the selected occurrence reports (ORs) are similar with historical reporting. No adverse trends were pronounced. However, when the number of ORs obtained during the third quarter are combined with those obtained during the first and second quarters, it appears that there may be a slight increase over the 150 P and T-related ORs that are typically retrieved from the ORPS annually. On the other hand, the severity of the ORs continues to be non-alarming. None of the 51 ORs that were rated had event consequence measures (WEC) greater than 2, 31 of which were categorized as having a WEC of 1. This means that all of the third quarter fiscal year (FY) 2001 ORs had only slight consequences at

  6. ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY, A SUGGESTED TWO-YEAR POST-HIGH-SCHOOL PROGRAM. SIX-QUARTER PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOBROVOLNY, JERRY S.

    THIS REPORT OUTLINES A 2-YEAR ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ADJUSTED FROM A 4-SEMESTER TO A 6-QUARTER SEQUENCE. IT DESCRIBES THE PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE AND THE DESIRABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FACULTY AND STUDENTS. IT GIVES THE CURRICULUM AND DETAILED COURSE OUTLINES FOR ALL PHASES OF THE PROGRAM AND FOR THE SUPPORTIVE STUDIES…

  7. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  8. A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. ERIP/DOE quarterly report no. 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Moelhman, M.; Butters, R.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (pentosans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During quarters 3 and 4, we have completed a literature survey on cellulase production, activated one strain of Trichoderma reesei. We continued developing our proprietary Steep Delignification (SD) process for biomass pretreatment. Some problems with fermentations were traces to bad cellulase enzyme. Using commercial cellulase enzymes from Solvay & Genecor, SSF experiments with wheat straw showed 41 g/L ethanol and free xylose of 20 g/L after completion of the fermentation. From corn stover, we noted 36 g/L ethanol production from the cellulose fraction of the biomass, and 4 g/L free xylose at the completion of the SSF. We also began some work with paper mill sludge as a cellulose source, and in some preliminary experiments obtained 23 g/L ethanol during SSF of the sludge. During year 2, a 130 L process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation.

  9. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, April-June 1982. Volume 22

    SciTech Connect

    1983-10-01

    Overall objective of this work is to provide NRC a comprehensive data base essential to (1) defining key safety issues, (2) understanding risk-significant accident sequences, (3) developing and verifying models used in safety assessments, and (4) assuring the public that power reactor systems will not be licensed and placed in commercial service in the United States without appropriate consideration being given to their effects on health and safety. This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents, and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  10. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study. Progress report, December 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ``modest`` extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

  11. Quarterly Program Progress Report April 1, 2002-June 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31

    DOE B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Quarterly Program Progress Report The DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program continues to provide, on a year round basis, a broad spectrum of medical care to the DOE patient population. During the fourth quarter of Year 4, the following medical services were provided: (1) Annual medical examinations for the DOE patient population (see Exhibit 1 for details). (2) Medications for the DOE patient population. (3) Preventive and primary medical care to the DOE patient population in the RMI as time and resources permit. (4) Additional manpower for the outpatient clinics at Ebeye and Majuro Hospitals (see Exhibit 2 for details). (5) Ancillary services such as labs, radiology and pharmacy in coordination with Kwajalein Hospital, Majuro Hospital and the 177 Health Care Program (177 HCP). (6) Referrals to Ebeye Hospital, Majuro Hospital and Kwajalein Hospital as necessary. (7) Referrals to Straub Clinic and Hospital in Honolulu as necessary (for details see Exhibit 1). (8) Monitored and adjusted monthly annual examination schedules based on equipment failure at Kwajalein. In addition to the above, the program was also involved in the following activities during this quarter: (1) Organized and conducted continuing medical education (CME) talks for the program's RMI staff and other RMI healthcare workers. (2) Held meetings with RMI government officials and Local Atoll government officials. (3) Input past medical records into the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system. (4) Made adjustments to and created more templates for the EMR system. (5) Coordinated with the Public Health Departments on Majuro and Ebeye. (6) Met with PEACESAT to discuss possible collaboration on high speed Internet access. (7) Looked for opportunities to expand the program's telehealth capabilities. (8) Participated in the DOE-RMI Meeting in Honolulu. (9) Finalized the agreement with the RMI Ministry of Health and

  12. Calorimetry Exchange Program Quarterly Data Report, 4th Quarter CY91

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, T.M.

    1996-07-01

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.

  13. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology: Final quarterly technical progress no. 2, 1 July - 30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Toseland, B.A.; Tischer, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  14. Quarterly Report, Dec. 1, 1999-Feb. 29, 2000, Novel, Integrated Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Paramono, D.V.

    2000-03-29

    The basic core design requirements were defined in the previous reporting period. During the second quarter, several series of neutronic calculations were performed. Monte Carlo BOL (Beginning-of-Life) simulations were performed to evaluate the impact of various design alternatives on key core parameters. Fuel design alternatives that were examined by these studies included: fuel form (oxide, carbide and nitride) (note that due to the AMTEC high temperature requirement, metal fuel was eliminated from further considerations); fissile fuel content, and fuel rod and lattice pitch. The key neutronic parameters that were compared include: core reactivity, neutron spectrum, fast neutron flux and projected lifetime fast fluence (E > 0.1 MeV), and material damage indicator, dpa (displacement-per-atom) and dpa rate. These analyses indicated that the fast neutron fluence will probably be the most limiting factor, with estimated fast fluence ranging between 3 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} and up to 9 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}, depending on the fuel characteristics. Therefore, different fuel forms were examined and the projected fast fluence and dpa compared. Using MOX fuel results in the highest fast fluence and dpa, about 10% higher than for the carbide or nitride fuel. The nitride fuel leads to the lowest dpa, for the same reactor power density, up to {approx} 4% and {approx} 7% lower than for the carbide and MOX fuel, respectively.

  15. The Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program Fourth Quarter 2000 (October thru December 2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-08-02

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during fourth quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program.

  16. FY 80 Tar Sands Program first quarterly report, January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.; Wayland, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    Research and development efforts in support of the Tar Sands program well completions and stimulation subactivity and new and novel concepts task have been initiated. The objectives of the well completion and stimulation efforts are to carry out research and development in areas with significant for long-range tar sand extraction development as well as provide potential interaction and support of the near-term tar sand field experiments. Evaluation testing of packers and computational analysis of well bore insulation for tar sands steam recovery injection wells have been investigated this quarter. Production well completions for the tar sand steam drive experiment have been examined, and a program to measure downhole steam quality in the experiment is under development. Initial examination of the application of the DOE downhole steam generator program to tar sand reservoirs has commenced. The examination of new and novel concepts for extraction of tar sands has been initiated. An overburden replacement technique was evaluated both computationally and in a laboratory scale experiment. Analyses of both microwave heating and in situ hydrogenation are being initiated.

  17. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-30

    The objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) stated in the proposal to DOE are to: develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter (January--March) of the third year of the grant. It reports progress against these grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. Questions, comments, or requests for further information concerning the activities under this grant can be forwarded to Jack Davis in the EHAP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (803) 727-6450.

  18. Program status. 2nd quarter - FY 1995. Confinement systems programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-18

    We conducted physics experiments: record normalized {Beta} = 4.9 achieved in VH-mode, {Beta} limits of ITER-like configurations evaluated, FWCD commissioning. The tokamak vessel was opened to atmosphere for six weeks and a number of key diagnostics for understanding the divertor were installed. The DIII-D Advisory Committee met in January to review the DIII-D program and plan. They commended us for recent progress and supported the vanadium divertor design. The U.S./Japan DIII-D steering committee met and recommended extending the agreement to the year 2000. The field work proposal for FY 96/97 was presented in Washington on March 29, 1995. A review of the DIII-D plan to install vanadium structural components as part of the new radiative divertor modification was held in Washington 31, 1995 and the panel endorsed the plans. Preliminary plans were developed with PPPL for collaborations in FY96,

  19. Program status 3. quarter -- FY 1994: Confinement systems programs

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-19

    Highlights of the DIII-D Research Operations are: began experimental research operations; successfully passed radiative divertor project review; presented papers at PSI, Diagnostics, and EPS meetings and prepared IAEA synopses; new computer speeds up data acquisition; completed installation of FWCD antennas with Faraday shields; and completed report of radiative divertor preliminary design with review committee. Summaries are given for progress in research programs; operations; mechanical engineering; electrical engineering; upgrade project; operations support; and collaborative efforts. Brief summaries are given for progress on the International Cooperation task which include JET, ASDEX, TEXTOR, TORE SUPRA, JAERI, TRINTI, T-10, and ARIES support. The work in support of the development plan for the TPX (Tokamak Physics Experiment) goals and milestones continued. Progress in improving on existing models and codes leading to improved understanding of experiments is given. Highlights from the User Service Center are: 18 gigabytes of disks were purchased for exclusive fusion use; a Hewlett-Packard 9000 Series 800 T500 computer was selected as the fusion complete server; the first VAX was removed from the USC cluster; security vulnerability on HP VUE software was corrected; and a cleanup script was developed for the NERSC Cray system. A list of personnel and their assignments is given for the ITER Design Engineering task.

  20. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  1. The Savannah River site`s groundwater monitoring program: second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1997-11-01

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1997, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. A detailed explanation of the flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1997 are included in this report.

  2. DOE reactor-pumped laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felty, James R.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; McArthur, David A.; Pickard, Paul S.

    1994-05-01

    FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1271, 1733, 1792, 2032, 2630, 2650, and 3370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. A ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth's shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night. The compact size and self-contained power also makes an RPL very suitable for ship basing so that power-beaming activities could be situated around the globe. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, wide-area deposition of diamond- like coatings, and 3-D ceramic lithography.

  3. DOE reactor-pumped laser program

    SciTech Connect

    Felty, J.R.; Lipinski, R.J.; McArthur, D.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1993-12-31

    FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1271, 1733, 1792, 2032, 2630, 2650, and 3370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. A ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night. The compact size and self-contained power also makes an RPL very suitable for ship basing so that power-beaming activities could be situated around the globe. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, wide-area deposition of diamond-like coatings, and 3-D ceramic lithography.

  4. A program toward a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebut, P.-H.; Watkins, M. L.; Gambier, D. J.; Boucher, D.

    1991-08-01

    Near breakeven conditions have been attained in the JET tokamak [Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)], with beryllium as the first-wall material. A fusion triple product (nDτETi) of 8-9×1020 m-3 sec keV has been reached (within a factor of 8 of that required in a fusion reactor). However, this has only been achieved transiently. At high heating powers, an influx of impurities still limits the achievement of better performance and steady-state operation. In parallel, an improved quantitative understanding of fusion plasmas has emerged from the development of a particular plasma model. Good quantitative agreement is obtained between the model and JET data. The main predictions are also consistent with statistical scaling laws. With such a model, a predictive capability begins to emerge to define the parameters and operating conditions of a DEMO, including impurity levels. Present experimental results and model predictions suggest that impurity dilution is a major threat to a reactor. A divertor concept must be developed further to ensure impurity control before a DEMO can be constructed. A New Phase for JET is planned in which an axisymmetric pumped divertor configuration will be used to address the problems of impurity control, plasma fueling, and helium ash exhaust. It should demonstrate a concept of impurity control and the operational domain for such a device. A single Next Step facility (ITER) is a high risk strategy in terms of physics, technology, and management, since it does not provide a sufficiently sound foundation for a DEMO. A Next Step program is proposed, which could comprise several complementary facilities, each optimized with respect to specific clear objectives. In a minimum program, there could be two Next Step tokamaks, and a Materials Test Facility. Such a program would allow division of effort and sharing of risk across the various scientific and technical problems, permit cross comparison, and ensure continuity of results. It could even be

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 2, Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  7. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-09-30

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs.

  8. Advanced turbine systems program. Quarterly report, February 1--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Allison continued progress on the following tasks during this quarter: (distributed generation) market study, GFATS system definition and analysis, Castcool{trademark} blade technology demonstration, low emissions combustion system, ceramic vane design and evaluation, and program management.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  10. Physics of reactor safety. Quarterly report, October-December 1980. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The work in the Applied Physics Division includes reports on reactor safety modeling and assessment by members of the Reactor Safety Appraisals Section. Work on reactor core thermal-hydraulics is performed in ANL's Components Technology Division, emphasizing 3-dimensional code development for LMFBR accidents under natural convection conditions.

  11. Physics of reactor safety. Volume II. Quarterly report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The work in the Applied Physics Division includes reports on reactor safety modeling and assessment by members of the Reactor Safety Appraisals Section. Work on reactor core thermal-hydraulics is performed in ANL's Components Technology Division, emphasizing 3-dimensional code development for LMFBR accidents under natural convection conditions.

  12. Physics of reactor safety. Quarterly report, January-March 1980. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The work in the Applied Physics Division includes reports on reactor safety modeling and assessment by members of the Reactor Safety Appraisals Section. Work on reactor core thermal-hydraulics is performed in ANL's Components Technology Division, emphasizing 3-dimensional code development for LMFBR accidents under natural convection conditions.

  13. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  14. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, First Quarter 1996, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1996-10-22

    This report summarizes the Savanna River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by EPD/EMS during the first quarter 1996. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program. It also provides a record of the program`s activities and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  15. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. First quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  16. Advanced reactor development: The LMR integral fast reactor program at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor technology for the 21st Century must develop with characteristics that can now be seen to be important for the future, quite different from the things when the fundamental materials and design choices for present reactors were made in the 1950s. Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 3 figs.

  17. FY 1991 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office: Work plan and quarterly reports, first and second quarter reports

    SciTech Connect

    1991-05-01

    The work carried out on behalf of the DOE by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to stat and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. This document contains the Work Plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

  18. FY 1991 environmental research programs for the DOE Field Office, Nevada: Work plan and quarterly reports, fourth quarter report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This research includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which required DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. In accordance with specific contract requirements for each activity, DRI will produce summary, status and final reports and, in some cases, journal articles which will present the results of specific research efforts. This document contains the work plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

  19. Energy programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, is engaged in developing energy resource, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the US Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va.

  20. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Fourth Quarter 1999 (October through December 1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    2000-10-12

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Savannah River site during fourth quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official records of the analytical results.

  1. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Second Quarter 2000 (April through June 2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-04-17

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  2. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Third Quarter 2000 (July through September 2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dukes, M.D.

    2001-05-02

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during third quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  3. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Third Quarter 1999 (July through September 1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    2000-09-05

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program during the third quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  4. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 2000 (January through March 2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dukes, M.

    2000-11-16

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during first quarter 2000. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  5. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 1998 (January through March 1998)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-05-26

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Savannah River Site during first quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  6. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Second Quarter 1998 (April through June 1998)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J B

    1999-02-10

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for the program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  7. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program Third Quarter 1998 (July through September 1998)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-05-10

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during third quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program second quarter 1999 (April through June 1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-16

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 1999 (January through March 1999)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-08

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  11. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    only installation to report a maneuver range evaluation. Ft. Stewart was the only installation to report conducting base camp evaluations this quarter...and Ft. Stewart reported that they conducted base camp evaluations. Hearing Conservation: Hearing conservation services are geared toward the

  12. Electric and hybrid vehicle program: Site operator program. Quarterly progress report, April--June, 1994 (3rd quarter of FY-1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1994-10-01

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three major activity categories; advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized. This third quarter report (FY-94) will include a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now included.

  13. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995 (first quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1996-03-01

    This is the Site Operator Program quarterly report for USDOE electric and hybrid vehicle research. Its mission now includes the three major activity categories of advancement of electric vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 11 Site Operator Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of the site operators totals about 250 vehicles. The individual fleets are summarized.

  14. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1993-02-04

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Table 1 lists those well series with constituents in the groundwater above Flag 2 during third quarter 1992, organized by location. Results from all laboratory analyses are used to generate this table. Specific conductance and pH data from the field also are included in this table.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.; Busby, Jeremy; Hallbert, Bruce; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Smith, Curtis; Barnard, Cathy

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  17. NASA-EPA automotive thermal reactor technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Hibbard, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The status of the NASA-EPA automotive thermal reactor technology program is summarized. This program is concerned primarily with materials evaluation, reactor design, and combustion kinetics. From engine dynamometer tests of candidate metals and coatings, two ferritic iron alloys (GE 1541 and Armco 18-SR) and a nickel-base alloy (Inconel 601) offer promise for reactor use. None of the coatings evaluated warrant further consideration. Development studies on a ceramic thermal reactor appear promising based on initial vehicle road tests. A chemical kinetic study has shown that gas temperatures of at least 900 K to 1000 K are required for the effective cleanup of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, but that higher temperatures require shorter combustion times and thus may permit smaller reactors.

  18. Quarterly report on program cost and schedule; First quarter FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This report is intended to provide a summary of the cost and schedule performance for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Historical and current cost profiles (extracted from the DOE Financial Information System) are presented for each of the major program elements. Also included in this report are the reference program schedule, the status of near-term program milestones and the status of the Nuclear Waste Fund revenues and disbursements. This report includes data through December 1990.

  19. Heat source technology program. Quarterly report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1993-10-01

    This quarterly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  20. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary, 1 March through 31 May 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    During this quarter further investigations of alternative designs for the Lincoln Training System LTS-4 project's features and subsystems continued. Software efforts proceeded concurrently in three areas: 1) system architecture, monitor, and input/output programs; 2) a new version of the Lincoln Terminal Language, LTL-2; and 3) programs to apply…

  1. OSU Reactor Sharing Program FY 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    This is the annual report of the activities supported under the Oregon State University Reactor Sharing Program, award number DE-FG06-NE38137. The beginning date for the award was September, 30, 1995 and the end date was September 29, 1996. Work conducted under this award is internally administered at the Radiation Center through a project tasking system. This allows for excellent quality control for the work which is performed from the point of initial contact, through the reactor application, project report generation and financial accounting. For the current fiscal year, FY95, the total cost of the reactor sharing program, including Radiation Center contributions, was $66,323.20 of which $40,000.00 was supplied by the DOE Reactor Sharing Program. The details of individual project costs is given in Table 1. The work performed for the individual projects are described in the brief work descriptions given in Table 2.

  2. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1993-08-01

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-17

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the fourth quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  4. EPA`s overview of the Acid Rain Program`s emissions tracking system (ETS) quarterly report process

    SciTech Connect

    Wockenfuss, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Program`s Emission Tracking System (ETS) was developed to collect, quality assure and publish the monitored and sampled emissions data collected and reported by the electric utility industry. Data are collected from fossil-fuel burning electrical generating stations that are affected by the Acid Rain Program. Since its operational start in 1993 the ETS and the data collection that surrounds it, the quarterly report process, has evolved to handle the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) increased expectations of quarterly report data quality. The quarterly report process that supports the ETS provides utilities with multiple data submission options. It also provides software tools so that utilities can perform their own data assessment. This paper highlights the quarterly report process and the systems that are at the center of that process. It also analyzes utility performance relating to their 1995 and 1996 quarterly data reports and previews how the EPA`s quarterly report process will evolve over the next year.

  5. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) ProgramQuarterly Review Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Phillips, Jason J.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-12-05

    On November 9 and 10, 2011 the IDCA had the annual quarterly meeting. The meeting started the afternoon of the first day with a tour of the NSWC IHD explosives safety testing and analysis facilities. The meeting on the second day addressed the formal sponsor review and further technical issues for the IDCA. Examination of the IHD equipment during the tour, lead to a long discussion on liquid test methods. The discussion resulted in revision of liquid test methods in the impact test and selection of a new liquid test standard. In addition, modifications to friction, spark and thermal test methods were discussed.

  6. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report for July through September 1994 (Fourth quarter of fiscal year 1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the US. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned, except for two Griffon vans. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: advancement of electric vehicle technologies; development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. The ultimate thrust of program activities varies among sites, reflecting not only the Operator`s business interests but also geographic and climate-related operating conditions. This fourth quarter report (FY-94) includes a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now found in Appendix A.

  7. Quarterly report on program cost and schedule, third quarter FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-10-01

    This report is intended to provide a summary of the cost and schedule performance for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Historical and current cost profiles (extracted from final Financial Information System (FIS) reports) are presented for each of the major program elements. Also included in this report is the status of the Nuclear Waste Fund revenues and disbursements. This report includes data through June 1990. 1 fig.

  8. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-10-01

    This is the eighteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0.

  9. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This is the nineteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 58 refs.

  10. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fifteenth quarterly report on the progress of active addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 60 refs.

  11. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-05-08

    This is the twentieth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same fomzat presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1. 2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2. 0 through 4. 0.

  12. Methane coupling by membrane reactor, Quarterly technical progress report, September 1994--December 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1995-04-14

    Experimental studies presented in this report discuss the performance of porous VYCOR membrane reactors in which the oxidative coupling of methane was carried out in an excess of oxygen. This was accomplished by shortening the porous section of the membrane reactor and operating at lower W/F ratios. Results are also discussed from experiments in which methane gas flow was metered in from the high pressure shell side into the oxygen stream on the tube side of the membrane reactor. These studies indicated that the presence of gas phase oxygen downstream to the catalyst bed was detrimental for the C{sub 2} selectivity in the methane coupling reaction. Dense membrane synthesis and characterization results are presented which describe new approaches to dense membrane synthesis. Modifications to the 40 Angstrom pore diameter gamma alumina membranes to enhance their stability and pore filling of micron size pores on alpha alumina supports are discussed. Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3}, an oxygen conducting perovslcite synthesized in the Microfluidizer showed interesting DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) and TGA (Thermo Gravimetric Analysis) spectra that indicated a change in the crystal structure at relatively moderate temperatures of 150{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C. This report also presents details of the design and experimental set-up of a catalytic membrane reactor in which the porous membrane is doped with the active catalyst and methane coupling occurs as the reactant gases pass through the membrane pores.

  13. The Savannah River Plant`s Groundwater Monitoring Program - second quarter 1987

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report is a summary of the groundwater monitoring program conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Group of the Health Protection Department in the second quarter of 1987 and includes the analytical results, field data, and detailed documentation for this program. The purpose of this report is twofold. First, the report provides a historical record of the activities and the rationale of the program; second, it provides an official document of the analytical results.

  14. NCSU Reactor Sharing Program. Final technical report, [September 1, 1980--August 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.B.

    1993-11-10

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University provides the PULSTAR Research Reactor and associated facilities to eligible institutions with support, in part, from the Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Participation in the NCSU Reactor Sharing Program continues to increase steadily with visitors ranging from advance high school physics and chemistry students to Ph.D. level research from neighboring universities.

  15. Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report -- First Calendar Quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1995-07-01

    During the first calendar quarter of 1995, air samples were collected and analyzed from 47 air particulate/halogen sampling stations, 6 noble gas sampling stations, and 16 tritiated water vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from 1 wastewater containment pond and 10 sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from 11 potable and 1 non-potable supply wells and 6 drinking water consumption points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 201 locations. Water sampling was conducted for analysis of bacteria, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic constituents, and water quality as required by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and state of Nevada regulations. Samples were taken at various locations throughout all drinking water distribution systems on the NTS.

  16. Impact of FY 1987 budget on advanced reactor technology programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1986-05-05

    The testimony reviews information on the consolidated fuel reprocessing program and reactor technology programs for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the reactor safety research programs for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  17. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  18. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 1 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-27

    Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status...Report Q1 FY17 Clinical Public Health & Epidemiology Directorate Army Hearing Division 27 March 2017 Army Hearing Program Status...Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Table of Contents Introduction

  19. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  20. Program status 2. quarter -- FY 1990: Fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    During this period, the ARIES-I blanket design team has concentrated its efforts on preparation of the final report. For the ARIES-II blanket design, two concepts are being evaluated. They are the Li self-cooled and the helium-cooled lithium breeder designs. The scoping design of the second concept has been completed. Varian EIMAC has had two tube failures in trying to assemble the X2274 tetrodes for the tests in Japan. Despite the failures it is still possible for the tubes to be ready as scheduled. Also during this quarter, the joint US/PRC integral experiment on beryllium was completed in March and the analysis of results has begun. Finally, the final design of DIII-D Divertor Material Exposure System (DiMES) was completed. Preliminary analysis by ANL of DIII-D divertor erosion, using measured plasma conditions, predicts maximum net erosion of 50 {micro}m and maximum net deposition of 23 {micro}m. Measurement by SNL-L of the 12 tiles removed in December 1989 is still pending.

  1. Program status 4. quarter -- FY 1989: Fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-18

    The ARIES-I design is nearing completion. The ARIES-II design work will begin soon and will be based on an advanced physics DT tokamak operating in the second stability regime. The ARIES-I blanket design team has selected the 5 MPa helium-cooled design as the reference blanket for study. Beryllium neutron multiplier will be used together with an advanced super-critical steam cycle for power conversion. Model ICRF tetrode tube anodes demonstrated the equivalent of plate dissipation, exceeding expectations. Full size tubes are being constructed for testing at JAERI. International fusion nuclear data cooperation activities continued to expand. The exposure of 12 well-characterized graphite tiles in the divertor region of DIII-D continues. The conceptual design of a mechanism to insert material samples into the DIII-D divertor is nearing completion. Finally, the data on manganese-stabilized austenitic steels that was obtained and compiled last quarter was prepared for presentation to the ITER team.

  2. Program status 3. quarter -- FY 1989: Fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect

    1989-07-17

    The cold support concept for the ARIES TF coil design was developed further. This concept not only works for aspect ratio 6 and 4.5 machines, but it also works for ITER. Beryllium was added to the two blanket concepts to improve energy multiplication and reduce COE. During the quarter a US-Japan steering committee meeting was held to discuss the US-Japan ICRH tube tests. They reviewed and approved the proposed X2242 ICRH tube improvements. Ed Cheng attended IAEA meeting on the International Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL). The first version of FENDL should be ready for use by mid-1990. Exposure of 12 well-characterized graphite tiles in the divertor region of DIII-D continues. Work has been initiated on the laser ellipsometry technique to be used for in situ on-line measurement of erosion and redeposition in the DIII-D divertor. A Neutron Interaction materials (NIM) report has been drafted compiling published and unpublished data on manganese-stabilized austenitic steels. These steels are being considered for the ITER.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  4. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1990 (April through June) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1990 are listed in this report.

  5. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  6. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  7. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement: Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 2, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter), accomplishments of the ER Program, concerns related to program work, and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  9. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-14

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q3 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health Management System and provides a means for the installation Hearing Program Managers...Army Pamphlet (DA PAM) 40-501, and the Chief of Staff of the Army’s Safety and Occupational Health objectives. Participation in the survey is mandated

  10. Program status 4. quarter -- FY 1993: ITER and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-20

    Work continued on the development of the high-pressure helium-cooled design for the PULSAR reactor study. It was found that the high pressure helium-cooled solid breeder design may be able to breed adequate tritium without the use of Be as the neutron multiplier. Thermal-hydraulic results also indicate that the ARIES-IV shield can be used as the thermal storage component, while keeping outlet coolant temperature constant during the dwell time of about 2 minutes. During this period, two TE{sub 22,6} mode generators were fabricated and a report on the testing of the RF vacuum feed-throughs were written. Also, the DiMES sample chamber was operated in a piggyback mode and different samples were exposed to the DIII-D plasma during dedicated physics experiments.

  11. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  12. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 September 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), reports on neotectonic investigations of the Manhattan Prong. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR&D funds. The second concerns OTEC pilot plant performance calculations, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The third, describing a study of landfill methane recovery, is supported by the National Park Service.

  13. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Entingh, Daniel J.

    1980-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/DGE), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division.

  14. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

  15. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  16. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R D.

  17. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R&D.

  18. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  19. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG&G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A&M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

  20. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Second Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B

    2002-04-01

    Since October 2001 the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past six months the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews and monthly status reporting. Those processes are described in an interim management plan for diagnostics (''National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Plan'', NIF-0081315, April 2002) and a draft Program Execution Plan (''Program Execution Plan for the National NlF Diagnostic Program'', NIF-0072083, October 2001) and documents cited therein. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility, all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past six months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request.

  1. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all, (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

  2. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  3. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994 (First quarter of FY-95)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three ma or activity categories: (1) Advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, (2) Development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and (3) Increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified in Table ES-1. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized in Table ES-2.

  5. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Karstensen, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period February 1, 1995, through April 30, 1995, for Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30246. The objective of Phase II of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. Tasks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of Phase II have been completed in prior quarters. Their results have been discussed in the applicable quarterly reports and in their respective topical reports. With the exception of Task 7, final editions of these topical reports have been submitted to the DOE. This quarterly report, then, addresses only Task 4 and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, {open_quotes}Design and Test of Critical Components.{close_quotes} These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: (1) Catalytic Combustion - Subtasks 8.2 and 8.5, (2) Recuperator - Subtasks 8.1 and 8.7, (3) Autothermal Fuel Reformer - Subtask 8.3, (4) High Temperature Turbine Disc - Subtask 8.4, (5) Advanced Control System (MMI) - Subtask 8.6, and (6) Ceramic Materials - Subtasks 8.8 and 8.9. Major technological achievements from Task 8 efforts during the quarter are as follows: (1) The subscale catalytic combustion rig in Subtask 8.2 is operating consistently at 3 ppmv of NO{sub x} over a range of ATS operating conditions. (2) The spray cast process used to produce the rim section of the high temperature turbine disc of Subtask 8.4 offers additional and unplanned spin-off opportunities for low cost manufacture of certain gas turbine parts.

  6. Development program to support industrial coal gasification. Quarterly report 1

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-15

    The Development Program to Support Industrial Coal Gasification is on schedule. The efforts have centered on collecting background information and data, planning, and getting the experimental program underway. The three principal objectives in Task I-A were accomplished. The technical literature was reviewed, the coals and binders to be employed were selected, and tests and testing equipment to be used in evaluating agglomerates were developed. The entire Erie Mining facility design was reviewed and a large portion of the fluidized-bed coal gasification plant design was completed. Much of the work in Task I will be experimental. Wafer-briquette and roll-briquette screening tests will be performed. In Task II, work on the fluidized-bed gasification plant design will be completed and work on a plant design involving entrained-flow gasifiers will be initiated.

  7. Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report for Year 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-04-30

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  8. Environmental Biosciences Program Third Quarter Report, Year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-03-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  9. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1996--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement in August 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No.: DE-FC21-92MC29467). Requirements stipulated by the Agreement require WVU to submit quarterly Technical Progress reports. This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 1st calendar quarter of 1996. For the period January 1 through December 31, 1996 twelve projects have been selected for funding, and the Kanawha Valley will continue under a no-cost extension. Three new projects have also been added to the program. This document describes these projects involving decontamination, decommissioning and remedial action issues and technologies.

  10. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. Year 1, fourth quarter report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-08-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter`s report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  11. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation Reactor Vessel Radiation Surveillance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, T.R.; Anderson, S.L.; Yanichko, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Westinghouse recognized that the disruption of the atomic lattice of metals by collision from energetic neutrons could alter the properties of the metals to such an extent that the changes could be of engineering significance. Furthermore, it was recognized that a physical-metallurgical phenomenon such as aging, both thermal and mechanical, also could alter the properties of a metal over its service life. Because of the potential changes in properties, reactor vessel radiation surveillance programs to monitor the effect of neutron radiation and other environmental factors on the reactor vessel materials during operational conditions over the life of the plant were initiated for Westinghouse plants with the insertion of reactor vessel material radiation surveillance capsules into the Yankee Atomic Company's Yankee Rowe plant in 1961.

  12. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  13. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL ISSUES FOR THE LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Odette, George Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Plan is a collaborative program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the private sector directed at extending the life of the present generation of nuclear power plants to enable operation to at least 80 years. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the primary components requiring significant research to enable such long-term operation. There are significant issues that need to be addressed to reduce the uncertainties in regulatory application, such as, 1) high neutron fluence/long irradiation times, and flux effects, 2) material variability, 3) high-nickel materials, 4)specimen size effects and the fracture toughness master curve, etc. The first issue is the highest priority to obtain the data and mechanistic understanding to enable accurate, reliable embrittlement predictions at high fluences. This paper discusses the major issues associated with long-time operation of existing RPVs and the LWRSP plans to address those issues.

  14. Oil shale program. Eighteenth quarterly report, April 1980-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A. L.

    1980-11-01

    Instrumentation and evaluation activities are in progress at two DOE-supported in situ oil shale field projects, namely, the Geokinetics Oil Shale Project near Vernal, Utah, and the Occidental Oil Shale Project near DeBeque, Colorado. In support of these projects, it is necessary to develop new and advanced instrumentation systems and associated deployment, recording and analysis techniques that are unique to the field project needs. A rock mechanics program provides material properties, material response models and computational methods for use in the design analysis, and evaluation functions. In addition, retorting studies are in progress on problems unique to the low void conditions encountered in field experiments.

  15. MUSC Environmental Biosciences Program First Quarter Report May - June, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Mohr

    2002-07-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.

  16. Oil shale program. Quarterly reports, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hommert, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Recent field experiments have demonstrated that the yield from an in situ retort is largely controlled by the characteristics of the rubble bed produced during the bed preparation step. This realization has focused the need to develop a predictive capability for the fragmentation step in the process of constructing an in situ retort. In addition, it is important that criteria for the blast results be developed that are based on a thorough understanding of retort yield as a function of bed characteristics. The influence of permeability structure on retort yield must be clearly defined. At the present time the Sandia program addresses the two interrelated areas of: bed preparation and characterization; and retorting process. This progress report contains the following papers: (1) Atlas cratering tests; (2) comparison of old and new damage models; (3) advancements in code development - CAROM; and (4) laboratory retorting experiments - run 42. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of these papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is

  18. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Third Quarter Report

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B

    2002-07-01

    Since October 2001, the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past nine months, the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews, and monthly status reporting. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility; all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past three months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request.

  19. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan quarterly report. Fourth quarter, 1989. Rept. for 1 Oct-31 Dec 89

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-28

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commerical-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described in a series of quarterly and annual reports. The report contains environmental compliance data reports, results of industrial hygiene compliance monitoring, and independent audits. Table 2-1 shows 14 of the 20 supplemental monitoring sites sampled during the quarter.

  20. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No. DE-FC21-92MC29467) This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 4th calendar quarter of 1995, and is the final quarterly report deliverable required for the period ending 31 December 1995. The projects reported for the WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into the following three areas: 1.0 In Situ Remediation Process Development, 2.0 Advanced Product Applications Testing, and 3.0 Information Systems, Public Policy, Community Outreach, and Economics. Summaries of the significant accomplishments for the projects reported during the period 1 October 95 through 31 December 95 are presented in the following discussions.

  1. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1992-10-07

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

  2. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  3. Advanced Turbine Systems Program -- Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The objective of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. This quarterly report, addresses only Task 4, conversion of a gas turbine to a coal-fired gas turbine, which was completed during the quarter and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, design and test of critical components. These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: catalytic combustion; recuperator; autothermal fuel reformer; high temperature turbine disc; advanced control system (MMI); and ceramic materials.

  4. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Second quarter, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  5. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Group of the Health Protection Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1988 (October--December), routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations was performed. The drinking water samples were collected from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. Two sets of flagging criteria were established in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  6. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  7. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  8. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Pimblott

    2000-10-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  9. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R. U.; Benneche, P. E.; Hosticka, B.

    1998-09-30

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these users institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities.

  10. UNOCAL Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental monitoring plan quarterly report. Second quarter 1988. Report for 1 April-30 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socio-economic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Twenty-two supplemental monitoring sites have been designated, to date. The report includes compliance operational monitoring data, ambient and source compliance data collected the previous quarter, and results of the industrial hygiene monitoring during the first quarter, 1988. Four pages of text precede over 718 pages of data sheets.

  11. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Katoh, Yutai; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Wilson, Dane F

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural

  12. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement. Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 4, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered herein is July through September 1995 (fourth quarter of FY 1995). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1995 commitments.

  13. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 4. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is July through September 1993 (fourth quarter of FY 1993). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1994 commitments.

  14. Oak Ridge reservation federal facility agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is October through December 1993 (first quarter of FY 1994). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1994 commitments.

  15. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  16. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1992 (Second quarter of fiscal year 1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-05-01

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the Program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  17. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 titled `Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs`. Requirements stipulated by the Agreement require WVU to submit Technical Progress reports on a quarterly basis. This report contains the efforts of the fourteen research projects comprising the Agreement for the period April 1 to June 30, 1995. During this period three new projects have been funded by the Agreement. These projects are: (1) WERC National Design Contest, (2) Graduate Interns to the Interagency Environmental Technology Office under the National Science and Technology Council, and (3) WV High Tech Consortium.

  18. High temperature packing test program. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 26, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-12

    The program was undertaken to improve the technical understanding of the performance of plunger packings in coal liquefaction pilot plant feed pumps. During the first quarter of FY 1982, visits were made to the H-Coal, EDS and SRC-I pilot plants, where technical discussions were held with maintenance and engineering personnel, and the maintenance records and work orders for the plunger pumps were reviewed. Technical discussions were held with engineering personnel at the manufacturing facilities of three plunger pump manufacturers' companies. Contracts and technical discussions with packing vendors were initiated. Design of the laboratory tests was started.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, M. L.; Peko, D.; Farmer, M.; Rempe, J.; Humrickhouse, P.; O'Brien, J.; Robb, K.; Gauntt, R.; Osborn, D.

    2016-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Reactor Safety Technologies Pathway Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 multi-unit accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Fukushima), the nuclear community has been reassessing certain safety assumptions about nuclear reactor plant design, operations and emergency actions, particularly with respect to extreme events that might occur and that are beyond each plant’s current design basis. Because of our significant domestic investment in nuclear reactor technology (99 operating reactors in the fleet of commercial LWRs with five under construction), the United States has been a major leader internationally in these activities. The U.S. nuclear industry is voluntarily pursuing a number of additional safety initiatives. The NRC continues to evaluate and, where deemed appropriate, establish new requirements for ensuring adequate protection of public health and safety in the occurrence of low probability events at nuclear plants; (e.g., mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events initiated by external events like seismic or flooding initiators). The DOE has also played a major role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident. Initially, DOE worked with the Japanese and the international community to help develop a more complete understanding of the Fukushima accident progression and its consequences, and to respond to various safety concerns emerging from uncertainties about the nature of and the effects from the accident. DOE R&D activities are focused on providing scientific and technical insights, data, analyses methods that ultimately support industry efforts to enhance safety. These activities are expected to further enhance the safety performance of currently operating U.S. nuclear power plants as well as better characterize the safety performance of future U.S. plants. In pursuing this area of R&D, DOE recognizes that the commercial nuclear industry is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities. As such, industry is considered the primary

  2. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending, March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-04-01

    This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3.0 of this report.

  3. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, G.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quarterly report provides a status of activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A ferrocyanide safety program plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or are completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3. 0 of this report.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is

  5. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Third Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    2000-03-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an offsite environmental surveillance program for the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the third quarter of 1999 is based on 704 samples of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, milk, and food. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No! measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  6. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Second Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    1999-12-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the second quarter 1999 is based on 618 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, drinking water, sheep, wild game tissues, and environmental radiation. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  7. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: First Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    1999-09-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the first quarter 1999 is based on 564 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, and wild game tissues. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons ! testing, an d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  8. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Fourth Quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    T. Saffle; R. Evans

    1999-08-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts the Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the fourth quarter 1998 is based on 622 samples collected of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, water, milk, potatoes, and game animals. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radioactivity, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, an! d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL, although statistical differences did exist between on-site and distant gross beta concentrations. No evidence could be found to link these differences with a specific INEEL source. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability

  12. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  13. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.; and others

    2016-05-15

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4′ channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4′ channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  14. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Murashkin, A. N.; Neustroev, P. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Petelin, A. L.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Ryabov, V. L.; Samoylov, R. M.; Sbitnev, S. V.; Fomin, A. K.; Fomichev, A. V.; Zimmer, O.; Cherniy, A. V.; Shoka, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4' channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4' channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  15. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, G.D.; Bryan, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    The program comprises studies related to all areas of the technology of materials fabricated into thick-section primary-coolant containment systems of light-water-cooled nuclear power reactors. The principal area of investigation is the behavior and structural integrity of steel pressure vessels containing cracklike flaws. Current work is organized into the following tasks: (1) program administration and procurement, (2) fracture mechanics analyses and investigations, (3) investigations of irradiated materials, (4) thermal shock investigations, and (5) pressure vessel investigations. Work performed under the existing research and development subcontracts is included in this report.

  16. URI Program Final Report FY 2001 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Vernetson

    2004-03-15

    The purpose of the URI program is to upgrade and improve university nuclear research and training reactors and to contribute to strengthening the academic community's nuclear engineering infrastructure.

  17. A FAST BREEDER REACTOR SPENT FUEL MEASUREMENTS PROGRAM FOR BN-350 REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    P. STAPLES; J. HALBIG; ET AL

    1999-04-01

    A project to verify the fissile content of fast breeder reactor spent nuclear fuel is underway in the Republic of Kasakhstan. There are a variety of assembly types with different irradiation histories and profiles in the reactor that require a variety of measurement and analysis procedures. These procedures will be discussed and compared as will the general process that has been designed to resolve any potential measurement discrepancies. The underwater counter is part of a system that is designed to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in maintaining continuity of knowledge from the time of measurement until the measured item is placed in a welded container with a unique identification. In addition to satisfying IAEA requirements for the spent nuclear fuel, this measurement program is able to satisfy some of the measurement requirements for the Kasakhstan Atomic Energy Agency concerning the repackaging of the spent nuclear fuel into a standard canister. The project is currently operational in a mode requiring the IAEA's continuous presence.

  18. Final Screening Program, Third and Fourth Quarters. Version 3.1. Task 4. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    network, but historical occurrences are present within ISP distribution patterns for both the alluvial and Denver aquifers . Third and Fourth Quarter...FY86) APPENDIX C--THIRD AND FOURTH QUARTERS (FY86) ALLUVIAL AND DENVER AQUIFER COMPOUND DISTRIBUTIOýN PLOTS C-RMA-04D/FIN•PT. TOC.Iii 05/20/88 TABLE...Level Measurement Well Network, Third and Fourth Quarter, Fiscal Year 1986 2 Water Level Elevation Alluvial Aquifer , Third Quarter, Fiscal Year 1986

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 1, Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement Quarterly Report for the Environmental Restoration Program was prepared to satisfy requirements for progress reporting on Environmental Restoration Program (ER) activities as specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The reporting period covered in this document is October through December 1995. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.2.3.04 (Activity Data Sheet 8304). Publication of this document meets two FFA milestones. The FFA Quarterly Report meets an FFA milestone defined as 30 days following the end of the applicable reporting period. Appendix A of this report meets the FFA milestone for the Annual Removal Action Report for the period FYs 1991--95. This document provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the FFA. Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period, as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter); accomplishments of the ER Program; concerns related to program work; and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent

  2. The Savannah River Site`s groundwater monitoring program. Third quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-06

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  3. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement on August 29, 1992 entitled ``Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs.`` Stipulated within the Agreement is the requirement that WVU submit to METC a series of Technical Progress Reports on a quarterly basis. This report comprises the first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for Year 2 of the Agreement. This report reflects the progress and/or efforts performed on the sixteen (16) technical projects encompassed by the Year 2 Agreement for the period of January 1 through March 31, 1994. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents; Microbial enrichment for enhancing in-situ biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes; Treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters; Drain-enhanced soil flushing (DESF) for organic contaminants removal; Chemical destruction of chlorinated organic compounds; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organics, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled polyion films for gas-phase chemical sensors; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; A systematic database of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Dust control methods for insitu nuclear and hazardous waste handling; Winfield Lock and Dam remediation; and Socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration technologies.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE

  5. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  6. UNOCAL: Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan quarterly report. Fourth quarter 1987. Report for 1 October-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-29

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic-fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socio-economic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of this project is to produce 10,000 barrels per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. During the fourth quarter, detailed analytical procedures and computer-data-management software were developed, sampling analytical and data-management standards were completed, and supplemental quality assurance and control programs were finalized. All of these activities are summarized in the report.

  7. U. S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program.

  8. US Department of Energy 1992--1993 Reactor Sharing Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1994-04-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor serves as a host institution to support various educational institutions which are located primarily within the state of Florida. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program. Three tables are included that provide basic information about the 1992--1993 program and utilization of the reactor facilities by user institutions.

  9. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  10. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  11. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  12. 77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear...-1265, ``Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265... plant startup, and power ascension tests for the condensate and feedwater systems in all types of...

  13. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan quarterly report. Third quarter, 1989. Report for 1 July-30 September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-30

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic-fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of and Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socio economic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of the project is to produce 10,000 barrels per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. A description of Compliance activities completed during the quarter and copies of agency reports are given in the document. Supplemental sampling for industrial hygiene also is described.

  14. UNOCAL Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental monitoring plan quarterly report. First quarter 1988. Report for 1 January-31 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socio-economic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Twenty-two supplemental monitoring sites have been designated, to date. This report describes ambient and source compliance data collected during the quarter, progress in performance monitoring, certification for air quality, monitoring audits, and initial industrial hygiene supplemental monitoring.

  15. USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quarterly report on program cost and schedule; Fourth Quarter, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This report is intended to provide a summary of the cost and schedule performance for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Historical and current cost profiles (extracted from the DOE Financial Information System) are presented for each of the major program elements. Also included in this report are the program schedule baseline, the status of near-term program milestones and the status of the Nuclear Waste Fund revenues and disbursements. In particular, cost profile for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is given. This report includes data through September 1991.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow

  17. AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined quarterly progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1982-1986 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. This report is divided into parts and chapters with each part describing projects related to a particular fossil energy technology. Chapters within a part provide details of the various projects associated with that technology. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program. Plans for the program will be issued annually. A draft of the program plan for FY 1982 to 1986 has been prepared and is in the review process. The implementation of these plans will be reflected by these quarterly progress reports, and this dissemination of information will bw augmented by topical or final reports as appropriate.

  18. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety studies for the Division of Reactor Safety Research. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Conklin, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.

    1980-08-01

    Work continued on development of the ORTAP, ORECA, and BLAST codes; and verification studies were continued on the ORECA, CORTAP, and BLAST codes. An improved steam turbine plant model (ORTURB) for use in ORTAP was developed and checked. Predictions from BLAST, CORTAP, and ORECA were compared with various transient test data from the Fort St. Vrain reactor.

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement quarterly report for the environmental restoration program. Volume 2: January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1995 commitments. The report describes the technical status of the following: Y-12 Plant; Oak Ridge National Lab; K-25 Plant; and Oak Ridge Reservation boundary areas. The report also describes technical programs, namely: the Oak Ridge environmental information system, remote sensing and special survey program, and the risk assessment program.

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement quarterly report for the environmental restoration program. Volume 3: April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1995 commitments. The report describes the technical status of the following: Y-12 Plant; Oak Ridge National Lab; K-25 Plant; and Oak Ridge Reservation boundary areas. The report also describes technical programs, namely: the Oak Ridge environmental information system, remote sensing and special survey program, and the risk assessment program.

  1. Solid State Track Recorder applications in United States nuclear reactor energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The domain of Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) applications in United States nuclear reactor energy programs extends from the harsh high temperature environments found in high power reactor cores to very low flux environments arising in out-of-core locations, critical assemblies, or away from reactors (AFR) experiments. The neutron energy region arising in these applications is very broad, covering more than eight orders of magnitude from thermal up to fusion energies. The range of neutron flux/fluence intensity is even greater, extending over more than thirteen orders of magnitude. As a consequence, use of a variety of SSTR is entailed in US nuclear reactor energy programs.

  2. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki; Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1997-08-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE.

  3. Parental education and the WHO neonatal G-6-PD screening program: a quarter century later.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Hammerman, C; Bhutani, V K

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in any population with a male frequency >3-5%, combined with parental education regarding the dietary, environmental and sepsis-related triggers for hemolysis was recommended by the WHO (World Health Organization) Working Group in 1989. As the aim of identifying G-6-PD deficiency in the newborn period is to avert or detect extreme hyperbilirubinemia developing at home, before the development of kernicterus, the parental role in identifying evolving icterus was considered integral to any screening program. Now, a quarter century after publication of this report, severe bilirubin neurotoxicity associated with G-6-PD deficiency continues to be encountered worldwide. Screening programs have not been universally introduced but several national or regional maternal child health programs have implemented neonatal G-6-PD screening. Some reports detail the role of parental education, based on the above mentioned principles, through a variety of audio-visual materials. The paucity of randomized controlled trials or validated evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of the contribution of parental education fails to meet the ideal testable evidence-based approach. However, our review of the cumulative experience and evidence currently available does supply certain information reflecting a positive impact of screening programs combined with parental input. We propose that the current information is sufficient to continue to support and apply the Working Group's recommendations. In order not to waste unnecessary time available, data may be used in lieu of randomized trials to continue to recommend screening programs, as suggested, in high-risk regions. If the incidence of kernicterus associated with G-6-PD deficiency is to be diminished, G-6-PD screening in combination with parental explanation may be one instance in which the consensus approach suggested by the WHO Working Group, rather than reliance

  4. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the hydrocracking of 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl in the presence of iron (Fe) catalysts and sulfur and residual wall catalytic effect. Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NMBB) predominantly yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Various iron compounds were examined as catalyst precursors. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors led to substantially higher catalyst activity and higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur in the absence of iron compounds, in concentrations of 1.2-3.4 wt%, corresponding to the conditions present in reactions with added iron compounds. Increasing sulfur concentrations led to higher NMBB conversions. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent effect on the reactor walls. A black sulfide layer formed on the surface which could not be removed mechanically. The supposed non-catalytic reactions done in the same reactor but after experiments with added sulfur showed higher conversions than comparable experiments done in new reactors. This wall catalytic effect can be reduced by treating the sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid. The results of this work demonstrate the significant effect of sulfur addition and sulfur-induced residual wall effects on carbon-carbon bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics.

  5. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  6. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  7. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the United States. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: (1) Advancement of electric vehicle technologies; (2) Development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and (3) Increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. Table 1 indicates the EVs in each of the Site Operator fleets. Table 2 provides baseline information on several EVs currently in use by the Site Operators, or which have evolved to the point that they may be introduced in the near future. The Program is currently managed by personnel of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The current principal management functions include: Coordination of Site Operator efforts in the areas of public awareness and infrastructure development (program-related meetings, and educational presentations).

  8. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond.

  9. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA for use at their institutions. These areas are discussed here.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth; Oxstrand, Johanna

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  12. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  13. Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan, quarterly report, second quarter, April 1-June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socioeconomic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of this project is to produce 10,000 per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. The report contains compliance monitoring results, copies of regulatory reports and independent audits performed on compliance air quality, water quality, and supplemental analytical programs.

  14. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    Rat tissue distribution properties of ``IQNP,`` a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

  15. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    Rat tissue distribution properties of IQNP,'' a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.

  16. Stanford Geothermal Program (quarterly technical progress reports, July--September 1990 and October--December 1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-18

    For the summer quarter, progress is summarized and data are presented on the following: well test analysis of finite-conductivity fractures, theoretical investigation of adsorption phenomena, and optimization of reinjection strategy. For the fall quarter, activity focused on the adsorption and well testing projects. A new project investigating reinjection at the Geysers was initiated. (MHR)

  17. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors.

  18. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program: Site Operation Program. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1995-12-01

    The Site Operator Program has evolved substantially since its inception in response to the Electric Vehicle Research and Demonstration Act of 1976. In its original form, a commercialization effort was intended but this was not feasible for lack of vehicle suppliers and infrastructure. Nonetheless, with DOE sponsorship and technical participation, a few results (primarily operating experience and data) were forthcoming. The current Program comprises eleven sites and over 200 vehicles, of which about 50 are latest generation vehicles. DOE partially funds the Program participant expenditures and the INEL receives operating and maintenance data for the DOE-owned, and participant-owned or monitored vehicles, as well as Program reports. As noted elsewhere in this report, participants represent several widely differing categories: electric utilities, academic institutions, and federal agencies. While both the utilities and the academic institutions tend to establish beneficial relationships with the industrial community.

  19. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1996-08-01

    Goals of the site operator program include field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments, advancement of electric vehicle technologies, development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant EV use, and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The site operator program currently consists of 11 participants under contract and two other organizations with data-sharing agreements with the program. The participants (electric utilities, academic institutions, Federal agencies) are geographically dispersed within US and their vehicles see a broad spectrum of service conditions. Current EV inventories of the site operators exceeds 250 vehicles. Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of EVs, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for EVs; (2) DOE, DOT, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of EVs. Current focus of the program is collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real- world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus: EV testing results, energy economics of EVs, and site operators activities.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-03-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 through December 31, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. For all fixed sites, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2007. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the current deployment in Niamey, Niger, Africa. PYE represents the AMF statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be

  1. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  2. Design reliability assurance program for Korean next generation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Beom-Su; Han, Jin-Kyu; Na, Jang Hwan; Yoo, Kyung Yeong

    1997-12-01

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) project is to develop standardized nuclear power plant design for the construction of future nuclear power plants in Korea. The main purpose of the KNGR project is to develop the advanced nuclear power plants, which enhance safety and economics significantly through the incorporation of design concepts for severe accident prevention and mitigation, supplementary passive safety concept, simplification and application of modularization and so on. For those, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and availability study will be performed at the early stage of the design, and the Design Reliability Assurance Program (D-RAP) is applied in the development of the KNGR to ensure that the safety and availability evaluated in the PSA and availability study at the early phase of the design is maintained through the detailed design, construction, procurement and operation of the plants. This paper presents the D-RAP concept that could be applied at the stage of the basic design of the nuclear power plants, based on the models for the reference plants and/or similar plants. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  3. 77 FR 55877 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear... plant startup, and power ascension tests for the condensate and feedwater systems in all types of light..., including condensate storage and supply, for light-water reactors (LWRs) and for startup feedwater...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in the fracture toughness properties of ferritic materials in the reactor vessel beltline region of... and the thermal environment. Under the program, fracture toughness test data are obtained from... requirements for number of materials to be irradiated, specimen types, or number of specimens per reactor is...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in the fracture toughness properties of ferritic materials in the reactor vessel beltline region of... and the thermal environment. Under the program, fracture toughness test data are obtained from... requirements for number of materials to be irradiated, specimen types, or number of specimens per reactor is...

  6. Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Quarterly report for the period ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    Various high-level radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site in underground storage tanks since the mid-1940s. During the 1950s, additional tank storage space was required to support the defense mission. To obtain this additional storage volume within a short time period, and to minimize the need for constructing additional storage tanks, Hanford Site scientists developed a process to scavenge {sup 137}Cs from tank waste liquids. In implementing this process, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste that was later routed to some Hanford Site single-shell tanks. The reactive nature of ferrocyanide in the presence of an oxidizer has been known for decades, but the conditions under which the compound can undergo endothermic and exothermic reactions have not been thoroughly studied. Because the scavenging process precipitated ferrocyanide from solutions containing nitrate and nitrite, an intimate mixture of ferrocyanides and nitrates and/or nitrites is likely to exist in some regions of the ferrocyanide tanks. This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway at the Hanford Site on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue, as requested by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in their Recommendation 90-7. A revised Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was recently prepared and released in March 1994. Activities in the revised program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Section 4.0 of this report.

  7. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 1, September 21, 1989--December 20, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  8. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  9. FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

  10. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 12, June 21, 1992--September 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  11. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarter report No. 9, September 21, 1991--December 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-07-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e, the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 10, December 21, 1991--March 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-07-01

    In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL`s contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

  13. Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  14. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-04-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  15. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  16. Decontamination systems information and research programs. Quarterly report, July 1--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The US contains numerous hazardous waste sites. Many sites are on private land near operating units of various companies. An effort is being made to determine the conditions under which such sites can be remediated voluntarily. The objective of the project will be to first assess the interest and willingness of industry in the Kanawha River Valley, WV to participate in discussions that would lead toward voluntary cleanup activities. The second will be to implement the activities agreed upon by the interested parties. The project will first involve individual discussions with the industrial, government, and other organized groups in the area. These discussions will help determine the feasibility of organizing voluntary efforts. If the discussions indicate that conditions may be favorable for developing individual or group voluntary cleanup projects, a working group will be convened to establish the environmental goals of the project as well as the technical approach for achieving those goals. The projects for the 1996 WVU Cooperative Agreement are categorized into three task focus areas: Task 1.0 Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation, Task 2.0 Cross Cutting Innovative Technologies, and Task 3.0 Small Business Support Program. Summaries of the accomplishments for the subtasks reporting under these categories during the third quarter, 1 July 96 through 30 September 96, are presented.

  17. Long-term materials test program. Quarterly report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1984-03-01

    Exposure of gas turbine materials to a PFBC effluent under the Long-Term Materials Test Program has reached 1507 hours. Unprotected nickel and cobalt base blade and vane alloys show susceptibility to hot corrosion at 1500/sup 0/F (gas temperature), 1300/sup 0/F, and 1100/sup 0/F (air-cooled pins). Precious metal aluminide and M (Co,Fe) CrAlY overlay coatings continue to show good resistance to corrosion above 1450/sup 0/F, but are susceptible to varying degrees of pitting attack between 1050 and 1300/sup 0/F. Significant erosion/corrosion degradation of both base alloys and protective coatings/claddings has been observed on airfoil specimens exposed at 1350/sup 0/F, 800 to 900 fps and dust loadings less than 100 ppM for 1085 hours. Corrosion predominately occurred in areas of direct particle impaction; i.e., leading edge and pressure surface, indicating an erosion/corrosion synergism. At gas velocities of 1200 to 1400 fps, a platinum-aluminide coated IN-738 pin experienced a metal recession rate of 8 mils/1000-hours. The PFBC facility continues to show excellent operational reliability, accumulating over 1100 test hours this quarter. The only concern from an operations standpoint is the gradual thinning of the in-bed heat exchanger tubing at a rate of about 5 mils/100 hours off the diameter.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office environmental monitoring program summary data report, first calendar quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-10-01

    The continuing moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. The onsite radiological surveillance program is shown in a table, and this report gives the first quarter results for that program. During the first calendar quarter of 1997, air samples were collected and analyzed from 45 air particulate sampling stations, 3 noble gas sampling stations, and 12 tritiated water (HTO) vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from one wastewater containment pond and nine sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from ten potable supply wells, one non-potable supply well, and seven drinking water distribution end points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 168 locations.

  19. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cyrus M; Nanstad, Randy K; Clayton, Dwight A; Matlack, Katie; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Light, Glenn

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to

  1. Artificial intelligence program in a computer application supporting reactor operations

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.C.; Town, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Improving nuclear reactor power plant operability is an ever-present concern for the nuclear industry. The definition of plant operability involves a complex interaction of the ideas of reliability, safety, and efficiency. This paper presents observations concerning the issues involved and the benefits derived from the implementation of a computer application which combines traditional computer applications with artificial intelligence (AI) methodologies. A system, the Component Configuration Control System (CCCS), is being installed to support nuclear reactor operations at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II.

  2. Commercial Nuclear Waste Research and Development Program. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hakl, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Noteworthy accomplishments during the first quarter of FY-1983 were: Schedules reflecting current plans for FY-1983 equipment maintenance, technical and administrative training, and anticipated task activities were prepared and transmitted to DOE/NV as Contract Deliverables. Cost and schedule estimates were prepared, at DOE/NV request, for cask testing and emergency storage of spent fuel at E-MAD, performance of a PWR cask characterization test at E-MAD, and AESD-Nevada Operations support of Climax Spent Fuel Test decommissioning. For the first time, full volume filtered gas samples were acquired from a sealed canister containing a spent nuclear fuel assembly for analysis to determine canister atmosphere composition. Another significant first: A sealed canister containing a spent nuclear fuel assembly was cut open and the fuel assembly removed for examination of the fuel and the canister interior. Maintenance was performed on Engine Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly Facility (E-MAD) railroad tracks and vehicles including the Manned Control Car, Emplacement-Installation Vehicle, locomotives, and flatcars.Comments to the first draft of the report, Histories of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies While at the E-MAD Facility, were resolved and a revised draft was issued for review. Comments received to this draft are being resolved and the document is being revised. The annual DOE audit of the AESD-Nevada Operations radiological safety program was performed, with no findings reported. A computer, to provide interface between the E-MAD Stack Air Monitor and the Remote Air Monitor console, was received and installed. Vendor recommendations were received for electrical modifications to the Plasma Arc Welder. A modified torch was received, installed on the welder, and satisfactorily tested. A procedure for Quality Assurance surveillance and monitoring of the NNWSI drilling program was prepared and implemented.

  3. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  4. Overview of the fast reactors fuels program. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides.

  5. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    A mechanistic model for the prediction of microcracking (grain-boundary separation) during transient conditions has been generated within the context of the FASTGRASS computer code. A model based on the work of DiMelfi and Deitrich describing ductile/brittle behavior has been replaced by one based on the work of Beere and Speight, Chuang and Rice, and Chen and Argon. The theory underlying this new model is described and its proposed implementation in the prediction of DEH test results is outlined.

  6. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 11, March 21, 1992--June 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  7. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  8. Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation: HEDL stabilizer materials program, October-December quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.L.; Cash, R.J.

    1981-12-15

    The objective of the Spent Fuel Stabilizer Materials Program is to identify, test, select, and qualify stabilizer materials for use in the design of spent fuel waste packages. Emphasis is placed on the selection of stabilizer materials with minimal interactions. The preliminary screening of candidate spent fuel stabilizer materials was completed and reported to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation in November 1980. Based on criteria set for thermally induced stresses, material cost, and material availability, an initial list of potential stabilizers was reduced to 34 that are recommended for additional screening tests. The spent fuel stabilizer temperature limit test was completed during this report period. Tests were conducted to establish a conservative temperature limit for spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel during the stabilizer emplacement process. Melting of metals and metal alloys, fusing of glass stabilizers,or other possible emplacement processes may require elevation of the spent fuel temperature above levels desirable for maintaining fuel rod integrity (intact cladding) or reasonable inter-rod spacing for stabilizer flow. This test was conducted to establish the temperature below which these concerns would not exist. Stabilizers that require emplacement process temperatures above the limit will be eliminated from the screening program.

  9. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program — IDCA Quarterly Program Review, September 14 and 15, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2012-02-07

    The IDCA conducted a program review at Los Alamos National Laboratory, September 14 and 15, 2010. The review was divided into three parts: 1) an update on the current status of the program, 2) an information exchange and discussion on technical details for current issues and future planning, and 3) a tour of the SSST testing facilities at LANL. The meeting started with an update from DHS by Laura Parker and a restating of some of the objectives of the Proficiency Test of which the IDCA is currently engaged. This update was followed by a discussion of some high level programmatic issues particularly about ways of communicating the overall goals of the IDCA to non-technical representatives. The final topic focused on the difficulty of releasing information, including the DHS approval process, ITAR, and open publication. Next JGR presented a technical summary of accomplishments, schedule, milestones, and future directions. These key points made were: 1) about 1/3 of the materials have been tested, 2) some participants are behind others causing a lag in report writing, 3) method reports have been assigned to various participants to speed up the process of reporting, 4) the SSST Compendium needs reformatting and restructuring, and 5) the Compendium needs a web site to house with access control. After the technical update, some of the Proficiency Test results were shown comparing data from the various laboratories. These results included comparisons of the RDX standard, KC/sugar mixtures (-100 mesh and as received), KC/dodecane, KP/Al, and KP/C. Impact, friction, ESD, and DSC results were the focus. All the participants were involved in these discussions. This report includes summary notes, presentations, and explanatory information.

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  11. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 2, December 21, 1989--March 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 8, June 21, 1991--September 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  13. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 7, March 21, 1991--June 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  14. FFTF reactor-characterization program: gamma-ray measurements and shield characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, W.L.; Moore, F.S. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    A series of experiments is to be made during the acceptance test program of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to measure the gamma ray characteristics of the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) and to establish the performance characteristics of the reactor shield. These measurements are a part of the FFTF Reactor Characterization Program (RCP). Detailed plans have been developed for these experiments. During the initial phase of the Characteristics Program, which will be carried out in the In-Reactor Thimble (IRT), both active and passive measurement methods will be employed to obtain as much information concerning the gamma ray environment as is practical. More limited active gamma ray measurements also will be made in the Vibration Open Test Assembly (VOTA).

  15. Syn-Fuel reciprocating charge pump improvement program. Quarterly technical project report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Major accomplishments during the second quarter of 1984 were completion of the Diaphragm Separation Seal clear liquid testing, and initiation of Phase III Field Testing. Diaphragm operational testing was conducted on a clear water test loop. The test goals were to ensure; mechanical reliability of the Diaphragm Seal, safe operation with simulated component failure, and proper operation of the Diaphragm Buffer Volume Control System. This latter system is essential in controlling the phasing of the diaphragm with its driving plunger. These tests were completed successfully. All operational problems were solved. However, it must be emphasized that the Diaphragm Seal would be damaged by allowing the pump to operate in a cavitating condition for an extended period of time. A change in the Field Test phase of the program was made regarding choice of field test site. There is no operating Syn-Fuel pilot plant capable of inexpensively producing the slurry stream required for the reciprocating pump testing. The Field Tests will now be conducted by first testing the prototype pump and separation seals in an ambient temperature sand water slurry. This will determine resistence to abrasive wear and determine any operation problems at pressure over a lengthy period of time. After successful conclusion of these tests the pump and seals will be operated with a high temperature oil, but without solids, to identify any problems associated with thermal gradients, thermal shock and differential growth. After successful completion of the high temperature clean oil tests the pump will be deemed ready for in-line installation at a designated Syn-Fuel pilot plant. The above approach avoids the expense and complications of a separate hot slurry test loop. It also reduces risk of operational problems while in-line at the pilot plant. 5 figs.

  16. Program of basic research on the preparation and stability of coal/water slurries. Quarterly report, June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, H.; Casassa, E.Z.; Parfitt, G.D.; Toor, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the research proposed here is to relate the surface chemistry (surface charge, wettability and additive adsorption) of a coal to its previous history of oxidation and beneficiation, and to surface analysis of each coal sample. These studies will be used to further develop the model for coal/water slurry behavior which was proposed as a result of previous studies of coal/water slurry surface chemistry carried out between September 1981 and September 1983 under Grant No. DE-FG281PC40285 from DOE/PETC. These studies are expected to lead to a better understanding of the balance among and effects of the different types of materials on the heterogeneous coal surface which will allow more effective utilization of coal/water slurries, regardless of coal source. The current two-year research program was initiated June 1, 1984, and this first quarterly report for the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1984, covers progress during the month of June, as well as some preliminary work carried out earlier in the quarter before initiation of the program. Research accomplishments and plans for the next report period are discussed for the following tasks: (1) standardizing of grinding conditions for coal number 1; (2) characterization of pulverized coal at Carnegie-Mellon University; and (3) characterization of coal/water slurries prepared from aged coals. 2 figures, 7 tables.

  17. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1995 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    SciTech Connect

    Loika, E.F.

    1994-09-22

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY-1995 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan, DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1995 MYPP. Following direction given by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on December 15, 1993, Advanced Reactors Transition (ART), previously known as Advanced Reactors, will provide the planning and perform the necessary activities for placing the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition. The DOE goal is to accomplish the shutdown in approximately five years. The Advanced Reactors Transition Multi-Year Program Plan, and the supporting documents; i.e., the FFTF Shutdown Program Plan and the FFTF Shutdown Project Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS), are defined for the life of the Program. During the transition period to achieve the Shutdown end-state, the facilities and systems will continue to be maintained in a safe and environmentally sound condition. Additionally, facilities that were associated with the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Programs, and are no longer required to support the Liquid Metal Reactor Program will be deactivated and transferred to an alternate sponsor or the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program for final disposition, as appropriate.

  18. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

    1993-03-01

    We describe the synthesis of the cis- and trans-iodovinyl isomers of the new ORNL cholinergic-muscarinicreceptorligand, 1 -azabicyclo[2.2-2]oct-3-yl{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-l-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (``IQNP``). This agent is prepared in high radiochemical yield, and the racemic mixture shows high specificity and selectivity for the cerebral and myocardial receptors. Since two chiral centers are present in this molecule, it is important to evaluate the importance of the absolute configuration of the two centers on receptor specificity. The tributyltin substrates were carefully separated by column chromatography, converted to the iodine-125 analogues by iododestannylation, and evaluated in rats in vivo. While the ``E`` (trans) isomer cleared rapidly from the receptor-rich areas of rat brain, the ``Z`` (cis) isomer showed high uptake in these areas but also high concentration in the cerebellum. In contrast, the E,Z-isomeric mixture showed good uptake and retention in the receptor rich areas. Also described in this report is a description of neutron flux measurements in the hydraulic tube position at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Also during this period, samples of [l-125]- and [l-131]-labeled racemic ``IQNP`` were supplied through a collaborative program with the Brookhaven National Laboratory for high resolution autoradiographic studies in rat tissues.

  19. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

    1993-03-01

    We describe the synthesis of the cis- and trans-iodovinyl isomers of the new ORNL cholinergic-muscarinicreceptorligand, 1 -azabicyclo[2.2-2]oct-3-yl[alpha]-hydroxy-[alpha]-(1-iodo-l-propen-3-yl)-[alpha]-phenylacetate ( IQNP''). This agent is prepared in high radiochemical yield, and the racemic mixture shows high specificity and selectivity for the cerebral and myocardial receptors. Since two chiral centers are present in this molecule, it is important to evaluate the importance of the absolute configuration of the two centers on receptor specificity. The tributyltin substrates were carefully separated by column chromatography, converted to the iodine-125 analogues by iododestannylation, and evaluated in rats in vivo. While the E'' (trans) isomer cleared rapidly from the receptor-rich areas of rat brain, the Z'' (cis) isomer showed high uptake in these areas but also high concentration in the cerebellum. In contrast, the E,Z-isomeric mixture showed good uptake and retention in the receptor rich areas. Also described in this report is a description of neutron flux measurements in the hydraulic tube position at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Also during this period, samples of [l-125]- and [l-131]-labeled racemic IQNP'' were supplied through a collaborative program with the Brookhaven National Laboratory for high resolution autoradiographic studies in rat tissues.

  20. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this report, we describe the results for study of the production of lutetium-177 ({sup 177}Lu) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Two pathways for production of {sup 177}Lu were studied which involved both direct neutron capture on enriched {sup 176}Lu, {sup 176}Lu (n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu, reaction and by decay of ytterbium-177 ({sup 177}Yb) produced by the {sup 176}Yb(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Yb ({beta}{sup {minus}} {sup {yields}}) reaction. Although the direct route is more straight forward and does not involve any separation steps, the indirect method via {beta}{sup {minus}}-decay of {sup 177}Yb has the advantage of providing carrier-free {sup 177}Lu, which would be required for antibody radiolabeling and other applications where very high specific activity is required.Substrates required for preparation of tissue-specific agents and several radioisotopes were also provided during this period through several Medical Cooperative Programs. These include the substrate for preparation of the ``BMIPP`` cardiac imaging which was developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program, which was provided to Dr. A. Giodamo, M.D. and colleagues at the Catholic University Hospital in Rome, Italy. Tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL HFIR was also provided to the Catholic University Hospital for fabrication of a tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator to provide carrier-free rhenium-188 which will be used for preparation of rhenium-188 labeled methylenediphosphonate (MDP) for initial clinical evaluation for palliative treatment of bone pain (L. Troncone, M.D.). Samples of substrates for preparation of the new ORNL ``IQNP`` agent for imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors were provided to the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, for preparation of radioiodinated IQNP for initial imaging studies with this new agent in monkeys and for tissue binding studies with human brain samples obtained from autopsy (C. Halldin, Ph.D.).

  1. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  3. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  4. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  5. Quarterly report on the Strontium Heat Source Development Program, Operations and By-Products Utilization Division for April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-09-01

    All experimental activities related to the Strontium Heat Source Development Program have been completed. The only remaining activities are preparation and issuance of final reports that summarize program results. This report represents the last of the program quarterly progress reports that will be issued.

  6. A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1992-07-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion systems are envisioned as a fast and efficient form of transportation for the exploration of space. Several nuclear reactor concepts have been proposed. This document discusses SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) which is an engineering computer program that allows the fluid mechanic, heat transfer, and reactor dynamic simulation of the entire propulsion system. SAFSIM currently contains three basic physics modules: (1) fluid mechanics, (2) heat transfer, and (3) reactor dynamics. All three modules are coupled to allow the prediction of system performance. The analyst can employ any or all of the physics modules as the problem dictates.

  7. Materials technology for an advanced space power nuclear reactor concept: Program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.; Watson, G. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a materials technology program for a long-life (50,000 hr), high-temperature (950 C coolant outlet), lithium-cooled, nuclear space power reactor concept are reviewed and discussed. Fabrication methods and compatibility and property data were developed for candidate materials for fuel pins and, to a lesser extent, for potential control systems, reflectors, reactor vessel and piping, and other reactor structural materials. The effects of selected materials variables on fuel pin irradiation performance were determined. The most promising materials for fuel pins were found to be 85 percent dense uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad with tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf).

  8. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  9. Advanced Reactors Transition program fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, D.A.

    1997-09-25

    The mission of the Advanced Reactors Transition program is two-fold. First, the program is to maintain the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) in Standby to support a possible future role in the tritium production strategy. Secondly, the program is to continue deactivation activities which do not conflict with the Standby directive. On-going deactivation activities include the processing of non-usable, irradiated, FFTF components for storage or disposal; deactivation of Nuclear Energy legacy test facilities; and deactivation of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) facility, 309 Building.

  10. NRC review of passive reactor design certification testing programs: Overview, progress, and regulatory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E.

    1995-09-01

    New reactor designs, employing passive safety systems, are currently under development by reactor vendors for certification under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) design certification rule. The vendors have established testing programs to support the certification of the passive designs, to meet regulatory requirements for demonstration of passive safety system performance. The NRC has, therefore, developed a process for the review of the vendors` testing programs and for incorporation of the results of those reviews into the safety evaluations for the passive plants. This paper discusses progress in the test program reviews, and also addresses unique regulatory aspects of those reviews.

  11. Cooperative Developmental Energy Program. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.S.; Anthony, J.L.; Crawford, B. Jr.; Grissom, W.A.; Washington, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    This study identified constraints of employment for minorities and the growth opportunities of minority businesses in the energy field, linked minority businesses and major industries with the university, and developed a strategy and methodology for the penetration of minorities in the energy field. Activities during this quarter are discussed. (PSB)

  12. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary, 1 September Through 30 November 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    Several on-goint activities were conducted during this quarter. Field trials of the Lincoln Training System-3 (LTS-3) at Keesler Air Force Base were extended to include high-aptitude students previously excluded. Results showed such students scored significantly higher on achievement tests and learned substantially faster when they received LTS…

  13. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary, 1 June through 31 August 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    During the quarter covered by this report, the design of the Lincoln Training System-3 (LTS-3) Terminal System was completed and construction of a prototype unit begun. Four major hardware developments occurred: 1) An Image Systems, Incorporated Model 201 CARD Reader was converted into the LTS-3 audio-visual student terminal; 2) the first of five…

  14. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary; 1 December 1974 through 28 February 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    The development of the Lincoln Terminal System (LTS) terminals is described. During the quarter, a decision was made to discontinue work on a cassette-based microfiche storage and retrieval system and to continue work on a carousel-based system. The center has continued its preparation of lessons for use with LTS. Application of LTS to the…

  15. A computer program for estimating decommissioning costs for light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses a desk-top computer program has been developed for estimating the costs, waste volumes, and occupational radiation exposures associated with decommissioning light-water reactor power stations. Cost categories and cost algorithms used in the program are discussed and a brief description of the user interface is given.

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Nuclear Reactor (Plant) Operator Trainee. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary nuclear reactor (plant) operator trainee program is designed for use with courses 1-16 of thirty-five in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians and operators; and to assist planners,…

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Nuclear Reactor (Plant) Operator Trainee. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary nuclear reactor (plant) operator trainee program is designed for use with courses 1-16 of thirty-five in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians and operators; and to assist planners,…

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It

  19. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37 of... reactor fuel is required to assure that individuals used as shipment escorts have completed a...

  20. Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program

    SciTech Connect

    Travelli, A.

    1994-05-01

    The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program.

  1. SP-100 reactor disassembly remote handling test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Charles E.; Potter, Jerry D.; Maiden, Glenn E.; Vader, David P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is presented as an overview of the remote handling equipment validation testing, which will be conducted before installation and use in the ground engineering test facility. This equipment will be used to defuel the SP-100 reactor core after removing it from the Test Assembly following nuclear testing. A series of full scale mock-up operational tests will be conducted at a Hanford Site facility to verify equipment design, operation, and capabilities.

  2. SP-100 reactor diassembly remote handling test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Charles E.; Potter, Jerry D.; Maiden, Glenn E.; Vader, David P.

    This paper is presented as an overview of the remote handling equipment validation testing, which will be conducted before installation and use in the ground engineeering test facility. This equipment will be used to defuel the SP-100 reactor core after removing it from the Test Assembly following nuclear testing. A series of full scale mock-up operational tests will be conducted at a Hanford Site facility to verify equipment design, operation, and capabilities.

  3. SR's reactor tank inspection program: UT development, application, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B. ); McKaig, M.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) has the nation's only plutonium and tritium production reactors. All three reactors have been idle for more than a year so that a variety of modifications can be made. Modifications are being carried out to enhance safety and technical systems. A 1987 decision was made to develop an inspection capability which would allow volumetric inspection of the SRS reactor tanks for the purpose of life extension. The scope of this inspection was defined to address the heat affected zones (HAZ's) of the tanks' weldments for the presence of service induced flaws, i.e., intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In order to be consistent with the existing practices and technology of the nuclear industry a state-of-the-art ultrasonic (UT) examination was chosen as the primary examination medium. Both ultrasonic and eddy current testing were selected as complementary methods for this application, since both can be configured to acquire test data remotely, and the test data can be digitized and stored for post-test analysis. Since intergranular stress corrosion cracking was believed to be the service-induced flaw most likely to occur adjacent to SRS's type 304 stainless steel reactor tank welds, the Savannah River Site's nondestructive testing specialists were faced with a unique challenge. Up to this point the major concentration of effort in the commercial nuclear world has been to apply ultrasonic testing techniques which were developed to detect and size IGSCC on the inside surface of piping with the search unit scanning on the outside surface of the pipe. Proven methods for detection and depth sizing IGSCC which initiated on the near surface (the surface in which the ultrasonic wave enters the metal) had not been established.

  4. LOA-1: prevent accidents. Quarterly technical progress report, FRSP program - July through September 1981. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Information related to LMFBR reactor safety is presented concerning common cause failures; shutdown by self-activated system; shutdown heat removal system operation; sodium burning; core catcher material interactions; accident release of sodium oxide aerosol; and LMFBR risk assessment.

  5. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.E.

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  6. New approaches in the USA for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.; Neylan, A.J.; Penfield, S.R. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Several concepts are being evaluated in the US HTR Program to explore designs which might improve the commercial viability of nuclear power. The general approach is to reduce the reactor power and increase the ability to use inherent features for removing heat following extreme accidents. The unit size and design of these concepts are constrained so that extreme accidents do not result in significant release of radioactivity from the reactor plant. Through the greater reliance on inherent safety features in small HTRs, it should be possible to minimize the amount of nuclear grade components required in the balance-of-plant, which could lead to an economic system. Four HTR concepts are presently being evaluated within the US Program, and these concepts are briefly summarized. A modular HTR using a steel pressure vessel, which is very similar to one of the four HTR concepts being evaluated within the US National program, is presented as an example of a specific concept to illustrate the features and performance of HTRs having a high degree of inherent safety.

  7. University Reactor Instrumentation grant program. Final report, September 7, 1990--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1998-06-17

    The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSU NRL) participated in the Department of Energy (DOE) grant program commonly denoted as the University Reactor Instrumentation (URI) program from the period September 1990 through August 1995, after which funding was terminated on a programmatic basis by DOE. This program provided funding support for acquisition of capital equipment targeted for facility upgrades and improvements, including modernizing reactor systems and instrumentation, improvements in research and instructional capabilities, and infrastructure enhancements. The staff of the OSU NRL submitted five grant applications during this period, all of which were funded either partially or in their entirety. This report will provide an overview of the activities carried out under these grants and assess their impact on the OSU NRL facilities.

  8. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    typing can be used to design computer algorithms to predict the best matched donor. (B.3) Efforts of these Aims are to support the hypothesis that HLA...frequency data and primary DNA data can be used to predict the best-matched donor. Approaches to insure data validation and provide public...match prediction has been implemented as part of the HapLogic TM algorithm. During the past quarter software was implemented to predict the DRBI

  9. Northeast regional biomass program. First quarter report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This progress report presents summaries of various projects which were in operation or being planned during this quarter period. Projects included testing the efficiency of using wood chips as fuel in heating systems, barriers to commercial development of wood pellet fuels, studies of more efficient and less polluting wood stoves, work on landfill gas utilization, directories of facilities using biomass fuels, surveys of biomass conversion processes to liquid fuels, for commercial development, etc.

  10. Syn-fuel reciprocating charge pump improvement program. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Two significant accomplishments were achieved in the fourth quarter of 1984. The 3V3 slurry pump valves were successfully modified and now operate correctly. The 200 h accelerated sand-water test of the pump and seals was started and completed. The conventional plunger/packing failed twice during this test while under the same conditions the floating piston seals maintained a positive seal between the slurry and buffer liquids. 6 figs.

  11. Heat Source Technology Programs. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  12. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-28

    quarter 2011: o KIR-DS, CIBMTR Sample Tracking Application , 09 MRD Study • All Audit Recipient module development milestones are complete...CSS Custom Search Support PSA Public Service Announcement CT Confirmatory Testing PT Proficiency Testing CTA Clinical Trial Application QAMS Quality...the first week of October 2010 with a Recovery Time of 42 hours. Tier 1 is comprised of the following Core Business critical applications and

  13. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1981. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Siting of Critical Facilities, supported by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and in-house funds, contains reports on geologic investigations in western Connecticut and areas in adjacent New York, development of seismotectonic domains, and fracture permeability in siting hazardous waste repositories. The third section, Energy Conservation and Storage Techniques, supported by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), reports on institutional barriers to landfill methane recovery and the need for state legislation.

  14. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 30 June 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is on data analysis of OTEC core unit condenser tests, and is supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The second is on the current status of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va., and is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division. The third is on utilization of landfill methane and is supported by Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to

  16. FFTF and Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-10-31

    This Resource Load Schedule (RLS) addresses two missions. The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) mission, funded by DOE-EM, is to transition assigned, surplus facilities to a safe and compliant, low-cost, stable, deactivated condition (requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance) pending eventual reuse or D&D. Facilities to be transitioned include the 309 Building Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) and Nuclear Energy Legacy facilities. This mission is funded through the Environmental Management (EM) Project Baseline Summary (PBS) RL-TP11, ''Advanced Reactors Transition.'' The second mission, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Project, is funded through budget requests submitted to the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (DOE-NE). The FFTF Project mission is maintaining the FFTF, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and affiliated 400 Area buildings in a safe and compliant standby condition. This mission is to preserve the condition of the plant hardware, software, and personnel in a manner not to preclude a plant restart. This revision of the Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) is based upon the technical scope in the latest revision of the following project and management plans: Fast Flux Test Facility Standby Plan (Reference 1); Hanford Site Sodium Management Plan (Reference 2); and 309 Building Transition Plan (Reference 4). The technical scope, cost, and schedule baseline is also in agreement with the concurrent revision to the ART Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP), which is available in an electronic version (only) on the Hanford Local Area Network, within the ''Hanford Data Integrator (HANDI)'' application.

  17. A low energy continuous reactor separator for the production of ethanol from corn grits/starch and biomass streams. 3rd Quarterly report, October 15, 1994--January 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This project is an attempt to develop and demonstrate an improved reactor for the production of ethanol from starch and ligno-cellulosic streams. Bio-Process Innovations holds a patent of this reactor technology, and is directing the project. A Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) is being built on a pilot plant scale for testing at a small Iowa ethanol plant (Permeate Refining) while bench scale tests on the reactor system are being performed at Purdue University. The project involves two industrial partners, Permeate Refining of Hopkinton, IA who will site and operate the pilot scale unit, and Lamont Sign Co, who are building the pilot scale unit. The CSRS is expected to allow the continuous conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The CSRS unit combines several operations within the confines of the reactor vessel; (1) complex carbohydrates are reduced to simple sugars by enzymatic breakdown; (2) sugars are converted to ethanol by yeast or bacteria; and (3) the ethanol is separated by a stripping gas stream. The ethanol is removed from the stripping gas in an absorber, and then taken to an extractive distillation column. This unit should allow concentrated feeds to be converted to ethanol, and the use of bottoms recycle will be extensively tested to establish the limits of minimizing net bottoms water production leaving the plant. Progress during this quarter is described.

  18. Advanced Two-Phase Flow Instrumentation Program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.G.; Davis, C.E.; Anderson, R.L.; Miller, G.N.

    1980-12-01

    Work performed to develop and evaluate liquid level sensors for in-vessel use in pressurized water reactors is described. Experiments were performed with three thermal-type level sensors in natural convection to saturated water and steam. Pressures in those tests ranged from 0.1 to 8.6 MPa (15 to 1250 psia). Thermal-type sensors were also tested in steam-water forced convection at low and moderate pressures. Sensor response was found to be insensitive to flow velocity and void fraction but sensitive to the presence or absence of a liquid phase. A series of meetings was held with representatives of three pressurized water reactor vendors regarding research goals and implementation of reactor-vessel monitoring instrumentation.

  19. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1983-06-01

    During 1982 the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Technology Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continued to develop experimental data required for the design and licensing of cogeneration HTGRs. The program involves fuels and materials development (including metals, graphite, ceramic, and concrete materials), HTGR chemistry studies, structural component development and testing, reactor physics and shielding studies, performance testing of the reactor core support structure, and HTGR application and evaluation studies.

  20. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety-reliability program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a safety plan as part of an overall program plan for the design and development of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). This plan is intended to establish a logical framework for identifying the technology necessary to demonstrate that the requisite degree of public risk safety can be achieved economically. This plan provides a coherent system safety approach together with goals and success criterion as part of a unifying strategy for licensing a lead reactor plant in the near term. It is intended to provide guidance to program participants involved in producing a technology base for the HTGR that is fully responsive to safety consideration in the design, evaluation, licensing, public acceptance, and economic optimization of reactor systems.

  1. Annual report in compliance with the reactor sharing program, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, R.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report contains information with regard to facilities utilization, descriptions (brief), personnel, organization, and programs of the Neely Nuclear Research Center (NNRC) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The NNRC has two major facilities: the Georgia Tech Research Reactor and the Hot Cell Laboratory. This report of NNRC utilization is prepared in compliance with the contract requirements between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Georgia Institute of Technology. The NNRC is a participant in the University Reactor Sharing Program; as such, it makes available its 5 MW research reactor, its Co-60 irradiation facility and its activation analysis laboratory to large numbers of students and faculty from many universities and colleges.

  2. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  3. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program Environmental Monitoring Program. Quarterly report, Fourth Quarter, 1990. Rept. for 1 Sep 90-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-28

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The support agreement included development of an Environmental Monitoring Plan, incorporating existing compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring on water, air, solid waste, worker health and safety, and socioeconomic impacts during the period 1986-1993. Phase I of the project is to produce 10,000 barrels per day of syncrude from oil shale, using the Unishale B process. Ten pages of text describe ten compliance reports, supplemental sampling at eight sites, and industrial hygiene monitoring results. The remaining pages contain detailed data sheets for ambient air and meteorological monitoring.

  4. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule D Appendix D to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule D Appendix D to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37...

  6. Light-water breeder reactor (LWBR Development Program)

    DOEpatents

    Beaudoin, B.R.; Cohen, J.D.; Jones, D.H.; Marier, L.J. Jr.; Raab, H.F.

    1972-06-20

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  7. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  8. A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

  9. Fossil-energy program. Quarterly progress report for June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    McNeese, L.E.

    1983-08-01

    This quarterly report covers the progress made during the period March 31 through June 30 for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research and development projects that are carried out in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuels as sources of clean energy. These projects are supported by various parts of DOE including Fossil Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, the Electric Power Research Institute, and by the Tennessee Valley Authority and the EPA Office of Research and Development through inter-agency agreement with DOE.

  10. Test Report on the Qualification Program for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Common Module Cryogenic Cooler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    lUI~ II"- NATIONAL URFAU OF E O [pgnuc TE$1 Z 9 N (0 TEST REPORT ON THE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Common...q le62.... O .. . TEST REPORT ON THE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Common Module Cryogenic Cooler CONTRACT NO...1/4 Watt Split Stirling Common Module Cryogenic 41- PERFORMING ORO.REPORTNHUMMER Cooler 7. AUTMDR~e) 11 . CONTRACT 00 GRANT NUM0ER4’a) Raymond M

  11. Test Report on the Qualification Program for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Common Module Cryogenic Cooler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Stirling Common Module Cryogenic Cooler CONTRACT NO. DAAK70-82-C-0216 January 1984 DTIC ELECTE * A ..... r This docum, ent ::n- I...8217% , ... . . .. , ...-. ... .- . . , -- . -.. , .-.... ’.’ .. ’.’..-’".- ’-.’,-.’*("-."-*. -- - -t . - - - - - -. TEST REPORT ON THE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Comon...QUALIFICATION PROGRAM for the One-Quarter (1/4) Watt Split Stirling Common Module Cryogenic Cooler CONTRACT NO. DAAK7O-82-C-0216

  12. Gas-cooled fast reactor program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    Since the national Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program has been terminated, this document is the last progress report until reinstatement. It is divided into three sections: Core Flow Test Loop, GCFR shielding and physics, and GCFR pressure vessel and closure studies. (DLC)

  13. Determination of the Arrhenius Activation Energy Using a Temperature-Programmed Flow Reactor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kit-ha C.; Tse, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a novel method for the determination of the Arrhenius activation energy, without prejudging the validity of the Arrhenius equation or the concept of activation energy. The method involves use of a temperature-programed flow reactor connected to a concentration detector. (JN)

  14. Determination of the Arrhenius Activation Energy Using a Temperature-Programmed Flow Reactor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kit-ha C.; Tse, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a novel method for the determination of the Arrhenius activation energy, without prejudging the validity of the Arrhenius equation or the concept of activation energy. The method involves use of a temperature-programed flow reactor connected to a concentration detector. (JN)

  15. Computer program predicts thermal and flow transients experienced in a reactor loss- of-flow accident

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, C. J.

    1967-01-01

    Program analyzes the consequences of a loss-of-flow accident in the primary cooling system of a heterogeneous light-water moderated and cooled nuclear reactor. It produces a temperature matrix 36 x 41 /x,y/ which includes fuel surface temperatures relative to the time the pump power was lost.

  16. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  17. Federal assistance program. Quarterly project progress report, January 1998--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-98-98 (January-March, 1998). It describes 268 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, spacing heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications for line shaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers and a comprehensive aquaculture developer package. The revised Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebooks was completed, published and is available for distribution. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 19, No. 1) which was devoted entirely to geothermal equipment, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisitions and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  18. Fast reactor safety program. Progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The goal of the DOE LMFBR Safety Program is to provide a technology base fully responsive to safety considerations in the design, evaluation, licensing, and economic optimization of LMFBRs for electrical power generation. A strategy is presented that divides safety technology development into seven program elements, which have been used as the basis for the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the Program. These elements include four lines of assurance (LOAs) involving core-related safety considerations, an element supporting non-core-related plant safety considerations, a safety R and D integration element, and an element for the development of test facilities and equipment to be used in Program experiments: LOA-1 (prevent accidents); LOA-2 (limit core damage); LOA-3 (maintain containment integrity); LOA-4 (attenuate radiological consequences); plant considerations; R and D integration; and facility development.

  19. Overview of the US program of controls for advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.; Sackett, J.I.; Monson, R.; Lindsay, R.W.; Carroll, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    An automated control system can incorporate control goals and strategies, assessment of present and future plant status, diagnostic evaluation and maintenance planning, and signal and command validation. It has not been feasible to employ these capabilities in conventional hard-wired, analog, control systems. Recent advances in computer-based digital data acquisition systems, process controllers, fiber-optic signal transmission artificial intelligence tools and methods, and small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers---with both numeric and symbolic capabilities---have provided many of the necessary ingredients for developing large, practical automated control systems. Furthermore, recent reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. This paper presents an overall US national perspective for advanced controls research and development. The goals of high reliability, low operating cost and simple operation are described. The staged approach from conceptualization through implementation is discussed. Then the paper describes the work being done by ORNL, ANL and GE. The relationship of this work to the US commercial industry is also discussed.

  20. SAFSIM: A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1992-07-01

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program that provides engineering simulations of user-specified flow networks at the system level. It includes fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics capabilities. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the simulation of almost any flow system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary goals of SAFSIM. The current capabilities of SAFSIM are summarized, and some illustrative example results are presented.

  1. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  2. ABWR (advanced boiling water reactor) Design Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.N.

    1990-10-01

    The ABWR Design Verification Program is aimed at restoring confidence in the US licensing process by demonstrating its workability by obtaining USNRC preapproval of GE's ABWR Standard Plant. The purpose of this work is to achieve full NRC approval of the ABWR through the award of an NRC Staff final design approval (FDA) and design certification. The approach is to (1) establish a licensing basis with the NRC Staff for the ABWR, (2) prepare and submit, for NRC Staff review, an SSAR to obtain an FDA, and (3) participate in a rulemaking process to obtain certification of the ABWR design. This program was initiated August 27, 1986. This report, the fourth annual progress report, summarizes progress on this program from October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, August 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Progress in four major research areas is summarized in this report. In the area of oil and gas, subtasks reported on are CROW process modeling and miscible-immiscible gas injection processes. Advanced systems applications research includes four subtasks: (1) development and optimization of a process for the production of a premium solid fuel from western U.S. coals, (2) development of an on-line alkali monitoring probe, (3) optimization of the recycle oil process for eastern oil shale, and (4) process support and development. Solid waste management and remediation of contaminated soils are reported on for the environmental technologies research area. Under applied energy science, heavy oil/plastics co-processing activities are described. Information supplied for each subtask includes an account status report, which includes budget and schedule data, and a brief project summary consisting of research objectives, accomplishments, and activities scheduled for the next quarter. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1982 on Energy Conversion Research and Development Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the continued design work for the low mass flow train superheater. The detailed design of this component continued and the overall arrangement drawing for the superheater and air heater was finalized. The air heater procurement reached the point of contract award, but the actual purchase order award was held up pending receipt of additional funding from the Department of Energy. Testing activity reported includes two additional tests in the LMF1C series, which concludes this test series. Test data are presented, along with preliminary analyses for the combustor, nozzle, diagnostic channel, diffuser, radiant furnace/secondary combustor and Materials Test Module. In addition to the nitrogen oxide test measurements, corrosion and erosion rates for the boiler tube specimens and the materials test module are reported.

  5. Nuclear waste: Quarterly report on DOE`s nuclear waste program as of March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy`s implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE`s failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin an orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million of the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  6. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes.

  7. Status of the DOE`s foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    SciTech Connect

    Chacey, K.; Saris, E.C.

    1997-12-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the U.S. Department of State (DOS), adopted a policy to accept and manage in the United States {approximately}20 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in up to 41 countries. This spent fuel is being accepted under the nuclear weapons non-proliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Only spent fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States is covered under this policy. Implementing this policy is a top priority of the DOE. The purpose of this paper is to provide the current status of the foreign research reactor acceptance program, including achievements to date and future challenges.

  8. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 2, Second quarter report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.; Maier, M.A.

    1992-12-31

    This concludes the sixth quarter that Kansas State University has been under contract to the US Department of Energy and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program to demonstrate electric vehicle technology. The G-Van continues to perform within acceptable limits, although the batteries and the charger have caused some problems. Dave Harris, Chloride, has been working with K-State to correct these problems. It may very well be that the limited mileage (less than 25 miles) can be increased by extending the charge cycle (overcharging) the batteries. Soleq Corp. has failed to deliver contracted vehicles. A dual shaft electric propulsion minivan, built by Eaton Corp. in 1987, will be shipped here. On the infrastructure side, EHV Corp. is developing curbside and home charging stations.

  9. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Halsey, William; Hayner, George; Katoh, Yutai; Klett, James William; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Stoller, Roger E; Wilson, Dane F

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  10. Participation in the US Department of Energy reactor sharing program. Final progress report, October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA from use at their institutions. These areas are discussed in this report.

  11. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Design for Constructability's overall purpose was to identify and address changes in the nuclear industry to restore nuclear energy as an attractive option for new generating capacity. The program stove to meet the following goals related to the future construction of nuclear power plants: reduced costs; assurance of improved quality; and shortened construction schedules. This is Volume 1 of three volumes.

  12. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

  13. Aging management program of the reactor building concrete at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, C.-M.; Shenton, B.; Demerchant, M. M.; Gendron, T.

    2011-04-01

    In order for New Brunswick Power Nuclear (NBPN) to control the risks of degradation of the concrete reactor building at the Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) the development of an aging management plan (AMP) was initiated. The intention of this plan was to determine the requirements for specific structural components of concrete of the reactor building that require regular inspection and maintenance to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the plant. The document is currently in draft form and presents an integrated methodology for the application of an AMP for the concrete of the reactor building. The current AMP addresses the reactor building structure and various components, such as joint sealant and liners that are integral to the structure. It does not include internal components housed within the structure. This paper provides background information regarding the document developed and the strategy developed to manage potential degradation of the concrete of the reactor building, as well as specific programs and preventive and corrective maintenance activities initiated.

  14. The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A.

    1997-08-01

    During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.

  15. Instructional Materials Development Program: Winter and Spring Quarters, 1976. OASIS Evaluation Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Majer, Kenneth

    The Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services (OASIS) at the University of California, San Diego administers an Instructional Materials Development Program. An overview of the program is presented along with a description of the product development/evaluation cycle. Program evaluation is generic to this process, since several formative…

  16. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

    1992-12-01

    The radioiodination and in vivo evaluation of p-iodocaramiphen a muscarinic antagonist which binds with high affinity to the M[sub 1] receptor subtype in vitro are described. Biodistribution studies in female Fischer rats demonstrated that [[sup 125]I]-piodocaraminphen had significant cerebral localization, but the uptake did not demonstrate specific uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors, and radioactivity washed out rapidly from the brain. In addition there was no significant blockage of activity when the rats were preinjected with quinuclidinyl benzilate. These results suggest that p-iodocaramiphen is not a good candidate for the in vivo study of M[sub 1] muscarinic receptor populations by SPECT. Because of the widespread interest and expected importance of the availability of large amounts of tungsten-188 required for the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator systems, we have investigated the large-scale production of tungsten-188 in the ORNL HFIR. We have also compared our production data with the theoretical production values and with experimental data available in the literature from other reactors. Tungsten-188 is produced in a fission nuclear reactor by double neutron capture of tungsten-186. The experimental yield of tungsten-188 is approximately 4 mCi/mg of tungsten-186 at the end of bombardment (EOB) in the HFIR operating at 85 MWt power for a one cycle irradiation ([approximately]21 days) at a thermal neutron flux of 2 [times] 10[sup 15] n.s[sup [minus]1]cm[sup [minus]2].

  17. Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.

    1992-12-01

    The radioiodination and in vivo evaluation of p-iodocaramiphen a muscarinic antagonist which binds with high affinity to the M{sub 1} receptor subtype in vitro are described. Biodistribution studies in female Fischer rats demonstrated that [{sup 125}I]-piodocaraminphen had significant cerebral localization, but the uptake did not demonstrate specific uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors, and radioactivity washed out rapidly from the brain. In addition there was no significant blockage of activity when the rats were preinjected with quinuclidinyl benzilate. These results suggest that p-iodocaramiphen is not a good candidate for the in vivo study of M{sub 1} muscarinic receptor populations by SPECT. Because of the widespread interest and expected importance of the availability of large amounts of tungsten-188 required for the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator systems, we have investigated the large-scale production of tungsten-188 in the ORNL HFIR. We have also compared our production data with the theoretical production values and with experimental data available in the literature from other reactors. Tungsten-188 is produced in a fission nuclear reactor by double neutron capture of tungsten-186. The experimental yield of tungsten-188 is approximately 4 mCi/mg of tungsten-186 at the end of bombardment (EOB) in the HFIR operating at 85 MWt power for a one cycle irradiation ({approximately}21 days) at a thermal neutron flux of 2 {times} 10{sup 15} n.s{sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  18. 78 FR 26038 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-January Through March 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Listing of Program Issuances--January Through March 2013 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... through March 2013, relating to the Medicare and Medicaid programs and other programs administered by CMS...

  19. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 4, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-15

    During this reporting period preliminary data were taken for the kinetic models necessary for a peat biogasification process. A limited number of batch experiments were conducted to obtain rate data for the solubilization kinetic model. The analysis of the pretreatment batch tests was slowed down this quarter because the High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) solvent system was altered. This was done because a mass balance around the HPLC with the solvent system (85% H/sub 2/O/15% acetonitrile) was incomplete. The preliminary data indicate that the new solvent system developed seems to be acceptable. Pretreated peat, both oxidized and unoxidized, has been fermented to fuel gas with conversions up to 20%. The fermentation experiments show that oxidation temperature has little effect on anaerobic digestion. Continuous digesters were set up to obtain rate data for the fermentation model. Preliminary process models were developed for the three phases of peat biogasification, namely, solubilization, oxidation, and fermentation. Rate data for the solubilization phase were taken, but more is needed to develop the model further.

  20. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, G.J.

    1994-06-01

    Objective (Phase II) is to develop an industrial gas turbine system to operate at a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50) with efficiency enhancements to be added as they become possible. During this quarter, Solar`s engine design team has refined both the 1- and 2-spool cycle concepts, to determine sensitivity to key component efficiencies, cooling air usage and origin, and location of compressor surge lines. The refined analysis included more detailed component work such as compressor and turbine design; different speed trade-offs for the low-and high-pressure compressor in the 1-spool configuration were examined for the best overall compressor efficiency. High-temperature and creep testing of recuperator candidate materials continued. Creep, yield, and proportional limit were measured for foil thicknesses 0.0030--0.0050 for Type 347 ss, Inconel 625, and Haynes 230. Combustor design work included preliminary layout of a multi-can annular combustor integrated into the main engine layout. During the subscale catalytic combustion rig testing, NOx emissions < 5 ppmv were measured. Integration of the engine concept designs into the full power plant system designs has started.

  1. Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. The goals of the JSR and Base Programs are accomplished by focusing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization in three major technology areas: energy programs emphasize the increased production and utilization of domestic energy resources and include enhanced oil recovery, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coalbed methane recovery, and renewable energy resources; environmental programs minimize the impact of energy production and utilization by providing technology to clean underground oily wastes, mitigate acid mine drainage, and demonstrate uses for clean coal technology (CCT) and pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) waste solids; technology enhancement activities encompass resource characterization studies, the development of improved environmental monitors and sensors, and improved techniques and models for predicting the dispersion of hazardous gas releases. Significant accomplishments under the Base Research program are reported.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, William G.

    1999-04-01

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such a broad

  3. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Glebov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network.

  4. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  5. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  6. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  7. Advanced two-phase flow instrumentation program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.G.; Davis, C.E.; Anderson, R.L.; Miller, G.N.

    1980-09-01

    Work performed to develop reliable liquid level sensors for in-vessel use in pressurized water reactors is described. During this period, an improved heated thermocouple level sensor was fabricated and techniques for separating thermocouple output signals from superimposed ac voltages were developed. Experiments that were performed with a thermal-type level sensor in natural convection to saturated water and steam are described. Pressures in those tests ranged from 0.1 to 10 MPa (15 to 1500 psia). Acoustic techniques using pulse transit times along a waveguide were studied. A single waveguide was used to obtain accurate measurements of liquid level at room temperature and to compensate for temperature variations over a 10/sup 0/C temperature range. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Advanced two-phase flow instrumentation program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K G; Davis, C E; McCulloch, R W; Anderson, R L; Miller, G N; Rogers, S C

    1981-05-01

    Work performed to develop and evaluate liquid level sensors for in-vessel use in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is described. Thermal-type and acoustic-type devices were tested under conditions similar to a hypothetical PWR loss-of-coolant accident. A heated thermocouple (HTS) and a pressure difference instrument were tested in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility during high-pressure rod-bundle uncovery and reflood experiments. Both methods provided useful indications of the system coolant inventory. A three-element HTC was fabricated and tested in a pressurizer over a wide range of conditions. Improvements were made in a ribbon-type ultrasonic liquid level device. Data obtained from the ultrasonic device in the pressurizer were reduced and evaluated.

  9. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

    1997-01-01

    The reactor production yields of tungsten-188 produced by neutron capture by enriched tungsten-186 in the HFIR and other reactors are nearly an order of magnitude lower than expected by calculation using established cross section values. Since neutron capture of tungsten-188 may be the major factor which significantly reduces the observed yields of tungsten-188, the authors have evaluated the possible burn-up cross section of the tungsten-188 product. Tungsten-189 was produced by irradiating a radioactive target containing a known amount of {sup 188}W. In order to reduce the radiation level to an acceptable level (<20% detector dead time), the authors chemically removed >90% of {sup 188}Re, which is the decay product of {sup 188}W, prior to irradiation. They were able to confirm the two predominant {gamma}-rays in the decay of {sup 189}W, 260.1 {+-} 1.4 and 421.5 {+-} 1.6 keV. By following the decay of these {gamma}-rays in two sets of experiments, a half-life of 10.8 {+-} 0.3 m was obtained for {sup 189}W. Based on a knowledge of the {sup 188}W content of target (52.6 mBq), neutron flux of 5 {times} 10{sup 13} n {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1} {center_dot} cm{sup {minus}2}, irradiation time of 10 min and with the assumption of 100% intensity for 260.1 and 421.5 keV {gamma}-rays, a cross-section of 12.0 {+-} 2.5 b was calculated for burn-up cross-section of {sup 188}W, which helps explain the greatly reduced production yields of {sup 188}W.

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Digital Architecture Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    There are many technologies available to the nuclear power industry to improve efficiency in plant work activities. These range from new control room technologies to those for mobile field workers. They can make a positive impact on a wide range of performance objectives – increase in productivity, human error reduction, validation of results, accurate transfer of data, and elimination of repetitive tasks. It is expected that the industry will more and more turn to these technologies to achieve these operational efficiencies to lower costs. At the same time, this will help utilities manage a looming staffing problem as the inevitable retirement wave of the more seasoned workers affects both staffing levels and knowledge retention. A barrier to this wide-scale implementation of new technologies for operational efficiency is the lack of a comprehensive digital architecture that can support the real-time information exchanges needed to achieve the desired operational efficiencies. This project will define an advanced digital architecture that will accommodate the entire range of system, process, and plant worker activity to enable the highest degree of integration, thereby creating maximum efficiency and productivity. This pilot project will consider a range of open standards that are suitable for the various data and communication requirements of a seamless digital environment. It will map these standards into an overall architecture to support the II&C developments of this research program.

  11. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

  12. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

  13. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 5, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Grant, T.J.; Nordquist, A.L.; Stone, D.S.; Wendell, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz. The use of cyclotron resonance interaction is being pursued. The design, procurement and early construction phases of this program are discussed.

  14. 60 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 4, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shively, J.F.; Grant, T.J.; Stone, D.S.; Symons, R.S.; Wendell, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a microwave oscillator capable of producing 200 kW of CW output power at 60 GHz. The use of cyclotron resonance interaction is being pursued. The design and early procurement and construction phases of this program are discussed.

  15. Calorimetry exchange program quarterly data report for, January 1989--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.; McClelland, T.M.

    1996-08-01

    The goals of the calorimetry sample exchange program are to: discuss measurement differences; improve analytical methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide standardized materials as necessary; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of plutonium dioxide powder is available at each participating site for NDA analysis.

  16. DOE-OTM Tribology Program; Quarterly progress report, January 1991--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F. A.; Michaels, A. I.

    1991-07-01

    The OTM Tribology Program supports generic, long-term, high-risk applied research and exploratory development which private enterprise will not or cannot pursue, in areas pertaining to energy conservation in the transportation sector. This report presents work in the three areas of the tribology program: extreme environment lubrication, engineered tribological interfaces, and tribology by design.

  17. DOE Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) Fiscal Year 2001 Fourth Quarter Report of Packaging- and Transportation-related Occurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, L.S.

    2001-11-30

    The Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) retrieved 44 packaging- or transportation-related occurrences from the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) during the period from July 1 through September 30, 2001. Only those incidents that occur in preparation for transport, during transport, and during unloading of hazardous material are considered as packaging- or transportation-related occurrences. Other incidents with packaging and transportation (P and T) significance but not involving hazardous material (such as vehicle accidents or empty packagings) are not rated to the SMIP criteria, but are archived in the SMIP Subsidiary Database of occurrences, a sub-database of the main SMIP P and T Occurrence Database. Thirty-two of the originally-selected 44 occurrences were appropriate for classification to the SMIP criteria, only 7 of which have offsite applicability. Eight of the original 44 reports are archived in a subsidiary database because they either do not involve the transport of hazardous material or do not involve transport by vehicle, plane, boat, or rail. The others either were deleted because more thorough review revealed that they were not strictly related to P and T or were canceled by the reporting site and removed from the ORPS. These occurrences have not been normalized as in the Annual Report of Occurrences because the necessary information is not yet available. The number and severity of the selected occurrence reports (ORs) are consistent with historical reporting. Contamination events continue to be among the most common type of occurrences; however, ''Shipping Preparation'' events decreased this quarter to only 4 events from the 21 reported last quarter. None of the 32 ORs that were rated had event consequence measures (W{sub EC}) greater than 2; 14 of them were categorized as having a W{sub EC} of 1. This means that all of the fourth-quarter FY 2001 ORs had only slight consequences at worst (i.e., resulting in minimal safety

  18. Development program for a 200-kW, c-w gyrotron. Quarterly report No. 7, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, J J; Caplan, M; Sandoval, J J; Jordan, E; Matranga, V A

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is the design and development of a millimeter-wave device to produce 200 kW of continuous-wave power at 60 GHz. The device, which will be a gyrotron oscillator, will be compatible with power delivery to an electron-cyclotron plasma. Smooth control of rf power output over a 17 dB range is required, and the device should be capable of operation into a severe time-varying rf load mismatch. An interim program goal is to demonstrate operation at 100 ms pulse widths by 31 December 1981. During this quarter, progress was made in the areas of tube, solenoid, and facility construction. Two magnetron injection gun assemblies were completed, and one was partially evaluated as a gun tester. The superconducting solenoid was assembled, but a vacuum leak prevented early delivery in March. Construction began on the gyrotron test facility by enclosing the area and providing bake-out and vacuum processing utilities.

  19. Implementation of a source term control program in a mature boiling water reactor.

    PubMed

    Vargo, G J; Jarvis, A J; Remark, J F

    1991-06-01

    The implementation and results of a source term control program implemented at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant (JAF), a mature boiling water reactor (BWR) facility that has been in commercial operation since 1975, are discussed. Following a chemical decontamination of the reactor water recirculation piping in the Reload 8/Cycle 9 refueling outage in 1988, hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and feedwater Zn addition were implemented. This is the first application of both HWC and feedwater Zn addition in a BWR facility. The radiological benefits and impacts of combined operation of HWC and feedwater Zn addition at JAF during Cycle 9 are detailed and summarized. The implementation of hydrogen water chemistry resulted in a significant transport of corrosion products within the reactor coolant system that was greater than anticipated. Feedwater Zn addition appears to be effective in controlling buildup of other activated corrosion products such as 60Co on reactor water recirculation piping; however, adverse impacts were encountered. The major adverse impact of feedwater Zn addition is the production of 65Zn that is released during plant outages and operational transients.

  20. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  1. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  2. Strengthening the fission reactor nuclear science and engineering program at UCLA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Okrent, D.

    1997-06-23

    This is the final report on DOE Award No. DE-FG03-92ER75838 A000, a three year matching grant program with Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to support strengthening of the fission reactor nuclear science and engineering program at UCLA. The program began on September 30, 1992. The program has enabled UCLA to use its strong existing background to train students in technological problems which simultaneously are of interest to the industry and of specific interest to PG and E. The program included undergraduate scholarships, graduate traineeships and distinguished lecturers. Four topics were selected for research the first year, with the benefit of active collaboration with personnel from PG and E. These topics remained the same during the second year of this program. During the third year, two topics ended with the departure o the students involved (reflux cooling in a PWR during a shutdown and erosion/corrosion of carbon steel piping). Two new topics (long-term risk and fuel relocation within the reactor vessel) were added; hence, the topics during the third year award were the following: reflux condensation and the effect of non-condensable gases; erosion/corrosion of carbon steel piping; use of artificial intelligence in severe accident diagnosis for PWRs (diagnosis of plant status during a PWR station blackout scenario); the influence on risk of organization and management quality; considerations of long term risk from the disposal of hazardous wastes; and a probabilistic treatment of fuel motion and fuel relocation within the reactor vessel during a severe core damage accident.

  3. Base program on energy-related research. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report describes research performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in the following areas: oil and gas; advanced systems describing a coal solid fuel and an eastern shale oil residue waste program; environmental remediation; and waste management technologies.

  4. Fossil Energy Program quarterly progress report for the period ending March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report covers progress made during the period January 1 through March 31, 1986, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by DOE Office of Fossil Energy, DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Fossil Energy Program organization chart is shown in the Appendix.

  5. Review of the Tri-Agency Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrus, J. H.; Wright, W. E.; Bunch, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program designated SP-100 was created in 1983 by NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Attention is presently given to the development history of SP-100 over the course of its first year, in which it has been engaged in program objectives' definition, the analysis of civil and military missions, nuclear power system functional requirements' definition, concept definition studies, the selection of primary concepts for technology feasibility validation, and the acquisition of initial experimental and analytical results.

  6. Review of the Tri-Agency Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrus, J. H.; Wright, W. E.; Bunch, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Space Nuclear Reactor Power System Technology Program designated SP-100 was created in 1983 by NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Attention is presently given to the development history of SP-100 over the course of its first year, in which it has been engaged in program objectives' definition, the analysis of civil and military missions, nuclear power system functional requirements' definition, concept definition studies, the selection of primary concepts for technology feasibility validation, and the acquisition of initial experimental and analytical results.

  7. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 2, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Donald L.; Buivid, Michael G.

    1980-01-01

    Batch experiments have been performed to determine the effects of different alkalis, temperatures, retention times, solids loading, and oxygen partial pressures on the solubility of peat organic material. Oxidation experiments have been performed simultaneously with and separately from solubilization. In both cases kinetic information has been developed based on oxygen consumption. Kinetics based on fermentable product formation are dependent on satisfactory identification methods. Development of analytical procedures for product identification have included: Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), solvent extraction, aldehyde precipitation, and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC). Microorganisms from three inoculation sources are being grown anaerobically using a growth medium containing a standard nutrient and a specific substrate, one of twelve aromatic compounds. The concentration of aromatic compound was increased gradually in order that bacteria acclimate for future use as inocula with pretreated peat liquors. Acids and methane production are being monitored for pretreated peat liquor fermentations using an acclimated microorganism inocula. Apparent viscosity and apparent heat transfer coefficient data are being obtained at three peat slurry solids concentrations (3-5, 10, 15% total solids). A 75% heat recovery would give a positive energy balance around the pretreatment reactor. Development has continued in regards to full scale peat biogasification design (75 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD, pipeline quality methane). The information necessary for continuous PDU scale operation is being evaluated in terms of what processing information may be obtained from various scale units, batch and continuous.

  8. Simulation and Design of an Automatic Controller for a Fast Breeder Nuclear Reactor Power Plant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BREEDER REACTORS, *REACTOR CONTROL, *REACTOR REACTIVITY, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NEUTRON TRANSPORT THEORY, REACTOR FUELS, REACTOR FUEL CLADDING , HEAT TRANSFER, COMPUTER PROGRAMS, LOGIC CIRCUITS, THESES.

  9. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production Progress Report for Year 1, Quarter 2 (January - March 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-03-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  10. Northeast Regional Biomass Program. Ninth year, Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  11. Final report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-95NE38118-5 University Reactor Sharing Program [Purdue University

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.S.

    2001-06-01

    Under the Reactor Sharing Program, a total of 350 high school students participated in the neutron activation experiment and 484 high school and university students and members of the general public participated in reactor tours.

  12. Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Year 1 third quarter report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

  13. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites.

  14. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary, 1 March - 31 May 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    The results of the field trials of the Lincoln Training System (LTS-3) program are summarized in this report. The LTS-3 system was designed to teach basic electronics to Air Force personnel at Kessler Air Force Base, Mississippi. The results indicated that the instructional delays due to system failure were minimal, and those failures were…

  15. Library Service Enhancement Program, DePauw University. Grant Proposal and Quarterly Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, James; Hardesty, Larry

    The purpose of this grant, funded by the Council on Library Resources, was to allow a librarian to put aside normal duties for an academic year to explore with faculty, students, and administrators ways of improving library services, and to design methods of increasing library use by college students. A program was developed for orienting and…

  16. Educational Technology Program. Quarterly Technical Summary, Period Ending 31 May 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Frederick C.

    An overview of the Lincoln Training System (LTS) and descriptions of the hardward and software of the LTS-1 and LTS-2 systems are provided. The overall program seeks to develop, test, and evaluate technical aids to vocational training systems. These are appropriate to this field because the high costs need to be reduced and because there are clear…

  17. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland

    2001-03-31

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors. Washington University's work for the quarter involved the study of the dynamic simulations of bubble columns in three dimensions. Work was also done in dynamic simulations of two-phase transient flow using CFDLIB. Ohio State measured the axial dispersion coefficients of the liquid phase. The steady-state thermal dispersion method was used to obtain the measurements. Iowa State followed the last quarter's work by using CFDLIB to simulate conditions described in the literature, with the objective of validating the simulation result. The group's work also led to a determination of the adequacy of periodic boundary conditions in representing small columns.

  18. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorski, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    At the beginning of the third quarter of 1980, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station was operating with the 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 1BD purification loops in service. During the quarter, the Station was operated for Duquesne Light Company System grid including base load and swing load operation. Twelve (12) planned swing load operations were performed on the LWBR Core this quarter to complete the LWBR operating plan of fifty (50) during this operating phase. The Station was shutdown on September 12 for the Fall 1980 Shutdown and remained in this mode through the end of the quarter. The LWBR Core has generated 18,297.98 EFPH from start-up through the end of the quarter. There were no radioactive liquid discharges from the Radioactive Waste Processing System to the river this quarter. The radioactive liquid waste effluent line to the river remained blanked off to prevent inadvertent radioactive liquid waste discharges. During the quarter, approximately 0.001 curies of Xe 133 activity were released from the station. The radioactivity released from Shippingport Station is far too small to have any measurable effect on the general background environmental radioactivity outside the plant.

  19. Development program for a 200 kW, c-w gyrotron. Quarterly report No. 8, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, J J; Caplan, M; Sandoval, J J; Jordan, E N; Matranga, V A

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is the design and development of a millimeter wave device to produce 200 kW of continuous-wave power at 60 GHz. The device, a gyrotron oscillator, will be compatible with power delivery to an electron-cyclotron plasma. Smooth control of RF power output over a 17 dB range is required, and the device should be capable of operation into a severe time-varying load mismatch. The first tube was assembled and vacuum processed during this quarter. However RF evaluation was postponed because of a superconducting solenoid malfunction. The emission quality of a gun tester was confirmed. The gun tester was then used to check out a cathode modulated pulser and resistor grid divider. The first phase of the Gyrotron Test Facility was completed when the vacuum processing equipment and short pulse modulator were brought on-line. The second Facility phase was started with the reassembly of the medium pulse (100 ms) modulator.

  20. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-10-23

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

  1. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-08-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

  2. BREEDER: a microcomputer program for financial analysis of a large-scale prototype breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes a microcomputer-based, single-project financial analysis program: BREEDER. BREEDER is a user-friendly model designed to facilitate frequent and rapid analyses of the financial implications associated with alternative design and financing strategies for electric generating plants and large-scale prototype breeder (LSPB) reactors in particular. The model has proved to be a useful tool in establishing cost goals for LSPB reactors. The program is available on floppy disks for use on an IBM personal computer (or IBM look-a-like) running under PC-DOS or a Kaypro II transportable computer running under CP/M (and many other CP/M machines). The report documents version 1.5 of BREEDER and contains a user's guide. The report also includes a general overview of BREEDER, a summary of hardware requirements, a definition of all required program inputs, a description of all algorithms used in performing the construction-period and operation-period analyses, and a summary of all available reports. The appendixes contain a complete source-code listing, a cross-reference table, a sample interactive session, several sample runs, and additional documentation of the net-equity program option.

  3. A two-step method for developing a control rod program for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H. ); Hsiao, M.Y. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-step method that is established for the generation of a long-term control rod program for boiling water reactors (BWRs). The new method assumes a time-variant target power distribution in core depletion. In the new method, the BWR control rod programming is divided into two steps. In step 1, a sequence of optimal, exposure-dependent Haling power distribution profiles is generated, utilizing the spectral shift concept. In step 2, a set of exposure-dependent control rod patterns is developed by using the Haling profiles generated at step 1 as a target. The new method is implemented in a computer program named OCTOPUS. The optimization procedure of OCTOPUS is based on the method of approximation programming, in which the SIMULATE-E code is used to determine the nucleonics characteristics of the reactor core state. In a test in cycle length over a time-invariant, target Haling power distribution case because of a moderate application of spectral shift. No thermal limits of the core were violated. The gain in cycle length could be increased further by broadening the extent of the spetral shift.

  4. The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Travelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

  5. Acid rain program: CEMS submission instructions for monitoring plans, certification test notifications, and quarterly reports

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-12

    The Acid Rain Program regulations require all affected utility units to continuously measure, record and report SO2, NOx, volumetric flow data and CO2 emissions. All affected units also must continuously measure and record opacity, and must report opacity exceedances to the appropriate State or Local Agency. To ensure that your CEMS and fuel flowmeters are performing at an acceptable level, and providing quality assured data, you are required under 40 CFR 75.53, 75.62 (a) to submit a monitoring plan and certification test data for acid rain CEM certificaton. The purpose of this handbook is to help you fulfill your requirements under the Acid Rain Program. This handbook will walk you through the necessary steps for gaining CEMS certification, including filling out and mailing the proper forms, administering the required tests, and applying for certification and sending in electronic data to EPA.

  6. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The objective of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. During this report period, the following tasks were completed: Market study; System definition and analysis; and Integrated program plans. Progress on Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components, is also discussed. This particular task includes expanded materials and component research covering recuperators, combustion, autothermal fuel reformation, ceramics application and advanced gas turbine system controls.

  7. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program. Quarterly report, 9th year, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  8. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. Quarterly report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Progress in the three projects in this program during April to July 1981 is reported. For the Electric Vehicle (EV) Project, development of engineering models of electronically commutated permanent magnet propulsion motors is nearing completion, tests on a samarium-cobalt motor and a ferrite motor were completed, a Phase I ac propulsion system breadboard was installed on the Road Load Simulator, lead-acid multicell modules delivered by industrial subcontractors surpassed 390 cycles in ongoing tests and offer promise of exceeding the FY 1981 objective of 450 cycles, and ongoing tests on nickel/iron modules demonstrated greater than 670 cycles in one case, and 430 cycles in another. For the Electric Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) Project, the final report of the Environmental Control System study was received and recommends a split heat pump system, and a test program which reflects recent project modifications was planned.

  9. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Second quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This document contains information concerning the groundwater monitoring program at Savannah River Plant. The EPD/EMS (environmental protection department/environmental monitoring section) is responsible for monitoring constituents in the groundwater at approximately 135 waste sites in 16 areas at SRS. This report consolidates information from field reports, laboratory analysis, and quality control. The groundwater in these areas has been contaminated with radioactive materials, organic compounds, and heavy metals.

  10. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development: Quarterly report, November 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress made in the advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. The topics of the report include selection of the Allison GFATS, castcool technology development for industrial engines test plan and schedule, code development and background gathering phase for the ultra low NOx combustion technology task, active turbine clearance task, and water vapor/air mixture cooling of turbine vanes task.

  11. Fluidized-bed combustion process evaluation and program support. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Podolski, W.F.; Swift, W.M.; Henry, R.F.; Hanway, J.E.; Griggs, K.E.; Herzenberg, C.; Helt, J.E.; Carls, E.L.

    1980-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is undertaking several tasks primarily in support of the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion project management team at Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Work is under way to provide fluidized-bed combustion process evaluation and program support to METC, determination of the state of the art of instrumentation for FBC applications, evaluation of the performance capability of cyclones for hot-gas cleaning in PFBC systems, and an initial assessment of methods for the measurement of sodium sulfate dew point.

  12. DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program year 5 first quarter report, July 1-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy` s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU now has two electric cars. Both are electric conversion vehicles from Soleq Corporation out of Chicago. KSU in conjunction with KEURP also initiated procurement for the purchase of four (4) Chevy S-10 pickup trucks. Since the supplier, GE-Spartan, canceled its effort concerning the production of vehicles other appropriate sources were sought. Today, K-State and the Kansas Utilities are working with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM), Redford, Michigan. TDM is working with Ford Motor Company and expects to become the first certified electric vehicle Quality Vehicle Modifier (QVM). Kansas State has entered into an agreement to assist TDM in supporting the infrastructure and technical manual development for these vehicles. The Soleq EVcorts have not been signed to illustrate to the public that it is an electric vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged. As soon as TDM`s Ford Ranger electric vehicles are delivered they will be used throughout the state by utility companies that are participating with K-State`s Site Operator Program.

  13. Northeast regional biomass program. Second & third quarterly reports, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut. Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market.

  14. Northeast Regional Biomass Program first and second quarter reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven Northeastern states overcome these obstacles and achieve their biomass energy potentials. The objective of this program in the current and future years is to increase the role of biomass fuels in the region`s energy mix by providing the impetus for states and the private sector to develop a viable Northeast biomass fuels market. This paper contains a management report, state program summaries, technical project status report, and technology transfer activities.

  15. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. Quarterly report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Progress in the three projects in this program during April to July 1981 is reported. For the Electric Vehicle (EV) Project, development of engineering models of electronically commutated permanent magnet propulsion motors is nearing completion, tests on a samarium-cobalt motor and a ferrite motor were completed, a Phase I ac propulsion system breadboard was installed on the Road Load Simulator, lead-acid multicell modules delivered by industrial subcontractors surpassed 390 cycles in ongoing tests and offer promise of exceeding the FY 1981 objective of 450 cycles, and ongoing tests on nickel/iron modules demonstrated greater than 670 cycles in one case, and 430 cycles in another. For the Electric Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) Project, the final report of the Environmental Control System study was received and recommends a split heat pump system, and a test program which reflects recent project modifications was planned. For the Advanced Vehicle Development Project, the dc controllers were tested and had measured efficiencies of from 85 to 98%, Mg-Al-C was evaluated as a low-cost permanent magnet material but its use is limited by its relatively low maximum operating temperature, the EHV computer simulation program is usable, and EHV subsystem technology assessment are continuing. (LCL)

  16. DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

  17. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  18. Providing solutions to energy and environmental programs. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The goals of WRI`s jointly sponsored research program are to: (1) increase the production of US and western energy resources--low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) reduce the nation`s dependence upon foreign energy supplies and strengthen the US and regional economies; and (4) minimize the impact of energy production and utilization on the environment. A summary of appropriations, obligations and expenditures is given, then a summary of objectives and accomplishments for the 21 tasks being supported is presented.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, November 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Objective of Phase II of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for anultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. Technical progress covered in this report is confined to Task 4 (conversion to coal) and the nine subtasks under Task 8 (design and test of critical components). These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies: catalytic combustion, recuperator, autothermal fuel reformer, high temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  20. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the tasks completed for the advanced turbine systems program. The topics of the report include last row turbine blade development, single crystal blade casting development, ceramic materials development, combustion cylinder flow mapping, shroud film cooling, directional solidified valve development, shrouded blade cooling, closed-loop steam cooling, active tip clearance control, flow visualization tests, combustion noise investigation, TBC field testing, catalytic combustion development, optical diagnostics probe development, serpentine channel cooling tests, brush seal development, high efficiency compressor design, advanced air sealing development, advanced coating development, single crystal blade development, Ni-based disc forging development, and steam cooling effects on materials.

  1. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 5 and 6, October 1, 1998 through March 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  2. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 7, 8 and Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast stran, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  3. Quarterly Progress Report on the Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-12-30

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program ( BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  4. Northeast regional biomass program: Second and Third quarterlies and final report, January 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is comprised of the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island and Vermont. It is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the CONEG Policy Research Center, Inc. The Northeast states face several near-term barriers to the expanded use of biomass energy. Informational and technical barriers have impeded industrial conversions, delaying the development of a wood energy supply infrastructure. Concern over the environmental impacts on resources are not well understood. Public awareness and concern about safety issues surrounding wood energy use has also grown to the point of applying a brake to the trend of increases in residential applications of biomass energy. In addition, many residential, commercial, industrial, and commercial energy users are discouraged from using biomass energy because of the convenience factor. Regardless of the potential for cost savings, biomass energy sources, aside from being perceived as more esoteric, are also viewed as more work for the user. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is designed to help the eleven states overcome obstacles and achieve biomass energy potentials.

  5. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report contains separate reports on the following subtasks: analysis of the Vortec cyclone melting system for remediation of PCB contaminated soils using CFD; drain enhanced soil flushing using prefabricated vertical drains; performance and characteristics evaluation of acrylates as grout barriers; development of standard test protocol barrier design models for desiccation barriers, and for in-situ formed barriers; in-situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; development of a decision support system and a prototype database for management of the EM50 technology development program; GIS-based infrastructure for site characterization and remediation; treatment of mixed wastes via fluidized bed steam reforming; use of centrifugal membrane technology to treat hazardous/radioactive waste; environmental pollution control devices based on novel forms of carbon; development of instrumental methods for analysis of nuclear wastes and environmental materials; production and testing of biosorbents and cleaning solutions for D and D; use of SpinTek centrifugal membrane and sorbents/cleaning solutions for D and D; West Virginia High Tech Consortium Foundation--Environmental support program; small business interaction opportunities; and approach for assessing potential voluntary environmental protection.

  6. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a summary of the work conducted for the period of October--December 1993 by the West Virginia University for the US DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Research under the program focuses on pertinent technology for hazardous waste clean-up. This report reflects the progress performed on sixteen technical projects encompassed by this program: Systematic assessment of the state of hazardous waste clean-up technologies; Site remediation technologies: (a) Drain-enhanced soil flushing and (b) In situ bio-remediation of organic contaminants; Excavation systems for hazardous waste sites: Dust control methods for in-situ nuclear waste handling; Chemical destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls; Development of organic sensors: Monolayer and multilayer self-assembled films for chemical sensors; Winfield lock and dam remediation; Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale test facility implementation; Remediation of hazardous sites with steam reforming; Microbial enrichment for enhancing biodegradation of hazardous organic wastes in soil; Soil decontamination with a packed flotation column; Treatment of volatile organic compounds using biofilters; Use of granular activated carbon columns for the simultaneous removal of organic, heavy metals, and radionuclides; Compact mercuric iodide detector technology development; Evaluation of IR and mass spectrometric techniques for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds; and Improved socio-economic assessment of alternative environmental restoration techniques.

  7. SP-100, the US Space Nuclear Reactor Power Program. Technical information report

    SciTech Connect

    Truscello, V.C.

    1983-11-01

    DARPA, in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, and NASA`s Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology are jointly sponsoring a space nuclear reactor power system program known as the Space Power-100 (SP-100) Development Project. The program is presently in the critical technology phase. This phase, better known as technology assessment and advancement, includes mission requirements definition, system conceptual designs, and critical technology development. A ground test phase decision is scheduled for July 1985. If the decision is positive, the next phase would begin in fiscal year 1986. An overriding concern in conducting this program is to ensure that nuclear safety is being properly addressed even in these early stages.

  8. PR-EDB: Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 2. Revision 2, Program description

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.; Taylor, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations of regulatory issues such as vessel integrity over plant life, vessel failure, and sufficiency of current codes Standard Review Plans (SRP`s) and Guides for license renewal can be greatly expedited by the use of a well-designed computerized data base. Also, such a data base is essential for the validation of embrittlement prediction models by researchers. The Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) is such a comprehensive collection of data for US commercial nuclear reactors. The current version of the PR-EDB contains the Charpy test data that were irradiated in 252 capsules of 96 reactors and consists of 207 data points for heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials (98 different HAZ), 227 data points for weld materials (105 different welds), 524 data points for base materials (136 different base materials), including 297 plate data points (85 different plates), 119 forging data points (31) different forging), and 108 correlation monitor materials data points (3 different plates). The data files are given in dBASE format and can be accessed with any computer using the DOS operating system. ``User-friendly`` utility programs are used to retrieve and select specific data, manipulate data, display data to the screen or printer, and to fit and plot Charpy impact data. The results of several studies investigated are presented in Appendix D.

  9. Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    SciTech Connect

    Batte, G.L. ); Hoffman, G.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  11. 2-D pressurized water reactor whole core benchmark problem development and MOCUM program verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oredeko, Ayoola Emmanuel

    The need to solve larger-scale and highly heterogeneous reactor problems is urgent nowadays; different computational codes are being developed to meet this demand. Method of characteristics unstructured meshing (MOCUM) is a transport theory code based on the method of characteristic as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor. The objective of this research was to use the MOCUM program to solve the whole core, highly heterogeneous pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem, to determine its efficiency in solving complicated benchmarks, the large scale full-core PWR benchmark problem presented in this work was modeled for high heterogeneity at the core and assembly level, and depicts a realistic reactor design. The design of the core is a 15x15 assembly arrangement and each assembly is based on the C5G7 assembly design, i.e, 17x17 fuel pins. The problem was simplified for faster computation time by using the 1/4 symmetry of the core. MATLAB is used for the visualization of the neutron flux for each group, and the fission rate. MOCUM result shows good agreement with monte carlo N-particles (MCNP6) solution with a -0.025% difference in eigenvalue (keff). The pin and assembly power calculated with MOCUM, shows good agreement with that of MCNP6; the maximum relative difference for pin and assembly power was -2.53% and -1.79% respectively. The power profiles from these two computational codes were compared and used to validate the MOCUM solutions.

  12. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  3. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates

  4. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety studies for the Division of Accident Evaluation. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.; Wilson, J.H.

    1986-02-01

    Modeling, code development, and analyses of the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) continued with work on the side-by-side design. Fission-product release and transport experiments were completed. Sections of an HTGR safety handbook were written.

  5. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor safety studies for the Division of Accident Evaluation quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.; Weber, C.F.; Wilson, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Modeling, code development, and analyses of the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) continued with work on the side-by-side design. Fission-product release and transport experiments were completed. A description and assessment report on Oak Ridge National Laboratory HTGR safety codes was issued.

  6. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  7. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-07-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  8. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  9. 75 FR 79173 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Quarterly Listing of Program Issuances-July Through September 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs..., No. 242 / Friday, December 17, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers... regulations under the authority granted to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services...

  10. Enhanced oil recovery and applied geoscience research program. [Quarterly] report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this research program are to develop microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to reservoirs containing medium to heavy oils and to evaluate reservoir wettability and its effects on oil recovery. The MEOR research goals include: (a) development of bacterial cultures that are effective for oil displacement under a broad range of reservoir conditions, (b) improved understanding of the mechanisms by which microbial systems displace oil under reservoir conditions, (c) determination of the feasibility of combining microbial systems with or following conventional enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, (d) development and implementation of industry cost-shared field demonstration projects for MEOR technology. The goals of the reservoir wettability project are to develop: (a) better methods for assessment of reservoir core wettability, (b) more certainty in relating laboratory core analysis procedures to field conditions, (c) a better understanding of the effects of reservoir matrix properties and heterogeneity on wettability, and (d) improved ability to predict and influence waterflood and EOR response through control of wettability in reservoirs.

  11. Commercial Nuclear Waste Research and Development Program. Quarterly report, April-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    1985-07-01

    Support was provided to DOE/NV during preparation of a proposal, requested by the DOE San Francisco office, for performance of SP-100 Ground Engineering Systems tests at the E-MAD facility. The site selection committee visited the Nevada Test Site in May for a tour and briefings on all aspects of the proposal. The fuel assembly used in the two-year metal cask simulation test was removed from the test stand and characterized to document its post-test condition. Fuel assembly integrity monitoring for the second half of FY 1985 was completed of six of the fuel assemblies being stored in unwelded canisters. Post-storage characterization was completed on three fuel assemblies which were stored in welded canisters. All test procedures have been completed and delivered for the Canister Assembly Launch Test Program being conducted at another Area 25 facility. The "Safety Assessment Document for Spent Fuel Handling, Packaging, and Storage Demonstrations at the E-MAD Facility on the Nevada Test Site," DOE/NV10250-20, was revised to be consistent with new and revised DOE Orders and Directives, and delivered to DOE/NV.

  12. Long Term Materials Test Program. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion and erosion/corrosion testing of gas turbine vane and blade base alloys and a variety of protective coating systems under the Long Term Materials Test program has surpassed 3400 hours. The PFBC facility at Malta, New York continues to show an exceptionally high degree of reliability and consistency in performance. Operating conditions include a 1650/sup 0/F bed temperature at 10 atmospheres pressures utilizing Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and a low alkali dolomite sulfur sorbent. After 2687 hours, unprotected nickel and cobalt base vane and blade alloys generally experienced corrosion rates of 1 to 2 mils/1000 hours at metal temperatures of 1100, 1300, and 1500/sup 0/F. Precious metal aluminide and MCrAlY coatings continue to show excellent corrosion resistance (<0.5 mils/1000 hrs) at 1500/sup 0/F, but are susceptible to varying degrees of pitting attack at 1100/sup 0/ and 1300/sup 0/F. Erosion/corrosion degradation rates at 800 to 900 fps., 1350/sup 0/F and less than 100 ppM dust loading ranged from 1 to 4 mils/1000 hours with corrosion predominately concentrated in areas of particle impaction indicating an erosion/corrosion synergism.

  13. Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emission compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emission control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  14. Jointly sponsored research program quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the Koppelman ``Series C`` Power River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; and in-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

  15. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 5, for period October 1 - December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Dr., Donald L.

    1981-01-15

    Progress is reported in the peat biogasification development program. The objective of the research is to compile the necessary data for the design and operation of a peat anaerobic digestion process development unit. Five areas are addressed: pretreatment information; anaerobic digestion; evaluation of waste streams; process model development and economic analysis; and planning for the process development unit. During the reporting period extensive data was taken for the development of the predictive process model. A number of batch and continuous pretreatment experiments were completed and analyzed. The four samples being analyzed through solvent extration were completed, and the results are presented. Work on High Pressure Liquid Chromatography continued, and the development of the gradient elution solvent system was completed with encouraging results. Pretreated peat has been batch fermented; the continuously oxidized peat has shown conversions of close to 30%. This is significantly higher than the conversions for the batch oxidized peat. Continuous digesters have been in operation for approximately one month. Development of a predictive process model for the three phases of peat biogasification, solubilization, oxidation, and fermentation, continued with very good results. The models for solubilization and oxidation were developed and experimental data are being gathered for the fermentation phase of the process model. (DMC)

  16. Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Deans, H.A.

    1994-05-01

    This is a progress report on work performed by Western Research Institute for the U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in the period October- December 1993. Tasks addressed include: development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; the impact of leachate from clean coal technology waste on the stability of clay liners; investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; chemical sensor and field screening technology development; demonstration of the koppelman {open_quotes}series c{close_quotes} process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; remote chemical sensor development; market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Crow{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} series pilot plant tests; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program.

  17. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

    1997-03-20

    In this report the authors describe the use of an effective method for concentration of the rhenium-188 bolus and the results of the first Phase 1 clinical studies for bone pain palliation with rhenium-188 obtained from the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. Initial studies with therapeutic levels of Re-188-HEDP at the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn, Germany, have demonstrated the expected good metastatic uptake of Re-188-HEDP in four patients who presented with skeletal metastases from disseminated prostatic cancer with good pain palliation and minimal marrow suppression. In addition, skeletal metastatic targeting of tracer doses of Re-188(V)-DMSA has been evaluated in several patients with metastases from prostatic cancer at the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Canterbury and Kent Hospital in Canterbury, England. In this report the authors also describe further studies with the E-(R,R)-IQNP ligand developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program as a potential imaging agent for detection of changes which may occur in the cerebral muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) in Alzheimer`s and other diseases.

  18. Application of the successive linear programming technique to the optimum design of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    The successive linear programming technique is applied to obtain the optimum thermal flux in the reflector region of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel. The design variables are the reactor power, core radius and coolant channel thickness. The constraints are the cycle length, average heat flux and peak/average power density ratio. The characteristics of the optimum solutions with various constraints are discussed.

  19. Application of the successive linear programming technique to the optimum design of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The successive linear programming technique is applied to obtain the optimum thermal flux in the reflector region of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel. The design variables are the reactor power, core radius and coolant channel thickness. The constraints are the cycle length, average heat flux and peak/average power density ratio. The characteristics of the optimum solutions with various constraints are discussed.

  20. Unocal Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Quarterly report. Second quarter 1989. Report for 1 April-30 June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-31

    The Energy Security Act of 1980 established a program to provide financial assistance to private industry in the construction and operation of commercial-scale synthetic fuels plants. The Parachute Creek Shale Oil Program is one of four projects awarded financial assistance. The Program agreed to comply with existing environmental monitoring regulations and to develop an Environmental Monitoring Plan incorporating supplemental monitoring in the areas of water, air, solid waste, and worker health and safety during the period 1985-1992. These activities are described and the rationale for Tier I and Tier II monitoring are explained in the Environmental Monitoring Plan.