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Sample records for readily releasable vesicles

  1. Cholecystokinin facilitates glutamate release by increasing the number of readily releasable vesicles and releasing probability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Xiao, Zhaoyang; Jha, Archana; Ramonet, David; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Leitges, Michael; Shin, Hee-Sup; Porter, James E; Geiger, Jonathan D; Lei, Saobo

    2010-04-14

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuropeptide originally discovered in the gastrointestinal tract, is abundantly distributed in the mammalian brains including the hippocampus. Whereas CCK has been shown to increase glutamate concentration in the perfusate of hippocampal slices and in purified rat hippocampal synaptosomes, the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby CCK modulates glutamatergic function remain unexplored. Here, we examined the effects of CCK on glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus using whole-cell recordings from hippocampal slices. Application of CCK increased AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs at perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cell, CA3-CA3 and Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses without effects at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. CCK-induced increases in AMPA EPSCs were mediated by CCK-2 receptors and were not modulated developmentally and transcriptionally. CCK reduced the coefficient of variation and paired-pulse ratio of AMPA EPSCs suggesting that CCK facilitates presynaptic glutamate release. CCK increased the release probability and the number of readily releasable vesicles with no effects on the rate of recovery from vesicle depletion. CCK-mediated increases in glutamate release required the functions of phospholipase C, intracellular Ca(2+) release and protein kinase Cgamma. CCK released endogenously from hippocampal interneurons facilitated glutamatergic transmission. Our results provide a cellular and molecular mechanism to explain the roles of CCK in the brain.

  2. Readily releasable vesicles recycle at the active zone of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2014-04-08

    During the synaptic vesicle cycle, synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane and recycle for repeated exo/endocytic events. By using activity-dependent N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino) styryl) pyridinium dibromide dye uptake combined with fast (<1 s) microwave-assisted fixation followed by photoconversion and ultrastructural 3D analysis, we tracked endocytic vesicles over time, "frame by frame." The first retrieved synaptic vesicles appeared 4 s after stimulation, and these endocytic vesicles were located just above the active zone. Second, the retrieved vesicles did not show any sign of a protein coat, and coated pits were not detected. Between 10 and 30 s, large labeled vesicles appeared that had up to 5 times the size of an individual synaptic vesicle. Starting at around 20 s, these large labeled vesicles decreased in number in favor of labeled synaptic vesicles, and after 30 s, labeled vesicles redocked at the active zone. The data suggest that readily releasable vesicles are retrieved as noncoated vesicles at the active zone.

  3. Readily releasable vesicles recycle at the active zone of hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During the synaptic vesicle cycle, synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane and recycle for repeated exo/endocytic events. By using activity-dependent N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino) styryl) pyridinium dibromide dye uptake combined with fast (<1 s) microwave-assisted fixation followed by photoconversion and ultrastructural 3D analysis, we tracked endocytic vesicles over time, “frame by frame.” The first retrieved synaptic vesicles appeared 4 s after stimulation, and these endocytic vesicles were located just above the active zone. Second, the retrieved vesicles did not show any sign of a protein coat, and coated pits were not detected. Between 10 and 30 s, large labeled vesicles appeared that had up to 5 times the size of an individual synaptic vesicle. Starting at around 20 s, these large labeled vesicles decreased in number in favor of labeled synaptic vesicles, and after 30 s, labeled vesicles redocked at the active zone. The data suggest that readily releasable vesicles are retrieved as noncoated vesicles at the active zone. PMID:24706824

  4. Temperature-Dependent Differences between Readily Releasable and Reserve Pool Vesicles in Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christy L.; Siff, Lauren N.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Summary Statistical differences between amperometric traces recorded from chromaffin cells using K+ and Ba2+ secretagogues support the assertion that readily releasable pool (RRP) and reserve pool (RP) vesicles can be probed with pool-specific secretagogues. Release from the RRP was evoked by K+ while release from the RP was evoked by Ba2+. Similar temperature-dependent changes in spike area and half-width for both pools suggest that the content of RRP and RP vesicles is similar and packaged in the same way. Differences between the vesicle pools were revealed in the temperature dependence of spike frequency. While the burst spike frequency of the RRP, which is comprised of pre-docked and primed vesicles, increased 2.8% per °C, the RP spike frequency increased 12% per °C. This difference is attributed to a temperature dependent mobilization of the RP. Furthermore, the RP exhibited more foot events at room temperature than the RRP but this difference was not apparent at 37°C. This trend suggests that RP vesicle membranes have a compromised surface tension compared to RRP vesicles. Collectively, the changes of release characteristics with temperature reveal distinctions between the RRP and the RP. PMID:17467077

  5. Readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles measured at single synaptic contacts.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Sakaba, Takeshi; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2012-10-30

    To distinguish between different models of vesicular release in brain synapses, it is necessary to know the number of vesicles of transmitter that can be released immediately at individual synapses by a high-calcium stimulus, the readily releasable pool (RRP). We used direct stimulation by calcium uncaging at identified, single-site inhibitory synapses to investigate the statistics of vesicular release and the size of the RRP. Vesicular release, detected as quantal responses in the postsynaptic neuron, showed an unexpected stochastic variation in the number of quanta from stimulus to stimulus at high intracellular calcium, with a mean of 1.9 per stimulus and a maximum of three or four. The results provide direct measurement of the RRP at single synaptic sites. They are consistent with models in which release proceeds from a small number of vesicle docking sites with an average occupancy around 0.7.

  6. Long-Term Culture of Astrocytes Attenuates the Readily Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Kakazu, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Yuta; Kubo, Natsuko; Kubo, Masafumi; Okuda, Hideto; Takasaki, Kotaro; Kubota, Kaori; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Harata, N. Charles; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    The astrocyte is a major glial cell type of the brain, and plays key roles in the formation, maturation, stabilization and elimination of synapses. Thus, changes in astrocyte condition and age can influence information processing at synapses. However, whether and how aging astrocytes affect synaptic function and maturation have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Here, we show the effects of prolonged culture on the ability of astrocytes to induce synapse formation and to modify synaptic transmission, using cultured autaptic neurons. By 9 weeks in culture, astrocytes derived from the mouse cerebral cortex demonstrated increases in β-galactosidase activity and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, both of which are characteristic of aging and glial activation in vitro. Autaptic hippocampal neurons plated on these aging astrocytes showed a smaller amount of evoked release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, and a lower frequency of miniature release of glutamate, both of which were attributable to a reduction in the pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles. Other features of synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission were retained, for example the ability to induce structural synapses, the presynaptic release probability, the fraction of functional presynaptic nerve terminals, and the ability to recruit functional AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors to synapses. Thus the presence of aging astrocytes affects the efficiency of synaptic transmission. Given that the pool of readily releasable vesicles is also small at immature synapses, our results are consistent with astrocytic aging leading to retarded synapse maturation. PMID:23110166

  7. Superpriming of synaptic vesicles after their recruitment to the readily releasable pool

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Sung; Ho, Won-Kyung; Neher, Erwin; Lee, Suk-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of release-competent vesicles during sustained synaptic activity is one of the major factors governing short-term plasticity. During bursts of synaptic activity, vesicles are recruited to a fast-releasing pool from a reluctant vesicle pool through an actin-dependent mechanism. We now show that newly recruited vesicles in the fast-releasing pool do not respond at full speed to a strong Ca2+ stimulus, but require approximately 4 s to mature to a “superprimed” state. Superpriming was found to be altered by agents that modulate the function of unc13 homolog proteins (Munc13s), but not by calmodulin inhibitors or actin-disrupting agents. These findings indicate that recruitment and superpriming of vesicles are regulated by separate mechanisms, which require integrity of the cytoskeleton and activation of Munc13s, respectively. We propose that refilling of the fast-releasing vesicle pool proceeds in two steps, rapid actin-dependent “positional priming,” which brings vesicles closer to Ca2+ sources, followed by slower superpriming, which enhances the Ca2+ sensitivity of primed vesicles. PMID:23980146

  8. A Well-Defined Readily Releasable Pool with Fixed Capacity for Storing Vesicles at Calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Mahfooz, Kashif; Singh, Mahendra; Renden, Robert; Wesseling, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles is a core concept in studies of presynaptic function. However, operating principles lack consensus definition and the utility for quantitative analysis has been questioned. Here we confirm that RRPs at calyces of Held from 14 to 21 day old mice have a fixed capacity for storing vesicles that is not modulated by Ca2+. Discrepancies with previous studies are explained by a dynamic flow-through pool, established during heavy use, containing vesicles that are released with low probability despite being immediately releasable. Quantitative analysis ruled out a posteriori explanations for the vesicles with low release probability, such as Ca2+-channel inactivation, and established unexpected boundary conditions for remaining alternatives. Vesicles in the flow-through pool could be incompletely primed, in which case the full sequence of priming steps downstream of recruitment to the RRP would have an average unitary rate of at least 9/s during heavy use. Alternatively, vesicles with low and high release probability could be recruited to distinct types of release sites; in this case the timing of recruitment would be similar at the two types, and the downstream transition from recruited to fully primed would be much faster. In either case, further analysis showed that activity accelerates the upstream step where vesicles are initially recruited to the RRP. Overall, our results show that the RRP can be well defined in the mathematical sense, and support the concept that the defining mechanism is a stable group of autonomous release sites. PMID:27035349

  9. A Well-Defined Readily Releasable Pool with Fixed Capacity for Storing Vesicles at Calyx of Held.

    PubMed

    Mahfooz, Kashif; Singh, Mahendra; Renden, Robert; Wesseling, John F

    2016-04-01

    The readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles is a core concept in studies of presynaptic function. However, operating principles lack consensus definition and the utility for quantitative analysis has been questioned. Here we confirm that RRPs at calyces of Held from 14 to 21 day old mice have a fixed capacity for storing vesicles that is not modulated by Ca2+. Discrepancies with previous studies are explained by a dynamic flow-through pool, established during heavy use, containing vesicles that are released with low probability despite being immediately releasable. Quantitative analysis ruled out a posteriori explanations for the vesicles with low release probability, such as Ca2+-channel inactivation, and established unexpected boundary conditions for remaining alternatives. Vesicles in the flow-through pool could be incompletely primed, in which case the full sequence of priming steps downstream of recruitment to the RRP would have an average unitary rate of at least 9/s during heavy use. Alternatively, vesicles with low and high release probability could be recruited to distinct types of release sites; in this case the timing of recruitment would be similar at the two types, and the downstream transition from recruited to fully primed would be much faster. In either case, further analysis showed that activity accelerates the upstream step where vesicles are initially recruited to the RRP. Overall, our results show that the RRP can be well defined in the mathematical sense, and support the concept that the defining mechanism is a stable group of autonomous release sites.

  10. Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 Are Redundantly Essential for Maintaining the Capacity of the Readily-Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Burré, Jacqueline; Malenka, Robert C.; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In forebrain neurons, Ca2+ triggers exocytosis of readily releasable vesicles by binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7, thereby inducing fast and slow vesicle exocytosis, respectively. Loss-of-function of synaptotagmin-1 or -7 selectively impairs the fast and slow phase of release, respectively, but does not change the size of the readily-releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles as measured by stimulation of release with hypertonic sucrose, or alter the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Here we show, however, that simultaneous loss-of-function of both synaptotagmin-1 and -7 dramatically decreased the capacity of the RRP, again without altering the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Either synaptotagmin-1 or -7 was sufficient to rescue the RRP size in neurons lacking both synaptotagmin-1 and -7. Although maintenance of RRP size was Ca2+-independent, mutations in Ca2+-binding sequences of synaptotagmin-1 or synaptotagmin-7—which are contained in flexible top-loop sequences of their C2 domains—blocked the ability of these synaptotagmins to maintain the RRP size. Both synaptotagmins bound to SNARE complexes; SNARE complex binding was reduced by the top-loop mutations that impaired RRP maintenance. Thus, synaptotagmin-1 and -7 perform redundant functions in maintaining the capacity of the RRP in addition to nonredundant functions in the Ca2+ triggering of different phases of release. PMID:26437117

  11. Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 Are Redundantly Essential for Maintaining the Capacity of the Readily-Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bacaj, Taulant; Wu, Dick; Burré, Jacqueline; Malenka, Robert C; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2015-10-01

    In forebrain neurons, Ca(2+) triggers exocytosis of readily releasable vesicles by binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7, thereby inducing fast and slow vesicle exocytosis, respectively. Loss-of-function of synaptotagmin-1 or -7 selectively impairs the fast and slow phase of release, respectively, but does not change the size of the readily-releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles as measured by stimulation of release with hypertonic sucrose, or alter the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Here we show, however, that simultaneous loss-of-function of both synaptotagmin-1 and -7 dramatically decreased the capacity of the RRP, again without altering the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Either synaptotagmin-1 or -7 was sufficient to rescue the RRP size in neurons lacking both synaptotagmin-1 and -7. Although maintenance of RRP size was Ca(2+)-independent, mutations in Ca(2+)-binding sequences of synaptotagmin-1 or synaptotagmin-7--which are contained in flexible top-loop sequences of their C2 domains--blocked the ability of these synaptotagmins to maintain the RRP size. Both synaptotagmins bound to SNARE complexes; SNARE complex binding was reduced by the top-loop mutations that impaired RRP maintenance. Thus, synaptotagmin-1 and -7 perform redundant functions in maintaining the capacity of the RRP in addition to nonredundant functions in the Ca(2+) triggering of different phases of release.

  12. Synapsin-dependent reserve pool of synaptic vesicles supports replenishment of the readily releasable pool under intense synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Mariya; Horstmann, Heinz; Geumann, Constanze; Gitler, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Synapsins are abundant synaptic vesicle (SV)-associated proteins thought to mediate synaptic vesicle mobility and clustering at most synapses. We used synapsin triple knock-out (TKO) mice to examine the morphological and functional consequences of deleting all synapsin isoforms at the calyx of Held, a giant glutamatergic synapse located in the auditory brain stem. Quantitative three-dimensional (3D) immunohistochemistry of entire calyces showed lower amounts of the synaptic vesicle protein vGluT1 while the level of the active zone marker bassoon was unchanged in TKO terminals. Examination of brain lysates by ELISA revealed a strong reduction in abundance of several synaptic vesicle proteins, while proteins of the active zone cytomatrix or postsynaptic density were unaffected. Serial section scanning electron microscopy of large 3D-reconstructed segments confirmed a decrease in the number of SVs to approximately 50% in TKO calyces. Short-term depression tested at stimulus frequencies ranging from 10 to 300 Hz was accelerated only at frequencies above 100 Hz and the time course of recovery from depression was slowed in calyces lacking synapsins. These results reveal that in wild-type synapses, the synapsin-dependent reserve pool contributes to the replenishment of the readily releasable pool (RRP), although accounting only for a small fraction of the SVs that enter the RRP. In conclusion, our results suggest that synapsins may be required for normal synaptic vesicle biogenesis, trafficking and immobilization of synaptic vesicles, yet they are not essential for sustained high-frequency synaptic transmission at the calyx terminal.

  13. ELKS controls the pool of readily releasable vesicles at excitatory synapses through its N-terminal coiled-coil domains

    PubMed Central

    Held, Richard G; Liu, Changliang; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-01-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic strength is determined by the pool of readily releasable vesicles (RRP) and the probability of release (P) of each RRP vesicle. These parameters are controlled at the active zone and vary across synapses, but how such synapse specific control is achieved is not understood. ELKS proteins are enriched at vertebrate active zones and enhance P at inhibitory hippocampal synapses, but ELKS functions at excitatory synapses are not known. Studying conditional knockout mice for ELKS, we find that ELKS enhances the RRP at excitatory synapses without affecting P. Surprisingly, ELKS C-terminal sequences, which interact with RIM, are dispensable for RRP enhancement. Instead, the N-terminal ELKS coiled-coil domains that bind to Liprin-α and Bassoon are necessary to control RRP. Thus, ELKS removal has differential, synapse-specific effects on RRP and P, and our findings establish important roles for ELKS N-terminal domains in synaptic vesicle priming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14862.001 PMID:27253063

  14. Stress and corticosterone increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles in synaptic terminals of prefrontal and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Treccani, G; Musazzi, L; Perego, C; Milanese, M; Nava, N; Bonifacino, T; Lamanna, J; Malgaroli, A; Drago, F; Racagni, G; Nyengaard, J R; Wegener, G; Bonanno, G; Popoli, M

    2014-04-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids alter glutamatergic transmission, and the outcome of stress may range from plasticity enhancing effects to noxious, maladaptive changes. We have previously demonstrated that acute stress rapidly increases glutamate release in prefrontal and frontal cortex via glucocorticoid receptor and accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complex. Here we compared the ex vivo effects of acute stress on glutamate release with those of in vitro application of corticosterone, to analyze whether acute effect of stress on glutamatergic transmission is mediated by local synaptic action of corticosterone. We found that acute stress increases both the readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles and depolarization-evoked glutamate release, while application in vitro of corticosterone rapidly increases the RRP, an effect dependent on synaptic receptors for the hormone, but does not induce glutamate release for up to 20 min. These findings indicate that corticosterone mediates the enhancement of glutamate release induced by acute stress, and the rapid non-genomic action of the hormone is necessary but not sufficient for this effect.

  15. Pan-neurexin perturbation results in compromised synapse stability and a reduction in readily releasable synaptic vesicle pool size

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Dylan P.; Kolar, Annette; Wigerius, Michael; Gomm-Kolisko, Rachel N.; Atwi, Hanine; Fawcett, James P.; Krueger, Stefan R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurexins are a diverse family of cell adhesion molecules that localize to presynaptic specializations of CNS neurons. Heterologous expression of neurexins in non-neuronal cells leads to the recruitment of postsynaptic proteins in contacting dendrites of co-cultured neurons, implicating neurexins in synapse formation. However, isoform-specific knockouts of either all α- or all β-neurexins show defects in synaptic transmission but an unaltered density of glutamatergic synapses, a finding that argues against an essential function of neurexins in synaptogenesis. To address the role of neurexin in synapse formation and function, we disrupted the function of all α- and β-neurexins in cultured hippocampal neurons by shRNA knockdown or by overexpressing a neurexin mutant that is unable to bind to postsynaptic neurexin ligands. We show that neurexin perturbation results in an attenuation of neurotransmitter release that is in large part due to a reduction in the number of readily releasable synaptic vesicles. We also find that neurexin perturbation fails to alter the ability of neurons to form synapses, but rather leads to more frequent synapse elimination. These experiments suggest that neurexins are dispensable for the formation of initial synaptic contacts, but play an essential role in the stabilization and functional maturation of synapses. PMID:28220838

  16. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  17. CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles to fusion competence at CA3–CA1 synapses in adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yo; Ishii, Chiaki; Fukazawa, Yugo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Ishii, Yuki; Sano, Yoshitake; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and of synaptic vesicles in neurons. However, the synaptic function of CAPS1 in the mature brain is unclear because Caps1 knockout (KO) results in neonatal death. Here, using forebrain-specific Caps1 conditional KO (cKO) mice, we demonstrate, for the first time, a critical role of CAPS1 in adult synapses. The amplitude of synaptic transmission at CA3–CA1 synapses was strongly reduced, and paired-pulse facilitation was significantly increased, in acute hippocampal slices from cKO mice compared with control mice, suggesting a perturbation in presynaptic function. Morphological analysis revealed an accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the presynapse without any overall morphological change. Interestingly, however, the percentage of docked vesicles was markedly decreased in the Caps1 cKO. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles, thereby enhancing neurotransmitter release at hippocampal synapses. PMID:27545744

  18. Munc18-1 expression levels control synapse recovery by regulating readily releasable pool size

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Ruud F. G.; Wierda, Keimpe; Sons, Michèle S.; de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Brussaard, Arjen; Plomp, Jaap J.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Prompt recovery after intense activity is an essential feature of most mammalian synapses. Here we show that synapses with reduced expression of the presynaptic gene munc18-1 suffer from increased depression during intense stimulation at glutamatergic, GABAergic, and neuromuscular synapses. Conversely, munc18-1 overexpression makes these synapses recover faster. Concomitant changes in the readily releasable vesicle pool and its refill kinetics were found. The number of vesicles docked at the active zone and the total number of vesicles per terminal correlated with both munc18-1 expression levels and the size of the releasable vesicle pool. These data show that varying expression of a single gene controls synaptic recovery by modulating the number of docked, release-ready vesicles and thereby replenishment of the secretion capacity. PMID:17110441

  19. Discharge of the Readily Releasable Pool With Action Potentials at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Charles F.; Williams, James H.

    2008-01-01

    A readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles has been identified at hippocampal synapses with application of hypertonic solution. RRP size correlates with important properties of synaptic function such as release probability. However, a discrepancy in RRP size has been reported depending on the method used to evoke synaptic release. This study was undertaken to determine quantitative relationships between the RRP defined with hypertonic solution and that released with trains of action potentials. We find that asynchronous release at cell culture synapses contributes significantly to the discharge of the RRP with trains of action potentials and that RRP size is the same when elicited by either nerve stimuli or hypertonic challenge. PMID:17942621

  20. Is replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with vesicular movement?

    PubMed

    Bui, Loc; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2014-04-01

    At the excitatory synapse of rat hippocampus the short-term synaptic depression observed during long high-frequency stimulation is associated with slower replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. Given that the replenishment rate is also not [Ca(++)]o sensitive this puts into question a widely held notion that the vesicles-constrained by the cytoskeleton and rendered free from such constraints by Ca(++) entry that renders them more mobile-are important in the replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. This raises a question-Is vesicular replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with significant movement? To answer this question we evaluated how okadaic acid and staurosporine (compounds known to affect vesicular mobility) influence the replenishment rate. We used patterned stimulation on the Schaffer collateral fiber pathway and recorded the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) from rat CA1 neurons, in the absence and presence of these drugs. The parameters of a circuit model with two vesicular pools were estimated by minimizing the squared difference between the ESPC amplitudes and simulated model output. [Ca(2+)]o did not influence the progressive decrease of the replenishment rate during long, high frequency stimulation. Okadaic acid did not significantly affect any parameters of the vesicular storage and release system, including the replenishment rate. Staurosporine reduced the replenishment coupling, but not the replenishment rate, and this is owing to the fact that it also reduces the ability of the readily releasable pool to contain quanta. Moreover, these compounds were ineffective in influencing how the replenishment rate decreases during long, high frequency stimulation. In conclusion at the excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus the replenishment of the readily releasable pool does not appear to be associated with a significant vesicular movement, and during long high frequency stimulation [Ca(++)]o does not influence the

  1. Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.-L.; Light, W.B.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1988-09-01

    In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t = 0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  2. A Three-Pool Model Dissecting Readily Releasable Pool Replenishment at the Calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Ge, Jian-long; Hao, Mei; Sun, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Xin-sheng; Zhu, Jian-bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Pan-tong; Lin, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although vesicle replenishment is critical in maintaining exo-endocytosis recycling, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that both rapid and slow endocytosis recycle into a very large recycling pool instead of within the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the time course of RRP replenishment is slowed down by more intense stimulation. This finding contradicts the calcium/calmodulin-dependence of RRP replenishment. Here we address this issue and report a three-pool model for RRP replenishment at a central synapse. Both rapid and slow endocytosis provide vesicles to a large reserve pool (RP) ~42.3 times the RRP size. When moving from the RP to the RRP, vesicles entered an intermediate pool (IP) ~2.7 times the RRP size with slow RP-IP kinetics and fast IP-RRP kinetics, which was responsible for the well-established slow and rapid components of RRP replenishment. Depletion of the IP caused the slower RRP replenishment observed after intense stimulation. These results establish, for the first time, a realistic cycling model with all parameters measured, revealing the contribution of each cycling step in synaptic transmission. The results call for modification of the current view of the vesicle recycling steps and their roles. PMID:25825223

  3. A three-pool model dissecting readily releasable pool replenishment at the calyx of held.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Ge, Jian-long; Hao, Mei; Sun, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Xin-sheng; Zhu, Jian-bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Pan-tong; Lin, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2015-03-31

    Although vesicle replenishment is critical in maintaining exo-endocytosis recycling, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that both rapid and slow endocytosis recycle into a very large recycling pool instead of within the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the time course of RRP replenishment is slowed down by more intense stimulation. This finding contradicts the calcium/calmodulin-dependence of RRP replenishment. Here we address this issue and report a three-pool model for RRP replenishment at a central synapse. Both rapid and slow endocytosis provide vesicles to a large reserve pool (RP) ~42.3 times the RRP size. When moving from the RP to the RRP, vesicles entered an intermediate pool (IP) ~2.7 times the RRP size with slow RP-IP kinetics and fast IP-RRP kinetics, which was responsible for the well-established slow and rapid components of RRP replenishment. Depletion of the IP caused the slower RRP replenishment observed after intense stimulation. These results establish, for the first time, a realistic cycling model with all parameters measured, revealing the contribution of each cycling step in synaptic transmission. The results call for modification of the current view of the vesicle recycling steps and their roles.

  4. How neurosecretory vesicles release their cargo.

    PubMed

    Scalettar, Bethe A

    2006-04-01

    Neurons and related cell types often contain two major classes of neurosecretory vesicles, synaptic vesicles (SVs) and dense-core granules (DCGs), which store and release distinct cargo. SVs store and release classic neurotransmitters, which facilitate propagation of action potentials across the synaptic cleft, whereas DCGs transport, store, and release hormones, proteins, and neuropeptides, which facilitate neuronal survival, synaptic transmission, and learning. Over the past few years, there has been a major surge in our understanding of many of the key molecular mechanisms underlying cargo release from SVs and DCGs. This surge has been driven largely by the use of fluorescence microscopy (especially total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy) to visualize SVs or DCGs in living cells. This review highlights some of the recent insights into cargo release from neurosecretory vesicles provided by fluorescence microscopy, with emphasis on DCGs.

  5. Release of canine parvovirus from endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Suikkanen, Sanna; Antila, Mia; Jaatinen, Anne; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Vuento, Matti

    2003-11-25

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small nonenveloped virus with a single-stranded DNA genome. CPV enters cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and requires an acidic endosomal step for productive infection. Virion contains a potential nuclear localization signal as well as a phospholipase A(2) like domain in N-terminus of VP1. In this study we characterized the role of PLA(2) activity on CPV entry process. PLA(2) activity of CPV capsids was triggered in vitro by heat or acidic pH. PLA(2) inhibitors inhibited the viral proliferation suggesting that PLA(2) activity is needed for productive infection. The N-terminus of VP1 was exposed during the entry, suggesting that PLA(2) activity might have a role during endocytic entry. The presence of drugs modifying endocytosis (amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, and monensin) caused viral proteins to remain in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles, even though the drugs were not able to inhibit the exposure of VP1 N-terminal end. These results indicate that the exposure of N-terminus of VP1 alone is not sufficient to allow CPV to proliferate. Some other pH-dependent changes are needed for productive infection. In addition to blocking endocytic entry, amiloride was able to block some postendocytic steps. The ability of CPV to permeabilize endosomal membranes was demonstrated by feeding cells with differently sized rhodamine-conjugated dextrans together with the CPV in the presence or in the absence of amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, or monensin. Dextran with a molecular weight of 3000 was released from vesicles after 8 h of infection, while dextran with a molecular weight of 10,000 was mainly retained in vesicles. The results suggest that CPV infection does not cause disruption of endosomal vesicles. However, the permeability of endosomal membranes apparently changes during CPV infection, probably due to the PLA(2) activity of the virus. These results suggest that parvoviral PLA(2) activity is essential for productive

  6. Amphetamine Elicits Opposing Actions on Readily Releasable and Reserve Pools for Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Dan P.; Juliano, Steven A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine, a highly addictive drug with therapeutic efficacy, exerts paradoxical effects on the fundamental communication modes employed by dopamine neurons in modulating behavior. While amphetamine elevates tonic dopamine signaling by depleting vesicular stores and driving non-exocytotic release through reverse transport, this psychostimulant also activates phasic dopamine signaling by up-regulating vesicular dopamine release. We hypothesized that these seemingly incongruent effects arise from amphetamine depleting the reserve pool and enhancing the readily releasable pool. This novel hypothesis was tested using in vivo voltammetry and stimulus trains of varying duration to access different vesicular stores. We show that amphetamine actions are stimulus dependent in the dorsal striatum. Specifically, amphetamine up-regulated vesicular dopamine release elicited by a short-duration train, which interrogates the readily releasable pool, but depleted release elicited by a long-duration train, which interrogates the reserve pool. These opposing actions of vesicular dopamine release were associated with concurrent increases in tonic and phasic dopamine responses. A link between vesicular depletion and tonic signaling was supported by results obtained for amphetamine in the ventral striatum and cocaine in both striatal sub-regions, which demonstrated augmented vesicular release and phasic signals only. We submit that amphetamine differentially targeting dopamine stores reconciles the paradoxical activation of tonic and phasic dopamine signaling. Overall, these results further highlight the unique and region-distinct cellular mechanisms of amphetamine and may have important implications for its addictive and therapeutic properties. PMID:23671560

  7. BMP signaling modulates the probability of neurotransmitter release and readily releasable pools in Drosophila neuromuscular junction synapses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Choi, Se-Young

    2016-10-21

    The structure and function of synapses is modulated by the interaction of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons via cell adhesion molecules or secreted signal molecules. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) is a secreted molecule mediating retrograde signaling that is involved in the formation and maintenance of synaptic structure throughout many animal species. However, how BMP signaling modulates presynaptic neurotransmitter release is not yet clear. We studied the function of BMP signaling factors in neurotransmitter release in Drosophila neuromuscular synapses using loss-of-function mutants in genes for BMP modulators, Wit, Mad, and Dad. Larvae with mutations in wit and mad commonly showed a decreased synaptic bouton number in neuromuscular synapses. Larvae with dad mutations showed an increased bouton number. The amplitudes of miniature EJC (mEJC) were normal for these mutants. Wit and mad mutants showed decreased evoked EJC (eEJC) amplitude and increased paired pulse facilitation, implying impaired presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We found a reduction in readily releasable neurotransmitters pool sizes in wit and mad mutants. However, dad mutants showed a normal probability of neurotransmitter release and readily releasable pool sizes and normal eEJC amplitude even with clear abnormalities in synaptic structure. These results suggested that BMP signaling was critical for each step of presynaptic neurotransmission. The results also suggested that BMP signaling modulated both synaptic structure and function independently and specifically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Monitoring dopamine release from single living vesicles with nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Zhan; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zong-Li; Cheng, Jie-Ke; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Rong-Ying; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jie

    2005-06-29

    Carbon fiber nanoelectrodes (tip diameter = ca. 100 nm) have been first used to monitor real-time dopamine release from single living vesicles of single rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The experiments show that active and inactive release sites exist on the surface of cells, and the spatial distributions have been differentiated even in the same active release zone. It is first demonstrated that multiple vesicles can sequentially release dopamine at the same site of the cell surface, which possibly plays the main role in the dopamine release from PC12 cells.

  9. Heterogeneity in synaptic vesicle release at neuromuscular synapses of mice expressing synaptopHluorin.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Ryan M; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2008-01-02

    Mammalian neuromuscular junctions are useful model synapses to study the relationship between synaptic structure and function, although these have rarely been studied together at the same synapses. To do this, we generated transgenic lines of mice in which the thy1.2 promoter drives expression of synaptopHluorin (spH) as a means of optically measuring synaptic vesicle distribution and release. SpH is colocalized with other synaptic vesicle proteins in presynaptic terminals and does not alter normal synaptic function. Nerve stimulation leads to readily detectable and reproducible fluorescence changes in motor axon terminals that vary with stimulus frequency and, when compared with electrophysiological recordings, are reliable indicators of neurotransmitter release. Measurements of fluorescence intensity changes reveal a surprising amount of heterogeneity in synaptic vesicle release throughout individual presynaptic motor axon terminals. Some discrete terminal regions consistently displayed a greater rate and extent of release than others, regardless of stimulation frequency. The amount of release at a particular site is highly correlated to the relative abundance of synaptic vesicles there, indicating that a relatively constant fraction of the total vesicular pool, approximately 30%, is released in response to activity. These studies reveal previously unknown relationships between synaptic structure and function at mammalian neuromuscular junctions and demonstrate the usefulness of spH expressing mice as a tool for studying neuromuscular synapses in adults, as well as during development and diseases that affect neuromuscular synaptic function.

  10. Titration of Syntaxin1 in mammalian synapses reveals multiple roles in vesicle docking, priming, and release probability.

    PubMed

    Arancillo, Marife; Min, Sang-Won; Gerber, Stefan; Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Wu, Yuan-Ju; Herman, Melissa; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Riedel, Dietmar; Südhof, Thomas C; Rosenmund, Christian

    2013-10-16

    Synaptic vesicles undergo sequential steps in preparation for neurotransmitter release. Individual SNARE proteins and the SNARE complex itself have been implicated in these processes. However, discrete effects of SNARE proteins on synaptic function have been difficult to assess using complete loss-of-function approaches. We therefore used a genetic titration technique in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons to evaluate the contribution of the neuronal SNARE protein Syntaxin1 (Stx1) in vesicle docking, priming, and release probability. We generated graded reductions of total Stx1 levels by combining two approaches, namely, endogenous hypomorphic expression of the isoform Stx1B and RNAi-mediated knockdown. Proximity of synaptic vesicles to the active zone was not strongly affected. However, overall release efficiency of affected neurons was severely impaired, as demonstrated by a smaller readily releasable pool size, slower refilling rate of primed vesicles, and lower release probability. Interestingly, dose-response fitting of Stx1 levels against readily releasable pool size and vesicular release probability showed similar Kd (dissociation constant) values at 18% and 19% of wild-type Stx1, with cooperativity estimates of 3.4 and 2.5, respectively. This strongly suggests that priming and vesicle fusion share the same molecular stoichiometry, and are governed by highly related mechanisms.

  11. Astrocytic vesicles and gliotransmitters: Slowness of vesicular release and synaptobrevin2-laden vesicle nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J; Parpura, V

    2016-05-26

    Neurotransmitters released at synapses activate neighboring astrocytes, which in turn, modulate neuronal activity by the release of diverse neuroactive substances that include classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA or ATP. Neuroactive substances are released from astrocytes through several distinct molecular mechanisms, for example, by diffusion through membrane channels, by translocation via plasmalemmal transporters or by vesicular exocytosis. Vesicular release regulated by a stimulus-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium involves soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent merger of the vesicle membrane with the plasmalemma. Up to 25 molecules of synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2), a SNARE complex protein, reside at a single astroglial vesicle; an individual neuronal, i.e. synaptic, vesicle contains ∼70 Sb2 molecules. It is proposed that this paucity of Sb2 molecules in astrocytic vesicles may determine the slow secretion. In the present essay we shall overview multiple aspects of vesicular architecture and types of vesicles based on their cargo and dynamics in astroglial cells. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  12. Bayesian Inference of Synaptic Quantal Parameters from Correlated Vesicle Release

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.; Wall, Mark J.; Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is both history-dependent and stochastic, resulting in varying responses to presentations of the same presynaptic stimulus. This complicates attempts to infer synaptic parameters and has led to the proposal of a number of different strategies for their quantification. Recently Bayesian approaches have been applied to make more efficient use of the data collected in paired intracellular recordings. Methods have been developed that either provide a complete model of the distribution of amplitudes for isolated responses or approximate the amplitude distributions of a train of post-synaptic potentials, with correct short-term synaptic dynamics but neglecting correlations. In both cases the methods provided significantly improved inference of model parameters as compared to existing mean-variance fitting approaches. However, for synapses with high release probability, low vesicle number or relatively low restock rate and for data in which only one or few repeats of the same pattern are available, correlations between serial events can allow for the extraction of significantly more information from experiment: a more complete Bayesian approach would take this into account also. This has not been possible previously because of the technical difficulty in calculating the likelihood of amplitudes seen in correlated post-synaptic potential trains; however, recent theoretical advances have now rendered the likelihood calculation tractable for a broad class of synaptic dynamics models. Here we present a compact mathematical form for the likelihood in terms of a matrix product and demonstrate how marginals of the posterior provide information on covariance of parameter distributions. The associated computer code for Bayesian parameter inference for a variety of models of synaptic dynamics is provided in the Supplementary Material allowing for quantal and dynamical parameters to be readily inferred from experimental data sets. PMID:27932970

  13. Triggered release of ciprofloxacin from nanostructured agglomerated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Bhavane, Rohan; Karathanasis, Efstathios; Annapragada, Ananth V

    2007-01-01

    Nanostructured agglomerated vesicles encapsulating ciprofloxacin were evaluated for modulated delivery from the lungs in a healthy rabbit model. An aliphatic disulfide crosslinker, cleavable by cysteine was used to form cross-links between nanosized liposomes to form the agglomerates. The blood levels of drug after pulmonary instillation of free ciprofloxacin, liposomal ciprofloxacin, and the agglomerated liposomes encapsulating ciprofloxacin were evaluated. The liposomes and agglomerated vesicles showed extended release of drug into the blood over 24 hours, while the free ciprofloxacin did not. The agglomerates also allowed modulation of the drug release rate upon the introduction of cysteine into the lungs post-drug instillation; the cysteine-cleavable agglomerates accelerated their drug release rate, indicated by an increased level of drug in the blood. This technology holds promise for the post-administration modulation of antibiotic release, for the prevention and treatment of pulmonary and systemic infections. PMID:18019839

  14. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top of a pin or up to 5 millimeters wide. A larger blister is called a bulla. In many cases, vesicles break easily and release their fluid onto the skin. When this fluid dries, yellow crusts may remain on the skin surface.

  15. Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; Taylor, Charles P; Smith, Stephen J

    2006-08-01

    Pregabalin [S-[+]-3-isobutylGABA or (S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, Lyrica] is an anticonvulsant and analgesic medication that is both structurally and pharmacologically related to gabapentin (Neurontin; Pfizer Inc., New York, NY). Previous studies have shown that pregabalin reduces the release of neurotransmitters in several in vitro preparations, although the molecular details of these effects are less clear. The present study was performed using living cultured rat hippocampal neurons with the synaptic vesicle fluorescent dye probe FM4-64 to determine details of the action of pregabalin to reduce neurotransmitter release. Our results indicate that pregabalin treatment, at concentrations that are therapeutically relevant, slightly but significantly reduces the emptying of neurotransmitter vesicles from presynaptic sites in living neurons. Dye release is reduced in both glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-immunoreactive and GAD-negative (presumed glutamatergic) synaptic terminals. Furthermore, both calcium-dependent release and hyperosmotic (calcium-independent) dye release are reduced by pregabalin. The effects of pregabalin on dye release are masked in the presence of l-isoleucine, consistent with the fact that both of these compounds have a high binding affinity to the calcium channel alpha(2)-delta protein. The effect of pregabalin is not apparent in the presence of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid], suggesting that pregabalin action depends on NMDA receptor activation. Finally, the action of pregabalin on dye release is most apparent before and early during a train of electrical stimuli when vesicle release preferentially involves the readily releasable pool.

  16. Vesicle-membrane fusion. Observation of simultaneous membrane incorporation and content release.

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, D J; Hall, J E

    1988-01-01

    Vesicle fusion, the central process of neurotransmitter release and hormonal secretion, is a complex process culminating in simultaneous incorporation of vesicle membrane into the plasma membrane and release of the vesicular contents extracellularly. This report describes simultaneous observation of membrane incorporation and content release using a model system composed of a planar bilayer and dye-filled vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2462925

  17. Presynaptic Mechanisms of Lead Neurotoxicity: Effects on Vesicular Release, Vesicle Clustering and Mitochondria Number

    PubMed Central

    McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Stanton, Patric K.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  18. Introduction to Extracellular Vesicles: Biogenesis, RNA Cargo Selection, Content, Release, and Uptake.

    PubMed

    Abels, Erik R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-limited vesicles loaded with various proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Release of extracellular vesicles from its cell of origin occurs either through the outward budding of the plasma membrane or through the inward budding of the endosomal membrane, resulting in the formation of multivesicular bodies, which release vesicles upon fusion with the plasma membrane. The release of vesicles can facilitate intercellular communication by contact with or by internalization of contents, either by fusion with the plasma membrane or by endocytosis into "recipient" cells. Although the interest in extracellular vesicle research is increasing, there are still no real standards in place to separate or classify the different types of vesicles. This review provides an introduction into this expanding and complex field of research focusing on the biogenesis, nucleic acid cargo loading, content, release, and uptake of extracellular vesicles.

  19. Altered neurotransmitter release, vesicle recycling and presynaptic structure in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Chirag; Otero, Rafael; Partida, Carlos; Skinner, Frank; Thakker, Ravi; Pacheco, Luis F.; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Maglakelidze, Giorgi; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor; Romanovicz, Dwight; Jones, Theresa; Stanton, Patric K.

    2012-01-01

    In searching for persistent seizure-induced alterations in brain function that might be causally related to epilepsy, presynaptic transmitter release has relatively been neglected. To measure directly the long-term effects of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus on vesicular release and recycling in hippocampal mossy fibre presynaptic boutons, we used (i) two-photon imaging of FM1-43 vesicular release in rat hippocampal slices; and (ii) transgenic mice expressing the genetically encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent reporter synaptopHluorin preferentially at glutamatergic synapses. In this study we found that, 1–2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, there were significant increases in mossy fibre bouton size, faster rates of action potential-driven vesicular release and endocytosis. We also analysed the ultrastructure of rat mossy fibre boutons using transmission electron microscopy. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus led to a significant increase in the number of release sites, active zone length, postsynaptic density area and number of vesicles in the readily releasable and recycling pools, all correlated with increased release probability. Our data show that presynaptic release machinery is persistently altered in structure and function by status epilepticus, which could contribute to the development of the chronic epileptic state and may represent a potential new target for antiepileptic therapies. PMID:22344585

  20. RIM-binding protein links synaptic homeostasis to the stabilization and replenishment of high release probability vesicles.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin; Genç, Özgür; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-03-04

    Here we define activities of RIM-binding protein (RBP) that are essential for baseline neurotransmission and presynaptic homeostatic plasticity. At baseline, rbp mutants have a ∼10-fold decrease in the apparent Ca(2+) sensitivity of release that we attribute to (1) impaired presynaptic Ca(2+) influx, (2) looser coupling of vesicles to Ca(2+) influx, and (3) limited access to the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP). During homeostatic plasticity, RBP is necessary for the potentiation of Ca(2+) influx and the expansion of the RRP. Remarkably, rbp mutants also reveal a rate-limiting stage required for the replenishment of high release probability (p) vesicles following vesicle depletion. This rate slows ∼4-fold at baseline and nearly 7-fold during homeostatic signaling in rbp. These effects are independent of altered Ca(2+) influx and RRP size. We propose that RBP stabilizes synaptic efficacy and homeostatic plasticity through coordinated control of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and the dynamics of a high-p vesicle pool.

  1. Membrane vesicles released by Avibacterium paragallinarum contain putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Ramón Rocha, Marcela O; García-González, Octavio; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; Pérez-Márquez, Victor M; Vaca, Sergio; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2006-04-01

    Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, releases extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs), containing immunogenic proteins, proteases, putative RTX proteins, haemagglutinin, and nucleic acids, into the medium. MVs ranging 50-300 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. They contained immunogenic proteins in the range of 20-160 kDa, detected using vaccinated or experimentally infected chicken sera raised against Av. paragallinarum, but not in pooled sera from specific pathogen-free chickens. Proteolytic activity was not detected in MVs through zymograms; however, immune recognition of high molecular mass bands was observed by Western blotting using an antiprotease serum against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 purified protease, suggesting its presence. MVs agglutinated glutaraldehyde-fixed chicken red blood cells indicating the presence of haemagglutinating antigens. Nucleic acids were also detected inside MVs. Avibacterium paragallinarum releases MVs containing putative virulence factors, which could be important in the pathogenesis of infectious coryza.

  2. Disruption of adaptor protein 2μ (AP-2μ) in cochlear hair cells impairs vesicle reloading of synaptic release sites and hearing.

    PubMed

    Jung, SangYong; Maritzen, Tanja; Wichmann, Carolin; Jing, Zhizi; Neef, Andreas; Revelo, Natalia H; Al-Moyed, Hanan; Meese, Sandra; Wojcik, Sonja M; Panou, Iliana; Bulut, Haydar; Schu, Peter; Ficner, Ralf; Reisinger, Ellen; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Neef, Jakob; Strenzke, Nicola; Haucke, Volker; Moser, Tobias

    2015-11-03

    Active zones (AZs) of inner hair cells (IHCs) indefatigably release hundreds of vesicles per second, requiring each release site to reload vesicles at tens per second. Here, we report that the endocytic adaptor protein 2μ (AP-2μ) is required for release site replenishment and hearing. We show that hair cell-specific disruption of AP-2μ slows IHC exocytosis immediately after fusion of the readily releasable pool of vesicles, despite normal abundance of membrane-proximal vesicles and intact endocytic membrane retrieval. Sound-driven postsynaptic spiking was reduced in a use-dependent manner, and the altered interspike interval statistics suggested a slowed reloading of release sites. Sustained strong stimulation led to accumulation of endosome-like vacuoles, fewer clathrin-coated endocytic intermediates, and vesicle depletion of the membrane-distal synaptic ribbon in AP-2μ-deficient IHCs, indicating a further role of AP-2μ in clathrin-dependent vesicle reformation on a timescale of many seconds. Finally, we show that AP-2 sorts its IHC-cargo otoferlin. We propose that binding of AP-2 to otoferlin facilitates replenishment of release sites, for example, via speeding AZ clearance of exocytosed material, in addition to a role of AP-2 in synaptic vesicle reformation.

  3. RIM1 and RIM2 redundantly determine Ca2+ channel density and readily releasable pool size at a large hindbrain synapse

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yunyun; Babai, Norbert; Kaeser, Pascal; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The localization and density of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones are essential for the amount and kinetics of transmitter release at synapses. RIM proteins are scaffolding proteins at the active zone that bind to several other presynaptic proteins, including voltage-gated Ca2+ channel α-subunits. The long isoforms of RIM proteins, which contain NH2-terminal Rab3- and Munc13-interacting domains, as well as a central PDZ domain and two COOH-terminal C2 domains, are encoded by two genes, Rim1 and Rim2. Here, we used the ideal accessibility of the large calyx of Held synapse for direct presynaptic electrophysiology to investigate whether the two Rim genes have redundant, or separate, functions in determining the presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, and the size of a readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP). Quantitative PCR showed that cochlear nucleus neurons, which include calyx of Held generating neurons, express both RIM1 and RIM2. Conditional genetic inactivation of RIM2 at the calyx of Held led to a subtle reduction in presynaptic Ca2+ current density, whereas deletion of RIM1 was ineffective. The release efficiency of brief presynaptic Ca2+ “tail” currents and the RRP were unaffected in conditional single RIM1 and RIM2 knockout (KO) mice, whereas both parameters were strongly reduced in RIM1/2 double KO mice. Thus, despite a somewhat more decisive role for RIM2 in determining presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, RIM1 and RIM2 can overall replace each other's presynaptic functions at a large relay synapse in the hindbrain, the calyx of Held. PMID:25343783

  4. Impact of Lysosome Status on Extracellular Vesicle Content and Release

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Suire, Caitlin; Zhang, Shi; Mattson, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nanoscale size bubble-like membranous structures released from cells. EVs contain RNA, lipids and proteins and are thought to serve various roles including intercellular communication and removal of misfolded proteins. The secretion of misfolded and aggregated proteins in EVs may be a cargo disposal alternative to the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. In this review we will discuss the importance of lysosome functionality for the regulation of EV secretion and content. Exosomes are a subtype of EVs that are released by the fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane. MVBs can also fuse with lysosomes, and the trafficking pathway of MVBs can therefore determine whether or not exosomes are released from cells. Here we summarize data from studies of the effects of lysosome inhibition on the secretion of EVs and on the possibility that cells compensate for lysosome malfunction by disposal of potentially toxic cargos in EVs. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate trafficking of MVBs to lysosomes and the plasma membrane may advance an understanding of diseases in which pathogenic proteins, lipids or infectious agents accumulate within or outside of cells. PMID:27238186

  5. Membrane vesicles released by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae contain proteases and Apx toxins.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Abascal, E; García, R M; Reyes, M E; Godínez, D; de la Garza, M

    2000-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 releases vesicles containing proteases and Apx toxins into the culture medium. Vesicles were concentrated by ultracentrifugation and analyzed by electron microscopy and electrophoresis; their size ranged from 20 to 200 nm. A polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified high molecular mass secreted protease of serotype 1 recognized this protease on the surface of the vesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Higher molecular mass polypeptides from vesicle extracts were recognized by the antiserum by Western immunoblot, indicating that the protease could form oligomers. However, these oligomers were not active against gelatin until secreted. Additionally, Apx toxins were also present in vesicles, and were recognized by Western immunoblot by an anti-serotype 1 toxins polyclonal serum. A. pleuropneumoniae antigens in vesicles were recognized by convalescent-phase pig sera from animals infected with serotype 1 or 5. The release of vesicles containing virulence factors could be a tissue damage mechanism in swine pleuropneumonia.

  6. Sustaining rapid vesicular release at active zones: potential roles for vesicle tethering

    PubMed Central

    Hallermann, Stefan; Silver, R. Angus

    2016-01-01

    Rapid information processing in our nervous system relies on high-frequency fusion of transmitter-filled vesicles at chemical synapses. Some sensory synapses possess prominent electron-dense ribbon structures that provide a scaffold for tethering synaptic vesicles at the active zone (AZ), enabling sustained vesicular release. Here, we review functional data indicating that some central and neuromuscular synapses can also sustain vesicle-fusion rates that are comparable to those of ribbon-type sensory synapses. Comparison of the ultrastructure across these different types of synapses, together with recent work showing that cytomatrix proteins can tether vesicles and speed vesicle reloading, suggests that filamentous structures may play a key role in vesicle supply. We discuss potential mechanisms by which vesicle tethering could contribute to sustained high rates of vesicle fusion across ribbon-type, central, and neuromuscular synapses. PMID:23164531

  7. TRPM7 senses oxidative stress to release Zn(2+) from unique intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Abiria, Sunday A; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Sah, Rajan; Santa-Cruz, Ana G; Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Zhang, Jin; Adstamongkonkul, Pichet; DeCaen, Paul G; Clapham, David E

    2017-07-25

    TRPM7 (transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7) regulates gene expression and stress-induced cytotoxicity and is required in early embryogenesis through organ development. Here, we show that the majority of TRPM7 is localized in abundant intracellular vesicles. These vesicles (M7Vs) are distinct from endosomes, lysosomes, and other familiar vesicles or organelles. M7Vs accumulate Zn(2+) in a glutathione-enriched, reduced lumen when cytosolic Zn(2+) concentrations are elevated. Treatments that increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) trigger TRPM7-dependent Zn(2+) release from the vesicles, whereas reduced glutathione prevents TRPM7-dependent cytosolic Zn(2+) influx. These observations strongly support the notion that ROS-mediated TRPM7 activation releases Zn(2+) from intracellular vesicles after Zn(2+) overload. Like the endoplasmic reticulum, these vesicles are a distributed system for divalent cation uptake and release, but in this case the primary divalent ion is Zn(2+) rather than Ca(2).

  8. Mathematical modeling of vesicle drug delivery systems 1: vesicle formation and stability along with drug loading and release.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Garrett L; Yamanishi, Cameron D; Kamei, Daniel T

    2013-02-01

    Vesicles represent an important class of nanoscale drug delivery vehicles. To significantly reduce the time and resources that are required to optimize these drug carriers, this review article discusses the mathematical models that have been derived for understanding the formation of vesicles and their stability, as well as for predicting drug loading and their release. With regard to vesicle formation and stability, the packing parameter can be used to predict how the solution environment, surfactant composition, and surfactant molecular architecture can influence the supermolecular self-assembled structures that are formed from amphiphiles. In the context of drug delivery, this is useful for facilitating vesicle formation and stability during transit through the body. At the target site, this information can be used to help trigger a rapid release of the drug. With regard to drug loading, kinetic and equilibrium models provide guidelines for appropriate pH conditions and drug incubation times during loading. The diffusivity, partition coefficient, and bilayer thickness also play significant roles during loading and release of the drug. Our hope is that more researchers in this exciting field will complement their experimental approaches with these mathematical models to more efficiently develop vesicle-based drug carriers.

  9. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Michael E.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. PMID:26510758

  10. Synaptic vesicle pool-specific modification of neurotransmitter release by intravesicular free radical generation.

    PubMed

    Afuwape, Olusoji A T; Wasser, Catherine R; Schikorski, Thomas; Kavalali, Ege T

    2017-02-15

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters from synaptic vesicles in response to stimulation or through the spontaneous fusion of a synaptic vesicle with the presynaptic plasma membrane. There is growing evidence that synaptic vesicles undergoing spontaneous fusion versus those fusing in response to stimuli are functionally distinct. In this study, we acutely probe the effects of intravesicular free radical generation on synaptic vesicles that fuse spontaneously or in response to stimuli. By targeting vesicles that preferentially release spontaneously, we can dissociate the effects of intravesicular free radical generation on spontaneous neurotransmission from evoked neurotransmission and vice versa. Taken together, these results further advance our knowledge of the synapse and the nature of the different synaptic vesicle pools mediating neurotransmission. Earlier studies suggest that spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release processes are maintained by synaptic vesicles which are segregated into functionally distinct pools. However, direct interrogation of the link between this putative synaptic vesicle pool heterogeneity and neurotransmission has been difficult. To examine this link, we tagged vesicles with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) - a haem-containing plant enzyme - or antibodies against synaptotagmin-1 (syt1). Filling recycling vesicles in hippocampal neurons with HRP and subsequent treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) modified the properties of neurotransmitter release depending on the route of HRP uptake. While strong depolarization-induced uptake of HRP suppressed evoked release and augmented spontaneous release, HRP uptake during mild activity selectively impaired evoked release, whereas HRP uptake at rest solely potentiated spontaneous release. Expression of a luminal HRP-tagged syt1 construct and subsequent H2 O2 application resulted in a similar increase in spontaneous release and suppression as well as

  11. Position of UNC-13 in the active zone regulates synaptic vesicle release probability and release kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keming; Stawicki, Tamara M; Goncharov, Alexandr; Jin, Yishi

    2013-01-01

    The presynaptic active zone proteins UNC-13/Munc13s are essential for synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis by directly interacting with SV fusion apparatus. An open question is how their association with active zones, hence their position to Ca2+ entry sites, regulates SV release. The N-termini of major UNC-13/Munc13 isoforms contain a non-calcium binding C2A domain that mediates protein homo- or hetero-meric interactions. Here, we show that the C2A domain of Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-13 regulates release probability of evoked release and its precise active zone localization. Kinetics analysis of SV release supports that the proximity of UNC-13 to Ca2+ entry sites, mediated by the C2A-domain containing N-terminus, is critical for accelerating neurotransmitter release. Additionally, the C2A domain is specifically required for spontaneous release. These data reveal multiple roles of UNC-13 C2A domain, and suggest that spontaneous release and the fast phase of evoked release may involve a common pool of SVs at the active zone. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01180.001 PMID:24220508

  12. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4–64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis. PMID:28106089

  13. Release activity-dependent control of vesicle endocytosis by the synaptic adhesion molecule N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    van Stegen, Bernd; Dagar, Sushma; Gottmann, Kurt

    2017-01-20

    At synapses in the mammalian brain, continuous information transfer requires the long-term maintenance of homeostatic coupling between exo- and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because classical endocytosis is orders of magnitude slower than the millisecond-range exocytosis of vesicles, high frequency vesicle fusion could potentially compromise structural stability of synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the tight coupling of exo- and endocytosis are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the transsynaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 in regulating vesicle exo- and endocytosis by using activity-induced FM4-64 staining and by using synaptophysin-pHluorin fluorescence imaging. The synaptic adhesion molecules N-cadherin and Neuroligin1 had distinct impacts on exo- and endocytosis at mature cortical synapses. Expression of Neuroligin1 enhanced vesicle release in a N-cadherin-dependent way. Most intriguingly, expression of N-cadherin enhanced both vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Further detailed analysis of N-cadherin knockout neurons revealed that the boosting of endocytosis by N-cadherin was largely dependent on preceding high levels of vesicle release activity. In summary, regulation of vesicle endocytosis was mediated at the molecular level by N-cadherin in a release activity-dependent manner. Because of its endocytosis enhancing function, N-cadherin might play an important role in the coupling of vesicle exo- and endocytosis.

  14. Passive Diffusion as a Mechanism Underlying Ribbon Synapse Vesicle Release and Resupply

    PubMed Central

    Graydon, Cole W.; Zhang, Jun; Oesch, Nicholas W.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic ribbons are presynaptic protein structures found at many synapses that convey graded, “analog” sensory signals in the visual, auditory, and vestibular pathways. Ribbons, typically anchored to the presynaptic membrane and surrounded by tethered synaptic vesicles, are thought to regulate or facilitate vesicle delivery to the presynaptic membrane. No direct evidence exists, however, to indicate how vesicles interact with the ribbon or, once attached, move along the ribbon's surface to reach the presynaptic release sites at its base. To address these questions, we have created, validated, and tested a passive vesicle diffusion model of retinal rod bipolar cell ribbon synapses. We used axial (bright-field) electron tomography in the scanning transmission electron microscopy to obtain 3D structures of rat rod bipolar cell terminals in 1-μm-thick sections of retinal tissue at an isotropic spatial resolution of ∼3 nm. The resulting structures were then incorporated with previously published estimates of vesicle diffusion dynamics into numerical simulations that accurately reproduced electrophysiologically measured vesicle release/replenishment rates and vesicle pool sizes. The simulations suggest that, under physiologically realistic conditions, diffusion of vesicles crowded on the ribbon surface gives rise to a flow field that enhances delivery of vesicles to the presynaptic membrane without requiring an active transport mechanism. Numerical simulations of ribbon–vesicle interactions predict that transient binding and unbinding of multiple tethers to each synaptic vesicle may achieve sufficiently tight association of vesicles to the ribbon while permitting the fast diffusion along the ribbon that is required to sustain high release rates. PMID:24990916

  15. Synaptotagmin-7 Is Essential for Ca2+-Triggered Delayed Asynchronous Release But Not for Ca2+-Dependent Vesicle Priming in Retinal Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bacaj, Taulant

    2015-01-01

    mediating delayed asynchronous release, or vesicle repriming, in cultured neurons. To test the precise function of synaptotagmin-7 in a physiologically important synapse in situ, we have used pair recordings to study the synaptic transmission between retinal rod bipolar cells and AII amacrine cells. Our data demonstrate that the knock-out of synaptotagmin-7 selectively impaired delayed asynchronous release but not synchronous release. In contrast, the readily releasable vesicles after depletion recover normally in knock-out mice. Therefore, our findings extend our knowledge of synaptotagmins as Ca2+ sensors in vesicle fusion and support the idea that synapses are governed universally by different synaptotagmin Ca2+ sensors mediating distinct release. PMID:26245964

  16. Synaptotagmin-7 Is Essential for Ca2+-Triggered Delayed Asynchronous Release But Not for Ca2+-Dependent Vesicle Priming in Retinal Ribbon Synapses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fujun; Bacaj, Taulant; Südhof, Thomas C

    2015-08-05

    mediating delayed asynchronous release, or vesicle repriming, in cultured neurons. To test the precise function of synaptotagmin-7 in a physiologically important synapse in situ, we have used pair recordings to study the synaptic transmission between retinal rod bipolar cells and AII amacrine cells. Our data demonstrate that the knock-out of synaptotagmin-7 selectively impaired delayed asynchronous release but not synchronous release. In contrast, the readily releasable vesicles after depletion recover normally in knock-out mice. Therefore, our findings extend our knowledge of synaptotagmins as Ca(2+) sensors in vesicle fusion and support the idea that synapses are governed universally by different synaptotagmin Ca(2+) sensors mediating distinct release. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3511024-10$15.00/0.

  17. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    PubMed

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-18

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released.

  19. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histoplasma capsulatum produces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment of H. capsulatum cells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bind H. capsulatum heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion. IMPORTANCE Diverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a common pathway for the delivery of molecules to the extracellular space. However

  20. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum produces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment of H. capsulatum cells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bind H. capsulatum heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion. IMPORTANCE Diverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a common pathway for the delivery of molecules to the extracellular space. However, there has

  1. Munc13 controls the location and efficiency of dense-core vesicle release in neurons.

    PubMed

    van de Bospoort, Rhea; Farina, Margherita; Schmitz, Sabine K; de Jong, Arthur; de Wit, Heidi; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2012-12-10

    Neuronal dense-core vesicles (DCVs) contain diverse cargo crucial for brain development and function, but the mechanisms that control their release are largely unknown. We quantified activity-dependent DCV release in hippocampal neurons at single vesicle resolution. DCVs fused preferentially at synaptic terminals. DCVs also fused at extrasynaptic sites but only after prolonged stimulation. In munc13-1/2-null mutant neurons, synaptic DCV release was reduced but not abolished, and synaptic preference was lost. The remaining fusion required prolonged stimulation, similar to extrasynaptic fusion in wild-type neurons. Conversely, Munc13-1 overexpression (M13OE) promoted extrasynaptic DCV release, also without prolonged stimulation. Thus, Munc13-1/2 facilitate DCV fusion but, unlike for synaptic vesicles, are not essential for DCV release, and M13OE is sufficient to produce efficient DCV release extrasynaptically.

  2. Munc13 controls the location and efficiency of dense-core vesicle release in neurons

    PubMed Central

    van de Bospoort, Rhea; Farina, Margherita; Schmitz, Sabine K.; de Jong, Arthur; de Wit, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal dense-core vesicles (DCVs) contain diverse cargo crucial for brain development and function, but the mechanisms that control their release are largely unknown. We quantified activity-dependent DCV release in hippocampal neurons at single vesicle resolution. DCVs fused preferentially at synaptic terminals. DCVs also fused at extrasynaptic sites but only after prolonged stimulation. In munc13-1/2–null mutant neurons, synaptic DCV release was reduced but not abolished, and synaptic preference was lost. The remaining fusion required prolonged stimulation, similar to extrasynaptic fusion in wild-type neurons. Conversely, Munc13-1 overexpression (M13OE) promoted extrasynaptic DCV release, also without prolonged stimulation. Thus, Munc13-1/2 facilitate DCV fusion but, unlike for synaptic vesicles, are not essential for DCV release, and M13OE is sufficient to produce efficient DCV release extrasynaptically. PMID:23229896

  3. Bacterial Membrane Vesicles Mediate the Release of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipoglycans and Lipoproteins from Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Athman, Jaffre J; Wang, Ying; McDonald, David J; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V; Wearsch, Pamela A

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and releases microbial factors that regulate host defense. M. tuberculosis lipoproteins and lipoglycans block phagosome maturation, inhibit class II MHC Ag presentation, and modulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production, but the mechanisms for their release during infection are poorly defined. Furthermore, these molecules are thought to be incorporated into host membranes and released from infected macrophages within exosomes, 40-150-nm extracellular vesicles that derive from multivesicular endosomes. However, our studies revealed that extracellular vesicles released from infected macrophages include two distinct, largely nonoverlapping populations: one containing host cell markers of exosomes (CD9, CD63) and the other containing M. tuberculosis molecules (lipoglycans, lipoproteins). These vesicle populations are similar in size but have distinct densities, as determined by separation on sucrose gradients. Release of lipoglycans and lipoproteins from infected macrophages was dependent on bacterial viability, implicating active bacterial mechanisms in their secretion. Consistent with recent reports of extracellular vesicle production by bacteria (including M. tuberculosis), we propose that bacterial membrane vesicles are secreted by M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages and subsequently are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, extracellular vesicles released from M. tuberculosis-infected cells activate TLR2 and induce cytokine responses by uninfected macrophages. We demonstrate that these activities derive from the bacterial membrane vesicles rather than exosomes. Our findings suggest that bacterial membrane vesicles are the primary means by which M. tuberculosis exports lipoglycans and lipoproteins to impair effector functions of infected macrophages and circulate bacterial components beyond the site of infection to regulate immune responses by uninfected

  4. Vesicular Release of Glutamate Utilizes the Proton Gradient Between the Vesicle and Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jon T.; Weatherall, Kate L.; Corria, Laura R.; Chater, Thomas E.; Isaac, John T.; Marrion, Neil V.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is released from synaptic vesicles following formation of a fusion pore, connecting the vesicle interior with the synaptic cleft. Release is proposed to result from either full fusion of the vesicle with the terminal membrane or by ‘kiss-and-run,’ where release occurs through the fusion pore. ‘Kiss-and-run’ seems implausible as passive diffusion of glutamate through the pore is too slow to account for the rapidity of release. Vesicular accumulation of glutamate is driven by a proton gradient, resulting in the co-release of protons during exocytosis. We tested whether the proton gradient between the vesicle and cleft contributes to glutamate exocytosis. Collapse of the gradient reduced hippocampal glutamatergic transmission, an effect that was not associated with presynaptic changes in excitability, transmitter release probability, or postsynaptic sensitivity. These data indicate that approximately half of glutamate release utilizes the proton gradient between vesicle and cleft, suggesting a significant proportion of release by ‘kiss-and-run.’ PMID:21423501

  5. What is Rate-Limiting during Sustained Synaptic Activity: Vesicle Supply or the Availability of Release Sites

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    For some types of synapses the availability of release-ready vesicles is a limiting factor during ongoing activity. Synaptic strength in this case is determined both by the recruitment of such vesicles and the probability of their release during an action potential. Here it is argued that not the availability of vesicles is the limiting factor for recruitment, but rather the availability of specific sites to which vesicles can dock. PMID:21423530

  6. Mechanisms, pools, and sites of spontaneous vesicle release at synapses of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Van Hook, Matthew J; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors have depolarized resting potentials that stimulate calcium-dependent release continuously from a large vesicle pool but neurons can also release vesicles without stimulation. We characterized the Ca(2+) dependence, vesicle pools, and release sites involved in spontaneous release at photoreceptor ribbon synapses. In whole-cell recordings from light-adapted horizontal cells (HCs) of tiger salamander retina, we detected miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) when no stimulation was applied to promote exocytosis. Blocking Ca(2+) influx by lowering extracellular Ca(2+) , by application of Cd(2+) and other agents reduced the frequency of mEPSCs but did not eliminate them, indicating that mEPSCs can occur independently of Ca(2+) . We also measured release presynaptically from rods and cones by examining quantal glutamate transporter anion currents. Presynaptic quantal event frequency was reduced by Cd(2+) or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in rods, but not in cones, that were voltage clamped at -70 mV. By inhibiting the vesicle cycle with bafilomycin, we found the frequency of mEPSCs declined more rapidly than the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) suggesting a possible separation between vesicle pools in evoked and spontaneous exocytosis. We mapped sites of Ca(2+) -independent release using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize fusion of individual vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pHrodo. Spontaneous release in rods occurred more frequently at non-ribbon sites than evoked release events. The function of Ca(2+) -independent spontaneous release at continuously active photoreceptor synapses remains unclear, but the low frequency of spontaneous quanta limits their impact on noise.

  7. Magnetic and photoresponsive theranosomes: translating cell-released vesicles into smart nanovectors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K A; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Bonneau, Stephanie; Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Aubertin, Kelly; Clément, Olivier; Bureau, Michel Francis; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-06-25

    Cell-released vesicles are natural carriers that circulate in body fluids and transport biological agents to distal cells. As nature uses vesicles in cell communication to promote tumor progression, we propose to harness their unique properties and exploit these biogenic carriers as Trojan horses to deliver therapeutic payloads to cancer cells. In a theranostic approach, cell-released vesicles were engineered by a top-down procedure from precursor cells, previously loaded with a photosensitizer and magnetic nanoparticles. The double exogenous cargo provided vesicles with magnetic and optical responsiveness allowing therapeutic and imaging functions. This new class of cell-derived smart nanovectors was named "theranosomes". Theranosomes enabled efficient photodynamic tumor therapy in a murine cancer model in vivo. Moreover the distribution of this biogenic vector could be monitored by dual-mode imaging, combining fluorescence and MRI. This study reports the first success in translating a cell communication mediator into a smart theranostic nanovector.

  8. Synaptotagmin-12, a synaptic vesicle phosphoprotein that modulates spontaneous neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Maximov, Anton; Shin, Ok-Ho; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    Central synapses exhibit spontaneous neurotransmitter release that is selectively regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). We now show that synaptic vesicles contain synaptotagmin-12, a synaptotagmin isoform that differs from classical synaptotagmins in that it does not bind Ca2+. In synaptic vesicles, synaptotagmin-12 forms a complex with synaptotagmin-1 that prevents synaptotagmin-1 from interacting with SNARE complexes. We demonstrate that synaptotagmin-12 is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent PKA on serine97, and show that expression of synaptotagmin-12 in neurons increases spontaneous neurotransmitter release by approximately threefold, but has no effect on evoked release. Replacing serine97 by alanine abolishes synaptotagmin-12 phosphorylation and blocks its effect on spontaneous release. Our data suggest that spontaneous synaptic-vesicle exocytosis is selectively modulated by a Ca2+-independent synaptotagmin isoform, synaptotagmin-12, which is controlled by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. PMID:17190793

  9. Synaptotagmin-12, a synaptic vesicle phosphoprotein that modulates spontaneous neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Anton; Shin, Ok-Ho; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    Central synapses exhibit spontaneous neurotransmitter release that is selectively regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). We now show that synaptic vesicles contain synaptotagmin-12, a synaptotagmin isoform that differs from classical synaptotagmins in that it does not bind Ca(2+). In synaptic vesicles, synaptotagmin-12 forms a complex with synaptotagmin-1 that prevents synaptotagmin-1 from interacting with SNARE complexes. We demonstrate that synaptotagmin-12 is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent PKA on serine(97), and show that expression of synaptotagmin-12 in neurons increases spontaneous neurotransmitter release by approximately threefold, but has no effect on evoked release. Replacing serine(97) by alanine abolishes synaptotagmin-12 phosphorylation and blocks its effect on spontaneous release. Our data suggest that spontaneous synaptic-vesicle exocytosis is selectively modulated by a Ca(2+)-independent synaptotagmin isoform, synaptotagmin-12, which is controlled by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

  10. Clay-vesicle interactions: fluorescence measurements and structural implications for slow release formulations of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Nir, Shlomo; Gomara, Maria Jose

    2004-08-03

    Clay-vesicle systems exhibit a potential for environmental applications, such as herbicide formulations for reduced leaching. Clay-vesicle interactions were addressed by combining adsorption and XRD measurements with fluorescence studies for didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDOB), and montmorillonite. XRD and adsorption data indicated that the adsorbing vesicles were transformed after 3 days into paraffinic and bilayer structures. Fluorescence studies revealed that adsorption was almost complete within 5 min for a loading below the cation exchange capacity (CEC). Aggregation and sedimentation of clay-surfactant particles occurred within several minutes. Fluorescent measurements of supernatants indicated decomposition of vesicles at a high clay/surfactant ratio due to rapidly adsorbing cationic monomers. The kinetics of energy transfer between vesicles labeled by NBD-PE (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)) and montmorillonite labeled by rhodamine-B follows that of aggregation of surfactant-clay particles and structural changes of the vesicles at times of minutes to hours. Experiments following the reduction of NBD fluorescence by addition of dithionite indicate faster permeabilization of DDOB than DDAB vesicles, which was confirmed by leakage experiments. The faster permeabilization of DDOB vesicles in the presence of clay was correlated with their inferior suitability for the preparation of clay-based formulations of anionic herbicides for slow release.

  11. Release of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria is a novel envelope stress response

    PubMed Central

    McBroom, Amanda J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2007-01-01

    Conditions that impair protein folding in the Gram-negative bacterial envelope cause stress. The destabilizing effects of stress in this compartment are recognized and countered by a number of signal transduction mechanisms. Data presented here reveal another facet of the complex bacterial stress response, release of outer membrane vesicles. Native vesicles are composed of outer membrane and periplasmic material, and they are released from the bacterial surface without loss of membrane integrity. Here we demonstrate that the quantity of vesicle release correlates directly with the level of protein accumulation in the cell envelope. Accumulation of material occurs under stress, and is exacerbated upon impairment of the normal housekeeping and stress-responsive mechanisms of the cell. Mutations that cause increased vesiculation enhance bacterial survival upon challenge with stressing agents or accumulation of toxic misfolded proteins. Preferential packaging of a misfolded protein mimic into vesicles for removal indicates that the vesiculation process can act to selectively eliminate unwanted material. Our results demonstrate that production of bacterial outer membrane vesicles is a fully independent, general envelope stress response. In addition to identifying a novel mechanism for alleviating stress, this work provides physiological relevance for vesicle production as a protective mechanism. PMID:17163978

  12. Neurotransmitter Release: The Last Millisecond in the Life of a Synaptic Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    During an action potential, Ca2+ entering a presynaptic terminal triggers synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in less than a millisecond. How does Ca2+ stimulate release so rapidly and precisely? Work over the last decades revealed that Ca2+-binding to synaptotagmin triggers release by stimulating synaptotagmin-binding to a core machinery composed of SNARE and SM proteins that mediates membrane fusion during exocytosis. Complexin adaptor proteins assist synaptotagmin by activating and clamping this core fusion machinery. Synaptic vesicles containing synaptotagmin are positioned at the active zone, the site of vesicle fusion, by a protein complex containing RIM proteins. RIM proteins simultaneously activate docking and priming of synaptic vesicles and recruit Ca2+-channels to active zones, thereby connecting in a single complex primed synaptic vesicles to Ca2+-channels. This architecture allows direct flow of Ca2+-ions from Ca2+-channels to synaptotagmin, which then triggers fusion, thus mediating tight millisecond coupling of an action potential to neurotransmitter release. PMID:24183019

  13. Membrane vesicle release in bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea: a conserved yet underappreciated aspect of microbial life.

    PubMed

    Deatherage, Brooke L; Cookson, Brad T

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of microbes with their environment depends on features of the dynamic microbial surface throughout cell growth and division. Surface modifications, whether used to acquire nutrients, defend against other microbes, or resist the pressures of a host immune system, facilitate adaptation to unique surroundings. The release of bioactive membrane vesicles (MVs) from the cell surface is conserved across microbial life, in bacteria, archaea, fungi, and parasites. MV production occurs not only in vitro but also in vivo during infection, underscoring the influence of these surface organelles in microbial physiology and pathogenesis through delivery of enzymes, toxins, communication signals, and antigens recognized by the innate and adaptive immune systems. Derived from a variety of organisms that span kingdoms of life and called by several names (membrane vesicles, outer membrane vesicles [OMVs], exosomes, shedding microvesicles, etc.), the conserved functions and mechanistic strategies of MV release are similar, including the use of ESCRT proteins and ESCRT protein homologues to facilitate these processes in archaea and eukaryotic microbes. Although forms of MV release by different organisms share similar visual, mechanistic, and functional features, there has been little comparison across microbial life. This underappreciated conservation of vesicle release, and the resulting functional impact throughout the tree of life, explored in this review, stresses the importance of vesicle-mediated processes throughout biology.

  14. The Immediately Releasable Pool of Mouse Chromaffin Cell Vesicles Is Coupled to P/Q-Type Calcium Channels via the Synaptic Protein Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Yanina D.; Belingheri, Ana Verónica; Perez Bay, Andrés E.; Javis, Scott E.; Tedford, H. William; Zamponi, Gerald; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the immediately releasable pool is a group of readily releasable vesicles that are closely associated with voltage dependent Ca2+ channels. We have previously shown that exocytosis of this pool is specifically coupled to P/Q Ca2+ current. Accordingly, in the present work we found that the Ca2+ current flowing through P/Q-type Ca2+ channels is 8 times more effective at inducing exocytosis in response to short stimuli than the current carried by L-type channels. To investigate the mechanism that underlies the coupling between the immediately releasable pool and P/Q-type channels we transiently expressed in mouse chromaffin cells peptides corresponding to the synaptic protein interaction site of Cav2.2 to competitively uncouple P/Q-type channels from the secretory vesicle release complex. This treatment reduced the efficiency of Ca2+ current to induce exocytosis to similar values as direct inhibition of P/Q-type channels via ω-agatoxin-IVA. In addition, the same treatment markedly reduced immediately releasable pool exocytosis, but did not affect the exocytosis provoked by sustained electric or high K+ stimulation. Together, our results indicate that the synaptic protein interaction site is a crucial factor for the establishment of the functional coupling between immediately releasable pool vesicles and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:23382986

  15. A cell-semiconductor synapse: transistor recording of vesicle release in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, Janosch; Fromherz, Peter

    2007-03-15

    The release of dense-core vesicles in bovine chromaffin cells is a model for the presynaptic process in neurons. It is usually studied by microamperometry of catecholamines with carbon fibers. Here we introduce transistor recording as a tool to study vesicle release. When we stimulate a chromaffin cell placed on a field-effect transistor, the gate voltage exhibits peaks that correlate with a simultaneously performed amperometric recording. We attribute the transistor signal to a release of protons from the extruded matrix of vesicles that lowers the extracellular pH and changes the electrical surface potential of the gate oxide. The rise time of the transistor signals is similar to that of amperometric responses, whereas their duration is distinctly longer. In a model computation, the rise time is identified with the extrusion of vesicle matrix into the narrow extracellular space between cell and gate oxide, and the decay time is attributed to pH equilibration through slow diffusion in the extruded matrix. Because the transistor recording relies on protons, it can be applied to acidic vesicles with electrochemically inactive hormones or transmitters.

  16. Synaptotagmin 1 directs repetitive release by coupling vesicle exocytosis to the Rab3 cycle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunsheng; Wang, Jiaming; Wang, Yu; Ding, Mei

    2015-02-24

    In response to Ca(2+) influx, a synapse needs to release neurotransmitters quickly while immediately preparing for repeat firing. How this harmonization is achieved is not known. In this study, we found that the Ca(2+) sensor synaptotagmin 1 orchestrates the membrane association/disassociation cycle of Rab3, which functions in activity-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles. In the absence of Ca(2+), synaptotagmin 1 binds to Rab3 GTPase activating protein (GAP) and inhibits the GTP hydrolysis of Rab3 protein. Rab3 GAP resides on synaptic vesicles, and synaptotagmin 1 is essential for the synaptic localization of Rab3 GAP. In the presence of Ca(2+), synaptotagmin 1 releases Rab3 GAP and promotes membrane disassociation of Rab3. Without synaptotagmin 1, the tight coupling between vesicle exocytosis and Rab3 membrane disassociation is disrupted. We uncovered the long-sought molecular apparatus linking vesicle exocytosis to Rab3 cycling and we also revealed the important function of synaptotagmin 1 in repetitive synaptic vesicle release.

  17. A Cell-Semiconductor Synapse: Transistor Recording of Vesicle Release in Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberger, Janosch; Fromherz, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The release of dense-core vesicles in bovine chromaffin cells is a model for the presynaptic process in neurons. It is usually studied by microamperometry of catecholamines with carbon fibers. Here we introduce transistor recording as a tool to study vesicle release. When we stimulate a chromaffin cell placed on a field-effect transistor, the gate voltage exhibits peaks that correlate with a simultaneously performed amperometric recording. We attribute the transistor signal to a release of protons from the extruded matrix of vesicles that lowers the extracellular pH and changes the electrical surface potential of the gate oxide. The rise time of the transistor signals is similar to that of amperometric responses, whereas their duration is distinctly longer. In a model computation, the rise time is identified with the extrusion of vesicle matrix into the narrow extracellular space between cell and gate oxide, and the decay time is attributed to pH equilibration through slow diffusion in the extruded matrix. Because the transistor recording relies on protons, it can be applied to acidic vesicles with electrochemically inactive hormones or transmitters. PMID:17189317

  18. Triggered Release from Lipid Bilayer Vesicles by an Artificial Transmembrane Signal Transduction System.

    PubMed

    Langton, Matthew J; Scriven, Lorel M; Williams, Nicholas H; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-09-06

    The on-demand delivery of drug molecules from nanoscale carriers with spatiotemporal control is a key challenge in modern medicine. Here we show that lipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes) can be triggered to release an encapsulated molecular cargo in response to an external control signal by employing an artificial transmembrane signal transduction mechanism. A synthetic signal transducer embedded in the lipid bilayer membrane acts as a switchable catalyst, catalyzing the formation of surfactant molecules inside the vesicle in response to a change in external pH. The surfactant permeabilizes the lipid bilayer membrane to facilitate release of an encapsulated hydrophilic cargo. In the absence of the pH control signal, the catalyst is inactive, and the cargo remains encapsulated within the vesicle.

  19. Complexin facilitates exocytosis and synchronizes vesicle release in two secretory model systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Yi; Rohan, Joyce G; Cai, Haijiang; Reim, Kerstin; Ko, Chien-Ping; Chow, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Complexins (Cplxs) are small, SNARE-associated proteins believed to regulate fast, calcium-triggered exocytosis. However, studies have pointed to either an inhibitory and/or facilitatory role in exocytosis, and the role of Cplxs in synchronizing exocytosis is relatively unexplored. Here, we compare the function of two types of complexin, Cplx 1 and 2, in two model systems of calcium-dependent exocytosis. In mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we find that lack of Cplx 1 significantly reduces and desynchronizes calcium-triggered synaptic transmission; furthermore, high-frequency stimulation elicits synaptic facilitation, instead of normal synaptic depression, and the degree of facilitation is highly sensitive to the amount of cytoplasmic calcium buffering. In Cplx 2-null adrenal chromaffin cells, we also find decreased and desynchronized evoked release, and identify a significant reduction in the vesicle pool close to the calcium channels (immediately releasable pool, IRP). Viral transduction with either Cplx 1 or 2 rescues both the size of the evoked response and the synchronicity of release, and it restores the IRP size. Our findings in two model systems are mutually compatible and indicate a role of Cplx 1 and 2 in facilitating vesicle priming, and also lead to the new hypothesis that Cplxs may synchronize vesicle release by promoting coupling between secretory vesicles and calcium channels. PMID:23401610

  20. Intracellular calcium stores drive slow non-ribbon vesicle release from rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Križaj, David; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Rods are capable of greater slow release than cones contributing to overall slower release kinetics. Slow release in rods involves Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). By impairing release from ribbons, we found that unlike cones where release occurs entirely at ribbon-style active zones, slow release from rods occurs mostly at ectopic, non-ribbon sites. To investigate the role of CICR in ribbon and non-ribbon release from rods, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as a tool for visualizing terminals of isolated rods loaded with fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dyes and synaptic vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pH-sensitive rhodamine. We found that rather than simply facilitating release, activation of CICR by ryanodine triggered release directly in rods, independent of plasma membrane Ca2+ channel activation. Ryanodine-evoked release occurred mostly at non-ribbon sites and release evoked by sustained depolarization at non-ribbon sites was mostly due to CICR. Unlike release at ribbon-style active zones, non-ribbon release did not occur at fixed locations. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-tracker dye in rod terminals showed that ER extends continuously from synapse to soma. Release of Ca2+ from terminal ER by lengthy depolarization did not significantly deplete Ca2+ from ER in the perikaryon. Collectively, these results indicate that CICR-triggered release at non-ribbon sites is a major mechanism for maintaining vesicle release from rods and that CICR in terminals may be sustained by diffusion of Ca2+ through ER from other parts of the cell. PMID:24550779

  1. A Sequential Vesicle Pool Model with a Single Release Sensor and a Ca2+-Dependent Priming Catalyst Effectively Explains Ca2+-Dependent Properties of Neurosecretion

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Alexander M.; Pinheiro, Paulo S.; Verhage, Matthijs; Sørensen, Jakob B.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release depends on the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane and the release of their contents. The final fusion step displays higher-order Ca2+ dependence, but also upstream steps depend on Ca2+. After deletion of the Ca2+ sensor for fast release – synaptotagmin-1 – slower Ca2+-dependent release components persist. These findings have provoked working models involving parallel releasable vesicle pools (Parallel Pool Models, PPM) driven by alternative Ca2+ sensors for release, but no slow release sensor acting on a parallel vesicle pool has been identified. We here propose a Sequential Pool Model (SPM), assuming a novel Ca2+-dependent action: a Ca2+-dependent catalyst that accelerates both forward and reverse priming reactions. While both models account for fast fusion from the Readily-Releasable Pool (RRP) under control of synaptotagmin-1, the origins of slow release differ. In the SPM the slow release component is attributed to the Ca2+-dependent refilling of the RRP from a Non-Releasable upstream Pool (NRP), whereas the PPM attributes slow release to a separate slowly-releasable vesicle pool. Using numerical integration we compared model predictions to data from mouse chromaffin cells. Like the PPM, the SPM explains biphasic release, Ca2+-dependence and pool sizes in mouse chromaffin cells. In addition, the SPM accounts for the rapid recovery of the fast component after strong stimulation, where the PPM fails. The SPM also predicts the simultaneous changes in release rate and amplitude seen when mutating the SNARE-complex. Finally, it can account for the loss of fast- and the persistence of slow release in the synaptotagmin-1 knockout by assuming that the RRP is depleted, leading to slow and Ca2+-dependent fusion from the NRP. We conclude that the elusive ‘alternative Ca2+ sensor’ for slow release might be the upstream priming catalyst, and that a sequential model effectively explains Ca2+-dependent properties of

  2. Controlled release application of multilamellar vesicles: a novel drug delivery approach.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sunil A; Soppimath, Kumaresh S; Betageri, Guru V

    2010-02-01

    A novel multilamellar vesicular delivery system was developed for the controlled release application. Multilamellar vesicles were prepared by thin film hydration and converted into proliposomes by freeze-drying. A model drug metoclopramide, a highly hydrophilic drug, was successfully encapsulated into proliposomes. The proliposomes produced were non-sticky, free-flowing powders. The proliposomes were formulated into a unit dosage form by combining with various excipients. The effect of different compositions such as type and concentration of phospholipid or hydrophilic polymer was investigared to optimize the formulation. The formation of multilamellar vesicles was confirmed by observing the process of hydration of proliposomes under an optical microscope. The spherical shape of vesicles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mean particle sizes were in the range of 1.3-2.5 microm, as measured by dynamic light scattering technique. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study of formulations was conducted to understand the crystalline nature of drug in the vesicles. The results indicated a molecular level dispersion of drug into proliposomes with encapsulation efficiency up to 43%. Critical formulation parameters were identified to obtain a near zero order in vitro release pattern. Proliposomal formulations produced were suitable as multiparticulate drug delivery systems for the controlled release of a highly hydrophilic molecule.

  3. A comprehensive characterization of membrane vesicles released by autophagic human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Sirois, Isabelle; Bell, Christina; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Hamelin, Katia; Dieudé, Mélanie; Rondeau, Christiane; Thibault, Pierre; Desjardins, Michel; Hebert, Marie-Josée

    2013-04-01

    The stress status of the apoptotic cell can promote phenotypic changes that have important consequences on the immunogenicity of the dying cell. Autophagy is one of the biological processes activated in response to a stressful condition. It is an important mediator of intercellular communications, both by regulating the unconventional secretion of molecules, including interleukin 1β, and by regulating the extracellular release of ATP from early stage apoptotic cells. Additionally, autophagic components can be released in a caspase-dependent manner by serum-starved human endothelial cells that have engaged apoptotic and autophagic processes. The nature and the components of the extracellular vesicles released by dying autophagic cells are not known. In this study, we have identified extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by human endothelial cells undergoing apoptosis and autophagy, and characterized their biochemical, ultrastructural, morphological properties as well as their proteome. These extracellular vesicles differ from classical apoptotic bodies because they do not contain nucleus components and are released independently of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 activation. Instead, they are enriched with autophagosomes and mitochondria and convey various danger signals, including ATP, suggesting that they could be involved in the modulation of innate immunity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  5. Release of kinesin from vesicles by hsc70 and regulation of fast axonal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; Morfini, G.; Szebenyi, G.; Brady, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The nature of kinesin interactions with membrane-bound organelles and mechanisms for regulation of kinesin-based motility have both been surprisingly difficult to define. Most kinesin is recovered in supernatants with standard protocols for purification of motor proteins, but kinesin recovered on membrane-bound organelles is tightly bound. Partitioning of kinesin between vesicle and cytosolic fractions is highly sensitive to buffer composition. Addition of either N-ethylmaleimide or EDTA to homogenization buffers significantly increased the fraction of kinesin bound to organelles. Given that an antibody against kinesin light chain tandem repeats also releases kinesin from vesicles, these observations indicated that specific cytoplasmic factors may regulate kinesin release from membranes. Kinesin light tandem repeats contain DnaJ-like motifs, so the effects of hsp70 chaperones were evaluated. Hsc70 released kinesin from vesicles in an MgATP-dependent and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive manner. Recombinant kinesin light chains inhibited kinesin release by hsc70 and stimulated the hsc70 ATPase. Hsc70 actions may provide a mechanism to regulate kinesin function by releasing kinesin from cargo in specific subcellular domains, thereby effecting delivery of axonally transported materials.

  6. Properties of ribbon and non-ribbon release from rod photoreceptors revealed by visualizing individual synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghui; Van Hook, Matthew J; Zenisek, David; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2013-01-30

    Vesicle release from rod photoreceptors is regulated by Ca(2+) entry through L-type channels located near synaptic ribbons. We characterized sites and kinetics of vesicle release in salamander rods by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize fusion of individual synaptic vesicles. A small number of vesicles were loaded by brief incubation with FM1-43 or a dextran-conjugated, pH-sensitive form of rhodamine, pHrodo. Labeled organelles matched the diffraction-limited size of fluorescent microspheres and disappeared rapidly during stimulation. Consistent with fusion, depolarization-evoked vesicle disappearance paralleled electrophysiological release kinetics and was blocked by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx. Rods maintained tonic release at resting membrane potentials near those in darkness, causing depletion of membrane-associated vesicles unless Ca(2+) entry was inhibited. This depletion of release sites implies that sustained release may be rate limited by vesicle delivery. During depolarizing stimulation, newly appearing vesicles approached the membrane at ∼800 nm/s, where they paused for ∼60 ms before fusion. With fusion, vesicles advanced ∼18 nm closer to the membrane. Release events were concentrated near ribbons, but lengthy depolarization also triggered release from more distant non-ribbon sites. Consistent with greater contributions from non-ribbon sites during lengthier depolarization, damaging the ribbon by fluorophore-assisted laser inactivation (FALI) of Ribeye caused only weak inhibition of exocytotic capacitance increases evoked by 200-ms depolarizing test steps, whereas FALI more strongly inhibited capacitance increases evoked by 25 ms steps. Amplifying release by use of non-ribbon sites when rods are depolarized in darkness may improve detection of decrements in release when they hyperpolarize to light.

  7. Properties of Ribbon and Non-Ribbon Release from Rod Photoreceptors Revealed by Visualizing Individual Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Zenisek, David

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle release from rod photoreceptors is regulated by Ca2+ entry through L-type channels located near synaptic ribbons. We characterized sites and kinetics of vesicle release in salamander rods by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize fusion of individual synaptic vesicles. A small number of vesicles were loaded by brief incubation with FM1–43 or a dextran-conjugated, pH-sensitive form of rhodamine, pHrodo. Labeled organelles matched the diffraction-limited size of fluorescent microspheres and disappeared rapidly during stimulation. Consistent with fusion, depolarization-evoked vesicle disappearance paralleled electrophysiological release kinetics and was blocked by inhibiting Ca2+ influx. Rods maintained tonic release at resting membrane potentials near those in darkness, causing depletion of membrane-associated vesicles unless Ca2+ entry was inhibited. This depletion of release sites implies that sustained release may be rate limited by vesicle delivery. During depolarizing stimulation, newly appearing vesicles approached the membrane at ∼800 nm/s, where they paused for ∼60 ms before fusion. With fusion, vesicles advanced ∼18 nm closer to the membrane. Release events were concentrated near ribbons, but lengthy depolarization also triggered release from more distant non-ribbon sites. Consistent with greater contributions from non-ribbon sites during lengthier depolarization, damaging the ribbon by fluorophore-assisted laser inactivation (FALI) of Ribeye caused only weak inhibition of exocytotic capacitance increases evoked by 200-ms depolarizing test steps, whereas FALI more strongly inhibited capacitance increases evoked by 25 ms steps. Amplifying release by use of non-ribbon sites when rods are depolarized in darkness may improve detection of decrements in release when they hyperpolarize to light. PMID:23365244

  8. Morphological changes in vesicles and release of an encapsulated compound triggered by a photoresponsive Malachite Green leuconitrile derivative.

    PubMed

    Uda, Ryoko M; Hiraishi, Eri; Ohnishi, Ryo; Nakahara, Yoshio; Kimura, Keiichi

    2010-04-20

    Photoinduced morphological changes in phosphatidylcholine vesicles are triggered by a Malachite Green leuconitrile derivative dissolved in the lipidic membrane, and are observed at Malachite Green derivative/lipid ratios <5 mol %. This Malachite Green derivative is a photoresponsive compound that undergoes ionization to afford a positive charge on the molecule by UV irradiation. The Malachite Green derivative exhibits amphiphilicity when ionized photochemically, whereas it behaves as a lipophilic compound under dark conditions. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy was used to determine vesicle morphology. The effects of the Malachite Green derivative on vesicles were studied by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Irradiation of vesicles containing the Malachite Green derivative induces nonspherical vesicle morphology, fusion of vesicles, and membrane solubilization, depending on conditions. Furthermore, irradiation of the Malachite Green derivative induces the release of a vesicle-encapsulated compound.

  9. Physiopathological roles of spontaneously released outer membrane vesicles of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Gianmarco; Arato, Vanessa; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Leuzzi, Rosanna

    2017-10-05

    Bordetella pertussis has been shown to release outer membrane vesicles (OMV) both in vitro and in vivo but little is known about their biological role during the initial phases of B. pertussis infection of the airways. We have demonstrated that OMV are released by B. pertussis in a human ciliated-airway cell model and purified vesicles can interact with host cells. Binding and uptake are strictly Bvg-regulated and OMV-associated. Pertussis toxin contributes to host-cell intoxication. Furthermore, we have shown that OMV act as iron-delivery systems complementing the B. pertussis growth defect in iron-limiting conditions. We have proved that OMV play different roles in B. pertussis physiopathology and we opened new perspectives to be further investigated.

  10. FK506 induces biphasic Ca2+ release from microsomal vesicles of rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Terutaka

    2006-07-01

    The effect of the immunosuppressant drug FK506 on microsomal Ca2+ release was investigated in rat pancreatic acinar cells. When FK506 (0.1-200 microM) was added to the microsomal vesicles at a steady state of ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake, FK506 caused a dose-dependent and a biphasic release of 45Ca2+. Almost 10% of total 45Ca2+ uptake was released at FK506 concentrations up to 10 microM (Km=0.47 microM), and 60% of total 45Ca2+ uptake was released at FK506 concentrations over 10 microM (Km=55 microM). Preincubation of the vesicles with cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR, 0.5 microM) increased the FK506 (< or =10 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release (Ozawa T, Biochim Biophys Acta 1693: 159-166, 2004). Preincubation with heparin (200 microg/ml) resulted in significant inhibition of the FK506 (30 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release. Subsequent addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, 5 microM) after FK506 (100 microM)-induced 45Ca2+ release did not cause any release of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that two types of FK506-induced Ca2+ release mechanism operate in the endoplasmic reticulum of rat pancreatic acinar cells: a high-affinity mechanism of Ca2+ release, which involves activation of the ryanodine receptor, and a low-affinity mechanism of Ca2+ release, which involves activation of the IP3 receptor.

  11. Fife organizes synaptic vesicles and calcium channels for high-probability neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Monica; Ukken, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    The strength of synaptic connections varies significantly and is a key determinant of communication within neural circuits. Mechanistic insight into presynaptic factors that establish and modulate neurotransmitter release properties is crucial to understanding synapse strength, circuit function, and neural plasticity. We previously identified Drosophila Piccolo-RIM-related Fife, which regulates neurotransmission and motor behavior through an unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that Fife localizes and interacts with RIM at the active zone cytomatrix to promote neurotransmitter release. Loss of Fife results in the severe disruption of active zone cytomatrix architecture and molecular organization. Through electron tomographic and electrophysiological studies, we find a decrease in the accumulation of release-ready synaptic vesicles and their release probability caused by impaired coupling to Ca2+ channels. Finally, we find that Fife is essential for the homeostatic modulation of neurotransmission. We propose that Fife organizes active zones to create synaptic vesicle release sites within nanometer distance of Ca2+ channel clusters for reliable and modifiable neurotransmitter release. PMID:27998991

  12. Different populations of Wnt-containing vesicles are individually released from polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuhong; Takada, Ritsuko; Noda, Chiyo; Kobayashi, Satoru; Takada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes are heterogeneous in molecular composition and physical properties. Here we examined whether epithelial cells secrete a heterogeneous population of exosomes, and if that is the case, whether epithelial cell polarity affects release of different populations of exosomes, especially that of those carrying Wnt. Sucrose-density ultracentrifugation and molecular marker analysis revealed that different populations of exosomes or exosome-like vesicles were released from MDCK cells depending on the cell polarity. Wnt3a associated with these vesicles were detectable in culture media collected from both apical and basolateral sides of the cells. Basolaterally secreted Wnt3a were co-fractionated with a typical exosomal protein TSG101 in fractions having typical exosome densities. In contrast, most of apically secreted Wnt3a, as well as Wnt11, were co-fractionated with CD63 and Hsp70, which are also common to the most exosomes, but recovered in higher density fractions. Wnt3a exhibiting similar floatation behavior to the apically secreted ones were also detectable in the culture media of Wnt3a-expressing L and HEK293 cells. The lipidation of Wnt3a was required for its basolateral secretion in exosomes but was dispensable for the apical one. Thus, epithelial cells release Wnt via distinct populations of vesicles differing in secretion polarity and lipidation dependency. PMID:27765945

  13. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/β-cyclodextrin vesicles embedded in chitosan gel for insulin delivery with pH-selective release.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Caifen; Xu, Jianghui; Singh, Vikramjeet; Chen, Dawei; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-07-01

    In an answer to the challenge of enzymatic instability and low oral bioavailability of proteins/peptides, a new type of drug-delivery vesicle has been developed. The preparation, based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) embedded in chitosan gel, was used to successfully deliver the model drug-insulin. The self-assembled SDS/β-CD vesicles were prepared and characterized by particle size, zeta potential, appearance, microscopic morphology and entrapment efficiency. In addition, both the interaction of insulin with vesicles and the stability of insulin loaded in vesicles in the presence of pepsin were investigated. The vesicles were crosslinked into thermo-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerol phosphate solution for an in-situ gel to enhance the dilution stability. The in vitro release characteristics of insulin from gels in media at different pH values were investigated. The insulin loaded vesicles-chitosan hydrogel (IVG) improved the dilution stability of the vesicles and provided pH-selective sustained release compared with insulin solution-chitosan hydrogel (ISG). In vitro, IVG exhibited slow release in acidic solution and relatively quick release in neutral solutions to provide drug efficacy. In simulated digestive fluid, IVG showed better sustained release and insulin protection properties compared with ISG. Thus IVG might improve the stability of insulin during its transport in vivo and contribute to the bioavailability and therapeutic effect of insulin.

  14. Multistimuli-responsive supramolecular vesicles based on water-soluble pillar[6]arene and SAINT complexation for controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Hu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Yan; Zou, Xiaochun; Xiong, Shuhan; Lin, Chen; Shen, Ying-Zhong; Wang, Leyong

    2014-07-30

    Supramolecular binary vesicles based on the host-guest complexation of water-soluble pillar[6]arene (WP6) and SAINT molecule have been successfully constructed, which showed pH-, Ca(2+)-, and thermal-responsiveness. These supramolecular vesicles can efficiently encapsulate model substrate calcein, which then can be efficiently released either by adjusting the solution pH to acidic condition due to the complete disruption of vesicular structure, or particularly, by adding a certain amount of Ca(2+) due to the Ca(2+)-induced vesicle fusion and accompanied by the structure disruption. More importantly, drug loading and releasing experiments demonstrate that an anticancer drug, DOX, can be successfully encapsulated by the supramolecular vesicles, and the resulting DOX-loaded vesicles exhibit efficient release of the encapsulated DOX with the pH adjustment or the introduction of Ca(2+). Cytotoxicity experiments suggest that the resulting DOX-loaded supramolecular vesicles exhibit comparable therapeutic effect for cancer cells as free DOX and the remarkably reduced damage for normal cells as well. The present multistimuli-responsive supramolecular vesicles have great potential applications in the field of controlled drug delivery. In addition, giant supramolecular vesicles (~3 μm) with large internal volume and good stability can be achieved by increasing the temperature of WP6 ⊃ SAINT vesicular solution, and they might have potential applications for bioimaging.

  15. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    SciTech Connect

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2016-03-30

    ABSTRACT

    Histoplasma capsulatumproduces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment ofH. capsulatumcells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bindH. capsulatumheat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion.

    IMPORTANCEDiverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a

  16. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G; Enghild, Jan J; Praetorius, Jeppe; Borregaard, Niels; Petersen, Steen V

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD mRNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide in the extracellular space, but does not affect the capacity to generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Consequently, our data signifies that EC-SOD released from activated neutrophils affects the redox conditions of the extracellular space and may offer protection against highly reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals otherwise generated as a result of respiratory burst activity of activated neutrophils.

  17. Vesicles derived via AP-3 dependent recycling contribute to asynchronous release and influence information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Evstratova, Alesya; Chamberland, Simon; Faundez, Victor; Tóth, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Action potentials trigger synchronous and asynchronous neurotransmitter release. Temporal properties of both types of release could be altered in an activity-dependent manner. While the effects of activity-dependent changes in synchronous release on postsynaptic signal integration have been studied, the contribution of asynchronous release to information transfer during natural stimulus patterns is unknown. Here we find that during trains of stimulations, asynchronous release contributes to the precision of action potential firing. Our data show that this form of release is selectively diminished in AP-3b2 KO animals, which lack functional neuronal AP-3, an adaptor protein regulating vesicle formation from endosomes generated during bulk endocytosis. We find that in the absence of neuronal AP-3, asynchronous release is attenuated and the activity-dependent increase in the precision of action potential timing is compromised. Lack of asynchronous release decreases the capacity of synaptic information transfer and renders synaptic communication less reliable in response to natural stimulus patterns. PMID:25410111

  18. Nephrin Is Expressed on the Surface of Insulin Vesicles and Facilitates Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Release

    PubMed Central

    Fornoni, Alessia; Jeon, Jongmin; Varona Santos, Javier; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Jauregui, Alexandra; Inverardi, Luca; Mandic, Slavena A.; Bark, Christina; Johnson, Kevin; McNamara, George; Pileggi, Antonello; Molano, R. Damaris; Reiser, Jochen; Tryggvason, Karl; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Berggren, Per-Olof; Mundel, Peter; Ricordi, Camillo

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nephrin, an immunoglobulin-like protein essential for the function of the glomerular podocyte and regulated in diabetic nephropathy, is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells, where its function remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether diabetes modulates nephrin expression in human pancreatic islets and to explore the role of nephrin in β-cell function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Nephrin expression in human pancreas and in MIN6 insulinoma cells was studied by Western blot, PCR, confocal microscopy, subcellular fractionation, and immunogold labeling. Islets from diabetic (n = 5) and nondiabetic (n = 7) patients were compared. Stable transfection and siRNA knockdown in MIN-6 cells/human islets were used to study nephrin function in vitro and in vivo after transplantation in diabetic immunodeficient mice. Live imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-nephrin–transfected cells was used to study nephrin endocytosis. RESULTS Nephrin was found at the plasma membrane and on insulin vesicles. Nephrin expression was decreased in islets from diabetic patients when compared with nondiabetic control subjects. Nephrin transfection in MIN-6 cells/pseudoislets resulted in higher glucose-stimulated insulin release in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into immunodeficient diabetic mice. Nephrin gene silencing abolished stimulated insulin release. Confocal imaging of GFP-nephrin–transfected cells revealed nephrin endocytosis upon glucose stimulation. Actin stabilization prevented nephrin trafficking as well as nephrin-positive effect on insulin release. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that nephrin is an active component of insulin vesicle machinery that may affect vesicle-actin interaction and mobilization to the plasma membrane. Development of drugs targeting nephrin may represent a novel approach to treat diabetes. PMID:19833886

  19. Vesicle-associated microRNAs are released from blood cells on incubation of blood samples.

    PubMed

    Köberle, Verena; Kakoschky, Bianca; Ibrahim, Ahmed Atef; Schmithals, Christian; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd; Waidmann, Oliver; Pleli, Thomas; Piiper, Albrecht

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) circulating extracellularly in the blood are currently intensively studied as novel disease markers. However, the preanalytical factors influencing the levels of the extracellular miRNAs are still incompletely explored. In particular, it is unknown, whether the incubation of blood samples as occurring in clinical routine can lead to a release of miRNAs from blood cells and thus alter the extracellular miRNA levels before the preparation of serum or plasma from the blood cells. Using a set of marker miRNAs and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that the levels of extracellular miRNA-1, miRNA-16, and miRNA-21 were increased in EDTA and serum collection tubes incubated for 1-3 hours at room temperature and declined thereafter; the levels of the liver-specific miRNA-122 declined monophasically. These events occurred in the absence of significant hemolysis. When the blood was supplemented with Ribonuclease A inhibitor, the levels of miRNA-1, miRNA-16, and miRNA-21 increased substantially during the initial 3 hours of incubation and those of miRNA-122 remained unchanged, indicating that the release of blood cell-derived miRNAs occurred during the initial 3 hours of incubation of the blood tubes, but not at later time points. Separation of 5-hour preincubated blood into vesicle and nonvesicle fractions revealed a selective increase in the portion of vesicle-associated miRNAs. Together, these data indicate that the release of vesicle-associated miRNAs from blood cells can occur in blood samples within the time elapsing in normal clinical practice until their processing without significant hemolysis. This becomes particularly visible on the inhibition of miRNA degradation by Ribonuclease A inhibitor.

  20. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research.

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use.

  2. Action potentials and amphetamine release antipsychotic drug from dopamine neuron synaptic VMAT vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Block, Ethan R.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on lysotracker red imaging in cultured hippocampal neurons, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) were proposed to accumulate in synaptic vesicles by acidic trapping and to be released in response to action potentials. Because many APDs are dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) antagonists, such a mechanism would be particularly interesting if it operated in midbrain DA neurons. Here, the APD cyamemazine (CYAM) is visualized directly by two-photon microscopy in substantia nigra and striatum brain slices. CYAM accumulated slowly into puncta based on vacuolar H+-ATPase activity and dispersed rapidly upon dissipating organelle pH gradients. Thus, CYAM is subject to acidic trapping and released upon deprotonation. In the striatum, Ca2+-dependent reduction of the CYAM punctate signal was induced by depolarization or action potentials. Striatal CYAM overlapped with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, parachloroamphetamine (pCA), acting via vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), and a charged VMAT, substrate 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), reduced striatal CYAM. In vivo CYAM administration and in vitro experiments confirmed that clinically relevant CYAM concentrations result in vesicular accumulation and pCA-dependent release. These results show that some CYAM is in DA neuron VMAT vesicles and suggests a new drug interaction in which amphetamine induces CYAM deprotonation and release as a consequence of the H+ countertransport by VMAT that accompanies vesicular uptake, but not by inducing exchange or acting as a weak base. Therefore, in the striatum, APDs are released with DA in response to action potentials and an amphetamine. This synaptic corelease is expected to enhance APD antagonism of D2Rs where and when dopaminergic transmission occurs. PMID:26216995

  3. Release of Small RNA-containing Exosome-like Vesicles from the Human Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Agbedanu, Prince N; Harischandra, Hiruni; Moorhead, Andrew R; Day, Tim A; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Kimber, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a socio-economically devastating mosquito-borne Neglected Tropical Disease caused by parasitic filarial nematodes. The interaction between the parasite and host, both mosquito and human, during infection, development and persistence is dynamic and delicately balanced. Manipulation of this interface to the detriment of the parasite is a promising potential avenue to develop disease therapies but is prevented by our very limited understanding of the host-parasite relationship. Exosomes are bioactive small vesicles (30–120 nm) secreted by a wide range of cell types and involved in a wide range of physiological processes. Here, we report the identification and partial characterization of exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) released from the infective L3 stage of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. Exosome-like vesicles were isolated from parasites in culture media and electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to confirm that vesicles produced by juvenile B. malayi are exosome-like based on size and morphology. We show that loss of parasite viability correlates with a time-dependent decay in vesicle size specificity and rate of release. The protein cargo of these vesicles is shown to include common exosomal protein markers and putative effector proteins. These Brugia-derived vesicles contain small RNA species that include microRNAs with host homology, suggesting a potential role in host manipulation. Confocal microscopy shows J774A.1, a murine macrophage cell line, internalize purified ELVs, and we demonstrate that these ELVs effectively stimulate a classically activated macrophage phenotype in J774A.1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of exosome-like vesicle release by a human parasitic nematode and our data suggest a novel mechanism by which human parasitic nematodes may actively direct the host responses to infection. Further interrogation of the makeup and function of these bioactive vesicles could seed

  4. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  5. Reduction-cleavable polymeric vesicles with efficient glutathione-mediated drug release behavior for reversing drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianbin; Wu, Wei; Jia, Menghong; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Ou, Zhouluo

    2013-11-13

    In the treatment of cancer, multidrug resistance (MDR) has been the major obstacle to the success of chemotherapy. The underlying mechanism relies on the overexpression of drug-efflux transporters that prevent the intracellular transport of the drug. In this study, reduction-cleavable vesicles were designed and developed with efficient glutathione-mediated drug-release behavior for reversing drug resistance. Polymeric vesicles were self-assembled from triblock copolymers with disulfide-bond-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine) (PzLL). Observations from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) outline an obvious hollow structure surrounded by a thin outer layer, indicating the successful formation of the vesicles. Using fluorescently detectable doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl) as the model drug, a significant acceleration of drug release regulated by glutathione (GSH) was found (>3-fold difference). Upon incubation of the DOX·HCl-loaded polymeric vesicles with the HeLa cervical cancer cell line exposed to glutathione, an enhanced nuclear accumulation of DOX·HCl was observed, elicited by the preferred disassembly of the vesicle structure under reducing conditions. Importantly, by using the gemcitabine hydrochloride (GC·HCl)-resistant breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, it was found that cell viability was significantly reduced after treatment with GC·HCl-loaded polymeric vesicles, indicating that these vesicles can help to reverse the drug resistance.

  6. Using Dynamic Covalent Chemistry To Drive Morphological Transitions: Controlled Release of Encapsulated Nanoparticles from Block Copolymer Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Renhua; Derry, Matthew J; Mable, Charlotte J; Ning, Yin; Armes, Steven P

    2017-06-07

    Dynamic covalent chemistry is exploited to drive morphological order-order transitions to achieve the controlled release of a model payload (e.g., silica nanoparticles) encapsulated within block copolymer vesicles. More specifically, poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA) diblock copolymer vesicles were prepared via aqueous polymerization-induced self-assembly in either the presence or absence of silica nanoparticles. Addition of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) to such vesicles results in specific binding of this reagent to some of the pendent cis-diol groups on the hydrophilic PGMA chains to form phenylboronate ester bonds in mildly alkaline aqueous solution (pH ∼ 10). This leads to a subtle increase in the effective volume fraction of this stabilizer block, which in turn causes a reduction in the packing parameter and hence induces a vesicle-to-worm (or vesicle-to-sphere) morphological transition. The evolution in copolymer morphology (and the associated sol-gel transitions) was monitored using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, oscillatory rheology, and small-angle X-ray scattering. In contrast to the literature, in situ release of encapsulated silica nanoparticles is achieved via vesicle dissociation at room temperature; moreover, the rate of release can be fine-tuned by varying the solution pH and/or the APBA concentration. Furthermore, this strategy also works (i) for relatively thick-walled vesicles that do not normally exhibit stimulus-responsive behavior and (ii) in the presence of added salt. This novel molecular recognition strategy to trigger morphological transitions via dynamic covalent chemistry offers considerable scope for the design of new stimulus-responsive copolymer vesicles (and hydrogels) for targeted delivery and controlled release of cargoes. In particular, the conditions used in this new approach are relevant to liquid laundry formulations, whereby enzymes require

  7. Microtubule stabilization attenuates vascular calcification through the inhibition of osteogenic signaling and matrix vesicle release.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2014-08-29

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with chronic kidney disease or diabetes. The mechanism of vascular calcification has remained unclear, however, and no effective therapy is currently available. Our study was aimed at identifying the role of dynamic remodeling of microtubule cytoskeletons in hyperphosphatemia-induced vascular calcification. Exposure of primary cultures of mouse vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to inorganic phosphate (Pi) elicited ectopic calcification that was associated with changes in tubulin dynamics, induction of osteogenic signaling, and increased release of matrix vesicles. A microtubule depolymerizing agent enhanced Pi-dependent calcification, whereas microtubule stabilization by paclitaxel suppressed calcification both in VSMC cultures and in an ex vivo culture system for the mouse aorta. The inhibition of Pi-stimulated calcification by paclitaxel was associated with down-regulation of osteogenic signal and attenuation of matrix vesicle release. Our results indicate that microtubule plays a central role in vascular calcification, and that microtubule stabilization represents a potential new approach to the treatment of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. C. elegans ciliated sensory neurons release extracellular vesicles that function in animal communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Silva, Malan; Haas, Leonard A; Morsci, Natalia S; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-03-03

    Cells release extracellular vesicles (ECVs) that play important roles in intercellular communication and may mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. Many fundamental aspects of ECV biogenesis and signaling have yet to be determined, with ECV detection being a challenge and obstacle due to the small size (100 nm) of the ECVs. We developed an in vivo system to visualize the dynamic release of GFP-labeled ECVs. We show here that specific Caenorhabdidits elegans ciliated sensory neurons shed and release ECVs containing GFP-tagged polycystins LOV-1 and PKD-2. These ECVs are also abundant in the lumen surrounding the cilium. Electron tomography and genetic analysis indicate that ECV biogenesis occurs via budding from the plasma membrane at the ciliary base and not via fusion of multivesicular bodies. Intraflagellar transport and kinesin-3 KLP-6 are required for environmental release of PKD-2::GFP-containing ECVs. ECVs isolated from wild-type animals induce male tail-chasing behavior, while ECVs isolated from klp-6 animals and lacking PKD-2::GFP do not. We conclude that environmentally released ECVs play a role in animal communication and mating-related behaviors.

  9. C. elegans ciliated sensory neurons release extracellular vesicles that function in animal communication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Silva, Malan; Haas, Leonard; Morsci, Natalia; Nguyen, Ken C.Q.; Hall, David H.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cells release extracellular vesicles (ECVs) that play important roles in intercellular communication and may mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. Many fundamental aspects of ECV biogenesis and signaling have yet to be determined, with ECV detection being a challenge and obstacle due to their small size (100nm). We developed an in vivo system to visualize the dynamic release of GFP-labeled ECVs. We show here that specific Caenorhabdidits elegans ciliated sensory neurons shed and release ECVs containing GFP-tagged polycystins LOV-1 and PKD-2. These ECVs are also abundant in the lumen surrounding the cilium. Electron tomography and genetic analysis indicate that ECV biogenesis occurs via budding from the plasma membrane at the ciliary base and not via fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Intraflagellar transport (IFT) and kinesin-3 KLP-6 are required for environmental release of PKD-2::GFP-containing ECVs. ECVs isolated from wild-type animals induce male tail chasing behavior, while ECVs isolated from klp-6 animals and lacking PKD-2::GFP do not. We conclude that environmentally released ECVs play a role in animal communication and mating related behaviors. PMID:24530063

  10. Gel formulations containing catanionic vesicles composed of alprenolol and SDS: effects of drug release and skin penetration on aggregate structure.

    PubMed

    Dew, Noel; Edwards, Katarina; Eriksson, Jonny; Edsman, Katarina; Björk, Erik

    2012-01-01

    To fully utilize the extended contact time of gel formulations a novel formulation with drug containing catanionic aggregates offering prolonged drug release and skin penetration were investigated. This study aimed to further explore the drug release process from catanionic vesicles in gels. Catanionic vesicles were formed from alprenolol and sodium dodecyl sulphate. Physical gels composed of catanionic vesicles and a SoftCAT polymer were used as well as covalent Carbopol gels. Drug release was measured in vitro using a modified USP paddle method and the skin penetration was studied using dermatomized pig ear skin mounted in horizontal Ussing chambers. The aggregate structure was visualized with cryo-TEM during the drug release and skin penetration process. The study results show that catanionic vesicles are present in the formulations throughout the drug release process and during the clinically relevant skin application time. Hence, the decreased skin penetration rate stems from the prolonged release of drug substance from the gels. The rheological investigation shows that the gel structure of the physically cross-linked gels is maintained even as the drug substance is released and the gel volume is decreased. These findings indicate that the applicability of formulations like these is a future possibility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hearing requires otoferlin-dependent efficient replenishment of synaptic vesicles in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Pangrsic, Tina; Lasarow, Livia; Reuter, Kirsten; Takago, Hideki; Schwander, Martin; Riedel, Dietmar; Frank, Thomas; Tarantino, Lisa M; Bailey, Janice S; Strenzke, Nicola; Brose, Nils; Müller, Ulrich; Reisinger, Ellen; Moser, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Inner hair cell ribbon synapses indefatigably transmit acoustic information. The proteins mediating their fast vesicle replenishment (hundreds of vesicles per s) are unknown. We found that an aspartate to glycine substitution in the C(2)F domain of the synaptic vesicle protein otoferlin impaired hearing by reducing vesicle replenishment in the pachanga mouse model of human deafness DFNB9. In vitro estimates of vesicle docking, the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP), Ca(2+) signaling and vesicle fusion were normal. Moreover, we observed postsynaptic excitatory currents of variable size and spike generation. However, mutant active zones replenished vesicles at lower rates than wild-type ones and sound-evoked spiking in auditory neurons was sparse and only partially improved during longer interstimulus intervals. We conclude that replenishment does not match the release of vesicles at mutant active zones in vivo and a sufficient standing RRP therefore cannot be maintained. We propose that otoferlin is involved in replenishing synaptic vesicles.

  12. Corticosterone treatment results in enhanced release of peptidergic vesicles in astrocytes via cytoskeletal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2013-12-01

    While the effect of stress on neuronal physiology is widely studied, its effect on the functionality of astrocytes is not well understood. We studied the effect of high doses of stress hormone corticosterone, on two physiological properties of astrocytes, i.e., gliotransmission and interastrocytic calcium waves. To study the release of peptidergic vesicles from astrocytes, hippocampal astrocyte cultures were transfected with a plasmid to express pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) fused with the emerald green fluorescent protein (ANP.emd). The rate of decrease in fluorescence of ANP.emd on application of ionomycin, a calcium ionophore was monitored. Significant increase in the rate of calcium-dependent exocytosis of ANP.emd was observed with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatments for 3 h, which depended on the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. ANP.emd tagged vesicles exhibited increased mobility in astrocyte culture upon corticosterone treatment. Increasing corticosterone concentrations also resulted in concomitant increase in the calcium wave propagation velocity, initiated by focal ATP application. Corticosterone treatment also resulted in increased GFAP expression and F-actin rearrangements. FITC-Phalloidin immunostaining revealed increased formation of cross linked F-actin networks with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatment. Alternatively, blockade of actin polymerization and disruption of microtubules prevented the corticosterone-mediated increase in ANP.emd release kinetics. This study reports for the first time the effect of corticosterone on gliotransmission via modulation of cytoskeletal elements. As ANP acts on both neurons and blood vessels, modulation of its release could have functional implications in neurovascular coupling under pathophysiological conditions of stress.

  13. Characterisation of adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles released pre- and post-adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Katherine D.; Guschina, Irina A.; Yeung, Vincent; Clayton, Aled; Draman, Mohd Shazli; Von Ruhland, Christopher; Ludgate, Marian; James, Philip E.; Rees, D. Aled

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are submicron vesicles released from many cell types, including adipocytes. EVs are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-driven cardiovascular disease, although the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs are not well described. We sought to define the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs before and after adipogenesis, hypothesising that adipogenesis would affect EV structure, molecular composition and function. Using 3T3-L1 cells, EVs were harvested at day 0 and day 15 of differentiation. EV and cell preparations were visualised by electron microscopy and EVs quantified by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). EVs were then assessed for annexin V positivity using flow cytometry; lipid and phospholipid composition using 2D thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography; and vesicular protein content by an immuno-phenotyping assay. Pre-adipogenic cells are connected via a network of protrusions and EVs at both time points display classic EV morphology. EV concentration is elevated prior to adipogenesis, particularly in exosomes and small microvesicles. Parent cells contain higher proportions of phosphatidylserine (PS) and show higher annexin V binding. Both cells and EVs contain an increased proportion of arachidonic acid at day 0. PREF-1 was increased at day 0 whilst adiponectin was higher at day 15 indicating EV protein content reflects the stage of adipogenesis of the cell. Our data suggest that EV production is higher in cells before adipogenesis, particularly in vesicles <300 nm. Cells at this time point possess a greater proportion of PS (required for EV generation) whilst corresponding EVs are enriched in signalling fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and markers of adipogenesis, such as PREF-1 and PPARγ. PMID:26609807

  14. Ketamine Inhibits ATP-Evoked Exocytotic Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor from Vesicles in Cultured Rat Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Lasič, Eva; Božić, Mićo; Bobnar, Saša Trkov; Stout, Randy F; Grubišić, Vladimir; Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2016-12-01

    In the brain, astrocytes signal to neighboring cells via regulated exocytotic release of gliosignaling molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Recent studies uncovered a role of ketamine, an anesthetic and antidepressant, in the regulation of BDNF expression and in the disruption of astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling, but it is unclear whether it affects astroglial BDNF release. We investigated whether ketamine affects ATP-evoked Ca(2+) signaling and exocytotic release of BDNF at the single-vesicle level in cultured rat astrocytes. Cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding preproBDNF tagged with the pH-sensitive fluorescent protein superecliptic pHluorin, (BDNF-pHse) to load vesicles and measure the release of BDNF-pHse when the exocytotic fusion pore opens and alkalinizes the luminal pH. In addition, cell-attached membrane capacitance changes were recorded to monitor unitary vesicle interaction with the plasma membrane. Intracellular Ca(2+) activity was monitored with Fluo-4 and confocal microscopy, which was also used to immunocytochemically characterize BDNF-pHse-laden vesicles. As revealed by double-fluorescent micrographs, BDNF-pHse localized to vesicles positive for the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), VAMP3, and synaptotagmin IV. Ketamine treatment decreased the number of ATP-evoked BDNF-pHse fusion/secretion events (P < 0.05), the frequency of ATP-evoked transient (P < 0.001) and full-fusion exocytotic (P < 0.05) events, along with a reduction in the ATP-evoked increase in intracellular Ca(2+) activity in astrocytes by ~70 % (P < 0.001). The results show that ketamine treatment suppresses ATP-triggered vesicle fusion and BDNF secretion by increasing the probability of a narrow fusion pore open state and/or by reducing astrocytic Ca(2+) excitability.

  15. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: Changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca(2+) entry alter postsynaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial postsynaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca(2+) spread by lowering Ca(2+) buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps, showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability.

  16. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Post-synaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca2+ entry alter post-synaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically-determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial post-synaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca2+ spread by lowering Ca2+ buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability. PMID:26541100

  17. Dynamics of plasma membrane surface related to the release of extracellular vesicles by mesenchymal stem cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Casado, Santiago; Lobo, Maria Del Val Toledo; Paíno, Carlos Luis

    2017-07-28

    Extracellular vesicles (exosomes and shedding vesicles) released by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are regarded as a storable, cell-free alternative with comparable therapeutic potential to their parent cells. Shedding vesicles originate as bulges on the cell surface but little is known about their turnover or how their formation can be stimulated. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to follow the formation dynamics of bulges in living adipose tissue-derived MSCs. AFM images showed that, in general, MSCs present hundreds of nanosized protrusions on their surface with life spans of 10-20 min. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed those images and showed that bulges are also formed on filamentous processes. Extracellular vesicles deposited on the culture surface have comparable sizes to those of bulges showing up on the cell surface. The amount of protrusions on cells treated with progesterone or PDGF-BB, two treatments that stimulate the secretion of extracellular vesicles in MSCs, was evaluated by AFM. Measurements of the cross-area at 50 nm over the cell surface provided estimates of the amount of protrusions and showed that these values increased with the stimulating treatments. Our study suggests that shedding vesicles constitute a large population of the extracellular vesicle pool.

  18. Membrane Vesicles Released by Intestinal Epithelial Cells Infected with Rotavirus Inhibit T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Alfonso; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Rojas, Olga Lucía; Wolf, Marie; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Rotavirus (RV) predominantly replicates in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), and “danger signals” released by these cells may modulate viral immunity. We have recently shown that human model IEC (Caco-2 cells) infected with rhesus-RV release a non-inflammatory group of immunomodulators that includes heat shock proteins (HSPs) and TGF-β1. Here we show that both proteins are released in part in association with membrane vesicles (MV) obtained from filtrated Caco-2 supernatants concentrated by ultracentrifugation. These MV express markers of exosomes (CD63 and others), but not of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or nuclei. Larger quantities of proteins associated with MV were released by RV-infected cells than by non-infected cells. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 present in these MV, and VP6 co-localized with CD63 in RV-infected cells, suggesting that this viral protein is associated with the MV, and that this association occurs intracellularly. CD63 present in MV preparations from stool samples from 36 children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV were analyzed. VP6 co-immunoprecipitated with CD63 in 3/8 stool samples from RV-infected children, suggesting that these MV are released by RV-infected cells in vivo. Moreover, fractions that contained MV from RV-infected cells induced death and inhibited proliferation of CD4+ T cells to a greater extent than fractions from non-infected cells. These effects were in part due to TGF-β, because they were reversed by treatment of the T cells with the TGF-β-receptor inhibitor ALK5i. MV from RV-infected and non-infected cells were heterogeneous, with morphologies and typical flotation densities described for exosomes (between 1.10 and 1.18 g/mL), and denser vesicles (>1.24 g/mL). Both types of MV from RV-infected cells were more efficient at inhibiting T-cell function than were those from non-infected cells. We propose that RV infection of IEC releases MV that modulate viral immunity. PMID:21142445

  19. Cationic vesicles based on biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants: physicochemical properties, antimicrobial activity, encapsulation efficiency and drug release.

    PubMed

    Tavano, L; Pinazo, A; Abo-Riya, M; Infante, M R; Manresa, M A; Muzzalupo, R; Pérez, L

    2014-08-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of cationic vesicular systems prepared from biocompatible diacyl glycerol-arginine surfactants are investigated. These systems form stable cationic vesicles by themselves and the average diameter of the vesicles decreases as the alkyl chain length of the surfactant increases. The addition of DPPC also modifies the physicochemical properties of these vesicles. Among the drugs these cationic formulations can encapsulate, we have considered Ciprofloxacin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that the percentage of encapsulated drug depends on both the physicochemical properties of the carrier and the type of drug. The capacity of these systems to carry different molecules was evaluated performing in vitro drug release studies. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of empty and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria has been determined. Three bacteria were tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vitro drug release from all formulations was effectively delayed. Empty cationic vesicles showed antimicrobial activity and Ciprofloxacin-loaded vesicles showed similar or higher antimicrobial activity than the free drug solution. These results suggest that our formulations represent a great innovation in the pharmaceutical field, due to their dual pharmacological function: one related to the nature of the vehiculated drug and the other related to the innate antibacterial properties of the surfactant-based carriers.

  20. Massive release of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells after photodynamic treatment or chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aubertin, Kelly; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Luciani, Nathalie; Espinosa, Ana; Djemat, Aurélie; Charue, Dominique; Gallet, François; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an emerging cancer treatment that is particularly adapted for localized malignant tumor. The phototherapeutic agent is generally injected in the bloodstream and circulates in the whole organism as a chemotherapeutic agent, but needs light triggering to induce localized therapeutic effects. We found that one of the responses of in vitro and in vivo cancer cells to photodynamic therapy was a massive production and emission of extracellular vesicles (EVs): only 1 hour after the photo-activation, thousands of vesicles per cell were emitted in the extracellular medium. A similar effect has been found after treatment with Doxorubicin (chemotherapy), but far less EVs were produced, even 24 hours after the treatment. Furthermore, we found that the released EVs could transfer extracellular membrane components, drugs and even large intracellular objects to naive target cells. In vivo, photodynamic treatment and chemotherapy increased the levels of circulating EVs several fold, confirming the vast induction of cancer cell vesiculation triggered by anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27752092

  1. Molecular Machines Regulating the Release Probability of Synaptic Vesicles at the Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Christoph; Kuner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ) upon arrival of an action potential (AP) at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabilistic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr), is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffering of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ. PMID:26973506

  2. Time-dependent release of extracellular vesicle subpopulations in tumor CABA I cells.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Ilaria; Di Francesco, Marianna; Cantone, Laura; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Bollati, Valentina; Carta, Gaspare; Dolo, Vincenza

    2015-11-01

    Investigations into extracellular vesicles (EVs) have significantly increased since their role in physiological and pathological processes has become more clearly understood. Furthermore, it has become increasingly clear that several subpopulations of EVs exist, such as exosomes (EXOs) and microvesicles (MVs). Various methods and techniques used to identify and isolate the specific EVs subpopulations exist. However, these methods should be further elucidated. A deep understanding of the different factors that affect the EVs release may therefore be useful for the standardization of protocols and to establish guidelines for a more adequate analysis and correct inter‑laboratory comparison. In the present study, we investigated whether composition and molecular features of EVs altered over time following a trigger stimulus. Starved CABA I cells were stimulated with FBS and conditioned medium was collected after different time intervals (30 min and 4, 8 and 18 h). The dynamic of EVs release was time-dependent, as shown by the results of scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the time elapsed from the stimulus affected the size distribution (as highlighted by transmission electron microscopy and NanoSight assay), amount (in terms of the number of particles and protein amount) and molecular composition (CD63, HLA, Ago-2, gelatinases, and plasminogen activators) suggesting that, different EVs subpopulations were released at different time intervals following cell stimulation. Collectively, the results suggested that, parameters useful to standardize procedures for EVs isolation, including stimulation time should be considered.

  3. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz’s functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm2 in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm2 in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18167.001 PMID:27536876

  4. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-08-18

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz's functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm(2) in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm(2) in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents.

  5. Ultrastructural and functional fate of recycled vesicles in hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Stephanie A.; Smith, Catherine A.; Fowler, Milena W.; Crawford, Freya; Burden, Jemima J.; Staras, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Efficient recycling of synaptic vesicles is thought to be critical for sustained information transfer at central terminals. However, the specific contribution that retrieved vesicles make to future transmission events remains unclear. Here we exploit fluorescence and time-stamped electron microscopy to track the functional and positional fate of vesicles endocytosed after readily releasable pool (RRP) stimulation in rat hippocampal synapses. We show that most vesicles are recovered near the active zone but subsequently take up random positions in the cluster, without preferential bias for future use. These vesicles non-selectively queue, advancing towards the release site with further stimulation in an actin-dependent manner. Nonetheless, the small subset of vesicles retrieved recently in the stimulus train persist nearer the active zone and exhibit more privileged use in the next RRP. Our findings reveal heterogeneity in vesicle fate based on nanoscale position and timing rules, providing new insights into the origins of future pool constitution. PMID:26292808

  6. An Exclusion Zone for Ca2+ Channels around Docked Vesicles Explains Release Control by Multiple Channels at a CNS Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Daniel; Babai, Norbert; Kochubey, Olexiy; Han, Yunyun; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of Ca2+ channels and vesicles remains unknown for most CNS synapses, despite of the crucial importance of this geometrical parameter for the Ca2+ control of transmitter release. At a large model synapse, the calyx of Held, transmitter release is controlled by several Ca2+ channels in a "domain overlap" mode, at least in young animals. To study the geometrical constraints of Ca2+ channel placement in domain overlap control of release, we used stochastic MCell modelling, at active zones for which the position of docked vesicles was derived from electron microscopy (EM). We found that random placement of Ca2+ channels was unable to produce high slope values between release and presynaptic Ca2+ entry, a hallmark of domain overlap, and yielded excessively large release probabilities. The simple assumption that Ca2+ channels can be located anywhere at active zones, except below a critical distance of ~ 30 nm away from docked vesicles ("exclusion zone"), rescued high slope values and low release probabilities. Alternatively, high slope values can also be obtained by placing all Ca2+ channels into a single supercluster, which however results in significantly higher heterogeneity of release probabilities. We also show experimentally that high slope values, and the sensitivity to the slow Ca2+ chelator EGTA-AM, are maintained with developmental maturation of the calyx synapse. Taken together, domain overlap control of release represents a highly organized active zone architecture in which Ca2+ channels must obey a certain distance to docked vesicles. Furthermore, domain overlap can be employed by near-mature, fast-releasing synapses. PMID:25951120

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  8. Bassoon and the synaptic ribbon organize Ca2+ channels and vesicles to add release sites and promote refilling

    PubMed Central

    Frank, T.; Rutherford, M.A.; Strenzke, N.; Neef, A.; Pangršič, T.; Khimich, D.; Fetjova, A.; Gundelfinger, E.D.; Liberman, M.C.; Harke, B.; Bryan, K.E.; Lee, A.; Egner, A.; Riedel, D.; Moser, T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary At the presynaptic active zone, Ca2+ influx triggers fusion of synaptic vesicles. It is not well understood how Ca2+-channel clustering and synaptic vesicle docking are organized. Here we studied structure and function of hair cell ribbon synapses following genetic disruption of the presynaptic scaffold protein Bassoon. Mutant synapses - mostly lacking the ribbon - showed a reduction in membrane-proximal vesicles, with ribbonless synapses affected more than ribbon-occupied synapses. Ca2+-channels were also fewer at mutant synapses and appeared in abnormally shaped clusters. Ribbon absence reduced Ca2+-channel numbers at mutant and wild-type synapses. Fast and sustained exocytosis were reduced notwithstanding normal coupling of the remaining Ca2+-channels to exocytosis. In-vitro recordings revealed a slight impairment of vesicle replenishment. Mechanistic modeling of the in-vivo data independently supported morphological and functional in-vitro findings. We conclude that Bassoon and the ribbon (1) create a large number of release sites by organizing Ca2+-channels and vesicles, and (2) promote vesicle replenishment. PMID:21092861

  9. Bassoon and the synaptic ribbon organize Ca²+ channels and vesicles to add release sites and promote refilling.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Rutherford, Mark A; Strenzke, Nicola; Neef, Andreas; Pangršič, Tina; Khimich, Darina; Fejtova, Anna; Fetjova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Liberman, M Charles; Harke, Benjamin; Bryan, Keith E; Lee, Amy; Egner, Alexander; Riedel, Dietmar; Moser, Tobias

    2010-11-18

    At the presynaptic active zone, Ca²+ influx triggers fusion of synaptic vesicles. It is not well understood how Ca²+ channel clustering and synaptic vesicle docking are organized. Here, we studied structure and function of hair cell ribbon synapses following genetic disruption of the presynaptic scaffold protein Bassoon. Mutant synapses--mostly lacking the ribbon--showed a reduction in membrane-proximal vesicles, with ribbonless synapses affected more than ribbon-occupied synapses. Ca²+ channels were also fewer at mutant synapses and appeared in abnormally shaped clusters. Ribbon absence reduced Ca²+ channel numbers at mutant and wild-type synapses. Fast and sustained exocytosis was reduced, notwithstanding normal coupling of the remaining Ca²+ channels to exocytosis. In vitro recordings revealed a slight impairment of vesicle replenishment. Mechanistic modeling of the in vivo data independently supported morphological and functional in vitro findings. We conclude that Bassoon and the ribbon (1) create a large number of release sites by organizing Ca²+ channels and vesicles, and (2) promote vesicle replenishment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles released from human monocyte-derived macrophages upon β-glucan stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Wojciech; Ohman, Tiina; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2014-05-02

    Fungal infections (mycoses) are common diseases of varying severity that cause problems, especially to immunologically compromised people. Fungi express a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns on their surface including β-glucans, which are important immunostimulatory components of fungal cell walls. During stimulatory conditions of infection and colonization, besides intensive intracellular response, human cells actively communicate on the intercellular level by secreting proteins and other biomolecules with several mechanisms. Vesicular secretion remains one of the most important paths for the proteins to exit the cell. Here, we have used high-throughput quantitative proteomics combined with bioinformatics to characterize and quantify vesicle-mediated protein release from β-glucan-stimulated human macrophages differentiated in vitro from primary blood monocytes. We show that β-glucan stimulation induces vesicle-mediated protein secretion. Proteomic study identified 540 distinct proteins from the vesicles, and the identified proteins show a proteomic signature characteristic for their cellular origin. Importantly, we identified several receptors, including cation-dependent mannose-6-phosphate receptor, macrophage scavenger receptor, and P2X7 receptor, that have not been identified from vesicles before. Proteomic data together with detailed pathway and network analysis showed that integrins and their cytoplasmic cargo proteins are highly abundant in extracellular vesicles released upon β-glucan stimulation. In conclusion, the present data provides a solid basis for further studies on the functional role of vesicular protein secretion upon fungal infection.

  11. Monocyte activation drives preservation of membrane thiols by promoting release of oxidised membrane moieties via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Taylor, K É; Tóth, E Á; Balogh, A M; Sódar, B W; Kádár, L; Pálóczi, K; Fekete, N; Németh, A; Osteikoetxea, X; Vukman, K V; Holub, M; Pállinger, É; Nagy, Gy; Winyard, P G; Buzás, E I

    2017-03-18

    The redox state of cellular exofacial molecules is reflected by the amount of available thiols. Furthermore, surface thiols can be considered as indicators of immune cell activation. One group of thiol containing proteins, peroxiredoxins, in particular, have been associated with inflammation. In this study, we assessed surface thiols of the U937 and Thp1 monocyte cell lines and primary monocytes in vitro upon inflammatory stimulation by irreversibly labelling the cells with a fluorescent derivative of maleimide. We also investigated exofacial thiols on circulating blood mononuclear cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls. When analysing extracellular vesicles, we combined thiol labelling with the use of antibodies to specific CD markers to exclude extracellular vesicle mimicking signals from thiol containing protein aggregates. Furthermore, differential detergent lysis was applied to confirm the vesicular nature of the detected extracellular events in blood plasma. We found an increase in exofacial thiols on monocytes upon in vitro stimulation by LPS or TNF, both in primary monocytes and monocytic cell lines (p<0.0005). At the same time, newly released extracellular vesicles showed a decrease in their exofacial thiols compared with those from unstimulated cells (p<0.05). We also found a significant elevation of surface thiols on circulating monocytes in rheumatoid arthritis patients (p<0.05) and newly released extracellular vesicles of isolated CD14(+) cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients had decreased thiol levels compared with healthy subjects (p<0.01). Exofacial peroxiredoxin 1 was demonstrated on the surface of primary and cultured monocytes, and the number of peroxiredoxin 1 positive extracellular vesicles was increased in rheumatoid arthritis blood plasma (p<0.05). Furthermore, an overoxidised form of peroxiredoxin was detected in extracellular vesicle-enriched preparations from blood plasma. Our data show that cell surface thiols

  12. Lipid-Peptide Vesicle Nanoscale Hybrids for Triggered Drug Release by Mild Hyperthermia in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S.; Al-Jamal, Wafa’ T.; Bossche, Jeroen V.; Bui, Tam T.; Drake, Alex F.; Mason, A. James; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes leucine zipper peptide-lipid hybrid nanoscale vesicles engineered by self-assembled anchoring of the amphiphilic peptide within the lipid bilayer. These hybrid vesicles aim to combine the advantages of traditional temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSL) with the dissociative, unfolding properties of a temperature-sensitive peptide to optimize drug release under mild hyperthermia, while improving in vivo drug retention. The secondary structure of the peptide and its thermal-responsiveness after anchoring onto liposomes were studied with circular dichroism. In addition, the lipid-peptide vesicles (Lp-peptide) showed a reduction in bilayer fluidity at the inner-core as observed with DPH anisotropy studies, while the opposite effect was observed with ANS probe, indicating peptide interactions with both the head group region and the hydrophobic core. A model drug molecule, doxorubicin, was successfully encapsulated in the Lp-peptide vesicles at higher than 90% efficiency following the remote loading, pH-gradient methodology. The release of doxorubicin from Lp-peptide hybrids in vitro indicated superior serum stability at physiological temperatures compared to lysolipid-containing temperature-sensitive liposomes (LTSL) without affecting the overall thermo-responsive nature of the vesicles at 42 °C. A similar stabilizing effect was observed in vivo after intravenous administration of the Lp-peptide vesicles by measuring 14C-doxorubicin blood kinetics that also led to increased tumor accumulation after 24 hours. We conclude that Lp-peptide hybrid vesicles present a promising new class of TSL that can offer previously unexplored opportunities for the development of clinically-relevant mild hyperthermia-triggered therapeutic modalities. PMID:22857653

  13. Clavulanic acid increases dopamine release in neuronal cells through a mechanism involving enhanced vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2011-10-24

    Clavulanic acid is a CNS-modulating compound with exceptional blood-brain barrier permeability and safety profile. Clavulanic acid has been proposed to have anti-depressant activity and is currently entering Phase IIb clinical trials for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Studies have also shown that clavulanic acid suppresses anxiety and enhances sexual functions in rodent and primate models by a mechanism involving central nervous system (CNS) modulation, although its detailed mechanism of action has yet to be elucidated. To further examine its potential as a CNS modulating agent as well as its mechanism of action, we investigated the effects of clavulanic acid in neuronal cells. Our results indicate that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells without affecting dopamine synthesis. Furthermore, using affinity chromatography we were able to identify two proteins, Munc18-1 and Rab4 that potentially bind to clavulanic acid and play a critical role in neurosecretion and the vesicle trafficking process. Consistent with this result, an increase in the translocation of Munc18-1 and Rab4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane was observed in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these data suggest that clavulanic acid enhances dopamine release in a mechanism involving Munc18-1 and Rab4 modulation and warrants further investigation of its therapeutic use in CNS disorders, such as depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Extracellular vesicles released following heat stress induce bystander effect in unstressed populations.

    PubMed

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mulcahy, Laura Ann; Jacobs, Laura Ann; Samuel, Priya; Akbar, Naveed; Pink, Ryan Charles; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Cells naïve to stress can display the effects of stress, such as DNA damage and apoptosis, when they are exposed to signals from stressed cells; this phenomenon is known as the bystander effect. We previously showed that bystander effect induced by ionising radiation are mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Bystander effect can also be induced by other types of stress, including heat shock, but it is unclear whether EVs are involved. Here we show that EVs released from heat shocked cells are also able to induce bystander damage in unstressed populations. Naïve cells treated with media conditioned by heat shocked cells showed higher levels of DNA damage and apoptosis than cells treated with media from control cells. Treating naïve cells with EVs derived from media conditioned by heat shocked cells also induced a bystander effect when compared to control, with DNA damage and apoptosis increasing whilst the level of cell viability was reduced. We demonstrate that treatment of naïve cells with heat shocked cell-derived EVs leads to greater invasiveness in a trans-well Matrigel assay. Finally, we show that naïve cells treated with EVs from heat-shocked cells are more likely to survive a subsequent heat shock, suggesting that these EVs mediate an adaptive response. We propose that EVs released following stress mediate an intercellular response that leads to apparent stress in neighbouring cells but also greater robustness in the face of a subsequent insult.

  15. Vesicle release probability and pre-primed pool at glutamatergic synapses in area CA1 of the rat neonatal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric; Gustafsson, Bengt

    2001-01-01

    Factors determining the release probability were examined using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and minimal stimulation (10 impulses, 50 Hz) of individual glutamatergic synapses, containing single release sites, on pyramidal neurones in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from neonatal rats. Release probability following the first action potential in the burst (P1) varied among the synapses from 0 to 0.87 (mean ± s.d.; 0.35 ± 0.28, n = 52) and the average release during the burst (burst pool) varied from 0.4 to 4.1 events (1.7 ± 0.85, n = 52). Heterogeneity in P1 did not co-vary with that of the burst pool. By selecting burst trials during which only one release event occurred, the vesicle release probability (Pves) at a release site could be determined. It was found to vary considerably among the synapses, from 0.04 to 0.94 (0.43 ± 0.28, n = 43). This heterogeneity correlated significantly with that of P1 such that more than half of the variation of P1 could be explained by a variation in Pves. The average number of vesicles directly available for release at the onset of the burst (the pre-primed pool) was estimated as the cumulative release up to that point in the burst where a second release event did not produce higher initial release probability than that found in trials where only one vesicle was released. The average pre-primed pool varied among the synapses from 0.4 to 2.1 (1.03 ± 0.42, n = 43). It co-varied significantly with that of P1 such that it could explain the remaining variation in P1. The difference between the burst pool and the pre-primed pool suggests the presence of a fast (< 100 ms), activity-dependent priming of vesicles. Some synapses (9/52) did not show any initial release (P1 = 0), but release occurred later during the burst (‘low frequency mute synapses’). Their behaviour was explained by an absence of a pre-primed pool. PMID:11230520

  16. Bead-based flow-cytometry for semi-quantitative analysis of complex membrane vesicle populations released by bacteria and host cells.

    PubMed

    Volgers, Charlotte; Benedikter, Birke J; Grauls, Gert E; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-07-01

    During infection, the release of nano-sized membrane vesicle is a process which is common both for bacteria and host cells. Host cell-derived membrane vesicles can be involved in innate and adaptive immunity whereas bacterial membrane vesicles can contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. To study the contribution of both membrane vesicle populations during infection is highly complicated as most vesicles fall within a similar size range of 30-300nm. Specialized techniques for purification are required and often no single technique complies on its own. Moreover, techniques for vesicle quantification are either complicated to use or do not distinguish between host cell-derived and bacterial membrane vesicle subpopulations. Here we demonstrate a bead-based platform that allows a semi-quantitatively analysis by flow-cytometry of bacterial and host-cell derived membrane vesicles. We show this method can be used to study heterogeneous and complex vesicle populations composed of bacterial and host-cell membrane vesicles. The easy accessible design of the protocol makes it also highly suitable for screening procedures to assess how intrinsic and environmental factors affect vesicle release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Release of Membrane-Bound Vesicles and Inhibition of Tumor Cell Adhesion by the Peptide Neopetrosiamide A

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Pamela; Heller, Markus; Williams, David E.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Vogl, A. Wayne; Foster, Leonard J.; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA) is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of β1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: β1 integrin and numerous α integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD) proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that β1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface. PMID:20520768

  18. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Cirnaru, Maria D.; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex. PMID:24904275

  19. Mechanisms and functions of extracellular vesicle release in vivo—What we can learn from flies and worms

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells from bacteria to man release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain signaling molecules like proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The content, formation, and signaling roles of these conserved vesicles are diverse, but the physiological relevance of EV signaling in vivo is still debated. Studies in classical genetic model organisms like C. elegans and Drosophila have begun to reveal the developmental and behavioral roles for EVs. In this review, we discuss the emerging evidence for the in vivo signaling roles of EVs. Significant effort has also been made to understand the mechanisms behind the formation and release of EVs, specifically of exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and of microvesicles derived from plasma membrane budding called ectocytosis. In this review, we detail the impact of flies and worms on understanding the proteins and lipids involved in EV biogenesis and highlight the open questions in the field. PMID:27689411

  20. Mechanisms and functions of extracellular vesicle release in vivo-What we can learn from flies and worms.

    PubMed

    Beer, Katharina B; Wehman, Ann Marie

    2017-03-04

    Cells from bacteria to man release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain signaling molecules like proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The content, formation, and signaling roles of these conserved vesicles are diverse, but the physiological relevance of EV signaling in vivo is still debated. Studies in classical genetic model organisms like C. elegans and Drosophila have begun to reveal the developmental and behavioral roles for EVs. In this review, we discuss the emerging evidence for the in vivo signaling roles of EVs. Significant effort has also been made to understand the mechanisms behind the formation and release of EVs, specifically of exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and of microvesicles derived from plasma membrane budding called ectocytosis. In this review, we detail the impact of flies and worms on understanding the proteins and lipids involved in EV biogenesis and highlight the open questions in the field.

  1. Calcium dependence of neurotransmitter release and rate of spontaneous vesicle fusions are altered in Drosophila synaptotagmin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Littleton, J T; Stern, M; Perin, M; Bellen, H J

    1994-01-01

    Since the demonstration that Ca2+ influx into the presynaptic terminal is essential for neurotransmitter release, there has been much speculation about the Ca2+ receptor responsible for initiating exocytosis. Numerous experiments have shown that the protein, or protein complex, binds multiple Ca2+ ions, resides near the site of Ca2+ influx, and has a relatively low affinity for Ca2+. Synaptotagmin is an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles that contains two copies of a domain known to be involved in Ca(2+)-dependent membrane interactions. Synaptotagmin has been shown to bind Ca2+ in vitro with a relatively low affinity. In addition, synaptotagmin has been shown to bind indirectly to Ca2+ channels, positioning the protein close to the site of Ca2+ influx. Recently, a negative regulatory role for synaptotagmin has been proposed, in which it functions as a clamp to prevent fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. Release of the clamp would allow exocytosis. Here we present genetic and electrophysiological evidence that synaptotagmin forms a multimeric complex that can function as a clamp in vivo. However, upon nerve stimulation and Ca2+ influx, all synaptotagmin mutations dramatically decrease the ability of Ca2+ to promote release, suggesting that synaptotagmin probably plays a key role in activation of synaptic vesicle fusion. This activity cannot simply be attributed to the removal of a barrier to secretion, as we can electrophysiologically separate the increase in rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion from the decrease in evoked response. We also find that some syt mutations, including those that lack the second Ca(2+)-binding domain, decrease the fourth-order dependence of release on Ca2+ by approximately half, consistent with the hypothesis that a synaptotagmin complex functions as a Ca2+ receptor for initiating exocytosis. Images PMID:7971978

  2. Interaction Between Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone and GM1-Doped Cholesterol/Sphingomyelin Vesicles: A Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Shahzadi, Zarrin; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2017-09-11

    Understanding the role of neural membrane in translocation and action of neurohormone is of great importance. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a neuropeptide hormone and it acts as a final signaling molecule by stimulating the synthesis of LH and FSH to maintain reproduction in all vertebrates. The receptors of LHRH are found in breast tumors and pituitary gland in the brain. Moreover, neural plasma membrane is also found to contain specific binding site for LHRH. The mechanism by which LHRH binds to membrane before it binds to the receptors is a very critical step and can have a profound impact upon the translation of peptide across the membrane. A complex form of glycosphingolipids known as Ganglioside is an important component of plasma membrane of nerve cells and breast tumor tissues. They play an important role in various physiological membrane processes. Therefore, the interaction of ganglioside-containing membrane with LHRH might be crucial in aiding the LHRH to translate through the neural membrane and reach its receptor for binding and activation. Using CD, UV-Absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy, the effect of Ganglioside Monosialo 1(GM1)-induced conformational changes of LHRH in the presence of Cholesterol (CHOL)/Sphingomyelin (SM) and GM1/CHOL/SM vesicles was studied. The aforesaid spectroscopic studies show that LHRH is able to bind with both the vesicles, but GM1-containing vesicles interact more effectively than vesicles without GM1. CHOL/SM vesicles partially disturb the conformation of the peptide. Moreover, binding of LHRH to GM1/CHOL/SM vesicles induces loss of conformational rigidity and attainment of a random coil.

  3. Cysteine depletion causes oxidative stress and triggers outer membrane vesicle release by Neisseria meningitidis; implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Zomer, Gijsbert; van den Ijssel, Jan; van Keulen, Lonneke; Eppink, Michel H; van der Ley, Peter; van der Pol, Leo A

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) contain immunogenic proteins and contribute to in vivo survival and virulence of bacterial pathogens. The first OMV vaccines successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outbreaks but required detergent-extraction for endotoxin removal. Current vaccines use attenuated endotoxin, to preserve immunological properties and allow a detergent-free process. The preferred process is based on spontaneously released OMV (sOMV), which are most similar to in vivo vesicles and easier to purify. The release mechanism however is poorly understood resulting in low yield. This study with N. meningitidis demonstrates that an external stimulus, cysteine depletion, can trigger growth arrest and sOMV release in sufficient quantities for vaccine production (±1500 human doses per liter cultivation). Transcriptome analysis suggests that cysteine depletion impairs iron-sulfur protein assembly and causes oxidative stress. Involvement of oxidative stress is confirmed by showing that addition of reactive oxygen species during cysteine-rich growth also triggers vesiculation. The sOMV in this study are similar to vesicles from natural infection, therefore cysteine-dependent vesiculation is likely to be relevant for the in vivo pathogenesis of N. meningitidis.

  4. Microdomain [Ca(2+)] Fluctuations Alter Temporal Dynamics in Models of Ca(2+)-Dependent Signaling Cascades and Synaptic Vesicle Release.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2016-03-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent signaling is often localized in spatially restricted microdomains and may involve only 1 to 100 Ca(2+) ions. Fluctuations in the microdomain Ca(2+) concentration (Ca(2+)) can arise from a wide range of elementary processes, including diffusion, Ca(2+) influx, and association/dissociation with Ca(2+) binding proteins or buffers. However, it is unclear to what extent these fluctuations alter Ca(2+)-dependent signaling. We construct Markov models of a general Ca(2+)-dependent signaling cascade and Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic vesicle release. We compare the hitting (release) time distribution and statistics for models that account for [Ca(2+)] fluctuations with the corresponding models that neglect these fluctuations. In general, when Ca(2+) fluctuations are much faster than the characteristic time for the signaling event, the hitting time distributions and statistics for the models with and without Ca(2+) fluctuation are similar. However, when the timescale of Ca(2+) fluctuations is on the same order as the signaling cascade or slower, the hitting time mean and variability are typically increased, in particular when the average number of microdomain Ca(2+) ions is small, a consequence of a long-tailed hitting time distribution. In a model of Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic vesicle release, we demonstrate the conditions for which [Ca(2+)] fluctuations do and do not alter the distribution, mean, and variability of release timing. We find that both the release time mean and variability can be increased, demonstrating that Ca(2+) fluctuations are an important aspect of microdomain Ca(2+) signaling and further suggesting that Ca(2+) fluctuations in the presynaptic terminal may contribute to variability in synaptic vesicle release and thus variability in neuronal spiking.

  5. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Releases Extracellular Vesicles That Are Associated with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Blenkiron, Cherie; Simonov, Denis; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Tsai, Peter; Dauros, Priscila; Green, Sasha; Hong, Jiwon; Print, Cristin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterium-to-host signalling during infection is a complex process involving proteins, lipids and other diffusible signals that manipulate host cell biology for pathogen survival. Bacteria also release membrane vesicles (MV) that can carry a cargo of effector molecules directly into host cells. Supported by recent publications, we hypothesised that these MVs also associate with RNA, which may be directly involved in the modulation of the host response to infection. Methods and Results Using the uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain 536, we have isolated MVs and found they carry a range of RNA species. Density gradient centrifugation further fractionated and characterised the MV preparation and confirmed that the isolated RNA was associated with the highest particle and protein containing fractions. Using a new approach, RNA-sequencing of libraries derived from three different ‘size’ RNA populations (<50nt, 50-200nt and 200nt+) isolated from MVs has enabled us to now report the first example of a complete bacterial MV-RNA profile. These data show that MVs carry rRNA, tRNAs, other small RNAs as well as full-length protein coding mRNAs. Confocal microscopy visualised the delivery of lipid labelled MVs into cultured bladder epithelial cells and showed their RNA cargo labelled with 5-EU (5-ethynyl uridine), was transported into the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus. MV RNA uptake by the cells was confirmed by droplet digital RT-PCR of csrC. It was estimated that 1% of MV RNA cargo is delivered into cultured cells. Conclusions These data add to the growing evidence of pathogenic bacterial MV being associated a wide range of RNAs. It further raises the plausibility for MV-RNA-mediated cross-kingdom communication whereby they influence host cell function during the infection process. PMID:27500956

  7. Mycobacteria release active membrane vesicles that modulate immune responses in a TLR2-dependent manner in mice

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Baena, Andres; Martinez, Luis R.; Luque-Garcia, Jose; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Veeraraghavan, Usha; Camara, Carmen; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Chen, Bing; Jimenez, Juan; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Jacobs, William R.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria naturally release membrane vesicles (MVs) under a variety of growth environments. Their production is associated with virulence due to their capacity to concentrate toxins and immunomodulatory molecules. In this report, we show that the 2 medically important species of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin, release MVs when growing in both liquid culture and within murine phagocytic cells in vitro and in vivo. We documented MV production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent mycobacterial species, indicating that release of MVs is a property conserved among mycobacterial species. Extensive proteomic analysis revealed that only MVs from the virulent strains contained TLR2 lipoprotein agonists. The interaction of MVs with macrophages isolated from mice stimulated the release of cytokines and chemokines in a TLR2-dependent fashion, and infusion of MVs into mouse lungs elicited a florid inflammatory response in WT but not TLR2-deficient mice. When MVs were administered to mice before M. tuberculosis pulmonary infection, an accelerated local inflammatory response with increased bacterial replication was seen in the lungs and spleens. Our results provide strong evidence that actively released mycobacterial vesicles are a delivery mechanism for immunologically active molecules that contribute to mycobacterial virulence. These findings may open up new horizons for understanding the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and developing vaccines. PMID:21364279

  8. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  10. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  11. Correlative Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy Reveals that a Chimeric Flavivirus Is Released as Individual Particles in Secretory Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations. PMID:24681578

  12. Osteoblast-released Matrix Vesicles, Regulation of Activity and Composition by Sulfated and Non-sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes R.; Kliemt, Stefanie; Preissler, Carolin; Moeller, Stephanie; von Bergen, Martin; Hempel, Ute; Kalkhof, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Our aging population has to deal with the increasing threat of age-related diseases that impair bone healing. One promising therapeutic approach involves the coating of implants with modified glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that mimic the native bone environment and actively facilitate skeletogenesis. In previous studies, we reported that coatings containing GAGs, such as hyaluronic acid (HA) and its synthetically sulfated derivative (sHA1) as well as the naturally low-sulfated GAG chondroitin sulfate (CS1), reduce the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, but they also induce functions of the bone-forming cells, the osteoblasts. However, it remained open whether GAGs influence the osteoblasts alone or whether they also directly affect the formation, composition, activity, and distribution of osteoblast-released matrix vesicles (MV), which are supposed to be the active machinery for bone formation. Here, we studied the molecular effects of sHA1, HA, and CS1 on MV activity and on the distribution of marker proteins. Furthermore, we used comparative proteomic methods to study the relative protein compositions of isolated MVs and MV-releasing osteoblasts. The MV proteome is much more strongly regulated by GAGs than the cellular proteome. GAGs, especially sHA1, were found to severely impact vesicle-extracellular matrix interaction and matrix vesicle activity, leading to stronger extracellular matrix formation and mineralization. This study shows that the regulation of MV activity is one important mode of action of GAGs and provides information on underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26598647

  13. BDNF Enhances Quantal Neurotransmitter Release and Increases the Number of Docked Vesicles at the Active Zones of Hippocampal Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is emerging as a key mediator of activity-dependent modifications of synaptic strength in the CNS. We investigated the hypothesis that BDNF enhances quantal neurotransmitter release by modulating the distribution of synaptic vesicles within presynaptic terminals using organotypic slice cultures of postnatal rat hippocampus. BDNF specifically increased the number of docked vesicles at the active zone of excitatory synapses on CA1 dendritic spines, with only a small increase in active zone size. In agreement with the hypothesis that an increased docked vesicle density enhances quantal neurotransmitter release, BDNF increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. Synapse number, independently estimated from dendritic spine density and electron microscopy measurements, was also increased after BDNF treatment, indicating that the actions of BNDF on mEPSC frequency can be partially attributed to an increased synaptic density. Our results further suggest that all these actions were mediated via tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor activation, established by inhibition of plasma membrane tyrosine kinases with K-252a. These results provide additional evidence of a fundamental role of the BDNF–TrkB signaling cascade in synaptic transmission, as well as in cellular models of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. PMID:11404410

  14. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  15. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis captured by quick freezing and correlated with quantal transmitter release

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of a machine that freezes biological tissues by contact with a cold metal block, which incorporates a timing circuit that stimulates frog neuromuscular junctions in the last few milliseconds before thay are frozen. We show freeze-fracture replicas of nerve terminals frozen during transmitter discharge, which display synpatic vesicles caught in the act of exocytosis. We use 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to increase the number of transmitter quanta discharged with each nerve impulse, and show that the number of exocytotic vesicles caught by quick-freezing increases commensurately, indicating that one vesicle undergoes exocytosis for each quantum that is discharged. We perform statistical analyses on the spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle discharge sites along the "active zones" that mark the secretory regions of these nerves, and show that individual vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane independent of one another, as expected from physiological demonstrations that quanta are discharged independently. Thus, the utility of quick- freezing as a technique to capture biological processes as evanescent as synaptic transmission has been established. An appendix describes a new capacitance method to measure freezing rates, which shows that the "temporal resolution" of our quick-freezing technique is 2 ms or better. PMID:38256

  16. Influence of the environmental tonicity perturbations on the release of model compounds from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs): A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Iren Yeeling; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; di Cagno, Massimiliano Pio

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the influence of environmental tonicity perturbations on the size and release kinetics of model markers from liposomes (calcein and rhodamine) was investigated. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) were prepared from a mixture composed of organic solvents containing dissolved phosphatidylcholine and phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4). Organic phase was removed by rotary evaporation and the obtained liposomal dispersions were extruded to reduce the liposomal sizes to approx. 400 nm. The LUVs were exposed to PBS of different tonicity to induce water migration, and consequently, generate an osmotic pressure on the vesicle membranes. The markers release kinetics were studied by the dialysis method employing Franz diffusion cells. LUVs appeared to be more susceptible to the osmotic swelling than the shrinking and the size changes were significantly more pronounced for calcein-loaded LUVs in comparison to rhodamine-loaded LUVs. The calcein release from LUVs was highly affected by the water influx/efflux, whereas rhodamine release was less affected by the tonicity perturbations. Mechanistically, it appeared that hydrophilic molecules (calcein) followed the water flux, whereas lipophilic molecules (rhodamine) seemed to be more affected by the changes in LUVs size and consequent alteration of the tightness of the phospholipid bilayer (where the lipophilic marker was imbedded in). These results demonstrate that the different tonicity (within the inner core and external environment of vesicles) can enhance/hamper the diffusion of a marker from LUVs and that osmotically active liposomes could be used as a novel controlled drug delivery system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stable Positioning of Unc13 Restricts Synaptic Vesicle Fusion to Defined Release Sites to Promote Synchronous Neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Böhme, Mathias A; Reynolds, Eric; Beis, Christina; Grasskamp, Andreas T; Mampell, Malou M; Maglione, Marta; Jusyte, Meida; Rey, Ulises; Babikir, Husam; McCarthy, Anthony W; Quentin, Christine; Matkovic, Tanja; Bergeron, Dominique Dufour; Mushtaq, Zeeshan; Göttfert, Fabian; Owald, David; Mielke, Thorsten; Hell, Stefan W; Sigrist, Stephan J; Walter, Alexander M

    2017-09-13

    Neural information processing depends on precisely timed, Ca(2+)-activated synaptic vesicle exocytosis from release sites within active zones (AZs), but molecular details are unknown. Here, we identify that the (M)Unc13-family member Unc13A generates release sites and show the physiological relevance of their restrictive AZ targeting. Super-resolution and intravital imaging of Drosophila neuromuscular junctions revealed that (unlike the other release factors Unc18 and Syntaxin-1A) Unc13A was stably and precisely positioned at AZs. Local Unc13A levels predicted single AZ activity. Different Unc13A portions selectively affected release site number, position, and functionality. An N-terminal fragment stably localized to AZs, displaced endogenous Unc13A, and reduced the number of release sites, while a C-terminal fragment generated excessive sites at atypical locations, resulting in reduced and delayed evoked transmission that displayed excessive facilitation. Thus, release site generation by the Unc13A C terminus and their specific AZ localization via the N terminus ensure efficient transmission and prevent ectopic, temporally imprecise release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. One stone kills three birds: novel boron-containing vesicles for potential BNCT, controlled drug release, and diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gaojian; Yang, Jingying; Lu, Gang; Liu, Pi Chu; Chen, Qianjin; Xie, Zuowei; Wu, Chi

    2014-10-06

    A new conjugate polymer was prepared by an efficient thiol-ene coupling of one carborane with a linear PEG chain (Mn = 2,000 g/mol), and each carborane was further labeled with a fluorescence rhodamine dye. Such a novel polymer can associate in water to form narrowly distributed spherical vesicles, which were characterized using a range of methods, including laser light scattering, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and TEM. The vesicular structure is potentially multifunctional in biomedical applications, namely, serving as a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, a hydrophilic drug carrier, and a diagnostic imaging fluorescent probe. As expected, either cleaving the thiol-ene linked PEO chain by esterase or destroying carborane by neutron irradiation results in a dismantlement of such a vesicle structure to release its encapsulated drugs. Its potential biomedical applications have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our preliminary results reveal that these small vesicles can be quickly taken up by cells and have an enhanced stability in the bloodstream so that their targeting to specific cancer cells becomes feasible.

  19. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein, BIG2, regulates the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles.

    PubMed

    Islam, Aminul; Shen, Xiaoyan; Hiroi, Toyoko; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Levine, Stewart J

    2007-03-30

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released from cells to the extracellular space where it can bind and modulate TNF bioactivity. Extracellular TNFR1 release occurs by two distinct pathways: the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains and the constitutive release of full-length TNFR1 in exosome-like vesicles. Regulation of both TNFR1 release pathways appears to involve the trafficking of cytoplasmic TNFR1 vesicles. Vesicular trafficking is controlled by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are active in the GTP-bound state and inactive when bound to GDP. ARF activation is enhanced by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors that catalyze replacement of GDP by GTP. We investigated whether the brefeldin A (BFA)-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange proteins, BIG1 and/or BIG2, are required for TNFR1 release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Effects of specific RNA interference (RNAi) showed that BIG2, but not BIG1, regulated the release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles, whereas neither BIG2 nor BIG1 was required for the IL-1beta-induced proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. BIG2 co-localized with TNFR1 in diffusely distributed cytoplasmic vesicles, and the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 was disrupted by BFA. Consistent with the preferential activation of class I ARFs by BIG2, ARF1 and ARF3 participated in the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles in a nonredundant and additive fashion. We conclude that the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 selectively regulates the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles from human vascular endothelial cells via an ARF1- and ARF3-dependent mechanism.

  1. Cestode parasites release extracellular vesicles with microRNAs and immunodiagnostic protein cargo.

    PubMed

    Ancarola, María Eugenia; Marcilla, Antonio; Herz, Michaela; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Pérez, Matías; Asurmendi, Sebastián; Brehm, Klaus; Poncini, Carolina; Rosenzvit, Mara; Cucher, Marcela

    2017-09-01

    Intercellular communication is crucial in multiple aspects of cell biology. This interaction can be mediated by several mechanisms including extracellular vesicle (EV) transfer. EV secretion by parasites has been reported in protozoans, trematodes and nematodes. Here we report that this mechanism is present in three different species of cestodes, Taenia crassiceps, Mesocestoides corti and Echinococcus multilocularis. To confirm this we determined, in vitro, the presence of EVs in culture supernatants by transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, while T. crassiceps and M. corti metacestodes secrete membranous structures into the culture media, similar vesicles were observed in the interface of the germinal and laminated layers of E. multilocularis metacestodes and were hardly detected in culture supernatants. We then determined the protein cargo in the EV-enriched secreted fractions of T. crassiceps and M. corti conditioned media by LC-MS/MS. Among the identified proteins, eukaryotic vesicle-enriched proteins were identified as expected, but also proteins used for cestode disease diagnosis, proteins related to neurotransmission, lipid binding proteins as well as host immunoglobulins and complement factors. Finally, we confirmed by capillary electrophoresis the presence of intravesicular RNA for both parasites and detected microRNAs by reverse transcription-PCR. This is the first report of EV secretion in cestode parasites and of an RNA secretion mechanism. These findings will provide valuable data not only for basic cestode biology but also for the rational search for new diagnostic targets. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. BDNF increases release probability and the size of a rapidly recycling vesicle pool within rat hippocampal excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Hartman, Kenichi; Winterer, Jochen; Muller, Wolfgang; Stanton, Patric K; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    Exerting its actions pre-, post- and peri-synaptically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the most potent modulators of hippocampal synaptic function. Here, we examined the effects of BDNF on a rapidly recycling pool (RRP) of vesicles within excitatory synapses. First, we estimated vesicular release in hippocampal cultures by performing FM4-64 imaging in terminals impinging on enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labelled dendritic spines – a hallmark of excitatory synapses. Consistent with a modulation of the RRP, BDNF increased the evoked destaining rate of FM4-64 only during the initial phase of field stimulation. Multiphoton microscopy in acute hippocampal slices confirmed these observations by selectively imaging the RRP, which was loaded with FM1-43 by hyperosmotic shock. Slices exposed to BDNF showed an increase in the evoked and spontaneous rates of FM1-43 destaining from terminals in CA1 stratum radiatum, mostly representing excitatory terminals of Schaffer collaterals. Variance-mean analysis of evoked EPSCs in CA1 pyramidal neurons further confirmed that release probability is increased in BDNF-treated slices, without changes in the number of independent release sites or average postsynaptic quantal amplitude. Because BDNF was absent during dye loading, imaging, destaining and whole-cell recordings, these results demonstrate that BDNF induces a long-lasting enhancement in the probability of transmitter release at hippocampal excitatory synapses by modulating the RRP. Since the endogenous BDNF scavenger TrkB-IgG prevented the enhancement of FM1-43 destaining rate caused by induction of long-term potentiation in acute hippocampal slices, the modulation of a rapidly recycling vesicle pool may underlie the role of BDNF in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:16709633

  3. Effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the membrane vesicle release and growth of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Volgers, Charlotte; Benedikter, Birke J; Grauls, Gert E; Hellebrand, Pauline H M; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Reversible Recruitment of a Homeostatic Reserve Pool of Synaptic Vesicles Underlies Rapid Homeostatic Plasticity of Quantal Content

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Martin J.; Rich, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation is essential for the maintenance of synaptic strength within the physiological range. The current study is the first to demonstrate that both induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds of blocking or unblocking acetylcholine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction. Our data suggest that the homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). Blocking vesicle refilling prevented upregulation of quantal content (QC), while leaving baseline release relatively unaffected. This suggested that the upregulation of QC was due to mobilization of a distinct pool of vesicles that were rapidly recycled and thus were dependent on continued vesicle refilling. We term this pool the “homeostatic reserve pool.” A detailed analysis of the time course of vesicle release triggered by a presynaptic action potential suggests that the homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles is normally released more slowly than other vesicles, but the rate of their release becomes similar to that of the major pool during homeostatic upregulation of QC. Remarkably, instead of finding a generalized increase in the recruitment of vesicles into RRP, we identified a distinct homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles that appear to only participate in synchronized release following homeostatic upregulation of QC. Once this small pool of vesicles is depleted by the block of vesicle refilling, homeostatic upregulation of QC is no longer observed. This is the first identification of the population of vesicles responsible for the blockade-induced upregulation of release previously described. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study is the first to demonstrate that both the induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds. Our data suggest that homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent

  5. Metabolically active extracellular vesicles released from hepatocytes under drug-induced liver-damaging conditions modify serum metabolome and might affect different pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Palomo, Laura; Mleczko, Justyna; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Ibon; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Castro, Azucena; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2017-02-15

    Hepatocytes are involved in the endogenous and drug metabolism; many of the enzymes involved in those processes are incorporated into extracellular vesicles and secreted into the bloodstream. Liver-damaging conditions modify the molecular cargo of those vesicles significantly. However, no information about the effect of these hepatic vesicles on the extracellular environment is available. Drug-induced liver damage increases the number of circulating extracellular vesicles and affects the release and content of hepatocyte-derived vesicles. In this work, we evaluated the metabolic effect of these vesicles on the composition of the serum. We performed a targeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) metabolomics analysis of serum samples. The samples had been first incubated with hepatic extracellular vesicles from hepatocytes challenged with acetaminophen or diclofenac. The incubation affected the serum levels of 67 metabolites, such as amino acids and different species of lipids. The metabolites included various species of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines. These compounds are the components of biological membranes; our observations suggest that the vesicles might take part in remodelling and maintenance of the membranes. Alterations in the levels of some other serum metabolites might have deleterious consequences, for example, the tetracosanoic acid with its cardiovascular effects. However, some of the metabolites whose levels were increased, including alpha-linoleic and tauroursodeoxycholic acids, have been reported to have a protective effect. Our targeted metabolomics analysis indicated that the hepatic extracellular vesicles act as nano-metabolic machines supplying the extracellular environment with the means to integrate diverse tissue responses. In conclusion, we show that the hepatic extracellular vesicles are metabolically active and might play a role in the physiopathological response to hepatic insults

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii Extracellular OXA-58 Is Primarily and Selectively Released via Outer Membrane Vesicles after Sec-Dependent Periplasmic Translocation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chiang, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2015-12-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) shelter cohabiting carbapenem-susceptible bacteria from carbapenem killing via extracellular release of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases, including OXA-58. However, the mechanism of the extracellular release of OXA-58 has not been elucidated. In silico analysis predicted OXA-58 to be translocated to the periplasm via the Sec system. Using cell fractionation and Western blotting, OXA-58 with the signal peptide and C terminus deleted was not detected in the periplasmic and extracellular fractions. Overexpression of enhanced green fluorescent protein fused to the OXA-58 signal peptide led to its periplasmic translocation but not extracellular release, suggesting that OXA-58 is selectively released. The majority of the extracellular OXA-58 was associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). The OMV-associated OXA-58 was detected only in a strain overexpressing OXA-58. The presence of OXA-58 in OMVs was confirmed by a carbapenem inactivation bioassay, proteomic analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Imipenem treatment increased OMV formation and caused cell lysis, resulting in an increase in the OMV-associated and OMV-independent release of extracellular OXA-58. OMV-independent OXA-58 hydrolyzed nitrocefin more rapidly than OMV-associated OXA-58 but was more susceptible to proteinase K degradation. Rose bengal, an SecA inhibitor, inhibited the periplasmic translocation and OMV-associated release of OXA-58 and abolished the sheltering effect of CRAb. This study demonstrated that the majority of the extracellular OXA-58 is selectively released via OMVs after Sec-dependent periplasmic translocation. Addition of imipenem increased both OMV-associated and OMV-independent OXA-58, which may have different biological roles. SecA inhibitor could abolish the carbapenem-sheltering effect of CRAb. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Simulated ischaemia induces Ca2+-independent glutamatergic vesicle release through actin filament depolymerization in area CA1 of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Adriana L; Rossi, David J

    2010-05-01

    Transient, non-catastrophic brain ischaemia can induce either a protected state against subsequent episodes of ischaemia (ischaemic preconditioning) or delayed, selective neuronal death. Altered glutamatergic signalling and altered Ca(2+) homeostasis have been implicated in both processes. Here we use simultaneous patch-clamp recording and Ca(2+) imaging to monitor early changes in glutamate release and cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](c)) in an in vitro slice model of hippocampal ischaemia. In slices loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura-2, ischaemia leads to an early increase in [Ca(2+)](c) that precedes the severe ischaemic depolarization (ID) associated with pan necrosis. The early increase in [Ca(2+)](c) is mediated by influx through the plasma membrane and release from internal stores, and parallels an early increase in vesicular glutamate release that manifests as a fourfold increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). However, the increase in mEPSC frequency is not prevented by blocking the increase in [Ca(2+)](c), and the early rise in [Ca(2+)](c) is not affected by blocking ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Thus, the increase in [Ca(2+)](c) and the increase in glutamate release are independent of each other. Stabilizing actin filaments with jaspamide or phalloidin prevented vesicle release induced by ischaemia. Our results identify several early cellular cascades triggered by ischaemia: Ca(2+) influx, Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, actin filament depolymerization, and vesicular release of glutamate that depends on actin dynamics but not [Ca(2+)](c). All of these processes precede the catastrophic ID by several minutes, and thus represent potential target mechanisms to influence the outcome of an ischaemic episode.

  8. Increased vesicle recycling in response to osmotic cell swelling. Cause and consequence of hypotonicity-provoked ATP release.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Thea; Tomassen, Sebastian F B; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; de Jonge, Hugo R; Tilly, Ben C

    2003-10-10

    Osmotic swelling of Intestine 407 cells leads to an immediate increase in cell surface membrane area as determined using the fluorescent membrane dye FM 1-43. In addition, as measured by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-dextran uptake, a robust (>100-fold) increase in the rate of endocytosis was observed, starting after a discrete lag time of 2-3 min and lasting for approximately 10-15 min. The hypotonicity-induced increase in membrane surface area, like the cell swelling-induced release of ATP (Van der Wijk, T., De Jonge, H. R., and Tilly, B. C. (1999) Biochem. J. 343, 579-586), was diminished after 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester loading or cytochalasin B treatment. Uptake of TRITC-dextrans, however, was not affected. Treatment of the cells with the vesicle-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-specific protease Clostridium botulinum toxin F not only nearly eliminated the hypotonicity-induced increase in membrane surface area but also strongly diminished the release of ATP, indicating the involvement of regulated exocytosis. Both the ATP hydrolase apyrase and the MEK inhibitor PD098059 diminished the osmotic swelling-induced increase in membrane surface area as well as the subsequent uptake of TRITC-dextrans. Taken together, the results indicate that extracellular ATP is required for the hypotonicity-induced vesicle recycling and suggest that a positive feedback loop, involving purinergic activation of the Erk-1/2 pathway, may contribute to the release of ATP from hypo-osmotically stimulated cells.

  9. Hepatocytes release ceramide-enriched pro-inflammatory extracellular vesicles in an IRE1α-dependent manner[S

    PubMed Central

    Kakazu, Eiji; Mauer, Amy S.; Yin, Meng; Malhi, Harmeet

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a lipotoxic disease wherein activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and macrophage-mediated hepatic inflammation are key pathogenic features. However, the lipid mediators linking these two observations remain elusive. We postulated that ER stress-regulated release of pro-inflammatory extracellular vesicles (EVs) from lipotoxic hepatocytes may be this link. EVs were isolated from cell culture supernatants of hepatocytes treated with palmitate (PA) to induce lipotoxic ER stress, characterized by immunofluorescence, Western blotting, electron microscopy, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Sphingolipids were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. EVs were employed in macrophage chemotaxis assays. PA induced significant EV release. Because PA activates ER stress, we used KO hepatocytes to demonstrate that PA-induced EV release was mediated by inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α)/X-box binding protein-1. PA-induced EVs were enriched in C16:0 ceramide in an IRE1α-dependent manner, and activated macrophage chemotaxis via formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) from C16:0 ceramide. This chemotaxis was blocked by sphingosine kinase inhibitors and S1P receptor inhibitors. Lastly, elevated circulating EVs in experimental and human NASH demonstrated increased C16:0 ceramide. PA induces C16:0 ceramide-enriched EV release in an IRE1α-dependent manner. The ceramide metabolite, S1P, activates macrophage chemotaxis, a potential mechanism for the recruitment of macrophages to the liver under lipotoxic conditions. PMID:26621917

  10. Melanosome transfer to keratinocyte in the chicken embryonic skin is mediated by vesicle release associated with Rho-regulated membrane blebbing

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Murai, Hidetaka; Sakai, Ken-ichiro; Okui, Takahiro; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    During skin pigmentation in amniotes, melanin synthesized in the melanocyte is transferred to keratinocytes by a particle called the melanosome. Previous studies, mostly using dissociated cultured cells, have proposed several different models that explain how the melanosome transfer is achieved. Here, using a technique that labels the plasma membrane of melanocytes within a three-dimensional system that mimics natural tissues, we have visualized the plasma membrane of melanocytes with EGFP in chicken embryonic skin. Confocal time-lapse microscopy reveals that the melanosome transfer is mediated, at least in part, by vesicles produced by plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the vesicle release is accompanied by the membrane blebbing of melanocytes. Blebs that have encapsulated a melanosome are pinched off to become vesicles, and these melanosome-containing vesicles are finally engulfed by neighboring keratinocytes. For both the membrane blebbing and vesicle release, Rho small GTPase is essential. We further show that the membrane vesicle-mediated melanosome transfer plays a significant role in the skin pigmentation. Given that the skin pigmentation in inter-feather spaces in chickens is similar to that in inter-hair spaces of humans, our findings should have important consequences in cosmetic medicine. PMID:27910904

  11. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takanori; Kato, Kei; Kobayashi, Masashi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker) antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker) antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  12. Tonotopic variation in the calcium dependence of neurotransmitter release and vesicle pool replenishment at mammalian auditory ribbon synapses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stuart L; Forge, Andrew; Knipper, Marlies; Münkner, Stefan; Marcotti, Walter

    2008-07-23

    The mammalian cochlea is specialized to recognize and process complex auditory signals with remarkable acuity and temporal precision over a wide frequency range. The quality of the information relayed to the auditory afferent fibers mainly depends on the transfer characteristics of inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses. To investigate the biophysical properties of the synaptic machinery, we measured changes in membrane capacitance (DeltaC(m)) in low-frequency (apical region, approximately 300 Hz) and high-frequency (basal, approximately 30 kHz) gerbil IHCs maintained in near physiological conditions (1.3 mm extracellular Ca(2+) and body temperature). With maturation, the Ca(2+) efficiency of exocytosis improved in both apical and basal IHCs and was more pronounced in the latter. Prehearing IHCs showed a similar Ca(2+) cooperativity of exocytosis despite the smaller DeltaC(m) in apical cells. After maturation, DeltaC(m) in high-frequency IHCs increased linearly with the Ca(2+) current, whereas, somewhat surprisingly, the relationship was significantly more nonlinear in low-frequency cells. This tonotopic difference seemed to be correlated with ribbon synapse morphology (spherical in apical and ellipsoid in basal IHCs) but not with the expression level of the proposed Ca(2+) sensor otoferlin or the spatial coupling between Ca(2+) channels and active zones. Repetitive stimulation of adult IHCs showed that vesicle pool refilling could become rate limiting for vesicle release, with high-frequency IHCs able to sustain greater release rates. Together, our findings provide the first evidence for a tonotopic difference in the properties of the synaptic machinery in mammalian IHCs, which could be essential for fine-tuning their receptor characteristics during sound stimulation.

  13. Activation of metabotropic GABA receptors increases the energy barrier for vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Rost, Benjamin R; Nicholson, Patrick; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Rummel, Andreas; Rosenmund, Christian; Breustedt, Joerg; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2011-09-15

    Neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals is under the tight control of various metabotropic receptors. We report here that in addition to the regulation of Ca(2+) channel activity, metabotropic GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) at murine hippocampal glutamatergic synapses utilize an inhibitory pathway that directly targets the synaptic vesicle release machinery. Acute application of the GABA(B)R agonist baclofen rapidly and reversibly inhibits vesicle fusion, which occurs independently of the SNAP-25 C-terminus. Using applications of hypertonic sucrose solutions, we find that the size of the readily releasable pool remains unchanged by GABA(B)R activation, but the sensitivity of primed vesicles to hypertonic stimuli appears lowered as the response amplitudes at intermediate sucrose concentrations are smaller and release kinetics are slowed. These data show that presynaptic GABA(B)Rs can inhibit neurotransmitter release directly by increasing the energy barrier for vesicle fusion.

  14. RIG-I activation induces the release of extracellular vesicles with antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Daßler-Plenker, Juliane; Reiners, Katrin S.; van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Hansen, Hinrich P.; Putschli, Bastian; Barnert, Sabine; Schuberth-Wagner, Christine; Schubert, Rolf; Tüting, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Schlee, Martin; Hartmann, Gunther; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Coch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the innate immune receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) by its specific ligand 5′-triphosphate-RNA (3pRNA) triggers antitumor immunity predominantly via NK cell activation and direct apoptosis induction in tumor cells. However, how NK cells are mobilized to attack the tumor cells remains elusive. Here, we show that RIG-I activation induced the secretion of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from melanoma cells, which by themselves revealed antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. RIG-I-induced EVs from melanoma cells exhibited an increased expression of the NKp30-ligand (BAG6, BAT3) on their surface triggering NK cell-mediated lysis of melanoma cells via activation of the cytotoxicity NK cell-receptor NKp30. Moreover, systemic administration of RIG-I-induced melanoma-EVs showed a potent antitumor activity in a melanoma mouse model in vivo. In conclusion, our data establish a new RIG-I-dependent pathway leading to NK cell-mediated tumor cell killing. PMID:27853642

  15. Serum extracellular vesicle depletion processes affect release and infectivity of HIV-1 in culture.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhaohao; Muth, Dillon C; Eitan, Erez; Travers, Meghan; Learman, Lisa N; Lehrmann, Elin; Witwer, Kenneth W

    2017-05-31

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in intercellular communication and affect processes including immune and antiviral responses. Blood serum, a common cell culture medium component, is replete with EVs and must be depleted prior to EV-related experiments. The extent to which depletion processes deplete non-EV particles is incompletely understood, but depleted serum is associated with reduced viability and growth in cell culture. Here, we examined whether serum depleted by two methods affected HIV-1 replication. In cell lines, including HIV-1 latency models, increased HIV-1 production was observed, along with changes in cell behavior and viability. Add-back of ultracentrifuge pellets (enriched in EVs but possibly other particles) rescued baseline HIV-1 production. Primary cells were less sensitive to serum depletion processes. Virus produced under processed serum conditions was more infectious. Finally, changes in cellular metabolism, surface markers, and gene expression, but not miRNA profiles, were associated with depleted serum culture. In conclusion, depleted serum conditions have a substantial effect on HIV-1 production and infectivity. Dependence of cell cultures on "whole serum" must be examined carefully along with other experimental variables, keeping in mind that the effects of EVs may be accompanied by or confused with those of closely associated or physically similar particles.

  16. Stored platelets alter glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid species, which are differentially transferred to newly released extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pienimaeki-Roemer, Annika; Ruebsaamen, Katharina; Boettcher, Alfred; Orsó, Evelyn; Scherer, Max; Liebisch, Gerhard; Kilalic, Dzenan; Ahrens, Norbert; Schmitz, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for transfusion develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), resulting in decreased platelet (PLT) viability and function. The processes leading to PSL have not been described in detail and no data describe molecular changes occurring in all three components of stored PLCs: PLTs, PLC extracellular vesicles (PLC-EVs), and plasma. Fifty PLCs from healthy individuals were stored under standard blood banking conditions for 5 days. Changes in cholesterol, glycerophospholipid, and sphingolipid species were analyzed in PLTs, PLC-EVs, and plasma by mass spectrometry and metabolic labeling. Immunoblots were performed to compare PLT and PLC-EV protein expression. During 5 days, PLTs transferred glycerophospholipids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids to newly formed PLC-EVs, which increased corresponding lipids by 30%. Stored PLTs significantly increased ceramide (Cer; +53%) and decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate (-53%), shifting sphingolipid metabolism toward Cer. In contrast, plasma accumulated minor sphingolipids. Compared to PLTs, fresh PLC-EVs were enriched in lysophosphatidic acid (60-fold) and during storage showed significant increases in cholesterol, sphingomyelin, dihydrosphingomyelin, plasmalogen, and lysophosphatidylcholine species, as well as accumulation of apolipoproteins A-I, E, and J/clusterin. This is the first detailed analysis of lipid species in all PLC components during PLC storage, which might reflect mechanisms active during in vivo PLT senescence. Stored PLTs reduce minor sphingolipids and shift sphingolipid metabolism toward Cer, whereas in the plasma fraction minor sphingolipids increase. The composition of PLC-EVs resembles that of lipid rafts and confirms their role as carriers of bioactive molecules and master regulators in vascular disease. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Adipocytes of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, In-Kyu; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes are secretory vesicles that act as autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine messengers; mediate intercellular cross-talk; and carry a cargo of various proteins. Because EVs can be transported to recipient cells via circulation, many researchers have been studying EVs from immune cells or cancer cells. Adipocytes are also considered endocrine cells and secrete adipokines such as adiponectin, regulating a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Expansion of adipose tissue in obesity alters adipokine secretion, thereby increasing the risk of metabolic diseases. Characterization of adipocyte-derived exosomes is necessary to explain the communication between adipocytes and other cell types. In the present study, to identify proteins associated with adipocyte-derived exosomes, we isolated exosomes from adipose tissue of obese diabetic and obese nondiabetic rats. We identified proteins by analyzing exosomes from obese rats with type 2 diabetes and their matched control littermates using nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry coupled with label-free relative quantification. We identified 509 proteins from adipocytes including 81 known adipokines; ~78% of all the identified proteins were categorized as exosome-associated proteins. Among the protein profiles, we uncovered 128 upregulated and 72 downregulated proteins, which are differentially expressed in OLETF adipocyte-derived exosomes. This study seems to demonstrate for the first time hundreds of proteins in exosomes released by adipocytes in obese rats and rats with type 2 diabetes. Thus, protein profiles of exosomes from adipocytes possibly indicate the transmission of signals as part of cell-cell communication and should further our understanding of obesity- and diabetes-related diseases.

  18. Mildly oxidized HDL decrease agonist-induced platelet aggregation and release of pro-coagulant platelet extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tafelmeier, M; Fischer, A; Orsó, E; Konovalova, T; Böttcher, A; Liebisch, G; Matysik, S; Schmitz, G

    2017-05-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for therapeutic purpose, develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), characterized by impaired platelet (PLT) viability and function, platelet extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release and profound lipidomic changes. Whereas oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activates PLTs and promotes atherosclerosis, effects linked to oxidized high-density lipoprotein (oxHDL) are poorly characterized. PLCs from blood donors were treated with native (nHDL) or mildly oxidized HDL (moxHDL) for 5days under blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), aggregometry, immunoblot analysis and mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV and platelet exosomes (PL-EX) release, PLT aggregation, protein expression, and PLT and plasma lipid composition. In comparison to total nHDL, moxHDL significantly decreased PL-EV release by -36% after 5days of PLT storage and partially reversed agonist-induced PLT aggregation. PL-EV release positively correlated with PLT aggregation. MoxHDL improved PLT membrane lipid homeostasis through enhanced uptake of lysophospholipids and their remodeling to corresponding phospholipid species. This also appeared for sphingomyelin (SM) and d18:0/d18:1 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) at the expense of ceramide (Cer) and hexosylceramide (HexCer) leading to reduced Cer/S1P ratio as PLT-viability indicator. This membrane remodeling was associated with increased content of CD36 and maturation of scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1) protein in secreted PL-EVs. MoxHDL, more potently than nHDL, improves PLT-membrane lipid homeostasis, partially antagonizes PL-EV release and agonist-induced PLT aggregation. Altogether, this may be the result of more efficient phospho- and sphingolipid remodeling mediated by CD36 and SR-B1 in the absence of ABCA1 on PLTs. As in vitro supplement in PLCs, moxHDL has the potential to improve PLC quality and to prolong storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Loading of Silica Nanoparticles in Block Copolymer Vesicles during Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly: Encapsulation Efficiency and Thermally Triggered Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer vesicles can be prepared in the form of concentrated aqueous dispersions via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). In the present study, these syntheses are conducted in the presence of varying amounts of silica nanoparticles of approximately 18 nm diameter. This approach leads to encapsulation of up to hundreds of silica nanoparticles per vesicle. Silica has high electron contrast compared to the copolymer which facilitates TEM analysis, and its thermal stability enables quantification of the loading efficiency via thermogravimetric analysis. Encapsulation efficiencies can be calculated using disk centrifuge photosedimentometry, since the vesicle density increases at higher silica loadings while the mean vesicle diameter remains essentially unchanged. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to confirm silica encapsulation, since a structure factor is observed at q ≈ 0.25 nm–1. A new two-population model provides satisfactory data fits to the SAXS patterns and allows the mean silica volume fraction within the vesicles to be determined. Finally, the thermoresponsive nature of the diblock copolymer vesicles enables thermally triggered release of the encapsulated silica nanoparticles simply by cooling to 0–10 °C, which induces a morphological transition. These silica-loaded vesicles constitute a useful model system for understanding the encapsulation of globular proteins, enzymes, or antibodies for potential biomedical applications. They may also serve as an active payload for self-healing hydrogels or repair of biological tissue. Finally, we also encapsulate a model globular protein, bovine serum albumin, and calculate its loading efficiency using fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26600089

  20. An Active Form of Sphingosine Kinase-1 Is Released in the Extracellular Medium as Component of Membrane Vesicles Shed by Two Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Donati, Chiara; Cassarà, Donata; Taverna, Simona; Salamone, Monica; Bruni, Paola; Vittorelli, Maria Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK-1) correlates with a poor survival rate of tumor patients. This effect is probably due to the ability of SphK-1 to be released into the extracellular medium where it catalyzes the biosynthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a signaling molecule endowed with profound proangiogenic effects. SphK-1 is a leaderless protein which is secreted by an unconventional mechanism. In this paper, we will show that in human hepatocarcinoma Sk-Hep1 cells, extracellular signaling is followed by targeting the enzyme to the cell surface and parallels targeting of FGF-2 to the budding vesicles. We will also show that SphK-1 is present in a catalitycally active form in vesicles shed by SK-Hep1 and human breast carcinoma 8701-BC cells. The enzyme substrate sphingosine is present in shed vesicles where it is produced by neutral ceramidase. Shed vesicles are therefore a site for S1P production in the extracellular medium and conceivably also within host cell following vesicle endocytosis. PMID:20508814

  1. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2C (SV2C) modulates dopamine release and is disrupted in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Kristen A.; Ozawa, Minagi; Lohr, Kelly M.; Hoffman, Carlie A.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Minzheng; Sgobio, Carmelo; Sastry, Namratha; Cai, Huaibin; Caudle, W. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Members of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) family of proteins are involved in synaptic function throughout the brain. The ubiquitously expressed SV2A has been widely implicated in epilepsy, although SV2C with its restricted basal ganglia distribution is poorly characterized. SV2C is emerging as a potentially relevant protein in Parkinson disease (PD), because it is a genetic modifier of sensitivity to l-DOPA and of nicotine neuroprotection in PD. Here we identify SV2C as a mediator of dopamine homeostasis and report that disrupted expression of SV2C within the basal ganglia is a pathological feature of PD. Genetic deletion of SV2C leads to reduced dopamine release in the dorsal striatum as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, reduced striatal dopamine content, disrupted α-synuclein expression, deficits in motor function, and alterations in neurochemical effects of nicotine. Furthermore, SV2C expression is dramatically altered in postmortem brain tissue from PD cases but not in Alzheimer disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, or multiple system atrophy. This disruption was paralleled in mice overexpressing mutated α-synuclein. These data establish SV2C as a mediator of dopamine neuron function and suggest that SV2C disruption is a unique feature of PD that likely contributes to dopaminergic dysfunction. PMID:28246328

  2. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2C (SV2C) modulates dopamine release and is disrupted in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Amy R; Stout, Kristen A; Ozawa, Minagi; Lohr, Kelly M; Hoffman, Carlie A; Bernstein, Alison I; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Minzheng; Sgobio, Carmelo; Sastry, Namratha; Cai, Huaibin; Caudle, W Michael; Miller, Gary W

    2017-03-14

    Members of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) family of proteins are involved in synaptic function throughout the brain. The ubiquitously expressed SV2A has been widely implicated in epilepsy, although SV2C with its restricted basal ganglia distribution is poorly characterized. SV2C is emerging as a potentially relevant protein in Parkinson disease (PD), because it is a genetic modifier of sensitivity to l-DOPA and of nicotine neuroprotection in PD. Here we identify SV2C as a mediator of dopamine homeostasis and report that disrupted expression of SV2C within the basal ganglia is a pathological feature of PD. Genetic deletion of SV2C leads to reduced dopamine release in the dorsal striatum as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, reduced striatal dopamine content, disrupted α-synuclein expression, deficits in motor function, and alterations in neurochemical effects of nicotine. Furthermore, SV2C expression is dramatically altered in postmortem brain tissue from PD cases but not in Alzheimer disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, or multiple system atrophy. This disruption was paralleled in mice overexpressing mutated α-synuclein. These data establish SV2C as a mediator of dopamine neuron function and suggest that SV2C disruption is a unique feature of PD that likely contributes to dopaminergic dysfunction.

  3. GPM6B regulates osteoblast function and induction of mineralization by controlling cytoskeleton and matrix vesicle release.

    PubMed

    Drabek, Ksenija; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Eijken, Marco; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2011-09-01

    Neuronal membrane glycoprotein gene (GPM6B) encodes a membrane glycoprotein that belongs to the proteolipid protein family. We identified GPM6B as a gene that is strongly upregulated during osteoblast differentiation. To investigate the role of GPM6B in the process of bone formation, we silenced GPM6B expression during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). GPM6B silencing in hMSCs resulted in reduced alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity along with reduced mineralization of extracellular matrix (ECM). Microarray expression analysis of GPM6B-depleted osteogenic hMSCs revealed significant changes in genes involved in cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis. Immunocytochemistry results confirm changes in the distribution of actin filaments, as well as the shape and size of focal adhesions on GPM6B silencing. Moreover, we demonstrated that production and release of ALP-positive matrix vesicles (MVs) were reduced. In conclusion, we identified GPM6B as a novel regulator of osteoblast function and bone formation. This finding demonstrates the significance of cytoskeleton organization for MV production and subsequent mineralization. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  4. [Peculiarities of synaptic vesicle recycling in frog and mouse motor nerve terminals].

    PubMed

    Zefirov, A L; Zakharov, A V; Mukhamedzianov, R D; Petrov, A M

    2008-01-01

    Using electrophysiology and fluorescence microscopy (dye FM1-43), comparative study of neurotransmitter secretion, synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis, and recycling has been carried out in frog and mouse motor nerve terminals during a long strong stimulation (3 min; 20 imp/s). The obtained data have revealed three synaptic vesicle pools and two recycling ways existing on motor nerve terminals. The strong stimulation induced consecutive depletion of readily releasable, mobilized, and reserve vesicle pools of frog nerve terminals. The exocytosis rate exceeded the endocytosis rate; predominant was the slow synaptic vesicle recycling that replenished the reserve pool. In mouse nerve endings, vesicles of the readily releasable and mobilized pools were only exocytosed, the pools being replenished by fast recycling. At the same time, exo- and endocytosis occurred nearly in parallel and vesicles of the reserve pool did not participate in the neurotransmitter secretion. In is suggested that evolution of motor nerve terminals was directed to a decrease of the vesicle pool size, economic spending, and effective reuse of synaptic vesicles. This is achieved by an increase of endocytosis and recycling rates. These features can provide a long maintenance of a quite level of neurotransmitter secretion in nerve terminals of homoiothermal animals to preserve reliability of synaptic transmission during the high-frequency activity.

  5. Sequential Drug Release and Enhanced Photothermal and Photoacoustic Effect of Hybrid Reduced Graphene Oxide-Loaded Ultrasmall Gold Nanorod Vesicles for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jibin; Yang, Xiangyu; Jacobson, Orit; Lin, Lisen; Huang, Peng; Niu, Gang; Ma, Qingjie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    We report a hybrid reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-loaded ultrasmall plasmonic gold nanorod vesicle (rGO-AuNRVe) (~65 nm in size) with remarkably amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance and photothermal effects. The hybrid vesicle also exhibits a high loading capacity of doxorubicin (DOX), as both the cavity of the vesicle and the large surface area of the encapsulated rGO can be used for loading DOX, making it an excellent drug carrier. The loaded DOX is released sequentially: near-infrared photothermal heating induces DOX release from the vesicular cavity, and an intracellular acidic environment induces DOX release from the rGO surface. Positron emission tomography imaging showed high passive U87MG tumor accumulation of 64Cu-labeled rGO-AuNRVes (~9.7% ID/g at 24 h postinjection) and strong PA signal in the tumor region. Single intravenous injection of rGO-AuNRVe-DOX followed by low-power-density 808 nm laser irradiation (0.25 W/cm2) revealed effective inhibition of tumor growth due to the combination of chemo- and photothermal therapies. The rGO-AuNRVe-DOX capable of sequential DOX release by laser light and acid environment may have the potential for clinical translation to treat cancer patients with tumors accessible by light. PMID:26308265

  6. Extracellular vesicles released by CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells confer altered functional properties to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Dawn T; Apollonio, Benedetta; Willimott, Shaun; Lezina, Larissa; Alharthi, Afaf; Ambrose, Ashley R; De Rossi, Giulia; Ramsay, Alan G; Wagner, Simon D

    2016-07-28

    The complex interplay between cancer cells, stromal cells, and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulates tumorigenesis and provides emerging targets for immunotherapies. Crosstalk between CD4(+) T cells and proliferating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) tumor B cells occurs within lymphoid tissue pseudofollicles, and investigating these interactions is essential to understand both disease pathogenesis and the effects of immunotherapy. Tumor-derived extracellular vesicle (EV) shedding is emerging as an important mode of intercellular communication in the TME. In order to characterize tumor EVs released in response to T-cell-derived TME signals, we performed microRNA (miRNA [miR]) profiling of EVs released from CLL cells stimulated with CD40 and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Our results reveal an enrichment of specific cellular miRNAs including miR-363 within EVs derived from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells compared with parental cell miRNA content and control EVs from unstimulated CLL cells. We demonstrate that autologous patient CD4(+) T cells internalize CLL-EVs containing miR-363 that targets the immunomodulatory molecule CD69. We further reveal that autologous CD4(+) T cells that are exposed to EVs from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells exhibit enhanced migration, immunological synapse signaling, and interactions with tumor cells. Knockdown of miR-363 in CLL cells prior to CD40/IL-4 stimulation prevented the ability of CLL-EVs to induce increased synapse signaling and confer altered functional properties to CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, these data reveal a novel role for CLL-EVs in modifying T-cell function that highlights unanticipated complexity of intercellular communication that may have implications for bidirectional CD4(+) T-cell:tumor interactions within the TME. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. High-density lipoprotein 3 and apolipoprotein A-I alleviate platelet storage lesion and release of platelet extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pienimaeki-Roemer, Annika; Fischer, Astrid; Tafelmeier, Maria; Orsó, Evelyn; Konovalova, Tatiana; Böttcher, Alfred; Liebisch, Gerhard; Reidel, Armin; Schmitz, Gerd

    2014-09-01

    Stored platelet (PLT) concentrates (PLCs) for transfusion develop a PLT storage lesion (PSL), decreasing PLT viability and function with profound lipidomic changes and PLT extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release. High-density lipoprotein 3 (HDL3 ) improves PLT homeostasis through silencing effects on PLT activation in vivo. This prompted us to investigate HDL3 and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) as PSL-antagonizing agents. Healthy donor PLCs were split into low-volume standard PLC storage bags and incubated with native (n)HDL3 or apoA-I from plasma ethanol fractionation (precipitate IV) for 5 days under standard blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, Born aggregometry, and lipid mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV release, PLT aggregation, agonist-induced PLT surface marker expression, and PLT and plasma lipid compositions. Compared to control, added nHDL3 and apoA-I significantly reduced PL-EV release by up to -62% during 5 days, correlating with the added apoA-I concentration. At the lipid level, nHDL3 and apoA-I antagonized PLT lipid loss (+12%) and decreased cholesteryl ester (CE)/free cholesterol (FC) ratios (-69%), whereas in plasma polyunsaturated/saturated CE ratios increased (+3%) and CE 16:0/20:4 ratios decreased (-5%). Administration of nHDL3 increased PLT bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate/phosphatidylglycerol (+102%) and phosphatidic acid/lysophosphatidic acid (+255%) ratios and improved thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6-induced PLT aggregation (+5%). nHDL3 and apoA-I improve PLT membrane homeostasis and intracellular lipid processing and increase CE efflux, antagonizing PSL-related reduction in PLT viability and function and PL-EV release. We suggest uptake and catabolism of nHDL3 into the PLT open canalicular system. As supplement in PLCs, nHDL3 or apoA-I from Fraction IV of plasma ethanol fractionation have the potential to improve PLC quality to prolong storage. © 2014 AABB.

  8. Defensive slime formation in Pacific hagfish requires Ca2+- and aquaporin-mediated swelling of released mucin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Herr, Julia E; Clifford, Alexander M; Goss, Greg G; Fudge, Douglas S

    2014-07-01

    Hagfishes defend themselves from fish predators via the rapid deployment of a fibrous slime that adheres to and clogs gills. The slime transforms from a thick glandular exudate to a fully hydrated product in a fraction of a second through a process that involves the swelling and rupture of numerous mucin vesicles. Here we demonstrate that the vesicle membrane plays an important role in regulating the swelling of mucin granules, and provide evidence that the membrane contains proteins that facilitate the movement of ions and water molecules. By exposing isolated mucin vesicles to varying combinations of inorganic ions, organic compounds and membrane channel inhibitors, we found that the majority of hagfish mucin vesicles require Ca(2+) to rupture. We also show that Ca(2+)-dependent rupture can be pharmacologically inhibited, which suggests a role for Ca(2+)-activated membrane transporters. We demonstrate that the aquaporin inhibitor mercuric chloride reduces the rate of vesicle swelling by an order of magnitude, which suggests that aquaporins facilitate the influx of water during vesicle deployment. Molecular evidence of two aquaporin homologues expressed in the slime glands further supports this idea. We propose a model of hagfish slime mucin vesicle rupture that involves Ca(2+)-activated transporters and aquaporins, and suggest that the presence of these proteins is an adaptation for increasing the speed of vesicle rupture and, consequently, the speed of the sliming response of hagfishes. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Ceramidase Regulates Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Rushton, Emma; Palanker, Laura; Woodruff, Elvin; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Acharya, Usha; Acharya, Jairaj K.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    A screen for Drosophila synaptic dysfunction mutants identified slug-a-bed (slab). The slab gene encodes ceramidase, a central enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism and regulation. Sphingolipids are major constituents of lipid rafts, membrane domains with roles in vesicle trafficking, and signaling pathways. Null slab mutants arrest as fully developed embryos with severely reduced movement. The SLAB protein is widely expressed in different tissues but enriched in neurons at all stages of development. Targeted neuronal expression of slab rescues mutant lethality, demonstrating the essential neuronal function of the protein. C5-ceramide applied to living preparations is rapidly accumulated at neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses dependent on the SLAB expression level, indicating that synaptic sphingolipid trafficking and distribution is regulated by SLAB function. Evoked synaptic currents at slab mutant NMJs are reduced by 50–70%, whereas postsynaptic glutamate-gated currents are normal, demonstrating a specific presynaptic impairment. Hypertonic saline-evoked synaptic vesicle fusion is similarly impaired by 50–70%, demonstrating a loss of readily releasable vesicles. In addition, FM1-43 dye uptake is reduced in slab mutant presynaptic terminals, indicating a smaller cycling vesicle pool. Ultrastructural analyses of mutants reveal a normal vesicle distribution clustered and docked at active zones, but fewer vesicles in reserve regions, and a twofold to threefold increased incidence of vesicles linked together and tethered at the plasma membrane. These results indicate that SLAB ceramidase function controls presynaptic terminal sphingolipid composition to regulate vesicle fusion and trafficking, and thus the strength and reliability of synaptic transmission. PMID:15356190

  10. Roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated calcification. Effect of selective release of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase and treatment with isosmotic pH 6 buffer.

    PubMed

    Register, T C; McLean, F M; Low, M G; Wuthier, R E

    1986-07-15

    The roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated mineralization have been studied by selectively releasing the enzyme from a wide variety of matrix vesicle preparations using treatment with a bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and by demineralization of the vesicles using isosmotic pH 6 buffer. Following depletion of 50-90% of the alkaline phosphatase activity or treatment with citrate buffer, the vesicles were tested for their ability to accumulate 45Ca2+ and 32Pi from a synthetic cartilage lymph. Removal of alkaline phosphatase by phospholipase C treatment caused two principal effects, depending on the matrix vesicle preparation. In rapidly mineralizing vesicle fractions which did not require organic phosphate esters (Po) to accumulate mineral ions, release of alkaline phosphatase had only a minor effect. In slowly mineralizing vesicles preparations or those dependent on Po substrates for mineral ion uptake, release of alkaline phosphatase caused significant loss of mineralizing activity. The activity of rapidly calcifying vesicles was shown to be dependent on the presence of labile internal mineral, as demonstrated by major loss in activity when the vesicles were decalcified by various treatments. Ion uptake by demineralized vesicles or those fractionated on sucrose step gradients required Po and was significantly decreased by alkaline phosphatase depletion. Uptake of Pi, however, was not coupled with hydrolysis of the Po substrate. These findings argue against a direct role for alkaline phosphatase as a porter in matrix vesicle Pi uptake, contrary to previous postulates. The results emphasize the importance of internal labile mineral in rapid uptake of mineral ions by matrix vesicles.

  11. Effects of antiplatelet therapy on platelet extracellular vesicle release and procoagulant activity in health and in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Ly, Ken; Aslam, Anoosha; Boland, John; Low, Joyce; Jarvis, Susan; Muller, David W; Joseph, Joanne E

    2016-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is commonly used to prevent recurrent ischemic events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Whilst their effects on platelet reactivity are well documented, it is unclear, however, whether antiplatelet therapy inhibits platelet extracellular vesicle (EV) release. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of antiplatelet therapy on platelet EV formation and procoagulant activity. Blood samples from 10 healthy controls not receiving antiplatelet therapy were incubated in vitro with aspirin or a P2Y12 inhibitor (MeSAMP). Blood samples from 50 patients receiving long-term dual antiplatelet therapy and undergoing coronary angiography were also studied. Platelet reactivity was assessed by Multiplate™ impedance aggregometry. Platelet EV formation and procoagulant activity of pretreated and untreated blood samples in response to arachidonic acid (AA), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ADP+PGE1, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP) stimulation were assessed by flow cytometry and Procoag-PL assays, respectively. Incubation of normal platelets with aspirin significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet reactivity, EV formation, and procoagulant activity, whilst MeSAMP significantly inhibited platelet reactivity and EV formation in response to AA, ADP, and TRAP, but had minimal effect on procoagulant activity. Most patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy showed an appropriate reduction in platelet reactivity in response to their treatment; however there was not complete inhibition of increased platelet and EV procoagulant activity in response to ADP, AA, or TRAP. In addition, we could not find any correlation between platelet reactivity and procoagulant activity in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy.

  12. Selective release of miRNAs via extracellular vesicles is associated with house dust mite allergen-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Inoue, Toshio; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Yamagishi, Kenji; Kozu, Yutaka; Shikano, Sotaro; Soda, Kaori; Lotvall, Jan; Hashimoto, Shu

    2017-08-31

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may facilitate cell-to-cell communication via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The biological roles of miRNAs in EVs on allergic airway inflammation is unclear. Airway secreted EVs (AEVs) were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of control and house dust mite (HDM) allergen-exposed HDM-sensitized mice. The expression of miRNAs in AEVs or miRNAs and mRNAs in lung tissue was analyzed using miRNA microarray. The amount of AEV increased 8.9-fold in BALF from HDM-exposed mice compared with that from sham-control mice. HDM exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of 139 miRNAs in EVs and 175 miRNAs in lung tissues, with 54 miRNAs being common in both samples. Expression changes of these 54 miRNAs between miRNAs in AEVs and lung tissues after HDM exposure were inversely correlated. Computational analysis revealed that 31 genes, including IL-13 and IL-5Ra, are putative targets of the miRNAs upregulated in AEVs but downregulated in lung tissues after HDM exposure. The amount of AEV in BALF after HDM exposure was diminished by treatment with the sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869. The treatment with GW4869 also decreased Th2 cytokines and eosinophil counts in BALFs and reduced eosinophil accumulation in airway walls and mucosa. These results indicate that selective sorting of miRNA including Th2 inhibitory miRNAs into AEVs and increase release to the airway after HDM exposure would be involve in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  14. Readily integrated, electrically controlled microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. H.; Kwan, J.; Kaigala, G. V.; Hoang, V. N.; Backhouse, C. J.

    2008-04-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating and operating normally open, electrothermally actuated microvalves. These valves are fabricated by placing a gas-permeable elastomeric membrane between two etched glass plates. The reservoirs and channels on one layer are filled with a low melting point polymer (polyethylene glycol, PEG) that exhibits a large volumetric change (of up to 30%) upon phase transition (melting). This volume expansion is used to actuate the membrane and seal the microfluidic channels located in the second etched glass plate. The PEG in the reservoir is heated with integrated patterned platinum-resistive elements. The valve reliably seals the microfluidic channel against external fluid pressures of 10 psi. This valve can be readily integrated with one of the standard technologies for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) fabrication and is suitable for use with the polymerase chain reaction. The novelty of this microvalve lies in the ability to fill dead-end microchannels with a polymer, its self-sealing ability, the ability to remotely actuate the valve by transferring pressure via a microchannel and the compatibility of this microvalve with standard LOC technologies.

  15. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  16. Modeling the influence of short term depression in vesicle release and stochastic calcium channel gating on auditory nerve spontaneous firing statistics.

    PubMed

    Moezzi, Bahar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; McDonnell, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    We propose several modifications to an existing computational model of stochastic vesicle release in inner hair cell ribbon synapses, with the aim of producing simulated auditory nerve fiber spiking data that more closely matches empirical data. Specifically, we studied the inter-spike-interval (ISI) distribution, and long and short term ISI correlations in spontaneous spiking in post-synaptic auditory nerve fibers. We introduced short term plasticity to the pre-synaptic release probability, in a manner analogous to standard stochastic models of cortical short term synaptic depression. This modification resulted in a similar distribution of vesicle release intervals to that estimated from empirical data. We also introduced a biophysical stochastic model of calcium channel opening and closing, but showed that this model is insufficient for generating a match with empirically observed spike correlations. However, by combining a phenomenological model of channel noise and our short term depression model, we generated short and long term correlations in auditory nerve spontaneous activity that qualitatively match empirical data.

  17. Modeling the influence of short term depression in vesicle release and stochastic calcium channel gating on auditory nerve spontaneous firing statistics

    PubMed Central

    Moezzi, Bahar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    We propose several modifications to an existing computational model of stochastic vesicle release in inner hair cell ribbon synapses, with the aim of producing simulated auditory nerve fiber spiking data that more closely matches empirical data. Specifically, we studied the inter-spike-interval (ISI) distribution, and long and short term ISI correlations in spontaneous spiking in post-synaptic auditory nerve fibers. We introduced short term plasticity to the pre-synaptic release probability, in a manner analogous to standard stochastic models of cortical short term synaptic depression. This modification resulted in a similar distribution of vesicle release intervals to that estimated from empirical data. We also introduced a biophysical stochastic model of calcium channel opening and closing, but showed that this model is insufficient for generating a match with empirically observed spike correlations. However, by combining a phenomenological model of channel noise and our short term depression model, we generated short and long term correlations in auditory nerve spontaneous activity that qualitatively match empirical data. PMID:25566047

  18. Membrane Vesicles Released by a hypervesiculating Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 tolR Mutant Are Highly Heterogeneous and Show Reduced Capacity for Epithelial Cell Interaction and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Badia, Josefa; Mercade, Elena; Aguilera, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Membrane vesicles (MVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria are being explored for novel clinical applications due to their ability to deliver active molecules to distant host cells, where they can exert immunomodulatory properties. MVs released by the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) are good candidates for testing such applications. However, a drawback for such studies is the low level of MV isolation from in vitro culture supernatants, which may be overcome by the use of mutants in cell envelope proteins that yield a hypervesiculation phenotype. Here, we confirm that a tolR mutation in EcN increases MV production, as determined by protein, LPS and fluorescent lipid measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of negatively stained MVs did not reveal significant differences with wild type EcN MVs. Conversely, TEM observation after high-pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution of bacterial samples, together with cryo-TEM observation of plunge-frozen hydrated isolated MVs showed considerable structural heterogeneity in the EcN tolR samples. In addition to common one-bilayer vesicles (OMVs) and the recently described double-bilayer vesicles (O-IMVs), other types of MVs were observed. Time-course experiments of MV uptake in Caco-2 cells using rhodamine- and DiO-labelled MVs evidenced that EcN tolR MVs displayed reduced internalization levels compared to the wild-type MVs. The low number of intracellular MVs was due to a lower cell binding capacity of the tolR-derived MVs, rather than a different entry pathway or mechanism. These findings indicate that heterogeneity of MVs from tolR mutants may have a major impact on vesicle functionality, and point to the need for conducting a detailed structural analysis when MVs from hypervesiculating mutants are to be used for biotechnological applications. PMID:28036403

  19. A Missense Mutation of the Gene Encoding Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) Confers Seizure Susceptibility by Disrupting Amygdalar Synaptic GABA Release

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Kentaro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Shimizu, Saki; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Mashimo, Tomoji; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) is specifically expressed in the membranes of synaptic vesicles and modulates action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of SV2A in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders, we recently generated a novel rat model (Sv2aL174Q rat) carrying a missense mutation of the Sv2a gene and showed that the Sv2aL174Q rats were hypersensitive to kindling development (Tokudome et al., 2016). Here, we further conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the seizure vulnerability in Sv2aL174Q rats. Sv2aL174Q rats were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, yielding a significantly higher seizure scores and seizure incidence than the control animals. Brain mapping analysis of Fos expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that the seizure threshold level of PTZ region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the amygdala in Sv2aL174Q rats. In vivo microdialysis study showed that the Sv2aL174Q mutation preferentially reduced high K+ (depolarization)-evoked GABA release, but not glutamate release, in the amygdala. In addition, specific control of GABA release by SV2A was supported by its predominant expression in GABAergic neurons, which were co-stained with antibodies against SV2A and glutamate decarboxylase 1. The present results suggest that dysfunction of SV2A by the missense mutation elevates seizure susceptibility in rats by preferentially disrupting synaptic GABA release in the amygdala, illustrating the crucial role of amygdalar SV2A-GABAergic system in epileptogenesis. PMID:27471467

  20. Trans-Synaptic Transfer of Wnt Signals Through Release of Evi/Wntless Vesicles and Trafficking of Postsynaptic Frizzled-2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Ceren; Ataman, Bulent; Ramachandran, Preethi; Ashley, James; Barria, Romina; Gherbesi, Norberto; Budnik, Vivian

    2009-01-01

    Wnts play pivotal roles during development and in the mature nervous system. However, the mechanism by which Wnts traffic between cells has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism of Wnt transmission through release of exosome-like vesicles containing the Wnt-binding protein Evenness Interrupted/Wntless/Sprinter (Evi/Wls/Srt). We show that at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), presynaptic vesicular release of Evi is required for the secretion of the Wnt, Wingless (Wg). We also show that Evi acts cell-autonomously in the postsynaptic Wnt-receiving cell to target dGRIP, a Wg-receptor-interacting protein, to postsynaptic sites. Upon Evi loss of function, dGRIP is not properly targeted to synaptic sites, interfering with postsynaptic Wnt signal transduction. These findings uncover a previously unknown cellular mechanism by which a secreted Wnt is transported across synapses by Evi-containing vesicles, and reveal novel trafficking functions of Evi in both the Wnt-producing and the Wnt-receiving cell. PMID:19837038

  1. Mesolimbic alpha-, but not beta-adrenoceptors control the accumbal release of dopamine that is derived from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles.

    PubMed

    Verheij, M M M; Cools, A R

    2009-09-15

    Mesolimbic beta-, but not alpha-adrenoceptors control the accumbal release of dopamine that is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools of newly synthesized neurotransmitter. The aim of this study was to investigate which of these adrenoceptors control the accumbal release of dopamine that is derived from reserpine-sensitive pools of previously stored neurotransmitter. Rats, that were divided in low-responders and high-responders to novelty, were pretreated with 1 mg/kg of reserpine before the alpha-adrenergic-agent phentolamine or the beta-adrenergic-agent isoproterenol was locally applied into the nucleus accumbens. The original finding that phentolamine and isoproterenol increased accumbal dopamine levels in low-responders and high-responders was replicated. Reserpine reduced the phentolamine-induced increase of accumbal dopamine in both types of rat. However, phentolamine could still increase accumbal dopamine levels in reserpine-treated high-responders, but not anymore in reserpine-treated low-responders. Reserpine did not reduce the isoproterenol-induced increase of accumbal dopamine in any type of rat. This study demonstrates that mesolimbic alpha-, but not beta-adrenoceptors control the accumbal release of dopamine that is derived from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles. In addition, these data confirm our previous finding that dopamine can still be released from storage vesicles of reserpinized high-responders, but not of reserpinized low-responders. The collected data underline our notion that alpha- and beta-adrenergic drugs may have therapeutic effects in patients suffering from diseases in which accumbal dopamine is involved.

  2. Cephalosporinases associated with outer membrane vesicles released by Bacteroides spp. protect gut pathogens and commensals against β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Stentz, Régis; Horn, Nikki; Cross, Kathryn; Salt, Louise; Brearley, Charles; Livermore, David M.; Carding, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify β-lactamase genes in gut commensal Bacteroides species and to assess the impact of these enzymes, when carried by outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), in protecting enteric pathogens and commensals. Methods A deletion mutant of the putative class A β-lactamase gene (locus tag BT_4507) found in the genome of the human commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was constructed and a phenotypic analysis performed. A phylogenetic tree was built from an alignment of nine Bacteroides cephalosporinase protein sequences, using the maximum likelihood method. The rate of cefotaxime degradation after incubation with OMVs produced by different Bacteroides species was quantified using a disc susceptibility test. The resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium and Bifidobacterium breve to cefotaxime in liquid culture in the presence of B. thetaiotaomicron OMVs was evaluated by measuring bacterial growth. Results The B. thetaiotaomicron BT_4507 gene encodes a β-lactamase related to the CepA cephalosporinase of Bacteroides fragilis. OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron and several other Bacteroides species, except Bacteroides ovatus, carried surface-associated β-lactamases that could degrade cefotaxime. β-Lactamase-harbouring OMVs from B. thetaiotaomicron protected Salmonella Typhimurium and B. breve from an otherwise lethal dose of cefotaxime. Conclusions The production of membrane vesicles carrying surface-associated β-lactamases by Bacteroides species, which constitute a major part of the human colonic microbiota, may protect commensal bacteria and enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella Typhimurium, against β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:25433011

  3. Cephalosporinases associated with outer membrane vesicles released by Bacteroides spp. protect gut pathogens and commensals against β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Stentz, Régis; Horn, Nikki; Cross, Kathryn; Salt, Louise; Brearley, Charles; Livermore, David M; Carding, Simon R

    2015-03-01

    To identify β-lactamase genes in gut commensal Bacteroides species and to assess the impact of these enzymes, when carried by outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), in protecting enteric pathogens and commensals. A deletion mutant of the putative class A β-lactamase gene (locus tag BT_4507) found in the genome of the human commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was constructed and a phenotypic analysis performed. A phylogenetic tree was built from an alignment of nine Bacteroides cephalosporinase protein sequences, using the maximum likelihood method. The rate of cefotaxime degradation after incubation with OMVs produced by different Bacteroides species was quantified using a disc susceptibility test. The resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium and Bifidobacterium breve to cefotaxime in liquid culture in the presence of B. thetaiotaomicron OMVs was evaluated by measuring bacterial growth. The B. thetaiotaomicron BT_4507 gene encodes a β-lactamase related to the CepA cephalosporinase of Bacteroides fragilis. OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron and several other Bacteroides species, except Bacteroides ovatus, carried surface-associated β-lactamases that could degrade cefotaxime. β-Lactamase-harbouring OMVs from B. thetaiotaomicron protected Salmonella Typhimurium and B. breve from an otherwise lethal dose of cefotaxime. The production of membrane vesicles carrying surface-associated β-lactamases by Bacteroides species, which constitute a major part of the human colonic microbiota, may protect commensal bacteria and enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella Typhimurium, against β-lactam antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  4. Limited intermixing of synaptic vesicle components upon vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Felipe; Punge, Annedore; Bückers, Johanna; Hoopmann, Peer; Kastrup, Lars; Hell, Stefan W; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-06-01

    Synaptic vesicles recycle repeatedly in order to maintain synaptic transmission. We have previously proposed that upon exocytosis the vesicle components persist as clusters, which would be endocytosed as whole units. It has also been proposed that the vesicle components diffuse into the plasma membrane and are then randomly gathered into new vesicles. We found here that while strong stimulation (releasing the entire recycling pool) causes the diffusion of the vesicle marker synaptotagmin out of synaptic boutons, moderate stimulation (releasing approximately 19% of all vesicles) is followed by no measurable diffusion. In agreement with this observation, synaptotagmin molecules labeled with different fluorescently tagged antibodies did not appear to mix upon vesicle recycling, when investigated by subdiffraction resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Finally, as protein diffusion from vesicles has been mainly observed using molecules tagged with pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin), we have also investigated the membrane patterning of several native and pHluorin-tagged proteins. While the native proteins had a clustered distribution, the GFP-tagged ones were diffused in the plasma membrane. We conclude that synaptic vesicle components intermix little, at least under moderate stimulation, possibly because of the formation of clusters in the plasma membrane. We suggest that several pHluorin-tagged vesicle proteins are less well integrated in clusters.

  5. Inhibition of Calpains Protects Mn-Induced Neurotransmitter release disorders in Synaptosomes from Mice: Involvement of SNARE Complex and Synaptic Vesicle Fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Xu, Bin; Ma, Zhuo; Liu, Chang; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2017-06-16

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) could disrupt neurotransmitter release via influencing the formation of SNARE complex, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. A previous study demonstrated that SNAP-25 is one of substrate of calpains. The current study investigated whether calpains were involved in Mn-induced disorder of SNARE complex. After mice were treated with Mn for 24 days, Mn deposition increased significantly in basal nuclei in Mn-treated and calpeptin pre-treated groups. Behaviorally, less time spent in the center of the area and decreased average velocity significantly in an open field test after 24 days of Mn exposure. With the increase in MnCl2 dosage, intracellular Ca(2+) increased significantly, but pretreatment with calpeptin caused a dose-dependent decrease in calpains activity. There were fragments of N-terminal of SNAP-25 protein appearance in Mn-treated groups, but it is decreased with pretreatment of calpeptin. FM1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles also provided evidence that the treatment with Mn resulted in increasing first and then decreasing, which was consistent with Glu release and the 80 kDa protein levels of SNARE complexes. In summary, Mn induced the disorder of neurotransmitter release through influencing the formation of SNARE complex via cleaving SNAP-25 by overactivation of calpains in vivo.

  6. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  7. Bassoon-disruption slows vesicle replenishment and induces homeostatic plasticity at a CNS synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Schulz, Alejandro; Jing, Zhizi; María Sánchez Caro, Juan; Wetzel, Friederike; Dresbach, Thomas; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Endbulb of Held terminals of auditory nerve fibers (ANF) transmit auditory information at hundreds per second to bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Here, we studied the structure and function of endbulb synapses in mice that lack the presynaptic scaffold bassoon and exhibit reduced ANF input into the AVCN. Endbulb terminals and active zones were normal in number and vesicle complement. Postsynaptic densities, quantal size and vesicular release probability were increased while vesicle replenishment and the standing pool of readily releasable vesicles were reduced. These opposing effects canceled each other out for the first evoked EPSC, which showed unaltered amplitude. We propose that ANF activity deprivation drives homeostatic plasticity in the AVCN involving synaptic upscaling and increased intrinsic BC excitability. In vivo recordings from individual mutant BCs demonstrated a slightly improved response at sound onset compared to ANF, likely reflecting the combined effects of ANF convergence and homeostatic plasticity. Further, we conclude that bassoon promotes vesicular replenishment and, consequently, a large standing pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles at the endbulb synapse. PMID:24442636

  8. Bassoon-disruption slows vesicle replenishment and induces homeostatic plasticity at a CNS synapse.

    PubMed

    Mendoza Schulz, Alejandro; Jing, Zhizi; Sánchez Caro, Juan María; Wetzel, Friederike; Dresbach, Thomas; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2014-03-03

    Endbulb of Held terminals of auditory nerve fibers (ANF) transmit auditory information at hundreds per second to bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Here, we studied the structure and function of endbulb synapses in mice that lack the presynaptic scaffold bassoon and exhibit reduced ANF input into the AVCN. Endbulb terminals and active zones were normal in number and vesicle complement. Postsynaptic densities, quantal size and vesicular release probability were increased while vesicle replenishment and the standing pool of readily releasable vesicles were reduced. These opposing effects canceled each other out for the first evoked EPSC, which showed unaltered amplitude. We propose that ANF activity deprivation drives homeostatic plasticity in the AVCN involving synaptic upscaling and increased intrinsic BC excitability. In vivo recordings from individual mutant BCs demonstrated a slightly improved response at sound onset compared to ANF, likely reflecting the combined effects of ANF convergence and homeostatic plasticity. Further, we conclude that bassoon promotes vesicular replenishment and, consequently, a large standing pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles at the endbulb synapse.

  9. Release of HIV-1 sequestered in the vesicles of oral and genital mucosal epithelial cells by epithelial-lymphocyte interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yasen, Aizezi; Herrera, Rossana; Rosbe, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucosal epithelia of fetuses/neonates/infants and the genital epithelia of adults play a critical role in HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission of virus, respectively. To study the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through mucosal epithelium, we established polarized tonsil, cervical and foreskin epithelial cells. Analysis of HIV-1 transmission through epithelial cells showed that approximately 0.05% of initially inoculated virions transmigrated via epithelium. More than 90% of internalized virions were sequestered in the endosomes of epithelial cells, including multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and vacuoles. Intraepithelial HIV-1 remained infectious for 9 days without viral release. Release of sequestered intraepithelial HIV-1 was induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin and by cytochalasin D, which increase intracellular calcium and disrupt the cortical actin of epithelial cells, respectively. Cocultivation of epithelial cells containing HIV-1 with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes led to the disruption of epithelial cortical actin and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Treatment of epithelial cells with proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon gamma also induced reorganization of cortical actin and release of virus. Inhibition of MVB formation by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of its critical protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) expression reduced viral sequestration in epithelial cells and its transmission from epithelial cells to lymphocytes by ~60–70%. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuole formation of epithelial cells by siRNA-inactivated rabankyrin-5 expression also significantly reduced HIV-1 sequestration in epithelial cells and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Interaction of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of epithelial cells with the function-associated antigen-1

  10. Fusion competent synaptic vesicles persist upon active zone disruption and loss of vesicle docking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan Shan H.; Held, Richard G.; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S.

    2016-01-01

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  11. Small RNA deep sequencing discriminates subsets of extracellular vesicles released by melanoma cells – Evidence of unique microRNA cargos

    PubMed Central

    Lunavat, Taral R; Cheng, Lesley; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Bhadury, Joydeep; Jang, Su Chul; Lässer, Cecilia; Sharples, Robyn A; López, Marcela Dávila; Nilsson, Jonas; Gho, Yong Song; Hill, Andrew F; Lötvall, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma cells release different types of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the extracellular milieu that are involved with communication and signaling in the tumor microenvironment. Subsets of EVs include exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies that carry protein and genetic (RNA) cargos. To define the contribution of the RNA cargo of melanoma cell derived EVs we performed small RNA sequencing to identify different small RNAs in the EV subsets. Using validated centrifugation protocols, we separated these EV subsets released by the melanoma cell line MML-1, and performed RNA sequencing with the Ion Torrent platform. Various, but different, non-coding RNAs were detected in the EV subsets, including microRNA, mitochondrial associated tRNA, small nucleolar RNA, small nuclear RNA, Ro associated Y-RNA, vault RNA and Y-RNA. We identified in total 1041 miRNAs in cells and EV subsets. Hierarchical clustering showed enrichment of specific miRNAs in exosomes, including hsa-miR-214-3p, hsa-miR-199a-3p and hsa-miR-155-5p, all being associated with melanoma progression. Comparison of exosomal miRNAs with miRNAs in clinical melanoma samples indicate that multiple miRNAs in exosomes also are expressed specifically in melanoma tissues, but not in benign naevi. This study shows for the first time the presence of distinct small RNAs in subsets of EVs released by melanoma cells, with significant similarities to clinical melanoma tissue, and provides unique insights into the contribution of EV associated extracellular RNA in cancer. PMID:26176991

  12. Nigrostriatal overabundance of α-synuclein leads to decreased vesicle density and deficits in dopamine release that correlate with reduced motor activity.

    PubMed

    Gaugler, Meret Nora; Genc, Ozgur; Bobela, Wojciech; Mohanna, Safa; Ardah, Mustafa Taleb; El-Agnaf, Omar Mukhtar; Cantoni, Marco; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Schneggenburger, Ralf; Knott, Graham W; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard Laurent

    2012-05-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a presynaptic protein present at most nerve terminals, but its function remains largely unknown. The familial forms of Parkinson's disease associated with multiplications of the α-syn gene locus indicate that overabundance of this protein might have a detrimental effect on dopaminergic transmission. To investigate this hypothesis, we use adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to overexpress human α-syn in the rat substantia nigra. Moderate overexpression of either wild-type (WT) or A30P α-syn differs in the motor phenotypes induced, with only the WT form generating hemiparkinsonian impairments. Wild-type α-syn causes a reduction of dopamine release in the striatum that exceeds the loss of dopaminergic neurons, axonal fibers, and the reduction in total dopamine. At the ultrastructural level, the reduced dopamine release corresponds to a decreased density of dopaminergic vesicles and synaptic contacts in striatal terminals. Interestingly, the membrane-binding-deficient A30P mutant does neither notably reduce dopamine release nor it cause ultrastructural changes in dopaminergic axons, showing that α-syn's membrane-binding properties are critically involved in the presynaptic defects. To further determine if the affinity of the protein for membranes determines the extent of motor defects, we compare three forms of α-syn in conditions leading to pronounced degeneration. While membrane-binding α-syns (wild-type and A53T) induce severe motor impairments, an N-terminal deleted form with attenuated affinity for membranes is inefficient in inducing motor defects. Overall, these results demonstrate that α-syn overabundance is detrimental to dopamine neurotransmission at early stages of the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic axons.

  13. Multiple roles for the active zone protein RIM1alpha in late stages of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Calakos, Nicole; Schoch, Susanne; Südhof, Thomas C; Malenka, Robert C

    2004-06-24

    The active zone protein RIM1alpha interacts with multiple active zone and synaptic vesicle proteins and is implicated in short- and long-term synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear how RIM1alpha's biochemical interactions translate into physiological functions. To address this question, we analyzed synaptic transmission in autaptic neurons cultured from RIM1alpha-/- mice. Deletion of RIM1alpha causes a large reduction in the readily releasable pool of vesicles, alters short-term plasticity, and changes the properties of evoked asynchronous release. Lack of RIM1alpha, however, had no effect on synapse formation, spontaneous release, overall Ca2+ sensitivity of release, or synaptic vesicle recycling. These results suggest that RIM1alpha modulates sequential steps in synaptic vesicle exocytosis through serial protein-protein interactions and that this modulation is the basis for RIM1alpha's role in synaptic plasticity. Copyright 2004 Cell Press

  14. P01.07IMPACT OF EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES RELEASED BY GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS AFTER IRRADIATION ON TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ding, H.; Pinel, S.; Jouan-Hureaux, V.; Chateau, A.; Boura, C.; Faivre, B.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal of all human tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR), as a major therapeutic modality, induces multiple types of DNA lesions in cells, therefore causes cell death. However, IR could also affect neighboring unirradiated cells, inducing Bystander Effects as chromosomal aberrations, increased proliferation, etc. Intercellular communication through the release of different components is involved in the mechanism. GBM cells release different soluble factors as well as tumor microvesicles (TMVs) to modify the phenotype of neighboring cells, thus participating in the tumor progression. The present study was designed to investigate in vitro the impact of IR on the communication between tumor cells and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment via soluble factors and TMVs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two GBM cell lines (T98G, U87) were grown and sham-irradiated (0Gy) or irradiated (2 or 10Gy) using a Clinac iX linear accelerator. Cell culture media (CM) were collected. Filtrate (containing only soluble factors) and TMVs were separated with successive centrifugations and Pierce concentrator. Cell viability was assessed by cell counting using trypan blue. TMVs quantifications were performed by flow cytometry. The effect of CM/Filtrate/TMVs on the global behavior (proliferation, adhesion) of bystander tumor cells or HUVEC was investigated using the xCELLigence system (ACEA). RESULTS: As expected, irradiation caused a loss of cell number in U87 and T98G: 20% at 2Gy and 60% at 10Gy 48h post-IR as compared to untreated cells. Both CM and Filtrate collected from sham-irradiated tumor cells induced a 50% reduction of bystander tumor cells proliferation, while CM and Filtrate recovered from 10Gy-irradiated cells had different influence on the proliferation: herein, the inhibitory properties of CM were less marked than those of Filtrate. The discordant effects between CM and Filtrate led us to investigate the role of TMVs. When quantified using

  15. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Valeru, Soni Priya; Shanan, Salah; Alossimi, Haifa; Sandström, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment. PMID:24799908

  16. A single dose and long lasting vaccine against pandemic influenza through the controlled release of a heterospecies tandem M2 sequence embedded within detoxified bacterial outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Hannah C; Pagan, Catalina L; Childs, Hannah R; Posada, Sara; Chau, Annie; Rios, Jose; Guarino, Cassandra; DeLisa, Matthew P; Whittaker, Gary R; Putnam, David

    2017-08-30

    The influenza A virus undergoes genetic drift and shift, leaving the general population susceptible to emerging pandemic strains, despite seasonal flu vaccination. Here we describe a single dose influenza vaccine derived from recombinant outer membrane vesicles (rOMVs) that display an antigen-mapped heterospecies tandem sequence of the M2 protein from the influenza A virus, released over 30days from poly(lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles. Four weeks post vaccination, BALB/c mice developed high anti-M2e IgG titers that were equivalent to those generated at 8weeks in a typical prime/boost vaccine regimen. Challenge of mice with a lethal dose of mouse adapted influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) 10weeks post vaccination resulted in 100% survival for both rOMV single-dose microparticle and prime/boost vaccinated mice. Anti-M2e IgG1 and IgG2a antibody titers were weighted toward IgG1, but splenocytes isolated from rOMV single-dose microparticle vaccinated mice produced high levels of IFNγ relative to IL-4 in response to stimulation with M2e peptides, supporting a more Th1 biased immune response. The protective immune response was long lasting, eliciting sustained antibody titers and 100% survival of mice challenged with a lethal dose of PR8 six months post initial vaccination. Together, these data support the potential of controlled release rOMVs as an effective single dose, long lasting and rapidly effective vaccine to protect against influenza. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 is an autocrine regulator of extracellular matrix turnover and growth factor release via ERp60 activated matrix vesicle metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Wong, Kevin L; Fang, Mimi; Schwartz, Zvi

    2007-03-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes produce proteoglycan-rich type II collagen extracellular matrix (ECM). During cell maturation and hypertrophy, ECM is reorganized via a process regulated by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) and involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-3 and MMP-2. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) regulates MMP incorporation into matrix vesicles (MVs), where they are stored until released. Like plasma membranes (PM), MVs contain the 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-binding protein ERp60, phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), and caveolin-1, but appear to lack nuclear Vitamin D receptors (VDRs). Chondrocytes produce 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (10(-8)M), which binds ERp60, activating PLA(2), and resulting lysophospholipids lead to MV membrane disorganization, releasing active MMPs. MV MMP-3 activates TGF-beta1 stored in the ECM as large latent TGF-beta1 complexes, consisting of latent TGF-beta1 binding protein, latency associated peptide, and latent TGF-beta1. Others have shown that MMP-2 specifically activates TGF-beta2. TGF-beta1 regulates 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-production, providing a mechanism for local control of growth factor activation. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates PKCalpha in the PM via ERp60-signaling through PLA(2), lysophospholipid production, and PLCbeta. It also regulates distribution of phospholipids and PKC isoforms between MVs and PMs, enriching the MVs in PKCzeta. Direct activation of MMP-3 in MVs requires ERp60. However, when MVs are treated with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), PKCzeta activity is decreased and PKCalpha is unaffected, suggesting a more complex feedback mechanism, potentially involving MV lipid signaling.

  18. Hemoglobin encapsulation in vesicles retards NO and CO binding and O2 release when perfused through narrow gas-permeable tubes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromi; Okuda, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi; Yamaue, Tatsuya; Takeoka, Shinji; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2010-03-01

    Intravenous administration of cell-free Hb induces vasoconstriction and circulatory disorders, presumably because of the intrinsic affinities to endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) as vasorelaxation factors and because of the facilitated O(2) release that might induce autoregulatory vasoconstriction. We examined these gas reactions when Hb-containing solutions of four kinds were perfused through artificial narrow tubes at a practical Hb concentration (10 g/dl). Purified Hb solution, polymerized bovine Hb (Poly(B)Hb), encapsulated Hb [Hb-vesicles (HbV), 279 nm], and red blood cells (RBCs) were perfused through a gas-permeable narrow tube (25 microm inner diameter) at 1 mm/s centerline velocity. The level of reactions was determined microscopically based on the visible-light absorption spectrum of Hb. When the tube was immersed in NO and CO atmospheres, both NO binding and CO binding of deoxygenated Hb (deoxy-Hb) and Poly(B)Hb in the tube was faster than those of HbV and RBCs, and HbV and RBCs showed almost identical binding rates. When the tube was immersed in a N(2) atmosphere, oxygenated Hb and Poly(B)Hb showed much faster O(2) release than did HbV and RBCs. Poly(B)Hb showed a faster reaction than Hb because of the lower O(2) affinity of Poly(B)Hb than Hb. The diffusion process of the particles was simulated using Navier-Stokes and Maxwell-Stefan equations. Results clarified that small Hb (6 nm) diffuses laterally and mixes rapidly. However, the large-dimension HbV shows no such rapid diffusion. The purely physicochemical differences in diffusivity of the particles and the resulting reactivity with gas molecules are one factor inducing biological vasoconstriction of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  19. Cholesterol regulates multiple forms of vesicle endocytosis at a mammalian central synapse.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-07-01

    Endocytosis in synapses sustains neurotransmission by recycling vesicle membrane and maintaining the homeostasis of synaptic membrane. A role of membrane cholesterol in synaptic endocytosis remains controversial because of conflicting observations, technical limitations in previous studies, and potential interference from non-specific effects after cholesterol manipulation. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether cholesterol participates in distinct forms of endocytosis that function under different activity levels. In this study, applying the whole-cell membrane capacitance measurement to monitor endocytosis in real time at the rat calyx of Held terminals, we found that disrupting cholesterol with dialysis of cholesterol oxidase or methyl-β-cyclodextrin impaired three different forms of endocytosis, including slow endocytosis, rapid endocytosis, and endocytosis of the retrievable membrane that exists at the surface before stimulation. The effects were observed when disruption of cholesterol was mild enough not to change Ca(2+) channel current or vesicle exocytosis, indicative of stringent cholesterol requirement in synaptic endocytosis. Extracting cholesterol with high concentrations of methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced exocytosis, mainly by decreasing the readily releasable pool and the vesicle replenishment after readily releasable pool depletion. Our study suggests that cholesterol is an important, universal regulator in multiple forms of vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses.

  20. Pharmacology meets vesicular trafficking at a central nervous system synapse: pregabalin effects on synaptic vesicle cycling in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holz, Ronald W

    2006-08-01

    The contribution by Micheva et al. in this issue of Molecular Pharmacology adds to our understanding of the action of pregabalin, a drug used for treatment of partial seizures and neuropathic pain. The authors examine the effects of pregabalin on presynaptic function of cultured hippocampal neurons using a powerful technique to follow the trafficking of synaptic vesicles in individual boutons. The study revealed that pregabalin reduces the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles in an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent manner.

  1. Extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes from gastric infusion model of alcoholic liver disease contain a MicroRNA barcode that can be detected in blood.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul G; Wang, Jiaohong; Kim, Jihoon; Povero, Davide; Willliams, Brandon; Ho, Samuel B; Stärkel, Peter; Schnabl, Bernd; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released during cell stress, or demise, can contain a barcode of the cell origin, including specific microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we tested the hypothesis that during early alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) development, hepatocytes (HCs) release EVs with an miRNA signature that can be measured in circulation. A time-course experiment showed that after 2 weeks of intragastric infusion, a time point that results in isolated steatosis, there was no increase of blood EVs. After 4 weeks of infusion, mice developed features of early ASH accompanied by a marked increase in the level of EVs in blood (P < 0.05), as well as in culture media of isolated HCs (P < 0.001) and hepatic macrophages (P < 0.001), with HCs being the predominant source of EVs. The transcriptome analysis of HC-EVs from ASH mice detected differentially expressed miRNAs, including nine significantly up-regulated and four significantly down-regulated miRNAs. Target prediction and pathway analyses of the up-regulated miRNAs identified 121 potential target genes involved in inflammatory and cancer pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa B, EGF, Wnt, and B-cell lymphoma 2. Three miRNAs, let7f, miR-29a, and miR-340, were increased in blood EVs from ASH mice (P < 0.05), but not in blood EVs from three other models of chronic liver injury, including bile duct ligation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and obese mice, as well as EVs released from hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Blood EV level (P < 0.01) and three miRNAs (P < 0.05) were significantly increased in patients with ambulatory mild ALD as compared to nonalcoholics. Damaged hepatocytes from ASH mice are a key EV source with a specific miRNA cargo, which are specific for ASH-related liver injury. These findings uncover EVs as a potentially novel diagnostic for ASH. (Hepatology 2017;65:475-490). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  3. Isolation, Characterization and Potential Role in Beta Cell-Endothelium Cross-Talk of Extracellular Vesicles Released from Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    De Lena, Michela; Beltramo, Silvia; Romagnoli, Renato; Salizzoni, Mauro; Melzi, Raffaella; Nano, Rita; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Tetta, Ciro; Biancone, Luigi; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk between beta cells and endothelium plays a key role in islet physiopathology and in the revascularization process after islet transplantation. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this cross-talk are not fully elucidated. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted membrane nanoparticles involved in inter-cellular communication through the transfer of proteins and nucleic acids. The aims of this study were: 1) isolation and characterization of EVs from human islets; 2) evaluation of the pro-angiogenic effect of islet-derived EVs on human islet endothelial cells (IECs). EVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation from conditioned medium of human islets and characterized by nanotrack analysis (Nanosight), FACS, western blot, bioanalyzer, mRNA/microRNA RT-PCR array. On IECs, we evaluated EV-induced insulin mRNA transfer, proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, in vitro angiogenesis, migration, gene and protein profiling. EVs sized 236±54 nm, expressed different surface molecules and islet-specific proteins (insulin, C-peptide, GLP1R) and carried several mRNAs (VEGFa, eNOS) and microRNAs (miR-27b, miR-126, miR-130 and miR-296) involved in beta cell function, insulin secretion and angiogenesis. Purified EVs were internalized into IECs inducing insulin mRNA expression, protection from apoptosis and enhancement of angiogenesis. Human islets release biologically active EVs able to shuttle specific mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) into target endothelial cells. These results suggest a putative role for islet-derived EVs in beta cell-endothelium cross-talk and in the neoangiogenesis process which is critical for engraftment of transplanted islets. PMID:25028931

  4. Isolation, characterization and potential role in beta cell-endothelium cross-talk of extracellular vesicles released from human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Figliolini, Federico; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; De Lena, Michela; Beltramo, Silvia; Romagnoli, Renato; Salizzoni, Mauro; Melzi, Raffaella; Nano, Rita; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Tetta, Ciro; Biancone, Luigi; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk between beta cells and endothelium plays a key role in islet physiopathology and in the revascularization process after islet transplantation. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this cross-talk are not fully elucidated. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted membrane nanoparticles involved in inter-cellular communication through the transfer of proteins and nucleic acids. The aims of this study were: 1) isolation and characterization of EVs from human islets; 2) evaluation of the pro-angiogenic effect of islet-derived EVs on human islet endothelial cells (IECs). EVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation from conditioned medium of human islets and characterized by nanotrack analysis (Nanosight), FACS, western blot, bioanalyzer, mRNA/microRNA RT-PCR array. On IECs, we evaluated EV-induced insulin mRNA transfer, proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, in vitro angiogenesis, migration, gene and protein profiling. EVs sized 236±54 nm, expressed different surface molecules and islet-specific proteins (insulin, C-peptide, GLP1R) and carried several mRNAs (VEGFa, eNOS) and microRNAs (miR-27b, miR-126, miR-130 and miR-296) involved in beta cell function, insulin secretion and angiogenesis. Purified EVs were internalized into IECs inducing insulin mRNA expression, protection from apoptosis and enhancement of angiogenesis. Human islets release biologically active EVs able to shuttle specific mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) into target endothelial cells. These results suggest a putative role for islet-derived EVs in beta cell-endothelium cross-talk and in the neoangiogenesis process which is critical for engraftment of transplanted islets.

  5. Synthetic Polymers from Readily Available Monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbis, J. A.; García-Martín, M. G.

    The low degradability of petroleum-based polymers and the massive use of these materials constitute a serious problem because of the environmental pollution that they can cause. Thus, sustained efforts have been extensively devoted to produce new polymers based on natural renewing resources and with higher degradability. Of the different natural sources, carbohydrates stand out as highly convenient raw materials because they are inexpensive, readily available, and provide great stereochemical diversity. New polymers, analogous to the more accredited technical polymers, but based on chiral monomers, have been synthesized from natural and available sugars. This chapter describes the potential of sugar-based monomers as precursors to a wide variety of macromolecular materials.

  6. Light scattering characterization of extruded lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jin, A J; Huster, D; Gawrisch, K; Nossal, R

    1999-01-01

    By modeling extruded unilamellar lipid vesicles as thin-walled ellipsoidal shells, mathematical analysis provides simple equations which relate the mean elongation and other morphological characteristics of a vesicle population to quantities readily obtained from combined static and dynamic light scattering measurements. For SOPC vesicles extruded through a 100 nm pore-size filter into a 72.9 mM NaCl solution, the inferred elongation ratio (vesicle long axis to short axis) is approximately 3.7 +/- 0.6. When these vesicles were dialyzed into hypertonic or hypotonic solutions, this elongation ratio varied from 1 (for spherical liposomes) in strongly hypotonic solutions to greater than 6 in increasingly hypertonic solutions, beyond which abrupt morphological transformations appear. These results are quantitatively consistent with a mechanism of vesicle formation by extrusion and with the expectation that vesicle volumes change to equalize internal and external osmolarity via water flow, subject to the constraint of constant bilayer area. Our analysis also provides simplified equations to assess the effects of vesicle elongation and polydispersity on liposome parameters that are commonly required to characterize vesicle preparations for diverse applications. The implications of this study for routine light scattering characterization of extruded vesicles are discussed.

  7. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2017-07-03

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A NEW PATHOGENIC LEPTOSPIRA, NOT READILY CULTIVATED

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Aaron D.; Stoenner, Herbert G.; Wood, Garnett E.; Byrne, Robert J.

    1962-01-01

    Alexander, Aaron D. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Herbert G. Stoenner, Garnett E. Wood, and Robert J. Byrne. A new pathogenic Leptospira, not readily cultivated. J. Bacteriol. 83:754–760. 1962.—A pathogenic Leptospira was isolated from water of the Grand River, (S.D.) that differed significantly from other known leptospirae in that it could not be cultivated in conventional leptospiral media. Growth was promoted in Fletcher's medium modified to contain 20% rabbit serum. The isolate, after several serial passages, was lethal for hamsters. It could not be adapted to grow in the chick embryo. Guinea pigs and calves inoculated with the isolate developed febrile and antibody responses but showed no other overt signs of disease. The strain was identified on the basis of cross-agglutination and agglutinin-adsorption tests as a new subserotype of Leptospira naam and was therefore designated as L. naam, subserotype dakotii. PMID:13860321

  9. A new pathogenic Leptospira, not readily cultivated.

    PubMed

    ALEXANDER, A D; STOENNER, H G; WOOD, G E; BYRNE, R J

    1962-04-01

    Alexander, Aaron D. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Herbert G. Stoenner, Garnett E. Wood, and Robert J. Byrne. A new pathogenic Leptospira, not readily cultivated. J. Bacteriol. 83:754-760. 1962.-A pathogenic Leptospira was isolated from water of the Grand River, (S.D.) that differed significantly from other known leptospirae in that it could not be cultivated in conventional leptospiral media. Growth was promoted in Fletcher's medium modified to contain 20% rabbit serum. The isolate, after several serial passages, was lethal for hamsters. It could not be adapted to grow in the chick embryo. Guinea pigs and calves inoculated with the isolate developed febrile and antibody responses but showed no other overt signs of disease. The strain was identified on the basis of cross-agglutination and agglutinin-adsorption tests as a new subserotype of Leptospira naam and was therefore designated as L. naam, subserotype dakotii.

  10. RIM determines Ca2+ channel density and vesicle docking at the presynaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yunyun; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    At presynaptic active zones, neurotransmitter release is initiated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels close to docked vesicles. The mechanisms that enrich Ca2+ channels at active zones are, however, largely unknown, possibly because of the limited presynaptic accessibility of most synapses. Here, we have established a Cre-lox based conditional knock-out approach at a presynaptically accessible CNS synapse, the calyx of Held, to directly study the functions of RIM proteins. Removal of all RIM1/2 isoforms strongly reduced the presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, revealing a new role of RIM proteins in Ca2+ channel targeting. Removal of RIMs also reduced the readily-releasable pool, paralleled by a similar reduction of the number of docked vesicles, and the Ca2+ channel - vesicle coupling was decreased. Thus, RIM proteins co-ordinately regulate key functions for fast transmitter release: enabling a high presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, and vesicle docking at the active zone. PMID:21262468

  11. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation.This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and characterization, and FT-IR, TEM, DPD, FL and micro-DSC results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08596a

  12. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  13. Evaluation of a readily-fabricated infusion device.

    PubMed

    Wang, P Y; Smith, M S

    1987-01-01

    Drug delivery by controlled-release devices is used extensively in clinical practice and laboratory experiments. There are many external and implantable pumps available, but their cost is high and modification, when desired, to suit any special requirement is often difficult. We have tested a plastic infusion device fabricated from materials readily available in our research laboratory. The infusion device consists of a collapsible solution reservoir protected by a double jacket with vents to prevent the permeation of the volatile propellant contained in a rigid external casing. The flow moderator is a hollow glass-fibre, and flow rates as low as 100 microliter/h or less were maintained for an extended period without becoming occluded. In vivo tests on Wistar rats using a heparin solution demonstrate that controlled release of the anticoagulant was achieved, as indicated by the delay in the normal Lee-White clotting time. Since its size, service life and flow rate may be selected to suit the infusion requirement in an experiment, the device should be readily adaptable for the delivery of other drugs.

  14. A small pool of vesicles maintains synaptic activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Bethani, Ioanna; Kröhnert, Katharina; Körber, Christoph; Horstmann, Heinz; Wilhelm, Benjamin G.; Barysch, Sina V.; Kuner, Thomas; Neher, Erwin; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain substantial numbers of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles, ranging from approximately 100 to many thousands. The vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane to release neurotransmitter and are subsequently reformed and recycled. Stimulation of synapses in vitro generally causes the majority of the synaptic vesicles to release neurotransmitter, leading to the assumption that synapses contain numerous vesicles to sustain transmission during high activity. We tested this assumption by an approach we termed cellular ethology, monitoring vesicle function in behaving animals (10 animal models, nematodes to mammals). Using FM dye photooxidation, pHluorin imaging, and HRP uptake we found that only approximately 1–5% of the vesicles recycled over several hours, in both CNS synapses and neuromuscular junctions. These vesicles recycle repeatedly, intermixing slowly (over hours) with the reserve vesicles. The latter can eventually release when recycling is inhibited in vivo but do not seem to participate under normal activity. Vesicle recycling increased only to ≈5% in animals subjected to an extreme stress situation (frog predation on locusts). Synapsin, a molecule binding both vesicles and the cytoskeleton, may be a marker for the reserve vesicles: the proportion of vesicles recycling in vivo increased to 30% in synapsin-null Drosophila. We conclude that synapses do not require numerous reserve vesicles to sustain neurotransmitter release and thus may use them for other purposes, examined in the accompanying paper. PMID:21903928

  15. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  16. Synaptic vesicle pool size, release probability and synaptic depression are sensitive to Ca2+ buffering capacity in the developing rat calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Leão, R.M.; von Gersdorff, H.

    2010-01-01

    The calyx of Held, a specialized synaptic terminal in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, undergoes a series of changes during postnatal development that prepares this synapse for reliable high frequency firing. These changes reduce short-term synaptic depression during tetanic stimulation and thereby prevent action potential failures during a stimulus train. We measured presynaptic membrane capacitance changes in calyces from young postnatal day 5–7 (p5–7) or older (p10–12) rat pups to examine the effect of calcium buffer capacity on vesicle pool size and the efficiency of exocytosis. Vesicle pool size was sensitive to the choice and concentration of exogenous Ca2+ buffer, and this sensitivity was much stronger in younger animals. Pool size and exocytosis efficiency in p5–7 calyces were depressed by 0.2 mM EGTA to a greater extent than with 0.05 mM BAPTA, even though BAPTA is a 100-fold faster Ca2+ buffer. However, this was not the case for p10–12 calyces. With 5 mM EGTA, exocytosis efficiency was reduced to a much larger extent in young calyces compared to older calyces. Depression of exocytosis using pairs of 10-ms depolarizations was reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA compared to 0.05 mM BAPTA to a similar extent in both age groups. These results indicate a developmentally regulated heterogeneity in the sensitivity of different vesicle pools to Ca2+ buffer capacity. We propose that, during development, a population of vesicles that are tightly coupled to Ca2+ channels expands at the expense of vesicles more distant from Ca2+ channels. PMID:19219302

  17. Differential roles for snapin and synaptotagmin in the synaptic vesicle cycle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Szi-Chieh; Klosterman, Susan M; Martin, Ashley A; Gracheva, Elena O; Richmond, Janet E

    2013-01-01

    Evoked synaptic transmission is dependent on interactions between the calcium sensor Synaptotagmin I and the SNARE complex, comprised of Syntaxin, SNAP-25, and Synaptobrevin. Recent evidence suggests that Snapin may be an important intermediate in this process, through simultaneous interactions of Snapin dimers with SNAP-25 and Synaptotagmin. In support of this model, cultured neurons derived from embryonically lethal Snapin null mutant mice exhibit desynchronized release and a reduced readily releasable vesicle pool. Based on evidence that a dimerization-defective Snapin mutation specifically disrupts priming, Snapin is hypothesized to stabilize primed vesicles by structurally coupling Synaptotagmin and SNAP-25. To explore this model in vivo we examined synaptic transmission in viable, adult C. elegans Snapin (snpn-1) mutants. The kinetics of synaptic transmission were unaffected at snpn-1 mutant neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), but the number of docked, fusion competent vesicles was significantly reduced. However, analyses of snt-1 and snt-1;snpn-1 double mutants suggest that the docking role of SNPN-1 is independent of Synaptotagmin. Based on these results we propose that the primary role of Snapin in C. elegans is to promote vesicle priming, consistent with the stabilization of SNARE complex formation through established interactions with SNAP-25 upstream of the actions of Synaptotagmin in calcium-sensing and endocytosis.

  18. A Novel Sensitive Method to Measure Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Activity Unravels the Presence of This Activity in Extracellular Vesicles Released by Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Casal, Enriqueta; Palomo, Laura; Cabrera, Diana; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear need for drug treatments to be selected according to the characteristics of an individual patient, in order to improve efficacy and reduce the number and severity of adverse drug reactions. One of the main enzymes to take into account in pharmacogenomics is catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catechols and catecholamines, like the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Although, most of this enzyme is associated to intracellular vesicles, recently it has also been detected in extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes and in serum circulating vesicles. COMT has implications in many neurological and psychiatric disorders like Parkinson's disease, chronic fatigue, pain response, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders. Remarkably, genetic variations of COMT affect its activity and are associated to various human disorders from psychiatric diseases to estrogen-induced cancers. Consequently, the establishment of new methods to evaluate COMT activity is an important aspect to investigate the biology of this drug-metabolizing enzyme. Herein, we have developed a sensitive and selective method to determine COMT activity. We first optimized the activity in rat liver incubated with two different substrates; norepinephrine and dopamine. The enzymatically formed products (normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine, respectively) were extracted by solid-phase extraction using weak cation exchange cartridges, chromatographically separated, and detected and quantified using a mass spectrometer. The range of quantitation for both products was from 0.005 to 25 μg/mL. This methodology offers acceptable recovery for both enzymatic products (≥75%) and good accuracy and precision (≤15%). The lower limit of quantifications were 0.01 and 0.005 μM for 3-methoxytyramine and normetanephrine, respectively. Importantly, this sensitive assay was able to detect the presence of

  19. A Novel Sensitive Method to Measure Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Activity Unravels the Presence of This Activity in Extracellular Vesicles Released by Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Enriqueta; Palomo, Laura; Cabrera, Diana; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clear need for drug treatments to be selected according to the characteristics of an individual patient, in order to improve efficacy and reduce the number and severity of adverse drug reactions. One of the main enzymes to take into account in pharmacogenomics is catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT), which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catechols and catecholamines, like the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Although, most of this enzyme is associated to intracellular vesicles, recently it has also been detected in extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes and in serum circulating vesicles. COMT has implications in many neurological and psychiatric disorders like Parkinson's disease, chronic fatigue, pain response, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders. Remarkably, genetic variations of COMT affect its activity and are associated to various human disorders from psychiatric diseases to estrogen-induced cancers. Consequently, the establishment of new methods to evaluate COMT activity is an important aspect to investigate the biology of this drug-metabolizing enzyme. Herein, we have developed a sensitive and selective method to determine COMT activity. We first optimized the activity in rat liver incubated with two different substrates; norepinephrine and dopamine. The enzymatically formed products (normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine, respectively) were extracted by solid-phase extraction using weak cation exchange cartridges, chromatographically separated, and detected and quantified using a mass spectrometer. The range of quantitation for both products was from 0.005 to 25 μg/mL. This methodology offers acceptable recovery for both enzymatic products (≥75%) and good accuracy and precision (≤15%). The lower limit of quantifications were 0.01 and 0.005 μM for 3-methoxytyramine and normetanephrine, respectively. Importantly, this sensitive assay was able to detect the presence of

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Pomatto, Margherita A. C.; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:28638822

  1. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Pomatto, Margherita A C; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko; Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G.; Zorec, Robert

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  3. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  4. Optogenetic Acidification of Synaptic Vesicles and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Wozny, Christian; Bentz, Claudia; Blessing, Anja; Rosenmund, Tanja; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acidification is required for the function of many intracellular organelles, but methods to acutely manipulate their intraluminal pH have not been available. Here we present a targeting strategy to selectively express the light-driven proton pump Arch3 on synaptic vesicles. Our new tool, pHoenix, can functionally replace endogenous proton pumps, enabling optogenetic control of vesicular acidification and neurotransmitter accumulation. Under physiological conditions, glutamatergic vesicles are nearly full, as additional vesicle acidification with pHoenix only slightly increased the quantal size. By contrast, we found that incompletely filled vesicles exhibited a lower release probability than full vesicles, suggesting preferential exocytosis of vesicles with high transmitter content. Our subcellular targeting approach can be transferred to other organelles, as demonstrated for a pHoenix variant that allows light-activated acidification of lysosomes. PMID:26551543

  5. Poking Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas R.; Huber, Greg; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2000-03-01

    Lipid vesicles can exhibit a variety of interesting shapes when subject to point forcing, as has been demonstrated with laser-tweezed beads and with growing microtubules. Using numerical and analytic techniques, we study the force vs. extension in two regimes. At low forces, the resistance to deformation is primarily entropic, with a tension given by the fluctuating bending modes. At high forces, the thermal wrinkles are smoothed out, and there is bending and stretching which balance in a thin tether, which we treat using boundary-layer techniques. This work was supported in part by the Harvard MRSEC and Army Research Office Grant DAA655-97-1-014 (TRP) and NSF DMR9812526 (GH & REG).

  6. Developmental acquisition of a rapid calcium-regulated vesicle supply allows sustained high rates of exocytosis in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Levic, Snezana; Bouleau, Yohan; Dulon, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Auditory hair cells (HCs) have the remarkable property to indefinitely sustain high rates of synaptic vesicle release during ongoing sound stimulation. The mechanisms of vesicle supply that allow such indefatigable exocytosis at the ribbon active zone remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we characterized the kinetics of vesicle recruitment and release in developing chick auditory HCs. Experiments were done using the intact chick basilar papilla from E10 (embryonic day 10) to P2 (two days post-hatch) by monitoring changes in membrane capacitance and Ca(2+) currents during various voltage stimulations. Compared to immature pre-hearing HCs (E10-E12), mature post-hearing HCs (E18-P2) can steadily mobilize a larger readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles with faster kinetics and higher Ca(2+) efficiency. As assessed by varying the inter-pulse interval of a 100 ms paired-pulse depolarization protocol, the kinetics of RRP replenishment were found much faster in mature HCs. Unlike mature HCs, exocytosis in immature HCs showed large depression during repetitive stimulations. Remarkably, when the intracellular concentration of EGTA was raised from 0.5 to 2 mM, the paired-pulse depression level remained unchanged in immature HCs but was drastically increased in mature HCs, indicating that the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the vesicle replenishment process increases during maturation. Concomitantly, the immunoreactivity of the calcium sensor otoferlin and the number of ribbons at the HC plasma membrane largely increased, reaching a maximum level at E18-P2. Our results suggest that the efficient Ca(2+)-dependent vesicle release and supply in mature HCs essentially rely on the concomitant engagement of synaptic ribbons and otoferlin at the plasma membrane.

  7. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    PubMed Central

    Stoorvogel, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNA. Deficiencies in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for EV formation and lack of methods to interfere with the packaging of cargo or with vesicle release, however, still hamper identification of their physiological relevance in vivo. In this review, we focus on the characterization of EVs and on currently proposed mechanisms for their formation, targeting, and function. PMID:23420871

  8. Streptococcus mutans extracellular DNA is upregulated during growth in biofilms, actively released via membrane vesicles, and influenced by components of the protein secretion machinery.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I; Heim, Kyle P; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L Jeannine; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA.

  9. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-02-02

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury Impairs Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor Complex Formation and Alters Synaptic Vesicle Distribution in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Shaun W.; Yan, Hong; Ma, Michelle; Li, Youming; Henchir, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) impairs neuronal function and can culminate in lasting cognitive impairment. While impaired neurotransmitter release has been well established after experimental TBI, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying this consequence. In the synapse, vesicular docking and neurotransmitter release requires the formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Impairments in vesicle docking, and alterations in SNARE complex formation are associated with impaired neurotransmitter release. We hypothesized that TBI reduces SNARE complex formation and disrupts synaptic vesicle distribution in the hippocampus. To examine the effect of TBI on the SNARE complex, rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) or sham injury, and the brains were assessed at 6 h, 1 d, one week, two weeks, or four weeks post-injury. Immunoblotting of hippocampal homogenates revealed significantly reduced SNARE complex formation at one week and two weeks post-injury. To assess synaptic vesicles distribution, rats received CCI or sham injury and the brains were processed for transmission electron microscopy at one week post-injury. Synapses in the hippocampus were imaged at 100k magnification, and vesicle distribution was assessed in pre-synaptic terminals at the active zone. CCI resulted in a significant reduction in vesicle number within 150 nm of the active zone. These findings provide the first evidence of TBI-induced impairments in synaptic vesicle docking, and suggest that reductions in the pool of readily releasable vesicles and impaired SNARE complex formation are two novel mechanisms contributing to impaired neurotransmission after TBI. PMID:25923735

  11. Signaling for Vesicle Mobilization and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Edwin S.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that release of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is facilitated by increasing the mobility of small synaptic vesicles (SSVs) and dense core vesicles (DCVs) could not be tested until the advent of methods for visualizing these secretory vesicles in living nerve terminals. In fact, fluorescence imaging studies have only since 2005 established that activity increases secretory vesicle mobility in motoneuron terminals and chromaffin cells. Mobilization of DCVs and SSVs appears to be due to liberation of hindered vesicles to promote quicker diffusion. However, F-actin and synapsin, which have been featured in mobilization models, are not required for activity-dependent increases in the mobility of DCVs or SSVs. Most recently, the signaling required for sustained mobilization has been identified for Drosophila motoneuron DCVs and shown to increase synaptic transmission. Specifically, presynaptic endoplasmic reticulum ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated Ca2+ release activates Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CamKII) to mobilize DCVs and induce post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) of neuropeptide release in the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. The shared signaling for increasing vesicle mobility and PTP links vesicle mobilization and synaptic plasticity. PMID:18446451

  12. Impaired synaptic vesicle recycling contributes to presynaptic dysfunction in lipoprotein lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhang, B; Yang, H; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Huang, A; Liu, T; Tian, X; Tong, Y; Zhou, T; Zhang, T; Xing, G; Xiao, W; Guo, X; Fan, D; Han, X; Liu, G; Zhou, Z; Chui, D

    2014-11-07

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is expressed at high levels in hippocampal neurons, although its function is unclear. We previously reported that LPL-deficient mice have learning and memory impairment and fewer synaptic vesicles in hippocampal neurons, but properties of synaptic activity in LPL-deficient neurons remain unexplored. In this study, we found reduced frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and readily releasable pool (RRP) size in LPL-deficient neurons, which led to presynaptic dysfunction and plasticity impairment without altering postsynaptic activity. We demonstrated that synaptic vesicle recycling, which is known to play an important role in maintaining the RRP size in active synapses, is impaired in LPL-deficient neurons. Moreover, lipid assay revealed deficient docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in the hippocampus of LPL-deficient mice; exogenous DHA or AA supplement partially restored synaptic vesicle recycling capability. These results suggest that impaired synaptic vesicle recycling results from deficient DHA and AA and contributes to the presynaptic dysfunction and plasticity impairment in LPL-deficient neurons.

  13. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7 oncoprotein expression alters microRNA expression in extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles released by cancer cells are mediators of intercellular communication that have been reported to contribute to carcinogenesis. Since they are readily detected in bodily fluids, they may also be used as cancer biomarkers. The E6/E7 oncoproteins drive human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers, which account for approximately 5% of all human cancers worldwide. Here, we investigate how HPV16 E6/E7 oncogene expression in primary human epithelial cells alters miR expression in extracellular vesicles and compare these to changes in intracellular miR expression. Examining a panel of 68 cancer related miRs revealed that many miRs had similar expression patterns in cells and in extracellular vesicles, whereas some other miRs had different expression patterns and may be selectively packaged into extracellular vesicles. Interestingly, the set of miRs that may be selectively packaged in HPV16 E6/E7 extracellular vesicles is predicted to inhibit necrosis and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence that vesicles undergo compound fusion on the synaptic ribbon

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gary; Sterling, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The ribbon synapse can release a stream of transmitter quanta at very high rates. Although the ribbon tethers numerous vesicles near the presynaptic membrane, most of the tethered vesicles are held at a considerable distance from the plasma membrane. Therefore, it remains unclear how their contents are released. We evoked prolonged bouts of exocytosis from a retinal bipolar cell, fixed within seconds, and then studied the ribbons by electron microscopy. Vesicle density on ribbons was reduced by ~50% compared with cells where exocytosis was blocked with intracellular ATP-γS. Large, irregularly shaped vesicles appeared on the ribbon in cells fixed during repetitive stimulation of exocytosis, and in some cases the large vesicles could be traced in adjacent sections to cisternae open to the medium. The large cisternal structures were attached to the ribbon by filaments similar to those that tether synaptic vesicles to the ribbon, and they occupied the base of the ribbon near the plasma membrane, where normal synaptic vesicles are found in resting cells. We suggest that the cisternae attached to ribbons represent synaptic vesicles that fused by compound exocytosis during strong repetitive stimulation, and thus that vesicles tethered to the ribbon can empty their contents by fusing to other vesicles docked at the presynaptic membrane. Such compound fusion could explain the extremely high release rates and the multivesicular release reported for auditory and visual ribbon synapses. PMID:18495874

  15. Hemifusion in Synaptic Vesicle Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Yeon-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    In the neuron, early neurotransmitters are released through the fusion pore prior to the complete vesicle fusion. It has been thought that the fusion pore is a gap junction-like structure made of transmembrane domains (TMDs) of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. However, evidence has accumulated that lipid mixing occurs prior to the neurotransmitter release through the fusion pore lined predominantly with lipids. To explain these observations, the hemifusion, a membrane structure in which two bilayers are partially merged, has emerged as a key step preceding the formation of the fusion pore. Furthermore, the hemifusion appears to be the bona fide intermediate step not only for the synaptic vesicle cycle, but for a wide range of membrane remodeling processes, such as viral membrane fusion and endocytotic membrane fission. PMID:28360835

  16. Optical Manipulation of Vesicles for Optofluidic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; O'Neil, C. P.; Psaltis, D.; Hubbell, J. A.

    2013-09-12

    In this report, we review our recent results in the optical micromanipulation of vesicles. Traditionally, vesicle manipulation has been possible by employing photon momentum and optical trapping, giving rise to unique observations of vesicle shape changes and soft matter mechanics. Contrary to these attempts, we employ photon energy rather than momentum, by sensitizing vesicles with an oxidizing moiety. The later converts incident photons to reactive oxygen species, which in turn attack and compromise the stability of the vesicle membrane. Both coherent and incoherent radiation was employed. Polymersome re-organization into smaller diameter vesicles was possible by focusing the excitation beam in the vicinity of the polymersomes. Extended vesicle illumination with a collimated beam lead to their complete destabilization and micelle formation. Single particle analysis revealed that payload release takes place within seconds of illumination in an explosive burst. We will discuss the destabilization and payload release kinetics, as revealed by high resolution microscopy at the single particle level, as well as potential applications in single cell biomodulation.

  17. Brain metastatic cancer cells release microRNA-181c-containing extracellular vesicles capable of destructing blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Naoomi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ono, Makiko; Katsuda, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Tamura, Kenji; Lötvall, Jan; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastasis is an important cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. A key event during brain metastasis is the migration of cancer cells through blood–brain barrier (BBB). However, the molecular mechanism behind the passage through this natural barrier remains unclear. Here we show that cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), mediators of cell–cell communication via delivery of proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs), trigger the breakdown of BBB. Importantly, miR-181c promotes the destruction of BBB through the abnormal localization of actin via the downregulation of its target gene, PDPK1. PDPK1 degradation by miR-181c leads to the downregulation of phosphorylated cofilin and the resultant activated cofilin-induced modulation of actin dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that systemic injection of brain metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs promoted brain metastasis of breast cancer cell lines and are preferentially incorporated into the brain in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate a novel mechanism of brain metastasis mediated by EVs that triggers the destruction of BBB. PMID:25828099

  18. Brain metastatic cancer cells release microRNA-181c-containing extracellular vesicles capable of destructing blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Naoomi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ono, Makiko; Katsuda, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Tamura, Kenji; Lötvall, Jan; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis is an important cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. A key event during brain metastasis is the migration of cancer cells through blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the molecular mechanism behind the passage through this natural barrier remains unclear. Here we show that cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), mediators of cell-cell communication via delivery of proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs), trigger the breakdown of BBB. Importantly, miR-181c promotes the destruction of BBB through the abnormal localization of actin via the downregulation of its target gene, PDPK1. PDPK1 degradation by miR-181c leads to the downregulation of phosphorylated cofilin and the resultant activated cofilin-induced modulation of actin dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that systemic injection of brain metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs promoted brain metastasis of breast cancer cell lines and are preferentially incorporated into the brain in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate a novel mechanism of brain metastasis mediated by EVs that triggers the destruction of BBB.

  19. Characterization and Diagnostic Application of Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Excreted-Secreted Antigens Shed in Extracellular Vesicles Released from Infected Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Bautista-López, Norma L; Ndao, Momar; Camargo, Fabio Vasquez; Nara, Takeshi; Annoura, Takeshi; Hardie, Darryl B; Borchers, Christoph H; Jardim, Armando

    2017-03-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, although endemic in many parts of Central and South America, is emerging as a global health threat through the potential contamination of blood supplies. Consequently, in the absence of a gold standard assay for the diagnosis of Chagas disease, additional antigens or strategies are needed. A proteomic analysis of the trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigens (TESA) associated with exosomal vesicles shed by T. cruzi identified ∼80 parasite proteins, with the majority being trans-sialidases. Mass spectrometry analysis of immunoprecipitation products performed using Chagas immune sera showed a marked enrichment in a subset of TESA proteins. Of particular relevance for diagnostic applications were the retrotransposon hot spot (RHS) proteins, which are absent in Leishmania spp., parasites that often confound diagnosis of Chagas disease. Interestingly, serological screens using recombinant RHS showed a robust immunoreactivity with sera from patients with clinical stages of Chagas ranging from asymptomatic to advance cardiomyopathy and this immunoreactivity was comparable to that of crude TESA. More importantly, no cross-reactivity with RHS was detected with sera from patients with malaria, leishmaniasis, toxoplasmosis, or African sleeping sickness, making this protein an attractive reagent for diagnosis of Chagas disease.

  20. Transcriptome and long noncoding RNA sequencing of three extracellular vesicle subtypes released from the human colon cancer LIM1863 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maoshan; Xu, Rong; Ji, Hong; Greening, David W.; Rai, Alin; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Previously we reported that LIM1863 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells secrete three distinct extracellular vesicle subtypes – two subpopulations of exosomes (apical EpCAM-Exos and basolateral A33-Exos) and shed microvesicles (sMVs) – with distinct protein and miRNA signatures. Here, we extend our omics approach to understand the fundamental role of LIM1863-derived EVs by performing a comprehensive analysis of their mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) using RNA-Seq. We show that 2,389 mRNAs, 317 pseudogene transcripts, 1,028 lncRNAs and 206 short non-coding RNAs selectively distributed to (i.e., are enriched in) LIM1863 EVs, relative to the parent cell. An Ensembl/UniProtKB analysis revealed 1,937 mRNAs encode canonical proteins, 348 isoforms (including splice-variant proteins), and 119 ‘missing proteins’ (i.e., annotated in Ensembl but not UniProtKB). Further dissection of our protein/RNA data revealed that 6/151 observed RNA binding proteins have the potential to interact with ~75% of EV-enriched RNAs. Intriguingly, the co-existence of U1 and U2 ribonucleoproteins and their cognate snRNAs in LIM1863 EVs suggests a possible association of CRC EVs with recipient cell splicing events. Our data reveal several potential lncRNA CRC biomarkers and novel splicing/fusion genes that, collectively, will advance our understanding of EV biology in CRC and accelerate the development of EV-based diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27917920

  1. Reactive block copolymer vesicles with an epoxy wall.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Liu, Qingchun; Chen, Yongming

    2007-01-16

    Recently, block copolymer vesicles have attracted considerable attention because of their properties in encapsulation and release. To explore their applications in biorelated fields, functionalization of the polymer vesicle is necessary. Herein, a reactive unilamellar vesicle is reported by self-assembly of poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(glycidyl methacrylate) copolymer (PEO-b-PGMA) in solution. When water was added into the PEO-b-PGMA solution in THF, unilamellar vesicles were produced. If hydrophobic primary amine additives, such as hexamethylenediamine (HDA) and dodecylamine (DA), were introduced during block copolymer assembling, the vesicular morphology remained unchanged; instead, the amines reacted with the epoxys and the vesicles were fixed by cross-linking. Furthermore, when 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) was applied, the organic/inorganic hybrid vesicles were obtained, which were stable against the solvent change. Therefore, this research not only supplies a new way to fix the vesicular morphology but also a reactive vesicle scaffold for introducing functional species.

  2. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Go, Gyeongyun; Park, Seon-Min; Kim, Si Hyun; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Chang, Chulhun L; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-10-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles, also known as outer membrane vesicles, membrane vesicles, exosomes, and microvesicles, is an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon from bacteria to eukaryotes. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases extracellular vesicles harboring immunologically active molecules, and these extracellular vesicles have been suggested to be applicable in vaccine development and biomarker discovery. However, the comprehensive proteomic analysis has not been performed for M. tuberculosis extracellular vesicles. In this study, we identified a total of 287 vesicular proteins by four LC-MS/MS analyses with high confidence. In addition, we identified several vesicular proteins associated with the virulence of M. tuberculosis. This comprehensive proteome profile will help elucidate the pathogenic mechanism of M. tuberculosis. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001160 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001160). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Charge-reversal instability in mixed bilayer vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Nelson, Philip

    2000-08-01

    Bilayer vesicles form readily from mixtures of charged and neutral surfactants. When such a mixed vesicle binds an oppositely charged object, its membrane partially demixes: the adhesion zone recruits more charged surfactants from the rest of the membrane. Given an unlimited supply of adhering objects one might expect the vesicle to remain attractive until it was completely covered. Contrary to this expectation, we show that a vesicle can instead exhibit adhesion saturation, partitioning spontaneously into an attractive zone with definite area fraction, and a repulsive zone. The latter zone rejects additional incoming objects because counterions on the interior of the vesicle migrate there, effectively reversing the membrane's charge. The effect is strongest at high surface charge densities, low ionic strength, and with thin, impermeable membranes. Adhesion saturation in such a situation has recently been observed experimentally [H. Aranda-Espinoza et al., Science 285, 394 (1999)].

  5. Interactions Between SNAP-25 and Synaptotagmin-1 Are Involved in Vesicle Priming, Clamping Spontaneous and Stimulating Evoked Neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Melanie; Malsam, Jörg; Ruiter, Marvin; Scheutzow, Andrea; Wierda, Keimpe D B; Söllner, Thomas H; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2016-11-23

    Whether interactions between synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1) and the soluble NSF attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are required during neurotransmission is debated. We examined five SNAP-25 mutations designed to interfere with syt-1 interactions. One mutation, D51/E52/E55A, targeted negative charges within region II of the primary interface (Zhou et al., 2015); two mutations targeted region I (D166A and D166/E170A) and one mutation targeted both (D51/E52/E55/D166A). The final mutation (D186/D193A) targeted C-terminal residues not expected to interact with syt-1. An in vitro assay showed that the region I, region II, and region I+II (D51/E52/E55/D166A) mutants markedly reduced the attachment between syt-1 and t-SNARE-carrying vesicles in the absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. In the presence of PI(4,5)P2, vesicle attachment was unaffected by mutation. When expressed in Snap-25-null mouse autaptic neurons, region I mutations reduced the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles, whereas the region II mutation reduced vesicular release probability. Combining both in the D51/E52/E55/D166A mutation abrogated evoked release. These data point to a division of labor between region I (vesicle priming) and region II (evoked release). Spontaneous release was disinhibited by region I mutations and found to correlate with defective complexin (Cpx) clamping in an in vitro fusion assay, pointing to an interdependent role of synaptotagmin and Cpx in release clamping. Mutation in region II (D51/E52/E55A) also unclamped release, but this effect could be overcome by synaptotagmin overexpression, arguing against an obligatory role in clamping. We conclude that three synaptic release functions of syt-1, vesicle priming, spontaneous release clamping, and evoked release triggering, depend on direct SNARE complex interaction. The function of synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1):soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) interactions during neurotransmission remains

  6. Simultaneous lipid and content mixing assays for in vitro reconstitution studies of synaptic vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Seven, Alpay Burak; Xu, Junjie; Esser, Victoria; Su, Lijing; Ma, Cong; Rizo, Josep

    2017-09-01

    This protocol describes reconstitution assays to study how the neurotransmitter release machinery triggers Ca(2+)-dependent synaptic vesicle fusion. The assays monitor fusion between proteoliposomes containing the synaptic vesicle SNARE synaptobrevin (with or without the Ca(2+) sensor synaptotagmin-1) and proteoliposomes initially containing the plasma membrane SNAREs syntaxin-1 and soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP)-25. Lipid mixing (from fluorescence de-quenching of Marina-Blue-labeled lipids) and content mixing (from development of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between phycoerythrin-biotin (PhycoE-Biotin) and Cy5-streptavidin trapped in the two proteoliposome populations) are measured simultaneously to ensure that true, nonleaky membrane fusion is monitored. This protocol is based on a method developed to study yeast vacuolar fusion. In contrast to other protocols used to study the release machinery, this assay incorporates N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) and α-SNAP, which disassemble syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 heterodimers. As a result, fusion requires Munc18-1, which binds to the released syntaxin-1, and Munc13-1, which, together with Munc18-1, orchestrates SNARE complex assembly. The protocol can be readily adapted to investigation of other types of intracellular membrane fusion by using appropriate alternative proteins. Total time required for one round of the assay is 4 d.

  7. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  8. ATP-gated P2X receptors on excitatory nerve terminals onto interneurons initiate a form of asynchronous glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Khakh, Baljit S

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has shown that ATP-gated P2X2 receptors are expressed in excitatory nerve terminals onto stratum radiatum interneurons in the mouse hippocampal CA1 region. At these synapses receptor activation results in calcium-dependent facilitation of miniature and spontaneous EPSC frequency. In this study I determined if activation of presynaptic P2X receptors produces these effects by utilizing the vesicles underlying action potential dependent release. Brief trains of electrical stimuli caused short-term synaptic depression of excitatory synapses onto interneurons, in a manner consistent with depletion of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. P2X receptor activation increased the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, but unexpectedly evoked little effect on synaptic depression. This suggests that P2X receptor activation does not markedly draw on the vesicles underlying action potential dependent glutamate release. However asynchronous EPSCs were increased following synaptic depression and a component of these appeared to be initiated by endogenously released ATP acting on presynaptic P2X receptors. Unexpectedly, the data suggest P2X receptor activation initiates a form of asynchronous glutamate release, rather than detectably affecting the vesicles underlying action potential evoked release.

  9. Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.; Rizo, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals release neurotransmitters by synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Membrane fusion mediating synaptic exocytosis and other intracellular membrane traffic is affected by a universal machinery that includes SNARE (for “soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor”) and SM (for “Sec1/Munc18-like”) proteins. During fusion, vesicular and target SNARE proteins assemble into an α-helical trans-SNARE complex that forces the two membranes tightly together, and SM proteins likely wrap around assembling trans-SNARE complexes to catalyze membrane fusion. After fusion, SNARE complexes are dissociated by the ATPase NSF (for “N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor”). Fusion-competent conformations of SNARE proteins are maintained by chaperone complexes composed of CSPα, Hsc70, and SGT, and by nonenzymatically acting synuclein chaperones; dysfunction of these chaperones results in neurodegeneration. The synaptic membrane-fusion machinery is controlled by synaptotagmin, and additionally regulated by a presynaptic protein matrix (the “active zone”) that includes Munc13 and RIM proteins as central components. PMID:22026965

  10. Vesicle Pool Size at the Salamander Cone Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti, Theodore M.; Babai, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Cone light responses are transmitted to postsynaptic neurons by changes in the rate of synaptic vesicle release. Vesicle pool size at the cone synapse constrains the amount of release and can thus shape contrast detection. We measured the number of vesicles in the rapidly releasable and reserve pools at cone ribbon synapses by performing simultaneous whole cell recording from cones and horizontal or off bipolar cells in the salamander retinal slice preparation. We found that properties of spontaneously occurring miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) are representative of mEPSCs evoked by depolarizing presynaptic stimulation. Strong, brief depolarization of the cone stimulated release of the entire rapidly releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles. Comparing charge transfer of the EPSC with mEPSC charge transfer, we determined that the fast component of the EPSC reflects release of ∼40 vesicles. Comparing EPSCs with simultaneous presynaptic capacitance measurements, we found that horizontal cell EPSCs constitute 14% of the total number of vesicles released from a cone terminal. Using a fluorescent ribeye-binding peptide, we counted ∼13 ribbons per cone. Together, these results suggest each cone contacts a single horizontal cell at ∼2 ribbons. The size of discrete components in the EPSC amplitude histogram also suggested ∼2 ribbon contacts per cell pair. We therefore conclude there are ∼20 vesicles per ribbon in the RRP, similar to the number of vesicles contacting the plasma membrane at the ribbon base. EPSCs evoked by lengthy depolarization suggest a reserve pool of ∼90 vesicles per ribbon, similar to the number of additional docking sites further up the ribbon. PMID:19923246

  11. Identification and characterization of cell-bound membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qisheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Wendiao; Zhao, Siyuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-05-01

    In contrast to the released/circulating membrane vesicles (extracellular vesicles), cell-bound membrane vesicles are poorly identified and characterized. In this study, cell-bound membrane vesicles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human hepatoma HepG-2 cells were investigated. We identified that cell-bound membrane vesicles are not co-localized with the major markers for extracellular vesicles (e.g. phosphatidylserine, CD63, CD107α, CD31, and DNA fragments for the three well-known types of extracellular vesicles) and for intracellular organelles with similar sizes (e.g. MitoTracker and LAMP1/LAMP3 for mitochondria and multivesicular bodies or lysosomes, respectively). The data imply that cell-bound membrane vesicles are neither the precursors of extracellular vesicles nor a false structure pushed up by an intracellular organelle but probably a novel unknown structure in the plasma membrane. Moreover, we revealed that cell-bound membrane vesicles are resistant to various detergents including but probably not limited to Triton X-100, SDS, and saponin. We further characterized that these unique vesicles are soluble in organic solvents (e.g. chloroform-methanol mixture and ethanol) which can be prevented by a lipid-stabilizing fixative (e.g. OsO4) and that they are co-localized with, but do not monopolize, the major markers (e.g. caveolin-1 and GM1) for lipid rafts (a nano-sized detergent-resistant domains in the plasma membrane). The data imply that cell-bound membrane vesicles contain the lipid component and lipid rafts. Involvement of other specific unknown components might explain the detergent resistance of cell-bound membrane vesicles. Further research will mainly depend on the establishment of an effective approach for isolation/purification of these vesicles from the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. PMID:26985032

  13. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking.

    PubMed

    Cole, Andy A; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2016-03-16

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363222-09$15.00/0.

  14. Properties of synchronous and asynchronous release during pulse train depression in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hagler, D J; Goda, Y

    2001-06-01

    that highly favor asynchronous release by substituting extracellular Ca(2+) with Sr(2+). Initially, asynchronous release was twofold greater in Sr(2+). By the end of the train, the difference was approximately 50%; consequently, the total release per pulse during the plateau phase was slightly larger in Sr(2+) compared with Ca(2+). We thus conclude that while asynchronous release--like synchronous release--is limited by vesicle availability, it may be able to access a slightly larger subset of the readily releasable pool. Our results are consistent with the view that during repetitive stimulation, the elevation of asynchronous release depletes the vesicles immediately available for release, resulting in depression of synchronous release. This implies that both forms of release share a small pool of immediately releasable vesicles, which is being constantly depleted and refilled during repetitive stimulation.

  15. Challenges posed by extracellular vesicles from eukaryotic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) produced by eukaryotic microbes play an important role during infection. EV release is thought to benefit microbial invasion by delivering a high concentration of virulence factors to distal host cells or to the cytoplasm of a host cell. EV can significantly impact the outcome of host-pathogen interaction in a cargo-dependent manner. Release of EV from eukaryotic microbes poses unique challenges when compared to their bacterial or archaeal counterparts. Firstly, the membrane-bound organelles within eukaryotes facilitate multiple mechanisms of vesicle generation. Secondly, the fungal cell wall poses a unique barrier between the vesicle release site at the plasma membrane and its destined extracellular environment. This review focuses on these eukaryotic-specific aspects of vesicle synthesis and release. PMID:25460799

  16. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  17. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. UV-Responsive Supramolecular Vesicles with Double Hydrophobic Chains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Dai, Yu; Chen, Xin; Zhuo, Renxi

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the stability of polymeric vesicles, supramolecular vesicles are developed via self-assembly of the inclusion of γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) and 1-pyrenemethyl palmitate (Py-pal). The inclusion has one hydrophilic head and double hydrophobic tails, which looks like the phospholipid. From the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image, it can be observed that the average diameter of supramolecular vesicles is approximately 55 nm and there is a huge cavity in supramolecular vesicles. Due to the photo-breakable ester of Py-pal, supramolecular vesicles are broken under UV irradiation. Supramolecular vesicles are used as UV-responsive drug carriers to release the hydrophilic drug such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX•HCl). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Lysozyme binding onto cat-anionic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bonincontro, A; Spigone, E; Ruiz Peña, M; Letizia, C; La Mesa, C

    2006-12-15

    Mixing aqueous sodium dodecylsulfate with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions in mole ratios close to (1.7/1.0) allows the formation of cat-anionic vesicles with an excess of negative charges on the outer surface. The vesicular dispersions are mixed with lysozyme, and interact electrostatically with the positive charges on the protein, forming lipo-plexes. Dielectric relaxation, zeta-potential, and light scattering indicate the occurrence of interactions between vesicles and the protein. According to CD, the vesicle-adsorbed protein retains its native conformation. Binding and surface saturation, inferred by dielectric relaxation and zeta-potential, fulfil a charge neutralisation stoichiometry. Adsorbed lysozyme promotes the vesicle clustering and is concomitant with the lipo-plexes flocculation. Above the charge neutralisation threshold, lysozyme in excess remains dispersed in molecular form. Attempts were made to determine in what conditions protein release from the vesicles occurs. Accordingly, the full neutralisation of sodium dodecylsulfate in excess by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ensures the lipo-plexes break-up, the precipitation of the mixed surfactants and the protein release in native form.

  20. Two distinct secretory vesicle-priming steps in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Schirra, Claudia; Edelmann, Ludwig; Matti, Ulf; Rhee, JeongSeop; Hof, Detlef; Bruns, Dieter; Brose, Nils; Rieger, Heiko; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens

    2010-09-20

    Priming of large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) is a Ca(2+)-dependent step by which LDCVs enter a release-ready pool, involving the formation of the soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein (SNAP) receptor complex consisting of syntaxin, SNAP-25, and synaptobrevin. Using mice lacking both isoforms of the calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), we show that LDCV priming in adrenal chromaffin cells entails two distinct steps. CAPS is required for priming of the readily releasable LDCV pool and sustained secretion in the continued presence of high Ca(2+) concentrations. Either CAPS1 or CAPS2 can rescue secretion in cells lacking both CAPS isoforms. Furthermore, the deficit in the readily releasable LDCV pool resulting from CAPS deletion is reversed by a constitutively open form of syntaxin but not by Munc13-1, a priming protein that facilitates the conversion of syntaxin to the open conformation. Our data indicate that CAPS functions downstream of Munc13s but also interacts functionally with Munc13s in the LDCV-priming process.

  1. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synaptotagmin interaction with SNAP-25 governs vesicle docking, priming, and fusion triggering.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Ralf; de Wit, Heidi; Connell, Emma; Pinheiro, Paulo S; Leese, Charlotte; Bruns, Dieter; Davletov, Bazbek; Verhage, Matthijs; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2013-09-04

    SNARE complex assembly constitutes a key step in exocytosis that is rendered Ca(2+)-dependent by interactions with synaptotagmin-1. Two putative sites for synaptotagmin binding have recently been identified in SNAP-25 using biochemical methods: one located around the center and another at the C-terminal end of the SNARE bundle. However, it is still unclear whether and how synaptotagmin-1 × SNARE interactions at these sites are involved in regulating fast neurotransmitter release. Here, we have used electrophysiological techniques with high time-resolution to directly investigate the mechanistic ramifications of proposed SNAP-25 × synaptotagmin-1 interaction in mouse chromaffin cells. We demonstrate that the postulated central binding domain surrounding layer zero covers both SNARE motifs of SNAP-25 and is essential for vesicle docking, priming, and fast fusion-triggering. Mutation of this site caused no further functional alterations in synaptotagmin-1-deficient cells, indicating that the central acidic patch indeed constitutes a mechanistically relevant synaptotagmin-1 interaction site. Moreover, our data show that the C-terminal binding interface only plays a subsidiary role in triggering but is required for the full size of the readily releasable pool. Intriguingly, we also found that mutation of synaptotagmin-1 interaction sites led to more pronounced phenotypes in the context of the adult neuronal isoform SNAP-25B than in the embryonic isoform SNAP-25A. Further experiments demonstrated that stronger synaptotagmin-1 × SNAP-25B interactions allow for the larger primed vesicle pool supported by SNAP-25 isoform B. Thus, synaptotagmin-1 × SNARE interactions are not only required for multiple mechanistic steps en route to fusion but also underlie the developmental control of the releasable vesicle pool.

  3. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Zohreh; Preobraschenski, Julia; van den Bogaart, Geert; Riedel, Dietmar; Jahn, Reinhard; Woehler, Andrew

    2016-02-26

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided by an electrochemical proton gradient. However, it is unclear how transmitter molecules carrying different net charges can be efficiently sequestered while maintaining charge neutrality and osmotic balance. We used single-vesicle imaging to monitor pH and electrical gradients and directly showed different uptake mechanisms for glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) operating in parallel. In contrast to glutamate, GABA was exchanged for protons, with no other ions participating in the transport cycle. Thus, only a few components are needed to guarantee reliable vesicle filling with different neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol antioxidant capacity in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Appell, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Antioxidants have critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and disease-state prevention. The multi-functional agent α-lipoic acid offers numerous beneficial effects to oxidatively stressed tissues. α-Lipoic acid was enzymatically incorporated into a triglyceride in conjunction with oleic acid, creating lipoyl dioleoylglycerol, and chemically reduced to form dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol. The triglyceride forms of lipoic acid stabilized dioleoylphosphatidylcholine unilamellar liposomal vesicles, as judged by calcein-cobalt leakage. Stabilization resulted from increased packing density of phospholipid acyl chains. Scavenging activity against the 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) radical was monitored by oxidation of 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid (C(11)-Bodipy). Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in vesicles demonstrated strong antioxidant capacity in comparison to the conventional Trolox standard. Fluorescence quenching measurements indicated the lipoyl moiety of dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol is positioned near the vesicle aqueous/lipid boundary. Treatment of intact vesicles with a nonpenetrating sulfhydryl reagent indicated that 80% of the dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol was available for reaction. Molecular modeling of lipoyl dioleoylglycerol and dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in a phospholipid layer confirmed the existence of an extended configuration for the molecules that accounts for the interfacial location of the lipoyl moiety, which may allow the antioxidant to readily react with radical species approaching membranes from the aqueous phase. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Estimates for the pool size of releasable quanta at a single central synapse and for the time required to refill the pool.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C F; Tsujimoto, T

    1995-01-31

    Local superfusion of limited dendritic areas with hypertonic or hyperkalemic solutions stimulates the release of quanta from a small population of synapses made on rodent hippocampal neurons maintained in primary culture, and each quantal event can be detected in the postsynaptic neuron. With maintained stimulation, the initial release rate is about 20 quanta per sec per synapse, and this rate declines exponentially to a final low level. These observations can be interpreted as depletion of available quanta and, with this interpretation, a bouton would contain one to two dozen quanta in its readily releasable pool. Tests with a second application of the solution that produces release reveal that the pool of readily releasable quanta is replenished with a time constant of about 10 sec (36 degrees C). The pool of quanta defined in this way may correspond to the population of vesicles docked at the bouton's active zone.

  6. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  7. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  8. Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1997-04-18

    The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

  9. Efficient synthesis of readily water-soluble sulfonic Acid carbamates.

    PubMed

    Idzik, Krzysztof R; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2015-04-16

    A series of various readily water-soluble carbamates were synthesized with good yields. These compounds are useful chemical tracers for assessing the cooling progress in a georeservoir during geothermal power plant operation. Acylation of primary amines was carried out as well as using a solution of sodium bicarbonate and without the presence of salt. Products were characterized by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Purity was confirmed through elemental analysis.

  10. Magainin 2a - Induced Permeabilization of Phospholipid Vesicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-02

    unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of phosphatidylserine ( PS ). Addition of peptide to the SUVs causes an initial rapid release of dye, lasting about 100 sec...Measurements 39 VII. Results 40 A. Effect of MGN2a on the Permeability of PS Vesicles 40 B. Effect of Extravesicular Osmotic Pressure on 6CF Release from...Depiction of all-or-none versus graded release mechanisms 34 4. Standard quenching curve for 6CF entrapped within PS SUVs 38 5. MGN2a-induced release

  11. Vesicle extrusion in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joóos, B. Éla; Bertrand, Martin; Ouellet, S. Ébastien

    2010-03-01

    Monodisperse vesicles of nearly circular shape or liposomes are used as drug delivery systems. Their fabrication involves repeated passage of large vesicles through small pores. At each passage the vesicle ruptures and the fragments reform into smaller vesicles. We report on the last stages of the process where small liposomes are pushed by pressure differences into nano-sized pores, and we study the stress distribution along the lipid bilayer to determine the rupture lines. This is done by performing coarse grained Molecular Dynamics simulations. We have developed a technique to measure the stress in the membrane based on a tessellation of the surface which allows us to monitor the local area per lipid fluctuations. The results show subtle and complex flow phenomena. We can predict the final size distribution after many passages. Comparisons will be made with existing experimental data.

  12. Pulling on adhered vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ana-Suncana; Goennenwein, Stefanie; Lorz, Barbara; Seifert, Udo; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-03-01

    A theoretical model describing pulling of vesicles adhered in a contact potential has been developed. Two different regimes have been recognized. For weak to middle-strength adhesive potentials, locally stable shapes are found in a range of applied forces, separated from the free shape by an energy barrier. The phase diagram contains regions with either a unique bound shape or an additional meta-stable shape. Upon pulling, these shapes unbind discontinuously since the vesicle disengage from the surface while still possessing a finite adhesion area (Smith 2003a). In a strong adhesion regime, a competition between adhesion and tether formation is observed. A critical onset force is identified where a tether spontaneously appears as a part of a second order shape transition. Further growth of a tether is followed by a detachment process which terminates at a finite force when a vesicle continuously unbinds from the substrate (Smith 2003b). Both critical forces, as well as all shape parameters, are calculated as a function of the reduced volume and the strength of adhesive potential. Analogous experimental study has been performed where a vertical magnetic tweezers are used in combination with micro-interferometric and confocal techniques to reproduce the same symmetry as in the theoretical investigation. Giant vesicles are bound to the substrate by numerous specific bonds formed between ligands and receptors incorporated into the vesicle and the substrate, respectively. Application of a constant force is inducing a new thermodynamic equilibrium of the system where the vesicle is partially unbound from the substrate (Goennenwein 2003). The shapes of vesicles are compared prior and during application of the force. Very good agreement is obtained, particularly in the middle-strength adhesion regime (Smith 2003c). References: 1. A.-S. Smith, E. Sackmann, U. Seifert: Effects of a pulling force on the shape of a bound vesicle, Europhys. Lett., 64, 2 (2003). 2. A.-S. Smith

  13. Released fraction and total size of a pool of immediately available transmitter quanta at a calyx synapse.

    PubMed

    Schneggenburger, R; Meyer, A C; Neher, E

    1999-06-01

    The size of a pool of readily releasable vesicles at a giant brainstem synapse, the calyx of Held, was probed with three independent approaches. Using simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic whole-cell recordings, two forms of presynaptic Ca2+ stimuli were applied in rapid succession: uncaging of Ca2+ by flash photolysis and the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The ensuing transmitter release showed a nearly complete cross-inhibition between the two stimuli, indicating the depletion of a limited pool of about 700 transmitter quanta. The pool size was confirmed in experiments using enhanced extracellular Ca2+ concentrations, as well as short, high-frequency stimulus trains. The results reveal a surprisingly large pool of functionally available vesicles, of which a fraction of about 0.2 is released by a single presynaptic action potential under physiological conditions.

  14. Mechanics of post-fusion exocytotic vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Thomas; Wu, Zhanghan; Liu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Exocytosis is an important cellular process controlled by metabolic signaling. It involves vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane, followed by the opening of a fusion pore, and the subsequent release of the vesicular lumen content into the extracellular space. While most modeling efforts focus on the events leading to membrane fusion, how the vesicular membrane remodels after fusing to plasma membrane remains unclear. This latter event dictates the nature and the efficiency of exocytotic vesicular secretions, and is thus critical for exocytotic function. We provide a generic membrane mechanical model to systematically study the fate of post-fusion vesicles. We show that while membrane stiffness favors full-collapse vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, the intravesicular pressure swells the vesicle and causes the fusion pore to shrink. Dimensions of the vesicle and its associated fusion pore further modulate this mechanical antagonism. We systematically define the mechanical conditions that account for the full spectrum of the observed vesicular secretion modes. Our model therefore can serve as a unified theoretical framework that sheds light on the elaborate control mechanism of exocytosis.

  15. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  16. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-09

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells.

  17. Altered active zones, vesicle pools, nerve terminal conductivity, and morphology during experimental MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G; Babu, Gopal J; Wilson, Brenda A; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG.

  18. Altered Active Zones, Vesicle Pools, Nerve Terminal Conductivity, and Morphology during Experimental MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG. PMID:25438154

  19. Extracellular Vesicles Released from Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Prevent Life-Threatening Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in a Mouse Model of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Gu, Zhenyang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Yang, Nan; Wang, Feiyan; Deng, Ailing; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Wei, Huaping; Guan, Lixun; Gao, Zhe; Li, Yonghui; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Gao, Chunji

    2016-12-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are attractive agents for the prophylaxis of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). However, safety concerns remain about their clinical application. In this study, we explored whether extracellular vesicles released from human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC-MSC-EVs) could prevent aGVHD in a mouse model of allo-HSCT. hUC-MSC-EVs were intravenously administered to recipient mice on days 0 and 7 after allo-HSCT, and the prophylactic effects of hUC-MSC-EVs were assessed by observing the in vivo manifestations of aGVHD, histologic changes in target organs, and recipient mouse survival. We evaluated the effects of hUC-MSC-EVs on immune cells and inflammatory cytokines by flow cytometry and ProcartaPlex™ Multiplex Immunoassays, respectively. The in vitro effects of hUC-MSC-EVs were determined by mitogen-induced proliferation assays. hUC-MSC-EVs alleviated the in vivo manifestations of aGVHD and the associated histologic changes and significantly reduced the mortality of the recipient mice. Recipients treated with hUC-MSC-EVs had significantly lower frequencies and absolute numbers of CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells; reduced serum levels of IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ; a higher ratio of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells; and higher serum levels of IL-10. An in vitro experiment demonstrated that hUC-MSC-EVs inhibited the mitogen-induced proliferation of splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner, and the cytokine changes were similar to those observed in vivo. This study indicated that hUC-MSC-EVs can prevent life-threatening aGVHD by modulating immune responses. These data provide the first evidence that hUC-MSC-EVs represent an ideal alternative in the prophylaxis of aGVHD after allo-HSCT.

  20. Redox-Reactive Membrane Vesicles produced by Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gorby, Yuri A.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Korenevsky, Anton A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Beveridge, Terrance J.

    2008-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria produce and release membrane vesicles with diameters ranging from 50 to 250 nm. The vesicles, which arise from the outer membrane of these Gram-negative bacteria, lack DNA but contain proteins that catalyze the reduction of ferric iron and other multivalent heavy metals and radionuclides. This enzymatic process results in the formation of nano-size biogenic mineral assemblages that resemble nanofossils. Under low-shear conditions, membrane vesicles are commonly tethered to intact cells by electrically conductive filaments known as bacterial nanowires. The functional role of membrane vesicles and associated nanowires is not known, but the potential for mineralized vesicles that morphologically resemble nanofossils to serve as paleontological indicators of early life on earth and as biosignatures of like on other planets is recognized.

  1. TRPM7 facilitates cholinergic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Brauchi, Sebastian; Krapivinsky, Grigory; Krapivinsky, Luba; Clapham, David E

    2008-06-17

    TRPM7, of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family, is both an ion channel and a kinase. Previously, we showed that TRPM7 is located in the membranes of acetylcholine (ACh)-secreting synaptic vesicles of sympathetic neurons, forms a molecular complex with proteins of the vesicular fusion machinery, and is critical for stimulated neurotransmitter release. Here, we targeted pHluorin to small synaptic-like vesicles (SSLV) in PC12 cells and demonstrate that it can serve as a single-vesicle plasma membrane fusion reporter. In PC12 cells, as in sympathetic neurons, TRPM7 is located in ACh-secreting SSLVs. TRPM7 knockdown by siRNA, or abolishing channel activity by expression of a dominant negative TRPM7 pore mutant, decreased the frequency of spontaneous and voltage-stimulated SSLV fusion events without affecting large dense core vesicle secretion. We conclude that the conductance of TRPM7 across the vesicle membrane is important in SSLV fusion.

  2. Vesicle coats: structure, function, and general principles of assembly.

    PubMed

    Faini, Marco; Beck, Rainer; Wieland, Felix T; Briggs, John A G

    2013-06-01

    The transport of proteins and lipids between distinct cellular compartments is conducted by coated vesicles. These vesicles are formed by the self-assembly of coat proteins on a membrane, leading to collection of the vesicle cargo and membrane bending to form a bud. Scission at the bud neck releases the vesicle. X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy (EM) have recently generated models of isolated coat components and assembled coats. Here, we review these data to present a structural overview of the three main coats: clathrin, COPII, and COPI. The three coats have similar function, common ancestry, and structural similarities, but exhibit fundamental differences in structure and assembly. We describe the implications of structural similarities and differences for understanding the function, assembly principles, and evolution of vesicle coats.

  3. Membrane vesicles in sea water: heterogeneous DNA content and implications for viral abundance estimates.

    PubMed

    Biller, Steven J; McDaniel, Lauren D; Breitbart, Mya; Rogers, Everett; Paul, John H; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2017-02-01

    Diverse microbes release membrane-bound extracellular vesicles from their outer surfaces into the surrounding environment. Vesicles are found in numerous habitats including the oceans, where they likely have a variety of functional roles in microbial ecosystems. Extracellular vesicles are known to contain a range of biomolecules including DNA, but the frequency with which DNA is packaged in vesicles is unknown. Here, we examine the quantity and distribution of DNA associated with vesicles released from five different bacteria. The average quantity of double-stranded DNA and size distribution of DNA fragments released within vesicles varies among different taxa. Although some vesicles contain sufficient DNA to be visible following staining with the SYBR fluorescent DNA dyes typically used to enumerate viruses, this represents only a small proportion (<0.01-1%) of vesicles. Thus DNA is packaged heterogeneously within vesicle populations, and it appears that vesicles are likely to be a minor component of SYBR-visible particles in natural sea water compared with viruses. Consistent with this hypothesis, chloroform treatment of coastal and offshore seawater samples reveals that vesicles increase epifluorescence-based particle (viral) counts by less than an order of magnitude and their impact is variable in space and time.

  4. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Vesicle Deformation and Rupture in Confined Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Alison

    Vesicles are simple structures, but display complex, non-linear dynamics in fluid flow. I investigate the deformation of nanometer-sized vesicles, both fully-inflated and those with excess area, as they travel in tightly confined capillaries. By varying both channel size and flow strength, I simulate vesicles as they transition from steady-state to unstable shapes, and then rupture in strong flow fields. By employing a molecular dynamics model of the vesicle, fluid, and capillary system one is able to rupture the lipid bilayer of these vesicles. This is unique in that most other numerical methods for modelling vesicles are unable to show rupture. The rupture of fully-inflated vesicles is applicable to drug delivery in which the release of the encapsulated medicine needs to be controlled. The deformation and rupture of vesicles with excess area could be applicable to red blood cells which have similar rheological properties.

  5. Dynamic Partitioning of Synaptic Vesicle Pools by the SNARE-Binding Protein Tomosyn.

    PubMed

    Cazares, Victor A; Njus, Meredith M; Manly, Amanda; Saldate, Johnny J; Subramani, Arasakumar; Ben-Simon, Yoav; Sutton, Michael A; Ashery, Uri; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2016-11-02

    Neural networks engaged in high-frequency activity rely on sustained synaptic vesicle recycling and coordinated recruitment from functionally distinct synaptic vesicle (SV) pools. However, the molecular pathways matching neural activity to SV dynamics and release requirements remain unclear. Here we identify unique roles of SNARE-binding Tomosyn1 (Tomo1) proteins as activity-dependent substrates that regulate dynamics of SV pool partitioning at rat hippocampal synapses. Our analysis is based on monitoring changes in distinct functionally defined SV pools via V-Glut1-pHluorin fluorescence in cultured hippocampal neurons in response to alterations in presynaptic protein expression. Specifically, we find knockdown of Tomo1 facilitates release efficacy from the Readily Releasable Pool (RRP), and regulates SV distribution to the Total Recycling Pool (TRP), which is matched by a decrease in the SV Resting Pool. Notably, these effects were reversed by Tomo1 rescue and overexpression. Further, we identify that these actions of Tomo1 are regulated via activity-dependent phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). Assessment of molecular interactions that may contribute to these actions identified Tomo1 interaction with the GTP-bound state of Rab3A, an SV GTPase involved in SV targeting and presynaptic membrane tethering. In addition, Tomo1 via Rab3A-GTP was also observed to interact with Synapsin 1a/b cytoskeletal interacting proteins. Finally, our data indicate that Tomo1 regulation of SV pool sizes serves to adapt presynaptic neurotransmitter release to chronic silencing of network activity. Overall, the results establish Tomo1 proteins as central mediators in neural activity-dependent changes in SV distribution among SV pools.

  6. Direct Imaging of RAB27B-Enriched Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis in Lacrimal Acinar Cells Reveals Origins on a Nascent Vesicle Budding Site

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Karvar, Serhan; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the “nascent vesicle site,” from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules. PMID:22363735

  7. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J; Ivanov, Alexander R; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  8. Alternative Methods for Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J.; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell–cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face. PMID:22973237

  9. Hyperviscous diblock copolymer vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova, R.; Seifert, U.; Pouligny, B.; Förster, S.; Döbereiner, H.-G.

    2002-03-01

    Giant vesicles prepared from the diblock copolymer polybutadien-b-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) exhibit a shear surface viscosity, which is about 500 times higher than those found in common phospholipid bilayers. Our result constitutes the first direct measurement of the shear surface viscosity of such polymersomes. At the same time, we measure bending and stretching elastic constants, which fall in the range of values typical for lipid membranes. Pulling out a tether from an immobilized polymersome and following its relaxation back to the vesicle body provides an estimate of the viscous coupling between the two monolayers composing the polymer membrane. The detected intermonolayer friction is about an order of magnitude higher than the characteristic one for phospholipid membranes. Polymersomes are tough vesicles with a high lysis tension. This, together with their robust rheological properties, makes them interesting candidates for a number of technological applications.

  10. Young infants readily use proximity to organize visual pattern information.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul C; Bhatt, Ramesh S; Hayden, Angela

    2008-02-01

    Four experiments relying on novelty and spontaneous preference procedures were performed to determine whether 3-4-month-old infants utilize the Gestalt principle of proximity to organize visual pattern information. In Experiment 1, infants familiarized with arrays of elements that could be organized into either columns or rows were tested for their preference between vertical and horizontal bars. The infants preferred the novel organization of bars. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that the novelty preference could not be attributed to an a priori preference or an inability to discriminate between the elements comprising the patterns. Experiment 4 replicated the results of Experiment 1 in a bars --> elements version of the task, indicating that extended exposure is not necessary for infants to organize based on proximity. The results suggest that infants readily organize visual pattern information in accord with proximity. Implications of this finding for models of the ontogenesis and microgenesis of object perception in infants and adults are discussed.

  11. Rapid Cu-Free Click Chemistry with Readily Synthesized Biarylazacyclooctynones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical reactions, those that do not interact or interfere with biology, have allowed for exploration of numerous biological processes that were previously difficult to study. The reaction of azides with strained alkynes, such as cyclooctynes, readily forms a triazole product without the need for a toxic catalyst. Here we describe a biarylazacyclooctynone (BARAC) that has exceptional reaction kinetics and whose synthesis is designed to be both modular and scalable. We employed BARAC for live cell fluorescence imaging of azide-labeled glycans. The high signal-to-background ratio obtained using nanomolar concentrations of BARAC obviated the need for washing steps. Thus, BARAC is a promising reagent for in vivo imaging. PMID:20187640

  12. Lipid-targeting peptide probes for extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Aaron D.; Yin, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. PMID:26909741

  13. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles on Stainless Steel Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are well-established model systems for studying membrane structure and dynamics. Electroformation, also referred to as electroswelling, is one of the most prevalent methods for producing GUVs, as it enables modulation of the lipid hydration process to form relatively monodisperse, defect-free vesicles. Currently, however, it is expensive and time-consuming compared with other methods. In this study, we demonstrate that 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine GUVs can be prepared readily at a fraction of the cost on stainless steel electrodes, such as commercially available syringe needles, without any evidence of lipid oxidation or hydrolysis. PMID:28393132

  14. Vesicles in Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Danker, Gerrit; Vlahovska, Petia M; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-04-10

    Blood microcirculation critically depends on the migration of red cells towards the flow centerline. We identify theoretically the ratio of the inner over the outer fluid viscosities lambda as a key parameter. At low lambda, the vesicle deforms into a tank-treading ellipsoid shape far away from the flow centerline. The migration is always towards the flow centerline, unlike drops. Above a critical lambda, the vesicle tumbles or breaths and migration is suppressed. A surprising coexistence of two types of shapes at the centerline, a bulletlike and a parachutelike shape, is predicted.

  15. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shin-ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems. PMID:26861303

  16. Role of extracellular vesicles in de novo mineralization: an additional novel mechanism of cardiovascular calcification.

    PubMed

    New, Sophie E P; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane micro/nanovesicles secreted by many cell types into the circulation and the extracellular milieu in physiological and pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles, known as matrix vesicles, play a role in the mineralization of skeletal tissue, but emerging ultrastructural and in vitro studies have demonstrated their contribution to cardiovascular calcification as well. Cells involved in the progression of cardiovascular calcification release active vesicles capable of nucleating hydroxyapatite on their membranes. This review discusses the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular calcification and elaborates on this additional mechanism of calcification as an alternative pathway to the currently accepted mechanism of biomineralization via osteogenic differentiation.

  17. The Role of Extracellular Vesicles in De Novo Mineralization: An Additional Novel Mechanism of Cardiovascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    New, Sophie E. P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane micro/nanovesicles secreted by many cell types into the circulation and the extracellular milieu in physiological and pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles, known as matrix vesicles, play a role in the mineralization of skeletal tissue, but emerging ultrastructural and in vitro studies have demonstrated their contribution to cardiovascular calcification as well. Cells involved in the progression of cardiovascular calcification release active vesicles capable of nucleating hydroxyapatite on their membranes. This review discusses the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular calcification, and elaborates on this additional mechanism of calcification as an alternative pathway to the currently accepted mechanism of biomineralization via osteogenic differentiation. PMID:23766262

  18. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion Sites in Central Synapses.

    PubMed

    Maschi, Dario; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2017-04-05

    The number and availability of vesicle release sites at the synaptic active zone (AZ) are critical factors governing neurotransmitter release; yet, these fundamental synaptic parameters have remained undetermined. Moreover, how neural activity regulates the spatiotemporal properties of the release sites within individual central synapses is unknown. Here, we combined a nanoscale imaging approach with advanced image analysis to detect individual vesicle fusion events with ∼27 nm localization precision at single hippocampal synapses under physiological conditions. Our results revealed the presence of multiple distinct release sites within individual hippocampal synapses. Release sites were distributed throughout the AZ and underwent repeated reuse. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal properties of the release sites were activity dependent with a reduction in reuse frequency and a shift in location toward the AZ periphery during high-frequency stimulation. These findings have revealed fundamental spatiotemporal properties of individual release sites in small central synapses and their activity-dependent modulation.

  19. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate.

    PubMed

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Verhage, Matthijs; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels

    2015-04-14

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane ('activation energy') is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca(2+)-dependent release.

  20. Complexity of vesicle microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoui, B.; Tahiri, N.; Biben, T.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Biros, G.; Misbah, C.

    2011-10-01

    This study focuses numerically on dynamics in two dimensions of vesicles in microcirculation. The method used is based on boundary integral formulation. This study is inspired by the behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvasculature. Red RBCs carry oxygen from the lungs and deliver it through the microvasculature. The shape adopted by RBCs can affect blood flow and influence oxygen delivery. Our simulation using vesicles (a simple model for RBC) reveals unexpected complexity as compared to the case where a purely unbounded Poiseuille flow is considered [Kaoui, Biros, and Misbah, Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.188101 103, 188101 (2009)]. In sufficiently large channels (in the range of 100μm; the vesicle size and its reduced volume are taken in the range of those of a human RBC), such as arterioles, a slipperlike (asymmetric) shape prevails. A parachutelike (symmetric) shape is adopted in smaller channels (in the range of 20μm, as in venules), but this shape loses stability and again changes to a pronounced slipperlike morphology in channels having a size typical of capillaries (5-10 μm). Stiff membranes, mimicking malaria infection, for example, adopt a centered or off-centered snakelike locomotion instead (the denomination snaking is used for this regime). A general scenario of how and why vesicles adopt their morphologies and dynamics among several distinct possibilities is provided. This finding potentially points to nontrivial RBCs dynamics in the microvasculature.

  1. Binding Isotherms and Time Courses Readily from Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Van Doren, Steven R

    2016-08-16

    Evidence is presented that binding isotherms, simple or biphasic, can be extracted directly from noninterpreted, complex 2D NMR spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) to reveal the largest trend(s) across the series. This approach renders peak picking unnecessary for tracking population changes. In 1:1 binding, the first principal component captures the binding isotherm from NMR-detected titrations in fast, slow, and even intermediate and mixed exchange regimes, as illustrated for phospholigand associations with proteins. Although the sigmoidal shifts and line broadening of intermediate exchange distorts binding isotherms constructed conventionally, applying PCA directly to these spectra along with Pareto scaling overcomes the distortion. Applying PCA to time-domain NMR data also yields binding isotherms from titrations in fast or slow exchange. The algorithm readily extracts from magnetic resonance imaging movie time courses such as breathing and heart rate in chest imaging. Similarly, two-step binding processes detected by NMR are easily captured by principal components 1 and 2. PCA obviates the customary focus on specific peaks or regions of images. Applying it directly to a series of complex data will easily delineate binding isotherms, equilibrium shifts, and time courses of reactions or fluctuations.

  2. Rapeseed napin and cruciferin are readily digested by poultry.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, M M; Houdijk, J G M; Liddell, S; Davis, K; Olukosi, O A; Kightley, S; White, G A; Wiseman, J

    2017-08-01

    Rapeseed proteins have been considered as being poorly digestible in the gut of non-ruminants. The aim of the study was to assess the digestibility of napin and cruciferin in ileal digesta of broiler chickens, testing sixteen samples of rapeseed co-products with protein levels ranging from 293 g/kg to 560 g/kg dry matter. Each sample was included into a semi-synthetic diet at a rate of 500 g/kg and evaluated with broiler chickens in a randomised design. Dietary and ileal digesta proteins were extracted and identified by gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Three isomers of napin (a 2S albumin) and nine cruciferins (an 11S globulin) were identified in the rapeseed co-products, whereas six endogenous enzymes such as trypsin (I-P1, II-P29), chymotrypsin (elastase and precursor), carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase were found in the ileal digesta. It is concluded that as none of the rapeseed proteins were detected in the ileal digesta, rapeseed proteins can be readily digested by broiler chickens, irrespective of the protein content in the diet. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. The entrapment of kojic oleate in bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Manosroi, A; Wongtrakul, P; Manosroi, J; Midorikawa, U; Hanyu, Y; Yuasa, M; Sugawara, F; Sakai, H; Abe, M

    2005-07-14

    The entrapment of kojic acid and its newly synthesized ester (kojic oleate) has been evaluated. Kojic oleate was synthesized by DCC (N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, DCC)/(4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridine, DMAP) esterification method and identified by FAB-MS and 1H NMR. The synthesized product was mainly 7-O-kojic oleate with more than 80% yield. It was entrapped in vesicular membrane prepared from 9.5:9.5:1.0 molar ratio of amphiphiles (Span 60, Tween 61 or DPPC), cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate. Kojic acid was encapsulated in the water compartment of these vesicles in order to confirm the vesicle formation. The morphology and particle size of the vesicles were characterized by an optical microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The entrapment efficiencies of kojic acid and kojic oleate in the vesicles were investigated by dialysis and column chromatography, respectively. The contents of the entrapped kojic acid and kojic oleate were assayed by HPLC. The entrapment efficiency of kojic acid was 0.01-0.04 mol, whereas kojic oleate gave higher entrapment efficiency of 0.25-0.35 mol/mol of the total compositions of amphiphile/cholesterol/dicetyl phosphate. Structural modification of kojic acid improved its entrapment in the vesicles. Tween 61 vesicles could entrap kojic oleate more than did Span 60 vesicles. The pi-A isotherms revealed the lower area per molecule of Span 60, which formed a more rigid pack of its molecule on air/water interface than that of Tween 61. This implied the high rigidity of vesicular membrane prepared with Span 60 led to the lower amount of kojic oleate entrapped in the vesicles. From the release study of kojic acid through the dialysis membrane, it indicated that the intercalation of kojic oleate in the vesicular membranes did not significantly affect the release of kojic acid from the vesicles.

  4. Transient release kinetics of rod bipolar cells revealed by capacitance measurement of exocytosis from axon terminals in rat retinal slices

    PubMed Central

    Oltedal, Leif; Hartveit, Espen

    2010-01-01

    Presynaptic transmitter release has mostly been studied through measurements of postsynaptic responses, but a few synapses offer direct access to the presynaptic terminal, thereby allowing capacitance measurements of exocytosis. For mammalian rod bipolar cells, synaptic transmission has been investigated in great detail by recording postsynaptic currents in AII amacrine cells. Presynaptic measurements of the dynamics of vesicular cycling have so far been limited to isolated rod bipolar cells in dissociated preparations. Here, we first used computer simulations of compartmental models of morphologically reconstructed rod bipolar cells to adapt the ‘Sine + DC’ technique for capacitance measurements of exocytosis at axon terminals of intact rod bipolar cells in retinal slices. In subsequent physiological recordings, voltage pulses that triggered presynaptic Ca2+ influx evoked capacitance increases that were proportional to the pulse duration. With pulse durations ≤100 ms, the increase saturated at ∼10 fF, corresponding to the size of a readily releasable pool of vesicles. Pulse durations ≥400 ms evoked additional capacitance increases, probably reflecting recruitment from additional pools of vesicles. By using Ca2+ tail current stimuli, we separated Ca2+ influx from Ca2+ channel activation kinetics, allowing us to estimate the intrinsic release kinetics of the readily releasable pool, yielding a time constant of ∼1.1 ms and a maximum release rate of 2–3 vesicles (release site)−1 ms−1. Following exocytosis, we observed endocytosis with time constants ranging from 0.7 to 17 s. Under physiological conditions, it is likely that release will be transient, with the kinetics limited by the activation kinetics of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. PMID:20211976

  5. Genetic spatial autocorrelation can readily detect sex-biased dispersal.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sam C; Peakall, Rod

    2012-05-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is expected to generate differences in the fine-scale genetic structure of males and females. Therefore, spatial analyses of multilocus genotypes may offer a powerful approach for detecting sex-biased dispersal in natural populations. However, the effects of sex-biased dispersal on fine-scale genetic structure have not been explored. We used simulations and multilocus spatial autocorrelation analysis to investigate how sex-biased dispersal influences fine-scale genetic structure. We evaluated three statistical tests for detecting sex-biased dispersal: bootstrap confidence intervals about autocorrelation r values and recently developed heterogeneity tests at the distance class and whole correlogram levels. Even modest sex bias in dispersal resulted in significantly different fine-scale spatial autocorrelation patterns between the sexes. This was particularly evident when dispersal was strongly restricted in the less-dispersing sex (mean distance <200 m), when differences between the sexes were readily detected over short distances. All tests had high power to detect sex-biased dispersal with large sample sizes (n ≥ 250). However, there was variation in type I error rates among the tests, for which we offer specific recommendations. We found congruence between simulation predictions and empirical data from the agile antechinus, a species that exhibits male-biased dispersal, confirming the power of individual-based genetic analysis to provide insights into asymmetries in male and female dispersal. Our key recommendations for using multilocus spatial autocorrelation analyses to test for sex-biased dispersal are: (i) maximize sample size, not locus number; (ii) concentrate sampling within the scale of positive structure; (iii) evaluate several distance class sizes; (iv) use appropriate methods when combining data from multiple populations; (v) compare the appropriate groups of individuals. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Vesicle dynamics during the atmospheric entry heating of cosmic spherules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genge, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic spherules are unique igneous objects that form by melting due to gas drag heating during atmospheric entry heating. Vesicles are an important component of many cosmic spherules since they suggest their precursors had finite volatile contents. Vesicle abundances in spherules decrease through the series porphyritic, glassy, barred, to cryptocrystalline spherules. Anomalous hollow spherules, with large off-center vesicles occur in both porphyritic and glassy spheres. Numerical simulation of the dynamic behavior of vesicles during atmospheric flight is presented that indicates vesicles rapidly migrate due to deceleration and separate from nonporphyritic particles. Modest rotation rates of tens of radians s-1 are, however, sufficient to impede loss of vesicles and may explain the presence of small solitary vesicles in barred, cryptocrystalline and glassy spherules. Rapid rotation at spin rates of several thousand radians s-1 are required to concentrate vesicles at the rotational axis and leads to rapid growth by coalescence and either separation or retention depending on the orientation of the rotational axis. Complex rapid rotations that concentrate vesicles in the core of particles are proposed as a mechanism for the formation of hollow spherules. High vesicle contents in porphyritic spherules suggest volatile-rich precursors; however, calculation of volatile retention indicates these have lost >99.9% of volatiles to degassing prior to melting. The formation of hollow spherules, by rapid spin, necessarily implies preatmospheric rotations of several thousand radians s-1. These particles are suggested to represent immature dust, recently released from parent bodies, in which rotations have not been slowed by magnetic damping.

  7. Microfluidic filtration system to isolate extracellular vesicles from blood.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ryan T; Kim, Junho; Jang, Su Chul; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2012-12-21

    Extracellular vesicles are released by various cell types, particularly tumor cells, and may be potential targets for blood-based cancer diagnosis. However, studies performed on blood-borne vesicles to date have been limited by lack of effective, standardized purification strategies. Using in situ prepared nanoporous membranes, we present a simple strategy employing a microfluidic filtration system to isolate vesicles from whole blood samples. This method can be applied to purify nano-sized particles from blood allowing isolation of intact extracellular vesicles, avoiding the need for laborious and potentially damaging centrifugation steps or overly specific antibody-based affinity purification. Porous polymer monoliths were integrated as membranes into poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by benchtop UV photopolymerization through a mask, allowing precise positioning of membrane elements while preserving simplicity of device preparation. Pore size could be manipulated by changing the ratio of porogenic solvent to prepolymer solution, and was tuned to a size proper for extraction of vesicles. Using the membrane as a size exclusion filter, we separated vesicles from cells and large debris by injecting whole blood under pressure through the microfluidic device. To enhance isolation purity, DC electrophoresis was employed as an alternative driving force to propel particles across the filter and increase the separation efficiency of vesicles from proteins. From the whole blood of melanoma-grown mice, we isolated extracellular vesicles and performed RT-PCR to verify their contents of RNA. Melan A mRNA derived from melanoma tumor cells were found enriched in filtered samples, confirming the recovery of vesicles via their cargo. This filtration system can be incorporated into other on-chip processes enabling integrated sample preparation for the downstream analysis of blood-based extracellular vesicles.

  8. Regulation of synaptic vesicles pools within motor nerve terminals during short-term facilitation and neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, S; Johnstone, A F M; Viele, K; Cooper, R L

    2006-02-01

    The reserve pool (RP) and readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles within presynaptic nerve terminals were physiologically differentiated into distinctly separate functional groups. This was accomplished in glutamatergic nerve terminals by blocking the glutamate transporter with dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; 10 microM) during electrical stimulation with either 40 Hz of 10 pulses within a train or 20- or 50-Hz continuous stimulation. The 50-Hz continuous stimulation decreased the excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude 60 min faster than for the 20-Hz continuous stimulation in the presence of TBOA (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the train stimulation and 20-Hz continuous stimulation in the run-down time in the presence of TBOA. After TBOA-induced synaptic depression, the excitatory postsynaptic potentials were rapidly (<1 min) revitalized by exposure to serotonin (5-HT, 1 microM) in every preparation tested (P < 0.05). At this glutamatergic nerve terminal, 5-HT promotes an increase probability of vesicular docking and fusion. Quantal recordings made directly at nerve terminals revealed smaller quantal sizes with TBOA exposure with a marked increase in quantal size as well as a continual appearance of smaller quanta upon 5-HT treatment after TBOA-induced depression. Thus 5-HT was able to recruit vesicles from the RP that were not rapidly depleted by acute TBOA treatment and electrical stimulation. The results support the notion that the RRP is selectively activated during rapid electrical stimulation sparing the RP; however, the RP can be recruited by the neuromodulator 5-HT. This suggests at least two separate kinetic and distinct regulatory paths for vesicle recycling within the presynaptic nerve terminal.

  9. Increased asynchronous release and aberrant calcium channel activation in amyloid precursor protein deficient neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wang, B; Long, C; Wu, G; Zheng, H

    2007-11-23

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca(2+) channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca(2+) channel function.

  10. Rotavirus interaction with isolated membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Alonso-Torre, S R; Charpilienne, A; Vasseur, M; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J; Alvarado, F

    1994-06-01

    To gain information about the mechanism of epithelial cell infection by rotavirus, we studied the interaction of bovine rotavirus, RF strain, with isolated membrane vesicles from apical membrane of pig enterocytes. Vesicles were charged with high (quenching) concentrations of either carboxyfluorescein or calcein, and the rate of fluorophore release (dequenching) was monitored as a function of time after mixing with purified virus particles. Purified single-shelled particles and untrypsinized double-shelled ones had no effect. Trypsinized double-shelled virions induced carboxyfluorescein release according to sigmoid curves whose lag period and amplitude were a function of virus concentration and depended on both temperature and pH. The presence of 100 mM salts (Tris Cl, NaCl, or KCl) was required, since there was no reaction in isoosmotic salt-free sorbitol media. Other membrane vesicle preparations such as apical membranes of piglet enterocyte and rat placenta syncytiotrophoblasts, basolateral membranes of pig enterocytes, and the undifferentiated plasma membrane of cultured MA104 cells all gave qualitatively similar responses. Inhibition by a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that the active species causing carboxyfluorescein release is VP5*. Ca2+ (1 mM), but not Mg2+, inhibited the reaction. In situ solubilization of the outer capsid of trypsinized double-shelled particles changed release kinetics from sigmoidal to hyperbolic and was not inhibited by Ca2+. Our results indicate that membrane destabilization caused by trypsinized outer capsid proteins of rotavirus leads to fluorophore release. From the data presented here, a hypothetical model of the interaction of the various states of the viral particles with the membrane lipid phase is proposed. Membrane permeabilization induced by rotavirus may be related to the mechanism of entry of the virus into the host cell.

  11. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Fedotenko, Illya A; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  12. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  13. Macrocyclic peptides self-assemble into robust vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-jin; Lim, Yong-beom

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we developed macrocyclic peptide building blocks that formed self-assembled peptide vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities. Macrocyclic peptides were significantly different from conventional amphiphiles, in that they could self-assemble into vesicles at very high hydrophilic-to-total mass ratios. The flexibility of the hydrophobic self-assembly segment was critical for vesicle formation. The unique features of this peptide vesicle system include a homogeneous size distribution, unusually small size, and robust structural and thermal stability. The peptide vesicles successfully entrapped a hydrophilic model drug, released the payload very slowly, and were internalized by cells in a highly efficient manner. Moreover, the peptide vesicles exhibited molecular recognition capabilities, in that they selectively bound to target RNA through surface-displayed peptides. This study demonstrates that self-assembled peptide vesicles can be used as strong intracellular delivery vehicles that recognize specific biomacromolecular targets.

  14. Gas vesicles isolated from Halobacterium cells by lysis in hypotonic solution are structurally weakened.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Pri-El, Nuphar; Shapiro, Orr; Siboni, Nachshon

    2005-11-15

    Analysis of pressure-collapse curves of Halobacterium cells containing gas vesicles and of gas vesicles released from such cells by hypotonic lysis shows that the isolated gas vesicles are considerably weaker than those present within the cells: their mean critical collapse pressure was around 0.049-0.058 MPa, as compared to 0.082-0.095 MPa for intact cells. The hypotonic lysis procedure, which is widely used for the isolation of gas vesicles from members of the Halobacteriaceae, thus damages the mechanical properties of the vesicles. The phenomenon can possibly be attributed to the loss of one or more structural gas vesicle proteins such as GvpC, the protein that strengthens the vesicles built of GvpA subunits: Halobacterium GvpC is a highly acidic, typically "halophilic" protein, expected to denature in the absence of molar concentrations of salt.

  15. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  16. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R.; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W.; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-01-01

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  17. Equilibrium of nematic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A variational scheme is proposed which allows the derivation of a concise and elegant formulation of the equilibrium equations for closed fluid membranes, endowed with a nematic microstructure. The nematic order is described by an in-plane nematic director and a degree of orientation, as customary in the theory of uniaxial nematics. The only constitutive ingredient in this scheme is a free-energy density which depends on the vesicle geometry and order parameters. The stress and the couple stress tensors related to this free-energy density are provided. As an application of the proposed scheme, a certain number of special theories are deduced: soap bubbles, lipid vesicles, chiral and achiral nematic membranes, and nematics on curved substrates.

  18. Poking vesicles in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Ben; Bertrand, Martin; Joos, Bela

    2014-03-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to poke cells and study their mechanical properties. Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the deformation and relaxation of lipid bilayer vesicles, when poked with a constant force. The relaxation time, equilibrium area expansion, and surface tension of the vesicle membrane are studied over a range of applied forces. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force-dependence. Our force-compression curves show a strong similarity with results from a recent experiment by Schafer et al. (Langmuir, 2013). They used an AFM to ``poke'' adherent giant liposomes with constant nanonewton forces and observed the resulting deformation with a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. Results of such experiments, whether on vesicles or cells, are often interpreted in terms of dashpots and springs. This simple approach used to describe the response of a whole cell --complete with cytoskeleton, organelles etc.-- can be problematic when trying to measure the contribution of a single cell component. Our modeling is a first step in a ``bottom-up'' approach where we investigate the viscoelastic properties of an in silico cell prototype with constituents added step by step. Supported by NSERC (Canada).

  19. Studying calcium triggered vesicle fusion in a single vesicle-vesicle content/lipid mixing system

    PubMed Central

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Diao, Jiajie; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T.

    2013-01-01

    This Protocol describes a single vesicle-vesicle microscopy system to study Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion. Donor vesicles contain reconstituted synaptobrevin and synaptotagmin-1. Acceptor vesicles contain reconstituted syntaxin and SNAP-25, and are tethered to a PEG-coated glass surface. Donor vesicles are mixed with the tethered acceptor vesicles and incubated for several minutes at zero Ca2+-concentration, resulting in a collection of single interacting vesicle pairs. The donor vesicles also contain two spectrally distinct fluorophores that allow simultaneous monitoring of temporal changes of the content and membrane. Upon Ca2+-injection into the sample chamber, our system therefore differentiates between hemifusion and complete fusion of interacting vesicle pairs and determines the temporal sequence of these events on a sub-hundred millisecond timescale. Other factors, such as complexin, can be easily added. Our system is unique by monitoring both content and lipid mixing, and by starting from a metastable state of interacting vesicle pairs prior to Ca2+-injection. PMID:23222454

  20. Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Membrane Vesicles in Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Weinrick, Brian C.; Piqué, Daniel G.; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases membrane vesicles packed with molecules that can modulate the immune response. Because environmental conditions often influence the production and content of bacterial vesicles, this study examined M. tuberculosis microvesicles released under iron limitation, a common condition faced by pathogens inside the host. The findings indicate that M. tuberculosis increases microvesicle production in response to iron restriction and that these microvesicles contain mycobactin, which can serve as an iron donor and supports replication of iron-starved mycobacteria. Consequently, the results revealed a role of microvesicles in iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis, which can be critical for survival in the host. PMID:24415729

  1. Extracellular Vesicles Produced by the Gram-positive Bacterium Bacillus subtilis are Disrupted by the Lipopeptide Surfactin

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa; Kessler, Anne; Cabezas-Sanchez, Pablo; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously, extracellular vesicle production in Gram-positive bacteria was dismissed due to the absence of an outer membrane, where Gram-negative vesicles originate, and the difficulty in envisioning how such a process could occur through the cell wall. However, recent work has shown that Gram-positive bacteria produce extracellular vesicles and that the vesicles are biologically active. In this study, we show that Bacillus subtilis produces extracellular vesicles similar in size and morphology to other bacteria, characterized vesicles using a variety of techniques, provide evidence that these vesicles are actively produced by cells, show differences in vesicle production between strains, and identified a mechanism for such differences based on vesicle disruption. We found that in wild strains of B. subtilis, surfactin disrupted vesicles while in laboratory strains harboring a mutation in the gene sfp, vesicles accumulated in the culture supernatant. Surfactin not only lysed B. subtilis vesicles, but also vesicles from Bacillus anthracis, indicating a mechanism that crossed species boundaries. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gene and a mechanism has been identified in the active disruption of extracellular vesicles and subsequent release of vesicular cargo in Gram-positive bacteria. We also identify a new mechanism of action for surfactin. PMID:24826903

  2. Primary vesicles, vesicle-rich segregation structures and recognition of primary and secondary porosities in lava flows from the Paraná igneous province, southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Carla Joana S.; de Lima, Evandro F.; Goldberg, Karin

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on a volcanic succession of pāhoehoe to rubbly lavas of the Paraná-Etendeka Province exposed in a single road profile in southernmost Brazil. This work provides an integrated approach for examining primary vesicles and vesicle-rich segregation structures at the mesoscopic scale. In addition, this study provides a quantitative analysis of pore types in thin section. We documented distinct distribution patterns of vesicle and vesicle-rich segregation structures according to lava thickness. In compound pāhoehoe lavas, the cooling allows only vesicles (<1 cm size) and pipe vesicles to be frozen into place. In inflated pāhoehoe lavas, vesicles of different sizes are common, including pipe vesicles, and also segregation structures such as proto-cylinders, cylinders, cylinder sheets, vesicle sheets, and pods. In rubbly lavas, only vesicles of varying sizes occur. Gas release from melt caused the formation of primary porosity, while hydrothermal alteration and tectonic fracturing are the main processes that generated secondary porosity. Although several forms of porosity were created in the basaltic lava flows, the precipitation of secondary minerals within the pores has tended to reduce the original porosities. Late-stage fractures could create efficient channel networks for possible hydrocarbon/groundwater migration and entrapment owing to their ability to connect single pores. Quantitative permeability data should be gathered in future studies to confirm the potential of these lavas for store hydrocarbons or groundwater.

  3. Preparation of Artificial Plasma Membrane Mimicking Vesicles with Lipid Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes “artificial plasma membrane mimicking” (“PMm”) vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes. PMID:24489974

  4. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  5. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  6. Cycling of Dense Core Vesicles Involved in Somatic Exocytosis of Serotonin by Leech Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Trueta, Citlali; Kuffler, Damien P.; De-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the cycling of dense core vesicles producing somatic exocytosis of serotonin. Our experiments were made using electron microscopy and vesicle staining with fluorescent dye FM1-43 in Retzius neurons of the leech, which secrete serotonin from clusters of dense core vesicles in a frequency-dependent manner. Electron micrographs of neurons at rest or after 1 Hz stimulation showed two pools of dense core vesicles. A perinuclear pool near Golgi apparatuses, from which vesicles apparently form, and a peripheral pool with vesicle clusters at a distance from the plasma membrane. By contrast, after 20 Hz electrical stimulation 47% of the vesicle clusters were apposed to the plasma membrane, with some omega exocytosis structures. Dense core and small clear vesicles apparently originating from endocytosis were incorporated in multivesicular bodies. In another series of experiments, neurons were stimulated at 20 Hz while bathed in a solution containing peroxidase. Electron micrographs of these neurons contained gold particles coupled to anti-peroxidase antibodies in dense core vesicles and multivesicular bodies located near the plasma membrane. Cultured neurons depolarized with high potassium in the presence of FM1-43 displayed superficial fluorescent spots, each reflecting a vesicle cluster. A partial bleaching of the spots followed by another depolarization in the presence of FM1-43 produced restaining of some spots, other spots disappeared, some remained without restaining and new spots were formed. Several hours after electrical stimulation the FM1-43 spots accumulated at the center of the somata. This correlated with electron micrographs of multivesicular bodies releasing their contents near Golgi apparatuses. Our results suggest that dense core vesicle cycling related to somatic serotonin release involves two steps: the production of clear vesicles and multivesicular bodies after exocytosis, and the formation of new dense core vesicles in the perinuclear

  7. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  8. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Donowitz, M.; Emmer, E.; McCullen, J.; Reinlib, L.; Cohen, M.E.; Rood, R.P.; Madara, J.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Murer, H.; Malmstrom, K.

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with (/sup 32/P)ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  9. Magneto-mechanical mixing and manipulation of picoliter volumes in vesicles.

    PubMed

    Franke, Thomas; Schmid, Lothar; Weitz, David A; Wixforth, Achim

    2009-10-07

    Superparamagnetic beads in giant unilamellar vesicles are used to facilitate magnetic manipulation, positioning, agitation and mixing of ultrasmall liquid volumes. Vesicles act as leakproof picoliter reaction vessels in an aqueous bulk solution and can be deliberately conveyed by an external magnetic field to a designated position. Upon application of an external magnetic field the beads align to form extended chains. In a rotating magnetic field chains break up into smaller fragments caused by the interplay of viscous friction and magnetic attraction. This process obeys a simple relationship and can be exploited to enhance mixing of the vesicle content and the outer solution or adjacent vesicle volumes exactly at the position of release.

  10. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A model of synaptic vesicle-pool depletion and replenishment can account for the interspike interval distributions and nonrenewal properties of spontaneous spike trains of auditory-nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Adam J; Irvine, Dexter R F; Heil, Peter

    2014-11-05

    In mammalian auditory systems, the spiking characteristics of each primary afferent (type I auditory-nerve fiber; ANF) are mainly determined by a single ribbon synapse in a single receptor cell (inner hair cell; IHC). ANF spike trains therefore provide a window into the operation of these synapses and cells. It was demonstrated previously (Heil et al., 2007) that the distribution of interspike intervals (ISIs) of cat ANFs during spontaneous activity can be modeled as resulting from refractoriness operating on a non-Poisson stochastic point process of excitation (transmitter release events from the IHC). Here, we investigate nonrenewal properties of these cat-ANF spontaneous spike trains, manifest as negative serial ISI correlations and reduced spike-count variability over short timescales. A previously discussed excitatory process, the constrained failure of events from a homogeneous Poisson point process, can account for these properties, but does not offer a parsimonious explanation for certain trends in the data. We then investigate a three-parameter model of vesicle-pool depletion and replenishment and find that it accounts for all experimental observations, including the ISI distributions, with only the release probability varying between spike trains. The maximum number of units (single vesicles or groups of simultaneously released vesicles) in the readily releasable pool and their replenishment time constant can be assumed to be constant (∼4 and 13.5 ms, respectively). We suggest that the organization of the IHC ribbon synapses not only enables sustained release of neurotransmitter but also imposes temporal regularity on the release process, particularly when operating at high rates.

  12. Vesicles with a double bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2004-01-01

    A modified reverse phase evaporation method was used to prepare intermediate unilamellar vesicles coated with an additional membrane, or large vesicles in which several vesicles were coated with a common membrane. In both kinds of vesicle, the outer and inner membranes are usually of different phospholipid composition. The preparation involves the formation of a double emulsion: vesicles in a buffer are emerged in a low-boiling point organic solution of phospholipids. Then the organic solvent is evaporated during the heating and mixing process. As result large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), about 100 nm in diameter, were coated with an additional membrane from egg lecithin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. The highest yield of the coating was about 50%. When DPPC was used for coating above the phase transition temperature Tm, the data suggested the formation of vesicles that were slightly larger than the starting LUVs. It might be concluded that many of these had a double bilayer. If the coating was done below Tm, the micrographs suggested the formation of structures resembling multi-vesicular vesicles. They looked like LUV clusters coated with a common membrane.

  13. Physical determinants of vesicle mobility and supply at a central synapse

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Jason Seth; Kocsis, Laszlo; Herzog, Etienne; Nusser, Zoltan; Silver, Robin Angus

    2016-01-01

    Encoding continuous sensory variables requires sustained synaptic signalling. At several sensory synapses, rapid vesicle supply is achieved via highly mobile vesicles and specialized ribbon structures, but how this is achieved at central synapses without ribbons is unclear. Here we examine vesicle mobility at excitatory cerebellar mossy fibre synapses which sustain transmission over a broad frequency bandwidth. Fluorescent recovery after photobleaching in slices from VGLUT1Venus knock-in mice reveal 75% of VGLUT1-containing vesicles have a high mobility, comparable to that at ribbon synapses. Experimentally constrained models establish hydrodynamic interactions and vesicle collisions are major determinants of vesicle mobility in crowded presynaptic terminals. Moreover, models incorporating 3D reconstructions of vesicle clouds near active zones (AZs) predict the measured releasable pool size and replenishment rate from the reserve pool. They also show that while vesicle reloading at AZs is not diffusion-limited at the onset of release, diffusion limits vesicle reloading during sustained high-frequency signalling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15133.001 PMID:27542193

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions between two vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Pierre-Yves; Dyfcom Team

    2011-11-01

    A giant vesicle is a closed elastic membrane containing a liquid, inside another liquid. Its size is around 10 microns. If a suspension of such objects is sheared, they sometimes come close and interact hydrodynamically. We studied how these interactions affect the trajectories of the vesicles. For this, we model the properties of the membrane, assuming that the area of a surface element is constant in the course of time, and that it resists bending. We also assume that the inside and outside fluids are Newtonian, and are in the creeping regime. To solve the partial differential equations arising from this model, we used two methods : an asymptotic expansion around spherical shapes for vesicles far away from each other (3d case), and a boudary integral method (2d case). We find that vesicles repel, and that this repulsion decreases with initial transverse distance. We compare our results with experimental results performed with vesicles flowing in microfluidic devices.

  15. Molecular recognition of bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Voskuhl, Jens; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2009-02-01

    Vesicles have been a versatile topic of research in chemistry ever since the discovery that, besides phospholipids, synthetic amphiphiles can also form molecular bilayers enclosing a small aqueous compartment. Non-covalent interactions of receptors and ligands or hosts and guests at vesicle surfaces resemble recognition processes at biological membranes, including cell recognition, adhesion and fusion. Molecular recognition at membranes is often mediated by a multivalent instead of a monovalent interaction. This tutorial review describes the basics as well as the latest developments in biomimetic supramolecular chemistry of bilayer vesicles. We describe how molecular recognition can mediate the interaction between vesicles, and how the biomimetic supramolecular chemistry of vesicles furthers our understanding of biological membranes.

  16. Characterizing Synaptic Vesicle Proteins Using Synaptosomal Fractions and Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DiGiovanni, Jerome; Sun, Tao; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2012-01-01

    Cloning and characterization of synaptic vesicle proteins and their binding counterparts on the presynaptic plasma membrane have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the synaptic vesicle cycle and neurotransmitter release. This unit discusses multidisciplinary approaches to characterize proteins from synaptosome-enriched subcellular fractions and localize them within cultured neurons. The first approach regroups methods used to isolate synaptic vesicles from rat brain synaptosomal preparations, allowing for specific biochemical investigation of synaptic vesicle proteins. The second is a detailed procedure for pre-embedding immunogold staining and electron microscopic observation, which permits the morphological identification of proteins in individual vesicles at intact synapses. Additionally, this chapter proposes methods for light microscopic examination of hippocampal neurons. It includes procedures for embryonic and postnatal hippocampal neuron culture and describes an immunocytochemical staining protocol used to investigate synaptic vesicle protein localization with respect to other proteins or subcellular structures. PMID:22470148

  17. Mapping Organelle Motion Reveals a Vesicular Conveyor Belt Spatially Replenishing Secretory Vesicles in Stimulated Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A.

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this “conveyor belt” towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:24489879

  18. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation.

  19. Dynamic flow-through approach to evaluate readily bioaccessible antioxidants in solid food samples.

    PubMed

    Maia, Miguel A; Soares, Tânia R P; Mota, Ana I P; Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luís M; Miró, Manuel; Segundo, Marcela A

    2017-05-01

    Release of bioactive compounds from food matrices is regarded as the first step towards their human bioavailability. The objective of this work was the implementation of an affordable and robust flow-through device for expedient dynamic leaching experiments aiming at the assessment of readily bioaccessible antioxidant compounds in solid food commodities. A simple configuration is proposed using commercially available devices containing regenerated cellulose filters placed in polypropylene holders to entrap the solid sample, featuring a disposable, single use extraction chamber. The kinetic extraction profile of fast leachable antioxidants from different food matrices was evaluated using the ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) assay, fitting a first-order reaction model for readily bioaccessible compounds (R>0.9). The leaching rate constant values associated to the fast leachable antioxidant compounds were 0.060-0.446min(-1) and 0.105-0.210min(-1) for water and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v) applied as extractants, respectively. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were found between the estimated values of bioaccessible antioxidant compounds by the kinetic model and the values attained using conventional batch-wise extraction methodology, ranging from 3.37 to 60.3 µmol of Trolox ((±)-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid) per g of sample. Extension of the method using U. S. Pharmacopeia surrogate biological media (stomach (pH 1.2) and intestinal (pH 7.5) fluids without enzymes) to NIST-1570a spinach leaves provided gastrointestinal compartment-dependent kinetic leaching rates (0.120 and 0.198min(-1), respectively) and total antioxidant content (45.5 and 52.5µmol of Trolox per g of sample, respectively).

  20. 16 CFR 1101.13 - Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public ability to ascertain readily identity...)(1) § 1101.13 Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler. The... readily ascertain from the information itself the identity of the manufacturer or private labeler of...

  1. 16 CFR 1101.13 - Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public ability to ascertain readily identity...)(1) § 1101.13 Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler. The... readily ascertain from the information itself the identity of the manufacturer or private labeler of...

  2. 16 CFR 1101.13 - Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public ability to ascertain readily identity...)(1) § 1101.13 Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler. The... readily ascertain from the information itself the identity of the manufacturer or private labeler of...

  3. 16 CFR 1101.13 - Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public ability to ascertain readily identity...)(1) § 1101.13 Public ability to ascertain readily identity of manufacturer or private labeler. The... readily ascertain from the information itself the identity of the manufacturer or private labeler of...

  4. 17 CFR 37.300 - Core Principle 3-Swaps not readily susceptible to manipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... readily susceptible to manipulation. 37.300 Section 37.300 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SWAP EXECUTION FACILITIES Swaps Not Readily Susceptible to Manipulation § 37.300 Core Principle 3—Swaps not readily susceptible to manipulation. The swap execution facility...

  5. Needle-free jet injection of intact phospholipid vesicles across the skin: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Michele; Lai, Francesco; Murgia, Sergio; Valenti, Donatella; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2016-08-01

    Needle-free liquid jet injectors are devices developed for the delivery of pharmaceutical solutions through the skin. In this paper, we investigated for the first time the ability of these devices to deliver intact lipid vesicles. Diclofenac sodium loaded phospholipid vesicles of two types, namely liposomes and transfersomes, were prepared and fully characterized. The lipid vesicles were delivered through a skin specimen using a jet injector and the collected samples were analyzed to assess vesicle structural integrity, drug retention and release kinetics after the injection. In this regard, data concerning size, size distribution, surface charge of vesicles and bilayer integrity and thickness, before and after the injections, were measured by dynamic light scattering experiments, cryo-electron microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques. Finally, the effect of vesicle fast jet injection through the skin on drug release kinetics was checked by in vitro experiments. The retention of the morphological, physico-chemical, and technological features after injection, proved the integrity of vesicles after skin crossing as a high-speed liquid jet. The delivery of undamaged vesicular carriers beneath the skin is of utmost importance to create a controlled release drug depot in the hypoderm, which may be beneficial for several localized therapies. Overall results reported in this paper may broaden the range of application of liquid jet injectors to lipid vesicle based formulations thus combining beneficial performance of painless devices with those of liposomal drug delivery systems.

  6. AFM visualization of cortical filaments/network under cell-bound membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tang, Qisheng; Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Chen, Yong

    2015-10-01

    While circulating/plasma membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, due to the lack of effective methods cell-bound membrane vesicles are poorly understood including their shape and correlation with the intracellular cytoskeleton. In this study, we focused on cell-bound membrane vesicles and individual vesicle-derived pits on endothelial cells by using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the first time, we found that cell-bound membrane vesicles are hemisphere-shaped and that the actin cortical filaments/network lies at the cytosolic opening of a vesicle instead of being closely attached to the inner side of the vesicle membrane. This structure of cell-bound membrane vesicles may be beneficial to their movement in, or release from, the plasma membrane of cells due to less membrane-cytoskeleton coupling to be broken therefore probably minimizing energy consumption and time usage. Further study indicates that TNF-α activation induced a significant increase in average number/size of cell-bound vesicles and the local disruption of the actin network at the cytosolic opening of cell-bound vesicles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Histones cause aggregation and fusion of lipid vesicles containing phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Lete, Marta G; Sot, Jesus; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Medina, Milagros; Goñi, Felix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2015-02-17

    In a previous article, we demonstrated that histones (H1 or histone octamers) interact with negatively charged bilayers and induce extensive aggregation of vesicles containing phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) and, to a lesser extent, vesicles containing phosphatidylinositol (PI). Here, we found that vesicles containing PIP, but not those containing PI, can undergo fusion induced by histones. Fusion was demonstrated through the observation of intervesicular mixing of total lipids and inner monolayer lipids, and by ultrastructural and confocal microscopy studies. Moreover, in both PI- and PIP-containing vesicles, histones caused permeabilization and release of vesicular aqueous contents, but the leakage mechanism was different (all-or-none for PI and graded release for PIP vesicles). These results indicate that histones could play a role in the remodeling of the nuclear envelope that takes place during the mitotic cycle.

  8. Histones Cause Aggregation and Fusion of Lipid Vesicles Containing Phosphatidylinositol-4-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lete, Marta G.; Sot, Jesus; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Medina, Milagros; Goñi, Felix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    In a previous article, we demonstrated that histones (H1 or histone octamers) interact with negatively charged bilayers and induce extensive aggregation of vesicles containing phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) and, to a lesser extent, vesicles containing phosphatidylinositol (PI). Here, we found that vesicles containing PIP, but not those containing PI, can undergo fusion induced by histones. Fusion was demonstrated through the observation of intervesicular mixing of total lipids and inner monolayer lipids, and by ultrastructural and confocal microscopy studies. Moreover, in both PI- and PIP-containing vesicles, histones caused permeabilization and release of vesicular aqueous contents, but the leakage mechanism was different (all-or-none for PI and graded release for PIP vesicles). These results indicate that histones could play a role in the remodeling of the nuclear envelope that takes place during the mitotic cycle. PMID:25692591

  9. Adhesion of phospholipid vesicles to Chinese hamster fibroblasts: Role of cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, RE; Takeichi, M

    1977-01-01

    The adhesion of artificially generated lipid membrane vesicles to Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts in suspension was used as a model system for studying membrane interactions. Below their gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, vesicles comprised of dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL) or dimyristoyl lecithin (DML) absorbed to the surfaces of EDTA- dissociated cells. These adherent vesicles could not be removed by repeated washings of the treated cells but could be released into the medium by treatment with trypsin. EM autoradiographic studies of cells treated with[(3)H]DML or [(3)H]DPL vesicles showed that most of the radioactive lipids were confined to the cell periphery. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy further confirmed the presence of adherent vesicles at the cell surface. Adhesion of DML or DPL vesicles to EDTA-dissociated cells modified the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination pattern of the cell surface proteins; the inhibition of labeling of two proteins with an approximately 60,000- dalton mol wt was particularly evident. Incubation of cells wit h (3)H-lipid vesicles followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that some of the (3)H-lipid migrated preferentially with these approximately 60,000-mol wt proteins. Studies of the temperature dependence of vesicle uptake and subsequent release by trypsin showed that DML or DPL vesicle adhesion to EDTA- dissociated cells increased with decreasing temperatures. In contrast, cells trypsinized before incubation with vesicles showed practically no temperature dependence of vesicle uptake. These results suggest two pathways for adhesion of lipid vesicles to the cell surface-a temperature-sensitive one involving cell surface proteins, and a temperature-independent one. These findings are discussed in terms of current models for cell-cell interactions. PMID:407233

  10. pH-responsive jello: gelatin gels containing fatty acid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Matthew B; Lee, Jae-Ho; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2009-08-04

    We describe a new way to impart pH-responsive properties to gels of biopolymers such as gelatin. This approach involves the embedding of pH-sensitive nanosized vesicles within the gel. The vesicles employed here are those of sodium oleate (NaOA), a fatty-acid-based amphiphile with a single C18 tail. In aqueous solution, NaOA undergoes a transition from vesicles at a pH approximately 8 to micelles at a pH higher than approximately 10. Here, we combine NaOA and gelatin at pH 8.3 to create a vesicle-loaded gel and then bring the gel in contact with a pH 10 buffer solution. As the buffer diffuses into the gel, the vesicles within the gel get transformed into micelles. Accordingly, a vesicle-micelle front moves through the gel, and this can be visually identified by the difference in turbidity between the two regions. Vesicle disruption can also be done in a spatially selective manner to create micelle-rich domains within a vesicle-loaded gel. A possible application of the above approach is in the area of pH-dependent controlled release. A vesicle-to-micelle transition releases hydrophilic solutes encapsulated within the vesicles into the bulk gel, and in turn these solutes can rapidly diffuse out of the gel into the external bath. Experiments with calcein dye confirm this concept and show that we can indeed use the pH in the bath to tune the release rate of solutes from vesicle-loaded gels.

  11. Altered mechanisms underlying the abnormal glutamate release in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at a pre-symptomatic stage of the disease.

    PubMed

    Bonifacino, Tiziana; Musazzi, Laura; Milanese, Marco; Seguini, Mara; Marte, Antonella; Gallia, Elena; Cattaneo, Luca; Onofri, Franco; Popoli, Maurizio; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal Glu release occurs in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) mice, a transgenic animal model for human ALS. Here we studied the mechanisms underlying Glu release in spinal cord nerve terminals of SOD1(G93A) mice at a pre-symptomatic disease stage (30days) and found that the basal release of Glu was more elevated in SOD1(G93A) with respect to SOD1 mice, and that the surplus of release relies on synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Exposure to high KCl or ionomycin provoked Ca(2+)-dependent Glu release that was likewise augmented in SOD1(G93A) mice. Equally, the Ca(2+)-independent hypertonic sucrose-induced Glu release was abnormally elevated in SOD1(G93A) mice. Also in this case, the surplus of Glu release was exocytotic in nature. We could determine elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, increased phosphorylation of Synapsin-I, which was causally related to the abnormal Glu release measured in spinal cord synaptosomes of pre-symptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, and increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 at the inhibitory sites, an event that favours SNARE protein assembly. Western blot experiments revealed an increased number of SNARE protein complexes at the nerve terminal membrane, with no changes of the three SNARE proteins and increased expression of synaptotagmin-1 and β-Actin, but not of an array of other release-related presynaptic proteins. These results indicate that the abnormal exocytotic Glu release in spinal cord of pre-symptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice is mainly based on the increased size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and release facilitation, supported by plastic changes of specific presynaptic mechanisms.

  12. Mass spectrometry of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Stanly, Christopher; Vilasi, Annalisa; Fiume, Immacolata; Capasso, Giovambattista; Turiák, Lilla; Buzas, Edit I; Vékey, Károly

    2016-01-01

    The review briefly summaries main features of extracellular vesicles, a joint terminology for exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic vesicles. These vesicles are in the center of interest in biology and medical sciences, and form a very active field of research. Mass spectrometry (MS), with its specificity and sensitivity, has the potential to identify and characterize molecular composition of these vesicles; but as yet there are only a limited, but fast-growing, number of publications that use MS workflows in this field. MS is the major tool to assess protein composition of extracellular vesicles: qualitative and quantitative proteomics approaches are both reviewed. Beside proteins, lipid and metabolite composition of vesicles might also be best assessed by MS techniques; however there are few applications as yet in this respect. The role of alternative analytical approaches, like gel-based proteomics and antibody-based immunoassays, are also mentioned. The objective of the review is to give an overview of this fast-growing field to help orient MS-based research on extracellular vesicles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles as New Players in Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Urbanelli, Lorena; Buratta, Sandra; Sagini, Krizia; Tancini, Brunella; Emiliani, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Cell senescence is associated with the secretion of many factors, the so-called “senescence-associated secretory phenotype”, which may alter tissue microenvironment, stimulating the organism to clean up senescent cells and replace them with newly divided ones. Therefore, although no longer dividing, these cells are still metabolically active and influence the surrounding tissue. Much attention has been recently focused not only on soluble factors released by senescent cells, but also on extracellular vesicles as conveyors of senescence signals outside the cell. Here, we give an overview of the role of extracellular vesicles in biological processes and signaling pathways related to senescence and aging. PMID:27571072

  14. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  15. Urinary extracellular vesicles and the kidney: biomarkers and beyond.

    PubMed

    Salih, Mahdi; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2014-06-01

    Extracellular vesicles have been isolated in various body fluids, including urine. The cargo of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) is composed of proteins and nucleic acids reflecting the physiological and possibly pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron. Because urine is a noninvasive and readily available biofluid, the discovery of uEVs has opened a new field of biomarker research. Their potential use as diagnostic, prognostic, or therapeutic biomarkers for various kidney diseases, including glomerulonephritis, acute kidney injury, tubular disorders, and polycystic kidney disease, is currently being explored. Some challenges, however, remain. These challenges include the need to standardize isolation methods, normalization between samples, and validation of candidate biomarkers. Also, the development of a high-throughput platform to isolate and analyze uEVs, for example, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, is desirable. Here, we review recent studies on uEVs dealing with kidney physiology and pathophysiology. Furthermore, we discuss new and exciting developments regarding vesicles, including their role in cell-to-cell communication and the possibility of using vesicles as a therapy for kidney disorders.

  16. Enzymes inside lipid vesicles: preparation, reactivity and applications.

    PubMed

    Walde, P; Ichikawa, S

    2001-10-31

    There are a number of methods that can be used for the preparation of enzyme-containing lipid vesicles (liposomes) which are lipid dispersions that contain water-soluble enzymes in the trapped aqueous space. This has been shown by many investigations carried out with a variety of enzymes. A review of these studies is given and some of the main results are summarized. With respect to the vesicle-forming amphiphiles used, most preparations are based on phosphatidylcholine, either the natural mixtures obtained from soybean or egg yolk, or chemically defined compounds, such as DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) or POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). Charged enzyme-containing lipid vesicles are often prepared by adding a certain amount of a negatively charged amphiphile (typically dicetylphosphate) or a positively charged lipid (usually stearylamine). The presence of charges in the vesicle membrane may lead to an adsorption of the enzyme onto the interior or exterior site of the vesicle bilayers. If (i) the high enzyme encapsulation efficiencies; (ii) avoidance of the use of organic solvents during the entrapment procedure; (iii) relatively monodisperse spherical vesicles of about 100 nm diameter; and (iv) a high degree of unilamellarity are required, then the use of the so-called 'dehydration-rehydration method', followed by the 'extrusion technique' has shown to be superior over other procedures. In addition to many investigations in the field of cheese production--there are several studies on the (potential) medical and biomedical applications of enzyme-containing lipid vesicles (e.g. in the enzyme-replacement therapy or for immunoassays)--including a few in vivo studies. In many cases, the enzyme molecules are expected to be released from the vesicles at the target site, and the vesicles in these cases serve as the carrier system. For (potential) medical applications as enzyme carriers in the blood circulation, the preparation of

  17. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse.

    PubMed

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2010-11-24

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness, and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording postsynaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attaining a steady state between vesicle release and replenishment using trains of test pulses. Increasing Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)) by changing the test step from -30 to -10 mV increased replenishment. Lengthening -30 mV test pulses to match the Ca(2+) influx during 25 ms test pulses to -10 mV produced similar replenishment rates. Reducing Ca(2+) driving force by using test steps to +30 mV slowed replenishment. Using UV flashes to reverse inhibition of I(Ca) by nifedipine accelerated replenishment. Increasing [Ca(2+)](i) by flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) also accelerated replenishment. Replenishment, but not the initial burst of release, was enhanced by using an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer of 0.5 mm EGTA rather than 5 mm EGTA, and diminished by 1 mm BAPTA. This suggests that although release and replenishment exhibited similar Ca(2+) dependencies, release sites are <200 nm from Ca(2+) channels but replenishment sites are >200 nm away. Membrane potential thus regulates replenishment by controlling Ca(2+) influx, principally by effects on replenishment mechanisms but also by altering releasable pool size. This in turn provides a mechanism for converting changes in light intensity into changes in sustained release at the cone ribbon synapse.

  18. Photolabile plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles for remote-controlled traceable drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jibin; Fang, Zheng; Wang, Chenxu; Zhou, Jiajing; Duan, Bo; Pu, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) upon photo exposure. Benefiting from the interparticle plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles in close proximity, the plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles exhibit distinctively different optical properties from single nanoparticle units, which offer the opportunity to track the photo-triggered disassembly of the vesicles and the associated cargo release by plasmonic imaging. We have shown the dense layer of PEG grafts on the vesicles not only endow plasmonic vesicles with excellent colloidal stability, but also serve as flexible spacers for bioconjugation of targeting ligands to facilitate the specific recognition of cancer cells. The targeted delivery of model anticancer drug doxorubicin, investigated by dual-modality plasmonic and fluorescence imaging and toxicity studies, clearly demonstrated the potential of photolabile plasmonic vesicles as multi-functional drug carriers.We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into

  19. Open Syntaxin Docks Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shawn; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2007-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock to the plasma membrane at synapses to facilitate rapid exocytosis. Docking was originally proposed to require the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins; however, perturbation studies suggested that docking was independent of the SNARE proteins. We now find that the SNARE protein syntaxin is required for docking of all vesicles at synapses in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The active zone protein UNC-13, which interacts with syntaxin, is also required for docking in the active zone. The docking defects in unc-13 mutants can be fully rescued by overexpressing a constitutively open form of syntaxin, but not by wild-type syntaxin. These experiments support a model for docking in which UNC-13 converts syntaxin from the closed to the open state, and open syntaxin acts directly in docking vesicles to the plasma membrane. These data provide a molecular basis for synaptic vesicle docking. PMID:17645391

  20. Bassoon Speeds Vesicle Reloading at a Central Excitatory Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hallermann, Stefan; Fejtova, Anna; Schmidt, Hartmut; Weyhersmüller, Annika; Silver, R. Angus; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Eilers, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Summary Sustained rate-coded signals encode many types of sensory modalities. Some sensory synapses possess specialized ribbon structures, which tether vesicles, to enable high-frequency signaling. However, central synapses lack these structures, yet some can maintain signaling over a wide bandwidth. To analyze the underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the function of the active zone core component Bassoon in cerebellar mossy fiber to granule cell synapses. We show that short-term synaptic depression is enhanced in Bassoon knockout mice during sustained high-frequency trains but basal synaptic transmission is unaffected. Fluctuation and quantal analysis as well as quantification with constrained short-term plasticity models revealed that the vesicle reloading rate was halved in the absence of Bassoon. Thus, our data show that the cytomatrix protein Bassoon speeds the reloading of vesicles to release sites at a central excitatory synapse. PMID:21092860

  1. Synaptojanin is recruited by endophilin to promote synaptic vesicle uncoating.

    PubMed

    Verstreken, Patrik; Koh, Tong-Wey; Schulze, Karen L; Zhai, R Grace; Hiesinger, P Robin; Zhou, Yi; Mehta, Sunil Q; Cao, Yu; Roos, Jack; Bellen, Hugo J

    2003-11-13

    We describe the isolation and characterization of Drosophila synaptojanin (synj) mutants. synj encodes a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We show that Synj is specifically localized to presynaptic terminals and is associated with synaptic vesicles. The electrophysiological and ultrastructural defects observed in synj mutants are strikingly similar to those found in endophilin mutants, and Synj and Endo colocalize and interact biochemically. Moreover, synj; endo double mutant synaptic terminals exhibit properties that are very similar to terminals of each single mutant, and overexpression of Endophilin can partially rescue the functional defects in partial loss-of-function synj mutants. Interestingly, Synj is mislocalized and destabilized at synapses devoid of Endophilin, suggesting that Endophilin recruits and stabilizes Synj on newly formed vesicles to promote vesicle uncoating. Our data also provide further evidence that kiss-and-run is able to maintain neurotransmitter release when synapses are not extensively challenged.

  2. Extracellular vesicles shuffling intercellular messages: for good or for bad.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Stahl, Philip D; Raposo, Graça

    2015-08-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a highly conserved process exploited by diverse organisms as a mode of intercellular communication. Vesicles of sizes ranging from 30 to 1000nm, or even larger, are generated by blebbing of the plasma membrane (microvesicles) or formed in multivesicular endosomes (MVEs) to be secreted by exocytosis as exosomes. Exosomes, microvesicles and other EVs contain membrane and cytosolic components that include proteins, lipids and RNAs, a composition that differs related to their site of biogenesis. Several mechanisms are involved in vesicle formation at the plasma membrane or in endosomes, which is reflected in their heterogeneity, size and composition. EVs have significant promise for therapeutics and diagnostics and for understanding physiological and pathological processes all of which have boosted research to find modulators of their composition, secretion and targeting.

  3. Emerging Roles of Extracellular Vesicles in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Jitin; Barr, Maureen M.; Court, Felipe A.; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Picou, Frederic; Raposo, Graça; van der Vos, Kristan E.; van Niel, Guillaume; Wang, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Information exchange executed by extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, is a newly described form of intercellular communication important in the development and physiology of neural systems. These vesicles can be released from cells, are packed with information including signaling proteins and both coding and regulatory RNAs, and can be taken up by target cells, thereby facilitating the transfer of multilevel information. Recent studies demonstrate their critical role in physiological processes, including nerve regeneration, synaptic function, and behavior. These vesicles also have a sinister role in the propagation of toxic amyloid proteins in neurodegenerative conditions, including prion diseases and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, in inducing neuroinflammation by exchange of information between the neurons and glia, as well as in aiding tumor progression in the brain by subversion of normal cells. This article provides a summary of topics covered in a symposium and is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the subject. PMID:25392515

  4. Visualizing the effect of dynamin inhibition on annular gap vesicle formation and fission

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Beth; Boller, Marie; Schneider, Kimberly; Shakespeare, Teresa; Gay, Vernon; Murray, Sandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although gap junction plaque assembly has been extensively studied, mechanisms involved in plaque disassembly are not well understood. Disassembly involves an internalization process in which annular gap junction vesicles are formed. These vesicles undergo fission, but the molecular machinery needed for these fissions has not been described. The mechanoenzyme dynamin has been previously demonstrated to play a role in gap junction plaque internalization. To investigate the role of dynamin in annular gap junction vesicle fission, immunocytochemical, time-lapse and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze SW-13 adrenocortical cells in culture. Dynamin was demonstrated to colocalize with gap junction plaques and vesicles. Dynamin inhibition, by siRNA knockdown or treatment with the dynamin GTPase inhibitor dynasore, increased the number and size of gap junction ‘buds’ suspended from the gap junction plaques. Buds, in control populations, were frequently released to form annular gap junction vesicles. In dynamin-inhibited populations, the buds were larger and infrequently released and thus fewer annular gap junction vesicles were formed. In addition, the number of annular gap junction vesicle fissions per hour was reduced in the dynamin-inhibited populations. We believe this to be the first report addressing the details of annular gap junction vesicle fissions and demonstrating a role of dynamin in this process. This information is crucial for elucidating the relationship between gap junctions, membrane regulation and cell behavior. PMID:23591819

  5. Benzaldehyde-functionalized Polymer Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Fang, Huafeng; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Ke; Walker, Amy V.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer vesicles with diameters of ca. 100-600 nm and bearing benzaldehyde functionalities within the vesicular walls were constructed through self assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer PEO45-b-PVBA26 in water. The reactivity of the benzaldehyde functionalities was verified by crosslinking the polymersomes, and also by a one-pot crosslinking and functionalization approach to further render the vesicles fluorescent, each via reductive amination. In vitro studies found these labelled nanostructures to undergo cell association. PMID:19309173

  6. Differential Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Tethering and Docking by UNC-18 and TOM-1.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, Elena O; Maryon, Ed B; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Richmond, Janet E

    2010-01-01

    The assembly of SNARE complexes between syntaxin, SNAP-25 and synaptobrevin is required to prime synaptic vesicles for fusion. Since Munc18 and tomosyn compete for syntaxin interactions, the interplay between these proteins is predicted to be important in regulating synaptic transmission. We explored this possibility, by examining genetic interactions between C. elegans unc-18(Munc18), unc-64(syntaxin) and tom-1(tomosyn). We have previously demonstrated that unc-18 mutants have reduced synaptic transmission, whereas tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced release. Here we show that the unc-18 mutant release defect is associated with loss of two morphologically distinct vesicle pools; those tethered within 25 nm of the plasma membrane and those docked with the plasma membrane. In contrast, priming defective unc-13 mutants accumulate tethered vesicles, while docked vesicles are greatly reduced, indicating tethering is UNC-18-dependent and occurs in the absence of priming. C. elegans unc-64 mutants phenocopy unc-18 mutants, losing both tethered and docked vesicles, whereas overexpression of open syntaxin preferentially increases vesicle docking, suggesting UNC-18/closed syntaxin interactions are responsible for vesicle tethering. Given the competition between vertebrate tomosyn and Munc18, for syntaxin binding, we hypothesized that C. elegans TOM-1 may inhibit both UNC-18-dependent vesicle targeting steps. Consistent with this hypothesis, tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced UNC-18 plasma membrane localization and a concomitant increase in both tethered and docked synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, in tom-1;unc-18 double mutants the docked, primed vesicle pool is preferentially rescued relative to unc-18 single mutants. Together these data provide evidence for the differential regulation of two vesicle targeting steps by UNC-18 and TOM-1 through competitive interactions with syntaxin.

  7. Synaptic vesicles in rat hippocampal boutons recycle to different pools in a use-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Klingauf, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Efficient vesicle membrane recycling at presynaptic terminals is pivotal for preventing depletion and maintaining high firing rates in neuronal networks. We used a new approach, based on the combination of spectrally different optical probes, to investigate how stimulation determines the fate of synaptic vesicles after endocytosis. We found that in the small central synapses of rat hippocampal neurones low frequency stimulation (40 action potentials at 2 Hz) targets vesicles preferentially to vesicle pools that were kinetically faster. Vesicles taken up during endocytosis triggered by high frequency stimulation (400 action potentials, 20 Hz) were also placed in the back of the release queue. We performed a spatial analysis of the recycled vesicles in living hippocampal boutons using two spectrally different FM-dyes (FM1-43 and FM5-95). By using these consecutively, vesicles endocytosed by either stimulation protocol were labelled with a different colour. This revealed that the kinetic arrangement was also reflected in the spatial organization of vesicles within the bouton. Next, we identified the postsynaptic site of the active zone by transfecting the neurones with postsynaptic density protein PSD-95-CFP. The data from these triple colour experiments suggest that retrieval after low frequency stimulation keeps vesicles in a more confined region closer to the active zone as identified by PSD-95-CFP expression at the postsynaptic site. PMID:16439431

  8. Composite chitosan-transfersomal vesicles for improved transnasal permeation and bioavailability of verapamil.

    PubMed

    Mouez, Mamdouh Abdel; Nasr, Maha; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona; Geneidi, Ahmed S; Mansour, Samar

    2016-12-01

    The creation of composite systems has become an emerging field in drug delivery. Chitosan has demonstrated several pharmaceutical advantages, especially in intranasal delivery. In this manuscript, a comparative study was conducted between regular vesicles (transfersomes and penetration enhancer vesicles) and composite vesicles (chitosan containing transfersomes and penetration enhancer vesicles) loaded with a model antihypertensive drug; verapamil hydrochloride VRP. Composite vesicles displayed larger particle size than regular vesicles owing to the coating potential of chitosan on the vesicular bilayer as displayed by transmission electron microscopy, with an increased viscosity of composite vesicles and a shift in the zeta potential values from negative to positive. The entrapment efficiency of VRP in the vesicles ranged from 24 to 64%, with best physical stability displayed with transfersomal vesicles prepared using sodium deoxycholate. Chitosan slowed the in vitro release of VRP from the selected formulation but managed to achieve high penetrability across sheep nasal mucosa as displayed by confocal laser microscopy. The chitosan composite transfersomal formulation exhibited absolute bioavailability of 81.83% compared to the oral solution which displayed only 13.04%. Findings of this manuscript highly recommend chitosan as a promising functional additive in vesicular formulations to improve the intranasal delivery of drugs with low oral bioavailability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced Detection of Cancer Biomarkers in Blood-Borne Extracellular Vesicles Using Nanodroplets and Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Jovel, Juan; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Lewis, John D; Zemp, Roger J

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of personalized medicine approaches will be greatly improved by the development of noninvasive methods to interrogate tumor biology. Extracellular vesicles shed by solid tumors into the bloodstream have been under recent investigation as a source of tumor-derived biomarkers such as proteins and nucleic acids. We report here an approach using submicrometer perfluorobutane nanodroplets and focused ultrasound to enhance the release of extracellular vesicles from specific locations in tumors into the blood. The released extracellular vesicles were enumerated and characterized using micro flow cytometry. Only in the presence of nanodroplets could ultrasound release appreciable levels of tumor-derived vesicles into the blood. Sonication of HT1080-GFP tumors did not increase the number of circulating tumor cells or the metastatic burden in the tumor-bearing embryos. A variety of biological molecules were successfully detected in tumor-derived extracellular vesicles, including cancer-associated proteins, mRNAs, and miRNAs. Sonication of xenograft HT1080 fibrosarcoma tumors released extracellular vesicles that contained detectable RAC1 mRNA with the highly tumorigenic N92I mutation known to exist in HT1080 cells. Deep sequencing serum samples of embryos with sonicated tumors allowed the identification of an additional 13 known heterozygous mutations in HT1080 cells. Applying ultrasound to HT1080 tumors increased tumor-derived DNA in the serum by two orders of magnitude. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced extracellular vesicle release by ultrasound stimulation and suggests that nanodroplets/ultrasound offers promise for genetic profiling of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness by stimulating the release of extracellular vesicles. Cancer Res; 77(1); 3-13. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Tweek, an evolutionary conserved proteinis required for synaptic vesicle recycling

    PubMed Central

    Verstreken, Patrik; Ohyama, Tomoko; Haueter, Claire; Habets, Ron L.P.; Lin, Yong Q.; Swan, Laura E.; Ly, Cindy V.; Venken, Koen J. T.; De Camilli, Pietro; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle endocytosis is critical to maintain synaptic communication during intense stimulation. Here we describe Tweek, a conserved protein that is required for synaptic vesicle recycling. tweek mutants show reduced FM 1–43 uptake, cannot maintain release during intense stimulation and harbor larger than normal synaptic vesicles, implicating it in vesicle recycling at the synapse. Interestingly, the levels of a fluorescent PI(4,5)P2 reporter are reduced at tweek mutant synapses and the probe is aberrantly localized during stimulation. In addition, various endocytic adaptors known to bind PI(4,5)P2 are mislocalized and the defects in FM 1–43 dye uptake and adaptor localization are partially suppressed by removing one copy of the phosphoinositide-phosphatase synaptojanin, suggesting a role for Tweek in maintaining proper phosphoinositide levels at synapses. Our data implicate Tweek in regulating synaptic vesicle recycling via an action mediated at least in part by the regulation of PI(4,5)P2 levels or availability at the synapse. PMID:19640479

  11. MicroRNA exocytosis by large dense-core vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gümürdü, Alican; Yildiz, Ramazan; Eren, Erden; Karakülah, Gökhan; Ünver, Turgay; GENÇ, Şermin; Park, Yongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted into outside the cell by a vesicle fusion process. Although non-coding RNA (ncRNA) that include microRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression inside the cell where they are transcribed, extracellular miRNA has been recently discovered outside the cells, proposing that miRNA might be released to participate in cell-to-cell communication. Despite its importance of extracellular miRNA, the molecular mechanisms by which miRNA can be stored in vesicles and released by vesicle fusion remain enigmatic. Using next-generation sequencing, vesicle purification techniques, and synthetic neurotransmission, we observe that large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) contain a variety of miRNAs including miR-375. Furthermore, miRNA exocytosis is mediated by the SNARE complex and accelerated by Ca2+. Our results suggest that miRNA can be a novel neuromodulator that can be stored in vesicles and released by vesicle fusion together with classical neurotransmitters. PMID:28358390

  12. Preparation and Evaluation of Nano-vesicles of Brimonidine Tartrate as an Ocular Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, P; Nitish, Kumar R; Koland, M; Harish, NM; Vijayanarayan, K; Dhondge, G; Charyulu, RN

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to design a vesicular formulation of brimonidine tartrate and evaluate its ability to reduce the dosing frequency and improve the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. Nano-vesicles of brimonidine tartrate were prepared by film hydration method. The prepared vesicles were evaluated for photomicroscopic characteristics, entrapment efficiency, in vitro, and ex-in vitro drug release and in vivo intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering activity. The methods employed for preparation of vesicles produced nano vesicles of acceptable shape and size. The in vitro, and ex-in vitro drug release studies showed that there was slow and prolonged release of the drug, which followed zero-order kinetics. The IOP-lowering activity of nano vesicles was determined and compared with that of pure drug solution and showed that the IOP-lowering action of nano-vesicles sustained for a longer period of time. Stability studies revealed that the vesicle formulations were stable at the temperature range of 2-8°C, with no change in shape and drug content. The results of the study indicate that it is possible to develop a safe and physiologically effective topical formulation that is also convenient for patients. PMID:21264093

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Nano-vesicles of Brimonidine Tartrate as an Ocular Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, P; Nitish, Kumar R; Koland, M; Harish, Nm; Vijayanarayan, K; Dhondge, G; Charyulu, Rn

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to design a vesicular formulation of brimonidine tartrate and evaluate its ability to reduce the dosing frequency and improve the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. Nano-vesicles of brimonidine tartrate were prepared by film hydration method. The prepared vesicles were evaluated for photomicroscopic characteristics, entrapment efficiency, in vitro, and ex-in vitro drug release and in vivo intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering activity. The methods employed for preparation of vesicles produced nano vesicles of acceptable shape and size. The in vitro, and ex-in vitro drug release studies showed that there was slow and prolonged release of the drug, which followed zero-order kinetics. The IOP-lowering activity of nano vesicles was determined and compared with that of pure drug solution and showed that the IOP-lowering action of nano-vesicles sustained for a longer period of time. Stability studies revealed that the vesicle formulations were stable at the temperature range of 2-8°C, with no change in shape and drug content. The results of the study indicate that it is possible to develop a safe and physiologically effective topical formulation that is also convenient for patients.

  14. Extracellular Vesicles in Alzheimer’s Disease: Friends or Foes? Focus on Aβ-Vesicle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Benussi, Luisa; Furlan, Roberto; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins has received increasing attention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among other transfer modes, Aβ and tau dissemination has been suggested to occur through release of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs), which may facilitate delivery of pathogenic proteins over large distances. Recent evidence indicates that EVs carry on their surface, specific molecules which bind to extracellular Aβ, opening the possibility that EVs may also influence Aβ assembly and synaptotoxicity. In this review we focus on studies which investigated the impact of EVs in Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration and showed either detrimental or protective role for EVs in the pathology. PMID:25741766

  15. Unbinding of adhesive vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, FrançOise de Gennes, Pierre-Gilles

    We consider a vesicle, bound on one side to a pipette and sticking on the other side to a flat plate. When a pulling force f is applied to the pipette, the radius Rc of the contact patch decreases, and jumps to zero at a critical value of the force. We present here an extension of the Evans theory for these processes. Then we discuss the dynamics of separation for two distinct cases: (a) nonspecific adhesion; and (b) specific adhesion induced by mobile proteins. To cite this article: F. Brochard-Wyart, P.-G. de Gennes, C. R. Physique 4 (2003). On considère une vésicule qui, aspirée par une pipette d'un coteé adhèe de l'autre sur une surface plane. Lorsqu'on tire sur la pipette avec une force f le rayon du contact adhesif decroit, et s'annule brusquement a une valeur critique de la force. On présente ici une extension de la théorie d'Evans pour interpréter ces processus de détachement. Puis l'on discute la dynamique de la séparation pour deux cas distincts : (a) adhésion non spécifique ; et (b) adhésion spécifique par des protéines mobiles. Pour citer cet article : F. Brochard-Wyart, P.-G. de Gennes, C. R. Physique 4 (2003).

  16. Presynaptic D1 heteroreceptors and mGlu autoreceptors act at individual cortical release sites to modify glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Takuya; Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Arbuthnott, Gordon William

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study release of glutamic acid (GLU) from one-axon terminal or bouton at-a-time using cortical neurons grown in vitro to study the effect of presynaptic auto- and heteroreceptor stimulation. Neurons were infected with release reporters SypHx2 or iGluSnFR at 7 or 3 days-in-vitro (DIV) respectively. At 13-15 DIV single synaptic boutons were identified from images obtained from a confocal scanning microscope before and after field electrical stimulation. We further stimulated release by raising intracellular levels of cAMP with forskolin (10µM). Forskolin-mediated effects were dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) and did not result from an increase in endocytosis, but rather from an increase in the size of the vesicle readily releasable pool. Once iGluSnFR was confirmed as more sensitive than SypHx2, it was used to study the participation of presynaptic auto- and heteroreceptors on GLU release. Although most receptor agonizts (carbamylcholine, nicotine, dopamine D2, BDNF) did not affect electrically stimulated GLU release, a significant increase was observed in the presence of metabotropic D1/D5 heteroreceptor agonist (SKF38393 10µM) that was reversed by PKA inhibitors. Interestingly, stimulation of group II metabotropic mGLU2/3 autoreceptors (LY379268 50nM) induced a decrease in GLU release that was reversed by the specific mGLU2/3 receptor antagonist (LY341495 1µM) and also by PKA inhibitors (KT5720 200nM and PKI14-22 400nM). These changes in release probability at individual release sites suggest another level of control of the distribution of transmitter substances in cortical tissue.

  17. Dysregulations of Synaptic Vesicle Trafficking in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Egbujo, Chijioke N; Sinclair, Duncan; Hahn, Chang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness which is experienced by about 1 % of individuals worldwide and has a debilitating impact on perception, cognition, and social function. Over the years, several models/hypotheses have been developed which link schizophrenia to dysregulations of the dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin receptor pathways. An important segment of these pathways that have been extensively studied for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the presynaptic neurotransmitter release mechanism. This set of molecular events is an evolutionarily well-conserved process that involves vesicle recruitment, docking, membrane fusion, and recycling, leading to efficient neurotransmitter delivery at the synapse. Accumulated evidence indicate dysregulation of this mechanism impacting postsynaptic signal transduction via different neurotransmitters in key brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. In recent years, after ground-breaking work that elucidated the operations of this mechanism, research efforts have focused on the alterations in the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of presynaptic neurotransmitter release molecules in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review article, we present recent evidence from schizophrenia human postmortem studies that key proteins involved in the presynaptic release mechanism are dysregulated in the disorder. We also discuss the potential impact of dysfunctional presynaptic neurotransmitter release on the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia.

  18. Matching kinetics of synaptic vesicle recycling and enhanced neurotransmitter influx by Ca2+ in brain plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kovács, I; Szárics, E; Nyitrai, G; Blandl, T; Kardos, J

    1998-11-01

    Using native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions from the rat cerebral cortex under conditions designed to alter intravesicular [Ca2+], we found that Ca2+ induced 47 +/- 5% more influx of [3H]GABA, [3H]D-aspartate and [3H]glycine at 37 degrees C with half-times 1.7 +/- 0.5, 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 1.3 +/- 0.4 min, respectively. We labelled GABA transporter sites with the uptake inhibitor, [3H]-(R,S)-N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-3-en-1-yl]nipecotic acid and found that Ca2+ induced a partial dissociation of the bound inhibitor from GABA transporter sites with a similar half-time. By means of rapid kinetic techniques applied to native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions, containing synaptic vesicles stained with the amphipathic fluorescent styryl membrane probe N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-[4-(dibutylamino)styryl]pyrid inium dibromide, we have measured the progress of the release and reuptake of synaptic vesicles in response to Ca2+ and high-[K+] depolarization in the 0.0004-100 s range of time. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis, strongly influenced by external [Ca2+], appeared with the kinetics accelerated by depolarization. These results are consistent with the potential involvement of Ca2+ in taking low-affinity transporters to the plasma membrane surface via exocytosis.

  19. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wurdinger, Thomas; Gatson, NaTosha N.; Balaj, Leonora; Kaur, Balveen; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Pegtel, D. Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles), such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:22888349

  1. 26 CFR 1.453-3 - Purchaser evidences of indebtedness payable on demand or readily tradable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... not the obligation is readily tradable in an established securities market), (2) In registered form... tradable in an established securities market), or (3) In any other form designed to render such obligation readily tradable in an established securities market shall not be treated as an evidence of indebtedness...

  2. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current data, these vesicular components play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with cancer development, progression and therapeutic failures. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, and genetic exchange. These tumor-derived extracellular vesicles not only to represent a central mediator of the tumor microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for tumor biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. PMID:23908664

  3. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas D; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current data, these vesicular components play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with cancer development, progression and therapeutic failures. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, and genetic exchange. These tumor-derived extracellular vesicles not only to represent a central mediator of the tumor microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for tumor biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  4. Clathrin regenerates synaptic vesicles from endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Rost, Benjamin R.; Brokowski, Bettina; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Felies, Annegret; Davis, M. Wayne; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ultrafast endocytosis can retrieve a single large endocytic vesicle as fast as 50-100 ms after synaptic vesicle fusion. However, the fate of the large endocytic vesicles is not known. Here we demonstrate that these vesicles transition to a synaptic endosome about one second after stimulation. The endosome is resolved into coated vesicles after 3 seconds, which in turn become small-diameter synaptic vesicles 5-6 seconds after stimulation. We disrupted clathrin function using RNAi and found that clathrin is not required for ultrafast endocytosis but is required to generate synaptic vesicles from the endosome. Ultrafast endocytosis fails when actin polymerization is disrupted, or when neurons are stimulated at room temperature instead of physiological temperature. In the absence of ultrafast endocytosis, synaptic vesicles are retrieved directly from the plasma membrane by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results explain in large part discrepancies among published experiments concerning the role of clathrin in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. PMID:25296249

  5. Extracellular vesicles are rapidly purified from human plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR).

    PubMed

    Gallart-Palau, Xavier; Serra, Aida; Wong, Andrew See Weng; Sandin, Sara; Lai, Mitchell K P; Chen, Christopher P; Kon, Oi Lian; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2015-09-30

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes and microvesicles mediate intercellular communication and regulate a diverse range of crucial biological processes. Host cells that are damaged, infected or transformed release biomarker-containing EVs into the peripheral circulation, where they can be readily accessed for use in diagnostic or prognostic testing. However, current methods of EV isolation from blood plasma are complex and often require relatively large sample volumes, hence are inefficient for widespread use in clinical settings. Here, we report a novel and inexpensive method of rapidly isolating EVs from small volumes of human blood plasma by PRotein Organic Solvent PRecipitation (PROSPR). PROSPR encompasses a rapid three-step protocol to remove soluble proteins from plasma via precipitation in cold acetone, leaving the lipid-encapsulated EVs behind in suspension. This generates higher purity EVs that can then be obtained from filtration or classical ultracentrifugation methods. We foresee that PROSPR-based purification of EVs will significantly accelerate the discovery of new disease biomarkers and the characterization of EVs with potential for clinical applications.

  6. Regulated Production of Mineralization-competent Matrix Vesicles in Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Thorsten; Nah, Hyun-Duck; Shapiro, Irving M.; Pacifici, Maurizio

    1997-01-01

    Matrix vesicles have a critical role in the initiation of mineral deposition in skeletal tissues, but the ways in which they exert this key function remain poorly understood. This issue is made even more intriguing by the fact that matrix vesicles are also present in nonmineralizing tissues. Thus, we tested the novel hypothesis that matrix vesicles produced and released by mineralizing cells are structurally and functionally different from those released by nonmineralizing cells. To test this hypothesis, we made use of cultures of chick embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes in which mineralization was triggered by treatment with vitamin C and phosphate. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that both control nonmineralizing and vitamin C/phosphatetreated mineralizing chondrocytes produced and released matrix vesicles that exhibited similar round shape, smooth contour, and average size. However, unlike control vesicles, those produced by mineralizing chondrocytes had very strong alkaline phosphatase activity and contained annexin V, a membrane-associated protein known to mediate Ca2+ influx into matrix vesicles. Strikingly, these vesicles also formed numerous apatite-like crystals upon incubation with synthetic cartilage lymph, while control vesicles failed to do so. Northern blot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that the production and release of annexin V-rich matrix vesicles by mineralizing chondrocytes were accompanied by a marked increase in annexin V expression and, interestingly, were followed by increased expression of type I collagen. Studies on embryonic cartilages demonstrated a similar sequence of phenotypic changes during the mineralization process in vivo. Thus, chondrocytes located in the hypertrophic zone of chick embryo tibial growth plate were characterized by strong annexin V expression, and those located at the chondro–osseous mineralizing border exhibited expression of both annexin V and type I collagen. These findings reveal that

  7. Presynaptic Ca2+ influx and vesicle exocytosis at the mouse endbulb of Held: a comparison of two auditory nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Han; Oleskevich, Sharon; Taschenberger, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The functional properties of mammalian presynaptic nerve endings remain elusive since most terminals of the central nervous system are not accessible to direct electrophysiological recordings. In this study, direct recordings were performed for the first time at endbulb of Held terminals to characterize passive membrane properties, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Endbulb of Held terminals arise from endings of auditory nerve fibres contacting spherical bushy cells (SBCs) in the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). These terminals had a high mean input resistance (1.1 GΩ) and a small mean capacitance (4.3 pF). Presynaptic VGCCs were predominantly of the P/Q type (86%) and expressed at a high density with an estimated average number of 6400 channels per terminal. Presynaptic Ca2+ currents (ICa(V)) activated and deactivated rapidly. Simulations of action potential (AP)-driven gating of VGCCs suggests that endbulb APs trigger brief Ca2+ influx with a mean half-width of 240 μs and a peak amplitude of 0.45 nA which results from the opening of approximately 2600 channels. Unlike Ca2+ currents at the calyx of Held, ICa(V) of endbulb terminals showed no inactivation during trains of AP-like presynaptic depolarizations. Endbulb terminals are endowed with a large readily releasable vesicle pool (1064 vesicles) of which only a small fraction (<10%) is consumed during a single AP-like stimulus. Fast presynaptic APs together with rapidly gating VGCCs will generate brief intracellular Ca2+ transients that favour highly synchronous transmitter release. Collectively these characteristics ensure sustained and precise transmission of timing information from auditory stimuli at the endbulb→SBC synapse. PMID:21746778

  8. Gel formation in systems composed of drug containing catanionic vesicles and oppositely charged hydrophobically modified polymer.

    PubMed

    Dew, Noel; Edwards, Katarina; Edsman, Katarina

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore if mixtures of drug containing catanionic vesicles and polymers give rise to gel formation, and if so, if drug release from these gels could be prolonged. Catanionic vesicles formed from the drug substances alprenolol or tetracaine, and the oppositely charged surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate were mixed with polymers. Three polymers with different properties were employed: one bearing hydrophobic modifications, one positively charged and one positively charged polymer bearing hydrophobic modifications. The structure of the vesicles before and after addition of polymer was investigated by using cryo-TEM. Gel formation was confirmed by using rheological measurements. Drug release was studied using a modified USP paddle method. Gels were observed to form only in the case when catanionic vesicles, most likely with a net negative charge, were mixed with positively charged polymer bearing lipophilic modifications. The release of drug substance from these systems, where the vesicles are not trapped within the gel but constitute a founding part of it, could be significantly prolonged. The drug release rate was found to depend on vesicle concentration to a higher extent than on polymer concentration.

  9. Tetraspanins in extracellular vesicle formation and function.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physiological and/or pathological processes. Depending on their origin, they can alter the fate of recipient cells according to the information transferred. In the last two decades, EVs have become the focus of many studies because of their putative use as non-invasive biomarkers and their potential in bioengineering and clinical applications. In order to exploit this ability of EVs many aspects of their biology should be deciphered. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in EV biogenesis, assembly, recruitment of selected proteins, and genetic material as well as the uptake mechanisms by target cells in an effort to understand EV functions and their utility in clinical applications. In these contexts, the role of proteins from the tetraspanin superfamily, which are among the most abundant membrane proteins of EVs, will be highlighted.

  10. When to biopsy seminal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Panach-Navarrete, J; García-Morata, F; Hernández-Medina, J A; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2015-05-01

    The involvement of seminal vesicles in prostate cancer can affect the prognosis and determine the treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether we could predict its infiltration at the time of the prostate biopsy to know when to indicate the biopsy of the seminal vesicles. observational retrospective study of 466 patients who underwent seminal vesicle biopsy. The indication for this biopsy was a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 10 ng/ml or an asymmetric or obliterated prostatoseminal angle. The following variables were included in the analysis: PSA level, PSA density, prostate volume, number of cores biopsied, suspicious rectal examination, and preservation of the prostatoseminal angle, studying its relationship with the involvement of the seminal vesicles. Forty-one patients (8.8%) had infiltrated seminal vesicles and 425 (91.2%) had no involvement. In the univariate analysis, the cases with infiltration had a higher mean PSA level (P < .01) and PSA density (P < .01), as well as a lower mean prostate volume (P < .01). A suspicious rectal examination (20.7% of the infiltrated vesicles) and the obliteration or asymmetry of the prostatoseminal angle (33.3% of the infiltrated vesicles) were significantly related to the involvement (P < .01). In the multivariate analysis, we concluded that the probability of having infiltrated seminal vesicles is 5.19 times higher if the prostatoseminal angle is not preserved (P < .01), 4.65 times higher for PSA levels >19.60 ng/dL (P < .01) and 2.95 times higher if there is a suspicious rectal examination (P = .014). Furthermore, this probability increases by 1.04 times for each unit of prostate volume lower (P < .01). The ROC curves showed maximum sensitivity and specificity at 19.6 ng/mL for PSA and 0.39 for PSA density. In this series, greater involvement of seminal vesicles was associated with a PSA level ≥20 ng/ml, a suspicious rectal examination and a lack of prostatoseminal angle

  11. Synapsin knockdown is associated with decreased neurite outgrowth, functional synaptogenesis impairment, and fast high-frequency neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Oscar; Giachello, Carlo Natale Giuseppe; Corradi, Anna Margherita; Ghirardi, Mirella; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Synapsins (Syns) are an evolutionarily conserved family of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins related to fine tuning of synaptic transmission. Studies with mammals have partially clarified the different roles of Syns; however, the presence of different genes and isoforms and the development of compensatory mechanisms hinder accurate data interpretation. Here, we use a simple in vitro monosynaptic Helix neuron connection, reproducing an in vivo physiological connection as a reliable experimental model to investigate the effects of Syn knockdown. Cells overexpressing an antisense construct against Helix Syn showed a time-dependent decrease of Syn immunostaining, confirming protein loss. At the morphological level, Syn-silenced cells showed a reduction in neurite linear outgrowth and branching and in the size and number of synaptic varicosities. Functionally, Syn-silenced cells presented a reduced ability to form synaptic connections; however, functional chemical synapses showed similar basal excitatory postsynaptic potentials and similar short-term plasticity paradigms. In addition, Syn-silenced cells presented faster neurotransmitter release and decreased postsynaptic response toward the end of long tetanic presynaptic stimulations, probably related to an impairment of the synaptic vesicle trafficking resulting from a different vesicle handling, with an increased readily releasable pool and a compromised reserve pool.

  12. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    PubMed Central

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane (‘activation energy’) is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05531.001 PMID:25871846

  13. Synaptotagmin-1, -2, and -9: Ca(2+) sensors for fast release that specify distinct presynaptic properties in subsets of neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Südhof, Thomas C

    2007-05-24

    Synaptotagmin-1 and -2 are known Ca(2+) sensors for fast synchronous neurotransmitter release, but the potential Ca(2+)-sensor functions of other synaptotagmins in release remain uncharacterized. We now show that besides synaptotagmin-1 and -2, only synaptotagmin-9 (also called synaptotagmin-5) mediates fast Ca(2+) triggering of release. Release induced by the three different synaptotagmin Ca(2+) sensors exhibits distinct kinetics and apparent Ca(2+) sensitivities, suggesting that the synaptotagmin isoform expressed by a neuron determines the release properties of its synapses. Conditional knockout mice producing GFP-tagged synaptotagmin-9 revealed that synaptotagmin-9 is primarily expressed in the limbic system and striatum. Acute deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in striatal neurons severely impaired fast synchronous release without changing the size of the readily-releasable vesicle pool. These data show that in mammalian brain, only synaptotagmin-1, -2, and -9 function as Ca(2+) sensors for fast release, and that these synaptotagmins are differentially expressed to confer distinct release properties onto synapses formed by defined subsets of neurons.

  14. The discovery of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and the molecular regulation of synaptic vesicle transmitter release: the 2010 Kavli Prize in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S; Davanger, S

    2011-09-08

    Brain function depends on a crucial feature: The ability of individual neurons to share packets of information, known as quantal transmission. Given the sheer number of tasks the brain has to deal with, this information sharing must be extremely rapid. Synapses are specialized points of contact between neurons, where fast transmission takes place. Though the basic elements and functions of the synapse had been established since the 1950s, the molecular basis for regulation of fast synaptic transmitter release was not known 20 years ago. However, around 1990, crucial discoveries were made by Richard Scheller, James Rothman, and Thomas Südhof, leading a few years later to the formulation of the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) hypothesis and a new understanding of the molecular events controlling vesicular release of transmitter in synapses. The 2010 Kavli Prize in neuroscience was awarded to these three researchers, "for their work to reveal the precise molecular basis of the transfer of signals between nerve cells in the brain."

  15. Inhibiting Extracellular Vesicle Release from Human Cardiosphere Derived Cells with Lentiviral Knockdown of nSMase2 Differentially Effects Proliferation and Apoptosis in Cardiomyocytes, Fibroblasts and Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Young, Rebeccah F.; Ashraf, Hashmat; Canty, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown a beneficial effect of cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy on regeneration of injured myocardium. Paracrine signaling by CDC secreted exosomes may contribute to improved cardiac function. However, it has not yet been demonstrated by a genetic approach that exosome release contributes to the therapeutic effect of transplanted CDCs. By employing a lentiviral knockdown (KD) strategy against neutral spingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), a crucial gene in exosome secretion, we have defined the role of physiologically secreted human CDC-derived exosomes on cardiac fibroblast, endothelial cell and primary cardiomyocyte proliferation, cell death, migration and angiogenesis using a series of in vitro coculture assays. We found that secretion of hCDC-derived exosomes was effectively inhibited by nSMase2 lentiviral KD and shRNAi expression was stable and constitutive. hCDC exosome release contributed to the angiogenic and pro-migratory effects of hCDCs on HUVECs, decreased proliferation of fibroblasts, and decreased apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. These in vitro reactions support a role for exosome secretion as a paracrine mechanism of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair in vivo. Importantly, we have established a novel tool to test constitutive inhibition of exosome secretion in stem cell populations in animal models of cardiac disease. PMID:27806113

  16. Vesicle Motion during Sustained Exocytosis in Chromaffin Cells: Numerical Model Based on Amperometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jarukanont, Daungruthai; Bonifas Arredondo, Imelda; Femat, Ricardo; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chromaffin cells release catecholamines by exocytosis, a process that includes vesicle docking, priming and fusion. Although all these steps have been intensively studied, some aspects of their mechanisms, particularly those regarding vesicle transport to the active sites situated at the membrane, are still unclear. In this work, we show that it is possible to extract information on vesicle motion in Chromaffin cells from the combination of Langevin simulations and amperometric measurements. We developed a numerical model based on Langevin simulations of vesicle motion towards the cell membrane and on the statistical analysis of vesicle arrival times. We also performed amperometric experiments in bovine-adrenal Chromaffin cells under Ba2+ stimulation to capture neurotransmitter releases during sustained exocytosis. In the sustained phase, each amperometric peak can be related to a single release from a new vesicle arriving at the active site. The amperometric signal can then be mapped into a spike-series of release events. We normalized the spike-series resulting from the current peaks using a time-rescaling transformation, thus making signals coming from different cells comparable. We discuss why the obtained spike-series may contain information about the motion of all vesicles leading to release of catecholamines. We show that the release statistics in our experiments considerably deviate from Poisson processes. Moreover, the interspike-time probability is reasonably well described by two-parameter gamma distributions. In order to interpret this result we computed the vesicles’ arrival statistics from our Langevin simulations. As expected, assuming purely diffusive vesicle motion we obtain Poisson statistics. However, if we assume that all vesicles are guided toward the membrane by an attractive harmonic potential, simulations also lead to gamma distributions of the interspike-time probability, in remarkably good agreement with experiment. We also show that

  17. Toward the Inner Nanostructure of a Secretory Vesicle.

    PubMed

    Nieto-González, José Luis; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2017-04-25

    The release of chemical mediators is an essential element of cell-to-cell communication. Signaling molecules such as neurotransmitters and hormones are stored in membrane-bound organelles called secretory vesicles. Some of these organelles can store molecules at high concentrations, overcoming the osmotic shock that could burst the organelle. These organelles contain a proteinaceous matrix that traps the molecules and avoids high intravesicular osmotic pressure. The functional nanostructure and internal organization of the matrix is not well understood. A report by Lovrić et al. in this issue of ACS Nano provides insight into the storage of a small molecule-dopamine-within the intraluminal compartments of a secretory vesicle. Lovrić et al. used a powerful combination of high spatial resolution mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with amperometric measurements of exocytotic release to delineate the temporal and spatial fate of intravesicular dopamine and its interaction with the matrix.

  18. Regulation of neurotransmitter release kinetics by NSF.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, F E; Dresbach, T; DeBello, W M; O'Connor, V; Augustine, G J; Betz, H

    1998-02-20

    NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor) is an adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that contributes to a protein complex essential for membrane fusion. The synaptic function of this protein was investigated by injecting, into the giant presynaptic terminal of squid, peptides that inhibit the ATPase activity of NSF stimulated by the soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP). These peptides reduced the amount and slowed the kinetics of neurotransmitter release as a result of actions that required vesicle turnover and occurred at a step subsequent to vesicle docking. These results define NSF as an essential participant in synaptic vesicle exocytosis that regulates the kinetics of neurotransmitter release and, thereby, the integrative properties of synapses.

  19. Morphological docking of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-dependent secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones is essential for brain function and neuroendocrine-signaling. Prior to exocytosis, neurotransmitter-containing vesicles dock to the target membrane. In electron micrographs of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, like chromaffin cells many synaptic vesicles (SVs) and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are docked. For many years the molecular identity of the morphologically docked state was unknown. Recently, we resolved the minimal docking machinery in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells using embryonic mouse model systems together with electron-microscopic analyses and also found that docking is controlled by the sub-membrane filamentous (F-)actin. Currently it is unclear if the same docking machinery operates in synapses. Here, I will review our docking assay that led to the identification of the LDCV docking machinery in chromaffin cells and also discuss whether identical docking proteins are required for SV docking in synapses. PMID:20577884

  20. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tsukasa; Fujita, Yu; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD. PMID:27801806

  2. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the dominant mechanism of vesicle retrieval at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Granseth, Björn; Odermatt, Benjamin; Royle, Stephen J; Lagnado, Leon

    2006-09-21

    The maintenance of synaptic transmission requires that vesicles be recycled after releasing neurotransmitter. Several modes of retrieval have been proposed to operate at small synaptic terminals of central neurons, including a fast "kiss-and-run" mechanism that releases neurotransmitter through a fusion pore. Using an improved fluorescent reporter comprising pHluorin fused to synaptophysin, we find that only a slow mode of endocytosis (tau = 15 s) operates at hippocampal synapses when vesicle fusion is triggered by a single nerve impulse or short burst. This retrieval mechanism is blocked by overexpression of the C-terminal fragment of AP180 or by knockdown of clathrin using RNAi, and it is associated with the movement of clathrin and vesicle proteins out of the synapse. These results indicate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major, if not exclusive, mechanism of vesicle retrieval after physiological stimuli.

  3. CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 are essential synaptic vesicle priming proteins.

    PubMed

    Jockusch, Wolf J; Speidel, Dina; Sigler, Albrecht; Sørensen, Jakob B; Varoqueaux, Frederique; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Brose, Nils

    2007-11-16

    Before transmitter-filled synaptic vesicles can fuse with the plasma membrane upon stimulation they have to be primed to fusion competence. The regulation of this priming process controls the strength and plasticity of synaptic transmission between neurons, which in turn determines many complex brain functions. We show that CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 are essential components of the synaptic vesicle priming machinery. CAPS-deficient neurons contain no or very few fusion competent synaptic vesicles, which causes a selective impairment of fast phasic transmitter release. Increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels can transiently revert this defect. Our findings demonstrate that CAPS proteins generate and maintain a highly fusion competent synaptic vesicle pool that supports phasic Ca(2+) triggered release of transmitters.

  4. Freeze-thaw and high-voltage discharge allow macromolecule uptake into ileal brush-border vesicles.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, M; Emmer, E; McCullen, J; Reinlib, L; Cohen, M E; Rood, R P; Madara, J; Sharp, G W; Murer, H; Malmstrom, K

    1987-06-01

    High-voltage discharge or one cycle of freeze-thawing are shown to transiently permeabilize rabbit ileal brush-border membrane vesicles to macromolecules. Uptake of the radiolabeled macromolecule dextran, mol wt 70,000, used as a marker for vesicle permeability, was determined by a rapid filtration technique, with uptake defined as substrate associated with the vesicle and releasable after incubation of vesicles with 0.1% saponin. Dextran added immediately after electric shock (2,000 V) or at the beginning of one cycle of freeze-thawing was taken up approximately eightfold compared with control; with both techniques, the concentration of dextran after being taken up into the vesicles was similar to that in the incubation medium, suggesting attainment of equilibrium. ATP also was taken up into freeze-thawed vesicles, whereas there was no significant uptake into control vesicles. The increase in vesicle permeability was reversible, based on Na-dependent D-glucose uptake being decreased when studied 5 but not 15 min after electric shock, and was not significantly decreased after completion of one cycle of freeze-thawing. In addition, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity were similar in control vesicles and vesicles exposed to high-voltage discharge or freeze-thawing. Also, vesicles freeze-thawed with [32P]ATP demonstrated increased phosphorylation compared with nonfrozen vesicles, while freeze-thawing did not alter vesicle protein as judged by Coomassie blue staining. These techniques should allow intestinal membrane vesicles to be used for studies of intracellular control of transport processes, for instance, studies of protein kinase regulation of transport.

  5. The protein machinery of vesicle budding and fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    A general protein machinery that buds and fuses transport vesicles is harnessed to generate the complex web of intracellular transport pathways critical for such diverse processes as cell growth, endocytosis, hormone release, and neurotransmission. With this appreciation, the challenge of understanding the precise molecular mechanisms of these many facets of cell biology has been reduced to a series of problems in protein structure and chemistry. PMID:8745395

  6. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Ung, Timothy H; Graner, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]), and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review the features of GBM EVs, in terms of EV content and activities that may lead to the use of EVs as serially accessible biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment response in neuro-oncology. PMID:24634586

  7. Outer membrane vesicle production by Escherichia coli is independent of membrane instability.

    PubMed

    McBroom, Amanda J; Johnson, Alexandra P; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Kuehn, Meta J

    2006-08-01

    It has been long noted that gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles, and recent data demonstrate that vesicles released by pathogenic strains can transmit virulence factors to host cells. However, the mechanism of vesicle release has remained undetermined. This genetic study addresses whether these structures are merely a result of membrane instability or are formed by a more directed process. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms and physiological basis of vesiculation, we conducted a screen in Escherichia coli to identify gene disruptions that caused vesicle over- or underproduction. Only a few low-vesiculation mutants and no null mutants were recovered, suggesting that vesiculation may be a fundamental characteristic of gram-negative bacterial growth. Gene disruptions were identified that caused differences in vesicle production ranging from a 5-fold decrease to a 200-fold increase relative to wild-type levels. These disruptions included loci governing outer membrane components and peptidoglycan synthesis as well as the sigma(E) cell envelope stress response. Mutations causing vesicle overproduction did not result in upregulation of the ompC gene encoding a major outer membrane protein. Detergent sensitivity, leakiness, and growth characteristics of the novel vesiculation mutant strains did not correlate with vesiculation levels, demonstrating that vesicle production is not predictive of envelope instability.

  8. Lipid transfer between vesicles: effect of high vesicle concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, P F

    1999-01-01

    The problem of the desorption of a lipid molecule from a lipid vesicle (donor) and its incorporation into another vesicle (acceptor) at high acceptor concentrations, which has been investigated experimentally (Jones, J. D. and Thompson, T. E., 1990. Biochemistry, 29:1593-1600), is analyzed here from a theoretical point of view, formulated in terms of the diffusion equation with appropriate boundary conditions. The goal is to determine whether or not the observed acceleration of the off-rate from a donor is caused by interaction with an acceptor vesicle at short range, or is simply the result of statistical effects due the proximity of the acceptor and its influence on the probability of the test lipid returning to the donor. We establish a correspondence between the theoretical parameters and the experimental, thermodynamic and dynamic variables entering the problem. The solution shows that, because of the extremely high Gibbs activation energy for desorption of a phospholipid, the process would always be first-order, even at very high vesicle concentrations. This means that acceleration of the off-rate must be due to donor-acceptor interactions at short distances, as proposed in the experimental work. PMID:10096890

  9. A Novel Pulse-Chase Paradigm to Visualize the Trafficking of Transport Vesicles in Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bassam, Sarmad

    In neurons transmembrane proteins are targeted to dendrites in vesicles that traffic solely within the somatodendritic compartment. How these vesicles are retained within the somatodendritic domain is unknown. Here we adapt a novel pulse chase system that allows synchronous release of exogenous transmembrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum using FKBP12 and Rapamycin. We demonstrate proof-of-concept and establish protein trafficking controls in incremental steps. We demonstrate the utility of this approach in studying protein trafficking and establish parameters for analysis of time-lapse images. We implement this novel pulse-chase strategy to track the movements of post-Golgi transport vesicles. Surprisingly, we found that post-Golgi vesicles carrying dendritic proteins were equally likely to enter axons and dendrites. However, once such vesicles entered the axon they very rarely moved beyond the axon initial segment, but instead either halted or reversed direction in an actin and Myosin Va-dependent manner. In contrast, vesicles carrying either an axonal or a nonspecifically localized protein only rarely halted or reversed and instead generally proceeded to the distal axon. Thus, our results are consistent with the axon initial segment behaving as a vesicle filter that mediates the differential trafficking of transport vesicles.

  10. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  11. Differential trafficking of transport vesicles contributes to the localization of dendritic proteins.

    PubMed

    Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Xu, Min; Wandless, Thomas J; Arnold, Don B

    2012-07-26

    In neurons, transmembrane proteins are targeted to dendrites in vesicles that traffic solely within the somatodendritic compartment. How these vesicles are retained within the somatodendritic domain is unknown. Here, we use a novel pulse-chase system, which allows synchronous release of exogenous transmembrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to follow movements of post-Golgi transport vesicles. Surprisingly, we found that post-Golgi vesicles carrying dendritic proteins were equally likely to enter axons and dendrites. However, once such vesicles entered the axon, they very rarely moved beyond the axon initial segment but instead either halted or reversed direction in an actin and Myosin Va-dependent manner. In contrast, vesicles carrying either an axonal or a nonspecifically localized protein only rarely halted or reversed and instead generally proceeded to the distal axon. Thus, our results are consistent with the axon initial segment behaving as a vesicle filter that mediates the differential trafficking of transport vesicles. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical properties of vesicles. I. Coordinated analysis of osmotic swelling and lysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, A; Marangoni, A G; Marsh, J; Hallett, F R; Wood, J M

    1993-01-01

    To determine how transmembrane osmotic gradients perturb the structure and dynamics of biological membranes, we examined the effects of medium dilution on the structures of osmolyte-loaded lipid vesicles. Our preparations were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Populations of Escherichia coli phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) vesicles prepared by the pH jump technique were variable and polymodal in size distribution. Complex and variable structural changes occurred when PE vesicles were diluted with hypotonic buffer. Such vesicles could not be used as model systems for the analysis of membrane mechanical properties. NaCl-loaded, DOPG vesicles prepared by extrusion through 100 nm (diameter) pores were reproducible and monomodal in size distribution and unilamellar, whereas those prepared by extrusion through 200-, 400-, or 600-nm pores were variable and polymodal in size distribution and/or multilamellar. Time and pressure regimes associated with osmotic lysis of extruded vesicles were defined by monitoring release of carboxyfluorescein, a self-quenching fluorescent dye. Corresponding effects of medium dilution on vesicle structure were assessed by DLS spectroscopy. These experiments and the accompanying analysis (Hallett, F.R., J. Marsh, B.G. Nickel, and J.M. Wood. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:000-000) revealed conditions under which vesicles are expected to reside in a consistently strained state. PMID:8457668

  13. Legionella pneumophila infection activates bystander cells differentially by bacterial and host cell vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Anna Lena; Herkt, Christina Elena; Schulz, Christine; Bolte, Kathrin; Seidel, Kerstin; Scheller, Nicoletta; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-07-24

    Extracellular vesicles from eukaryotic cells and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from gram-negative bacteria have been described as mediators of pathogen-host interaction and intercellular communication. Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a causative agent of severe pneumonia. The differential effect of bacterial and host cell vesicles in L. pneumophila infection is unknown so far. We infected THP-1-derived or primary human macrophages with L. pneumophila and isolated supernatant vesicles by differential centrifugation. We observed an increase of exosomes in the 100 k pellet by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein markers. This fraction additionally contained Legionella LPS, indicating also the presence of OMVs. In contrast, vesicles in the 16 k pellet, representing microparticles, decreased during infection. The 100 k vesicle fraction activated uninfected primary human alveolar epithelial cells, A549 cells, and THP-1 cells. Epithelial cell activation was reduced by exosome depletion (anti-CD63, or GW4869), or blocking of IL-1β in the supernatant. In contrast, the response of THP-1 cells to vesicles was reduced by a TLR2-neutralizing antibody, UV-inactivation of bacteria, or - partially - RNase-treatment of vesicles. Taken together, we found that during L. pneumophila infection, neighbouring epithelial cells were predominantly activated by exosomes and cytokines, whereas myeloid cells were activated by bacterial OMVs.

  14. A new approach to follow a single extracellular vesicle-cell interaction using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Amin, Ladan; Furlan, Roberto; Legname, Giuseppe; Verderio, Claudia; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical membrane structures released by most cells. These highly conserved mediators of intercellular communication carry proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, and transfer these cellular components between cells by different mechanisms, such as endocytosis, macropinocytosis, or fusion. However, the temporal and spatial dynamics of vesicle-cell interactions still remain largely unexplored. Here we used optical tweezers to drive single EVs produced by microglial cells onto the surface of astrocytes or microglia in primary culture. By visualizing single EV-cell contacts, we observed that microglial vesicles displayed different motilities on the surface of astrocytes compared with microglia. After contact, EVs positioned on astrocytes displayed some minor oscillatory motion around the point of adhesion, while vesicles dragged to microglia displayed quite regular directional movement on the plasma membrane. Both the adhesion and motion of vesicles on glial cells were strongly reduced by cloaking phosphatidylserine (PS) residues, which are externalized on the vesicle membrane and act as determinants for vesicle recognition by target cells. These data identify optical manipulation as a powerful tool to monitor in vitro vesicle-cell dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution and to determine in a quantitative manner the contribution of surface receptors/extracellular protein ligands to the contact.

  15. Synaptic vesicle endocytosis mediates the entry of tetanus neurotoxin into hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Matteoli, Michela; Verderio, Claudia; Rossetto, Ornella; Iezzi, Numa; Coco, Silvia; Schiavo, Giampietro; Montecucco, Cesare

    1996-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin causes the spastic paralysis of tetanus by blocking neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses of the spinal cord. This is due to the penetration of the toxin inside the neuronal cytosol where it cleaves specifically VAMP/synaptobrevin, an essential component of the neuroexocytosis apparatus. Here we show that tetanus neurotoxin is internalized inside the lumen of small synaptic vesicles following the process of vesicle reuptake. Vesicle acidification is essential for the toxin translocation in the cytosol, which results in the proteolytic cleavage of VAMP/synaptobrevin and block of exocytosis. PMID:8917587

  16. Movement within and movement beyond: synaptotagmin-mediated vesicle fusion during chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Richard A; Luster, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis plays an essential role in generating and delivering immune responses and is a critical component of inflammation. In order to identify novel genes and pathways important for regulating chemotaxis, we performed an RNAi-based screen and identified several genes involved with vesicle movement and fusion as mediators of chemotaxis. Our recently published data show that during chemotaxis vesicle trafficking proteins are required for lysosome fusion, uropod release and efficient directed cell migration.

  17. Microfluidic Fabrication of Pluronic Vesicles with Controlled Permeability.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Débora F; Arriaga, Laura R; Eggersdorfer, Max; Ziblat, Roy; Marques, Maria de Fátima V; Reynaud, Franceline; Koehler, Stephan A; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-31

    Block copolymers with a low hydrophilic-to-lipophilic balance form membranes that are highly permeable to hydrophilic molecules. Polymersomes with this type of membrane enable the controllable release of molecules without membrane rupture. However, these polymersomes are difficult to assemble because of their low hydrophobicity. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to the production of these polymersomes using double-emulsion drops with ultrathin shells as templates. The small thickness of the middle oil phase enables the attraction of the hydrophobic blocks of the polymers adsorbed at each of the oil/water interfaces of the double emulsions; this results in the dewetting of the oil from the surface of the innermost water drops of the double emulsions and the ultimate formation of the polymersome. This approach to polymersome fabrication enables control of the vesicle size and results in the efficient encapsulation of hydrophilic ingredients that can be released through the polymer membrane without membrane rupture. We apply our approach to the fabrication of Pluronic L121 vesicles and characterize the permeability of their membranes. Furthermore, we show that membrane permeability can be tuned by blending different Pluronic polymers. Our work thus describes a route to producing Pluronic vesicles that are useful for the controlled release of hydrophilic ingredients.

  18. Spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Bramble, Jonathan P; Law, Robert V; Brooks, Nicholas J; Seddon, John M; Ces, Oscar; O'Shea, Paul

    2017-10-03

    An assay to study the spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles is described. A donor/acceptor vesicle system is employed, where neutrally charged acceptor vesicles are fluorescently labelled with the electrostatic membrane probe Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE). Upon addition of charged donor vesicles, transfer of negatively charged lipid occurs, resulting in a fluorescently detectable change in the membrane potential of the acceptor vesicles. Using this approach we have studied the transfer properties of a range of lipids, varying both the headgroup and the chain length. At the low vesicle concentrations chosen, the transfer follows a first-order process where lipid monomers are transferred presumably through the aqueous solution phase from donor to acceptor vesicle. The rate of transfer decreases with increasing chain length which is consistent with energy models previously reported for lipid monomer vesicle interactions. Our assay improves on existing methods allowing the study of a range of unmodified lipids, continuous monitoring of transfer and simplified experimental procedures.

  19. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-02

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution.

  20. Origin and characterization of small membranous vesicles present in the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Souza-Imberg, Andréia; Carneiro, Sylvia Mendes; Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Sant'Anna, Sávio Stefanini; Yamanouye, Norma

    2017-09-15

    Small membranous vesicles are small closed fragments of membrane. They are released from multivesicular bodies (exosomes) or shed from the surface membrane (microvesicles). They contains various bioactive molecules and their molecular composition varies depending on their cellular origin. Small membranous vesicles have been identified in snake venoms, but the origin of these small membranous vesicles in the venom is controversial. The aim of this study was to verify the origin of the small membranous vesicles in venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus by morphological analyses using electron microscopy. In addition, the protein composition of the vesicles was analyzed by using a proteome approach. The small membranous vesicles present in the venom were microvesicles, since they originated from microvilli on the apical membrane of secretory cells. They contained cytoplasmic proteins, and proteins from the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and Golgi membrane. The release of microvesicles may be a mechanism to control the size of the cell membrane of the secretory cells after intense exocytosis. Microvesicle components that may have a role in envenoming include ecto-5'-nucleotidase, a cell membrane protein that releases adenosine, and aminopeptidase N, a cell membrane protein that may modulate the action of many peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synaptotagmin-1- and Synaptotagmin-7-Dependent Fusion Mechanisms Target Synaptic Vesicles to Kinetically Distinct Endocytic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying C; Chanaday, Natali L; Xu, Wei; Kavalali, Ege T

    2017-02-08

    Synaptic vesicle recycling is essential for maintaining normal synaptic function. The coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis is assumed to be Ca(2+) dependent, but the exact role of Ca(2+) and its key effector synaptotagmin-1 (syt1) in regulation of endocytosis is poorly understood. Here, we probed the role of syt1 in single- as well as multi-vesicle endocytic events using high-resolution optical recordings. Our experiments showed that the slowed endocytosis phenotype previously reported after syt1 loss of function can also be triggered by other manipulations that promote asynchronous release such as Sr(2+) substitution and complexin loss of function. The link between asynchronous release and slowed endocytosis was due to selective targeting of fused synaptic vesicles toward slow retrieval by the asynchronous release Ca(2+) sensor synaptotagmin-7. In contrast, after single synaptic vesicle fusion, syt1 acted as an essential determinant of synaptic vesicle endocytosis time course by delaying the kinetics of vesicle retrieval in response to increasing Ca(2+) levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of COPI vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Victor W.; Yang, Jia-Shu

    2009-01-01

    Coat Protein I (COPI) is one of the most intensely investigated coat complexes. Numerous studies have contributed to a general understanding of how coat proteins act to initiate intracellular vesicular transport. This review highlights key recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of how COPI vesicles are formed. PMID:19854177