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Sample records for real-time flood forecasting

  1. Real-time flood forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, C.; Tsay, T.-K.; Chien, C.-H.; Wu, I.-L.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers at the Hydroinformatic Research and Development Team (HIRDT) of the National Taiwan University undertook a project to create a real time flood forecasting model, with an aim to predict the current in the Tamsui River Basin. The model was designed based on deterministic approach with mathematic modeling of complex phenomenon, and specific parameter values operated to produce a discrete result. The project also devised a rainfall-stage model that relates the rate of rainfall upland directly to the change of the state of river, and is further related to another typhoon-rainfall model. The geographic information system (GIS) data, based on precise contour model of the terrain, estimate the regions that were perilous to flooding. The HIRDT, in response to the project's progress, also devoted their application of a deterministic model to unsteady flow of thermodynamics to help predict river authorities issue timely warnings and take other emergency measures.

  2. A Stochastic-Dynamic Model for Real Time Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, K. C. A.; Watt, W. E.; Watts, D. G.

    1983-06-01

    A stochastic-dynamic model for real time flood forecasting was developed using Box-Jenkins modelling techniques. The purpose of the forecasting system is to forecast flood levels of the Saint John River at Fredericton, New Brunswick. The model consists of two submodels: an upstream model used to forecast the headpond level at the Mactaquac Dam and a downstream model to forecast the water level at Fredericton. Inputs to the system are recorded values of the water level at East Florenceville, the headpond level and gate position at Mactaquac, and the water level at Fredericton. The model was calibrated for the spring floods of 1973, 1974, 1977, and 1978, and its usefulness was verified for the 1979 flood. The forecasting results indicated that the stochastic-dynamic model produces reasonably accurate forecasts for lead times up to two days. These forecasts were then compared to those from the existing forecasting system and were found to be as reliable as those from the existing system.

  3. A channel dynamics model for real-time flood forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Koussis, A.D.; Beale, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    A new channel dynamics scheme ASPIRE (alternative system predictor in real time), designed specifically for real-time river flow forecasting, is introduced to reduce uncertainty in the forecast. ASPIRE is a storage routing model that limits the influence of catchment model forecast errors to the downstream station closest to the catchment. Comparisons with the Muskingum routing scheme in field tests suggest that the ASPIRE scheme can provide more accurate forecasts, probably because discharge observations are used to a maximum advantage and routing reaches (and model errors in each reach) are uncoupled. Using ASPIRE in conjunction with the Kalman filter did not improve forecast accuracy relative to a deterministic updating procedure. Theoretical analysis suggests that this is due to a large process noise to measurement noise ratio. -Authors

  4. Real-time application of meteorological ensembles for Danube flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csík, A.; Gauzer, B.; Gnandt, B.; Balint, G.

    2009-04-01

    Flood forecasting schemes may have the most diverse structure depending on catchment size, response or concentration time and the availability of real time input data. The centre of weight of the hydrological forecasting system is often shifted from hydrological tools to the meteorological observation and forecasting systems. At lowland river sections simple flood routing techniques prevail where accuracy of discharge estimation might depend mostly on the accuracy of upstream discharge estimation. In large river basin systems both elements are present. Attempts are made enabling the use of ensemble of short and medium term meteorological forecast results for real-time flood forecasting by coupling meteorological and hydrological modelling tools. The system is designed in three parts covering the upper and central Danube. The large number of nodes (41) makes the system in fact semi distributed in basin scale. All of the nodes are prepared for forecast purposes. Real time mode runs are carried out in 6 hourly time steps. The available meteorological analysis and forecasting tools are linked to the flood forecasting system. Meteorological forecasts include 6 days and 12 days out of the ECMWF 10-14-day ahead EPS and VarEPS. The hydrological side of the system includes the data ingestion part producing semi distributed catchment wise input from gridded fields and rainfall-runoff, flood routing modules. Operational application of the of the ensemble system has been studied by the comparison of real time deterministic forecast and the experimental real time ensemble forecast results since the summer of 2008 on the river Danube. The period of June-October 2008 included mostly low water period interrupted by smaller floods. The real time ensemble hydrological forecasting experiment proved that the use of meteorological ensembles to produce sets of hydrological predictions increased the capability to issue forecasts with describing current uncertainties. As the result of the

  5. Research on classified real-time flood forecasting framework based on K-means cluster and rough set.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Peng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a new classified real-time flood forecasting framework. In this framework, historical floods are classified by a K-means cluster according to the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation, the time variance of precipitation intensity and other hydrological factors. Based on the classified results, a rough set is used to extract the identification rules for real-time flood forecasting. Then, the parameters of different categories within the conceptual hydrological model are calibrated using a genetic algorithm. In real-time forecasting, the corresponding category of parameters is selected for flood forecasting according to the obtained flood information. This research tests the new classified framework on Guanyinge Reservoir and compares the framework with the traditional flood forecasting method. It finds that the performance of the new classified framework is significantly better in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, the framework can be considered in a catchment with fewer historical floods.

  6. An extended real-time flood impact forecasting system for the Chapare watershed in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Lauro; Gabellani, Simone; Masoero, Alessandro; Dolia, Daniele; Rudari, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    All over the world a lot of cities are located in flood-prone areas and million of people are exposed to inundation risk. To cope with that the social safety demands efficient civil protection structures able to reduce flood risk by issuing warnings. This task requires civil protection organisms to adopt systems able to support their activities in predicting floods and rainfall impacts. For this reason flood early warning systems, based on rainfall observations and predictions, has become very useful because they are able to provide in advance a quantitative evaluation of possible effects in term of discharge and peak flow. Traditionally those forecasting systems use hydrologic models coupled with meteorological models to forecast discharge in relevant river sections and are called hydro-meteorological chains. In order to have a better representation of the flood dynamics, these hydro-meteorological chains can be expanded to include bi-dimensional hydraulic models where the level exposure is high or flow singularities (e.g. junctions, deltas, etc.) require more accurate investigation. That information allows the generation of real-time inundation scenarios that can be used by civil protection and authorities to estimate impact on population and take counter-measures. The new real-time flood impact forecasting chain consists of a suite of hydrometeorological tools that combines meteorological models, a disaggregation tool and a fully distributed hydrological model and a bidimensional hydraulic model that produces inundation scenarios in the most exposed river segments of the flood plain and a scenario tool that allows the assessment of assets involved. The complete modelling chain has been implemented in the Chapare watershed in Bolivia and it is managed by the Dewetra platform, which since 2013 is used by the Civil Defense and National Meteorological service as the main national Early Warning supporting tool.

  7. Forecasting surface water flooding hazard and impact in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Steven J.; Moore, Robert J.; Wells, Steven C.

    2016-04-01

    Across the world, there is increasing demand for more robust and timely forecast and alert information on Surface Water Flooding (SWF). Within a UK context, the government Pitt Review into the Summer 2007 floods provided recommendations and impetus to improve the understanding of SWF risk for both off-line design and real-time forecasting and warning. Ongoing development and trial of an end-to-end real-time SWF system is being progressed through the recently formed Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP) with delivery to the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) providing coverage over England & Wales. The NHP is a unique forum that aims to deliver coordinated assessments, research and advice on natural hazards for governments and resilience communities across the UK. Within the NHP, a real-time Hazard Impact Model (HIM) framework has been developed that includes SWF as one of three hazards chosen for initial trialling. The trial SWF HIM system uses dynamic gridded surface-runoff estimates from the Grid-to-Grid (G2G) hydrological model to estimate the SWF hazard. National datasets on population, infrastructure, property and transport are available to assess impact severity for a given rarity of SWF hazard. Whilst the SWF hazard footprint is calculated in real-time using 1, 3 and 6 hour accumulations of G2G surface runoff on a 1 km grid, it has been possible to associate these with the effective rainfall design profiles (at 250m resolution) used as input to a detailed flood inundation model (JFlow+) run offline to produce hazard information resolved to 2m resolution. This information is contained in the updated Flood Map for Surface Water (uFMfSW) held by the Environment Agency. The national impact datasets can then be used with the uFMfSW SWF hazard dataset to assess impacts at this scale and severity levels of potential impact assigned at 1km and for aggregated county areas in real-time. The impact component is being led by the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) within the NHP

  8. The POLIMI forecasting chain for real time flood and drought predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, Alessandro; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays coupling meteorological and hydrological models is recognized by scientific community as a necessary way to forecast extreme hydrological phenomena, in order to activate useful mitigation measurements and alert systems in advance. The development and implementation of a real-time forecasting chain with a hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure for flood and drought events is presented in this study. Different weather models are used to build the POLIMI operative chain: the probabilistic COSMO-LEPS model with 16 ensembles developed by ARPA-Emilia Romagna, the deterministic Bolam and Moloch models, developed by the Italian ISAC-CNR, and nine further simulations obtained by different runs of the WRF-ARW (3), WRF-NMM (2), ETA2012 (1) and the GFS (3), provided by the private Epson Meteo Center and Terraria companies. All the meteorological runs are then implemented with the rainfall-runoff physically-based distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano to obtain a multi-model approach system with hydrological ensemble forecasts in different areas of study over the Italian country. As far as concerning drought predictions, three test-beds are monitored: two in maize fields, one in the Puglia region (South of Italy), and another in the Po Valley area, (northern Italy), and one in a golf course in Milan city. The hydrological model was here calibrated and validated against measurements of latent heat flux and soil moisture acquired by an eddy-covariance station, TDR probes and remote sensing images. Regarding flood forecasts, two test-sites are chosen: the first one is the urban area northern Milan where three catchments (the Seveso, Olona, and Lambro River basins) are used to show how early warning systems are an effective complement to structural measures for flood control in Milan city which flooded frequently in the last 25 years, while the second test-site is the Idro Lake, located between the Lombardy and Trentino region where the

  9. A search for model parsimony in a real time flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, G.; Balistrocchi, M.

    2009-04-01

    As regards the hydrological simulation of flood events, a physically based distributed approach is the most appealing one, especially in those areas where the spatial variability of the soil hydraulic properties as well as of the meteorological forcing cannot be left apart, such as in mountainous regions. On the other hand, dealing with real time flood forecasting systems, less detailed models requiring a minor number of parameters may be more convenient, reducing both the computational costs and the calibration uncertainty. In fact in this case a precise quantification of the entire hydrograph pattern is not necessary, while the expected output of a real time flood forecasting system is just an estimate of the peak discharge, the time to peak and in some cases the flood volume. In this perspective a parsimonious model has to be found in order to increase the efficiency of the system. A suitable case study was identified in the northern Apennines: the Taro river is a right tributary to the Po river and drains about 2000 km2 of mountains, hills and floodplain, equally distributed . The hydrometeorological monitoring of this medium sized watershed is managed by ARPA Emilia Romagna through a dense network of uptodate gauges (about 30 rain gauges and 10 hydrometers). Detailed maps of the surface elevation, land use and soil texture characteristics are also available. Five flood events were recorded by the new monitoring network in the years 2003-2007: during these events the peak discharge was higher than 1000 m3/s, which is actually quite a high value when compared to the mean discharge rate of about 30 m3/s. The rainfall spatial patterns of such storms were analyzed in previous works by means of geostatistical tools and a typical semivariogram was defined, with the aim of establishing a typical storm structure leading to flood events in the Taro river. The available information was implemented into a distributed flood event model with a spatial resolution of 90m

  10. Real-Time Flood Forecasting System Using Channel Flow Routing Model with Updating by Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Chikamori, H.; Nagai, A.

    2008-12-01

    A real-time flood forecasting system using channel flow routing model was developed for runoff forecasting at water gauged and ungaged points along river channels. The system is based on a flood runoff model composed of upstream part models, tributary part models and downstream part models. The upstream part models and tributary part models are lumped rainfall-runoff models, and the downstream part models consist of a lumped rainfall-runoff model for hillslopes adjacent to a river channel and a kinematic flow routing model for a river channel. The flow forecast of this model is updated by Particle filtering of the downstream part model as well as by the extended Kalman filtering of the upstream part model and the tributary part models. The Particle filtering is a simple and powerful updating algorithm for non-linear and non-gaussian system, so that it can be easily applied to the downstream part model without complicated linearization. The presented flood runoff model has an advantage in simlecity of updating procedure to the grid-based distributed models, which is because of less number of state variables. This system was applied to the Gono-kawa River Basin in Japan, and flood forecasting accuracy of the system with both Particle filtering and extended Kalman filtering and that of the system with only extended Kalman filtering were compared. In this study, water gauging stations in the objective basin were divided into two types of stations, that is, reference stations and verification stations. Reference stations ware regarded as ordinary water gauging stations and observed data at these stations are used for calibration and updating of the model. Verification stations ware considered as ungaged or arbitrary points and observed data at these stations are used not for calibration nor updating but for only evaluation of forecasting accuracy. The result confirms that Particle filtering of the downstream part model improves forecasting accuracy of runoff at

  11. Model Integration for Real-Time Flood Forecasting Inundation Mapping for Nashville Tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W.; Moran, B.; LaRosa, J.

    2012-12-01

    In May of 2010, between 14 and 19 inches of rain fell on the Nashville metro area in two days, quickly overwhelming tributaries to the Cumberland River and causing wide-spread, serious flooding. Tractor-trailers and houses were seen floating down Mill Creek, a primary tributary in the south eastern area of Nashville. Twenty-six people died and over 2 billion dollars in damage occurred as a result of the flood. Since that time, several other significant rainfall events have occurred in the area. Emergency responders were unable to deliver aid or preventive measures to areas under threat of flooding (or under water) in time to reduce damages because they could not identify those areas far enough in advance of the floods. Nashville Metro Water, the National Weather Service, the US Geological Survey and the US Army Corps of Engineers established a joint venture to seek ways to better forecast short-term flood events in the region. One component of this effort was a pilot project to compute and display real time inundation maps for Mill Creek, a 108 square-mile basin to the south east of Nashville. HEC-RTS (Real-Time Simulation) was used to assimilate and integrate the hydrologic model HEC-HMS with the hydraulics model HEC-RAS and the inundation mapping program HEC-RAS Mapper. The USGS, along with the other agencies, installed additional precipitation and flow/stage gages in the area. Measurements are recorded every 5-30 minutes and are posted on the USGS NWIS database, which are downloaded by HEC-RTS. Using this data in combination with QPFs (Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts) from the NWS, HEC-RTS applies HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS to estimate current and forecast stage hydrographs. The peak stages are read by HEC-RAS Mapper to compute inundation depths for 6 by 6 foot grid cells. HEC-RTS displays the inundation on a high resolution MrSid aerial photo, along with subbasin boundary, street and various other layers. When a user zooms in and "mouses" over a cell, the

  12. Improving the effectiveness of real-time flood forecasting through Predictive Uncertainty estimation: the multi-temporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbetta, Silvia; Coccia, Gabriele; Moramarco, Tommaso; Todini, Ezio

    2015-04-01

    The negative effects of severe flood events are usually contrasted through structural measures that, however, do not fully eliminate flood risk. Non-structural measures, such as real-time flood forecasting and warning, are also required. Accurate stage/discharge future predictions with appropriate forecast lead-time are sought by decision-makers for implementing strategies to mitigate the adverse effects of floods. Traditionally, flood forecasting has been approached by using rainfall-runoff and/or flood routing modelling. Indeed, both types of forecasts, cannot be considered perfectly representing future outcomes because of lacking of a complete knowledge of involved processes (Todini, 2004). Nonetheless, although aware that model forecasts are not perfectly representing future outcomes, decision makers are de facto implicitly assuming the forecast of water level/discharge/volume, etc. as "deterministic" and coinciding with what is going to occur. Recently the concept of Predictive Uncertainty (PU) was introduced in hydrology (Krzysztofowicz, 1999), and several uncertainty processors were developed (Todini, 2008). PU is defined as the probability of occurrence of the future realization of a predictand (water level/discharge/volume) conditional on: i) prior observations and knowledge, ii) the available information obtained on the future value, typically provided by one or more forecast models. Unfortunately, PU has been frequently interpreted as a measure of lack of accuracy rather than the appropriate tool allowing to take the most appropriate decisions, given a model or several models' forecasts. With the aim to shed light on the benefits for appropriately using PU, a multi-temporal approach based on the MCP approach (Todini, 2008; Coccia and Todini, 2011) is here applied to stage forecasts at sites along the Upper Tiber River. Specifically, the STAge Forecasting-Rating Curve Model Muskingum-based (STAFOM-RCM) (Barbetta et al., 2014) along with the Rating

  13. Efficiency of a real time flood forecasting system in the Alps and in the Apennines: deterministic versus ensemble predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, G.

    2009-04-01

    Real time hydrological forecasting is still a challenging task for most of the Italian territory, especially in mountain areas where both the topography and the meteorological forcing are affected by a strong spatial variability. Nevertheless there is an increasing request to provide some clues for the development of efficient real time flood forecasting systems, for warning population as well as for water management purposes. In this perspective the efficiency of a real time forecasting system needs to be investigated, with particular care to the uncertainty of the provided prediction and to how this prediction will be handled by water resources managers and land protection services. To this aim a real time flood forecasting system using both deterministic and ensemble meteorological predictions has been implemented at University of Brescia and applied to an Alpine area (the Toce River - Piemonte Region) and to an Apennine area (the Taro River - Emilia Romagna Region). The Map D- Phase experiment (autumn 2007) was a good test for the implemented system: daily rainfall fields provided by high resolution deterministic limited area meteorological models and esemble rainfall predictions provided by coarser resolution meteorological models could be used to force a hydrological model and produce either a single deterministic or an esemble of flood forecats. Namely only minor flood events occurred in the Alpine area in autumn 2007, while one major flood event affected the Taro river at the end of November 2007. Focusing on this major event the potentials of the forecasting system was tested and evaluated with reference also to the geographical and climatic characteristics of the investigated area.

  14. The Design and Implementation of a Real-Time Flood Forecasting System in Durban, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Scott; Pegram, Geoff

    2003-04-01

    In South Africa, five flood events during the period 1994-1996 resulted in the loss of 173 lives, more than 7000 people requiring evacuation and/or emergency shelter and damages to the value of R680 million (White paper on Disaster Management 1998). The South African Disaster management bill provides for "...preventing or reducing the risk of disasters, mitigating the severity of disasters ...". To this end a pilot study funded by the Water Research Commission aims at providing flood forecasts for the Mgeni and Mlazi catchments near the city of Durban in South Africa. The importance and usefulness of flood forecasting is particularly evident in an urban context where the density of population and infrastructure provide great potential for disaster. A reliable flood warning or forecasting system cannot prevent the occurrence of floods, but provides a key tool that can allow decision makers to be proactive rather than reactive in their response to a flooding event. Taking preventative measures before the fact can significantly reduce the social and economic impacts associated with a disaster. The flood forecasting system described here makes use of a "best estimate" spatial rainfield (obtained by combining radar and telemetered rain gauge rainfall estimates) as input to a linear catchment model. The catchment model parameters are dynamically updated in response to measured streamflows using Kalman filtering techniques, allowing improved forecasts of streamflow as the catchment conditions change. Precomputed flood lines and a graphical representation of the spatial rainfield are dynamically displayed on a GIS in the Durban disaster management control center enabling Disaster Managers to be proactive in times of impending floods.

  15. Distributed precipitation corrections in Alpine areas for a real-time flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrnegger, Mathew; Senoner, Tobias; Nachtnebel, Hans-Peter

    2014-05-01

    This contribution presents a method for estimating spatial and temporal distributed precipitation correction factors. The approach is applied for a flood forecasting model in the Upper Enns and Upper Mur catchments in the Central Austrian Alps. Precipitation exhibits a large spatio-temporal variability in Alpine areas. Additionally the density of the monitoring network is low and measurements are subjected to major errors. This can lead to significant deficits in stream flow simulations, e.g. for flood forecasting models. Therefore precipitation correction factors are frequently applied. These correction factors are however mostly applied for whole catchments in a lumped manor, neglecting, that the magnitude of precipitation errors are spatially distributed. For the presented study a multiplicative linear correction model is therefore implemented, which enables a distribution of the correction factors as a function of elevation. The applied rainfall-runoff model COSERO is set up with a spatial resolution of 1x1km2. The correction of the rainfall pattern is thereby applied for every grid cell. To account for the local meteorological conditions, the correction model is derived for two elevation zones: (1) Valley floors to 2000 m a.s.l. and (2) above 2000 m a.s.l. to mountain peaks. Measurement errors also depend on the precipitation type, with higher magnitudes in winter months during snow fall. Therefore additionally separate correction factors for winter and summer months are estimated. The parameters for the correction model are estimated for every catchment based on independent station observations and observed and simulated runoff of the conceptual rainfall-runoff model. As driving input the INCA-precipitation fields of the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) are used. Due to the mentioned errors, these precipitation fields are corrected according to the described method. The results show a significant improvement of the simulated

  16. Status and Future of a Real-time Global Flood Detection and Forecasting System Using Satellite Rainfall Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. F.; Wu, H.; Hong, Y.; Policelli, F.; Pierce, H.

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several years a Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS) has been running in real-time to detect the occurrence of floods (see trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov and click on "Floods and Landslides"). The system uses 3-hr resolution composite rainfall analyses (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis [TMPA]) as input into a hydrological model that calculates water depth at each grid (at 0.25 degree latitude-longitude) over the tropics and mid-latitudes. These calculations can provide information useful to national and international agencies in understanding the location, intensity, timeline and impact on populations of these significant hazard events. The status of these flood calculations will be shown by case study examples and a statistical comparison against a global flood event database. The validation study indicates that results improve with longer duration (> 3 days) floods and that the statistics are impacted by the presence of dams, which are not accounted for in the model calculations. Limitations in the flood calculations that are related to the satellite rainfall estimates include space and time resolution limitations and underestimation of shallow orographic and monsoon system rainfall. The current quality of these flood estimations is at the level of being useful, but there is a potential for significant improvement, mainly through improved and more timely satellite precipitation information and improvement in the hydrological models being used. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program should lead to better precipitation analyses utilizing space-time interpolations that maintain accurate intensity distributions along with methods to disaggregate the rain information research should lead to improved rain estimation for shallow, orographic rainfall systems and some types of monsoon rainfall, a current problem area for satellite rainfall. Higher resolution flood models with accurate routing and regional calibration, and the use of satellite

  17. All-season flash flood forecasting system for real-time operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flash floods can cause extensive damage to both life and property, especially because they are difficult to predict. Flash flood prediction requires high-resolution meteorologic observations and predictions, as well as calibrated hydrologic models in addition to extensive data handling. We have de...

  18. A wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) dynamic neural network model for real-time flood forecasting using satellite-based rainfall products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Trushnamayee; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi; Beria, Harsh; Chatterjee, Chandranath

    2016-08-01

    Although flood forecasting and warning system is a very important non-structural measure in flood-prone river basins, poor raingauge network as well as unavailability of rainfall data in real-time could hinder its accuracy at different lead times. Conversely, since the real-time satellite-based rainfall products are now becoming available for the data-scarce regions, their integration with the data-driven models could be effectively used for real-time flood forecasting. To address these issues in operational streamflow forecasting, a new data-driven model, namely, the wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) is proposed and evaluated in comparison with four other data-driven models, viz., the linear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (ARMAX), static artificial neural network (ANN), wavelet-based ANN (WANN), and dynamic nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (NARX) models. First, the quality of input rainfall products of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), viz., TRMM and TRMM-real-time (RT) rainfall products is assessed through statistical evaluation. The results reveal that the satellite rainfall products moderately correlate with the observed rainfall, with the gauge-adjusted TRMM product outperforming the real-time TRMM-RT product. The TRMM rainfall product better captures the ground observations up to 95 percentile range (30.11 mm/day), although the hit rate decreases for high rainfall intensity. The effect of antecedent rainfall (AR) and climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) temperature product on the catchment response is tested in all the developed models. The results reveal that, during real-time flow simulation, the satellite-based rainfall products generally perform worse than the gauge-based rainfall. Moreover, as compared to the existing models, the flow forecasting by the WNARX model is way better than the other four models studied herein with the

  19. Real time flood forecasting in the Nan Basin, Thailand, by using a distributed Xin'anjiang Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Qiu, Xiaobin

    2015-04-01

    process is adaptively corrected by Attenuation memory least squares method to obtain final forecasting flood process. Verifications of this real-time flood forecasting model show high precision and the model system has been practically used in Thailand.

  20. A Distributed, Physically-Based, Rainfall-Runoff Model Incorporating Topography for Real-Time Flood Forecasting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Maximum 200 words) We present a distributed, physically-based model of runoff generation in a catchment, for operational use in flood forecasting. The...being exceeded in the month in question. The observed hydrographs for the various storms were, generally , in the area comprised between the "dry" and...We present a distributed, physically-based model of runoff generation in a catchment, for operational use in flood forecasting. The model accounts for

  1. Advancing the cyberinfrastructure for sustaining high resolution, real-time streamflow and flood forecasts at a national scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Maidment, D. R.; Clark, E. P.; Gochis, D. J.; Somos-Valenzuela, M. A.; Salas, F. R.; Nelson, J.

    2015-12-01

    In just the last year, it has become feasible to generate and refresh national 15-hour forecasts of streamflow and flood inundation, every hour at high resolution (average 3km stream segments), based on a workflow integrating US National Weather Service forecasts, the WRF-Hydro land surface model, the RAPID streamflow routing model, and other models. This capability has come about through a collaboration of numerous agencies, academic research and data centers, and commercial software vendors. This presentation provides insights and lessons learned for the development and evolution of a scalable architecture for water observations and forecasts that should be sustained operationally.

  2. A hydro-meteorological ensemble prediction system for real-time flood forecasting purposes in the Milano area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravazzani, Giovanni; Amengual, Arnau; Ceppi, Alessandro; Romero, Romualdo; Homar, Victor; Mancini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of forecasting strategies that can provide a tangible basis for flood early warning procedures and mitigation measures over the Western Mediterranean region is one of the fundamental motivations of the European HyMeX programme. Here, we examine a set of hydro-meteorological episodes that affected the Milano urban area for which the complex flood protection system of the city did not completely succeed before the occurred flash-floods. Indeed, flood damages have exponentially increased in the area during the last 60 years, due to industrial and urban developments. Thus, the improvement of the Milano flood control system needs a synergism between structural and non-structural approaches. The flood forecasting system tested in this work comprises the Flash-flood Event-based Spatially distributed rainfall-runoff Transformation, including Water Balance (FEST-WB) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models, in order to provide a hydrological ensemble prediction system (HEPS). Deterministic and probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) have been provided by WRF model in a set of 48-hours experiments. HEPS has been generated by combining different physical parameterizations (i.e. cloud microphysics, moist convection and boundary-layer schemes) of the WRF model in order to better encompass the atmospheric processes leading to high precipitation amounts. We have been able to test the value of a probabilistic versus a deterministic framework when driving Quantitative Discharge Forecasts (QDFs). Results highlight (i) the benefits of using a high-resolution HEPS in conveying uncertainties for this complex orographic area and (ii) a better simulation of the most of extreme precipitation events, potentially enabling valuable probabilistic QDFs. Hence, the HEPS copes with the significant deficiencies found in the deterministic QPFs. These shortcomings would prevent to correctly forecast the location and timing of high precipitation rates and

  3. The flood event of 10-12 November 2013 on the Tiber River basin (central Italy): real-time flood forecasting with uncertainty supporting risk management and decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, Nicola; Brocca, Luca; Barbetta, Silvia; Pandolfo, Claudia; Stelluti, Marco; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    The Italian national hydro-meteorological early warning system is composed by 21 regional offices (Functional Centres, CF). Umbria Region (central Italy) CF provides early warning for floods and landslides, real-time monitoring and decision support systems (DSS) for the Civil Defence Authorities when significant events occur. The alert system is based on hydrometric and rainfall thresholds with detailed procedures for the management of critical events in which different roles of authorities and institutions involved are defined. The real-time flood forecasting system is based also on different hydrological and hydraulic forecasting models. Among these, the MISDc rainfall-runoff model ("Modello Idrologico SemiDistribuito in continuo"; Brocca et al., 2011) and the flood routing model named STAFOM-RCM (STAge Forecasting Model-Rating Curve Model; Barbetta et al., 2014) are continuously operative in real-time providing discharge and stage forecasts, respectively, with lead-times up to 24 hours (when quantitative precipitation forecasts are used) in several gauged river sections in the Upper-Middle Tiber River basin. Models results are published in real-time in the open source CF web platform: www.cfumbria.it. MISDc provides discharge and soil moisture forecasts for different sub-basins while STAFOM-RCM provides stage forecasts at hydrometric sections. Moreover, through STAFOM-RCM the uncertainty of the forecast stage hydrograph is provided in terms of 95% Confidence Interval (CI) assessed by analyzing the statistical properties of model output in terms of lateral. In the period 10th-12th November 2013, a severe flood event occurred in Umbria mainly affecting the north-eastern area and causing significant economic damages, but fortunately no casualties. The territory was interested by intense and persistent rainfall; the hydro-meteorological monitoring network recorded locally rainfall depth over 400 mm in 72 hours. In the most affected area, the recorded rainfall depths

  4. Development of a Distributed Hydrologic Model Using Triangulated Irregular Networks for Continuous, Real-Time Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Vivoni, E. R.; Bras, R. L.; Entekhabi, D.

    2001-05-01

    The Triangulated Irregular Networks (TINs) are widespread in many finite-element modeling applications stressing high spatial non-uniformity while describing the domain of interest in an optimized fashion that results in superior computational efficiency. TINs, being adaptive to the complexity of any terrain, are capable of maintaining topological relations between critical surface features and therefore afford higher flexibility in data manipulation. The TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) is a distributed hydrologic model that utilizes the mesh architecture and the software environment developed for the CHILD landscape evolution model and employs the hydrologic routines of its raster-oriented version, RIBS. As a totally independent software unit, the tRIBS consolidates the strengths of the distributed approach and efficient computational data platform. The current version couples the unsaturated and the saturated zones and accounts for the interaction of moving infiltration fronts with a variable groundwater surface, allowing the model to handle both storm and interstorm periods in a continuous fashion. Recent model enhancements have included the development of interstorm hydrologic fluxes through an evapotranspiration scheme as well as incorporation of a rainfall interception module. Overall, the tRIBS model has proven to properly mimic successive phases of the distributed catchment response by reproducing various runoff production mechanisms and handling their meteorological constraints. Important improvements in modeling options, robustness to data availability and overall design flexibility have also been accomplished. The current efforts are focused on further model developments as well as the application of the tRIBS to various watersheds.

  5. Real-time forecasts of dengue epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, T. K.; Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of transmission. In many areas with endemic dengue, disease transmission is seasonal but prone to high inter-annual variability with occasional severe epidemics. Predicting and preparing for periods of higher than average transmission is a significant public health challenge. Here we present a model of dengue transmission and a framework for optimizing model simulations with real-time observational data of dengue cases and environmental variables in order to generate ensemble-based forecasts of the timing and severity of disease outbreaks. The model-inference system is validated using synthetic data and dengue outbreak records. Retrospective forecasts are generated for a number of locations and the accuracy of these forecasts is quantified.

  6. Real-time Social Internet Data to Guide Forecasting Models

    SciTech Connect

    Del Valle, Sara Y.

    2016-09-20

    Our goal is to improve decision support by monitoring and forecasting events using social media, mathematical models, and quantifying model uncertainty. Our approach is real-time, data-driven forecasts with quantified uncertainty: Not just for weather anymore. Information flow from human observations of events through an Internet system and classification algorithms is used to produce quantitatively uncertain forecast. In summary, we want to develop new tools to extract useful information from Internet data streams, develop new approaches to assimilate real-time information into predictive models, validate approaches by forecasting events, and our ultimate goal is to develop an event forecasting system using mathematical approaches and heterogeneous data streams.

  7. Streamflow forecast uncertainty evolution and its effect on real-time reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Lu, Weiwei; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Jianzhong; Guo, Shenglian

    2016-09-01

    When employing streamflow forecasting in practical applications, such as reservoir operation, one important issue is to deal with the uncertainty involved in forecasting. Traditional studies dealing with the uncertainty in streamflow forecasting have been limited in describing the evolution of forecast uncertainty. This paper proposes a copula-based uncertainty evolution (CUE) model to describe the evolution of streamflow forecast uncertainty. The generated forecast uncertainty series fits the observed series well in terms of observed mean, standard deviation and skewness. Daily flow with forecast uncertainty are simulated and used to determine the effect of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. Results show that using the forecast inflow coupled with the pre-release module for reservoir operation of TGR in flood season cannot increase the flood risk.

  8. Near-real-time simulation and internet-based delivery of forecast-flood inundation maps using two-dimensional hydraulic modeling--A pilot study for the Snoqualmie River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Fulford, Janice M.; Voss, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    A system of numerical hydraulic modeling, geographic information system processing, and Internet map serving, supported by new data sources and application automation, was developed that generates inundation maps for forecast floods in near real time and makes them available through the Internet. Forecasts for flooding are generated by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Center (RFC); these forecasts are retrieved automatically by the system and prepared for input to a hydraulic model. The model, TrimR2D, is a new, robust, two-dimensional model capable of simulating wide varieties of discharge hydrographs and relatively long stream reaches. TrimR2D was calibrated for a 28-kilometer reach of the Snoqualmie River in Washington State, and is used to estimate flood extent, depth, arrival time, and peak time for the RFC forecast. The results of the model are processed automatically by a Geographic Information System (GIS) into maps of flood extent, depth, and arrival and peak times. These maps subsequently are processed into formats acceptable by an Internet map server (IMS). The IMS application is a user-friendly interface to access the maps over the Internet; it allows users to select what information they wish to see presented and allows the authors to define scale-dependent availability of map layers and their symbology (appearance of map features). For example, the IMS presents a background of a digital USGS 1:100,000-scale quadrangle at smaller scales, and automatically switches to an ortho-rectified aerial photograph (a digital photograph that has camera angle and tilt distortions removed) at larger scales so viewers can see ground features that help them identify their area of interest more effectively. For the user, the option exists to select either background at any scale. Similar options are provided for both the map creator and the viewer for the various flood maps. This combination of a robust model, emerging IMS software, and application

  9. Spatio-temporal modeling for real-time ozone forecasting.

    PubMed

    Paci, Lucia; Gelfand, Alan E; Holland, David M

    2013-05-01

    The accurate assessment of exposure to ambient ozone concentrations is important for informing the public and pollution monitoring agencies about ozone levels that may lead to adverse health effects. High-resolution air quality information can offer significant health benefits by leading to improved environmental decisions. A practical challenge facing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is to provide real-time forecasting of current 8-hour average ozone exposure over the entire conterminous United States. Such real-time forecasting is now provided as spatial forecast maps of current 8-hour average ozone defined as the average of the previous four hours, current hour, and predictions for the next three hours. Current 8-hour average patterns are updated hourly throughout the day on the EPA-AIRNow web site. The contribution here is to show how we can substantially improve upon current real-time forecasting systems. To enable such forecasting, we introduce a downscaler fusion model based on first differences of real-time monitoring data and numerical model output. The model has a flexible coefficient structure and uses an efficient computational strategy to fit model parameters. Our hybrid computational strategy blends continuous background updated model fitting with real-time predictions. Model validation analyses show that we are achieving very accurate and precise ozone forecasts.

  10. Real-Time Forecasting of Echo-Centroid Motion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    motions has been developed. The key to this development is an algorithm for correlating previous with current storm- centroid positions. The program was...Modifications and Addtions ..... ... 12 1) Data Acquisition ..... ........... . 12 2) Correlation Algorithm .... .......... . 13 3) Forecast... Algorithm ............... 16 4) Data Diaplay ..... ............... . 20 3. Real-Time Operation ..... ................ 22 4. Data and Methodology

  11. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    During a flood event it is often difficult to get accurate information about the flood extent and the people affected. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. In the post flood phase, information about the flood extent is needed for damage estimation and calibrating hydrodynamic models. Currently, flood extent maps are derived from a few sources such as satellite images, areal images and post-flooding flood marks. However, getting accurate real-time or maximum flood extent maps remains difficult. With the rise of social media, we now have a new source of information with large numbers of observations. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at 8 tweets per second during floods in early 2014. A fair amount of these tweets also contains observations of water depth and location. Our hypothesis is that based on the large numbers of tweets it is possible to generate real-time flood extent maps. In this study we use tweets from the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to generate these flood extent maps. The data-mining procedure looks for tweets with a mention of 'banjir', the Bahasa Indonesia word for flood. It then removes modified and retweeted messages in order to keep unique tweets only. Since tweets are not always sent directly from the location of observation, the geotag in the tweets is unreliable. We therefore extract location information using mentions of names of neighborhoods and points of interest. Finally, where encountered, a mention of a length measure is extracted as water depth. These tweets containing a location reference and a water level are considered to be flood observations. The strength of this method is that it can easily be extended to other regions and languages. Based on the intensity of tweets in Jakarta during a flood event we can provide a rough estimate of the flood extent. To provide more accurate flood extend

  12. Intelligent Real-Time Reservoir Operation for Flood Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Hsu, H.

    2008-12-01

    Real-time flood control of a multi-purpose reservoir should consider decreasing the flood peak stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage during typhoon seasons. It is a continuous and instant decision-making process based on relevant operating rules, policy and water laws, in addition the immediate rainfall and the hydrology information; however, it is difficult to learn the intelligent experience from the elder operators. The main purpose of this study is to establish the automatic reservoir flood control model to achieve the goal of a reservoir operation during flood periods. In this study, we propose an intelligent reservoir operating methodology for real-time flood control. First, the genetic algorithm is used to search the optimal solutions, which can be considered as extracting the knowledge of reservoir operation strategies. Then, the adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), which uses a hybrid learning procedure for extracting knowledge in the form of fuzzy if-then rules, is used to learn the input-output patterns and then to estimate the optimal flood operation. The Shihmen reservoir in Northern Taiwan was used as a case study, where its 26 typhoon events are investigated by the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed control model can perform much better than the original reservoir operator in 26 flood events and effectively achieve decreasing peak flood stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage.

  13. Forecasting Emergency Department Crowding: A Prospective, Real-time Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Nathan R.; LeBlanc, Larry J.; Jones, Ian; Levin, Scott R.; Zhou, Chuan; Gadd, Cynthia S.; Aronsky, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Objective Emergency department crowding threatens quality and access to health care, and a method of accurately forecasting near-future crowding should enable novel ways to alleviate the problem. The authors sought to implement and validate the previously developed ForecastED discrete event simulation for real-time forecasting of emergency department crowding. Design and Measurements The authors conducted a prospective observational study during a three-month period (5/1/07–8/1/07) in the adult emergency department of a tertiary care medical center. The authors connected the forecasting tool to existing information systems to obtain real-time forecasts of operational data, updated every 10 minutes. The outcome measures included the emergency department waiting count, waiting time, occupancy level, length of stay, boarding count, boarding time, and ambulance diversion; each forecast 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours into the future. Results The authors obtained crowding forecasts at 13,239 10-minute intervals, out of 13,248 possible (99.9%). The R2 values for predicting operational data 8 hours into the future, with 95% confidence intervals, were 0.27 (0.26, 0.29) for waiting count, 0.11 (0.10, 0.12) for waiting time, 0.57 (0.55, 0.58) for occupancy level, 0.69 (0.68, 0.70) for length of stay, 0.61 (0.59, 0.62) for boarding count, and 0.53 (0.51, 0.54) for boarding time. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting ambulance diversion 8 hours into the future, with 95% confidence intervals, was 0.85 (0.84, 0.86). Conclusions The ForecastED tool provides accurate forecasts of several input, throughput, and output measures of crowding up to 8 hours into the future. The real-time deployment of the system should be feasible at other emergency departments that have six patient-level variables available through information systems. PMID:19261948

  14. Real Time Monitoring of Flooding from Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Frey, Herb (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new method for making high-resolution flood extent maps (e.g., at the 30-100 m scale of digital elevation models) in real-time from low-resolution (20-70 km) passive microwave observations. The method builds a "flood-potential" database from elevations and historic flood imagery and uses it to create a flood-extent map consistent with the observed open water fraction. Microwave radiometric measurements are useful for flood monitoring because they sense surface water in clear-or-cloudy conditions and can provide more timely data (e.g., compared to radars) from relatively wide swath widths and an increasing number of available platforms (DMSP, ADEOS-II, Terra, NPOESS, GPM). The chief disadvantages for flood mapping are the radiometers' low resolution and the need for local calibration of the relationship between radiances and open-water fraction. We present our method for transforming microwave sensor-scale open water fraction estimates into high-resolution flood extent maps and describe 30-day flood map sequences generated during a retrospective study of the 1993 Great Midwest Flood. We discuss the method's potential improvement through as yet unimplemented algorithm enhancements and expected advancements in microwave radiometry (e.g., improved resolution and atmospheric correction).

  15. A Real-Time Web Services Hub to Improve Situation Awareness during Flash Flood Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, F. R.; Liu, F.; Maidment, D. R.; Hodges, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    The central Texas corridor is one of the most flash flood-prone regions in the United States. Over the years, flash floods have resulted in hundreds of flood fatalities and billions of dollars in property damage. In order to mitigate risk to residents and infrastructure during flood events, both citizens and emergency responders need to exhibit proactive behavior instead of reactive. Real-time and forecasted flood information is fairly limited and hard to come by at varying spatial scales. The University of Texas at Austin has collaborated with IBM Research-Austin and ESRI to build a distributed real-time flood information system through a framework that leverages large scale data management and distribution, Open Geospatial Consortium standardized web services, and smart map applications. Within this paradigm, observed precipitation data encoded in WaterML is ingested into HEC-HMS and then delivered to a high performance hydraulic routing software package developed by IBM that utilizes the latest advancements in VLSI design, numerical linear algebra and numerical integration techniques on contemporary multicore architecture to solve fully dynamic Saint Venant equations at both small and large scales. In this paper we present a real-time flood inundation map application that in conjunction with a web services Hub, seamlessly integrates hydrologic information available through both public and private data services, model services and mapping services. As a case study for this project, we demonstrate how this system has been implemented in the City of Austin, Texas.

  16. Real time drought forecasting system for irrigation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Corbari, C.; Salerno, R.; Meucci, S.; Mancini, M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years frequent periods of water scarcity have enhanced the need to use water more carefully, even in European areas traditionally rich of water such as the Po Valley in northern Italy. In dry periods problems of water shortage can be enhanced by conflictual uses of water such as irrigation, industrial and power production (hydroelectric and thermoelectric). Further, over the last decade the social perspective about this issue is increasing due to possible impacts of climate change and global warming scenarios which come out from the fourth IPCC Report. The increased frequency of drought periods has stimulated the improvement of irrigation and water management. In this study we show the development and implementation of the real-time drought forecasting system PRE.G.I., an Italian acronym that stands for "Hydro-Meteorological forecast for irrigation management". The system is based on ensemble prediction (20 members) at long-range (30 days) with hydrological simulations of water balance to forecast the soil water content over a maize field. The hydrological model was validated against measurements of latent heat flux acquired by an eddy-covariance station, and soil moisture measured by TDR probes. Reliability of the forecasting system and its benefits were assessed on the growing season of 2012. Obtained results show how the proposed drought forecasting system is able to have a high reliability of forecast at least for a fortnight as lead time.

  17. Real-time Monitoring and Simulating of Urban Flood, a Case Study in Guangzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years urban flood frequently occurred and seriously impacted city's normal operation, particular on transportation. The increase of urban flood could be attributed to many factors, such as the increase of impervious land surface and extreme precipitation, the decrease of surface storage capacity, poor maintenance of drainage utilities, and so on. In order to provide accurate and leading prediction on urban flooding, this study acquires precise urban topographic data via air-borne Lidar system, collects detailed underground drainage pipes, and installs in-situ monitoring networks on precipitation, water level, video record and traffic speed in the downtown area of Panyu District, Guangzhou, China. Based on the above data acquired, a urban flood model with EPA SWMM5 is established to simulate the flooding and inundation processes in the study area of 20 km2. The model is driven by the real-time precipitation data and calibrated by the water level data, which are converted to flooding volume with precise topographic data. After calibration, the model could be employed to conduct sensitivity analysis for investigating primary factors of urban flooding, and to simulate the flooding processes in different scenarios, which are beneficial to assessment of flooding risk and drainage capacity. This model is expected to provide real-time forecasting in emergency management.

  18. Preparing for floods: flood forecasting and early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Flood forecasting and early warning has continued to stride ahead in strengthening the preparedness phases of disaster risk management, saving lives and property and reducing the overall impact of severe flood events. For example, continental and global scale flood forecasting systems such as the European Flood Awareness System and the Global Flood Awareness System provide early information about upcoming floods in real time to various decisionmakers. Studies have found that there are monetary benefits to implementing these early flood warning systems, and with the science also in place to provide evidence of benefit and hydrometeorological institutional outlooks warming to the use of probabilistic forecasts, the uptake over the last decade has been rapid and sustained. However, there are many further challenges that lie ahead to improve the science supporting flood early warning and to ensure that appropriate decisions are made to maximise flood preparedness.

  19. Real Time Flood Alert System (RTFAS) for Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez-Trujillo, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The Real Time Flood Alert System is a web-based computer program, developed as a data integration tool, and designed to increase the ability of emergency managers to rapidly and accurately predict flooding conditions of streams in Puerto Rico. The system includes software and a relational database to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, water levels in streams and reservoirs, and associated storms to determine hazardous and potential flood conditions. The computer program was developed as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey Caribbean Water Science Center and the Puerto Rico Emergency Management Agency, and integrates information collected and processed by these two agencies and the National Weather Service.

  20. Real-time drought forecasting system for irrigation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Corbari, C.; Salerno, R.; Meucci, S.; Mancini, M.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years frequent periods of water scarcity have enhanced the need to use water more carefully, even in European areas which traditionally have an abundant supply of water, such as the Po Valley in northern Italy. In dry periods, water shortage problems can be enhanced by conflicting uses of water, such as irrigation, industry and power production (hydroelectric and thermoelectric). Furthermore, in the last decade the social perspective in relation to this issue has been increasing due to the possible impact of climate change and global warming scenarios which emerge from the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC, 2013). Hence, the increased frequency of drought periods has stimulated the improvement of irrigation and water management. In this study we show the development and implementation of the PREGI real-time drought forecasting system; PREGI is an Italian acronym that means "hydro-meteorological forecast for irrigation management". The system, planned as a tool for irrigation optimization, is based on meteorological ensemble forecasts (20 members) at medium range (30 days) coupled with hydrological simulations of water balance to forecast the soil water content on a maize field in the Muzza Bassa Lodigiana (MBL) consortium in northern Italy. The hydrological model was validated against measurements of latent heat flux acquired by an eddy-covariance station, and soil moisture measured by TDR (time domain reflectivity) probes; the reliability of this forecasting system and its benefits were assessed in the 2012 growing season. The results obtained show how the proposed drought forecasting system is able to have a high reliability of forecast at least for 7-10 days ahead of time.

  1. Real-time drought forecasting system for irrigation managment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, Alessandro; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Corbari, Chiara; Masseroni, Daniele; Meucci, Stefania; Pala, Francesca; Salerno, Raffaele; Meazza, Giuseppe; Chiesa, Marco; Mancini, Marco

    2013-04-01

    In recent years frequent periods of water scarcity have enhanced the need to use water more carefully, even in in European areas traditionally rich of water such as the Po Valley. In dry periods, the problem of water shortage can be enhanced by conflictual use of water such as irrigation, industrial and power production (hydroelectric and thermoelectric). Further, over the last decade the social perspective on this issue is increasing due to climate change and global warming scenarios which come out from the last IPCC Report. The increased frequency of dry periods has stimulated the improvement of irrigation and water management. In this study we show the development and implementation of the real-time drought forecasting system Pre.G.I., an Italian acronym that stands for "Hydro-Meteorological forecast for irrigation management". The system is based on ensemble prediction at long range (30 days) with hydrological simulation of water balance to forecast the soil water content in every parcel over the Consorzio Muzza basin. The studied area covers 74,000 ha in the middle of the Po Valley, near the city of Lodi. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are based on 20 meteorological members of the non-hydrostatic WRF model with 30 days as lead-time, provided by Epson Meteo Centre, while the hydrological model used to generate the soil moisture and water table simulations is the rainfall-runoff distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano. The hydrological model was validated against measurements of latent heat flux and soil moisture acquired by an eddy-covariance station. Reliability of the forecasting system and its benefits was assessed on some cases-study occurred in the recent years.

  2. Real-time forecasts of tomorrow's earthquakes in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerstenberger, M.C.; Wiemer, S.; Jones, L.M.; Reasenberg, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite a lack of reliable deterministic earthquake precursors, seismologists have significant predictive information about earthquake activity from an increasingly accurate understanding of the clustering properties of earthquakes. In the past 15 years, time-dependent earthquake probabilities based on a generic short-term clustering model have been made publicly available in near-real time during major earthquake sequences. These forecasts describe the probability and number of events that are, on average, likely to occur following a mainshock of a given magnitude, but are not tailored to the particular sequence at hand and contain no information about the likely locations of the aftershocks. Our model builds upon the basic principles of this generic forecast model in two ways: it recasts the forecast in terms of the probability of strong ground shaking, and it combines an existing time-independent earthquake occurrence model based on fault data and historical earthquakes with increasingly complex models describing the local time-dependent earthquake clustering. The result is a time-dependent map showing the probability of strong shaking anywhere in California within the next 24 hours. The seismic hazard modelling approach we describe provides a better understanding of time-dependent earthquake hazard, and increases its usefulness for the public, emergency planners and the media.

  3. Real-Time Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis for Floods and Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets-- both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers, In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  4. Radar Based Precipitation Forecasting for Flood Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important inputs for flood warning. The accuracy of the measured precipitation controls the effectiveness of flood warning, while the forecasted precipitation increases the lead time of flood warning, this is vital for catastrophically flood warning as it provides time for flood management, such as the emergency evacuation of the people and properties within the flood prone area, so to avoid flood damages. This paper presents an algorithm for forecasting precipitation based on Chinese next generation weather radar- CINRAD for catastrophically flood warning. This algorithm includes radar data quality control, precipitation estimation and forecasting, result correction. The radar data, received at every 5-6 minutes, is quality controlled first to delete the data noises, the pre-processed radar data then is used to estimate the precipitation, which will be employed to calibrate the radar equation parameters, then the pre-processed radar data and calibrated radar equation parameters will be input to the precipitation procedure to forecast precipitation. A software based on the above algorithm is developed that can be used to forecast precipitation on real ¡§Ctime. The radar in Guangzhou city, the biggest city in southern China is studied and the precipitation in 2005 and 2006 in Liuxihe River Basin in southern China were forecasted to validate the effectiveness, the results show this algorithm is encouraging and will be put into real-time operation in the flood warning of Liuxihe River in 2007.

  5. Best Practice for Rainfall Measurement, Torrential Flood Monitoring and Real Time Alerting System in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovic, Milutin; Milojevic, Mileta; Zlatanovic, Nikola

    2014-05-01

    Serbia occupies 88.000 km2 and its confined zone menaced with torrent flood occupies 50.000km2. Floods on large rivers and torrents are the most frequent natural disasters in Serbia. This is the result of a geographic position and relief of Serbia. Therefore, defense from these natural disasters has been institutionalized since the 19th century. Through its specialized bodies and public companies, the State organized defense from floods on large rivers and protection of international and other main roads. The Topčiderska River is one of a number of rivers in Serbia that is a threat to both urban and rural environments. In this text, general characteristics of this river will be illustrated, as well as the historical natural hazards that have occurred in the part of Belgrade near Topčiderska River. Belgrade is the capital of Serbia, its political, administrative and financial center, which means that there are significant financial capacities and human resources for investments in all sectors, and specially in the water resources sector. Along the Topčiderska catchment there are many industrial, traffic and residential structures that are in danger of floods and flood protection is more difficult with rapid high flows. The goal is to use monitoring on the Topčiderska River basin to set up a modern system for monitoring in real time and forecast of torrential floods. This paper represents a system of remote detection and monitoring of torrential floods and rain measurements in real time on Topciderka river and ready for a quick response.

  6. Effect of Streamflow Forecast Uncertainty on Real-Time Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Cai, X.; Yang, D.

    2010-12-01

    Various hydrological forecast products have been applied to real-time reservoir operation, including deterministic streamflow forecast (DSF), DSF-based probabilistic streamflow forecast (DPSF), and ensemble streamflow forecast (ESF), which represent forecast uncertainty in the form of deterministic forecast error, deterministic forecast error-based uncertainty distribution, and ensemble forecast errors, respectively. Compared to previous studies that treat these forecast products as ad hoc inputs for reservoir operation models, this paper attempts to model the uncertainties involved in the various forecast products and explores their effect on real-time reservoir operation decisions. In hydrology, there are various indices reflecting the magnitude of streamflow forecast uncertainty; meanwhile, few models illustrate the forecast uncertainty evolution process. This research introduces Martingale Model of Forecast Evolution (MMFE) from supply chain management and justifies its assumptions for quantifying the evolution of uncertainty in streamflow forecast as time progresses. Based on MMFE, this research simulates the evolution of forecast uncertainty in DSF, DPSF, and ESF, and applies the reservoir operation models (dynamic programming, DP; stochastic dynamic programming, SDP; and standard operation policy, SOP) to assess the effect of different forms of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation. Through a hypothetical single-objective real-time reservoir operation model, the results illustrate that forecast uncertainty exerts significant effects. Reservoir operation efficiency, as measured by a utility function, decreases as the forecast uncertainty increases. Meanwhile, these effects also depend on the type of forecast product being used. In general, the utility of reservoir operation with ESF is nearly as high as the utility obtained with a perfect forecast; the utilities of DSF and DPSF are similar to each other but not as efficient as ESF. Moreover

  7. Real-time eruption forecasting using the material Failure Forecast Method with a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, A.; Lesage, P.; Cortés, G.; Valette, B.; Reyes-Dávila, G.

    2015-04-01

    Many attempts for deterministic forecasting of eruptions and landslides have been performed using the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM). This method consists in adjusting an empirical power law on precursory patterns of seismicity or deformation. Until now, most of the studies have presented hindsight forecasts based on complete time series of precursors and do not evaluate the ability of the method for carrying out real-time forecasting with partial precursory sequences. In this study, we present a rigorous approach of the FFM designed for real-time applications on volcano-seismic precursors. We use a Bayesian approach based on the FFM theory and an automatic classification of seismic events. The probability distributions of the data deduced from the performance of this classification are used as input. As output, it provides the probability of the forecast time at each observation time before the eruption. The spread of the a posteriori probability density function of the prediction time and its stability with respect to the observation time are used as criteria to evaluate the reliability of the forecast. We test the method on precursory accelerations of long-period seismicity prior to vulcanian explosions at Volcán de Colima (Mexico). For explosions preceded by a single phase of seismic acceleration, we obtain accurate and reliable forecasts using approximately 80% of the whole precursory sequence. It is, however, more difficult to apply the method to multiple acceleration patterns.

  8. Flood Forecasting in Wales: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Andrew; Williams, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    With steep, fast-responding river catchments, exposed coastal reaches with large tidal ranges and large population densities in some of the most at-risk areas; flood forecasting in Wales presents many varied challenges. Utilising advances in computing power and learning from best practice within the United Kingdom and abroad have seen significant improvements in recent years - however, many challenges still remain. Developments in computing and increased processing power comes with a significant price tag; greater numbers of data sources and ensemble feeds brings a better understanding of uncertainty but the wealth of data needs careful management to ensure a clear message of risk is disseminated; new modelling techniques utilise better and faster computation, but lack the history of record and experience gained from the continued use of more established forecasting models. As a flood forecasting team we work to develop coastal and fluvial forecasting models, set them up for operational use and manage the duty role that runs the models in real time. An overview of our current operational flood forecasting system will be presented, along with a discussion on some of the solutions we have in place to address the challenges we face. These include: • real-time updating of fluvial models • rainfall forecasting verification • ensemble forecast data • longer range forecast data • contingency models • offshore to nearshore wave transformation • calculation of wave overtopping

  9. Real-time extreme weather event attribution with forecast seasonal SSTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Otto, F. E. L.; Uhe, P.; Schaller, N.; Allen, M. R.; Hermanson, L.; Christidis, N.; McLean, P.; Cullen, H.

    2016-06-01

    Within the last decade, extreme weather event attribution has emerged as a new field of science and garnered increasing attention from the wider scientific community and the public. Numerous methods have been put forward to determine the contribution of anthropogenic climate change to individual extreme weather events. So far nearly all such analyses were done months after an event has happened. Here we present a new method which can assess the fraction of attributable risk of a severe weather event due to an external driver in real-time. The method builds on a large ensemble of atmosphere-only general circulation model simulations forced by seasonal forecast sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Taking the England 2013/14 winter floods as an example, we demonstrate that the change in risk for heavy rainfall during the England floods due to anthropogenic climate change, is of similar magnitude using either observed or seasonal forecast SSTs. Testing the dynamic response of the model to the anomalous ocean state for January 2014, we find that observed SSTs are required to establish a discernible link between a particular SST pattern and an atmospheric response such as a shift in the jetstream in the model. For extreme events occurring under strongly anomalous SST patterns associated with known low-frequency climate modes, however, forecast SSTs can provide sufficient guidance to determine the dynamic contribution to the event.

  10. Real Time Monitoring of Flooding from Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we review the progress to date including results from data analyses and present a schedule of milestones for the remainder of the project. We discuss the processing of flood extent data and SSM/I brightness temperature data for the 1993 Midwest Flood. We present preliminary results from the derivation of open water fraction from brightness temperatures.

  11. Local flood forecasting - From data collection to communicating forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. J.; Beven, K.

    2013-12-01

    An important aspect of improving resilience to flooding is the provision of timely warnings to flood sensitive locations thus allowing mitigating measures to be implemented. For specific locations such small communities (often in head water catchments) or river side factories the ability of traditional centralised forecasting systems to provide timely & accurate forecasts may be challenged. This is due in part to the finite resources of monitoring agencies which results in courser spatial scales of model and data collection then may be required for the generation of accurate forecasts. One strategy to improve flood resilience at such locations is to develop automated location specific forecasts. In this presentation we outline a methodology to achieve this based on the installation of adequate telemetered monitoring equipment; generally a water level sensor and a rain gauge. This allows the construction of a local flood forecasting model which may be coupled with available precipitation forecasts. The construction of the hydrological forecasting model consists of a guided process which incorporates both data assimilation and the representation of the forecast uncertainty based on post processing. The guided process requires the modeller to make only a few choices thus allowing rapid model deployment and revision. To be of use the derived forecasts must be made available in real time and updated frequently; maybe every five minutes. Traditional practices in issuing warnings dependent on expert interpretation must therefore be altered so that those at the site of interest become their own `experts'. To aid this appropriate presentation of both the predictions and past performance of the model, designed to encourage realistic interpretation of the forecasts and their uncertainties is considered. The resulting forecast chain is demonstrated on UK case studies.

  12. Real-Time Influenza Forecasts during the 2012–2013 Season

    PubMed Central

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Karspeck, Alicia; Yang, Wan; Tamerius, James; Lipsitch, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we developed a seasonal influenza prediction system that uses an advanced data assimilation technique and real-time estimates of influenza incidence to optimize and initialize a population-based mathematical model of influenza transmission dynamics. This system was used to generate and evaluate retrospective forecasts of influenza peak timing in New York City. Here we present weekly forecasts of seasonal influenza developed and run in real time for 108 cites in the United States during the recent 2012–2013 season. Reliable ensemble forecasts of influenza outbreak peak timing with leads of up to 9 weeks were produced. Forecast accuracy increased as the season progressed, and the forecasts significantly outperformed alternate, analog prediction methods. By Week 52, prior to peak for the majority of cities, 63% of all ensemble forecasts were accurate. To our knowledge, this is the first time predictions of seasonal influenza have been made in real time and with demonstrated accuracy. PMID:24302074

  13. Flood Warning and Forecasting System in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskova, Danica

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, it finished project Flood Warning and Forecasting System (POVAPSYS) as part of the flood protection in Slovakia till 2010. The aim was to build POVAPSYS integrated computerized flood forecasting and warning system. It took a qualitatively higher level of output meteorological and hydrological services in case of floods affecting large territorial units, as well as local flood events. It is further unfolding demands on performance and coordination of meteorological and hydrological services, troubleshooting observation, evaluation of data, fast communication, modeling and forecasting of meteorological and hydrological processes. Integration of all information entering and exiting to and from the project POVAPSYS provides Hydrological Flood Forecasting System (HYPOS). The system provides information on the current hydrometeorological situation and its evolution with the generation of alerts and notifications in case of exceeding predefined thresholds. HYPOS's functioning of the system requires flawless operability in critical situations while minimizing the loss of its key parts. HYPOS is a core part of the project POVAPSYS, it is a comprehensive software solutions based on a modular principle, providing data and processed information including alarms, in real time. In order to achieve full functionality of the system, in proposal, we have put emphasis on reliability, robustness, availability and security.

  14. Real time probabilistic precipitation forecasts in the Milano urban area: comparison between a physics and pragmatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, Alessandro; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Lombardi, Gabriele; Amengual, Arnau; Homar, Victor; Romero, Romu; Mancini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation forecasts from mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) models often contain features that are not deterministically predictable. In particular, accurate forecasts of deep moist convection and extreme rainfall are arduous to be predicted in terms of amount, time and target over small hydrological basins due to uncertainties arising from the numerical weather prediction (NWP), physical parameterizations and high sensitivity to misrepresentation of the atmospheric state, therefore they require a probabilistic forecast approach. Here, we examine some hydro-meteorological episodes that affected the Milano urban watersheds using a flood forecasting system which comprises the Flash-flood Event-based Spatially distributed rainfall-runoff Transformation, including Water Balance (FEST-WB) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. The first approach is based on a hydrological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) designed to explicitly cope with uncertainties in the initial and lateral boundary conditions (IC/LBCs) and physical parameterizations of the NWP model. The second involves a pragmatic post-processing procedure by randomly shifting in space the precipitation field provided by the deterministic WRF model run in order to get a cluster of different simulations. Although the physics-based approach needs a high computational cost, it outperforms the pragmatic set of configurations, which, however, turns out to be an acceptable low-budget alternative for real time flood forecasts over small urban basins when a single deterministic run is available.

  15. Real Time Data in Synoptic Meteolorolgy and Weather Forecasting Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campetella, C. M.; Gassmann, M. I.

    2006-05-01

    The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanographic Sciences (DAOS) of the University of Buenos Aires is the university component of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Regional Meteorological Training Center (RMTC) in Region III. In January, 2002 our RMTC was invited to take part in the MeteoForum pilot project that was developed jointly by the COMET and Unidata programs of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). MeteoForum comprises an international network of WMO Region III and IV RMTCs working collaboratively with universities to enhance their roles of training and education through information technologies and multilingual collections of resources. The DAOS undertook to improve its infrastructure to be able to access hydro-meteorological information in real-time as part of the Unidata community. In 2003, the DAOS received some Unidata equipment grant funds to update its computer infrastructure, improving communications with an operationally quicker system. Departmental networking was upgraded to 100 Mb/s capability while, at the same time, new computation resources were purchased that increased the number of computers available for student use from 5 to 8. This upgrade has also resulted in more and better computers being available for student and faculty research. A video projection system, purchased with funds provided by the COMET program as part of Meteoforum, is used in classrooms with Internet connections for a variety of educational activities. The upgraded computing and networking facilities have contributed to the development of educational modules using real-time hydro-meteorological and other digital data for the classroom. With the aid of Unidata personal, the Unidata Local Data Management (LDM) software was installed and configured to request and process real-time feeds of global observational data; global numerical model output from the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) models; and all imager channels

  16. Near Real Time Data for Operational Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather operations presents unique challenges for data systems and providers. Space weather events evolve more quickly than terrestrial weather events. While terrestrial weather occurs on timescales of minutes to hours, space weather storms evolve on timescales of seconds to minutes. For example, the degradation of the High Frequency Radio communications between the ground and commercial airlines is nearly instantaneous when a solar flare occurs. Thus the customer is observing impacts at the same time that the operational forecast center is seeing the event unfold. The diversity and spatial scale of the space weather system is such that no single observation can capture the salient features. The vast space that encompasses space weather and the scarcity of observations further exacerbates the situation and make each observation even more valuable. The physics of interplanetary space, through which many major storms propagate, is very different from the physics of the ionosphere where most of the impacts are felt. And while some observations can be made from ground-based observatories, many of the most critical data comes from satellites, often in unique orbits far from Earth. In this presentation, I will describe some of the more important sources and types of data that feed into the operational alerts, watches, and warnings of space weather storms. Included will be a discussion of some of the new space weather forecast models and the data challenges that they bring forward.

  17. Tracking and forecasting ecosystem interactions in real time

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, Ethan R.; May, Robert M.; Munch, Stephan B.; Sugihara, George

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that species interactions are not constant but change as the ecosystem shifts to new states. Although controlled experiments and model investigations demonstrate how nonlinear interactions can arise in principle, empirical tools to track and predict them in nature are lacking. Here we present a practical method, using available time-series data, to measure and forecast changing interactions in real systems, and identify the underlying mechanisms. The method is illustrated with model data from a marine mesocosm experiment and limnologic field data from Sparkling Lake, WI, USA. From simple to complex, these examples demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying, predicting and understanding state-dependent, nonlinear interactions as they occur in situ and in real time—a requirement for managing resources in a nonlinear, non-equilibrium world. PMID:26763700

  18. Real-time forecasting of infectious disease dynamics with a stochastic semi-mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Funk, Sebastian; Camacho, Anton; Kucharski, Adam J; Eggo, Rosalind M; Edmunds, W John

    2016-12-16

    Real-time forecasts of infectious diseases can help public health planning, especially during outbreaks. If forecasts are generated from mechanistic models, they can be further used to target resources or to compare the impact of possible interventions. However, paremeterising such models is often difficult in real time, when information on behavioural changes, interventions and routes of transmission are not readily available. Here, we present a semi-mechanistic model of infectious disease dynamics that was used in real time during the 2013-2016 West African Ebola epidemic, and show fits to a Ebola Forecasting Challenge conducted in late 2015 with simulated data mimicking the true epidemic. We assess the performance of the model in different situations and identify strengths and shortcomings of our approach. Models such as the one presented here which combine the power of mechanistic models with the flexibility to include uncertainty about the precise outbreak dynamics may be an important tool in combating future outbreaks.

  19. Value of Probabilistic Weather Forecasts: Assessment by Real-Time Optimization of Irrigation Scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Ximing; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Wang, Dingbao

    2011-09-29

    This paper presents a modeling framework for real-time decision support for irrigation scheduling using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) probabilistic rainfall forecasts. The forecasts and their probability distributions are incorporated into a simulation-optimization modeling framework. In this study, modeling irrigation is determined by a stochastic optimization program based on the simulated soil moisture and crop water-stress status and the forecasted rainfall for the next 1-7 days. The modeling framework is applied to irrigated corn in Mason County, Illinois. It is found that there is ample potential to improve current farmers practices by simply using the proposed simulation-optimization framework, which uses the present soil moisture and crop evapotranspiration information even without any forecasts. It is found that the values of the forecasts vary across dry, normal, and wet years. More significant economic gains are found in normal and wet years than in dry years under the various forecast horizons. To mitigate drought effect on crop yield through irrigation, medium- or long-term climate predictions likely play a more important role than short-term forecasts. NOAA's imperfect 1-week forecast is still valuable in terms of both profit gain and water saving. Compared with the no-rain forecast case, the short-term imperfect forecasts could lead to additional 2.4-8.5% gain in profit and 11.0-26.9% water saving. However, the performance of the imperfect forecast is only slightly better than the ensemble weather forecast based on historical data and slightly inferior to the perfect forecast. It seems that the 1-week forecast horizon is too limited to evaluate the role of the various forecast scenarios for irrigation scheduling, which is actually a seasonal decision issue. For irrigation scheduling, both the forecast quality and the length of forecast time horizon matter. Thus, longer forecasts might be necessary to evaluate the role

  20. Earthquake and failure forecasting in real-time: A Forecasting Model Testing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Boon, Steven; Meredith, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Across Europe there are a large number of rock deformation laboratories, each of which runs many experiments. Similarly there are a large number of theoretical rock physicists who develop constitutive and computational models both for rock deformation and changes in geophysical properties. Here we consider how to open up opportunities for sharing experimental data in a way that is integrated with multiple hypothesis testing. We present a prototype for a new forecasting model testing centre based on e-infrastructures for capturing and sharing data and models to accelerate the Rock Physicist (RP) research. This proposal is triggered by our work on data assimilation in the NERC EFFORT (Earthquake and Failure Forecasting in Real Time) project, using data provided by the NERC CREEP 2 experimental project as a test case. EFFORT is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between Geoscientists, Rock Physicists and Computer Scientist. Brittle failure of the crust is likely to play a key role in controlling the timing of a range of geophysical hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, yet the predictability of brittle failure is unknown. Our aim is to provide a facility for developing and testing models to forecast brittle failure in experimental and natural data. Model testing is performed in real-time, verifiably prospective mode, in order to avoid selection biases that are possible in retrospective analyses. The project will ultimately quantify the predictability of brittle failure, and how this predictability scales from simple, controlled laboratory conditions to the complex, uncontrolled real world. Experimental data are collected from controlled laboratory experiments which includes data from the UCL Laboratory and from Creep2 project which will undertake experiments in a deep-sea laboratory. We illustrate the properties of the prototype testing centre by streaming and analysing realistically noisy synthetic data, as an aid to generating and improving testing methodologies in

  1. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; Sardiña, Victor; Hsu, Vindell; Hirshorn, Barry F.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Kanamori, Hiroo; Koyanagi, Kanoa K.; Shiro, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  2. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; ,

    2012-01-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  3. Real time tests for long lead-time forecasting of the magnetic field vectors within CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, Neel; Vourlidas, Angelos; Pulkkinen, Antti; Wold, Alexandra M.

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections, CMEs, has significant importance for forecasting terrestrial behavior. We have developed a technique to estimate the time-varying magnetic field at Earth for periods within CMEs (Savani et al 2015, 2016). This technique reduces the complex dynamics in order to create a reliable prediction methodology to operate everyday under robust conditions. In this presentation, we focus on the results and skill scores of the forecasting technique calculated from 40 historical CME events from the pre-STEREO mission. Since these results provided substantial improvements in the long lead-time Kp index forecasts, we have now begun testing under real-time conditions. We will also show the preliminary results of our methodology under these real-time conditions within the CCMC hosted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. Real-Time Assessment of the 16 September 2015 Chile Tsunami and Implications for Near-Field Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liujuan; Titov, Vasily V.; Moore, Christopher; Wei, Yong

    2016-02-01

    The magnitude 8.3 earthquake in central Chile on 16 September 2015 and the resulting tsunami severely affected the region, with 15 deaths ( Onemi in Monitoreo por sismo de mayor intensidad. (In Spanish) [Available at: http://www.onemi.cl/alerta/se-declara-alerta-roja-por-sismo-de-mayor-intensidad-y-alarma-de-tsunami/], 2015), over one million evacuated, and flooding in nearby coastal cities. We present our real-time assessment of the 2015 Chile tsunami using the Short-term Inundation Forecasting for Tsunamis system, and post-event analyses with local community models in Chile. We evaluate three real-time tsunami sources, which were inverted at the time that the first quarter-, half-, and full-wave passed the first tsunameter (DART 32402, located approximately 580 km north-northwest of the epicenter), respectively. Measurement comparisons from 26 deep-ocean tsunameters and 38 coastal tide stations show that good model accuracies are achieved for all three sources, particularly for the local sites that recorded the most destructive waves. The study highlights the forecast speed, time and accuracy dependence, and their implications for the local forecast capability. Our analyses suggest that the tsunami's main origination area is about 100-200 km long and 100 km wide, to the north of the earthquake epicenter along the trench and the total estimated tsunami wave energy is 7.9 × 1013 J (with 13 % uncertainty). The study provides important guidelines for the earliest reliable estimate of tsunami energy and local forecasts. They can be obtained with the first quarter-wave of tsunameter recording. These results are also confirmed by a forecast analysis of the 2011 Japan tsunami. Furthermore, we find that the first half-wave tsunameter data are sufficient to accurately forecast the 2015 Chile tsunami, due to the specific orientation between the nearest tsunameter and the source. The study also suggests expanding the operational use of the local community models in real

  5. Use of Real-time Satellite Rainfall Information in a Global Flood Estimation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. F.; Wu, H.; Tian, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) is a merger of precipitation information from mainly passive microwave sensors on polar orbiting satellites. This information is cross-calibrated in terms of rainrate using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) flying in an inclined orbit at 35°. A research quality analysis is produced a few months after observation time, but a real-time product is also generated within a few hours of observation. This real-time, or RT, product can be used to quickly diagnose heavy rain events over most of the globe. This rainfall information is also used as the key input into an experimental system, the Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS), which produces real-time, quasi-global flood estimates. Images and output data are available for use by the community (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/globalflood/). The method uses the 3-hr resolution composite rainfall analyses as input into a hydrological model that calculates water depth and streamflow at each grid (at 0.125 ° latitude-longitude) over the tropics and mid-latitudes. Flood detection and intensity estimates are based on water depth thresholds calculated from a 13-year retrospective run using the satellite rainfall and model. Examination of individual cases in real-time or retrospectively often indicates skill in detecting the occurrence of a flood event and a reasonable evolution of water depth (at the scale of the calculation) and downstream movement of high water levels. A recently published study evaluating calculated flood occurrence from the GFMS against a global flood event database is reviewed. The statistics indicate that flood detection results improve with longer duration (> 3 days) floods and that the statistics are impacted by the presence of large dams, which are not accounted for in the model calculations. Overall, for longer floods in basins without large dams, the Probability of Detection (POD) of floods is ~ 0.7, while the False Alarm Rate

  6. Risk Analysis of Multipurpose Reservoir Real-time Operation based on Probabilistic Hydrologic Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of the risk for reservoir real-time operation is a hard task owing to the difficulty of accurate description of inflow uncertainties. The ensemble-based probabilistic hydrologic forecasting, which outputs a lot of inflow scenarios or traces, does well in depicting the inflow not only the marginal distribution but also their corrections. This motivates us to analyze the reservoir operating risk by inputting probabilistic hydrologic forecasting into reservoir real-time operation. The proposed procedure involves: (1) based upon the Bayesian inference, two alternative techniques, the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), are implemented for producing probabilistic hydrologic forecasting, respectively, (2) the reservoir risk is defined as the ratio of the number of traces that excessive (or below) the critical value to the total number of traces, and (3) a multipurpose reservoir operation model is build to produce Pareto solutions for trade-offs between risks and profits with the inputted probabilistic hydrologic forecasting. With a case study of the China's Three Gorges Reservoir, it is found that the reservoir real-time operation risks can be estimated and minimized based on the proposed methods, and this is great potential benefit in decision and choosing the most realistic one.

  7. Real-time forecasting of sample failure in laboratory rock deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Atkinson, Malcolm; Filgueira, Rosa; Meredith, Philip; Boon, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The ability to accurately forecast catastrophic failure in rocks is likely to be a key component in reliable eruption forecasting models. The processes controlling the approach to failure produce highly non-linear behaviour, with a large stochastic component due to material heterogeneity. In the laboratory, mechanical, hydraulic, and rock physical properties are known to change in systematic ways prior to catastrophic failure. The effectiveness of such signals in real-time forecasting has never been tested before in a controlled laboratory setting; previous work has often been qualitative in nature, and subject to retrospective selection bias. Here we describe a collaborative experiment in real-time data assimilation to explore the limits of predictability of rock failure in a best-case scenario. Data are streamed from a remote rock deformation laboratory to a user-friendly portal, where several proposed physical/stochastic models can be analyzed in parallel in real time, using a variety of statistical fitting techniques, including least squares regression, maximum likelihood fitting, Markov-chain Monte-Carlo and Bayesian analysis. The results are posted and regularly updated on the web site prior to catastrophic failure, to ensure a true and verifiable prospective test of forecasting power.

  8. Flood forecasting in Niger-Benue basin using satellite and quantitative precipitation forecast data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, Alemseged Tamiru; Tefera, Fekadu Teshome; Rientjes, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Availability of reliable, timely and accurate rainfall data is constraining the establishment of flood forecasting and early warning systems in many parts of Africa. We evaluated the potential of satellite and weather forecast data as input to a parsimonious flood forecasting model to provide information for flood early warning in the central part of Nigeria. We calibrated the HEC-HMS rainfall-runoff model using rainfall data from post real time Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi satellite Precipitation Analysis product (TMPA). Real time TMPA satellite rainfall estimates and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) rainfall products were tested for flood forecasting. The implication of removing the systematic errors of the satellite rainfall estimates (SREs) was explored. Performance of the rainfall-runoff model was assessed using visual inspection of simulated and observed hydrographs and a set of performance indicators. The forecast skill was assessed for 1-6 days lead time using categorical verification statistics such as Probability Of Detection (POD), Frequency Of Hit (FOH) and Frequency Of Miss (FOM). The model performance satisfactorily reproduced the pattern and volume of the observed stream flow hydrograph of Benue River. Overall, our results show that SREs and rainfall forecasts from weather models have great potential to serve as model inputs for real-time flood forecasting in data scarce areas. For these data to receive application in African transboundary basins, we suggest (i) removing their systematic error to further improve flood forecast skill; (ii) improving rainfall forecasts; and (iii) improving data sharing between riparian countries.

  9. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  10. Forecaster priorities for improving probabilistic flood forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterhall, Fredrik; Pappenberger, Florian; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Cloke, Hannah; Thielen, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) have in recent years been increasingly used for the operational forecasting of floods by European hydrometeorological agencies. The most obvious advantage of HEPS is that more of the uncertainty in the modelling system can be assessed. In addition, ensemble prediction systems generally have better skill than deterministic systems both in the terms of the mean forecast performance and the potential forecasting of extreme events. Research efforts have so far mostly been devoted to the improvement of the physical and technical aspects of the model systems, such as increased resolution in time and space and better description of physical processes. Developments like these are certainly needed; however, in this paper we argue that there are other areas of HEPS that need urgent attention. This was also the result from a group exercise and a survey conducted to operational forecasters within the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) to identify the top priorities of improvement regarding their own system. They turned out to span a range of areas, the most popular being to include verification of an assessment of past forecast performance, a multi-model approach for hydrological modelling, to increase the forecast skill on the medium range (>3 days) and more focus on education and training on the interpretation of forecasts. In light of limited resources, we suggest a simple model to classify the identified priorities in terms of their cost and complexity to decide in which order to tackle them. This model is then used to create an action plan of short-, medium- and long-term research priorities with the ultimate goal of an optimal improvement of EFAS in particular and to spur the development of operational HEPS in general.

  11. Global system for hydrological monitoring and forecasting in real time at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Enrique; De Michele, Carlo; Todini, Ezio; Cifres, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    This project presented at the EGU 2016 born of solidarity and the need to dignify the most disadvantaged people living in the poorest countries (Africa, South America and Asia, which are continually exposed to changes in the hydrologic cycle suffering events of large floods and/or long periods of droughts. It is also a special year this 2016, Year of Mercy, in which we must engage with the most disadvantaged of our Planet (Gaia) making available to them what we do professionally and scientifically. The project called "Global system for hydrological monitoring and forecasting in real time at high resolution" is Non-Profit and aims to provide at global high resolution (1km2) hydrological monitoring and forecasting in real time and continuously coupling Weather Forecast of Global Circulation Models, such us GFS-0.25° (Deterministic and Ensembles Run) forcing a physically based distributed hydrological model computationally efficient, such as the latest version extended of TOPKAPI model, named TOPKAPI-eXtended. Finally using the MCP approach for the proper use of ensembles for Predictive Uncertainty assessment essentially based on a multiple regression in the Normal space, can be easily extended to use ensembles to represent the local (in time) smaller or larger conditional predictive uncertainty, as a function of the ensemble spread. In this way, each prediction in time accounts for both the predictive uncertainty of the ensemble mean and that of the ensemble spread. To perform a continuous hydrological modeling with TOPKAPI-X model and have hot start of hydrological status of watersheds, the system assimilated products of rainfall and temperature derived from remote sensing, such as product 3B42RT of TRMM NASA and others.The system will be integrated into a Decision Support System (DSS) platform, based on geographical data. The DSS is a web application (For Pc, Tablet/Mobile phone): It does not need installation (all you need is a web browser and an internet

  12. The FASTER Approach: A New Tool for Calculating Real-Time Tsunami Flood Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. I.; Cross, A.; Johnson, L.; Miller, K.; Nicolini, T.; Whitmore, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the aftermath of the 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan tsunamis that struck the California coastline, emergency managers requested that the state tsunami program provide more detailed information about the flood potential of distant-source tsunamis well ahead of their arrival time. The main issue is that existing tsunami evacuation plans call for evacuation of the predetermined "worst-case" tsunami evacuation zone (typically at a 30- to 50-foot elevation) during any "Warning" level event; the alternative is to not call an evacuation at all. A solution to provide more detailed information for secondary evacuation zones has been the development of tsunami evacuation "playbooks" to plan for tsunami scenarios of various sizes and source locations. To determine a recommended level of evacuation during a distant-source tsunami, an analytical tool has been developed called the "FASTER" approach, an acronym for factors that influence the tsunami flood hazard for a community: Forecast Amplitude, Storm, Tides, Error in forecast, and the Run-up potential. Within the first couple hours after a tsunami is generated, the National Tsunami Warning Center provides tsunami forecast amplitudes and arrival times for approximately 60 coastal locations in California. At the same time, the regional NOAA Weather Forecast Offices in the state calculate the forecasted coastal storm and tidal conditions that will influence tsunami flooding. Providing added conservatism in calculating tsunami flood potential, we include an error factor of 30% for the forecast amplitude, which is based on observed forecast errors during recent events, and a site specific run-up factor which is calculated from the existing state tsunami modeling database. The factors are added together into a cumulative FASTER flood potential value for the first five hours of tsunami activity and used to select the appropriate tsunami phase evacuation "playbook" which is provided to each coastal community shortly after the forecast

  13. Optimization Based Data Mining Approah for Forecasting Real-Time Energy Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Li, Xueping; Zhou, Shengchao

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide concern over environmental degradation, increasing pressure on electric utility companies to meet peak energy demand, and the requirement to avoid purchasing power from the real-time energy market are motivating the utility companies to explore new approaches for forecasting energy demand. Until now, most approaches for forecasting energy demand rely on monthly electrical consumption data. The emergence of smart meters data is changing the data space for electric utility companies, and creating opportunities for utility companies to collect and analyze energy consumption data at a much finer temporal resolution of at least 15-minutes interval. While the data granularity provided by smart meters is important, there are still other challenges in forecasting energy demand; these challenges include lack of information about appliances usage and occupants behavior. Consequently, in this paper, we develop an optimization based data mining approach for forecasting real-time energy demand using smart meters data. The objective of our approach is to develop a robust estimation of energy demand without access to these other building and behavior data. Specifically, the forecasting problem is formulated as a quadratic programming problem and solved using the so-called support vector machine (SVM) technique in an online setting. The parameters of the SVM technique are optimized using simulated annealing approach. The proposed approach is applied to hourly smart meters data for several residential customers over several days.

  14. Global Near Real-Time Satellite-based Flood Monitoring and Product Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Slayback, D. A.; Policelli, F.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Tokay, M.

    2012-12-01

    Flooding is among the most destructive, frequent, and costly natural disasters faced by modern society, with several major events occurring each year. In the past few years, major floods have devastated parts of China, Thailand, Pakistan, Australia, and the Philippines, among others. The toll of these events, in financial costs, displacement of individuals, and deaths, is substantial and continues to rise as climate change generates more extreme weather events. When these events do occur, the disaster management community requires frequently updated and easily accessible information to better understand the extent of flooding and better coordinate response efforts. With funding from NASA's Applied Sciences program, we have developed, and are now operating, a near real-time global flood mapping system to help provide critical flood extent information within 24-48 hours after flooding events. The system applies a water detection algorithm to MODIS imagery received from the LANCE (Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS) system at NASA Goddard. The LANCE system typically processes imagery in less than 3 hours after satellite overpass, and our flood mapping system can output flood products within ½ hour of acquiring the LANCE products. Using imagery from both the Terra (10:30 AM local time overpass) and Aqua (1:30 PM) platforms allows an initial assessment of flooding extent by late afternoon, every day, and more robust assessments after accumulating imagery over a longer period; the MODIS sensors are optical, so cloud cover remains an issue, which is partly overcome by using multiple looks over one or more days. Other issues include the relatively coarse scale of the MODIS imagery (250 meters), the difficulty of detecting flood waters in areas with continuous canopy cover, confusion of shadow (cloud or terrain) with water, and accurately identifying detected water as flood as opposed to normal water extents. We have made progress on some of these issues

  15. A Real-Time Data-Assimilative Nowcast/Forecast System for the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrara, J.; Chao, Y.; Li, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, H.; He, R.; Qian, H.

    2012-12-01

    Based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), this talk will describe a real-time data-assimilative ocean nowcast/forecast system that has been developed as part of the GOMEX-Pilot Prediction Project funded by Department of Energy. This project seeks to evaluate and demonstrate numerical model-based operational predictions of the circulation of the Gulf of Mexico with a particular focus on the Loop Current and associated eddies. The data assimilation component of this system uses a multi-scale 3-dimensional variational (3DVAR) methodology that is capable of assimilating different types of observational data and is also computationally efficient enough for near real-time operations. In order to demonstrate the model performance and prediction skills, only the routine observations (e.g., satellite observations) are used for data assimilation. A set of real-time 3-month forecasts was conducted during the Fall of 2011 to evaluate the potential of the system to predict variations in the Loop Current and associated eddies, including eddy-shedding events. The skill of these forecasts will be analyzed with an emphasis on an eddy-shedding event that took place in November 2011.

  16. November 2004 space weather events: Real-time observations and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichtchenko, L.; Zhukov, A.; van der Linden, R.; Stankov, S. M.; Jakowski, N.; StanisłAwska, I.; Juchnikowski, G.; Wilkinson, P.; Patterson, G.; Thomson, A. W. P.

    2007-06-01

    Space weather events with their solar origin and their distribution through the heliosphere affect the whole magnetosphere-ionosphere-Earth system. Their real-time monitoring and forecasting are important for science and technology. Here we discuss one of the largest space weather events of Solar Cycle 23, in November 2004, which was also one of the most difficult periods to forecast. Nine halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interacting on their way through the interplanetary medium and forming two geoeffective interplanetary structures, exemplify the complexity of the event. Real-time and quasi-real-time observations of the ground geomagnetic field show rapid and extensive expansion of the auroral oval to 55° in geomagnetic latitude accompanied by great variability of the ionosphere. Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) seen in ground networks, such as power grids and pipelines, were significant during the event, although no problems were reported. Forecasts of the CME propagation, global and local ground geomagnetic activity, and ionospheric parameters, issued by several regional warning centers, revealed certain deficiencies in predictions of the interplanetary characteristics of the CME, size of the geomagnetic disturbances, and complexity of the ionospheric variations produced by this event. This paper is a collective report based on the materials presented at the splinter session on November 2004 events during the first European Space Weather Week.

  17. Application of Global Real-Time Landslide Forecasting System for International use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Hong, Y.; Adler, R.

    2008-12-01

    The variability of natural hazard events by category significantly vary in their spatial and temporal extents and onsets, requiring a catered, and focused approach to appropriately address the risk and vulnerability of the specific hazard event. The advent of satellite data products has helped to monitor tropical cyclones, droughts, and flooding conditions and consequent impacts. Geophysical events such as earthquake are continually monitored on a global seismic network. However, a warning or monitoring system has not been established at larger scales for landslides, a hazard with the smallest spatial extent but highest frequency and arguably largest impacts globally. One of the major challenges in landslide hazard research is the field's focus on site specific investigations, drawing on high resolution surface data as well as detailed landslide inventories and rainfall information to provide an estimate of static landslide hazard susceptibility. Few studies have approached the issue of landslide risk and susceptibility from a dynamic standpoint to estimate the potential for landslide susceptibility conditions in a time frame that allows for a better understanding of the physical processes both scientifically and as it relates to societal response. To present a more dynamic representation of landslide hazard risk at larger spatial scales new research has developed an algorithm which couples a landslide hazard susceptibility map with real-time satellite derived rainfall to forecast areas with high landslide potential at the global scale. The algorithm draws on near-real time Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data as well as other satellite products to obtain a 3-hourly picture of locations across the world where the surface susceptibility conditions are high and the rainfall accumulation exceeds a defined threshold. The resulting forecasts are updated every 3 hours on a website, highlighting pixels satisfying these conditions on a 0.25º grid. The spatial

  18. A centralized real-time controller for the reservoir's management on the Seine River using ensemble weather forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchi, Andrea; Raso, Luciano; Jay-Allemand, Maxime; Dorchies, David; Malaterre, Pierre-Olivier; Pianosi, Francesca; Van Overloop, Peter-Jules

    2013-04-01

    The reservoirs on the Seine River, upstream of Paris, are regulated with the objective of reducing floods and supporting low flows. The current management of these reservoirs is empirical, reactive, and decentralized, mainly based on filling curves, constructed from an analysis of historical floods and low flows. When inflows are significantly different from their seasonal average, this management strategy proves inefficient. Climate change is also a challenge, for the possible modification of future hydrologic conditions. To improve such management strategy, in this study we investigate the use of Tree-Based Model Predictive Control (TB-MPC), a proactive and centralized method that uses all the information available in real-time, including ensemble weather forecasting. In TB-MPC, a tree is generated from an ensemble of weather forecast. The tree structure summarizes the information contained in the ensemble, specifying the time, along the optimization horizon, when forecast trajectories diverge and thus uncertainty is expected to be resolved. This information is then used in the model predictive control framework. The TB-MPC controller is implemented in combination with the integrated model of the water system, including a semi-distributed hydrologic model of the watershed, a simplified hydraulic model of the river network, and the four reservoir models. Optimization takes into account the cost associated to floods and low-flows, and a penalty cost based on the final reservoir storages. The performances of the TB-MPC controller will be simulated and compared with those of deterministic MPC and with the actual management performances. This work is part of the Climaware European project (2010-2013) set up to develop and to assess measures for sustainable water resources management regarding adaptation to climate change.

  19. Improving real-time inflow forecasting into hydropower reservoirs through a complementary modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gragne, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.; Alfredsen, K.

    2015-08-01

    Accuracy of reservoir inflow forecasts is instrumental for maximizing the value of water resources and benefits gained through hydropower generation. Improving hourly reservoir inflow forecasts over a 24 h lead time is considered within the day-ahead (Elspot) market of the Nordic exchange market. A complementary modelling framework presents an approach for improving real-time forecasting without needing to modify the pre-existing forecasting model, but instead formulating an independent additive or complementary model that captures the structure the existing operational model may be missing. We present here the application of this principle for issuing improved hourly inflow forecasts into hydropower reservoirs over extended lead times, and the parameter estimation procedure reformulated to deal with bias, persistence and heteroscedasticity. The procedure presented comprises an error model added on top of an unalterable constant parameter conceptual model. This procedure is applied in the 207 km2 Krinsvatn catchment in central Norway. The structure of the error model is established based on attributes of the residual time series from the conceptual model. Besides improving forecast skills of operational models, the approach estimates the uncertainty in the complementary model structure and produces probabilistic inflow forecasts that entrain suitable information for reducing uncertainty in the decision-making processes in hydropower systems operation. Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations revealed an overall significant improvement in forecast accuracy for lead times up to 17 h. Evaluation of the percentage of observations bracketed in the forecasted 95 % confidence interval indicated that the degree of success in containing 95 % of the observations varies across seasons and hydrologic years.

  20. Impact of meteorological predictions on real-time spring flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulibaly, Paulin

    2003-12-01

    Meteorological predictions, such as precipitation and temperature, are commonly used to improve real-time hydrologic forecasting, despite their inherent uncertainty and their absence in the model calibration stage. In this study, we quantify the effect of meteorological prediction errors on the accuracy of daily spring reservoir inflow forecasts using weather predictions in both the model calibration and testing phases. Different modelling experiments are compared using an operational conceptual model and nonlinear empirical models to assess the effects of using daily numerical weather predictions as opposed to the use of historical observations. It is found that, even with large prediction errors, meteorological forecasts can provide significant improvement of spring flow forecast for up to 7 days lead time, particularly for low flows. Spring flow prediction errors associated with the type of hydrological model used are significantly larger than those related to the meteorological predictions, particularly for 1 to 4 days ahead forecasts. The experimental results also indicate that multiple model-based forecasting using an iterative prediction approach appears to be the most effective method for an adequate use of weather predictions. Copyright

  1. Global Near Real-Time MODIS and Landsat Flood Mapping and Product Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Policelli, F. S.; Slayback, D. A.; Tokay, M. M.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding is the most destructive, frequent, and costly natural disaster faced by modern society, and is increasing in frequency and damage (deaths, displacements, and financial costs) as populations increase and climate change generates more extreme weather events. When major flooding events occur, the disaster management community needs frequently updated and easily accessible information to better understand the extent of flooding and coordinate response efforts. With funding from NASA's Applied Sciences program, we developed and are now operating a near real-time global flood mapping system to help provide flood extent information within 24-48 hours of events. The principal element of the system applies a water detection algorithm to MODIS imagery, which is processed by the LANCE (Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS) system at NASA Goddard within a few hours of satellite overpass. Using imagery from both the Terra (10:30 AM local time overpass) and Aqua (1:30 PM) platforms allows the system to deliver an initial daily assessment of flood extent by late afternoon, and more robust assessments after accumulating cloud-free imagery over several days. Cloud cover is the primary limitation in detecting surface water from MODIS imagery. Other issues include the relatively coarse scale of the MODIS imagery (250 meters) for some events, the difficulty of detecting flood waters in areas with continuous canopy cover, confusion of shadow (cloud or terrain) with water, and accurately identifying detected water as flood as opposed to normal water extent. We are working on improvements to address these limitations. We have also begun delivery of near real time water maps at 30 m resolution from Landsat imagery. Although Landsat is not available daily globally, but only every 8 days if imagery from both operating platforms (Landsat 7 and 8) is accessed, it can provide useful higher resolution data on water extent when a clear acquisition coincides with an active

  2. Cyberinfrastructure to support Real-time, End-to-End, High Resolution, Localized Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Lindholm, D.; Baltzer, T.; Domenico, B.

    2004-12-01

    From natural disasters such as flooding and forest fires to man-made disasters such as toxic gas releases, the impact of weather-influenced severe events on society can be profound. Understanding, predicting, and mitigating such local, mesoscale events calls for a cyberinfrastructure to integrate multidisciplinary data, tools, and services as well as the capability to generate and use high resolution data (such as wind and precipitation) from localized models. The need for such end to end systems -- including data collection, distribution, integration, assimilation, regionalized mesoscale modeling, analysis, and visualization -- has been realized to some extent in many academic and quasi-operational environments, especially for atmospheric sciences data. However, many challenges still remain in the integration and synthesis of data from multiple sources and the development of interoperable data systems and services across those disciplines. Over the years, the Unidata Program Center has developed several tools that have either directly or indirectly facilitated these local modeling activities. For example, the community is using Unidata technologies such as the Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, Local Data Manger (LDM), decoders, netCDF libraries, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) in their real-time prediction efforts. In essence, these technologies for data reception and processing, local and remote access, cataloging, and analysis and visualization coupled with technologies from others in the community are becoming the foundation of a cyberinfrastructure to support an end-to-end regional forecasting system. To build on these capabilities, the Unidata Program Center is pleased to be a significant contributor to the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project, a NSF-funded multi-institutional large Information Technology Research effort. The goal of LEAD is to create an

  3. A Real-Time Measurement System for Long-Life Flood Monitoring and Warning Applications

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Perez, Rafael; García-Pintado, Javier; Gómez, Antonio Skarmeta

    2012-01-01

    A flood warning system incorporates telemetered rainfall and flow/water level data measured at various locations in the catchment area. Real-time accurate data collection is required for this use, and sensor networks improve the system capabilities. However, existing sensor nodes struggle to satisfy the hydrological requirements in terms of autonomy, sensor hardware compatibility, reliability and long-range communication. We describe the design and development of a real-time measurement system for flood monitoring, and its deployment in a flash-flood prone 650 km2 semiarid watershed in Southern Spain. A developed low-power and long-range communication device, so-called DatalogV1, provides automatic data gathering and reliable transmission. DatalogV1 incorporates self-monitoring for adapting measurement schedules for consumption management and to capture events of interest. Two tests are used to assess the success of the development. The results show an autonomous and robust monitoring system for long-term collection of water level data in many sparse locations during flood events. PMID:22666028

  4. A real-time measurement system for long-life flood monitoring and warning applications.

    PubMed

    Marin-Perez, Rafael; García-Pintado, Javier; Gómez, Antonio Skarmeta

    2012-01-01

    A flood warning system incorporates telemetered rainfall and flow/water level data measured at various locations in the catchment area. Real-time accurate data collection is required for this use, and sensor networks improve the system capabilities. However, existing sensor nodes struggle to satisfy the hydrological requirements in terms of autonomy, sensor hardware compatibility, reliability and long-range communication. We describe the design and development of a real-time measurement system for flood monitoring, and its deployment in a flash-flood prone 650 km(2) semiarid watershed in Southern Spain. A developed low-power and long-range communication device, so-called DatalogV1, provides automatic data gathering and reliable transmission. DatalogV1 incorporates self-monitoring for adapting measurement schedules for consumption management and to capture events of interest. Two tests are used to assess the success of the development. The results show an autonomous and robust monitoring system for long-term collection of water level data in many sparse locations during flood events.

  5. Validation of Real-time Dust Forecasting for the Iraq Region of Southwest Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Westphal, D. L.; Walker, A. L.; Holt, T. R.; Richardson, K. A.; Miller, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    Dust storms are a significant weather phenomenon in the Iraq region in spring. Real-time dust forecasting using the Navy's Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS? with an inline dust aerosol model was conducted for the Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) in March and April 2003. Daily forecasts of dust mass concentration, visibility and optical depth were produced out to 72 hours on nested grids of 9-, 27- and 81-km resolution. In this work, the model performance is evaluated using ground weather reports, visibility observations, and enhanced satellite retrievals. COAMPS successfully predicted the timing, magnitude, duration and spatial coverage of the five major dust episodes. A detailed validation of the severest dust storm of OIF shows the high-resolution forecasts of the dust front are consistent with satellite images and the corresponding cold front observations. A statistical analysis of dust visibility for the OIF period reveals that COAMPS generates higher bias, RMS and relative errors at the stations having high frequency of dust storms, and that the errors are resolution dependent with the 9-km grid errors being the lowest. The calculation of forecast rates shows COAMPS achieved a dust storm prediction rate of 50 to 90% and threat score of 0.3 to 0.55 at the stations with frequent dust storms. Overall it predicted more than 85% of the observed dust and non-dust weather at all stations. A comparison of the forecast rates and statistical errors for the forecasts of different lengths (12 to 72 hours) for both dust and dynamics fields reveals little dependence of model accuracy on forecast length, implying that COAMPS accurately and consistently forecasted the severest of the OIF dust events. (COAMPS?is a registered trademark of the Naval Research Laboratory).

  6. Data-Driven Geospatial Visual Analytics for Real-Time Urban Flooding Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Hill, D.; Rodriguez, A.; Marini, L.; Kooper, R.; Myers, J.; Wu, X.; Minsker, B. S.

    2009-12-01

    Urban flooding is responsible for the loss of life and property as well as the release of pathogens and other pollutants into the environment. Previous studies have shown that spatial distribution of intense rainfall significantly impacts the triggering and behavior of urban flooding. However, no general purpose tools yet exist for deriving rainfall data and rendering them in real-time at the resolution of hydrologic units used for analyzing urban flooding. This paper presents a new visual analytics system that derives and renders rainfall data from the NEXRAD weather radar system at the sewershed (i.e. urban hydrologic unit) scale in real-time for a Chicago stormwater management project. We introduce a lightweight Web 2.0 approach which takes advantages of scientific workflow management and publishing capabilities developed at NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications), streaming data-aware semantic content management repository, web-based Google Earth/Map and time-aware KML (Keyhole Markup Language). A collection of polygon-based virtual sensors is created from the NEXRAD Level II data using spatial, temporal and thematic transformations at the sewershed level in order to produce persistent virtual rainfall data sources for the animation. Animated color-coded rainfall map in the sewershed can be played in real-time as a movie using time-aware KML inside the web browser-based Google Earth for visually analyzing the spatiotemporal patterns of the rainfall intensity in the sewershed. Such system provides valuable information for situational awareness and improved decision support during extreme storm events in an urban area. Our further work includes incorporating additional data (such as basement flooding events data) or physics-based predictive models that can be used for more integrated data-driven decision support.

  7. Global, Daily, Near Real-Time Satellite-based Flood Monitoring and Product Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slayback, D. A.; Policelli, F. S.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Tokay, M. M.; Smith, M. M.; Kettner, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Flooding is the most destructive, frequent, and costly natural disaster faced by modern society, and is expected to increase in frequency and damage with climate change and population growth. Some of 2013's major floods have impacted the New York City region, the Midwest, Alberta, Australia, various parts of China, Thailand, Pakistan, and central Europe. The toll of these events, in financial costs, displacement of individuals, and deaths, is substantial and continues to rise as climate change generates more extreme weather events. When these events do occur, the disaster management community requires frequently updated and easily accessible information to better understand the extent of flooding and better coordinate response efforts. With funding from NASA's Applied Sciences program, we developed and are now operating a near real-time global flood mapping system to help provide critical flood extent information within 24-48 hours of events. The system applies a water detection algorithm to MODIS imagery received from the LANCE (Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS) system at NASA Goddard within a few hours of satellite overpass. Using imagery from both the Terra (10:30 AM local time overpass) and Aqua (1:30 PM) platforms allows an initial daily assessment of flooding extent by late afternoon, and more robust assessments after accumulating cloud-free imagery over several days. Cloud cover is the primary limitation in detecting surface water from MODIS imagery. Other issues include the relatively coarse scale of the MODIS imagery (250 meters), the difficulty of detecting flood waters in areas with continuous canopy cover, confusion of shadow (cloud or terrain) with water, and accurately identifying detected water as flood as opposed to normal water extents. We have made progress on many of these issues, and are working to develop higher resolution flood detection using alternate sensors, including Landsat and various radar sensors. Although these

  8. Web-Based Real Time Earthquake Forecasting and Personal Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Graves, W. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake forecasts have been computed by a variety of countries and economies world-wide for over two decades. For the most part, forecasts have been computed for insurance, reinsurance and underwriters of catastrophe bonds. One example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities that has been responsible for the official California earthquake forecast since 1988. However, in a time of increasingly severe global financial constraints, we are now moving inexorably towards personal risk management, wherein mitigating risk is becoming the responsibility of individual members of the public. Under these circumstances, open access to a variety of web-based tools, utilities and information is a necessity. Here we describe a web-based system that has been operational since 2009 at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. Models for earthquake physics and forecasting require input data, along with model parameters. The models we consider are the Natural Time Weibull (NTW) model for regional earthquake forecasting, together with models for activation and quiescence. These models use small earthquakes ('seismicity-based models") to forecast the occurrence of large earthquakes, either through varying rates of small earthquake activity, or via an accumulation of this activity over time. These approaches use data-mining algorithms combined with the ANSS earthquake catalog. The basic idea is to compute large earthquake probabilities using the number of small earthquakes that have occurred in a region since the last large earthquake. Each of these approaches has computational challenges associated with computing forecast information in real time. Using 25 years of data from the ANSS California-Nevada catalog of earthquakes, we show that real-time forecasting is possible at a grid scale of 0.1o. We have analyzed the performance of these models using Reliability/Attributes and standard Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) tests. We show how the Reliability and

  9. Flood and Landslide Applications of Near Real-time Satellite Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Negri, Andrew; Huffman, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Floods and associated landslides are one of the most widespread natural hazards on Earth, responsible for tens of thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in property damage every year. During 1993-2002, over 1000 of the more than 2,900 natural disasters reported were due to floods. These floods and associated landslides claimed over 90,000 lives, affected over 1.4 billion people and cost about $210 billion. The impact of these disasters is often felt most acutely in less developed regions. In many countries around the world, satellite-based precipitation estimation may be the best source of rainfall data due to lack of surface observing networks. Satellite observations can be of essential value in improving our understanding of the occurrence of hazardous events and possibly in lessening their impact on local economies and in reducing injuries, if they can be used to create reliable warning systems in cost-effective ways. This article addressed these opportunities and challenges by describing a combination of satellite-based real-time precipitation estimation with land surface characteristics as input, with empirical and numerical models to map potential of landslides and floods. In this article, a framework to detect floods and landslides related to heavy rain events in near-real-time is proposed. Key components of the framework are: a fine resolution precipitation acquisition system; a comprehensive land surface database; a hydrological modeling component; and landslide and debris flow model components. A key precipitation input dataset for the integrated applications is the NASA TRMM-based multi-satellite precipitation estimates. This dataset provides near real-time precipitation at a spatial-temporal resolution of 3 hours and 0.25deg x 0.25deg. By careful integration of remote sensing and in-situ observations, and assimilation of these observations into hydrological and landslide/debris flow models with surface topographic information, prediction of useful

  10. Generating Real-Time Tsunami Forecast Animations for Tsunami Warning Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.; Weinstein, S.

    2012-12-01

    The complex calculations inherent in tsunami forecast models once required supercomputers to solve and could only be deployed in an operational setting as a database of precomputed best-guess solutions for likely future tsunamis. More recently scientists at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) developed a tsunami forecast model, RIFT, that takes an earthquake's centroid moment tensor solution—either from nearby historic events or rapidly determined by W-phase analysis—and solves the linear shallow water equations in real time with commercial off-the-shelf computer servers and open-source software tools (Wang et al., 2009). RIFT not only rapidly calculates tsunami forecasts in real time, but also generates and archives data grids easily ingested by other software packages to generate maps and animations in a variety of image, video, and geobrowser file formats (e.g., KML). These graphical products aid both operational and outreach efforts as they help PTWC scientists to rapidly ingest and comprehend large, complex data sets, to share these data with emergency managers, and to educate the general public about the behavior of tsunamis. Prior to developing animation capability PTWC used tsunami travel time contour maps to show expected arrival times of the first tsunami waves. Though useful to expert users, such maps can mislead a nonexpert as they do not show amplitude information and give the impression that tsunami waves have constant amplitudes throughout an ocean basin. A tsunami forecast "energy map" improves tsunami hazard communication by showing the variability in maximum wave heights, but does not show the timing of the maximum wave arrivals. A tsunami forecast animation, however, shows both how fast the tsunami will move and the distribution of its amplitudes over time, thus communicating key concepts about tsunami behavior such as reflection and refraction of waves, that the first arriving wave is not necessarily the largest wave, and that tsunami

  11. Real-time monitoring and short-term forecasting of drought in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok Wong, Wai; Hisdal, Hege

    2013-04-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most costly natural disasters. Drought monitoring and forecasting are thus important for sound water management. In this study hydrological drought characteristics applicable for real-time monitoring and short-term forecasting of drought in Norway were developed. A spatially distributed hydrological model (HBV) implemented in a Web-based GIS framework provides a platform for drought analyses and visualizations. A number of national drought maps can be produced, which is a simple and effective way to communicate drought conditions to decision makers and the public. The HBV model is driven by precipitation and air temperature data. On a daily time step it calculates the water balance for 1 x 1 km2 grid cells characterized by their elevation and land use. Drought duration and areal drought coverage for runoff and subsurface storage (sum of soil moisture and groundwater) were derived. The threshold level method was used to specify drought conditions on a grid cell basis. The daily 10th percentile thresholds were derived from seven-day windows centered on that calendar day from the reference period 1981-2010 (threshold not exceeded 10% of the time). Each individual grid cell was examined to determine if it was below its respective threshold level. Daily drought-stricken areas can then be easily identified when visualized on a map. The drought duration can also be tracked and calculated by a retrospective analysis. Real-time observations from synoptic stations interpolated to a regular grid of 1 km resolution constituted the forcing data for the current situation. 9-day meteorological forecasts were used as input to the HBV model to obtain short-term hydrological drought forecasts. Downscaled precipitation and temperature fields from two different atmospheric models were applied. The first two days of the forecast period adopted the forecasts from Unified Model (UM4) while the following seven days were based on the 9-day forecasts

  12. Coupling flood forecasting and social media crowdsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Milan; Kliment, Tomas; Salamon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Social and mainstream media monitoring is being more and more recognized as valuable source of information in disaster management and response. The information on ongoing disasters could be detected in very short time and the social media can bring additional information to traditional data feeds (ground, remote observation schemes). Probably the biggest attempt to use the social media in the crisis management was the activation of the Digital Humanitarian Network by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in response to Typhoon Yolanda. The network of volunteers performing rapid needs & damage assessment by tagging reports posted to social media which were then used by machine learning classifiers as a training set to automatically identify tweets referring to both urgent needs and offers of help. In this work we will present the potential of coupling a social media streaming and news monitoring application ( GlobalFloodNews - www.globalfloodsystem.com) with a flood forecasting system (www.globalfloods.eu) and the geo-catalogue of the OGC services discovered in the Google Search Engine (WMS, WFS, WCS, etc.) to provide a full suite of information available to crisis management centers as fast as possible. In GlobalFloodNews we use advanced filtering of the real-time Twitter stream, where the relevant information is automatically extracted using natural language and signal processing techniques. The keyword filters are adjusted and optimized automatically using machine learning algorithms as new reports are added to the system. In order to refine the search results the forecasting system will be triggering an event-based search on the social media and OGC services relevant for crisis response (population distribution, critical infrastructure, hospitals etc.). The current version of the system makes use of USHAHIDI Crowdmap platform, which is designed to easily crowdsource information using multiple channels, including SMS, email

  13. A Real-time Irrigation Forecasting System in Jiefangzha Irrigation District, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the irrigation efficiency, we need to know when and how much to irrigate in real time. If we know the soil moisture content at this time, we can forecast the soil moisture content in the next days based on the rainfall forecasting and the crop evapotranspiration forecasting. Then the irrigation should be considered when the forecasting soil moisture content reaches to a threshold. Jiefangzha Irrigation District, a part of Hetao Irrigation District, is located in Inner Mongolia, China. The irrigated area of this irrigation district is about 140,000 ha mainly planting wheat, maize and sunflower. The annual precipitation is below 200mm, so the irrigation is necessary and the irrigation water comes from the Yellow river. We set up 10 sites with 4 TDR sensors at each site (20cm, 40cm, 60cm and 80cm depth) to monitor the soil moisture content. The weather forecasting data are downloaded from the website of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The reference evapotranspiration is estimated based on FAO-Blaney-Criddle equation with only the air temperature from ECMWF. Then the crop water requirement is forecasted by the crop coefficient multiplying the reference evapotranspiration. Finally, the soil moisture content is forecasted based on soil water balance with the initial condition is set as the monitoring soil moisture content. When the soil moisture content reaches to a threshold, the irrigation warning will be announced. The irrigation mount can be estimated through three ways: (1) making the soil moisture content be equal to the field capacity; (2) making the soil moisture saturated; or (3) according to the irrigation quota. The forecasting period is 10 days. The system is developed according to B2C model with Java language. All the databases and the data analysis are carried out in the server. The customers can log in the website with their own username and password then get the information about the irrigation forecasting

  14. Adapting CALIPSO Climate Measurements for Near Real Time Analyses and Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Trepte, Charles R.; Winker, David M.; Avery, Melody A.; Campbell, James; Hoff, Ray; Young, Stuart; Getzewich, Brian J.; Tackett, Jason L.; Kar, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission was originally conceived and designed as a climate measurements mission, with considerable latency between data acquisition and the release of the level 1 and level 2 data products. However, the unique nature of the CALIPSO lidar backscatter profiles quickly led to the qualitative use of CALIPSO?s near real time (i.e., ? expedited?) lidar data imagery in several different forecasting applications. To enable quantitative use of their near real time analyses, the CALIPSO project recently expanded their expedited data catalog to include all of the standard level 1 and level 2 lidar data products. Also included is a new cloud cleared level 1.5 profile product developed for use by operational forecast centers for verification of aerosol predictions. This paper describes the architecture and content of the CALIPSO expedited data products. The fidelity and accuracy of the expedited products are assessed via comparisons to the standard CALIPSO data products.

  15. An Indian monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISO) index for real time monitoring and forecast verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhas, E.; Neena, J. M.; Goswami, B. N.

    2013-06-01

    The wet/dry spells of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall are governed by northward propagating boreal summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISO). Unlike for the Madden Julian Oscillation (e.g. RMM indices, Wheeler and Hendon in Mon Weather Rev 132:1917-1932, 2004), a low dimensional real-time monitoring and forecast verification metric for the MISO is not currently available. Here, for the first time, we present a real time monitoring index developed for identifying the amplitude and phase of the MISO over the ISM domain. The index is constructed by applying extended empirical orthogonal function (EEOF) analysis on daily unfiltered rainfall anomalies averaged over the longitudinal domain 60.5°E-95.5°E. The gravest two modes of the EEOFs together explain about 23 % of the total variance, similar to the variance explained by MISO in observation. The pair of first two principal components (PCs) of the EEOFs is named as MISO1 and MISO2 indices which together represent the evolution of the MISOs in a low dimensional phase space. Power spectral analysis reveals that the MISO indices neatly isolate the MISO signal from the higher frequency noise. It is found that the current amplitude and phase of the MISO can be estimated by preserving a memory of at least 15 days. Composite pictures of the spatio-temporal evolution of the MISOs over the ISM domain are brought out using the MISO indices. It is further demonstrated that the MISO indices can be used in the quantification of skill of extended range forecasts of MISOs. Since the MISO index does not rely on any sort of time filtering, it has great potential for real time monitoring of the MISO and may be useful in developing some prediction scheme.

  16. Real-time Ensemble Forecasting of Coronal Mass Ejections using the WSA-ENLIL+Cone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ensemble forecasting of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) provides significant information in that it provides an estimation of the spread or uncertainty in CME arrival time predictions due to uncertainties in determining CME input parameters. Ensemble modeling of CME propagation in the heliosphere is performed by forecasters at the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC) using the WSA-ENLIL cone model available at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). SWRC is an in-house research-based operations team at the CCMC which provides interplanetary space weather forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and performs real-time model validation. A distribution of n (routinely n=48) CME input parameters are generated using the CCMC Stereo CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT) which employs geometrical triangulation techniques. These input parameters are used to perform n different simulations yielding an ensemble of solar wind parameters at various locations of interest (satellites or planets), including a probability distribution of CME shock arrival times (for hits), and geomagnetic storm strength (for Earth-directed hits). Ensemble simulations have been performed experimentally in real-time at the CCMC since January 2013. We present the results of ensemble simulations for a total of 15 CME events, 10 of which were performed in real-time. The observed CME arrival was within the range of ensemble arrival time predictions for 5 out of the 12 ensemble runs containing hits. The average arrival time prediction was computed for each of the twelve ensembles predicting hits and using the actual arrival time an average absolute error of 8.20 hours was found for all twelve ensembles, which is comparable to current forecasting errors. Some considerations for the accuracy of ensemble CME arrival time predictions include the importance of the initial distribution of CME input parameters, particularly the mean and spread. When the observed arrivals are not within the predicted range, this

  17. Extending RST-FLOOD to thermal infrared data: a possible operational strategy for flooded areas detection in near real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruolo, Mariapia; Coviello, Irina; Lacava, Teodosio; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years the use of remote sensing data has been growing rapidly in the flood risk context, because they can offer the possibility to support hydrological and hydraulic analyses aimed at both improving flood inundation models and better understanding hydrodynamic processes for managing flood emergency. Optical sensors aboard meteorological satellites may provide a useful contribution for a rapid detection and mapping of areas interested by a flood. Such sensors, being able to guarantee a steady and frequent stream of images (with a temporal resolution variable from hours to minutes), have in fact a great potential for near real time monitoring of flood evolution. Actually, to be effectively used for supporting flood risk management and assessment, such kind of data must be analyzed using reliable earth observation (EO) techniques in order to guarantee consistent results regardless of the used data/sensor. The methodology used and shown in this paper has been moving in this direction. Such a methodology, known as RST (Robust Satellite Techniques) approach (in the paper named RST-FLOOD to indicate its specific application to flood risk) and based entirely on satellite remote sensing data, is a multi-temporal scheme of data analysis which identifies statistically significant anomalies of the investigated signal on the basis of a preliminary characterization of the signal in normal (i.e. unperturbed) conditions. Its implementation on visible and near infrared bands of AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensors, for studying different flooding events occurred worldwide, already showed its potential in correctly detecting flooded zones furnishing reliable flood maps. The main issue of this approach is its limited application during daylight. In this paper, the proposed approach has been extended to satellite thermal data in order to assess its potential in identifying flooded pixel also

  18. The policy and science supporting flash flood forecasting in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranston, Michael; Maxey, Richard; Speight, Linda; Tavendale, Amy; Cole, Steven; Robson, Alice; Moore, Robert

    2013-04-01

    In 2012, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) published its Flood Warning Strategy. The strategy aims to ensure that emerging science is at the heart of supporting its strategic aim of reducing the impact of river flooding through the provision of reliable and timely flood warnings and allowing Scotland's flood warning authority to develop forecasting approaches in areas not previously considered. One specific area of agreed commitment is in the development of methods for forecasting in rapid response or flashy catchments. Previous policies have stated that flood warning provision would not be possible without adequate hydrological response time (greater than three hours). The particular challenge with meeting this new aim is on the reliance of increasingly uncertain flooding predictions at the shorter timescale against a more cautious and traditional approach to flood warning which relies on hydrological observations and real time verification of forecasts. This therefore places increasing demands on developing hydrometeorological forecasting capabilities. This paper will present on some scientific developments supporting the latest policy. In particular on Grid-2-Grid, a distributed hydrological model, which has been in operation across Scotland for over a year (Cranston, et al., 2012) and on a specific assessment of its capabilities using high resolution and ensemble rainfall forecasts. The paper will focus on Comrie, a community in Scotland that has been devastated twice during 2012 by flash flooding and considers the various challenges in meeting this strategic aim. References Cranston, M., Maxey, R., Tavendale, A., Buchanan, P., Motion, A., Moore, R. M., Cole, S., Robson, A. and Minett, A. (2012) Countrywide flood forecasting in Scotland: challenges for hydrometeorological uncertainty and prediction. Weather Radar and Hydrology (Proceedings of a symposium held in Exeter, UK, April 2011), IAHS Publ. 351, 2012)

  19. Rainfall estimation for real time flood monitoring using geostationary meteorological satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerakachen, Watcharee; Raksapatcharawong, Mongkol

    2015-09-01

    Rainfall estimation by geostationary meteorological satellite data provides good spatial and temporal resolutions. This is advantageous for real time flood monitoring and warning systems. However, a rainfall estimation algorithm developed in one region needs to be adjusted for another climatic region. This work proposes computationally-efficient rainfall estimation algorithms based on an Infrared Threshold Rainfall (ITR) method calibrated with regional ground truth. Hourly rain gauge data collected from 70 stations around the Chao-Phraya river basin were used for calibration and validation of the algorithms. The algorithm inputs were derived from FY-2E satellite observations consisting of infrared and water vapor imagery. The results were compared with the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) near real time product (GSMaP_NRT) using the probability of detection (POD), root mean square error (RMSE) and linear correlation coefficient (CC) as performance indices. Comparison with the GSMaP_NRT product for real time monitoring purpose shows that hourly rain estimates from the proposed algorithm with the error adjustment technique (ITR_EA) offers higher POD and approximately the same RMSE and CC with less data latency.

  20. Towards Real Time Tsunami Forecasting without Source: A Data Assimilation Approach with Dense Tsunameter Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, T.; Obara, K.; Shinohara, M.; Kanazawa, T.; Uehira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Real time tsunami observation networks with ocean bottom pressure sensors and GPS buoys are significantly improved in this decade, after several significant earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw9.3) and the 2011 Off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw9.0). In particular along the Pacific coast in northeastern Japan, a new cabled-type seismograph/tsunameter network are being under construction (e.g., Uehira et al., 2012; Saito, 2013). It will cover a vast area of roughly 400 km x 900 km including the source area of the Tohoku Earthquake, with average station separation of about 30 km. All stations are linked by ocean-bottom cables, and all data including seismic waves and tsunami heights will be collected in real time. To fully utilize power of such a dense observation network on tsunami hazard mitigation, we develop a new forecasting method that assimilates observed sea height with numerical simulation of tsunami propagation in real time. In this method, tsunami height at a certain time step is first predicted by numerical simulation and compared with the observed tsunami heights at stations. Residuals between observation and numerical forecast are used for correction of tsunami wave height and its flux. Then, the corrected wavefield are substituted for prediction of tsunami heights at the next time step by numerical simulation. We performed preliminary numerical test of the data assimilation technique with the layout of aforementioned tsunamater network in NE Japan as a feasibility study of real time tsunami forecasting. First we calculated tsunami wave propagation by the Tohoku earthquake based on the initial sea height estimated from the faulting in order to get the time series of sea height. The calculated time-series of tsunami height at the sensor locations are regarded as 'observed data' in the numerical test. Then, data assimilation is carried out for every one second to estimate the sea height based on the observed data. We

  1. Automating Flood Hazard Mapping Methods for Near Real-time Storm Surge Inundation and Vulnerability Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, A. M.; Griffin, R.; Gallagher, D.

    2015-12-01

    Storm surge has enough destructive power to damage buildings and infrastructure, erode beaches, and threaten human life across large geographic areas, hence posing the greatest threat of all the hurricane hazards. The United States Gulf of Mexico has proven vulnerable to hurricanes as it has been hit by some of the most destructive hurricanes on record. With projected rises in sea level and increases in hurricane activity, there is a need to better understand the associated risks for disaster mitigation, preparedness, and response. GIS has become a critical tool in enhancing disaster planning, risk assessment, and emergency response by communicating spatial information through a multi-layer approach. However, there is a need for a near real-time method of identifying areas with a high risk of being impacted by storm surge. Research was conducted alongside Baron, a private industry weather enterprise, to facilitate automated modeling and visualization of storm surge inundation and vulnerability on a near real-time basis. This research successfully automated current flood hazard mapping techniques using a GIS framework written in a Python programming environment, and displayed resulting data through an Application Program Interface (API). Data used for this methodology included high resolution topography, NOAA Probabilistic Surge model outputs parsed from Rich Site Summary (RSS) feeds, and the NOAA Census tract level Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI). The development process required extensive data processing and management to provide high resolution visualizations of potential flooding and population vulnerability in a timely manner. The accuracy of the developed methodology was assessed using Hurricane Isaac as a case study, which through a USGS and NOAA partnership, contained ample data for statistical analysis. This research successfully created a fully automated, near real-time method for mapping high resolution storm surge inundation and vulnerability for the

  2. ASSESSMENT OF AN ENSEMBLE OF SEVEN REAL-TIME OZONE FORECASTS OVER EASTERN NORTH AMERICA DURING THE SUMMER OF 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The real-time forecasts of ozone (O3) from seven air quality forecast models (AQFMs) are statistically evaluated against observations collected during July and August of 2004 (53 days) through the Aerometric Information Retrieval Now (AIRNow) network at roughly 340 mon...

  3. Forecasting Daily Patient Outflow From a Ward Having No Real-Time Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truyen; Luo, Wei; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modeling patient flow is crucial in understanding resource demand and prioritization. We study patient outflow from an open ward in an Australian hospital, where currently bed allocation is carried out by a manager relying on past experiences and looking at demand. Automatic methods that provide a reasonable estimate of total next-day discharges can aid in efficient bed management. The challenges in building such methods lie in dealing with large amounts of discharge noise introduced by the nonlinear nature of hospital procedures, and the nonavailability of real-time clinical information in wards. Objective Our study investigates different models to forecast the total number of next-day discharges from an open ward having no real-time clinical data. Methods We compared 5 popular regression algorithms to model total next-day discharges: (1) autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), (2) the autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX), (3) k-nearest neighbor regression, (4) random forest regression, and (5) support vector regression. Although the autoregressive integrated moving average model relied on past 3-month discharges, nearest neighbor forecasting used median of similar discharges in the past in estimating next-day discharge. In addition, the ARMAX model used the day of the week and number of patients currently in ward as exogenous variables. For the random forest and support vector regression models, we designed a predictor set of 20 patient features and 88 ward-level features. Results Our data consisted of 12,141 patient visits over 1826 days. Forecasting quality was measured using mean forecast error, mean absolute error, symmetric mean absolute percentage error, and root mean square error. When compared with a moving average prediction model, all 5 models demonstrated superior performance with the random forests achieving 22.7% improvement in mean absolute error, for all days in the year 2014. Conclusions In the

  4. Real time soil moisture forecasts for irrigation management: the Pre.G.I. project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Mancini, M.; Salerno, R.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years frequent periods of water scarcity have enhanced the need to use water more carefully. Future climate change scenarios, combined with limited water resources require better irrigation management and planning for farmers' water cooperatives. This has occurred also in areas traditionally rich of water as Lombardy Region, in the North of Italy. In this study we show the development and implementation of a real-time drought forecasting system with a soil moisture hydrological alert, in particular we describe preliminary results of the Pre.G.I. Project, an Italian acronym that stands for "Hydro-Meteorological forecast for irrigation management", funded by Lombardy Region. The project develops a support decision system based on an ensemble weather prediction in the medium-long range (up to 30 days) with hydrological simulation of water balance to forecast the soil water content in every parcel over the Consorzio Muzza basin, in order to use the irrigation water in a wiser and thriftier way. The studied area covers 74,000 ha in the middle of the Po Valley, near Lodi city. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are based on 20 meteorological members of a modified version of the non-hydrostatic WRF model, with multiple nesting to scale to the region of interest. Different physical schemes are also used to take into account a larger variability; these data are provided by Epson Meteo Centre. The hydrological model used to generate the soil moisture and water table simulations is the rainfall-runoff distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano. The analysis shows the system reliability based on most significant case-studies occurred in the recent years.

  5. Understanding uncertainty in distributed flash flood forecasting for semiarid regions 1909

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Semi-arid flash floods pose a significant danger for life and property in the US. One effective way to mitigate flood risk is by implementing a rainfall-runoff model in a real-time forecast and warning system. This study used a physically based, distributed semi-arid rainfall-runoff model driven by ...

  6. Flood forecasting and alert system for Arda River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artinyan, Eram; Vincendon, Beatrice; Kroumova, Kamelia; Nedkov, Nikolai; Tsarev, Petko; Balabanova, Snezhanka; Koshinchanov, Georgy

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the set-up and functioning of a flood alert system based on SURFEX-TOPODYN platform for the cross-border Arda River basin. The system was built within a Bulgarian-Greek project funded by the European Territorial Cooperation (ETC) Programme and is in operational use since April 2014. The basin is strongly influenced by Mediterranean cyclones during the autumn-winter period and experiences dangerous rapid floods, mainly after intensive rain, often combined with snow melt events. The steep mountainous terrain leads to floods with short concentration time and high river speed causing damage to settlements and infrastructure. The main challenge was to correctly simulate the riverflow in near-real time and to timely forecast peak floods for small drainage basins below 100 km2 but also for larger ones of about 1900 km2 using the same technology. To better account for that variability, a modification of the original hydrological model parameterisation is proposed. Here we present the first results of a new model variant which uses dynamically adjusted TOPODYN river velocity as function of the computed partial streamflow discharge. Based on historical flooding data, river sections along endangered settlements were included in the river flow forecasting. A continuous hydrological forecast for 5 days ahead was developed for 18 settlements in Bulgaria and for the border with Greece, thus giving enough reaction time in case of high floods. The paper discusses the practical implementation of models for the Arda basin, the method used to calibrate the models' parameters, the results of the calibration-validation procedure and the way the information system is organised. A real case of forecasted rapid floods that occurred after the system's finalisation is analysed. One of the important achievements of the project is the on-line presentation of the forecasts that takes into account their temporal variability and uncertainty. The web presentation includes a

  7. A Multi-Model Real Time Forecasting Prototype System in the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Valdes, J. B.; Valdes, R.; Demaria, E. M.; Durcik, M.; Maitaria, K.; Roy, T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing data and hydrologic models can respond to monitoring and forecasting needs in Africa and other poorly gauged regions. We present here the progress to date in developing a multi-model platform to provide hydrologic monitoring and forecasting using real time remote sensing observations. Satellite precipitation products such as CMORPH, TMPA (at 0.25° resolution) and PERSIANN-CCS (at 4km resolution) are used to force two models of different structure. One model is physically based and distributed, and the other is conceptual and lumped at the sub-basin level. The performance of both models is evaluated using different metrics, and the uncertainty in their predictions based on the errors incurred during the historical simulations period is computed. The models were compared and the potential increase in performance from using both models versus a single one will be assessed. This work provides insights into the advantages of a multi-model platform over a single model, with respect to different management and decision-making purposes. The methods were applied to the Mara Basin (Kenya/Tanzania), where growing human demands on water and land use are likely to alter significantly the hydrologic balance of the basin and the ecosystems that depend on it. These efforts are part of the Applied Sciences Team of the NASA SERVIR Program in collaboration with its East Africa Hub at the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (Nairobi,Kenya).

  8. Real time forecasts through physical and stochastic models of earthquake clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murru, M.; Console, R.; Catalli, F.; Falcone, G.

    2005-12-01

    The phenomenon of earthquake interaction has become a popular subject of study because it can shed light on the physical processes leading to earthquakes, and because it has a potential value for short-term earthquake forecast and hazard mitigation. In this study we start from a purely stochastic approach known as the so-called epidemic model (ETAS) introduced by Ogata in 1988 and its variations. Then we build up an approach by which this model and the rate-and-state constitutive law introduced by Dieterich in the `90s have been merged in a single algorithm and statistically tested. Tests on real seismicity and comparison with a plain time-independent Poissonian model through likelihood-based methods have reliably proved their validity. The models are suitable for real-time forecast of the seismic activity. In the context of the low-magnitude Italian seismicity recorded from 1987 to 2005, the new model incorporating the physical concept of the rate-and-state theory performs not better than the purely stochastic model. Nevertheless, it has the advantage of needing a smaller number of free parameters and providing new interesting insights on the physics of the seismogenic process.

  9. Improving probabilistic flood forecasting through a data assimilation scheme based on genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediero, L.; Garrote, L.; Chavez-Jimenez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Opportunities offered by high performance computing provide a significant degree of promise in the enhancement of the performance of real-time flood forecasting systems. In this paper, a real-time framework for probabilistic flood forecasting through data assimilation is presented. The distributed rainfall-runoff real-time interactive basin simulator (RIBS) model is selected to simulate the hydrological process in the basin. Although the RIBS model is deterministic, it is run in a probabilistic way through the results of calibration developed in a previous work performed by the authors that identifies the probability distribution functions that best characterise the most relevant model parameters. Adaptive techniques improve the result of flood forecasts because the model can be adapted to observations in real time as new information is available. The new adaptive forecast model based on genetic programming as a data assimilation technique is compared with the previously developed flood forecast model based on the calibration results. Both models are probabilistic as they generate an ensemble of hydrographs, taking the different uncertainties inherent in any forecast process into account. The Manzanares River basin was selected as a case study, with the process being computationally intensive as it requires simulation of many replicas of the ensemble in real time.

  10. Air quality real-time forecast before and during the G-20 ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2016 G-20 Hangzhou summit, the eleventh annual meeting of the G-20 heads of government, will be held during September 3-5, 2016 in Hangzhou, China. For a successful summit, it is important to ensure good air quality. To achieve this goal, governments of Hangzhou and its surrounding provinces will enforce a series of emission reductions, such as a forced closure of major highly-polluting industries and also limiting car and construction emissions in the cities and surroundings during the 2016 G-20 Hangzhou summit. Air quality forecast systems consisting of the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ and online-coupled WRF-Chem have been applied to forecast air quality in Hangzhou regularly. This study will present the results of real-time forecasts of air quality over eastern China using 12-km grid spacing and for Hangzhou area using 4-km grid spacing with these two modeling systems using emission inventories for base and 2016 G-20 scenarios before and during the 2016 G-20 Hangzhou summit. Evaluations of models’ performance for both cases for PM2.5, PM10, O3, SO2, NO2, CO, air quality index (AQI), and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are carried out by comparing them with observations obtained from satellites, such as MODIS, and surface monitoring networks. The effects of the emission reduction efforts on expected air quality improvements during the2016 G-20 Hangzhou summit will be studied in depth. This study provides insights on how air quality will be improved by a plan

  11. Web-based hydrological modeling system for flood forecasting and risk mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Cheng, Qiuming

    2008-10-01

    Mechanism of flood forecasting is a complex system, which involves precipitation, drainage characterizes, land use/cover types, ground water and runoff discharge. The application of flood forecasting model require the efficient management of large spatial and temporal datasets, which involves data acquisition, storage, pre-processing and manipulation, analysis and display of model results. The extensive datasets usually involve multiple organizations, but no single organization can collect and maintain all the multidisciplinary data. The possible usage of the available datasets remains limited primarily because of the difficulty associated with combining data from diverse and distributed data sources. Difficulty in linking data, analysis tools and model is one of the barriers to be overcome in developing real-time flood forecasting and risk prediction system. The current revolution in technology and online availability of spatial data, particularly, with the construction of Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure (CGDI), a lot of spatial data and information can be accessed in real-time from distributed sources over the Internet to facilitate Canadians' need for information sharing in support of decision-making. This has resulted in research studies demonstrating the suitability of the web as a medium for implementation of flood forecasting and flood risk prediction. Web-based hydrological modeling system can provide the framework within which spatially distributed real-time data accessed remotely to prepare model input files, model calculation and evaluate model results for flood forecasting and flood risk prediction. This paper will develop a prototype web-base hydrological modeling system for on-line flood forecasting and risk mapping in the Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM) area, southern Ontario, Canada, integrating information retrieval, analysis and model analysis for near real time river runoff prediction, flood frequency prediction, flood risk and flood inundation

  12. Global and Regional Real-time Systems for Flood and Drought Monitoring and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Xue, X.; Flamig, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A Hydrometeorological Extreme Mapping and Prediction System (HyXtreme-MaP), initially built upon the Coupled Routing and Excess STorage (CREST) distributed hydrological model, is driven by real-time quasi-global TRMM/GPM satellites and by the US Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) radar network with dual-polarimetric upgrade to simulate streamflow, actual ET, soil moisture and other hydrologic variables at 1/8th degree resolution quasi-globally (http://eos.ou.edu) and at 250-meter 2.5-mintue resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS: http://flash.ou.edu).­ Multifaceted and collaborative by-design, this end-to-end research framework aims to not only integrate data, models, and applications but also brings people together (i.e., NOAA, NASA, University researchers, and end-users). This presentation will review the progresses, challenges and opportunities of such HyXTREME-MaP System used to monitor global floods and droughts, and also to predict flash floods over the CONUS.

  13. Real-time tsunami inundation forecasting and damage mapping towards enhancing tsunami disaster resiliency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshimura, S.; Hino, R.; Ohta, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Musa, A.; Murashima, Y.

    2014-12-01

    With use of modern computing power and advanced sensor networks, a project is underway to establish a new system of real-time tsunami inundation forecasting, damage estimation and mapping to enhance society's resilience in the aftermath of major tsunami disaster. The system consists of fusion of real-time crustal deformation monitoring/fault model estimation by Ohta et al. (2012), high-performance real-time tsunami propagation/inundation modeling with NEC's vector supercomputer SX-ACE, damage/loss estimation models (Koshimura et al., 2013), and geo-informatics. After a major (near field) earthquake is triggered, the first response of the system is to identify the tsunami source model by applying RAPiD Algorithm (Ohta et al., 2012) to observed RTK-GPS time series at GEONET sites in Japan. As performed in the data obtained during the 2011 Tohoku event, we assume less than 10 minutes as the acquisition time of the source model. Given the tsunami source, the system moves on to running tsunami propagation and inundation model which was optimized on the vector supercomputer SX-ACE to acquire the estimation of time series of tsunami at offshore/coastal tide gauges to determine tsunami travel and arrival time, extent of inundation zone, maximum flow depth distribution. The implemented tsunami numerical model is based on the non-linear shallow-water equations discretized by finite difference method. The merged bathymetry and topography grids are prepared with 10 m resolution to better estimate the tsunami inland penetration. Given the maximum flow depth distribution, the system performs GIS analysis to determine the numbers of exposed population and structures using census data, then estimates the numbers of potential death and damaged structures by applying tsunami fragility curve (Koshimura et al., 2013). Since the tsunami source model is determined, the model is supposed to complete the estimation within 10 minutes. The results are disseminated as mapping products to

  14. A Real-Time MODIS Vegetation Composite for Land Surface Models and Short-Term Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center is producing real-time, 1- km resolution Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) gridded composites over a Continental U.S. domain. These composites are updated daily based on swath data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the polar orbiting NASA Aqua and Terra satellites, with a product time lag of about one day. A simple time-weighting algorithm is applied to the NDVI swath data that queries the previous 20 days of data to ensure a continuous grid of data populated at all pixels. The daily composites exhibited good continuity both spatially and temporally during June and July 2010. The composites also nicely depicted high greenness anomalies that resulted from significant rainfall over southwestern Texas, Mexico, and New Mexico during July due to early-season tropical cyclone activity. The SPoRT Center is in the process of computing greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) composites from the MODIS NDVI data at the same spatial and temporal resolution for use in the NASA Land Information System (LIS). The new daily GVF dataset would replace the monthly climatological GVF database (based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR] observations from 1992-93) currently available to the Noah land surface model (LSM) in both LIS and the public version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The much higher spatial resolution (1 km versus 0.15 degree) and daily updates based on real-time satellite observations have the capability to greatly improve the simulation of the surface energy budget in the Noah LSM within LIS and WRF. Once code is developed in LIS to incorporate the daily updated GVFs, the SPoRT Center will conduct simulation sensitivity experiments to quantify the impacts and improvements realized by the MODIS real-time GVF data. This presentation will describe the methodology used to develop the 1-km MODIS NDVI composites and

  15. Cloud-Based Numerical Weather Prediction for Near Real-Time Forecasting and Disaster Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Case, Jonathan; Venners, Jason; Schroeder, Richard; Checchi, Milton; Zavodsky, Bradley; Limaye, Ashutosh; O'Brien, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The use of cloud computing resources continues to grow within the public and private sector components of the weather enterprise as users become more familiar with cloud-computing concepts, and competition among service providers continues to reduce costs and other barriers to entry. Cloud resources can also provide capabilities similar to high-performance computing environments, supporting multi-node systems required for near real-time, regional weather predictions. Referred to as "Infrastructure as a Service", or IaaS, the use of cloud-based computing hardware in an on-demand payment system allows for rapid deployment of a modeling system in environments lacking access to a large, supercomputing infrastructure. Use of IaaS capabilities to support regional weather prediction may be of particular interest to developing countries that have not yet established large supercomputing resources, but would otherwise benefit from a regional weather forecasting capability. Recently, collaborators from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center have developed a scripted, on-demand capability for launching the NOAA/NWS Science and Training Resource Center (STRC) Environmental Modeling System (EMS), which includes pre-compiled binaries of the latest version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The WRF-EMS provides scripting for downloading appropriate initial and boundary conditions from global models, along with higher-resolution vegetation, land surface, and sea surface temperature data sets provided by the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. This presentation will provide an overview of the modeling system capabilities and benchmarks performed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) environment. In addition, the presentation will discuss future opportunities to deploy the system in support of weather prediction in developing countries supported by NASA's SERVIR Project, which provides capacity building

  16. [Real-time irrigation forecast of cotton mulched with plastic film under drip irrigation based on meteorological date].

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-jun; Sun, Jing-sheng; Li, Ming-si; Zhang, Ji-yang; Wang, Jing-lei; Li, Dong-wei

    2015-02-01

    It is important to improve the real-time irrigation forecasting precision by predicting real-time water consumption of cotton mulched with plastic film under drip irrigation based on meteorological data and cotton growth status. The model parameters for calculating ET0 based on Hargreaves formula were determined using historical meteorological data from 1953 to 2008 in Shihezi reclamation area. According to the field experimental data of growing season in 2009-2010, the model of computing crop coefficient Kc was established based on accumulated temperature. On the basis of crop water requirement (ET0) and Kc, a real-time irrigation forecast model was finally constructed, and it was verified by the field experimental data in 2011. The results showed that the forecast model had high forecasting precision, and the average absolute values of relative error between the predicted value and measured value were about 3.7%, 2.4% and 1.6% during seedling, squaring and blossom-boll forming stages, respectively. The forecast model could be used to modify the predicted values in time according to the real-time meteorological data and to guide the water management in local film-mulched cotton field under drip irrigation.

  17. Improvement in cloud predictions using satellite data assimilation for real-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellore, R.; Koracin, D.; Wetzel, M.

    2006-12-01

    adiabatic lapse rate; (b) the second step is to compute the cloud top height using cloud base temperature, and the satellite- derived cloud top temperature following the wet adiabatic lapse rate in the cloud layer; (c) the third step is to obtain a representative lapse rate for the computing domain; (d) the fourth step is to compute the cloud top heights for the individual satellite pixels in the entire domain. The information on cloud top height and cloud top temperature obtained from the cloudy pixels is then dynamically assimilated into the model analysis using Cressman's objective analysis. Using the improved model analyses, a deterministic forecast will be carried out with an option of four-dimensional data assimilation of model winds and thermodynamic variables for a pre- forecast period of one complete diurnal cycle. Verification will be carried out using the hourly surface observations and cloud base measurements, and also using the satellite cloud imagery against the simulated cloud imagery and associated cloud products. The data assimilation of the derived cloud products is being tested in modeling systems such as the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) and the Weather Research Forecasting Model (WRF). The data assimilation of cloud products and verification is intended for the pre-processing module in a real-time forecasting system using various objective analysis procedures such as the Cressman-type, multi-quadric and 3DVAR. This study is to develop an efficient forecasting system to support naval aircraft and rotorcraft operations at the Fallon Naval Air Station, Fallon, Nevada.

  18. Application of hydrological models for flood forecasting and flood control in India and Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J. C.; Havnø, K.; Ammentorp, H. C.; Verwey, A.

    A general mathematical modelling system for real-time flood forecasting and flood control planning is described. The system comprises a lumped conceptual rainfall-runoff model, a hydrodynamic model for river routing, reservoir and flood plain simulation, an updating procedure for real-time operation and a comprehensive data management system. The system is presently applied for real-time forecasting of the two 20 000 km 2 (Yamuna and Damodar) catchments in India as well as for flood control modelling at the same two catchments in India. In another project the system is being established for the entire Bangladesh with a coarse discretization and for the South East Region of Bangladesh with a fine model discretization. The objectives of the modelling application in Bangladesh are to enable predictions of the effects of alternative river regulation structures in terms of changes in water levels, inundations, siltration and salinity. The modelling system has been transferred to the Central Water Commission of India and the Master Plan Organization of Bangladesh in connection with comprehensive training programmes. The models are presently being operated by Indian and Bangladeshi engineers in the two countries.

  19. Ensemble Data Assimilation with HSPF for Improved Real-Time Water Quality Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Riazi, H.; rafieei nasab, A.; Shin, C.; Seo, D.

    2013-05-01

    An ensemble data assimilation (DA) procedure for the Hydrologic Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) model has been developed, tested and evaluated for implementation in real-time water quality forecasting. The procedure, referred to herein as MLEF-HSPF, uses maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF) which combines strengths of variational assimilation (VAR) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). To evaluate the procedure, MLEF-HSPF was run daily for a 2-yr period for the Kumho River Subbasin of the Nakdong River Basin in Korea. A set of performance measures was used to assess the marginal value of DA-aided predictions of stream flow and water quality variables such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), phosphate (PO4) and chlorophyll a. Due to large dimensionality of the state vector and complexity of the biochemical processes involved, DA with HSPF poses additional challenges. In this presentation, we describe MLEF-HSPF, summarize the evaluation results and identify the challenges.

  20. A model for real-time quantitative rainfall forecasting using remote sensing. 1. Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Mark N.; Krajewski, Witold F.

    1994-04-01

    A physically based rainfall forecasting model for real-time hydrologic applications is developed with emphasis on utilization of remote sensing observations. Temporal and spatial scales of interest are lead times of the order of hours and areas of the order of 10 km2. The dynamic model is derived from conservation of mass in a cloud column as defined by the continuity equations for air, liquid water, water vapor, and cloud water. Conservation of momentum is modeled using a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference. The model state is vertically integrated liquid water content in a column of the atmosphere. Additionally, laws of thermodynamics, adiabatic air parcel theory, and cloud microphysics are applied to derive a basic parameterization of the governing equations of model dynamics. The parameterization is in terms of hydrometeorologic observables including radar reflectivity, satellite-infrared brightness temperature, and ground-level air temperature, dew point temperature, and pressure. Implementation and application is described by French et al. (this issue) and involves incorporation of uncertainty analysis and a two-dimensional spatial domain, where the dynamics of the continuous space-time rainfall process are discretized onto a rectangular grid.

  1. Multiple indices method for real-time tsunami inundation forecast using a dense offshore observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Aoi, S.; Hirata, K.; Suzuki, W.; Kunugi, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-12-01

    We started to develop a new methodology for real-time tsunami inundation forecast system (Aoi et al., 2015, this meeting) using densely offshore tsunami observations of the Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (S-net), which is under construction along the Japan Trench (Kanazawa et al., 2012, JpGU; Uehira et al., 2015, IUGG). In our method, the most important concept is involving any type and/or form uncertainties in the tsunami forecast, which cannot be dealt with any of standard linear/nonlinear least square approaches. We first prepare a Tsunami Scenario Bank (TSB), which contains offshore tsunami waveforms at the S-net stations and tsunami inundation information calculated from any possible tsunami source. We then quickly select several acceptable tsunami scenarios that can explain offshore observations by using multiple indices and appropriate thresholds, after a tsunami occurrence. At that time, possible tsunami inundations coupled with selected scenarios are forecasted (Yamamoto et al., 2014, AGU). Currently, we define three indices: correlation coefficient and two variance reductions, whose L2-norm part is normalized either by observations or calculations (Suzuki et al., 2015, JpGU; Yamamoto et al., 2015, IUGG). In this study, we construct the TSB, which contains various tsunami source models prepared for the probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment in the Japan Trench region (Hirata et al., 2014, AGU). To evaluate the propriety of our method, we adopt the fault model based on the 2011 Tohoku earthquake as a pseudo "observation". We also calculate three indices using coastal maximum tsunami height distributions between observation and calculation. We then obtain the correlation between coastal and offshore indices. We notice that the index value of coastal maximum tsunami heights is closer to 1 than the index value of offshore waveforms, i.e., the coastal maximum tsunami height may be predictable within appropriate thresholds defined for

  2. A global flash flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Calum; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Hewson, Tim; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-04-01

    The sudden and devastating nature of flash flood events means it is imperative to provide early warnings such as those derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecasts. Currently such systems exist on basin, national and continental scales in Europe, North America and Australia but rely on high resolution NWP forecasts or rainfall-radar nowcasting, neither of which have global coverage. To produce global flash flood forecasts this work investigates the possibility of using forecasts from a global NWP system. In particular we: (i) discuss how global NWP can be used for flash flood forecasting and discuss strengths and weaknesses; (ii) demonstrate how a robust evaluation can be performed given the rarity of the event; (iii) highlight the challenges and opportunities in communicating flash flood uncertainty to decision makers; and (iv) explore future developments which would significantly improve global flash flood forecasting. The proposed forecast system uses ensemble surface runoff forecasts from the ECMWF H-TESSEL land surface scheme. A flash flood index is generated using the ERIC (Enhanced Runoff Index based on Climatology) methodology [Raynaud et al., 2014]. This global methodology is applied to a series of flash floods across southern Europe. Results from the system are compared against warnings produced using the higher resolution COSMO-LEPS limited area model. The global system is evaluated by comparing forecasted warning locations against a flash flood database of media reports created in partnership with floodlist.com. To deal with the lack of objectivity in media reports we carefully assess the suitability of different skill scores and apply spatial uncertainty thresholds to the observations. To communicate the uncertainties of the flash flood system output we experiment with a dynamic region-growing algorithm. This automatically clusters regions of similar return period exceedence probabilities, thus presenting the at-risk areas at a spatial

  3. Effects of Real-Time NASA Vegetation Data on Model Forecasts of Severe Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bell, Jordan R.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA-EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT started generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States beginning 1 June 2010. A companion poster presentation (Bell et al.) primarily focuses on impact results in an offline configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) for the 2010 warm season, comparing the SPoRT/MODIS GVF dataset to the current operational monthly climatology GVF available within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. This paper/presentation primarily focuses on individual case studies of severe weather events to determine the impacts and possible improvements by using the real-time, high-resolution SPoRT-MODIS GVFs in place of the coarser-resolution NCEP climatological GVFs in model simulations. The NASA-Unified WRF (NU-WRF) modeling system is employed to conduct the sensitivity simulations of individual events. The NU-WRF is an integrated modeling system based on the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core that is designed to represents aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and land processes at satellite-resolved scales in a coupled simulation environment. For this experiment, the coupling between the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and the WRF model is utilized to measure the impacts of the daily SPoRT/MODIS versus the monthly NCEP climatology GVFs. First, a spin-up run of the LIS is integrated for two years using the Noah LSM to ensure that the land surface fields reach an equilibrium state on the 4-km grid mesh used. Next, the spin-up LIS is run in two separate modes beginning on 1 June 2010, one continuing with the climatology GVFs while the

  4. Successive estimation of a tsunami wavefield without earthquake source data: A data assimilation approach toward real-time tsunami forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Obara, Kazushige; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Uehira, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    We propose a tsunami forecasting method based on a data assimilation technique designed for dense tsunameter networks. Rather than using seismic source parameters or initial sea surface height as the initial condition of for a tsunami forecasting, it estimates the current tsunami wavefield (tsunami height and tsunami velocity) in real time by repeatedly assimilating dense tsunami data into a numerical simulation. Numerical experiments were performed using a simple 1-D station array and the 2-D layout of the new S-net tsunameter network around the Japan Trench. Treating a synthetic tsunami calculated by the finite-difference method as observed data, the data assimilation reproduced the assumed tsunami wavefield before the tsunami struck the coastline. Because the method estimates the full tsunami wavefield, including velocity, these wavefields can be used as initial conditions for other tsunami simulations to calculate inundation or runup for real-time forecasting.

  5. Development of Real-time Tsunami Inundation Forecast Using Ocean Bottom Tsunami Networks along the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, S.; Yamamoto, N.; Suzuki, W.; Hirata, K.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.; Kubo, T.; Maeda, T.

    2015-12-01

    In the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, in which huge tsunami claimed a great deal of lives, the initial tsunami forecast based on hypocenter information estimated using seismic data on land were greatly underestimated. From this lesson, NIED is now constructing S-net (Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis along the Japan Trench) which consists of 150 ocean bottom observatories with seismometers and pressure gauges (tsunamimeters) linked by fiber optic cables. To take full advantage of S-net, we develop a new methodology of real-time tsunami inundation forecast using ocean bottom observation data and construct a prototype system that implements the developed forecasting method for the Pacific coast of Chiba prefecture (Sotobo area). We employ a database-based approach because inundation is a strongly non-linear phenomenon and its calculation costs are rather heavy. We prepare tsunami scenario bank in advance, by constructing the possible tsunami sources, and calculating the tsunami waveforms at S-net stations, coastal tsunami heights and tsunami inundation on land. To calculate the inundation for target Sotobo area, we construct the 10-m-mesh precise elevation model with coastal structures. Based on the sensitivities analyses, we construct the tsunami scenario bank that efficiently covers possible tsunami scenarios affecting the Sotobo area. A real-time forecast is carried out by selecting several possible scenarios which can well explain real-time tsunami data observed at S-net from tsunami scenario bank. An advantage of our method is that tsunami inundations are estimated directly from the actual tsunami data without any source information, which may have large estimation errors. In addition to the forecast system, we develop Web services, APIs, and smartphone applications and brush them up through social experiments to provide the real-time tsunami observation and forecast information in easy way to understand toward urging people to evacuate.

  6. On the integration of HydroProg and FloodMap: towards real-time inundation predictions in the upper Nysa Klodzka basin (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dapeng; Mizinski, Bartlomiej; Latocha, Agnieszka; Parzoch, Krzysztof; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes attempts to link the HydroProg system for issuing the real-time warnings against hydrologic hazards (research project no. 2011/01/D/ST10/04171 of the National Science Centre of Poland) with the hydrodynamic FloodMap model. HydroProg itself integrates hydrometeorological gauging networks with dissimilar hydrologic models in order to deliver multiple river stage prognoses and their multimodel ensemble prediction. FloodMap uses HydroProg-delivered forecasts and, along with data on topography and bed profiles, produces short-term (3-hour) prognoses of inundation. The research is carried out in five test sites located in the upper Nysa Klodzka basin (SW Poland), where the HydroProg-Klodzko prototype is experimentally implemented, and is steadily providing the users with experimental prognoses of river stages (www.klodzko.hydroprog.uni.wroc.pl). The successful implementation of HydroProg in Klodzko County is due to the partnership with its authorities who developed and maintain the Local System for Flood Monitoring (Lokalny System Oslony Przeciwpowodziowej - LSOP). For the purpose of HydroProg-FloodMap integration we selected: (1) three hydrograph prediction approaches offered by HydroProg-Klodzko, (2) five specific peak flow events, and (3) five test sites along four mountainous rivers of the study area, focusing on 3-hour hydrograph predictions. The calibration of the FloodMap model is based on an overbank flow reconstruction, produced as a result of mapping geomorphological consequences of the flood that occurred in the Zelazno site on 26-28 June 2009. The discussion as to whether the calibrated model can be extrapolated and used in the remaining test sites is also provided. By utilizing FloodMap with observed water depth data we produce simulated inundation, which we verify against the orthophoto images acquired by the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Subsequently, we again run the FloodMap model with the HydroProg-delivered prognoses of

  7. Optimized Flood Forecasts Using a Statistical Enemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Micha; Fredj, Erick

    2016-04-01

    The method presented here assembles an optimized flood forecast from a set of consecutive WRF-Hydro simulations by applying coefficients which we derive from straightforward statistical procedures. Several government and research institutions that produce climate data offer ensemble forecasts, which merge predictions from different models to gain a more accurate fit to observed data. Existing ensemble forecasts present climate and weather predictions only. In this research we propose a novel approach to constructing hydrological ensembles for flood forecasting. The ensemble flood forecast is created by combining predictions from the same model, but initiated at different times. An operative flood forecasting system, run by the Israeli Hydrological Service, produces flood forecasts twice daily with a 72 hour forecast period. By collating the output from consecutive simulation runs we have access to multiple overlapping forecasts. We then apply two statistical procedures to blend these consecutive forecasts, resulting in a very close fit to observed flood runoff. We first employ cross-correlation with a time lag to determine a time shift for each of the original, consecutive forecasts. This shift corrects for two possible sources of error: slow or fast moving weather fronts in the base climate data; and mis-calibrations of the WRF-Hydro model in determining the rate of flow of surface runoff and in channels. We apply this time shift to all consecutive forecasts, then run a linear regression with the observed runoff data as the dependent variable and all shifted forecasts as the predictor variables. The solution to the linear regression equation is a set of coefficients that corrects the amplitude errors in the forecasts. These resulting regression coefficients are then applied to the consecutive forecasts producing a statistical ensemble which, by design, closely matches the observed runoff. After performing this procedure over many storm events in the Negev region

  8. Decision making based on global flood forecasts and satellite-derived inundation maps in data-sparse regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Hirpa, Feyera A.; Thielen-del Pozo, Jutta; Salamon, Peter; Brakenridge, G. Robert; Pappenberger, Florian; De Groeve, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Early flood warning and real-time monitoring systems play a key role in flood risk reduction and disaster response decisions. Global-scale flood forecasting and satellite-based flood detection systems are currently operating, however their reliability for decision making applications needs to be assessed. In this study, we performed comparative evaluations of several operational global flood forecasting and flood detection systems, using major flood events recorded over 2012-2014. Specifically, we evaluated the spatial extent and temporal characteristics of flood detections from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) and the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). Furthermore, we compared the GFDS flood maps with those from NASA's two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors. Results reveal that: 1) general agreement was found between the GFDS and MODIS flood detection systems, 2) large differences exist in the spatio-temporal characteristics of the GFDS detections and GloFAS forecasts, and 3) the quantitative validation of global flood disasters in data-sparse regions is highly challenging. Overall, the satellite remote sensing provides useful near real-time flood information that can be useful for risk management. We highlight the known limitations of global flood detection and forecasting systems, and propose ways forward to improve the reliability of large scale flood monitoring tools.

  9. Numerical modelling for real-time forecasting of marine oil pollution and hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, Michela; Pinardi, Nadia; Bruciaferri, Diego; Liubartseva, Svitlana

    2015-04-01

    (MEDESS4MS) system, which is an integrated operational multi-model oil spill prediction service, that can be used by different users to run simulations of oil spills at sea, even in real time, through a web portal. The MEDESS4MS system gathers different oil spill modelling systems and data from meteorological and ocean forecasting systems, as well as operational information on response equipment, together with environmental and socio-economic sensitivity maps. MEDSLIK-II has been also used to provide an assessment of hazard stemming from operational oil ship discharges in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian (SANI) Seas. Operational pollution resulting from ships consists of a movable hazard with a magnitude that changes dynamically as a result of a number of external parameters varying in space and time (temperature, wind, sea currents). Simulations of oil releases have been performed with realistic oceanographic currents and the results show that the oil pollution hazard distribution has an inherent spatial and temporal variability related to the specific flow field variability.

  10. An Analytical Framework for Flood Water Conservation Considering Forecast Uncertainty and Acceptable Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W.; Zhang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir water levels are usually not allowed to exceed the flood limited water level (FLWL) during flood season, which neglects the meteorological and real-time forecast information and leads to the great waste of water resources. With the development of weather forecasting, hydrologic modeling, and hydro-climatic teleconnection, the streamflow forecast precision have improved a lot, which provides the technical support for the flood water utilization. This paper addresses how much flood water can be conserved for use after the flood season through the operation of reservoir based on uncertain forecast information by taking into account the residual flood control capacity (the difference between flood conveyance capacity and the expected inflow in a lead time). A two-stage model for dynamic control of the flood limited water level (the maximum allowed water level during the flood season, DC-FLWL) is established considering forecast uncertainty and acceptable flood risk. It is found that DC-FLWL is applicable when the reservoir inflow ranges from small to medium levels of the historical records, while both forecast uncertainty and acceptable risk in the downstream affect the feasible space of DC-FLWL. As forecast uncertainty increases (under a given risk level) or as acceptable risk level decreases (under a given forecast uncertainty level), the minimum required safety margin for flood control increases, and the chance for DC-FLWL decreases. The derived hedging rules from the modeling framework illustrate either the dominant role of water conservation or flood control or the tradeoff between the two objectives under different levels of forecast uncertainty and acceptable risk. These rules may provide useful guidelines for conserving water from flood, especially in the area with heavy water stress.

  11. Real-Time Ocean Forecasting System in support of U.S. Coast Guard's Search and Rescue Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, C.; Chao, Y.; Howlett, E.; Allen, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    This talk will describe a real-time ocean forecasting system off the U.S. west coast developed to enhance U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) decision support tools for search and rescue operations. The forecasting model is based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with multi-domain nested configurations. A multi-scale 3-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation scheme is used to assimilate both in situ (e.g., gliders) and remotely sensed data from both satellite and land-based platforms (e.g., high-frequency (HF) radars). The performance of this real-time ocean forecasting system was evaluated during a two-week field experiment during July-August 2009 in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The 72-hour ocean forecast fields in Alaska's Prince William Sound and California coastal ocean are now produced in real-time and accessible by the USCG's decision support tool during search and rescue operations. Recent test results using the independent data collected by the USCG will be discussed.

  12. Operational Precipitation prediction in Support of Real-Time Flash Flood Prediction and Reservoir Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, K. P.

    2006-05-01

    The presentation will outline the implementation and performance evaluation of a number of national and international projects pertaining to operational precipitation estimation and prediction in the context of hydrologic warning systems and reservoir management support. In all cases, uncertainty measures of the estimates and predictions are an integral part of the precipitation models. Outstanding research issues whose resolution is likely to lead to improvements in the operational environment are presented. The presentation draws from the experience of the Hydrologic Research Center (http://www.hrc-lab.org) prototype implementation projects at the Panama Canal, Central America, Northern California, and South-Central US. References: Carpenter, T.M, and K.P. Georgakakos, "Discretization Scale Dependencies of the Ensemble Flow Range versus Catchment Area Relationship in Distributed Hydrologic Modeling," Journal of Hydrology, 2006, in press. Carpenter, T.M., and K.P. Georgakakos, "Impacts of Parametric and Radar Rainfall Uncertainty on the Ensemble Streamflow Simulations of a Distributed Hydrologic Model," Journal of Hydrology, 298, 202-221, 2004. Georgakakos, K.P., Graham, N.E., Carpenter, T.M., Georgakakos, A.P., and H. Yao, "Integrating Climate- Hydrology Forecasts and Multi-Objective Reservoir Management in Northern California," EOS, 86(12), 122,127, 2005. Georgakakos, K.P., and J.A. Sperfslage, "Operational Rainfall and Flow Forecasting for the Panama Canal Watershed," in The Rio Chagres: A Multidisciplinary Profile of a Tropical Watershed, R.S. Harmon, ed., Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands, Chapter 16, 323-334, 2005. Georgakakos, K. P., "Analytical results for operational flash flood guidance," Journal of Hydrology, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.05.009, 2005.

  13. Flood Forecasting in River System Using ANFIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ullah, Nazrin; Choudhury, P.

    2010-10-26

    The aim of the present study is to investigate applicability of artificial intelligence techniques such as ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) in forecasting flood flow in a river system. The proposed technique combines the learning ability of neural network with the transparent linguistic representation of fuzzy system. The technique is applied to forecast discharge at a downstream station using flow information at various upstream stations. A total of three years data has been selected for the implementation of this model. ANFIS models with various input structures and membership functions are constructed, trained and tested to evaluate efficiency of the models. Statistical indices such as Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CORR) and Coefficient of Efficiency (CE) are used to evaluate performance of the ANFIS models in forecasting river flood. The values of the indices show that ANFIS model can accurately and reliably be used to forecast flood in a river system.

  14. Flood Forecasting in River System Using ANFIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Nazrin; Choudhury, P.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate applicability of artificial intelligence techniques such as ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) in forecasting flood flow in a river system. The proposed technique combines the learning ability of neural network with the transparent linguistic representation of fuzzy system. The technique is applied to forecast discharge at a downstream station using flow information at various upstream stations. A total of three years data has been selected for the implementation of this model. ANFIS models with various input structures and membership functions are constructed, trained and tested to evaluate efficiency of the models. Statistical indices such as Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CORR) and Coefficient of Efficiency (CE) are used to evaluate performance of the ANFIS models in forecasting river flood. The values of the indices show that ANFIS model can accurately and reliably be used to forecast flood in a river system.

  15. A method for probabilistic flash flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Jill; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hong, Yang; Kong, Fanyou; Flamig, Zachary L.

    2016-10-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the United States and across the globe. This study advances the use of high-resolution quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for flash flood forecasting. The QPFs are derived from a stormscale ensemble prediction system, and used within a distributed hydrological model framework to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Before creating the PFFFs, it is important to characterize QPF uncertainty, particularly in terms of location which is the most problematic for hydrological use of QPFs. The SAL methodology (Wernli et al., 2008), which stands for structure, amplitude, and location, is used for this error quantification, with a focus on location. Finally, the PFFF methodology is proposed that produces probabilistic hydrological forecasts. The main advantages of this method are: (1) identifying specific basin scales that are forecast to be impacted by flash flooding; (2) yielding probabilistic information about the forecast hydrologic response that accounts for the locational uncertainties of the QPFs; (3) improving lead time by using stormscale NWP ensemble forecasts; and (4) not requiring multiple simulations, which are computationally demanding.

  16. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  17. Real-Time Global Flood Estimation Using Satellite-Based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-01-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50 deg. N - 50 deg. S at relatively high spatial (approximately 12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is approximately 0.9 and the false alarm ratio is approximately 0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30 deg. S - 30 deg. N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  18. Developing Real-Time Emissions Estimates for Enhanced Air Quality Forecasting

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exploring the relationship between ambient temperature, energy demand, and electric generating unit point source emissions and potential techniques for incorporating real-time information on the modulating effects of these variables using the Mid-Atlantic/Northeast Visibility Uni...

  19. A Satellite Driven Real-time Forecasting Platform in the Upper Zambezi Basin: A Multi-model Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, J. B.; Wi, S.; Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Demaria, E. M.; Durcik, M.

    2015-12-01

    In large basins such as the Upper Zambezi where concentration times are of many days or even weeks, satellite precipitation products available in real-time become a key component enabling - with the use of hydrologic models - streamflow forecasts for downstream locations with enough lead time to inform decision-making. We present a real-time streamflow forecasting application based on this concept, using the TMPA and CMORPH rainfall products (which we bias-correct using the CHIRPS product) to force four distributed hydrologic models (VIC, HyMod, HBV, Sacramento) covering a variety of levels of model complexity. This study aims at establishing a multi-model satellite-based streamflow forecasting platform as a tool that can inform water management in real-time. This work is part of the efforts of the SERVIR Applied Sciences Team to bring NASA Earth Observation Applications into decision support tools for managing water resources in the Upper Zambezi, in collaboration with the Southern African Development Community Climate Services Center and the Zambezi Watercourse Commission.

  20. Recent development for near-field tsunami forecasting based on real time GNSS and offshore tsunami data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Y.; Tsushima, H.; Kawamoto, S.; Miyagawa, K.; Yahagi, T.; Sato, Y.; Hino, R.; Demachi, T.; Iinuma, T.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake and its associated tsunami clearly showed the need for an accurate tsunami early warning system. In a short time between the occurrence of earthquakes and associating tsunamis and the tsunami arrivals to near-field coastal inhabited regions, we can use many different kinds of observations for real-time tsunami forecasting. Since individual type of the observations has its advantages and disadvantages, it is strongly required to make use of multiple kinds of data for improving estimated size and arrival timing of imminent tsunamis by reinforcing one another. For example, the rapid analysis of short-period seismic wave data, such as earthquake early warning system in Japan will provide the first information on the size and location of an earthquake, helping issuing tsunami information immediately after earthquakes. Real-time GNSS data have an advantage over the short-time seismograms because robust estimations of location and dimension of coseismic faults can be derived from spatial patterns of permanent coseismic displacement measured by real-time GNSS data. It is one of the important lessons learnt from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake that estimation of reliable finite source fault models is indispensable in tsunami forecasting after massive earthquakes. Offshore measurements of coming tsunamis must be data most relevant to the arrival times and sizes of tsunamis along shorelines. However, it takes more time to obtain credible spatial distribution of tsunami wave height from the observations due to much slower propagation of tsunamis than seismic waves and deformations. In the presentation, we will introduce the current status of the real-time crustal deformation monitoring system based on the GNSS data developed by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan and Tohoku University. We also briefly introduce the real-time tsunami forecasting based on the offshore tsunami data, developed by the Meteorological Research Institute of Japan

  1. Multidisciplinary Approach to Flood Forecasting on the Base of Earth Observation Data and Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelentsov, Viacheslav; Potryasaev, Semen; Sokolov, Boris

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a new approach to the creation of short- term forecasting systems of river flooding is being further developed. It provides highly accurate forecasting results due to operative obtaining and integrated processing of the remote sensing and ground- based water flow data in real time. Forecasting of flood areas and depths is performed on a time interval of 12 to 48 hours to be able to perform the necessary steps to alert and evacuate the population. Forecast results are available as web services. The proposed system extends traditional separate methods based on satellite monitoring or modeling of a river's physical processes, by using an interdisciplinary approach, integration of different models and technologies, and through intelligent choice of the most suitable models for a flood forecasting.

  2. Real-Time Foreshock Probability Forecasting Experiments in Japan, Southern California and Whole Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2014-12-01

    I am concerned with whether currently occurring earthquakes will be "foreshocks" of a significantly larger earthquake or not. When plural earthquakes occur in a region, I attempt to statistically discriminate foreshocks from a swarm or the mainshock-aftershock sequence. The forecast needs identification of an earthquake cluster using the single-link algorithm; and then the probability is calculated based on the clustering strength and magnitude correlations. The probability forecast model were estimated from the JMA hypocenter data of earthquakes of M≧4 in the period 1926-1993 (Ogata et al., 1996). Then we presented the performance and validation of the forecasts during 1994 - 2010 by using the same model (Ogata and Katsura, 2012). The forecasts perform significantly better than the unconditional (average) foreshock probability throughout Japan region. The frequency of the actual foreshocks is consistent with the forecasted probabilities. In my poster, I would like to discuss details of the outcomes in the forecasting and evaluations. Furthermore, I would like to apply the forecasting in California and global catalogs to show some universality in the forecasting procedure. Reference: [1] Ogata, Y., Utsu, T. and Katsura, K. (1996). Statistical discrimination of foreshocks from other earthquake clusters, Geophys. J. Int. 127, 17-30. [2]Ogata, Y. and Katsura, K. (2012). Prospective foreshock forecast experiment during the last 17 years, Geophys. J. Int., 191, 1237-1244.

  3. The Central European Flood in June 2013: Experiences from a Near-Real Time Disaster Analysis in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Kai; Khazai, Bijan; Mühr, Bernhard; Elmer, Florian; Bessel, Tina; Möhrle, Stella; Dittrich, André; Kreibich, Heidi; Fohringer, Joachim; Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Trieselmann, Werner; Kunz, Michael; Merz, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The central European flood in June 2013 once again revealed that complete flood protection is not possible. Inundations caused severe damage to buildings, infrastructure and agricultural lands. Official estimates of total damage in Germany amount to approx. 8bn € which is lower than the damage caused by the August 2002 flood - the most expensive natural hazard experienced so far in Germany. Repeated and long lasting precipitation in combination with extremely adverse preconditions induced a large scale flood event. In Germany, particularly the catchment areas of the Danube and Elbe were affected. The June 2013 flood has been the most severe flood event in terms of spatial extent and magnitude of flood peaks in Germany during the last 60 years. Large scale inundation occurred as a consequence of levee breaches near Deggendorf (Danube), Groß Rosenau and Fischbeck (Elbe). The flood has had a great impact on people, transportation and the economy. In many areas more than 50,000 thousand people were evacuated. Electrical grid and local water supply utilities failed during the floods. Furthermore, traffic was disrupted in the interregional transportation network including federal highways and long distance railways. CEDIM analysed and assessed the flood event within its current research activity on near real time forensic disaster analysis (CEDIM FDA: www.cedim.de). This contribution gives an overview about the CEDIM FDA analyses' results. It describes the key hydro-meteorological factors that triggered this extraordinary event and draws comparisons to major flood events in August 2002 and July 1954. Further, it shows the outcomes of a rapid initial impact assessment on the district level using social, economic and institutional indicators which are supplemented with information on the number of people evacuated and transportation disruptions and combined with the magnitude of the event.

  4. Operational flash flood forecasting platform based on grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierion, V.; Ayral, P.-A.; Angelini, V.; Sauvagnargues-Lesage, S.; Nativi, S.; Payrastre, O.

    2009-04-01

    effort in term of grid technology development. This paper presents an operational flash flood forecasting platform which have been developed in the framework of CYCLOPS European project providing one of virtual organizations of EGEE project. This platform has been designed to enable multi-simulations processes to ease forecasting operations of several supervised watersheds on Grand Delta (SPC-GD) territory. Grid technology infrastructure, in providing multiple remote computing elements enables the processing of multiple rainfall scenarios, derived to the original meteorological forecasting transmitted by Meteo-France, and their respective hydrological simulations. First results show that from one forecasting scenario, this new presented approach can permit simulations of more than 200 different scenarios to support forecasters in their aforesaid mission and appears as an efficient hydrological decision-making tool. Although, this system seems operational, model validity has to be confirmed. So, further researches are necessary to improve models core to be more efficient in term of hydrological aspects. Finally, this platform could be an efficient tool for developing others modelling aspects as calibration or data assimilation in real time processing.

  5. Ensemble forecasting of short-term system scale irrigation demands using real-time flow data and numerical weather predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Kushan C.; Western, Andrew W.; Robertson, David E.; George, Biju; Nawarathna, Bandara

    2016-06-01

    Irrigation demands fluctuate in response to weather variations and a range of irrigation management decisions, which creates challenges for water supply system operators. This paper develops a method for real-time ensemble forecasting of irrigation demand and applies it to irrigation command areas of various sizes for lead times of 1 to 5 days. The ensemble forecasts are based on a deterministic time series model coupled with ensemble representations of the various inputs to that model. Forecast inputs include past flow, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration. These inputs are variously derived from flow observations from a modernized irrigation delivery system; short-term weather forecasts derived from numerical weather prediction models and observed weather data available from automatic weather stations. The predictive performance for the ensemble spread of irrigation demand was quantified using rank histograms, the mean continuous rank probability score (CRPS), the mean CRPS reliability and the temporal mean of the ensemble root mean squared error (MRMSE). The mean forecast was evaluated using root mean squared error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (NSE) and bias. The NSE values for evaluation periods ranged between 0.96 (1 day lead time, whole study area) and 0.42 (5 days lead time, smallest command area). Rank histograms and comparison of MRMSE, mean CRPS, mean CRPS reliability and RMSE indicated that the ensemble spread is generally a reliable representation of the forecast uncertainty for short lead times but underestimates the uncertainty for long lead times.

  6. Real-time numerical forecast of global epidemic spreading: case study of 2009 A/H1N1pdm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mathematical and computational models for infectious diseases are increasingly used to support public-health decisions; however, their reliability is currently under debate. Real-time forecasts of epidemic spread using data-driven models have been hindered by the technical challenges posed by parameter estimation and validation. Data gathered for the 2009 H1N1 influenza crisis represent an unprecedented opportunity to validate real-time model predictions and define the main success criteria for different approaches. Methods We used the Global Epidemic and Mobility Model to generate stochastic simulations of epidemic spread worldwide, yielding (among other measures) the incidence and seeding events at a daily resolution for 3,362 subpopulations in 220 countries. Using a Monte Carlo Maximum Likelihood analysis, the model provided an estimate of the seasonal transmission potential during the early phase of the H1N1 pandemic and generated ensemble forecasts for the activity peaks in the northern hemisphere in the fall/winter wave. These results were validated against the real-life surveillance data collected in 48 countries, and their robustness assessed by focusing on 1) the peak timing of the pandemic; 2) the level of spatial resolution allowed by the model; and 3) the clinical attack rate and the effectiveness of the vaccine. In addition, we studied the effect of data incompleteness on the prediction reliability. Results Real-time predictions of the peak timing are found to be in good agreement with the empirical data, showing strong robustness to data that may not be accessible in real time (such as pre-exposure immunity and adherence to vaccination campaigns), but that affect the predictions for the attack rates. The timing and spatial unfolding of the pandemic are critically sensitive to the level of mobility data integrated into the model. Conclusions Our results show that large-scale models can be used to provide valuable real-time forecasts of

  7. Draft Forecasts from Real-Time Runs of Physics-Based Models - A Road to the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2008-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models, and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity, the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. After consultations with NOAA/SEC and with AFWA, CCMC has developed a set of tools as a first step to make real-time model output useful to forecast centers. In this presentation, we will discuss the motivation for this activity, the actions taken so far, and options for future tools from model output.

  8. Medium range flood forecasts at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, N.; Wood, A. W.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Wood, E. F.

    2006-12-01

    While weather and climate forecast methods have advanced greatly over the last two decades, this capability has yet to be evidenced in mitigation of water-related natural hazards (primarily floods and droughts), especially in the developing world. Examples abound of extreme property damage and loss of life due to floods in the underdeveloped world. For instance, more than 4.5 million people were affected by the July 2000 flooding of the Mekong River and its tributaries in Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos and Thailand. The February- March 2000 floods in the Limpopo River of Mozambique caused extreme disruption to that country's fledgling economy. Mitigation of these events through advance warning has typically been modest at best. Despite the above noted improvement in weather and climate forecasts, there is at present no system for forecasting of floods globally, notwithstanding that the potential clearly exists. We describe a methodology that is eventually intended to generate global flood predictions routinely. It draws heavily from the experimental North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and the companion Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) for development of nowcasts, and the University of Washington Experimental Hydrologic Prediction System to develop ensemble hydrologic forecasts based on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models which serve both as nowcasts (and hence reduce the need for in situ precipitation and other observations in parts of the world where surface networks are critically deficient) and provide forecasts for lead times as long as fifteen days. The heart of the hydrologic modeling system is the University of Washington/Princeton University Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model. In the prototype (tested using retrospective data), VIC is driven globally up to the time of forecast with daily ERA40 precipitation (rescaled on a monthly basis to a station-based global climatology), ERA40 wind, and ERA40

  9. Predictive Skill of Meteorological Drought Based on Multi-Model Ensemble Forecasts: A Real-Time Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. C.; Mo, K. C.; Zhang, Q.; Huang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Drought prediction from monthly to seasonal time scales is of critical importance to disaster mitigation, agricultural planning, and multi-purpose reservoir management. Starting in December 2012, NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) has been providing operational Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) Outlooks using the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) forecasts, to support CPC's monthly drought outlooks and briefing activities. The current NMME system consists of six model forecasts from U.S. and Canada modeling centers, including the CFSv2, CM2.1, GEOS-5, CCSM3.0, CanCM3, and CanCM4 models. In this study, we conduct an assessment of the predictive skill of meteorological drought using real-time NMME forecasts for the period from May 2012 to May 2014. The ensemble SPI forecasts are the equally weighted mean of the six model forecasts. Two performance measures, the anomaly correlation coefficient and root-mean-square errors against the observations, are used to evaluate forecast skill.Similar to the assessment based on NMME retrospective forecasts, predictive skill of monthly-mean precipitation (P) forecasts is generally low after the second month and errors vary among models. Although P forecast skill is not large, SPI predictive skill is high and the differences among models are small. The skill mainly comes from the P observations appended to the model forecasts. This factor also contributes to the similarity of SPI prediction among the six models. Still, NMME SPI ensemble forecasts have higher skill than those based on individual models or persistence, and the 6-month SPI forecasts are skillful out to four months. The three major drought events occurred during the 2012-2014 period, the 2012 Central Great Plains drought, the 2013 Upper Midwest flash drought, and 2013-2014 California drought, are used as examples to illustrate the system's strength and limitations. For precipitation-driven drought events, such as the 2012 Central Great Plains drought

  10. Tools and Products of Real-Time Modeling: Opportunities for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of draft Space Weather forecasting tools. This presentation will focus on the last element. Specifically, we will discuss present capabilities, and the potential to derive further tools. These capabilities will be interpreted in the context of a broad-based, bootstrapping activity for modern Space Weather forecasting.

  11. Using Landslide Failure Forecast Models in Near Real Time: the Mt. de La Saxe case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manconi, Andrea; Giordan, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Forecasting the occurrence of landslide phenomena in space and time is a major scientific challenge. The approaches used to forecast landslides mainly depend on the spatial scale analyzed (regional vs. local), the temporal range of forecast (long- vs. short-term), as well as the triggering factor and the landslide typology considered. By focusing on short-term forecast methods for large, deep seated slope instabilities, the potential time of failure (ToF) can be estimated by studying the evolution of the landslide deformation over time (i.e., strain rate) provided that, under constant stress conditions, landslide materials follow creep mechanism before reaching rupture. In the last decades, different procedures have been proposed to estimate ToF by considering simplified empirical and/or graphical methods applied to time series of deformation data. Fukuzono, 1985 proposed a failure forecast method based on the experience performed during large scale laboratory experiments, which were aimed at observing the kinematic evolution of a landslide induced by rain. This approach, known also as the inverse-velocity method, considers the evolution over time of the inverse value of the surface velocity (v) as an indicator of the ToF, by assuming that failure approaches while 1/v tends to zero. Here we present an innovative method to aimed at achieving failure forecast of landslide phenomena by considering near-real-time monitoring data. Starting from the inverse velocity theory, we analyze landslide surface displacements on different temporal windows, and then apply straightforward statistical methods to obtain confidence intervals on the time of failure. Our results can be relevant to support the management of early warning systems during landslide emergency conditions, also when the predefined displacement and/or velocity thresholds are exceeded. In addition, our statistical approach for the definition of confidence interval and forecast reliability can be applied also to

  12. Real-time Aerosol Forecasting over North America using RAP-Chem and the GSI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    RAP-Chem is an implementation of WRF-Chem meteorology-chemistry model that is run daily at NOAA/ESRL over continental domain for air-quality forecasting. The chemical forecasts are combined with observations of species using three-dimensional variational data assimilation procedure implemented in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). In the presentation we detail the method of the assimilation and show verification statistics of the model performance.

  13. Probabilistic flood forecast: Exact and approximate predictive distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysztofowicz, Roman

    2014-09-01

    For quantification of predictive uncertainty at the forecast time t0, the future hydrograph is viewed as a discrete-time continuous-state stochastic process {Hn: n=1,…,N}, where Hn is the river stage at time instance tn>t0. The probabilistic flood forecast (PFF) should specify a sequence of exceedance functions {F‾n: n=1,…,N} such that F‾n(h)=P(Zn>h), where P stands for probability, and Zn is the maximum river stage within time interval (t0,tn], practically Zn=max{H1,…,Hn}. This article presents a method for deriving the exact PFF from a probabilistic stage transition forecast (PSTF) produced by the Bayesian forecasting system (BFS). It then recalls (i) the bounds on F‾n, which can be derived cheaply from a probabilistic river stage forecast (PRSF) produced by a simpler version of the BFS, and (ii) an approximation to F‾n, which can be constructed from the bounds via a recursive linear interpolator (RLI) without information about the stochastic dependence in the process {H1,…,Hn}, as this information is not provided by the PRSF. The RLI is substantiated by comparing the approximate PFF against the exact PFF. Being reasonably accurate and very simple, the RLI may be attractive for real-time flood forecasting in systems of lesser complexity. All methods are illustrated with a case study for a 1430 km headwater basin wherein the PFF is produced for a 72-h interval discretized into 6-h steps.

  14. Predictive Methods for Real-Time Control of Flood Operation of a Multireservoir System: Methodology and Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Malinowski, Krzysztof; Karbowski, Andrzej

    1996-04-01

    Predictive methods for real-time flood operation of water systems consisting of reservoirs located in parallel on tributaries to the main river are presented and discussed. The aspect of conflicting individual goals of the local decision units and other objectives important from an overall point of view is taken into account. The particular attention is focused on hierarchical control structure which provides framework for organization of an on-line reservoir management problem. The important factor involved in flood control the uncertainty with respect to future inflows is taken into consideration. A case study of the upper Vistula river basin system in the southern part of Poland is presented. Simulation results based on 11 historical floods are briefly described and discussed.

  15. Cooperative satellite-based flood detection, mapping, and river monitoring in near real time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakenridge, Robert G.; Nghiem, Son V.

    2004-01-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) combine to influence the planetary wave structure over the northern hemisphere. Floods and droughts are associated around the world with ENSO through such teleconnections, and improved flood prediction relies on understanding them better. The scientific study of floods, and consistent measurements thereof, are needed in order to allow 'Greenhouse warming' predictions about flooding to be tested, and the hydrologic effects of other phenomena such as ENSO to be evaluated. The needed tasks are: 1) detection/warning of flooding, 2) flood magnitude assessment, 3) flood inundation mapping, and 4) preservation of the record of flooding. Accomplishing these same tasks provides direct local societal benefits as well: they can save lives and reduce economic loss. We emphasize that the basic science observations need not be divorced from the immediate practical applications: both can occur together, and just as is the case for meteorological remote sensing.

  16. Construction of Real-time Forecast System on the Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Wheeler, M. C.; Lee, J.; Gottschalck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hae-Jeong Kim1, Matthew C. Wheeler2, June-Yi Lee3 and Jon C. Gottschalck4 1APEC Climate Center, 12 Centum 7-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan, 612-020, South Korea 2Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Australia 3Global Monsoon Climate Laboratory, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea 4Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/National Weather Service, Washington D. C., USA *E-mail : shout@apcc21.org The boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) is one of the dominant mode of variability in the Asian summer monsoon and global monsoon (e.g. Webster et al., 1998; Lee et al., 2013). The BSISO influences summer monsoon onsets (e.g. Wang and Xie, 1997) and interacts with a wide range of atmospheric circulation and associated weather (e.g. Lee et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012). In addition, the wet and dry spells of the BSISO strongly can influence extreme hydro-meteorological events, major driving forces of natural disasters (Lau and Waliser 2005). Thus, it is important to monitor and predict the BSISO. As the occurrence of and concern over extreme climate events rises, moreover, the provision of high-quality BSISO forecasts will become increasingly relevant. APCC has recently begun to provide the BSISO forecast information service at http://www.apcc21.org/eng/service/bsiso/fore/japcc030601.jsp. The forecast is contributed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction, the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and UK Meteorology Office in cooperation with the CAS/WCRP Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE) Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) Task Force. The APCC BSISO forecasts are displayed by newly developed indices proposed by Lee at al. (2013) that are able to overcome the limitation of the RMM index (Wheeler and Hendon, 2004) in terms of representing BSISO activity with northward propagation over off-equatorial monsoon domain. The BSISO forecast information can be

  17. Successful Detection of Floods in Real Time Onboard EO1 Through NASA's ST6 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, F.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Castano, R.; Cichy, B.; Chien, S.; Davies, A.; Doggett, T.; Greeley, R.

    2004-12-01

    For the first time, a spacecraft has the ability to autonomously detect and react to flood events. Flood detection and the investigation of flooding dynamics in real time from space have never been done before at least not until now. Part of the challenge for the hydrological community has been the difficulty of obtaining cloud-free scenes from orbit at sufficient temporal and spatial resolutions to accurately assess flooding. In addition, the large spatial extent of drainage networks coupled with the size of the data sets necessary to be downlinked from satellites add to the difficulty of monitoring flooding from space. Technology developed as part of the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) creates the new capability to autonomously detect, assess, and react to dynamic events, thereby enabling the monitoring of transient processes such as flooding in real time. In addition to being able to autonomously process the imaged data onboard the spacecraft for the first time and search the data for specific spectral features, the ASE Science Team has developed and tested change detection algorithms for the Hyperion spectrometer on EO-1. For flood events, if a change is detected in the onboard processed image (i.e. an increase in the number of ¡wet¡" pixels relative to a baseline image where the system is in normal flow condition or relatively dry), the spacecraft is autonomously retasked to obtain additional scenes. For instance, in February 2004 a rare flooding of the Australian Diamantina River was captured by EO-1. In addition, in August during ASE onboard testing a Zambezi River scene in Central Africa was successfully triggered by the classifier to autonomously take another observation. Yet another successful trigger-response flooding test scenario of the Yellow River in China was captured by ASE on 8/18/04. These exciting results pave the way for future smart reconnaissance missions of transient processes on Earth and beyond. Acknowledgments: We are grateful

  18. A Review of Real-Time Markov Model ENSO Forecast in 1996-2015: Why did it Forecast a Strong El Nino since March 2015?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov model for real time ENSO forecast at Climate Prediction Center of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is based on observed sea surface temperature, sea level from the NCEP ocean reanalysis, and pseudo wind stress from the Florida State University in 1980-1995. The Markov model is constructed in a reduced multivariate EOF (MEOF) space with 3 MEOFs. The cross-validated hindcast skill of NINO3.4 in 1980-1995 is competitive among dynamical and statistical models. The model was implemented into operation at CPC in early 2000s since it successfully forecasted the El Nino in winter 1997/98 starting from November 1996 initial conditions (I.C.). In this study, we assessed the real time forecast skill of ENSO by the Markov model in 1996-2015 and compared it with that of other operational forecast models. It is found that the Markov model has lower forecast skill of ENSO in the 2000s than that in the 1980s and 1990s, which is common among ENSO forecast models. The lower forecast skill of the Markov model in the 2000s can be attributed to weak precursor of positive heat content anomaly in the equatorial Pacific and a shorter lead time of the precursor relative to NINO3.4, both of which is related to the decadal change of ENSO. However, out of surprise, the Markov model successfully forecasted the El Nino in winter 2014/15 starting from February 2014 I.C.. In addition, the Markov model forecasted the continuation of the El Nino into the spring/summer/fall of 2015. Starting from March 2015 I.C., the Markov model forecasted a strong El Nino in winter 2015/16. This surprising long-lead forecast skill can be attributed to the positive second principal component (PC) of MEOF that leads NINO3.4 by 6-9 months, a precursor commonly seen in the 1980s and 1990s. This provided us confidence in the model forecast of a strong El Nino in winter 2015/16 that is highly consistent with the ensemble forecast of dynamical models.

  19. Real-time forecasting and predictability of catastrophic failure events: from rock failure to volcanoes and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, I. G.; Bell, A. F.; Naylor, M.; Atkinson, M.; Filguera, R.; Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate prediction of catastrophic brittle failure in rocks and in the Earth presents a significant challenge on theoretical and practical grounds. The governing equations are not known precisely, but are known to produce highly non-linear behavior similar to those of near-critical dynamical systems, with a large and irreducible stochastic component due to material heterogeneity. In a laboratory setting mechanical, hydraulic and rock physical properties are known to change in systematic ways prior to catastrophic failure, often with significant non-Gaussian fluctuations about the mean signal at a given time, for example in the rate of remotely-sensed acoustic emissions. The effectiveness of such signals in real-time forecasting has never been tested before in a controlled laboratory setting, and previous work has often been qualitative in nature, and subject to retrospective selection bias, though it has often been invoked as a basis in forecasting natural hazard events such as volcanoes and earthquakes. Here we describe a collaborative experiment in real-time data assimilation to explore the limits of predictability of rock failure in a best-case scenario. Data are streamed from a remote rock deformation laboratory to a user-friendly portal, where several proposed physical/stochastic models can be analysed in parallel in real time, using a variety of statistical fitting techniques, including least squares regression, maximum likelihood fitting, Markov-chain Monte-Carlo and Bayesian analysis. The results are posted and regularly updated on the web site prior to catastrophic failure, to ensure a true and and verifiable prospective test of forecasting power. Preliminary tests on synthetic data with known non-Gaussian statistics shows how forecasting power is likely to evolve in the live experiments. In general the predicted failure time does converge on the real failure time, illustrating the bias associated with the 'benefit of hindsight' in retrospective analyses

  20. Areal Rainfall Estimation for Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Bell, V.; Moore, R.

    2003-04-01

    This study deals with the estimation of catchment areal rainfall for the purpose of real-time flood forecasting using rainfall-runoff models. In the UK the two sources of rainfall data on the appropriate timescale are a sparse network of telemetered raingauges, with typical gauge spacings of 10 to 20km, and rainfall estimates derived from weather radar. The focus here is placed on raingauge estimation of rainfall. A survey of the literature reveals a vast number of methods developed for the estimation of areal rainfall from raingauge measurements on a range of spatial and temporal scales, ranging from simple weighting schemes to more complex interpolation methods. A review of previous method intercomparison studies identifies the need for a full evaluation of methods. Evaluation of a selection of nine weighting methods including Thiessen polygons, Standard Average Annual Rainfall (SAAR) weights and DTM-derived elevation weights has been carried out for two UK catchments. One catchment, the Brue in Somerset, is equipped with a special dense network of raingauges installed as part of the HYREX experiment. Evaluation was carried out using the PDM rainfall-runoff model with areal rainfall estimated from several sub-networks of raingauges and modelled flow compared with observed flow. Modelled flow was also compared with flow modelled using the ‘ground truth’ of areal rainfall estimated from the dense raingauge network. Estimates of 15 minute areal rainfall using each method were also compared directly with the areal estimate from the dense network for individual events characterised by either convective or stratiform rain. For stratiform rain, results indicated that all methods give reasonably accurate results, even when only two gauges are used, and the performances of the methods tested were almost indistinguishable. For convective rain, the Thiessen method gave consistently better results than the other methods, and the SAAR-method gave consistently worse

  1. JPSS application in a near real time regional numerical forecast system at CIMSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, P.; Han, H.; Zhu, F.; Schmit, T. J.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from next generation of environmental sensors onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Parnership (S-NPP) and its successor, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), provide us the critical information for numerical weather forecast (NWP). How to better represent these satellite observations and how to get value added information into NWP system still need more studies. Recently scientists from Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a near realtime regional Satellite Data Assimilation system for Tropical storm forecasts (SDAT) (http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/sdat). The system is built with the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation and advanced Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model. With GSI, SDAT can assimilate all operational available satellite data including GOES, AMSUA/AMSUB, HIRS, MHS, ATMS, AIRS and IASI radiances and some satellite derived products. In addition, some research products, such as hyperspectral IR retrieved temperature and moisture profiles, GOES imager atmospheric motion vector (AMV) and GOES sounder layer precipitable water (LPW), are also added into the system. Using SDAT as a research testbed, studies have been conducted to show how to improve high impact weather forecast by better handling cloud information in satellite data. Previously by collocating high spatial resolution MODIS data with hyperspectral resolution AIRS data, precise clear pixels of AIRS can be identified and some partially or thin cloud contamination from pixels can be removed by taking advantage of high spatial resolution and high accurate MODIS cloud information. The results have demonstrated that both of these strategies have greatly improved the hurricane track and intensity forecast. We recently have extended these methodologies into processing CrIS/VIIRS data. We also tested similar ideas in microwave sounders by the collocation of AMSU/MODIS and ATMS

  2. Integration of Remote Sensing derived Actual Evapotranspiration with Meteorological Data for Real Time Demand Forecasting in Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. K.; Hafeez, M. M.; Chemin, Y.; Faux, R.; Sixsmith, J.

    2010-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is major consumer of fresh water, but a large part of the water devour for irrigation is wasted due to poor management of irrigation systems. Improving water management in irrigated areas require the analysis of real time water demand in order to determine the possibilities in which it may be modified and rationalised. Real time water demand information in irrigated areas is a key for planning about sustainable use of irrigation water. These activities are needed not only to improve water productivity, but also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture by saving irrigation water. Demand forecasting entail the complete understanding of spatial and expected temporal variability of metrological parameters and evapotranspiration (ET). ET is the overriding aspect for irrigation demand forecasting at farm to catchment scale. Many models have been used to measure the ET rate, either empirical or functional. The major disadvantage of this approach is that most methods generate only point values, resulting in estimates that are not representative of large areas. These methods are based on crop factors under ideal conditions and cannot therefore represent actual crop ET. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful mean to estimate ET over various spatial and temporal scales. For improved irrigation system management and operation, a holistic approach of integrating remote sensing derived ET from SAM-ET (spatial algorithm for mapping ET) algorithm, for Australian agro-ecosystem, with forecasted meteorological data and field application loss functions for major crops were used to forecast actual water demand in Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA), New South Wales, Australia. It covers approximately 79,000 ha of intensive irrigation and comprise of number of secondary and tertiary canals. In order to capture the spatial variability, CIA has been divided into 22 nodes based on direction of flow and connectivity. All hydrological data of inflow (i

  3. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  4. A Pro-active Real-time Forecasting and Decision Support System for Daily Management of Marine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Mark; Leyssen, Gert; Smets, Steven; De Wachter, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Marine Works involving turbidity generating activities (eg. dredging, dredge spoil placement) can generate environmental stress in and around a project area in the form of sediment plumes causing light reduction and sedimentation. If these works are situated near sensitive habitats like sea-grass beds, coral reefs or sensitive human activities eg. aquaculture farms or water intakes, or if contaminants are present in the water soil environmental scrutiny is advised. Environmental Regulations can impose limitations to these activities in the form of turbidity thresholds, spill budgets, contaminant levels. Breaching environmental regulations can result in increased monitoring, adaptation of the works planning and production rates and ultimately in a (temporary) stop of activities all of which entail time and cost impacts for a contractor and/or client. Sediment plume behaviour is governed by the dredging process, soil properties and ambient conditions (currents, water depth) and can be modelled. Usually this is done during the preparatory EIA phase of a project, for estimation of environmental impact based on climatic scenarios. An operational forecasting tool is developed to adapt marine work schedules to the real-time circumstances and thus evade exceedance of critical threshold levels at sensitive areas. The forecasting system is based on a Python-based workflow manager with a MySQL database and a Django frontend web tool for user interaction and visualisation of the model results. The core consists of a numerical hydrodynamic model with sediment transport module (Mike21 from DHI). This model is driven by space and time varying wind fields and wave boundary conditions, and turbidity inputs (suspended sediment source terms) based on marine works production rates and soil properties. The resulting threshold analysis allows the operator to indicate potential impact at the sensitive areas and instigate an adaption of the marine work schedule if needed. In order to use

  5. Factors controlling storm impacts on coastal barriers and beaches - A preliminary basis for near real-time forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of ground conditions and meteorological and oceanographic parameters for some of the most severe Atlantic and Gulf Coast storms in the U.S. reveals the primary factors affecting morphological storm responses of beaches and barrier islands. The principal controlling factors are storm characteristics, geographic position relative to storm path, timing of storm events, duration of wave exposure, wind stress, degree of flow confinement, antecedent topography and geologic framework, sediment textures, vegetative cover, and type and density of coastal development. A classification of commonly observed storm responses demonstrates the sequential interrelations among (1) land elevations, (2) water elevations in the ocean and adjacent lagoon (if present), and (3) stages of rising water during the storm. The predictable coastal responses, in relative order from high frequency beach erosion to low frequency barrier inundation, include: beach erosion, berm migration, dune erosion, washover terrace construction, perched fan deposition, sheetwash, washover channel incision, washout formation, and forced and unforced ebb flow. Near real-time forecasting of expected storm impacts is possible if the following information is available for the coast: a detailed morphological and topographic characterization, accurate storm-surge and wave-runup models, the real-time reporting of storm parameters, accurate forecasts of the storm position relative to a particular coastal segment, and a conceptual model of geological processes that encompasses observed morphological changes caused by extreme storms.

  6. Puget Sound Operational Forecast System - A Real-time Predictive Tool for Marine Resource Management and Emergency Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Chase, Jared M.; Wang, Taiping

    2009-12-01

    To support marine ecological resource management and emergency response and to enhance scientific understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes in Puget Sound, a real-time Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OFS) was developed by the Coastal Ocean Dynamics & Ecosystem Modeling group (CODEM) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PS-OFS employs the state-of-the-art three-dimensional coastal ocean model and closely follows the standards and procedures established by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS). PS-OFS consists of four key components supporting the Puget Sound Circulation and Transport Model (PS-CTM): data acquisition, model execution and product archive, model skill assessment, and model results dissemination. This paper provides an overview of PS-OFS and its ability to provide vital real-time oceanographic information to the Puget Sound community. PS-OFS supports pacific northwest region’s growing need for a predictive tool to assist water quality management, fish stock recovery efforts, maritime emergency response, nearshore land-use planning, and the challenge of climate change and sea level rise impacts. The structure of PS-OFS and examples of the system inputs and outputs, forecast results are presented in details.

  7. Precipitation and floodiness: forecasts of flood hazard at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Liz; Day, Jonny; Pappenberger, Florian; Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In 2008, a seasonal forecast of an increased likelihood of above-normal rainfall in West Africa led the Red Cross to take early humanitarian action (such as prepositioning of relief items) on the basis that this forecast implied heightened flood risk. However, there are a number of factors that lead to non-linearity between precipitation anomalies and flood hazard, so in this presentation we use a recently developed global-scale hydrological model driven by the ERA-Interim/Land precipitation reanalysis (1980-2010) to quantify this non-linearity. Using these data, we introduce the concept of floodiness to measure the incidence of floods over a large area, and quantify the link between monthly precipitation, river discharge and floodiness anomalies. Our analysis shows that floodiness is not well correlated with precipitation, demonstrating the problem of using seasonal precipitation forecasts as a proxy for forecasting flood hazard. This analysis demonstrates the value of developing hydrometeorological forecasts of floodiness for decision-makers. As a result, we are now working with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and the Joint Research Centre, as partners of the operational Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS), to implement floodiness forecasts in real-time.

  8. Near real time Forensic Disaster Analysis of the central European flood in June 2013 in Germany: Impact and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazai, Bijan; Bessel, Tina; Möhrle, Stella; Dittrich, André; Schröter, Kai; Mühr, Bernhard; Elmer, Florian; Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Trieselmann, Werner; Kunz, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Within its current research activity on near real time Forensic Disaster Analysis (FDA), researchers from the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) aim to identify major risk drivers and to understand the root causes of disaster and infer the implications for disaster mitigation. A key component of this activity is the development of rapid assessment tools which allow for a science based estimate of disaster impacts. The central European flood in June 2013 caused in Germany severe damage to buildings, infrastructure and agricultural lands and has had a great impact on people, transportation and the economy. In many areas thousands of people were evacuated. Electrical grid and local water supply utilities failed during the floods. Furthermore, traffic was disrupted in the interregional transportation network including federal highways and long distance railways. CEDIM analysed the impact and management of the flood event within an FDA activity. An analysis on the amount and spatial distribution of flood-related Twitter messages in Germany revealed a high interest in the flood in the social media. Furthermore, an analysis of the resilience of selected affected areas in Germany has been carried out to assess the impact of the flood on the district level. The resilience indicator is based on social, economic and institutional indicators which are supplemented with information on the number of people evacuated and transportation disruptions. Combined with the magnitude of the event, an index is calculated that allows for a rapid initial but preliminary estimate of the flood impact. Results show high resilience of the administrative districts along the Danube while heavy impacts are seen along the Mulde and Elbe.

  9. Skill assessment of a real-time forecast system utilizing a coupled hydrologic and coastal hydrodynamic model during Hurricane Irene (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresback, Kendra M.; Fleming, Jason G.; Blanton, Brian O.; Kaiser, Carola; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Tromble, Evan M.; Luettich, Richard A.; Kolar, Randall L.; Hong, Yang; Van Cooten, Suzanne; Vergara, Humberto J.; Flamig, Zac L.; Lander, Howard M.; Kelleher, Kevin E.; Nemunaitis-Monroe, Kodi L.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the devastating effects of recent hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico (e.g., Katrina, Rita, Ike and Gustav), the development of a high-resolution, real-time, total water level prototype system has been accelerated. The fully coupled model system that includes hydrology is an extension of the ADCIRC Surge Guidance System (ASGS), and will henceforth be referred to as ASGS-STORM (Scalable, Terrestrial, Ocean, River, Meteorological) to emphasize the major processes that are represented by the system.The ASGS-STORM system incorporates tides, waves, winds, rivers and surge to produce a total water level, which provides a holistic representation of coastal flooding. ASGS-STORM was rigorously tested during Hurricane Irene, which made landfall in late August 2011 in North Carolina. All results from ASGS-STORM for the advisories were produced in real-time, forced by forecast wind and pressure fields computed using a parametric tropical cyclone model, and made available via the web. Herein, a skill assessment, analyzing wind speed and direction, significant wave heights, and total water levels, is used to evaluate ASGS-STORM's performance during Irene for three advisories and the best track from the National Hurricane Center (NHC). ASGS-STORM showed slight over-prediction for two advisories (Advisory 23 and 25) due to the over-estimation of the storm intensity. However, ASGS-STORM shows notable skill in capturing total water levels, wind speed and direction, and significant wave heights in North Carolina when utilizing Advisory 28, which had a slight shift in the track but provided a more accurate estimation of the storm intensity, along with the best track from the NHC. Results from ASGS-STORM have shown that as the forecast of the advisories improves, so does the accuracy of the models used in the study; therefore, accurate input from the weather forecast is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition to ensure the accuracy of the guidance provided by the system. While

  10. Kalman filter estimation model in flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Tahir

    Elementary precipitation and runoff estimation problems associated with hydrologic data collection networks are formulated in conjunction with the Kalman Filter Estimation Model. Examples involve the estimation of runoff using data from a single precipitation station and also from a number of precipitation stations. The formulations demonstrate the role of state-space, measurement, and estimation equations of the Kalman Filter Model in flood forecasting. To facilitate the formulation, the unit hydrograph concept and antecedent precipitation index is adopted in the estimation model. The methodology is then applied to estimate various flood events in the Carnation Creek of British Columbia.

  11. Multi-index method using offshore ocean-bottom pressure data for real-time tsunami forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naotaka; Aoi, Shin; Hirata, Kenji; Suzuki, Wataru; Kunugi, Takashi; Nakamura, Hiromitsu

    2016-07-01

    We developed a real-time tsunami forecast method using only pressure data collected from the bottom of the ocean via a dense offshore observation network. The key feature of the method is rapid matching between offshore tsunami observations and pre-calculated offshore tsunami spatial distributions. We first calculate the tsunami waveforms at offshore stations and the maximum coastal tsunami heights from any possible tsunami source model and register them in the proposed Tsunami Scenario Bank (TSB). When a tsunami occurs, we use multiple indices to quickly select dozens of appropriate tsunami scenarios that can explain the offshore observations. At the same time, the maximum coastal tsunami heights coupled with the selected tsunami scenarios are forecast. We apply three indices, which are the correlation coefficient and two kinds of variance reductions normalized by the L2-norm of either the observation or calculation, to match the observed spatial distributions with the pre-calculated spatial distributions in the TSB. We examine the ability of our method to select appropriate tsunami scenarios by conducting synthetic tests using a scenario based on "pseudo-observations." For these tests, we construct a tentative TSB, which contains tsunami waveforms at locations in the Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis along the Japan Trench and maximum coastal tsunami heights, using about 2000 tsunami source models along the Japan Trench. Based on the test results, we confirm that the method can select appropriate tsunami scenarios within a certain precision by using the two kinds of variance reductions, which are sensitive to the tsunami size, and the correlation coefficient, which is sensitive to the tsunami source location. In this paper, we present the results and discuss the characteristics and behavior of the multi-index method. The addition of tsunami inundation components to the TSB is expected to enable the application of this method to real-time

  12. Operational flood forecasting system of Umbria Region "Functional Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, N.; Pandolfo, C.; Stelluti, M.; Ponziani, F.; Viterbo, A.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrometeorological alert office (called "Decentrate Functional Centre" - CFD) of Umbria Region, in central Italy, is the office that provides technical tools able to support decisions when significant flood/landslide events occur, furnishing 24h support for the whole duration of the emergency period, according to the national directive DPCM 27 February 2004 concerning the "Operating concepts for functional management of national and regional alert system during flooding and landslide events for civil protection activities purposes" that designs, within the Italian Civil Defence Emergency Management System, a network of 21 regional Functional Centres coordinated by a central office at the National Civil Protection Department in Rome. Due to its "linking" role between Civil Protection "real time" activities and environmental/planning "deferred time" ones, the Centre is in charge to acquire and collect both real time and quasi-static data: quantitative data from monitoring networks (hydrometeorological stations, meteo radar, ...), meteorological forecasting models output, Earth Observation data, hydraulic and hydrological simulation models, cartographic and thematic GIS data (vectorial and raster type), planning studies related to flooding areas mapping, dam managing plans during flood events, non instrumental information from direct control of "territorial presidium". A detailed procedure for the management of critical events was planned, also in order to define the different role of various authorities and institutions involved. Tiber River catchment, of which Umbria region represents the main upper-medium portion, includes also regional trans-boundary issues very important to cope with, especially for what concerns large dam behavior and management during heavy rainfall. The alert system is referred to 6 different warning areas in which the territory has been divided into and based on a threshold system of three different increasing critical levels according

  13. A Regional Real-time Forecast of Marine Boundary Layers During VOCALS-REx

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    data used in this work were collected on board NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) along 20◦ S and on board CIRPAS (Cen- ter for Interdisciplinary...able every 10 min from the multi-year NOAA tropical east- ern Pacific synthesis data set (de Szoeke et al., 2010). These surface observations consist...forecast of MBL during VOCALS-REx 427 30 COAMPS NOAA /RHB Fig. 6. Time-height cross-section of potential temperature (θ ) from the COAMPS fore

  14. Timetable of an operational flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liechti, Katharina; Jaun, Simon; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2010-05-01

    At present a new underground part of Zurich main station is under construction. For this purpose the runoff capacity of river Sihl, which is passing beneath the main station, is reduced by 40%. If a flood is to occur the construction site is evacuated and gates can be opened for full runoff capacity to prevent bigger damages. However, flooding the construction site, even if it is controlled, is coupled with costs and retardation. The evacuation of the construction site at Zurich main station takes about 2 to 4 hours and opening the gates takes another 1 to 2 hours each. In the upper part of the 336 km2 Sihl catchment the Sihl lake, a reservoir lake, is situated. It belongs and is used by the Swiss Railway Company for hydropower production. This lake can act as a retention basin for about 46% of the Sihl catchment. Lowering the lake level to gain retention capacity, and therewith safety, is coupled with direct loss for the Railway Company. To calculate the needed retention volume and the water to be released facing unfavourable weather conditions, forecasts with a minimum lead time of 2 to 3 days are needed. Since the catchment is rather small, this can only be realised by the use of meteorological forecast data. Thus the management of the construction site depends on accurate forecasts to base their decisions on. Therefore an operational hydrological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) was introduced in September 2008 by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). It delivers daily discharge forecasts with a time horizon of 5 days. The meteorological forecasts are provided by MeteoSwiss and stem from the operational limited-area COSMO-LEPS which downscales the ECMWF ensemble prediction system to a spatial resolution of 7 km. Additional meteorological data for model calibration and initialisation (air temperature, precipitation, water vapour pressure, global radiation, wind speed and sunshine duration) and radar data are also provided by

  15. Real-time forecasting of Hong Kong beach water quality by 3D deterministic model.

    PubMed

    Chan, S N; Thoe, W; Lee, J H W

    2013-03-15

    Bacterial level (e.g. Escherichia coli) is generally adopted as the key indicator of beach water quality due to its high correlation with swimming associated illnesses. A 3D deterministic hydrodynamic model is developed to provide daily water quality forecasting for eight marine beaches in Tsuen Wan, which are only about 8 km from the Harbour Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) outfall discharging 1.4 million m(3)/d of partially-treated sewage. The fate and transport of the HATS effluent and its impact on the E. coli level at nearby beaches are studied. The model features the seamless coupling of near field jet mixing and the far field transport and dispersion of wastewater discharge from submarine outfalls, and a spatial-temporal dependent E. coli decay rate formulation specifically developed for sub-tropical Hong Kong waters. The model prediction of beach water quality has been extensively validated against field data both before and after disinfection of the HATS effluent. Compared with daily beach E. coli data during August-November 2011, the model achieves an overall accuracy of 81-91% in forecasting compliance/exceedance of beach water quality standard. The 3D deterministic model has been most valuable in the interpretation of the complex variation of beach water quality which depends on tidal level, solar radiation and other hydro-meteorological factors. The model can also be used in optimization of disinfection dosage and in emergency response situations.

  16. Real time wave forecasting using wind time history and numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Pooja; Deo, M. C.; Latha, G.; Rajendran, V.

    Operational activities in the ocean like planning for structural repairs or fishing expeditions require real time prediction of waves over typical time duration of say a few hours. Such predictions can be made by using a numerical model or a time series model employing continuously recorded waves. This paper presents another option to do so and it is based on a different time series approach in which the input is in the form of preceding wind speed and wind direction observations. This would be useful for those stations where the costly wave buoys are not deployed and instead only meteorological buoys measuring wind are moored. The technique employs alternative artificial intelligence approaches of an artificial neural network (ANN), genetic programming (GP) and model tree (MT) to carry out the time series modeling of wind to obtain waves. Wind observations at four offshore sites along the east coast of India were used. For calibration purpose the wave data was generated using a numerical model. The predicted waves obtained using the proposed time series models when compared with the numerically generated waves showed good resemblance in terms of the selected error criteria. Large differences across the chosen techniques of ANN, GP, MT were not noticed. Wave hindcasting at the same time step and the predictions over shorter lead times were better than the predictions over longer lead times. The proposed method is a cost effective and convenient option when a site-specific information is desired.

  17. The state of the art of flood forecasting - Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen-Del Pozo, J.; Pappenberger, F.; Salamon, P.; Bogner, K.; Burek, P.; de Roo, A.

    2010-09-01

    , has become evident. However, despite the demonstrated advantages, worldwide the incorporation of HEPS in operational flood forecasting is still limited. The applicability of HEPS for smaller river basins was tested in MAP D-Phase, an acronym for "Demonstration of Probabilistic Hydrological and Atmospheric Simulation of flood Events in the Alpine region" which was launched in 2005 as a Forecast Demonstration Project of World Weather Research Programme of WMO, and entered a pre-operational and still active testing phase in 2007. In Europe, a comparatively high number of EPS driven systems for medium-large rivers exist. National flood forecasting centres of Sweden, Finland and the Netherlands, have already implemented HEPS in their operational forecasting chain, while in other countries including France, Germany, Czech Republic and Hungary, hybrids or experimental chains have been installed. As an example of HEPS, the European Flood Alert System (EFAS) is being presented. EFAS provides medium-range probabilistic flood forecasting information for large trans-national river basins. It incorporates multiple sets of weather forecast including different types of EPS and deterministic forecasts from different providers. EFAS products are evaluated and visualised as exceedance of critical levels only - both in forms of maps and time series. Different sources of uncertainty and its impact on the flood forecasting performance for every grid cell has been tested offline but not yet incorporated operationally into the forecasting chain for computational reasons. However, at stations where real-time discharges are available, a hydrological uncertainty processor is being applied to estimate the total predictive uncertainty from the hydrological and input uncertainties. Research on long-term EFAS results has shown the need for complementing statistical analysis with case studies for which examples will be shown.

  18. Hourly runoff forecasting for flood risk management: Application of various computational intelligence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badrzadeh, Honey; Sarukkalige, Ranjan; Jayawardena, A. W.

    2015-10-01

    Reliable river flow forecasts play a key role in flood risk mitigation. Among different approaches of river flow forecasting, data driven approaches have become increasingly popular in recent years due to their minimum information requirements and ability to simulate nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics of hydrological processes. In this study, attempts are made to apply four different types of data driven approaches, namely traditional artificial neural networks (ANN), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), wavelet neural networks (WNN), and, hybrid ANFIS with multi resolution analysis using wavelets (WNF). Developed models applied for real time flood forecasting at Casino station on Richmond River, Australia which is highly prone to flooding. Hourly rainfall and runoff data were used to drive the models which have been used for forecasting with 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h lead-time. The performance of models further improved by adding an upstream river flow data (Wiangaree station), as another effective input. All models perform satisfactorily up to 12 h lead-time. However, the hybrid wavelet-based models significantly outperforming the ANFIS and ANN models in the longer lead-time forecasting. The results confirm the robustness of the proposed structure of the hybrid models for real time runoff forecasting in the study area.

  19. FEWS Vecht, a crossing boundaries flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeringen, Klaas-Jan; Filius, Pieter; Tromp, Gerben; Renner, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The river Vecht is a cross boundary river, starting in Germany and flowing to the Netherlands. The river is completely dependant on rainfall in the catchment. Being one of the smaller big rivers in the Netherlands, there was still no operational forecasting system avaible because of the hugh number of involved organisations (2 in Germany, 5 in the Netherlands) and many other stake holders. In 2011 a first operational forecasting system has been build by using the Delft-FEWS software. It collects the real time fluvial and meteorological observations from all the organisations, in that sense being a portal where all the collected information is available and can be consistantly interpreted as a whole. In 2012 an HBV rainfall runoff model and a Sobek 1D hydraulic model has been build. These models have been integrated into the FEWS system and are operationally running since the 2012 autumn. The system forecasts 5 days ahead using a 5 days ECMWF rainfall ensemble forecast. It enables making scenarios, especially useful for the operation of storage reservoirs. During the 2012 Christmas days a (relatively small) T=2 flood occurred (Q=175-200 m3/s) and proved the system to run succesfully. Dissemination of the forecasts is performed by using the FEWS system in all organisations, connected to the central system through internet. There is also a (password protected) website available that provides the current forecast to all stake holders in the catchment. The challenge of the project was not to make the models and to build the fews, but to connect all data and all operators together into one system, even cross boundary. Also in that sense the FEWS Vecht system has proved to be very succesful.

  20. New Measurements and Modeling Capability to Improve Real-time Forecast of Cascadia Tsunamis along U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Titov, V. V.; Bernard, E. N.; Spillane, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis, especially in the near field. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Existing observational instruments along the Cascadia Subduction Zone are capable of providing tsunami data within minutes of tsunami generation. However, this strategy requires separation of the tsunami signals from the overwhelming high-frequency seismic waves produced during a strong earthquake- a real technical challenge for existing operational tsunami observational network. A new-generation of nano-resolution pressure sensors can provide high temporal resolution of the earthquake and tsunami signals without loosing precision. The nano-resolution pressure sensor offers a state-of the-science ability to separate earthquake vibrations and other oceanic noise from tsunami waveforms, paving the way for accurate, early warnings of local tsunamis. This breakthrough underwater technology has been tested and verified for a couple of micro-tsunami events (Paros et al., 2011). Real-time forecast of Cascadia tsunamis is becoming a possibility with the development of nano-tsunameter technology. The present study provides an investigation on optimizing the placement of these new sensors so that the forecast time can be shortened.. The presentation will cover the optimization of an observational array to quickly detect and forecast a tsunami generated by a strong Cascadia earthquake, including short and long rupture scenarios. Lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami will be examined to demonstrate how we can improve the local forecast using the new technology We expect this study to provide useful guideline for

  1. LiDAR-Derived Flood-Inundation Maps for Real-Time Flood-Mapping Applications, Tar River Basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Wagner, Chad R.; Tighe, Kirsten C.; Terziotti, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    reaches at 0.305-meter increments for water levels ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the downstream-most gage in each modeled reach. Inundated areas were identified by subtracting the water-surface elevation in each 1.5-meter by 1.5-meter grid cell from the land-surface elevation in the cell through an automated routine that was developed to identify all inundated cells hydraulically connected to the cell at the downstream-most gage in the model domain. Inundation maps showing transportation networks and orthoimagery were prepared for display on the Internet. These maps also are linked to the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina Water Science Center real-time streamflow website. Hence, a user can determine the near real-time stage and water-surface elevation at a U.S. Geological Survey streamgage site in the Tar River basin and link directly to the flood-inundation maps for a depiction of the estimated inundated area at the current water level. Although the flood-inundation maps represent distinct boundaries of inundated areas, some uncertainties are associated with these maps. These are uncertainties in the topographic data for the hydraulic model computational grid and inundation maps, effective friction values (Manning's n), model-validation data, and forecast hydrographs, if used. The Tar River flood-inundation maps were developed by using a steady-flow hydraulic model. This assumption clearly has less of an effect on inundation maps produced for low flows than for high flows when it typically takes more time to inundate areas. A flood in which water levels peak and fall slowly most likely will result in more inundation than a similar flood in which water levels peak and fall quickly. Limitations associated with the steady-flow assumption for hydraulic modeling vary from site to site. The one-dimensional modeling approach used in this study resulted in good agreement between measurements and simulations. T

  2. Development of a System to Generate Near Real Time Tropospheric Delay and Precipitable Water Vapor in situ at Geodetic GPS Stations, to Improve Forecasting of Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. W.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Laber, J. L.; Morris, T.; Offield, D. G.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    We describe a system under development for generating ultra-low latency tropospheric delay and precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates in situ at a prototype network of geodetic GPS sites in southern California, and demonstrating their utility in forecasting severe storms commonly associated with flooding and debris flow events along the west coast of North America through infusion of this meteorological data at NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices and the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). The first continuous geodetic GPS network was established in southern California in the early 1990s and much of it was converted to real-time (latency <1s) high-rate (1Hz) mode over the following decades. GPS stations are multi-purpose and can also provide estimates of tropospheric zenith delays, which can be converted into mm-accuracy PWV using collocated pressure and temperature measurements, the basis for GPS meteorology (Bevis et al. 1992, 1994; Duan et al. 1996) as implemented by NOAA with a nationwide distribution of about 300 GPS-Met stations providing PW estimates at subhourly resolution currently used in operational weather forecasting in the U.S. We improve upon the current paradigm of transmitting large quantities of raw data back to a central facility for processing into higher-order products. By operating semi-autonomously, each station will provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of the narrow communications bandwidth that often occurs in the aftermath of natural disasters. The onsite ambiguity-resolved precise point positioning solutions are enabled by a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS and a low-cost MEMS meteorological sensor package. The decreased latency (~5 minutes) PW estimates will provide the detailed knowledge of the distribution and magnitude of PW that NWS forecasters require to monitor and predict severe winter

  3. Integral assessment of floodplains as a basis for spatially-explicit flood loss forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zischg, Andreas Paul; Mosimann, Markus; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A key aspect of disaster prevention is flood discharge forecasting which is used for early warning and therefore as a decision support for intervention forces. Hereby, the phase between the issued forecast and the time when the expected flood occurs is crucial for an optimal planning of the intervention. Typically, river discharge forecasts cover the regional level only, i.e. larger catchments. However, it is important to note that these forecasts are not useable directly for specific target groups on local level because these forecasts say nothing about the consequences of the predicted flood in terms of affected areas, number of exposed residents and houses. For this, on one hand simulations of the flooding processes and on the other hand data of vulnerable objects are needed. Furthermore, flood modelling in a high spatial and temporal resolution is required for robust flood loss estimation. This is a resource-intensive task from a computing time point of view. Therefore, in real-time applications flood modelling in 2D is not suited. Thus, forecasting flood losses in the short-term (6h-24h in advance) requires a different approach. Here, we propose a method to downscale the river discharge forecast to a spatially-explicit flood loss forecast. The principal procedure is to generate as many flood scenarios as needed in advance to represent the flooded areas for all possible flood hydrographs, e.g. very high peak discharges of short duration vs. high peak discharges with high volumes. For this, synthetic flood hydrographs were derived from the hydrologic time series. Then, the flooded areas of each scenario were modelled with a 2D flood simulation model. All scenarios were intersected with the dataset of vulnerable objects, in our case residential, agricultural and industrial buildings with information about the number of residents, the object-specific vulnerability, and the monetary value of the objects. This dataset was prepared by a data-mining approach. For each

  4. Development of Hydrometeorological Monitoring and Forecasting as AN Essential Component of the Early Flood Warning System:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukalo, V.

    2012-12-01

    Defining issue The river inundations are the most common and destructive natural hazards in Ukraine. Among non-structural flood management and protection measures a creation of the Early Flood Warning System is extremely important to be able to timely recognize dangerous situations in the flood-prone areas. Hydrometeorological information and forecasts are a core importance in this system. The primary factors affecting reliability and a lead - time of forecasts include: accuracy, speed and reliability with which real - time data are collected. The existing individual conception of monitoring and forecasting resulted in a need in reconsideration of the concept of integrated monitoring and forecasting approach - from "sensors to database and forecasters". Result presentation The Project: "Development of Flood Monitoring and Forecasting in the Ukrainian part of the Dniester River Basin" is presented. The project is developed by the Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Service in a conjunction with the Water Management Agency and the Energy Company "Ukrhydroenergo". The implementation of the Project is funded by the Ukrainian Government and the World Bank. The author is nominated as the responsible person for coordination of activity of organizations involved in the Project. The term of the Project implementation: 2012 - 2014. The principal objectives of the Project are: a) designing integrated automatic hydrometeorological measurement network (including using remote sensing technologies); b) hydrometeorological GIS database construction and coupling with electronic maps for flood risk assessment; c) interface-construction classic numerical database -GIS and with satellite images, and radar data collection; d) providing the real-time data dissemination from observation points to forecasting centers; e) developing hydrometeoroogical forecasting methods; f) providing a flood hazards risk assessment for different temporal and spatial scales; g) providing a dissemination of

  5. Surface Temperature Variation Prediction Model Using Real-Time Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M.; Vant-Hull, B.; Nazari, R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Combination of climate change and urbanization are heating up cities and putting the lives of millions of people in danger. More than half of the world's total population resides in cities and urban centers. Cities are experiencing urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. Hotter days are associated with serious health impacts, heart attaches and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Densely populated cities like Manhattan, New York can be affected by UHI impact much more than less populated cities. Even though many studies have been focused on the impact of UHI and temperature changes between urban and rural air temperature, not many look at the temperature variations within a city. These studies mostly use remote sensing data or typical measurements collected by local meteorological station networks. Local meteorological measurements only have local coverage and cannot be used to study the impact of UHI in a city and remote sensing data such as MODIS, LANDSAT and ASTER have with very low resolution which cannot be used for the purpose of this study. Therefore, predicting surface temperature in urban cities using weather data can be useful.Three months of Field campaign in Manhattan were used to measure spatial and temporal temperature variations within an urban setting by placing 10 fixed sensors deployed to measure temperature, relative humidity and sunlight. Fixed instrument shelters containing relative humidity, temperature and illumination sensors were mounted on lampposts in ten different locations in Manhattan (Vant-Hull et al, 2014). The shelters were fixed 3-4 meters above the ground for the period of three months from June 23 to September 20th of 2013 making measurements with the interval of 3 minutes. These high resolution temperature measurements and three months of weather data were used to predict temperature variability from weather forecasts. This study shows that the amplitude of spatial and temporal variation in temperature for each day can be predicted

  6. Advances in Global Flood Forecasting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen-del Pozo, J.; Pappenberger, F.; Burek, P.; Alfieri, L.; Kreminski, B.; Muraro, D.

    2012-12-01

    A trend of increasing number of heavy precipitation events over many regions in the world during the past century has been observed (IPCC, 2007), but conclusive results on a changing frequency or intensity of floods have not yet been established. However, the socio-economic impact particularly of floods is increasing at an alarming trend. Thus anticipation of severe events is becoming a key element of society to react timely to effectively reduce socio-economic damage. Anticipation is essential on local as well as on national or trans-national level since management of response and aid for major disasters requires a substantial amount of planning and information on different levels. Continental and trans-national flood forecasting systems already exist. The European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) has been developed in close collaboration with the National services and is going operational in 2012, enhancing the national forecasting centres with medium-range probabilistic added value information while at the same time providing the European Civil Protection with harmonised information on ongoing and upcoming floods for improved aid management. Building on experiences and methodologies from EFAS, a Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) has now been developed jointly between researchers from the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECWMF). The prototype couples HTESSEL, the land-surface scheme of the ECMWF NWP model with the LISFLOOD hydrodynamic model for the flow routing in the river network. GloFAS is set-up on global scale with horizontal grid spacing of 0.1 degree. The system is driven with 51 ensemble members from VAREPS with a time horizon of 15 days. In order to allow for the routing in the large rivers, the coupled model is run for 45 days assuming zero rainfall after day 15. Comparison with observations have shown that in some rivers the system performs quite well while in others the hydro

  7. Forecasting skills of the ensemble hydro-meteorological system for the Po river floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Montani, Andrea; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Pecora, Silvano; Tonelli, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The Po basin is the largest and most economically important river-basin in Italy. Extreme hydrological events, including floods, flash floods and droughts, are expected to become more severe in the next future due to climate change, and related ground effects are linked both with environmental and social resilience. A Warning Operational Center (WOC) for hydrological event management was created in Emilia Romagna region. In the last years, the WOC faced challenges in legislation, organization, technology and economics, achieving improvements in forecasting skill and information dissemination. Since 2005, an operational forecasting and modelling system for flood modelling and forecasting has been implemented, aimed at supporting and coordinating flood control and emergency management on the whole Po basin. This system, referred to as FEWSPo, has also taken care of environmental aspects of flood forecast. The FEWSPo system has reached a very high level of complexity, due to the combination of three different hydrological-hydraulic chains (HEC-HMS/RAS - MIKE11 NAM/HD, Topkapi/Sobek), with several meteorological inputs (forecasted - COSMOI2, COSMOI7, COSMO-LEPS among others - and observed). In this hydrological and meteorological ensemble the management of the relative predictive uncertainties, which have to be established and communicated to decision makers, is a debated scientific and social challenge. Real time activities face professional, modelling and technological aspects but are also strongly interrelated with organization and human aspects. The authors will report a case study using the operational flood forecast hydro-meteorological ensemble, provided by the MIKE11 chain fed by COSMO_LEPS EQPF. The basic aim of the proposed approach is to analyse limits and opportunities of the long term forecast (with a lead time ranging from 3 to 5 days), for the implementation of low cost actions, also looking for a well informed decision making and the improvement of

  8. Enhancing flood forecasting with the help of processed based calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullmann, Johannes; Krauße, Thomas; Philipp, Andy

    -234; Cullmann, J., Schmitz, G.H., Görner, W., 2006. A new strategy for online flood forecasting in mountainous catchments. in: IAHS Red Book, vol. 303]. Merging of the singular parameter class models is done with the help of a sigmoidal weighting procedure. The new approach thus integrates all available information from the specially calibrated WaSiM-ETH class models, accounting for the different processes and dynamics governing the various event classes. For example it portrays the flood formation process with parameters accounting for the characteristics of the event class models. Implications arising from this study are demonstrated for a catchment in the Erzgebirge (Ore-mountains) in East Germany (1700 km). The computational efficiency, together with the convincing agreement between the predicted and observed flood peaks underlines the potential of the new parameterisation strategy in the context of operational real time forecasting.

  9. An evaluation of the real-time tropical cyclone forecast skill of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System in the western North Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorino, Michael; Goerss, James S.; Jensen, Jack J.; Harrison, Edward J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper evaluates the meteorological quality and operational utility of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) in forecasting tropical cyclones. It is shown that the model can provide useful predictions of motion and formation on a real-time basis in the western North Pacific. The meterological characteristics of the NOGAPS tropical cyclone predictions are evaluated by examining the formation of low-level cyclone systems in the tropics and vortex structure in the NOGAPS analysis and verifying 72-h forecasts. The adjusted NOGAPS track forecasts showed equitable skill to the baseline aid and the dynamical model. NOGAPS successfully predicted unusual equatorward turns for several straight-running cyclones.

  10. Evaluation of TRMM satellite-based precipitation indexes for flood forecasting over Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekeli, Ahmet Emre; Fouli, Hesham

    2016-10-01

    Floods are among the most common disasters harming humanity. In particular, flash floods cause hazards to life, property and any type of structures. Arid and semi-arid regions are equally prone to flash floods like regions with abundant rainfall. Despite rareness of intensive and frequent rainfall events over Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA); an arid/semi-arid region, occasional flash floods occur and result in large amounts of damaging surface runoff. The flooding of 16 November, 2013 in Riyadh; the capital city of KSA, resulted in killing some people and led to much property damage. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) Real Time (RT) data (3B42RT) are used herein for flash flood forecasting. 3B42RT detected high-intensity rainfall events matching with the distribution of observed floods over KSA. A flood early warning system based on exceedance of threshold limits on 3B42RT data is proposed for Riyadh. Three different indexes: Constant Threshold (CT), Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDF) and Riyadh Flood Precipitation Index (RFPI) are developed using 14-year 3B42RT data from 2000 to 2013. RFPI and CDF with 90% captured the three major flooding events that occurred in February 2005, May 2010 and November 2013 in Riyadh. CT with 3 mm/h intensity indicated the 2013 flooding, but missed those of 2005 and 2010. The methodology implemented herein is a first-step simple and accurate way for flash flood forecasting over Riyadh. The simplicity of the methodology enables its applicability for the TRMM follow-on missions like Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission.

  11. An integrated modeling framework for real-time irrigation scheduling: the benefit of spectroscopy and weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Polinova, Maria; Housh, Mashor

    2016-04-01

    ). These studies have only incorporated short-term (weekly) forecasts, missing the potential benefit of the mid-term (seasonal) climate forecasts The latest progress in new data acquisition technologies (mainly in the field of Earth observation by remote sensing and imaging spectroscopy systems) as well as the state-of-the-art achievements in the fields of geographical information systems (GIS), computer science and climate and climate impact modelling enable to develop both integrated modelling and realistic spatial simulations. The present method is the use of field spectroscopy technology to keep constant monitoring of the field. The majority of previously developed decision support systems use satellite remote sensing data that provide very limited capabilities (conventional and basic parameters). The alternative is to use a more progressive technology of hyperspectral airborne or ground-based imagery data that provide an exhaustive description of the field. Nevertheless, this alternative is known to be very costly and complex. As such, we will present a low-cost imaging spectroscopy technology supported by detailed and fine-resolution field spectroscopy as a cost effective option for near field real-time monitoring tool. In order to solve the soil water balance and to predict the water irrigation volume a pedological survey is realized in the evaluation study areas.The remote sensing and field spectroscopy were applied to integrate continuous feedbacks from the field (e.g. soil moisture, organic/inorganic carbon, nitrogen, salinity, fertilizers, sulphur acid, texture; crop water-stress, plant stage, LAI , chlorophyll, biomass, yield prediction applying PROSPECT+SILT ; Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation FAPAR) estimated based on remote sensing information to minimize the errors associated with crop simulation process. A stochastic optimization model will be formulated that take into account both mid-term seasonal probabilistic climate prediction

  12. Characterizing 13 Years of Surface Water Variability from MODIS-based Near Real-Time Flood Mapping Products in the Indus River, Tonle Sap Lake, and Lake Chad.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slayback, D. A.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Policelli, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    Driven by an increase in extreme weather events in a warming world, flooding appears to be increasing in many regions. Since 2012, we have been using the twice-daily near-global observations of the two MODIS instruments to operate a near real-time flood mapping capability. Primarily intended to support disaster response efforts, our system generates daily near-global maps of flood water extent, at 250 m resolution. Although cloud cover is a challenge, the twice-daily coverage from the Terra and Aqua satellites helps to capture most major events. We use the MOD44W product (the "MODIS 250-m land-water mask") to differentiate "normal" water from flood water. Products from the system are freely available, and used by disaster response agencies and academic and industry researchers. An open question, however, is: how "normal" are recently observed floods? Destructive and — as reported by the press — record floods seem to be occurring more and more frequently. With the MODIS archive going back to 1999 (Terra satellite) and 2002 (Aqua satellite), we now have more than a decade of twice-daily near-global observations to begin answering this question. Although the 13 years of available twice-daily data (2002-2015) are not sufficient to fully characterize surface water normals (e.g., 100-year floods), we can start examining recent trends in surface water extent and flood frequency. To do so, we have back-processed our surface water product through mid-2002 (Aqua launch) for a few regions, and have used this to evaluate the variability in surface water extent and flood frequency. These results will eventually feed back into an improved characterization of flood water in our near real-time flood product. Here we will present results on trends in surface water extent and flood frequency for a few regions, including the Indus in Pakistan, the Tonle Sap lake in Cambodia, and lake Chad in Africa.

  13. Application of Rainfall-Runoff Simulation for Flood Forecasting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    One such approach is to apply Kalman fil- tering for automated adjustment (Georgakakos, 1986). For flash floods , auto- mated adjustment may not be...Davis, California.) Georgakakos, K.P. 1986. "A Generalized Stochastic Hydrometeorological Model for Flood and Flash - Flood Forecasting: 2. Case Studies...Service 1972. National Dwineering Handbook, Section 4, US Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. Sweeney, Timothy L. 1988. " Flash Flood Hydrologic

  14. Skill of real-time operational forecasts with the APCC multi-model ensemble prediction system during the period 2008-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Young-Mi; Kryjov, Vladimir N.; Oh, Sang Myeong; Lee, Hyun-Ju

    2017-02-01

    This paper assesses the real-time 1-month lead forecasts of 3-month (seasonal) mean temperature and precipitation on a monthly basis issued by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Climate Center (APCC) for 2008-2015 (8 years, 96 forecasts). It shows the current level of the APCC operational multi-model prediction system performance. The skill of the APCC forecasts strongly depends on seasons and regions that it is higher for the tropics and boreal winter than for the extratropics and boreal summer due to direct effects and remote teleconnections from boundary forcings. There is a negative relationship between the forecast skill and its interseasonal variability for both variables and the forecast skill for precipitation is more seasonally and regionally dependent than that for temperature. The APCC operational probabilistic forecasts during this period show a cold bias (underforecasting of above-normal temperature and overforecasting of below-normal temperature) underestimating a long-term warming trend. A wet bias is evident for precipitation, particularly in the extratropical regions. The skill of both temperature and precipitation forecasts strongly depends upon the ENSO strength. Particularly, the highest forecast skill noted in 2015/2016 boreal winter is associated with the strong forcing of an extreme El Nino event. Meanwhile, the relatively low skill is associated with the transition and/or continuous ENSO-neutral phases of 2012-2014. As a result the skill of real-time forecast for boreal winter season is higher than that of hindcast. However, on average, the level of forecast skill during the period 2008-2015 is similar to that of hindcast.

  15. Medium Range Flood Forecasting for Agriculture Damage Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhruddin, S. H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Early warning is a key element for disaster risk reduction. In recent decades, major advancements have been made in medium range and seasonal flood forecasting. This progress provides a great opportunity to reduce agriculture damage and improve advisories for early action and planning for flood hazards. This approach can facilitate proactive rather than reactive management of the adverse consequences of floods. In the agricultural sector, for instance, farmers can take a diversity of options such as changing cropping patterns, applying fertilizer, irrigating and changing planting timing. An experimental medium range (1-10 day) flood forecasting model has been developed for Bangladesh and Thailand. It provides 51 sets of discharge ensemble forecasts of 1-10 days with significant persistence and high certainty. This type of forecast could assist farmers and other stakeholders for differential preparedness activities. These ensembles probabilistic flood forecasts have been customized based on user-needs for community-level application focused on agriculture system. The vulnerabilities of agriculture system were calculated based on exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Indicators for risk and vulnerability assessment were conducted through community consultations. The forecast lead time requirement, user-needs, impacts and management options for crops were identified through focus group discussions, informal interviews and community surveys. This paper illustrates potential applications of such ensembles for probabilistic medium range flood forecasts in a way that is not commonly practiced globally today.

  16. Flash flood warnings using the ensemble precipitation forecasting technique: A case study on forecasting floods in Taiwan caused by typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsun-Hua; Yang, Sheng-Chi; Ho, Jui-Yi; Lin, Gwo-Fong; Hwang, Gong-Do; Lee, Cheng-Shang

    2015-01-01

    A flash flood is an event that develops rapidly. Given early warnings with sufficient lead time, flood forecasting can help people prepare disaster prevention measures. To provide this early warning, a statistics-based flood forecasting model was developed to evaluate the flooding potential in urban areas using ensemble quantitative precipitation forecasts (the Taiwan Cooperative Precipitation Ensemble Forecast Experiment, TAPEX). The proposed model uses different sources of information, such as (i) the designed capacity of storm sewer systems, (ii) a flood inundation potential database, and (iii) historical flooding observations, to evaluate the potential for flash flooding situations to occur. Using 24-, 48- and 72-h ahead precipitation forecasts from the TAPEX, the proposed model can assess the flooding potential with two levels of risk and at the township scale with a 3-day lead time. The proposed model is applied to Pingtung County, which includes 33 townships and is located in southern Taiwan. A dataset of typhoon storms from 2010 to 2014 was used to evaluate the model performance. The accuracy and threat score for testing events are 0.68 and 0.30, respectively, with a lead time of 24 h. The accuracy and threat score for training events are 0.82 and 0.31, respectively, with a lead time of 24 h. The model performance decreases when the lead time is extended. However, the model demonstrates its potential as a valuable reference to improve emergency responses to alleviate the loss of lives and property due to flooding.

  17. The FAST-T approach for operational, real time, short term hydrological forecasting: Results from the Betania Hydropower Reservoir case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Efraín; Angarita, Hector; Rosmann, Thomas; Mendez, Zulma; Angulo, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    A viable quantitative hydrological forecasting service is a combination of technological elements, personnel and knowledge, working together to establish a stable operational cycle of forecasts emission, dissemination and assimilation; hence, the process for establishing such system usually requires significant resources and time to reach an adequate development and integration in order to produce forecasts with acceptable levels of performance. Here are presented the results of this process for the recently implemented Operational Forecast Service for the Betania's Hydropower Reservoir - or SPHEB, located at the Upper-Magdalena River Basin (Colombia). The current scope of the SPHEB includes forecasting of water levels and discharge for the three main streams affluent to the reservoir, for lead times between +1 to +57 hours, and +1 to +10 days. The core of the SPHEB is the Flexible, Adaptive, Simple and Transient Time forecasting approach, namely FAST-T. This comprises of a set of data structures, mathematical kernel, distributed computing and network infrastructure designed to provide seamless real-time operational forecast and automatic model adjustment in case of failures in data transmission or assimilation. Among FAST-T main features are: an autonomous evaluation and detection of the most relevant information for the later configuration of forecasting models; an adaptively linearized mathematical kernel, the optimal adaptive linear combination or OALC, which provides a computationally simple and efficient algorithm for real-time applications; and finally, a meta-model catalog, containing prioritized forecast models at given stream conditions. The SPHEB is at present feed by the fraction of hydrological monitoring network installed at the basin that has telemetric capabilities via NOAA-GOES satellites (8 stages, approximately 47%) with data availability of about a 90% at one hour intervals. However, there is a dense network of 'conventional' hydro

  18. Action-based flood forecasting for triggering humanitarian action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan de Perez, Erin; van den Hurk, Bart; van Aalst, Maarten K.; Amuron, Irene; Bamanya, Deus; Hauser, Tristan; Jongma, Brenden; Lopez, Ana; Mason, Simon; Mendler de Suarez, Janot; Pappenberger, Florian; Rueth, Alexandra; Stephens, Elisabeth; Suarez, Pablo; Wagemaker, Jurjen; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-09-01

    Too often, credible scientific early warning information of increased disaster risk does not result in humanitarian action. With financial resources tilted heavily towards response after a disaster, disaster managers have limited incentive and ability to process complex scientific data, including uncertainties. These incentives are beginning to change, with the advent of several new forecast-based financing systems that provide funding based on a forecast of an extreme event. Given the changing landscape, here we demonstrate a method to select and use appropriate forecasts for specific humanitarian disaster prevention actions, even in a data-scarce location. This action-based forecasting methodology takes into account the parameters of each action, such as action lifetime, when verifying a forecast. Forecasts are linked with action based on an understanding of (1) the magnitude of previous flooding events and (2) the willingness to act "in vain" for specific actions. This is applied in the context of the Uganda Red Cross Society forecast-based financing pilot project, with forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). Using this method, we define the "danger level" of flooding, and we select the probabilistic forecast triggers that are appropriate for specific actions. Results from this methodology can be applied globally across hazards and fed into a financing system that ensures that automatic, pre-funded early action will be triggered by forecasts.

  19. Application of WRF - SWAT OpenMI 2.0 based models integration for real time hydrological modelling and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaets, Andrey; Gonchukov, Leonid

    2014-05-01

    Intake of deterministic distributed hydrological models into operational water management requires intensive collection and inputting of spatial distributed climatic information in a timely manner that is both time consuming and laborious. The lead time of the data pre-processing stage could be essentially reduced by coupling of hydrological and numerical weather prediction models. This is especially important for the regions such as the South of the Russian Far East where its geographical position combined with a monsoon climate affected by typhoons and extreme heavy rains caused rapid rising of the mountain rivers water level and led to the flash flooding and enormous damage. The objective of this study is development of end-to-end workflow that executes, in a loosely coupled mode, an integrated modeling system comprised of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) atmospheric model and Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT 2012) hydrological model using OpenMI 2.0 and web-service technologies. Migration SWAT into OpenMI compliant involves reorganization of the model into a separate initialization, performing timestep and finalization functions that can be accessed from outside. To save SWAT normal behavior, the source code was separated from OpenMI-specific implementation into the static library. Modified code was assembled into dynamic library and wrapped into C# class implemented the OpenMI ILinkableComponent interface. Development of WRF OpenMI-compliant component based on the idea of the wrapping web-service clients into a linkable component and seamlessly access to output netCDF files without actual models connection. The weather state variables (precipitation, wind, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity) are processed by automatic input selection algorithm to single out the most relevant values used by SWAT model to yield climatic data at the subbasin scale. Spatial interpolation between the WRF regular grid and SWAT subbasins centroid (which are

  20. Improving flash flood forecasting with distributed hydrological model by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangbo

    2016-04-01

    In China, flash food is usually regarded as flood occured in small and medium sized watersheds with drainage area less than 200 km2, and is mainly induced by heavy rains, and occurs in where hydrological observation is lacked. Flash flood is widely observed in China, and is the flood causing the most casualties nowadays in China. Due to hydrological data scarcity, lumped hydrological model is difficult to be employed for flash flood forecasting which requires lots of observed hydrological data to calibrate model parameters. Physically based distributed hydrological model discrete the terrain of the whole watershed into a number of grid cells at fine resolution, assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells, and derive model parameteris from the terrain properties, thus having the potential to be used in flash flood forecasting and improving flash flood prediction capability. In this study, the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model mainly proposed for watershed flood forecasting is employed to simulate flash floods in the Ganzhou area in southeast China, and models have been set up in 5 watersheds. Model parameters have been derived from the terrain properties including the DEM, the soil type and land use type, but the result shows that the flood simulation uncertainty is high, which may be caused by parameter uncertainty, and some kind of uncertainty control is needed before the model could be used in real-time flash flood forecastin. Considering currently many Chinese small and medium sized watersheds has set up hydrological observation network, and a few flood events could be collected, it may be used for model parameter optimization. For this reason, an automatic model parameter optimization algorithm using Particle Swam Optimization(PSO) is developed to optimize the model parameters, and it has been found that model parameters optimized even only with one observed flood events could largely reduce the flood

  1. Prediction and uncertainty of Hurricane Sandy (2012) explored through a real-time cloud-permitting ensemble analysis and forecast system assimilating airborne Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Erin B.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2014-03-01

    the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) real-time convection-permitting hurricane analysis and forecasting system (WRF-EnKF) that assimilates airborne Doppler radar observations, the sensitivity and uncertainty of forecasts initialized several days prior to landfall of Hurricane Sandy (2012) are assessed. The performance of the track and intensity forecasts of both the deterministic and ensemble forecasts by the PSU WRF-EnKF system show significant skill and are comparable to or better than forecasts produced by operational dynamical models, even at lead times of 4-5 days prior to landfall. Many of the ensemble members correctly capture the interaction of Sandy with an approaching midlatitude trough, which precedes Sandy's forecasted landfall in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. However, the ensemble reveals considerable forecast uncertainties in the prediction of Sandy. For example, in the ensemble forecast initialized at 0000 UTC 26 October 2012, 10 of the 60 members do not predict a United States landfall. Using ensemble composite and sensitivity analyses, the essential dynamics and initial condition uncertainties that lead to forecast divergence among the members in tracks and precipitation are examined. It is observed that uncertainties in the environmental steering flow are the most impactful factor on the divergence of Sandy's track forecasts, and its subsequent interaction with the approaching midlatitude trough. Though the midlatitude system does not strongly influence the final position of Sandy, differences in the timing and location of its interactions with Sandy lead to considerable differences in rainfall forecasts, especially with respect to heavy precipitation over land.

  2. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  3. Proper estimation of hydrological parameters from flood forecasting aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Morimasa; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Iwami, Yoichi; Yanami, Hitoshi; Anai, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological parameters of a flood forecasting model are normally calibrated based on an entire hydrograph of past flood events by means of an error assessment function such as mean square error and relative error. However, the specific parts of a hydrograph, i.e., maximum discharge and rising parts, are particularly important for practical flood forecasting in the sense that underestimation may lead to a more dangerous situation due to delay in flood prevention and evacuation activities. We conducted numerical experiments to find the most proper parameter set for practical flood forecasting without underestimation in order to develop an error assessment method for calibration appropriate for flood forecasting. A distributed hydrological model developed in Public Works Research Institute (PWRI) in Japan was applied to fifteen past floods in the Gokase River basin of 1,820km2 in Japan. The model with gridded two-layer tanks for the entire target river basin included hydrological parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, surface roughness and runoff coefficient, which were set according to land-use and soil-type distributions. Global data sets, e.g., Global Map and Digital Soil Map of the World (DSMW), were employed as input data for elevation, land use and soil type. The values of fourteen types of parameters were evenly sampled with 10,001 patterns of parameter sets determined by the Latin Hypercube Sampling within the search range of each parameter. Although the best reproduced case showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 for all flood events, the maximum discharge was underestimated in many flood cases. Therefore, two conditions, which were non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of a hydrograph, were added in calibration as the flood forecasting aptitudes. The cases with non-underestimation in the maximum discharge and rising parts of the hydrograph also showed a high Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.9 except two flood cases

  4. Satellite Remote Sensing and Hydrological Modeling for Real-time Flood Inundation Mapping: A Case Study in Nzoia Basin, Lake Victoria, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S.; Li, L.; Adler, R.; Policelli, F.; Habib, S.; Irwin, D.; Hong, Y.; Korme, T.

    2009-05-01

    Floods are among the most recurrent natural disasters around the globe impacting human being. Its trend has increased over the last decades. Getting satisfactory ground data for setting-up a flood prediction system had been a major constraint in the past despite the availability of numerous hydrological models. In the regions where installation of the ground equipments is limited by the available resources and rugged terrain, remotely sensed information with the global coverage have become an alternative and supplement to the ground-based observations in order to implement a cost-effective flood prediction system in many under-gauged regions. First, this presentation will demonstrate the applicability of integrating NASA's standard satellite precipitation products with a flood prediction model for disaster management in Nzoia, sub-basin of Lake Victoria, Africa. A high-resolution distributed hydrologic model has been calibrated for the period of 1985-2006 and benchmark streamflow simulations is produced with the calibrated hydrological model using the rain gauge data and observed discharges. Afterward, continuous discharge predictions forced by real-time satellite precipitation data was made. Acceptable results are obtained in comparison with the benchmark performance. Moreover, it is identified that the flood prediction results are improved with systematically bias-corrected satellite rainfall data. Finally, a space-based flood monitoring technique is also utilized to compare the flood inundation maps with the hydrologically modeled surface flooding map in terms of probability of detection of flooding areas and temporal correlation. The ultimate goal of the project is to build up disaster management capacity in East Africa by providing local governmental officials and international aid organizations a practical decision-support tool in order to better assess emerging flood impacts and to quantify spatial extent of flood risk, as well as to respond to such flood

  5. Performance of the 'material Failure Forecast Method' in real-time situations: A Bayesian approach applied on effusive and explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, A.; Lesage, P.; Cortés, G.; Valette, B.; Reyes-Dávila, G.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Budi-Santoso, A.

    2016-11-01

    Most attempts of deterministic eruption forecasting are based on the material Failure Forecast Method (FFM). This method assumes that a precursory observable, such as the rate of seismic activity, can be described by a simple power law which presents a singularity at a time close to the eruption onset. Until now, this method has been applied only in a small number of cases, generally for forecasts in hindsight. In this paper, a rigorous Bayesian approach of the FFM designed for real-time applications is applied. Using an automatic recognition system, seismo-volcanic events are detected and classified according to their physical mechanism and time series of probability distributions of the rates of events are calculated. At each time of observation, a Bayesian inversion provides estimations of the exponent of the power law and of the time of eruption, together with their probability density functions. Two criteria are defined in order to evaluate the quality and reliability of the forecasts. Our automated procedure has allowed the analysis of long, continuous seismic time series: 13 years from Volcán de Colima, Mexico, 10 years from Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island, France, and several months from Merapi volcano, Java, Indonesia. The new forecasting approach has been applied to 64 pre-eruptive sequences which present various types of dominant seismic activity (volcano-tectonic or long-period events) and patterns of seismicity with different level of complexity. This has allowed us to test the FFM assumptions, to determine in which conditions the method can be applied, and to quantify the success rate of the forecasts. 62% of the precursory sequences analysed are suitable for the application of FFM and half of the total number of eruptions are successfully forecast in hindsight. In real-time, the method allows for the successful forecast of 36% of all the eruptions considered. Nevertheless, real-time forecasts are successful for 83% of the cases that fulfil the

  6. Flash flood warnings for ungauged basins based on high-resolution precipitation forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demargne, Julie; Javelle, Pierre; Organde, Didier; de Saint Aubin, Céline; Janet, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of flash floods, which are typically triggered by severe rainfall events, is still challenging due to large meteorological and hydrologic uncertainties at the spatial and temporal scales of interest. Also the rapid rising of waters necessarily limits the lead time of warnings to alert communities and activate effective emergency procedures. To better anticipate such events and mitigate their impacts, the French national service in charge of flood forecasting (SCHAPI) is implementing a national flash flood warning system for small-to-medium (up to 1000 km²) ungauged basins based on a discharge-threshold flood warning method called AIGA (Javelle et al. 2014). The current deterministic AIGA system has been run in real-time in the South of France since 2005 and has been tested in the RHYTMME project (rhytmme.irstea.fr/). It ingests the operational radar-gauge QPE grids from Météo-France to run a simplified hourly distributed hydrologic model at a 1-km² resolution every 15 minutes. This produces real-time peak discharge estimates along the river network, which are subsequently compared to regionalized flood frequency estimates to provide warnings according to the AIGA-estimated return period of the ongoing event. The calibration and regionalization of the hydrologic model has been recently enhanced for implementing the national flash flood warning system for the entire French territory by 2016. To further extend the effective warning lead time, the flash flood warning system is being enhanced to ingest Météo-France's AROME-NWC high-resolution precipitation nowcasts. The AROME-NWC system combines the most recent available observations with forecasts from the nowcasting version of the AROME convection-permitting model (Auger et al. 2015). AROME-NWC pre-operational deterministic precipitation forecasts, produced every hour at a 2.5-km resolution for a 6-hr forecast horizon, were provided for 3 significant rain events in September and November 2014 and

  7. The RHYTMME system: an operational real-time warning and mapping system for flash floods, debris flows, landslide and rock falls in Southeastern France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchier, Catherine; Mériaux, Patrice; Atger, Frédéric; Ecrepont, Stéphane; Liébault, Frédéric; Bertrand, Mélanie; Bel, Coraline; Batista, Dominique; Azemard, Pierre; Saint-Martin, Clotilde; Javelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Almost all municipalities of Southeastern France are concerned by natural hazards triggered by heavy rainfalls such as floods, debris flows, landslides and rock falls. Although some tools exist to forecast and monitor heavy rains and floods in France, their spatial resolution sometimes does not meet the needs of local risk managers who have to monitor events at a small spatial scale. In order to improve the risk management in the mountainous and Mediterranean areas of Southeastern France, Irstea and Météo-France have led the RHYTMME project. The goal of this project is to improve the ability to forecast and localize high-risk rainfall-induced hazards in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur administrative area. This goal is currently under achievement thanks to the implementation of a real-time warning and mapping system for rainfall induced natural hazards, fed by radar data and whose outputs are made available via the Internet to operators in charge of risk management (local and regional authorities, emergency and rescue services, road and rail networks managers, ...). This system provides maps which display in real-time: - the radar estimations of rainfall for different rain durations and at the spatial resolution of 1 km² (Westrelin et al., 2013), - the estimation of the scarcity of these rainfall estimations, also at the spatial resolution of 1 km², thanks to a comparison with threshold values provided by a regionalized stochastic hourly point rainfall generator (Arnaud et al., 2007), - an anticipation of the rivers discharges, computed at the outlet of 1700 watersheds of Southeastern France thanks to the AIGA warning system which combines a rainfall runoff model and an estimation of the scarcity of the discharges thanks to a comparison with threshold values (Javelle et al., 2014). Maps of susceptibility to debris flow, landslide and rock falls can also be displayed in the RHYTMME warning system along with the real time maps of rainfall hazard (Batista, 2013a

  8. Hydrological model calibration for enhancing global flood forecast skill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirpa, Feyera A.; Beck, Hylke E.; Salamon, Peter; Thielen-del Pozo, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    Early warning systems play a key role in flood risk reduction, and their effectiveness is directly linked to streamflow forecast skill. The skill of a streamflow forecast is affected by several factors; among them are (i) model errors due to incomplete representation of physical processes and inaccurate parameterization, (ii) uncertainty in the model initial conditions, and (iii) errors in the meteorological forcing. In macro scale (continental or global) modeling, it is a common practice to use a priori parameter estimates over large river basins or wider regions, resulting in suboptimal streamflow estimations. The aim of this work is to improve flood forecast skill of the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS; www.globalfloods.eu), a grid-based forecasting system that produces flood forecast unto 30 days lead, through calibration of the distributed hydrological model parameters. We use a combination of in-situ and satellite-based streamflow data for automatic calibration using a multi-objective genetic algorithm. We will present the calibrated global parameter maps and report the forecast skill improvements achieved. Furthermore, we discuss current challenges and future opportunities with regard to global-scale early flood warning systems.

  9. Real-time prediction of atmospheric Lagrangian coherent structures based on forecast data: An application and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Ross, Shane D.; Schmale, David G.

    2013-09-01

    The language of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) provides a new means for studying transport and mixing of passive particles advected by an atmospheric flow field. Recent observations suggest that LCSs govern the large-scale atmospheric motion of airborne microorganisms, paving the way for more efficient models and management strategies for the spread of infectious diseases affecting plants, domestic animals, and humans. In addition, having reliable predictions of the timing of hyperbolic LCSs may contribute to improved aerobiological sampling of microorganisms with unmanned aerial vehicles and LCS-based early warning systems. Chaotic atmospheric dynamics lead to unavoidable forecasting errors in the wind velocity field, which compounds errors in LCS forecasting. In this study, we reveal the cumulative effects of errors of (short-term) wind field forecasts on the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields and the associated LCSs when realistic forecast plans impose certain limits on the forecasting parameters. Objectives of this paper are to (a) quantify the accuracy of prediction of FTLE-LCS features and (b) determine the sensitivity of such predictions to forecasting parameters. Results indicate that forecasts of attracting LCSs exhibit less divergence from the archive-based LCSs than the repelling features. This result is important since attracting LCSs are the backbone of long-lived features in moving fluids. We also show under what circumstances one can trust the forecast results if one merely wants to know if an LCS passed over a region and does not need to precisely know the passage time.

  10. Tsunami forecast by joint inversion of real-time tsunami waveforms and seismic of GPS data: application to the Tohoku 2011 tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yong, Wei; Newman, Andrew V.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Titov, Vasily V.; Tang, Liujuan

    2014-01-01

    Correctly characterizing tsunami source generation is the most critical component of modern tsunami forecasting. Although difficult to quantify directly, a tsunami source can be modeled via different methods using a variety of measurements from deep-ocean tsunameters, seismometers, GPS, and other advanced instruments, some of which in or near real time. Here we assess the performance of different source models for the destructive 11 March 2011 Japan tsunami using model–data comparison for the generation, propagation, and inundation in the near field of Japan. This comparative study of tsunami source models addresses the advantages and limitations of different real-time measurements with potential use in early tsunami warning in the near and far field. The study highlights the critical role of deep-ocean tsunami measurements and rapid validation of the approximate tsunami source for high-quality forecasting. We show that these tsunami measurements are compatible with other real-time geodetic data, and may provide more insightful understanding of tsunami generation from earthquakes, as well as from nonseismic processes such as submarine landslide failures.

  11. Flood forecasting for River Mekong with data-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Khurram M.; Plate, Erich J.

    2014-09-01

    In many regions of the world, the task of flood forecasting is made difficult because only a limited database is available for generating a suitable forecast model. This paper demonstrates that in such cases parsimonious data-based hydrological models for flood forecasting can be developed if the special conditions of climate and topography are used to advantage. As an example, the middle reach of River Mekong in South East Asia is considered, where a database of discharges from seven gaging stations on the river and 31 rainfall stations on the subcatchments between gaging stations is available for model calibration. Special conditions existing for River Mekong are identified and used in developing first a network connecting all discharge gages and then models for forecasting discharge increments between gaging stations. Our final forecast model (Model 3) is a linear combination of two structurally different basic models: a model (Model 1) using linear regressions for forecasting discharge increments, and a model (Model 2) using rainfall-runoff models. Although the model based on linear regressions works reasonably well for short times, better results are obtained with rainfall-runoff modeling. However, forecast accuracy of Model 2 is limited by the quality of rainfall forecasts. For best results, both models are combined by taking weighted averages to form Model 3. Model quality is assessed by means of both persistence index PI and standard deviation of forecast error.

  12. The near real time Forensic Disaster Analysis of the central European flood in June 2013 - A graphical representation of the main results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Kai; Elmer, Florian; Trieselmann, Werner; Kreibich, Heidi; Kunz, Michael; Khazai, Bijan; Dransch, Doris; Wenzel, Friedemann; Zschau, Jochen; Merz, Bruno; Mühr, Bernhard; Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Möhrle, Stella; Bessel, Tina; Fohringer, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The Central European flood of June 2013 is one of the most severe flood events that have occurred in Central Europe in the past decades. All major German river basins were affected (Rhine, Danube, and Elbe as well as the smaller Weser catchment).In terms of spatial extent and event magnitude, it was the most severe event at least since 1950. Within the current research focus on near real time forensic disaster analysis, the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) assessed and analysed the multiple facets of the flood event from the beginning. The aim is to describe the on-going event, analyse the event sources, link the physical characteristics to the impact and consequences of the event and to understand the root causes that turn the physical event into a disaster (or prevent it from becoming disastrous). For the near real time component of this research, tools for rapid assessment and concise presentation of analysis results are essential. This contribution provides a graphical summary of the results of the CEDIM-FDA analyses on the June 2013 flood. It demonstrates the potential of visual representations for improving the communication and hence usability of findings in a rapid, intelligible and expressive way as a valuable supplement to usual event reporting. It is based on analyses of the hydrometeorological sources, the flood pathways (from satellite imagery, data extraction from social media), the resilience of the affected regions, and causal loss analysis. The prototypical representation of the FDA-results for the June 2013 flood provides an important step in the development of graphical event templates for the visualisation of forensic disaster analyses. These are intended to become a standard component of future CEDIM-FDA event activities.

  13. Design and development of a Java-based graphical user interface to monitor/control a meteorological real-time forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Igor; José Estrela, María

    2010-10-01

    A regional forecasting system based on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is being run at the CEAM Foundation. The operational model involves several processes running in the background at specified times and executing a set of systematic steps. This system is being used as a support for a heat-wave warning system, a wind forecasting system for fire warning and prevention, and for general forecasting tasks. However, it is relatively difficult to use by researchers and forecasters without sophisticated information technology (IT) skill. In this paper, we report an effort to develop a tool to facilitate the monitoring of the system. This tool is based on the client-server architecture and enables those with little IT skill to monitor/control the state of the different processes involved in the real-time simulation. This tool has been successfully used in controlling the RAMS-based applications developed at CEAM since 2006. The design and the functionality and utilities of the tool reviewed in this paper could be exported and customized to be used by other research centres and institutions who offer services based on operational atmospheric models as routine jobs (MM5, WRF, etc.), as e.g. air pollution forecasting systems, other prevention and emergency response systems, etc.

  14. Comparison between genetic programming and an ensemble Kalman filter as data assimilation techniques for probabilistic flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediero, L.; Garrote, L.; Requena, A.; Chávez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Flood events are among the natural disasters that cause most economic and social damages in Europe. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) developments in last years have enabled hydrometeorological observations available in real-time. High performance computing promises the improvement of real-time flood forecasting systems and makes the use of post processing techniques easier. This is the case of data assimilation techniques, which are used to develop an adaptive forecast model. In this paper, a real-time framework for probabilistic flood forecasting is presented and two data assimilation techniques are compared. The first data assimilation technique uses genetic programming to adapt the model to the observations as new information is available, updating the estimation of the probability distribution of the model parameters. The second data assimilation technique uses an ensemble Kalman filter to quantify errors in both hydrologic model and observations, updating estimates of system states. Both forecast models take the result of the hydrologic model calibration as a starting point and adapts the individuals of this first population to the new observations in each operation time step. Data assimilation techniques have great potential when are used in hydrological distributed models. The distributed RIBS (Real-time Interactive Basin Simulator) rainfall-runoff model was selected to simulate the hydrological process in the basin. The RIBS model is deterministic, but it is run in a probabilistic way through Monte Carlo simulations over the probability distribution functions that best characterise the most relevant model parameters, which were identified by a probabilistic multi-objective calibration developed in a previous work. The Manzanares River basin was selected as a case study. Data assimilation processes are computationally intensive. Therefore, they are well suited to test the applicability of the potential of the Grid technology to

  15. Looking at the big scale - Global Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, P.; Alfieri, L.; Thielen-del Pozo, J.; Muraro, D.; Pappenberger, F.; Krzeminsk, B.

    2012-04-01

    Reacting to the increasing need for better preparedness to worldwide hydrological extremes, the Joint Research Centre has joined forces with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF), to couple state-of-the art weather forecasts with a hydrological model on global scale. On a pre-operationally basis a fully hydro-meteorological flood forecasting model is running since July 2011 and producing daily probabilistic discharge forecast with worldwide coverage and forecast horizon of about 1 month. An important aspect of this global system is that it is set-up on continental scale and therefore independent of administrative and political boundaries - providing downstream countries with information on upstream river conditions as well as continental and global overviews. The prototype of a Global Flood Alert System consists of HTESSEL land surface scheme coupled with LISFLOOD hydrodynamic model for the flow routing in the river network. Both hydrological models are set up on global coverage with horizontal grid resolution of 0.1° and daily time step for input and output data. To estimate corresponding discharge warning thresholds for selected return periods, the coupled HTESSEL-LISFLOOD hydrological model is driven with ERA-Interim input meteorological data for a 21 year period from 1989 onward. For daily forecasts the ensemble stream flow predictions are run by feeding Variable Resolution Ensemble Prediction System (VarEPS) weather forecasts into the coupled model. VarEPS consist of 51-member ensemble global forecasts for 15 days. The hydrological simulations are computed for a 45-day time horizon, to account the routing of flood waves through large river basins with time of concentration of the order of one month. Both results, the discharge thresholds from the long term run and the multiple hydrographs of the daily ensemble stream flow prediction are joined together to produce probabilistic information of critical threshold exceedance. Probabilistic

  16. Use of geostationary meteorological satellite images in convective rain estimation for flash-flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardah, T.; Abu Bakar, S. H.; Bardossy, A.; Maznorizan, M.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryFrequent flash-floods causing immense devastation in the Klang River Basin of Malaysia necessitate an improvement in the real-time forecasting systems being used. The use of meteorological satellite images in estimating rainfall has become an attractive option for improving the performance of flood forecasting-and-warning systems. In this study, a rainfall estimation algorithm using the infrared (IR) information from the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite-5 (GMS-5) is developed for potential input in a flood forecasting system. Data from the records of GMS-5 IR images have been retrieved for selected convective cells to be trained with the radar rain rate in a back-propagation neural network. The selected data as inputs to the neural network, are five parameters having a significant correlation with the radar rain rate: namely, the cloud-top brightness-temperature of the pixel of interest, the mean and the standard deviation of the temperatures of the surrounding five by five pixels, the rate of temperature change, and the sobel operator that indicates the temperature gradient. In addition, three numerical weather prediction (NWP) products, namely the precipitable water content, relative humidity, and vertical wind, are also included as inputs. The algorithm is applied for the areal rainfall estimation in the upper Klang River Basin and compared with another technique that uses power-law regression between the cloud-top brightness-temperature and radar rain rate. Results from both techniques are validated against previously recorded Thiessen areal-averaged rainfall values with coefficient correlation values of 0.77 and 0.91 for the power-law regression and the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, respectively. An extra lead time of around 2 h is gained when the satellite-based ANN rainfall estimation is coupled with a rainfall-runoff model to forecast a flash-flood event in the upper Klang River Basin.

  17. Flood Forecasting via Time Lag Forward Network; Kelantan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajarmizadeh, Milad; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Bte Basri, Hidayah; Shakira Jaffar, Aminah

    2016-03-01

    Forecasting water level is one of the critical issues in Malaysia for Kelantan region. Based on the flood events in 2014, this study investigates the hourly-forecasting of water level in one station namely Kg Jenob in Kelantan. For this issue, Time Lag Forward Network (TLFN) is evaluated for forecasting the water level as dynamic model. Heuristic method in stepwise forward methodology is performed. Rainfall and water level are the input and output of the modelling respectively. For selected flood period 15/12/2014 to 30/12/2014, 8 scenarios are developed to obtain a minimum error in water level forecasting. By monitoring the error, it will show that the optimum configuration of network has 2 processors in hidden layer and 7 lags have enough contribution on the result of hourly forecasting. Transfer functions in hidden and output layers are is Tangent hyperbolic and bias. Observed and simulated data are compared with usual error criteria called Mean Square Error (MSE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) which obtained 0.005 and 0.07 respectively. In conclusion, this study will be as a baseline for Kelantan to show that TLFN has promising result to forecast the flood events.

  18. Validation of the new HelioClim-3 version 4 real-time and short-term forecast service using 14 BSRN stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire; Saboret, Laurent; Wey, Etienne; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-07-01

    Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite images acquired every 15 min during daytime are currently processed by the Heliosat-2 method every night to generate the HelioClim-3 (HC3) database of the surface solar irradiation for the day before. A new service is proposed based on version 4 of HC3 (HC3v4) that offers real-time and forecasted irradiation for horizons up to a few hours. The service is based on a local persistence of the clear-sky index. Its results were compared to coincident high quality 15 min global irradiations measured in fourteen stations belonging to the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). For forecasts for a temporal horizon of 15 min ahead, the relative bias and root mean square error (RMSE) range respectively from 0 to 2 %, and 20 to 23 % for most stations. The correlation coefficient ranges from 0.94 to 0.95. These performances are similar to HC3v4 for the same stations. Expectedly, the quality of the forecasts degrades as the temporal horizon increases. For 1 h ahead forecasts of 15 min irradiation, the relative bias, root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient range respectively from -3 to 1 %, 30 to 37 %, and 0.90 to 0.91.

  19. Three-Month Real-Time Dengue Forecast Models: An Early Warning System for Outbreak Alerts and Policy Decision Support in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Kok, Suet-Yheng; Rajarethinam, Jayanthi; Liang, Shaohong; Yap, Grace; Chong, Chee-Seng; Lee, Kim-Sung; Tan, Sharon S.Y.; Chin, Christopher Kuan Yew; Lo, Andrew; Kong, Waiming; Ng, Lee Ching; Cook, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: With its tropical rainforest climate, rapid urbanization, and changing demography and ecology, Singapore experiences endemic dengue; the last large outbreak in 2013 culminated in 22,170 cases. In the absence of a vaccine on the market, vector control is the key approach for prevention. Objectives: We sought to forecast the evolution of dengue epidemics in Singapore to provide early warning of outbreaks and to facilitate the public health response to moderate an impending outbreak. Methods: We developed a set of statistical models using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) methods to forecast the weekly incidence of dengue notifications over a 3-month time horizon. This forecasting tool used a variety of data streams and was updated weekly, including recent case data, meteorological data, vector surveillance data, and population-based national statistics. The forecasting methodology was compared with alternative approaches that have been proposed to model dengue case data (seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average and step-down linear regression) by fielding them on the 2013 dengue epidemic, the largest on record in Singapore. Results: Operationally useful forecasts were obtained at a 3-month lag using the LASSO-derived models. Based on the mean average percentage error, the LASSO approach provided more accurate forecasts than the other methods we assessed. We demonstrate its utility in Singapore’s dengue control program by providing a forecast of the 2013 outbreak for advance preparation of outbreak response. Conclusions: Statistical models built using machine learning methods such as LASSO have the potential to markedly improve forecasting techniques for recurrent infectious disease outbreaks such as dengue. Citation: Shi Y, Liu X, Kok SY, Rajarethinam J, Liang S, Yap G, Chong CS, Lee KS, Tan SS, Chin CK, Lo A, Kong W, Ng LC, Cook AR. 2016. Three-month real-time dengue forecast models: an early warning system for outbreak

  20. Medium Range Ensembles Flood Forecasts for Community Level Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhruddin, S.; Kawasaki, A.; Babel, M. S.; AIT

    2013-05-01

    Early warning is a key element for disaster risk reduction. In recent decades, there has been a major advancement in medium range and seasonal forecasting. These could provide a great opportunity to improve early warning systems and advisories for early action for strategic and long term planning. This could result in increasing emphasis on proactive rather than reactive management of adverse consequences of flood events. This can be also very helpful for the agricultural sector by providing a diversity of options to farmers (e.g. changing cropping pattern, planting timing, etc.). An experimental medium range (1-10 days) flood forecasting model has been developed for Bangladesh which provides 51 set of discharge ensembles forecasts of one to ten days with significant persistence and high certainty. This could help communities (i.e. farmer) for gain/lost estimation as well as crop savings. This paper describe the application of ensembles probabilistic flood forecast at the community level for differential decision making focused on agriculture. The framework allows users to interactively specify the objectives and criteria that are germane to a particular situation, and obtain the management options that are possible, and the exogenous influences that should be taken into account before planning and decision making. risk and vulnerability assessment was conducted through community consultation. The forecast lead time requirement, users' needs, impact and management options for crops, livestock and fisheries sectors were identified through focus group discussions, informal interviews and questionnaire survey.

  1. Flood forecasting with DDD-application of a parsimonious hydrological model in operational flood forecasting in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugen, Thomas; Haddeland, Ingjerd

    2014-05-01

    A new parameter-parsimonious rainfall-runoff model, DDD (Distance Distribution Dynamics) has been run operationally at the Norwegian Flood Forecasting Service for approximately a year. DDD has been calibrated for, altogether, 104 catchments throughout Norway, and provide runoff forecasts 8 days ahead on a daily temporal resolution driven by precipitation and temperature from the meteorological forecast models AROME (48 hrs) and EC (192 hrs). The current version of DDD differs from the standard model used for flood forecasting in Norway, the HBV model, in its description of the subsurface and runoff dynamics. In DDD, the capacity of the subsurface water reservoir M, is the only parameter to be calibrated whereas the runoff dynamics is completely parameterised from observed characteristics derived from GIS and runoff recession analysis. Water is conveyed through the soils to the river network by waves with celerities determined by the level of saturation in the catchment. The distributions of distances between points in the catchment to the nearest river reach and of the river network give, together with the celerities, distributions of travel times, and, consequently unit hydrographs. DDD has 6 parameters less to calibrate in the runoff module than the HBV model. Experiences using DDD show that especially the timing of flood peaks has improved considerably and in a comparison between DDD and HBV, when assessing timeseries of 64 years for 75 catchments, DDD had a higher hit rate and a lower false alarm rate than HBV. For flood peaks higher than the mean annual flood the median hit rate is 0.45 and 0.41 for the DDD and HBV models respectively. Corresponding number for the false alarm rate is 0.62 and 0.75 For floods over the five year return interval, the median hit rate is 0.29 and 0.28 for the DDD and HBV models, respectively with false alarm rates equal to 0.67 and 0.80. During 2014 the Norwegian flood forecasting service will run DDD operationally at a 3h temporal

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FORECASTING SYSTEM FOR ROAD FACILITIES IN YAMAGUCHI PREFECTURE AND ITS PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Satoru; Yoshimura, Takashi; Miyamoto, Ayaho

    Maintenance strategy for road facilities on the road network which is an essential lifeline supporting our life is becoming a major social concern in safety and securer civil societies for not only Yamaguchi prefecture but also other prefectures in recently. This paper describes a road facilities maintenance man-agement support system combined with the latest information and communication technologies, such as the information function at the position of the GPS cellular phone with web GIS, etc. By using the system, because information can be shared by using location information function, photograph function, e-mail functionality, and web GIS of the GPS cellular phone to its maximum, an efficient, effective maintenance management can be done. From the comparison of the results of applying the system to an actual road network in Yamaguchi prefecture area, the road administrator can in real time confirm the position and the situation of the facilities damage of the road from the Internet, and a quick mending can be done.

  3. Using CATS near-real-time lidar observations to monitor and constrain volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, E. J.; Yorks, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Silva, A. M.; McGill, M.

    2016-10-01

    An eruption of Italian volcano Mount Etna on 3 December 2015 produced fast-moving sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate aerosol clouds that traveled across Asia and the Pacific Ocean, reaching North America in just 5 days. The Ozone Profiler and Mapping Suite's Nadir Mapping UV spectrometer aboard the U.S. National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite observed the horizontal transport of the SO2 cloud. Vertical profiles of the colocated volcanic sulfate aerosols were observed between 11.5 and 13.5 km by the new Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) space-based lidar aboard the International Space Station. Backward trajectory analysis estimates the SO2 cloud altitude at 7-12 km. Eulerian model simulations of the SO2 cloud constrained by CATS measurements produced more accurate dispersion patterns compared to those initialized with the back trajectory height estimate. The near-real-time data processing capabilities of CATS are unique, and this work demonstrates the use of these observations to monitor and model volcanic clouds.

  4. Using CATS Near-Real-time Lidar Observations to Monitor and Constrain Volcanic Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. J.; Yorks, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; da Silva, A. M.; Mcgill, M.

    2016-01-01

    An eruption of Italian volcano Mount Etna on 3 December 2015 produced fast-moving sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate aerosol clouds that traveled across Asia and the Pacific Ocean, reaching North America in just 5 days. The Ozone Profiler and Mapping Suite's Nadir Mapping UV spectrometer aboard the U.S. National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite observed the horizontal transport of the SO2 cloud. Vertical profiles of the colocated volcanic sulfate aerosols were observed between 11.5 and 13.5 km by the new Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) space-based lidar aboard the International Space Station. Backward trajectory analysis estimates the SO2 cloud altitude at 7-12 km. Eulerian model simulations of the SO2 cloud constrained by CATS measurements produced more accurate dispersion patterns compared to those initialized with the back trajectory height estimate. The near-real-time data processing capabilities of CATS are unique, and this work demonstrates the use of these observations to monitor and model volcanic clouds.

  5. Accounting for rainfall systematic spatial variability in flash flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kévin; Labat, David; Dartus, Denis

    2016-10-01

    Just as with the storms that cause them, flash floods are highly variable and non-linear phenomena in both time and space; hence understanding and anticipating the genesis of flash floods is far from straightforward. There is therefore a huge requirement for tools with the potential to provide advance warning of situations likely to lead to flash floods, and thus provide additional time for the flood forecasting services. The Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) method is used on US catchments to estimate the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding. This rainfall amount is used afterwards as a flood warning threshold. In Europe, flash floods often occur on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has already been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, an improved FFG method which accounts for rainfall spatial variability is proposed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to assess the FFG method applicability on French Mediterranean catchments with a distributed process-oriented hydrological model and (ii) to assess the effect of the rainfall spatial variability on this method. The results confirm the influence of the spatial variability of rainfall events in relation with its interaction with soil properties.

  6. Remote Sensing-Derived Water Extent and Level to Constrain Hydraulic Flood Forecasting Models: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Stefania; Li, Yuan; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate, precise and timely forecasts of flood wave arrival time, depth and velocity at each point of the floodplain are essential to reduce damage and save lives. Current computational capabilities support hydraulic models of increasing complexity over extended catchments. Yet a number of sources of uncertainty (e.g., input and boundary conditions, implementation data) may hinder the delivery of accurate predictions. Field gauging data of water levels and discharge have traditionally been used for hydraulic model calibration, validation and real-time constraint. However, the discrete spatial distribution of field data impedes the testing of the model skill at the two-dimensional scale. The increasing availability of spatially distributed remote sensing (RS) observations of flood extent and water level offers the opportunity for a comprehensive analysis of the predictive capability of hydraulic models. The adequate use of the large amount of information offered by RS observations triggers a series of challenging questions on the resolution, accuracy and frequency of acquisition of RS observations; on RS data processing algorithms; and on calibration, validation and data assimilation protocols. This paper presents a review of the availability of RS observations of flood extent and levels, and their use for calibration, validation and real-time constraint of hydraulic flood forecasting models. A number of conclusions and recommendations for future research are drawn with the aim of harmonising the pace of technological developments and their applications.

  7. Net-zero Building Cluster Simulations and On-line Energy Forecasting for Adaptive and Real-Time Control and Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiwang

    Buildings consume about 41.1% of primary energy and 74% of the electricity in the U.S. Moreover, it is estimated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory that more than 1/4 of the 713 GW of U.S. electricity demand in 2010 could be dispatchable if only buildings could respond to that dispatch through advanced building energy control and operation strategies and smart grid infrastructure. In this study, it is envisioned that neighboring buildings will have the tendency to form a cluster, an open cyber-physical system to exploit the economic opportunities provided by a smart grid, distributed power generation, and storage devices. Through optimized demand management, these building clusters will then reduce overall primary energy consumption and peak time electricity consumption, and be more resilient to power disruptions. Therefore, this project seeks to develop a Net-zero building cluster simulation testbed and high fidelity energy forecasting models for adaptive and real-time control and decision making strategy development that can be used in a Net-zero building cluster. The following research activities are summarized in this thesis: 1) Development of a building cluster emulator for building cluster control and operation strategy assessment. 2) Development of a novel building energy forecasting methodology using active system identification and data fusion techniques. In this methodology, a systematic approach for building energy system characteristic evaluation, system excitation and model adaptation is included. The developed methodology is compared with other literature-reported building energy forecasting methods; 3) Development of the high fidelity on-line building cluster energy forecasting models, which includes energy forecasting models for buildings, PV panels, batteries and ice tank thermal storage systems 4) Small scale real building validation study to verify the performance of the developed building energy forecasting methodology. The outcomes of

  8. Impact of rainfall spatial variability on Flash Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    According to the United States National Hazard Statistics database, flooding and flash flooding have caused the largest number of deaths of any weather-related phenomenon over the last 30 years (Flash Flood Guidance Improvement Team, 2003). Like the storms that cause them, flash floods are very variable and non-linear phenomena in time and space, with the result that understanding and anticipating flash flood genesis is far from straightforward. In the U.S., the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) estimates the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding in the indicated county. In Europe, flash flood often occurred on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, based on the Flash flood Guidance method, rainfall spatial variability information is introduced in the threshold estimation. As for FFG, the threshold is the number of millimeters of rainfall required to produce a discharge higher than the discharge corresponding to the first level (yellow) warning of the French flood warning service (SCHAPI: Service Central d'Hydrométéorologie et d'Appui à la Prévision des Inondations). The indexes δ1 and δ2 of Zoccatelli et al. (2010), based on the spatial moments of catchment rainfall, are used to characterize the rainfall spatial distribution. Rainfall spatial variability impacts on warning threshold and on hydrological processes are then studied. The spatially distributed hydrological model MARINE (Roux et al., 2011), dedicated to flash flood prediction is forced with synthetic rainfall patterns of different spatial distributions. This allows the determination of a warning threshold diagram: knowing the spatial distribution of the rainfall forecast and therefore the 2 indexes δ1 and δ2, the threshold value is read on the diagram. A warning threshold diagram is

  9. Retracking CryoSat waveforms for near-real-time ocean forecast products, platform attitude, and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.; Scharroo, R.; Lillibridge, J. L.; Leuliette, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    The SIRAL altimeter on CryoSat, launched in 2010, can operate in three modes: the low-rate mode (LRM) behaves as a conventional altimeter; the SAR mode allows more precise range and more focused footprint through use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), also known as delay-Doppler, processing; the SARIN mode, or interferometric SAR, also affords across-track slope determination from interferometry. We have been working on several CryoSat studies over this year and will present some highlights. For the conventional LRM mode, we have built a retracker that processes near-real-time (FDM: Fast Delivery Mode) and Level 1-B data at 20 Hz to yield wind speed, wave height, and sea surface height anomaly. These data are being fed to NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Prediction. The retracking also estimates the off-nadir mispointing angle of the satellite. After accounting for an effect due to orbit height variations, we find that the off-nadir angle estimates are sufficiently accurate that we have used them to calibrate biases in the pitch and roll of the spacecraft platform reported by the platform attitude control system. These biases account for mis-alignment between the star tracker bench and the antenna boresight. We have Full Bit Rate (FBR) data in SAR mode for some ocean passes, including portions crossing coastlines, both from ocean to land and from land to ocean. FBR data includes all the raw I and Q samples of the raw radar echoes, prior to the range FFT that deramps the chirp, or the azimuth FFT that initiates the delay-Doppler SAR focusing calculation. We are currently working on these data with several applications in mind: (1) We can use these data to trace exactly what happens as the instrument crosses a coastline. (2) We can use these data to derive a LRM (conventional) waveform as well as a SAR waveform, and can compare the performance of these two modes under the same conditions (sea state, propagation, etc.) (3) We can test a conjecture by J R

  10. Basic atmospheric measurements via Arduino Uno microcontroller with commercially available sensors towards simple real-time weather forecasting for increased classroom engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Ryan; Tanner, Meghan; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    Makers, engineers and the applied physics community have adapted Arduino microcontrollers due to their versatility, robustness and cost effectiveness. Arduino microcontroller environment coupled with commercially available sensors have been used to systematically measure, record and analyze temperature, humidity and barometric pressure for building a simplified weather station for subsequent educational purposes. This data will become available in classroom settings for real-time analysis towards simple weather forecasting. Setup was assembled via breadboard, wire and simple soldering with an Arduino Uno ATmega328P microcontroller connected to a PC. The microcontroller was programmed with Arduino Software while the bootloader was used to upload the code. Commercial DHT22 humidity and temperature sensor, and BMP180 barometric pressure sensor were used to obtain relative humidity, temperature and the barometric pressure. A weather resistant enclosure protected the system while stable real-time data measurements were obtained, and uploaded onto the PC. The data was used to predict atmospheric conditions and lifting condensation level (LCL). Discussion will focus on capabilities and limitations of these systems and corresponding teaching aspects. Lock Haven University Nanotechnology Program.

  11. A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-04

    At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode

  12. Delft FEWS: An open shell flood forecasting platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, P.; Kwadijk, J. C. J.; Werner, M. G. F.; van Dijk, M. J.; Schellekens, J.; van Kappel, R. R.; Sprokkereef, E.

    2003-04-01

    DELFT FEWS is a flood forecasting system developed over several years at Delft Hydraulics. The main philosophy underlying the system is to provide an open shell tool, that allows integration of arbitrary hydrological and river routing models with meteorological data and numerical weather forecasts. In its actual form DELFT-FEWS constitutes a collection of platform-independent software modules, linked to a central database. The database is used to store historical runoff data from gauging stations, and meteorological data from local and synoptic meteorological stations. These can be updated on-line through direct access to national weather services, weather forecast centres and hydro-meteorological services. In addition, the platform is designed to import and convert numerical weather forecasts produced by weather agencies, and interface them with the database. The system incorporates a wide range of algorithms for data verification, interpolation, model updating and data assimilation. These can be employed for data verification and reconstruction of missing values, as well as for pre processing of meteorological data, such that are made ready for use in hydrological models. The various hydrological and routing models are included into the system via appropriate model adapters, that convert data in the database to specific model data formats and vice versa. In this manner a concatenation of various operational and already tested models into model cascades is facilitated within a single and consistent computational framework. To date the system has been successfully tested with various numerical weather forecasts, including deterministic and ensemble forecasts provided by national weather forecast centres and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast. The hydrodynamic river routing module SOBEK, the LISFLOOD suite of raster-based hydrology and hydraulic codes and the well-known HBV hydrological model were included for the computation of the hydrologic

  13. Forecast skill of a high-resolution real-time mesoscale model designed for weather support of operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gregory E.; Zack, John W.; Manobianco, John

    1994-01-01

    NASA funded Mesoscale Environmental Simulations and Operations (MESO), Inc. to develop a version of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS). The model has been modified specifically for short-range forecasting in the vicinity of KSC/CCAS. To accomplish this, the model domain has been limited to increase the number of horizontal grid points (and therefore grid resolution) and the model' s treatment of precipitation, radiation, and surface hydrology physics has been enhanced to predict convection forced by local variations in surface heat, moisture fluxes, and cloud shading. The objective of this paper is to (1) provide an overview of MASS including the real-time initialization and configuration for running the data pre-processor and model, and (2) to summarize the preliminary evaluation of the model's forecasts of temperature, moisture, and wind at selected rawinsonde station locations during February 1994 and July 1994. MASS is a hydrostatic, three-dimensional modeling system which includes schemes to represent planetary boundary layer processes, surface energy and moisture budgets, free atmospheric long and short wave radiation, cloud microphysics, and sub-grid scale moist convection.

  14. Long-range forecast of all India summer monsoon rainfall using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system: skill comparison with CFSv2 model simulation and real-time forecast for the year 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Das, D.; Goswami, S.; Das, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    All India summer monsoon rainfall (AISMR) characteristics play a vital role for the policy planning and national economy of the country. In view of the significant impact of monsoon system on regional as well as global climate systems, accurate prediction of summer monsoon rainfall has become a challenge. The objective of this study is to develop an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for long range forecast of AISMR. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data of temperature, zonal and meridional wind at different pressure levels have been taken to construct the input matrix of ANFIS. The membership of the input parameters for AISMR as high, medium or low is estimated with trapezoidal membership function. The fuzzified standardized input parameters and the de-fuzzified target output are trained with artificial neural network models. The forecast of AISMR with ANFIS is compared with non-hybrid multi-layer perceptron model (MLP), radial basis functions network (RBFN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models. The forecast error analyses of the models reveal that ANFIS provides the best forecast of AISMR with minimum prediction error of 0.076, whereas the errors with MLP, RBFN and MLR models are 0.22, 0.18 and 0.73 respectively. During validation with observations, ANFIS shows its potency over the said comparative models. Performance of the ANFIS model is verified through different statistical skill scores, which also confirms the aptitude of ANFIS in forecasting AISMR. The forecast skill of ANFIS is also observed to be better than Climate Forecast System version 2. The real-time forecast with ANFIS shows possibility of deficit (65-75 cm) AISMR in the year 2015.

  15. Short period forecasting of catchment-scale precipitation. Part II: a water-balance storm model for short-term rainfall and flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, V. A.; Moore, R. J.

    A simple two-dimensional rainfall model, based on advection and conservation of mass in a vertical cloud column, is investigated for use in short-term rainfall and flood forecasting at the catchment scale under UK conditions. The model is capable of assimilating weather radar, satellite infra-red and surface weather observations, together with forecasts from a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, to obtain frequently updated forecasts of rainfall fields. Such data assimilation helps compensate for the simplified model dynamics and, taken together, provides a practical real-time forecasting scheme for catchment scale applications. Various ways are explored for using information from a numerical weather prediction model (16.8 km grid) within the higher resolution model (5 km grid). A number of model variants is considered, ranging from simple persistence and advection methods used as a baseline, to different forms of the dynamic rainfall model. Model performance is assessed using data from the Wardon Hill radar in Dorset for two convective events, on 10 June 1993 and 16 July 1995, when thunderstorms occurred over southern Britain. The results show that (i) a simple advection-type forecast may be improved upon by using multiscan radar data in place of data from the lowest scan, and (ii) advected, steady-state predictions from the dynamic model, using "inferred updraughts", provides the best performance overall. Updraught velocity is inferred at the forecast origin from the last two radar fields, using the mass-balance equation and associated data and is held constant over the forecast period. This inference model proves superior to the buoyancy parameterisation of updraught employed in the original formulation. A selection of the different rainfall forecasts is used as input to a catchment flow forecasting model, the IH PDM (Probability Distributed Moisture) model, to assess their effect on flow forecast accuracy for the 135 km2 Brue catchment in Somerset.

  16. Consensus Seasonal Flood Forecasts and Warning Response System (FFWRS): an alternate for nonstructural flood management in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rashed

    2005-06-01

    Despite advances in short-range flood forecasting and information dissemination systems in Bangladesh, the present system is less than satisfactory. This is because of short lead-time products, outdated dissemination networks, and lack of direct feedback from the end-user. One viable solution is to produce long-lead seasonal forecasts--the demand for which is significantly increasing in Bangladesh--and disseminate these products through the appropriate channels. As observed in other regions, the success of seasonal forecasts, in contrast to short-term forecast, depends on consensus among the participating institutions. The Flood Forecasting and Warning Response System (henceforth, FFWRS) has been found to be an important component in a comprehensive and participatory approach to seasonal flood management. A general consensus in producing seasonal forecasts can thus be achieved by enhancing the existing FFWRS. Therefore, the primary objective of this paper is to revisit and modify the framework of an ideal warning response system for issuance of consensus seasonal flood forecasts in Bangladesh. The five-stage FFWRS-i) Flood forecasting, ii) Forecast interpretation and message formulation, iii) Warning preparation and dissemination, iv) Responses, and v) Review and analysis-has been modified. To apply the concept of consensus forecast, a framework similar to that of the Southern African Regional Climate Outlook Forum (SARCOF) has been discussed. Finally, the need for a climate Outlook Fora has been emphasized for a comprehensive and participatory approach to seasonal flood hazard management in Bangladesh.

  17. Observed and forecast flood-inundation mapping application-A pilot study of an eleven-mile reach of the White River, Indianapolis, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Moon H.; Morlock, Scott E.; Arihood, Leslie D.; Kiesler, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Near-real-time and forecast flood-inundation mapping products resulted from a pilot study for an 11-mile reach of the White River in Indianapolis. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Indiana Silver Jackets hazard mitigation taskforce members, the National Weather Service (NWS), the Polis Center, and Indiana University, in cooperation with the City of Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water. The pilot project showed that it is technically feasible to create a flood-inundation map library by means of a two-dimensional hydraulic model, use a map from the library to quickly complete a moderately detailed local flood-loss estimate, and automatically run the hydraulic model during a flood event to provide the maps and flood-damage information through a Web graphical user interface. A library of static digital flood-inundation maps was created by means of a calibrated two-dimensional hydraulic model. Estimated water-surface elevations were developed for a range of river stages referenced to a USGS streamgage and NWS flood forecast point colocated within the study reach. These maps were made available through the Internet in several formats, including geographic information system, Keyhole Markup Language, and Portable Document Format. A flood-loss estimate was completed for part of the study reach by using one of the flood-inundation maps from the static library. The Federal Emergency Management Agency natural disaster-loss estimation program HAZUS-MH, in conjunction with local building information, was used to complete a level 2 analysis of flood-loss estimation. A Service-Oriented Architecture-based dynamic flood-inundation application was developed and was designed to start automatically during a flood, obtain near real-time and forecast data (from the colocated USGS streamgage and NWS flood forecast point within the study reach

  18. Real-time Reservoir Operation Based on a Combination of Long-term and Short-term Optimization and Hydrological Ensemble Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, P.; Tilmant, A.; Boucher, M.; Anctil, F.

    2012-12-01

    features two large and three smaller reservoirs. Electricity is produced at four of the five dams. Besides the production of hydropower, the reservoirs are used to mitigate floods and for recreational purposes. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are generated with the HYDROTEL model, using meteorological ensemble forecasts issued by Environment Canada as forcing data. The framework described above is applied on a rolling horizon optimization mode on a period of almost two years from March 2002 to the end of 2003. The autumn of 2003 is characterized by a period of strong rainfall events which eventually led to flooding in parts of the river basin. Results show, that this coupled optimization is able to maximize the power production without neglecting the multiple purposes of the reservoir. While the optimization process itself is relatively straight-forward, taking a decision form the set of optimal policies is not. For each ensemble member of the hydrological forecast an optimal operation policy is obtained. Therefore, a strategy of decision taking has to be developed, which allows the incorporation of the information provided by the ensemble forecast as a whole. Different decision making strategies are presented and assessed.

  19. Improvements in NOAA SURFRAD and ISIS sites for near real-time solar irradiance for verification of NWP solar forecasts for the DOE NOAA Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, K. O.; McComiskey, A. C.; Long, C. N.; Marquis, M.; Olson, J. B.; James, E.; Benjamin, S.; Clack, C.

    2015-12-01

    The DOE-NOAA Solar Forecasting Improvement Project's (SFIP) main goal is to improve solar forecasting and thereby increase penetration of solar renewable energy on the electric grid. NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD network is part of this initiative by providing high quality solar irradiance measurements for verification of improvements in solar forecasting for the short-term, day ahead, and ramp events. There are 14 ISIS and SURFRAD stations across the continental United States. We will give an overview of recent improvements in the networks for this project. The NOAA SURFRAD team has three main components: 1) In addition to the existing stations, two mobile SURFRAD stations have been built and deployed for 1 year each at two separate solar utility plants. 2) NOAA SURFRAD/ISIS will update the communications at their sites to provide near real-time data for verification activities at the 14 sites. 3) Global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal solar irradiance (DNI), and aerosol optical depth at various spatial and temporal averaging will be compared to forecasts from the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and an advanced version of the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) models. We will explore statistical correlations between in-coming and out-going shortwave radiation and longwave radiation at the surface for specific meteorological regimes and how well these are captured by NWP models.

  20. Regional hydrological models for distributed flash-floods forecasting: towards an estimation of potential impacts and damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Guillaume; Payrastre, Olivier; Gaume, Eric; Pons, Frederic; Moncoulon, David

    2016-04-01

    Hydrometeorological forecasting is an essential component of real-time flood management. The information it provides is of great help for crisis managers to anticipate the inundations and the associated risks. In the particular case of flash-floods, which may affect a large amount of small watersheds spread over the territory (up to 300 000 km of waterways considering a drained area of 5 km² minimum in France), appropriate flood forecasting systems are still under development. In France, highly distributed hydrological models have been implemented, enabling a real-time assessment of the potential intensity of flash-floods from the records of weather radars: AIGA-hydro system (Lavabre et al., 2005; Javelle et al., 2014), PreDiFlood project (Naulin et al., 2013). The approach presented here aims to go one step further by offering a direct assessment of the potential impacts of the simulated floods on inhabited areas. This approach is based on an a priori analysis of the study area in order (1) to evaluate with a simplified hydraulic approach (DTM treatment) the potentially flooded areas for different discharge levels, and (2) to identify the associated buildings and/or population at risk from geographic databases. This preliminary analysis enables to build an impact model (discharge-impact curve) on each river reach, which is then used to directly estimate the potentially affected assets based on a distributed rainfall runoff model. The overall principle of this approach was already presented at the 8th Hymex workshop. Therefore, the presentation will be here focused on the first validation results in terms of (1) accuracy of flooded areas simulated from DTM treatments, and (2) relevance of estimated impacts. The inundated areas simulated were compared to the European Directive cartography results (where available), showing an overall good correspondence in a large majority of cases, but also very significant errors for approximatively 10% of the river reaches

  1. Comprehensive evaluation of multi-year real-time air quality forecasting using an online-coupled meteorology-chemistry model over southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Hong, Chaopeng; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Li, Qi; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin

    2016-08-01

    An online-coupled meteorology-chemistry model, WRF/Chem-MADRID, has been deployed for real time air quality forecast (RT-AQF) in southeastern U.S. since 2009. A comprehensive evaluation of multi-year RT-AQF shows overall good performance for temperature and relative humidity at 2-m (T2, RH2), downward surface shortwave radiation (SWDOWN) and longwave radiation (LWDOWN), and cloud fraction (CF), ozone (O3) and fine particles (PM2.5) at surface, tropospheric ozone residuals (TOR) in O3 seasons (May-September), and column NO2 in winters (December-February). Moderate-to-large biases exist in wind speed at 10-m (WS10), precipitation (Precip), cloud optical depth (COT), ammonium (NH4+), sulfate (SO42-), and nitrate (NO3-) from the IMPROVE and SEARCH networks, organic carbon (OC) at IMPROVE, and elemental carbon (EC) and OC at SEARCH, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and column carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and formaldehyde (HCHO) in both O3 and winter seasons, column nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in O3 seasons, and TOR in winters. These biases indicate uncertainties in the boundary layer and cloud process treatments (e.g., surface roughness, microphysics cumulus parameterization), emissions (e.g., O3 and PM precursors, biogenic, mobile, and wildfire emissions), upper boundary conditions for all major gases and PM2.5 species, and chemistry and aerosol treatments (e.g., winter photochemistry, aerosol thermodynamics). The model shows overall good skills in reproducing the observed multi-year trends and inter-seasonal variability in meteorological and radiative variables such as T2, WS10, Precip, SWDOWN, and LWDOWN, and relatively well in reproducing the observed trends in surface O3 and PM2.5, but relatively poor in reproducing the observed column abundances of CO, NO2, SO2, HCHO, TOR, and AOD. The sensitivity simulations using satellite-constrained boundary conditions for O3 and CO show substantial improvement for both spatial distribution and domain-mean performance

  2. General characteristics of causes of urban flood damage and flood forecasting/warning system in Seoul, Korea Young-Il Moon1, 2, Jong-Suk Kim1, 2 1 Department of Civil Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743, South Korea 2 Urban Flood Research Inst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Young-Il; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2015-04-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and climate change, the frequency of concentrated heavy rainfall has increased, causing urban floods that result in casualties and property damage. As a consequence of natural disasters that occur annually, the cost of damage in Korea is estimated to be over two billion US dollars per year. As interest in natural disasters increase, demands for a safe national territory and efficient emergency plans are on the rise. In addition to this, as a part of the measures to cope with the increase of inland flood damage, it is necessary to build a systematic city flood prevention system that uses technology to quantify flood risk as well as flood forecast based on both rivers and inland water bodies. Despite the investment and efforts to prevent landside flood damage, research and studies of landside-river combined hydro-system is at its initial stage in Korea. Therefore, the purpose of this research introduces the causes of flood damage in Seoul and shows a flood forecasting and warning system in urban streams of Seoul. This urban flood forecasting and warning system conducts prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information and performs prompt and accurate prediction on the inland flooded area and also supports synthetic decision-making for prevention through real-time monitoring. Although we cannot prevent damage from typhoons or localized heavy rain, we can minimize that damage with accurate and timely forecast and a prevention system. To this end, we developed a flood forecasting and warning system, so in case of an emergency there is enough time for evacuation and disaster control. Keywords: urban flooding, flood risk, inland-river system, Korea Acknowledgments This research was supported by a grant (13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program (AWMP) funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  3. Recent Operational Innovations and Future Developments at the Flood Forecasting Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Jon; Pilling, Charlie

    2015-04-01

    The Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) was established in 2009 to give an overview of flood risk across England and Wales and is a partnership between the UK Met Office, the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales. Primarily serving the emergency response community, the FFC aims to provide trusted guidance to help protect lives and livelihoods from flooding across England and Wales from its base at the Met Office in Exeter. The flood forecasts consist of an assessment of the likelihood as well as the expected level of impacts of flood events during the next five days. The FFC provide forecasts for all natural sources of flooding, namely; fluvial, coastal, surface water and groundwater but liaise closely with meteorologists at the Met Office and local flood forecasters at the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales. Key challenges include providing; forecasts with longer lead times especially for fluvial and coastal events, forecasts at shorter timescales and with more spatial focus for rapid response catchments and surface water events, and also clear communications of forecast uncertainties. As well as operational activities, the FFC run a significant development and improvement programme and are linked in with Met Office and Environment Agency science projects in order to bring new science into operations to try and meet these challenges and improve performance. Latest developments which are now being applied operationally to provide an enhanced flood warning service will be presented. Examples include; the use of the national hydrological model Grid to Grid (G2G) for both fluvial and surface water flooding, extended surge ensembles for coastal flooding, enhancements in the surface water forecasting tool, and improvements to products communicating these forecasts. An overview of the current projects under development will also be provided, including; improvements to data within G2G, surface water hazard impact modelling, 7 day wave ensemble forecasts

  4. Operational flood-forecasting in the Piemonte region - development and verification of a fully distributed physically-oriented hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabuffetti, D.; Ravazzani, G.; Barbero, S.; Mancini, M.

    2009-03-01

    A hydrological model for real time flood forecasting to Civil Protection services requires reliability and rapidity. At present, computational capabilities overcome the rapidity needs even when a fully distributed hydrological model is adopted for a large river catchment as the Upper Po river basin closed at Ponte Becca (nearly 40 000 km2). This approach allows simulating the whole domain and obtaining the responses of large as well as of medium and little sized sub-catchments. The FEST-WB hydrological model (Mancini, 1990; Montaldo et al., 2007; Rabuffetti et al., 2008) is implemented. The calibration and verification activities are based on more than 100 flood events, occurred along the main tributaries of the Po river in the period 2000-2003. More than 300 meteorological stations are used to obtain the forcing fields, 10 cross sections with continuous and reliable discharge time series are used for calibration while verification is performed on about 40 monitored cross sections. Furthermore meteorological forecasting models are used to force the hydrological model with Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPFs) for 36 h horizon in "operational setting" experiments. Particular care is devoted to understanding how QPF affects the accuracy of the Quantitative Discharge Forecasts (QDFs) and to assessing the QDF uncertainty impact on the warning system reliability. Results are presented either in terms of QDF and of warning issues highlighting the importance of an "operational based" verification approach.

  5. Evaluation of the MACC operational forecast system - potential and challenges of global near-real-time modelling with respect to reactive gases in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Bouarar, I.; Brunke, E.-G.; Clerbaux, C.; Cupeiro, M.; Cristofanelli, P.; Eskes, H.; Flemming, J.; Flentje, H.; George, M.; Gilge, S.; Hilboll, A.; Inness, A.; Kapsomenakis, J.; Richter, A.; Ries, L.; Spangl, W.; Stein, O.; Weller, R.; Zerefos, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) project represents the European Union's Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) (http://www.copernicus.eu/), which became fully operational during 2015. The global near-real-time MACC model production run for aerosol and reactive gases provides daily analyses and 5-day forecasts of atmospheric composition fields. It is the only assimilation system worldwide that is operational to produce global analyses and forecasts of reactive gases and aerosol fields. We have investigated the ability of the MACC analysis system to simulate tropospheric concentrations of reactive gases covering the period between 2009 and 2012. A validation was performed based on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) surface observations from the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) network, the O3 surface observations from the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) and, furthermore, NO2 tropospheric columns, as well as CO total columns, derived from satellite sensors. The MACC system proved capable of reproducing reactive gas concentrations with consistent quality; however, with a seasonally dependent bias compared to surface and satellite observations - for northern hemispheric surface O3 mixing ratios, positive biases appear during the warm seasons and negative biases during the cold parts of the year, with monthly modified normalised mean biases (MNMBs) ranging between -30 and 30 % at the surface. Model biases are likely to result from difficulties in the simulation of vertical mixing at night and deficiencies in the model's dry deposition parameterisation. Observed tropospheric columns of NO2 and CO could be reproduced correctly during the warm seasons, but are mostly underestimated by the model during the cold seasons, when anthropogenic emissions are at their highest level, especially over the US, Europe and Asia. Monthly MNMBs of the satellite data

  6. Evaluation of the MACC operational forecast system - potential and challenges of global near-real-time modelling with respect to reactive gases in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Bouarar, I.; Brunke, E.-G.; Clerbaux, C.; Cupeiro, M.; Cristofanelli, P.; Eskes, H.; Flemming, J.; Flentje, H.; George, M.; Gilge, S.; Hilboll, A.; Inness, A.; Kapsomenakis, J.; Richter, A.; Ries, L.; Spangl, W.; Stein, O.; Weller, R.; Zerefos, C.

    2015-03-01

    Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC/MACCII) currently represents the European Union's Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) (http://www.copernicus.eu), which will become fully operational in the course of 2015. The global near-real-time MACC model production run for aerosol and reactive gases provides daily analyses and 5 day forecasts of atmospheric composition fields. It is the only assimilation system world-wide that is operational to produce global analyses and forecasts of reactive gases and aerosol fields. We have investigated the ability of the MACC analysis system to simulate tropospheric concentrations of reactive gases (CO, O3, and NO2) covering the period between 2009 and 2012. A validation was performed based on CO and O3 surface observations from the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) network, O3 surface observations from the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) and furthermore, NO2 tropospheric columns derived from the satellite sensors SCIAMACHY and GOME-2, and CO total columns derived from the satellite sensor MOPITT. The MACC system proved capable of reproducing reactive gas concentrations in consistent quality, however, with a seasonally dependent bias compared to surface and satellite observations: for northern hemispheric surface O3 mixing ratios, positive biases appear during the warm seasons and negative biases during the cold parts of the years, with monthly Modified Normalised Mean Biases (MNMBs) ranging between -30 and 30% at the surface. Model biases are likely to result from difficulties in the simulation of vertical mixing at night and deficiencies in the model's dry deposition parameterization. Observed tropospheric columns of NO2 and CO could be reproduced correctly during the warm seasons, but are mostly underestimated by the model during the cold seasons, when anthropogenic emissions are at a highest, especially over the US, Europe and Asia

  7. Forecasting of Storm Surge Floods Using ADCIRC and Optimized DEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of storm surge flood forecasts is essential for improving preparedness for hurricanes and other severe storms and, in particular, for optimizing evacuation scenarios. An interactive database, developed by WorldWinds, Inc., contains atlases of storm surge flood levels for the Louisiana/Mississippi gulf coast region. These atlases were developed to improve forecasting of flooding along the coastline and estuaries and in adjacent inland areas. Storm surge heights depend on a complex interaction of several factors, including: storm size, central minimum pressure, forward speed of motion, bottom topography near the point of landfall, astronomical tides, and most importantly, maximum wind speed. The information in the atlases was generated in over 100 computational simulations, partly by use of a parallel-processing version of the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model. ADCIRC is a nonlinear computational model of hydrodynamics, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the US Navy, as a family of two- and three-dimensional finite element based codes. It affords a capability for simulating tidal circulation and storm surge propagation over very large computational domains, while simultaneously providing high-resolution output in areas of complex shoreline and bathymetry. The ADCIRC finite-element grid for this project covered the Gulf of Mexico and contiguous basins, extending into the deep Atlantic Ocean with progressively higher resolution approaching the study area. The advantage of using ADCIRC over other storm surge models, such as SLOSH, is that input conditions can include all or part of wind stress, tides, wave stress, and river discharge, which serve to make the model output more accurate.

  8. Evaluating the Performance of Wavelet-based Data-driven Models for Multistep-ahead Flood Forecasting in an Urbanized Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaee Roodsari, B.; Chandler, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A real-time flood forecast system is presented to provide emergency management authorities sufficient lead time to execute plans for evacuation and asset protection in urban watersheds. This study investigates the performance of two hybrid models for real-time flood forecasting at different subcatchments of Ley Creek watershed, a heavily urbanized watershed in the vicinity of Syracuse, New York. Hybrid models include Wavelet-Based Artificial Neural Network (WANN) and Wavelet-Based Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (WANFIS). Both models are developed on the basis of real time stream network sensing. The wavelet approach is applied to decompose the collected water depth timeseries to Approximation and Detail components. The Approximation component is then used as an input to ANN and ANFIS models to forecast water level at lead times of 1 to 10 hours. The performance of WANN and WANFIS models are compared to ANN and ANFIS models for different lead times. Initial results demonstrated greater predictive power of hybrid models.

  9. Automatic removal of outliers in hydrologic time series and quality control of rainfall data: processing a real-time database of the Local System for Flood Monitoring in Klodzko County, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizinski, Bartlomiej; Niedzielski, Tomasz; Kryza, Maciej; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2013-04-01

    Real-time hydrological forecasting requires the highest quality of both hydrologic and meteorological data collected in a given river basin. Large outliers may lead to inaccurate predictions, with substantial departures between observations and prognoses considered even in short term. Although we need the correctness of both riverflow and rainfall data, they cannot be processed in the same way to produce a filtered output. Indeed, hydrologic time series at a given gauge can be interpolated in time domain after having detected suspicious values, however if no outlier has been detected at the upstream sites. In the case of rainfall data, interpolation is not suitable as we cannot verify the potential outliers at a given site against data from other sites especially in the complex terrain. This is due to the fact that very local convective events may occur, leading to large rainfall peaks at a limited space. Hence, instead of interpolating data, we rather perform a flagging procedure that only ranks outliers according to the likelihood of occurrence. Following the aforementioned assumptions, we have developed a few modules that serve a purpose of a fully automated correction of a database that is updated in real-time every 15 minutes, and the main objective of the work was to produce a high-quality database for a purpose of hydrologic rainfall-runoff modeling and ensemble prediction. The database in question is available courtesy of the County Office in Kłodzko (SW Poland), the institution which owns and maintains the Local System for Flood Monitoring in Kłodzko County. The dedicated prediction system, known as HydroProg, is now being built at the University of Wrocław (Poland). As the entire prediction system, the correction modules work automatically in real time and are developed in R language. They are plugged in to a larger IT infrastructure. Hydrologic time series, which are water levels recorded every 15 minutes at 22 gauges located in Kłodzko County, are

  10. Using ensemble rainfall predictions in a countrywide flood forecasting model in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranston, M. D.; Maxey, R.; Tavendale, A. C. W.; Buchanan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Improving flood predictions for all sources of flooding is at the centre of flood risk management policy in Scotland. With the introduction of the Flood Risk Management (Scotland) Act providing a new statutory basis for SEPA's flood warning responsibilities, the pressures on delivering hydrological science developments in support of this legislation has increased. Specifically, flood forecasting capabilities need to develop in support of the need to reduce the impact of flooding through the provision of actively disseminated, reliable and timely flood warnings. Flood forecasting in Scotland has developed significantly in recent years (Cranston and Tavendale, 2012). The development of hydrological models to predict flooding at a catchment scale has relied upon the application of rainfall runoff models utilising raingauge, radar and quantitative precipitation forecasts in the short lead time (less than 6 hours). Single or deterministic forecasts based on highly uncertain rainfall predictions have led to the greatest operational difficulties when communicating flood risk with emergency responders, therefore the emergence of probability-based estimates offers the greatest opportunity for managing uncertain predictions. This paper presents operational application of a physical-conceptual distributed hydrological model on a countrywide basis across Scotland. Developed by CEH Wallingford for SEPA in 2011, Grid-to-Grid (G2G) principally runs in deterministic mode and employs radar and raingauge estimates of rainfall together with weather model predictions to produce forecast river flows, as gridded time-series at a resolution of 1km and for up to 5 days ahead (Cranston, et al., 2012). However the G2G model is now being run operationally using ensemble predictions of rainfall from the MOGREPS-R system to provide probabilistic flood forecasts. By presenting a range of flood predictions on a national scale through this approach, hydrologists are now able to consider an

  11. Using Passive Microwaves for Open Water Monitoring and Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, R.; Johnson, F.; Sharma, A.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the biggest and severest natural disasters that society faces is floods. An important component that can help in reducing the impact of floods is satellite remote sensing as it allows for consistent monitoring and obtaining catchment information in absence of physical contact. Nowadays, passive microwave remote sensing observations are available in near real time (NRT) with a couple of hours delay from the actual sensing. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is a multi-frequency passive microwave sensor onboard the Global Change Observation Mission 1 - Water that was launched in May 2012. Several of these frequencies have a high sensitivity to the land surface and they also have the capacity to penetrate clouds. These advantages come at the cost of the relatively coarse spatial resolution (footprints range from ~5 to ~50 km) which in turn allows for global monitoring. A relatively simple methodology to monitor the fraction of open water from AMSR2 observations is presented here. Low frequency passive microwave observations have sensitivity to the land surface but are modulated by overlying signals from physical temperature and vegetation cover. We developed a completely microwave based artificial neural network supported by physically based components to monitor the fraction of open water. Three different areas, located in China, Southeast Asia and Australia, were selected for testing purposes and several different characteristics were examined. First, the overall performance of the methodology was evaluated against the NASA NRT Global Flood Mapping system. Second, the skills of the various different AMSR2 frequencies were tested and revealed that artificial contamination is a factor to consider. The different skills of the tested frequencies are of interest to apply the methodology to alternative passive microwave sensors. This will be of benefit in using the numerous multi-frequency passive microwaves sensors currently observing our Earth

  12. Urban flood early warning systems: approaches to hydrometeorological forecasting and communicating risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranston, Michael; Speight, Linda; Maxey, Richard; Tavendale, Amy; Buchanan, Peter

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenges for the flood forecasting community remains the provision of reliable early warnings of surface (or pluvial) flooding. The Scottish Flood Forecasting Service has been developing approaches for forecasting the risk of surface water flooding including capitalising on the latest developments in quantitative precipitation forecasting from the Met Office. A probabilistic Heavy Rainfall Alert decision support tool helps operational forecasters assess the likelihood of surface water flooding against regional rainfall depth-duration estimates from MOGREPS-UK linked to historical short-duration flooding in Scotland. The surface water flood risk is communicated through the daily Flood Guidance Statement to emergency responders. A more recent development is an innovative risk-based hydrometeorological approach that links 24-hour ensemble rainfall forecasts through a hydrological model (Grid-to-Grid) to a library of impact assessments (Speight et al., 2015). The early warning tool - FEWS Glasgow - presents the risk of flooding to people, property and transport across a 1km grid over the city of Glasgow with a lead time of 24 hours. Communication of the risk was presented in a bespoke surface water flood forecast product designed based on emergency responder requirements and trialled during the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. The development of new approaches to surface water flood forecasting are leading to improved methods of communicating the risk and better performance in early warning with a reduction in false alarm rates with summer flood guidance in 2014 (67%) compared to 2013 (81%) - although verification of instances of surface water flooding remains difficult. However the introduction of more demanding hydrometeorological capabilities with associated greater levels of uncertainty does lead to an increased demand on operational flood forecasting skills and resources. Speight, L., Cole, S.J., Moore, R.J., Pierce, C., Wright, B., Golding, B

  13. An integrated error estimation and lag-aware data assimilation scheme for real-time flood forecasting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of conventional filtering methods can be degraded by ignoring the time lag between soil moisture and discharge response when discharge observations are assimilated into streamflow modelling. This has led to the ongoing development of more optimal ways to implement sequential data ass...

  14. Comparison of Multiple Quantitative Precipitation Estimates for Warm-Season Flood Forecasting in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, H. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPEs) from ground and satellite platforms can potentially serve as input to hydrologic models used for flood forecasting in mountainous watersheds. This work compares the impact of ten different high-resolution (4-km and hourly) precipitation products on flood forecast skill in a large region of the Colorado Front Range. These products range from radar fields (Level II, Stage III and IV) to satellite estimates (HydroEstimator, AutoEstimator, Blend, GMSRA, PERSIANN-CCS). We examine QPE skill relative to ground rain gauges to detect error characteristics during the 2004 summer season which exhibited above-average precipitation accumulations in the region. We then quantify flood forecast skill by using the TIN-based Real time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) as an analysis tool in four mountain basins. The structural features of radar and satellite precipitation products determine the timing and magnitude of simulated summer floods in the study basins. Use of ground-based radar and multi-sensor satellite estimates minimize streamflow differences at the outlet locations compared to satellite-only QPEs which tend to underestimate total rainfall volumes, resulting in significant hydrologic response uncertainties. Given the generally low rainfall estimates from satellite-only products, a mean field bias correction is applied to all products and results are compared against non-corrected precipitation products. An exploratory analysis is conducted to assess precipitation volume differences between the bias-corrected and raw satellite products. Probability density functions of the differences allow examining the links between QPE bias, the diurnal precipitation cycle and topographic position. Analysis of the spatiotemporal precipitation and streamflow patterns help identify benefits and shortcomings of high-resolution QPEs for summer storms in mountainous areas.

  15. Application of Satellite information (JASON-2) in improvement of Flood Forecasting and Early Warning Service in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. A.; Anderson, E. R.; Bhuiyan, M. A.; Hossain, F.; Shah-Newaz, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Bangladesh is the lowest riparian of the huge system of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) basins, second to that of Amazan, with 1.75 million sq-km catchment area, only 7% is inside Bangladesh. High inflow from GBM associated with the intense rainfall is the source of flood in Bangladesh. Flood Forecasting and Early Warning (FFEW) is the mandate and responsibility of Bangladesh Water Development Board (BWDB) and Flood Forecasting and Warning Center (FFWC) under BWDB has been carrying out this responsibility since 1972 and operational on 7-days a week during monsoon (May to October). FFEW system started with few hours lead time has been upgraded up to to 5-days with reasonable accuracy. At FFWC numerical Hydrodynamic model is used for generating water level (WL) forecast upto 5-days at 54 points on 29 rivers based on real-time observed WL of 83 and rainfall of 56 stations with boundary estimationa on daily basis. Main challenge of this system is the boundary estimation is the limited upstream data of the transboundary rivers, obstacle for increasing lead-time for FFEW. The satellite based upper catchment data may overcome this limitation. Recent NASA-French joint Satellite mission JASON-2 records Water Elevation (WE) and it may be used within 24 hours. Using JASON-2 recorded WE data of 4 and 3 virtual stations on the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers , respectively (upper catchment), a new methodology has been developed for increasing lead time of forecast. Correlation between the JASON-2 recorded WE on the virtual stations at the upper catchment and WL of 2 dominating boundary stations at model boundary on the Ganges and Brahmaputra has been derived for generating WL forecast at those 2 boundary stations, which used as input in model. FFWC has started experimental 8-days lead-time WL forecast at 09 stations (5 in Brahmaputra and 4 in Ganges) using generated boundary data and regularly updating the results in the website. The trend of the forecasted WL using

  16. Fews-Risk: A step towards risk-based flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Daniel; Eilander, Dirk; de Leeuw, Annemargreet; Diermanse, Ferdinand; Weerts, Albrecht; de Bruijn, Karin; Beckers, Joost; Boelee, Leonore; Brown, Emma; Hazlewood, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Operational flood prediction and the assessment of flood risk are important components of flood management. Currently, the model-based prediction of discharge and/or water level in a river is common practice for operational flood forecasting. Based on the prediction of these values decisions about specific emergency measures are made within operational flood management. However, the information provided for decision support is restricted to pure hydrological or hydraulic aspects of a flood. Information about weak sections within the flood defences, flood prone areas and assets at risk in the protected areas are rarely used in a model-based flood forecasting system. This information is often available for strategic planning, but is not in an appropriate format for operational purposes. The idea of FEWS-Risk is the extension of existing flood forecasting systems with elements of strategic flood risk analysis, such as probabilistic failure analysis, two dimensional flood spreading simulation and the analysis of flood impacts and consequences. Thus, additional information is provided to the decision makers, such as: • Location, timing and probability of failure of defined sections of the flood defence line; • Flood spreading, extent and hydraulic values in the hinterland caused by an overflow or a breach flow • Impacts and consequences in case of flooding in the protected areas, such as injuries or casualties and/or damages to critical infrastructure or economy. In contrast with purely hydraulic-based operational information, these additional data focus upon decision support for answering crucial questions within an operational flood forecasting framework, such as: • Where should I reinforce my flood defence system? • What type of action can I take to mend a weak spot in my flood defences? • What are the consequences of a breach? • Which areas should I evacuate first? This presentation outlines the additional required workflows towards risk-based flood

  17. Taking into account hydrological modelling uncertainty in Mediterranean flash-floods forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edouard, Simon; Béatrice, Vincendon; Véronique, Ducrocq

    2015-04-01

    Title : Taking into account hydrological modelling uncertainty in Mediterranean flash-floods forecasting Authors : Simon EDOUARD*, Béatrice VINCENDON*, Véronique Ducrocq* * : GAME/CNRM(Météo-France, CNRS)Toulouse,France Mediterranean intense weather events often lead to devastating flash-floods (FF). Increasing the lead time of FF forecasts would permit to better anticipate their catastrophic consequences. These events are one part of Mediterranean hydrological cycle. HyMeX (HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiment) aims at a better understanding and quantification of the hydrological cycle and related processes in the Mediterranean. In order to get a lot of data, measurement campaigns were conducted. The first special observing period (SOP1) of these campaigns, served as a test-bed for a real-time hydrological ensemble prediction system (HEPS) dedicated to FF forecasting. It produced an ensemble of quantitative discharge forecasts (QDF) using the ISBA-TOP system. ISBATOP is a coupling between the surface scheme ISBA and a version of TOPMODEL dedicated to Mediterranean fast responding rivers. ISBA-TOP was driven with several quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) ensembles based on AROME atmospheric convection-permitting model. This permitted to take into account the uncertainty that affects QPF and that propagates up to the QDF. This uncertainty is major for discharge forecasting especially in the case of Mediterranean flash-floods. But other sources of uncertainty need to be sampled in HEPS systems. One of them is inherent to the hydrological modelling. The ISBA-TOP coupled system has been improved since the initial version, that was used for instance during Hymex SOP1. The initial ISBA-TOP consisted into coupling a TOPMODEL approach with ISBA-3L, which represented the soil stratification with 3 layers. The new version consists into coupling the same TOPMODEL approach with a version of ISBA where more than ten layers describe the soil vertical

  18. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational

  19. A Coastal Flood Decision Support Tool for Forecast Operations in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, C. M.; Moore, A.; Plumb, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    ABSTRACT Coastal flooding and erosion poses a serious threat to infrastructure, livelihood, and property for communities along Alaska's northern and western coastline. While the National Weather Service Alaska Region (NWS-AR) forecasts conditions favorable for coastal flooding, an improvement can be made in communicating event impacts between NWS-AR and local residents. Scientific jargon used by NWS-AR to indicate the severity of flooding potential is often misconstrued by residents. Additionally, the coastal flood forecasting process is cumbersome and time consuming due to scattered sources of flood guidance. To alleviate these problems, a single coastal flooding decision support tool was created for the Fairbanks Weather Forecast Office to help bridge the communication gap, streamline the forecast and warning process, and take into account both the meteorological and socioeconomic systems at work during a flood event. This tool builds on previous research and data collected by the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) and the NWS-AR, using high resolution elevation data to model the impacts of storm tide rise above the mean lower low water level on five of the most at-risk communities along the Alaskan coast. Important local buildings and infrastructure are highlighted, allowing forecasters to relate the severity of the storm tide in terms of local landmarks that are familiar to residents. In this way, this decision support tool allows for a conversion from model output storm tide levels into real world impacts that are easily understood by forecasters, emergency managers, and other stakeholders, helping to build a Weather-Ready Nation. An overview of the new coastal flood decision support tool in NWS-AR forecast operations will be discussed. KEYWORDS Forecasting; coastal flooding; coastal hazards; decision support

  20. Application of Medium and Seasonal Flood Forecasts for Agriculture Damage Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhruddin, Shamsul; Ballio, Francesco; Menoni, Scira

    2015-04-01

    Early warning is a key element for disaster risk reduction. In recent decades, major advancements have been made in medium range and seasonal flood forecasting. This progress provides a great opportunity to reduce agriculture damage and improve advisories for early action and planning for flood hazards. This approach can facilitate proactive rather than reactive management of the adverse consequences of floods. In the agricultural sector, for instance, farmers can take a diversity of options such as changing cropping patterns, applying fertilizer, irrigating and changing planting timing. An experimental medium range (1-10 day) and seasonal (20-25 days) flood forecasting model has been developed for Thailand and Bangladesh. It provides 51 sets of discharge ensemble forecasts of 1-10 days with significant persistence and high certainty and qualitative outlooks for 20-25 days. This type of forecast could assist farmers and other stakeholders for differential preparedness activities. These ensembles probabilistic flood forecasts have been customized based on user-needs for community-level application focused on agriculture system. The vulnerabilities of agriculture system were calculated based on exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Indicators for risk and vulnerability assessment were conducted through community consultations. The forecast lead time requirement, user-needs, impacts and management options for crops were identified through focus group discussions, informal interviews and community surveys. This paper illustrates potential applications of such ensembles for probabilistic medium range and seasonal flood forecasts in a way that is not commonly practiced globally today.

  1. The FireWork air quality forecast system with near-real-time biomass burning emissions: Recent developments and evaluation of performance for the 2015 North American wildfire season

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Radenko; Chen, Jack; Anderson, Kerry; Moran, Michael D.; Beaulieu, Paul-André; Davignon, Didier; Cousineau, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environment and Climate Change Canada’s FireWork air quality (AQ) forecast system for North America with near-real-time biomass burning emissions has been running experimentally during the Canadian wildfire season since 2013. The system runs twice per day with model initializations at 00 UTC and 12 UTC, and produces numerical AQ forecast guidance with 48-hr lead time. In this work we describe the FireWork system, which incorporates near-real-time biomass burning emissions based on the Canadian Wildland Fire Information System (CWFIS) as an input to the operational Regional Air Quality Deterministic Prediction System (RAQDPS). To demonstrate the capability of the system we analyzed two forecast periods in 2015 (June 2–July 15, and August 15–31) when fire activity was high, and observed fire-smoke-impacted areas in western Canada and the western United States. Modeled PM2.5 surface concentrations were compared with surface measurements and benchmarked with results from the operational RAQDPS, which did not consider near-real-time biomass burning emissions. Model performance statistics showed that FireWork outperformed RAQDPS with improvements in forecast hourly PM2.5 across the region; the results were especially significant for stations near the path of fire plume trajectories. Although the hourly PM2.5 concentrations predicted by FireWork still displayed bias for areas with active fires for these two periods (mean bias [MB] of –7.3 µg m−3 and 3.1 µg m−3), it showed better forecast skill than the RAQDPS (MB of –11.7 µg m−3 and –5.8 µg m−3) and demonstrated a greater ability to capture temporal variability of episodic PM2.5 events (correlation coefficient values of 0.50 and 0.69 for FireWork compared to 0.03 and 0.11 for RAQDPS). A categorical forecast comparison based on an hourly PM2.5 threshold of 30 µg m−3 also showed improved scores for probability of detection (POD), critical success index (CSI), and false alarm rate (FAR

  2. An Evaluation of Real-time Air Quality Forecasts and their Urban Emissions over Eastern Texas During the Summer of 2006 Second Texas Air Quality Study Field Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forecasts of ozone (O3) and particulate matter (diameter less than 2.5 µm, PM2.5) from seven air quality forecast models (AQFMs) are statistically evaluated against observations collected during August and September of 2006 (49 days) through the AIRNow netwo...

  3. A Multitemporal Remote Sensing Approach to Streamflow Prediction and Flood Vulnerability Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissling, B. P.; Xie, H.

    2006-12-01

    precipitation, land surface temperature, and select vegetation indices accounted for 78% (R2adj = 0.78) of the variance of gage station observed streamflow for calendar year 2004. Efforts are underway to calibrate and validate this model for other time periods within the data availability window of MODIS imagery products, and for other watersheds of varying size and similar climatic regime within the Guadalupe River and neighboring basins. The success of this remote sensing approach will have implications for developing near real-time flood risk and vulnerability forecasting models for both gaged and ungaged watersheds, as well as water supply management in regions of the world with limited resources to undertake conventional ground-based hydrologic studies.

  4. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research

  5. Operational aspects of asynchronous filtering for improved flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovec, Oldrich; Weerts, Albrecht; Sumihar, Julius; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    and assimilation and is suitable to be connected to any kind of environmental model. This setup is embedded in the Delft Flood Early Warning System (Delft-FEWS, Werner et al., 2013) for making all simulations and forecast runs and handling of all hydrological and meteorological data. References: Evensen, G. (2009), Data Assimilation: The Ensemble Kalman Filter, Springer, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-03711-5. OpenDA (2013), The OpenDA data-assimilation toolbox, www.openda.org, (last access: 1 November 2013). OpenStreams (2013), OpenStreams, www.openstreams.nl, (last access: 1 November 2013). Sakov, P., G. Evensen, and L. Bertino (2010), Asynchronous data assimilation with the EnKF, Tellus, Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography, 62(1), 24-29, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0870.2009.00417.x. Werner, M., J. Schellekens, P. Gijsbers, M. van Dijk, O. van den Akker, and K. Heynert (2013), The Delft-FEWS flow forecasting system, Environ. Mod. & Soft., 40(0), 65-77, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2012.07.010.

  6. Reduction of the uncertainties in the water level-discharge relation of a 1D hydraulic model in the context of operational flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habert, J.; Ricci, S.; Le Pape, E.; Thual, O.; Piacentini, A.; Goutal, N.; Jonville, G.; Rochoux, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-driven hydrodynamic simulator based on the 1-D hydraulic solver dedicated to flood forecasting with lead time of an hour up to 24 h. The goal of the study is to reduce uncertainties in the hydraulic model and thus provide more reliable simulations and forecasts in real time for operational use by the national hydrometeorological flood forecasting center in France. Previous studies have shown that sequential assimilation of water level or discharge data allows to adjust the inflows to the hydraulic network resulting in a significant improvement of the discharge while leaving the water level state imperfect. Two strategies are proposed here to improve the water level-discharge relation in the model. At first, a modeling strategy consists in improving the description of the river bed geometry using topographic and bathymetric measurements. Secondly, an inverse modeling strategy proposes to locally correct friction coefficients in the river bed and the flood plain through the assimilation of in situ water level measurements. This approach is based on an Extended Kalman filter algorithm that sequentially assimilates data to infer the upstream and lateral inflows at first and then the friction coefficients. It provides a time varying correction of the hydrological boundary conditions and hydraulic parameters. The merits of both strategies are demonstrated on the Marne catchment in France for eight validation flood events and the January 2004 flood event is used as an illustrative example throughout the paper. The Nash-Sutcliffe criterion for water level is improved from 0.135 to 0.832 for a 12-h forecast lead time with the data assimilation strategy. These developments have been implemented at the SAMA SPC (local flood forecasting service in the Haute-Marne French department) and used for operational forecast since 2013. They were shown to provide an efficient tool for evaluating flood risk and to improve the flood early warning system

  7. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  8. Near-field tsunami forecast system based on near real-time seismic moment tensor estimation in the regions of Indonesia, the Philippines, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazu, Daisuke; Pulido, Nelson; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Senda, Jouji; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a near-field tsunami forecast system based on an automatic centroid moment tensor (CMT) estimation using regional broadband seismic observation networks in the regions of Indonesia, the Philippines, and Chile. The automatic procedure of the CMT estimation has been implemented to estimate tsunamigenic earthquakes. A tsunami propagation simulation model is used for the forecast and hindcast. A rectangular fault model based on the estimated CMT is employed to represent the initial condition of tsunami height. The forecast system considers uncertainties due to two possible fault planes and two possible scaling laws and thus shows four possible scenarios with these associated uncertainties for each estimated CMT. The system requires approximately 15 min to estimate the CMT after the occurrence of an earthquake and approximately another 15 min to make the tsunami forecast results including the maximum tsunami height and its arrival time at the epicentral region and near-field coasts available. The retrospectively forecasted tsunamis were evaluated by the deep-sea pressure and tide gauge observations, for the past eight tsunamis ( M w 7.5-8.6) that occurred throughout the regional seismic networks. The forecasts ranged from half to double the amplitudes of the deep-sea pressure observations and ranged mostly within the same order of magnitude as the maximum heights of the tide gauge observations. It was found that the forecast uncertainties increased for greater earthquakes (e.g., M w > 8) because the tsunami source was no longer approximated as a point source for such earthquakes. The forecast results for the coasts nearest to the epicenter should be carefully used because the coasts often experience the highest tsunamis with the shortest arrival time (e.g., <30 min).

  9. Modeling flash flood events in an ungaged semi-arid basin using a real-time distributed model: Fish Creek near Anza Borrego, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast responding headwater basins and canyons pose a significant threat to life and property throughout the semi-arid western United States. This paper presents the results from the application of the real-time distributed model KINematic runoff and EROsin model (KINEROS2) to the complex terrain of t...

  10. Using subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) extreme rainfall forecasts for extended-range flood prediction in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. J.; Franks, S. W.; McEvoy, D.

    2015-06-01

    Meteorological and hydrological centres around the world are looking at ways to improve their capacity to be able to produce and deliver skilful and reliable forecasts of high-impact extreme rainfall and flooding events on a range of prediction timescales (e.g. sub-daily, daily, multi-week, seasonal). Making improvements to extended-range rainfall and flood forecast models, assessing forecast skill and uncertainty, and exploring how to apply flood forecasts and communicate their benefits to decision-makers are significant challenges facing the forecasting and water resources management communities. This paper presents some of the latest science and initiatives from Australia on the development, application and communication of extreme rainfall and flood forecasts on the extended-range "subseasonal-to-seasonal" (S2S) forecasting timescale, with a focus on risk-based decision-making, increasing flood risk awareness and preparedness, capturing uncertainty, understanding human responses to flood forecasts and warnings, and the growing adoption of "climate services". The paper also demonstrates how forecasts of flood events across a range of prediction timescales could be beneficial to a range of sectors and society, most notably for disaster risk reduction (DRR) activities, emergency management and response, and strengthening community resilience. Extended-range S2S extreme flood forecasts, if presented as easily accessible, timely and relevant information are a valuable resource to help society better prepare for, and subsequently cope with, extreme flood events.

  11. Real Time Network Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-12

    Demonstrate a simple system Conduct a feasibility assessment of data storage, maintenance, and integration requirements Test a web-based data feed...Real Time Network Assessment Prototype We demonstrated the feasibility of linking near real time network analytics to mashups and web- based...combining similar concepts into single node) Stemmers Thesauri application Network position Statistical common patterns Pronoun identification

  12. Improving our understanding of flood forecasting using earlier hydro-meteorological intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Dong-Sin; Chen, Cheng-Hsin; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, Taiwan has suffered from severe bouts of torrential rain, and typhoon induced floods have become the major natural threat to Taiwan. In order to warn the public of potential risks, authorities are considering establishing an early warning system derived from an integrated hydro-meteorological estimation process. This study aims at the development and accuracy of such a warning system. So it is first necessary to understand the distinctive features of flood forecasting in integrated rainfall-runoff simulations. Additionally the adequacies of a warning system that is based on extracting useful intelligence from earlier, possibly faulty numerical simulation results are discussed. In order to precisely model flooding, hydrological simulations based upon spot measured rainfall data have been utilized in prior studies to calibrate model parameters. Here, precipitation inputs from an ensemble of almost 20 different realizations of rainfall fields have been used to derive flood forecasts. The flood warning system therefore integrates rainfall-runoff calculations, field observations and data assimilations. Simulation results indicate that the ensemble precipitation estimates generated by a Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model produce divergent estimates. Considerable flooding is often shown in the simulated hydrographs, but the results as to the peak time and peak stage are not always in agreement with the observations. In brief, such forecasts can be good for warning against potential damaging floods in the near future, but the meteorological inputs are not good enough to forecast the time and magnitude of the peaks. The key for such warning system is not to expect highly accurate rainfall predictions, but to improve our understanding from individual ensemble flood forecasts.

  13. Development of a real time streamflow monitoring system for the Indian sub-continental basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, H. L.; Mishra, V.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time streamflow monitoring is essential in the Indian sub-continental river basins as a large population is affected by floods. Moreover, streamflow monitoring may help in managing the water resources in the agriculture dominated region. In the Indian sub-continental basins, it is challenging to obtain the real time information of streamflow, which is valuable for reservoir operations, water management, and flood forecasts. We setup the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model at daily temporal resolution and 0.25◦ spatial resolution using the bias corrected satellite precipitation product from the Tropical rainfall Measurement Mission Real Time (TRMM-3B42RTV7) and bias corrected temperature product from the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS), version 2. Near-real-time precipitation and temperatures are bias corrected using the historic precipitation and temperature data from the India Meteorological Department (IMD). Moreover, we evaluated data assimilation approaches to improve the real-time monitoring of streamflow in the sub-continental basins.

  14. ADAPTATION AND APPLICATION OF THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM FOR REAL-TIME AIR QUALITY FORECASTING DURING THE SUMMER OF 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to forecast local and regional air pollution events is challenging since the processes governing the production and sustenance of atmospheric pollutants are complex and often non-linear. Comprehensive atmospheric models, by representing in as much detail as possible t...

  15. Real-Time Bias-Adjusted O3 and PM2.5 Air Quality Index Forecasts and their Performance Evaluations over the Continental United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Air Quality Forecast Capacity (NAQFC) system, which links NOAA's North American Mesoscale (NAM) meteorological model with EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, provided operational ozone (O3) and experimental fine particular matter (PM2...

  16. Evaluation of real-time hydrometeorological ensemble prediction on hydrologic scales in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, Konstantine P.; Graham, Nicholas E.; Modrick, Theresa M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Shamir, Eylon; Spencer, Cristopher R.; Sperfslage, Jason A.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents an evaluation of real time ensemble forecasts produced during 2010-2012 by the demonstration project INFORM (Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management) in Northern California. In addition, the innovative elements of the forecast component of the INFORM project are highlighted. The forecast component is designed to dynamically downscale operational multi-lead ensemble forecasts from the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) and the Climate Forecast system (CFS) of the National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP), and to use adaptations of the operational hydrologic models of the US National Weather Service California Nevada River Forecast Center to provide ensemble reservoir inflow forecasts in real time. A full-physics 10-km resolution (10 km on the side) mesoscale model was implemented for the ensemble prediction of surface precipitation and temperature over the domain of Northern California with lead times out to 16 days with 6-hourly temporal resolution. An intermediate complexity regional model with a 10 km resolution was implemented to downscale the NCEP CFS ensemble forecasts for lead times out to 41.5 days. Methodologies for precipitation and temperature model forecast adjustment to comply with the corresponding observations were formulated and tested as regards their effectiveness for improving the ensemble predictions of these two variables and also for improving reservoir inflow forecasts. The evaluation is done using the real time databases of INFORM and concerns the snow accumulation and melt seasons. Performance is measured by metrics that range from those that use forecast means to those that use the entire forecast ensemble. The results show very good skill in forecasting precipitation and temperature over the subcatchments of the INFORM domain out to a week in advance for all basins, models and seasons. For temperature, in some cases, non-negligible skill has been obtained out to four weeks for the melt season

  17. Forecast-based Integrated Flood Detection System for Emergency Response and Disaster Risk Reduction (Flood-FINDER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcorace, Mauro; Silvestro, Francesco; Rudari, Roberto; Boni, Giorgio; Dell'Oro, Luca; Bjorgo, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Most flood prone areas in the globe are mainly located in developing countries where making communities more flood resilient is a priority. Despite different flood forecasting initiatives are now available from academia and research centers, what is often missing is the connection between the timely hazard detection and the community response to warnings. In order to bridge the gap between science and decision makers, UN agencies play a key role on the dissemination of information in the field and on capacity-building to local governments. In this context, having a reliable global early warning system in the UN would concretely improve existing in house capacities for Humanitarian Response and the Disaster Risk Reduction. For those reasons, UNITAR-UNOSAT has developed together with USGS and CIMA Foundation a Global Flood EWS called "Flood-FINDER". The Flood-FINDER system is a modelling chain which includes meteorological, hydrological and hydraulic models that are accurately linked to enable the production of warnings and forecast inundation scenarios up to three weeks in advance. The system is forced with global satellite derived precipitation products and Numerical Weather Prediction outputs. The modelling chain is based on the "Continuum" hydrological model and risk assessments produced for GAR2015. In combination with existing hydraulically reconditioned SRTM data and 1D hydraulic models, flood scenarios are derived at multiple scales and resolutions. Climate and flood data are shared through a Web GIS integrated platform. First validation of the modelling chain has been conducted through a flood hindcasting test case, over the Chao Phraya river basin in Thailand, using multi temporal satellite-based analysis derived for the exceptional flood event of 2011. In terms of humanitarian relief operations, the EO-based services of flood mapping in rush mode generally suffer from delays caused by the time required for their activation, programming, acquisitions and

  18. Dynamic Critical Rainfall-Based Flash Flood Early Warning and Forecasting for Medium-Small Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yang, D.; Hu, J.

    2012-04-01

    China is extremely frequent food disasters hit countries, annual flood season flash floods triggered by rainfall, mudslides, landslides have caused heavy casualties and property losses, not only serious threaten the lives of the masses, but the majority of seriously restricting the mountain hill areas of economic and social development and the people become rich, of building a moderately prosperous society goals. In the next few years, China will focus on prevention and control area in the flash flood disasters initially built "for the surveillance, communications, forecasting, early warning and other non-engineering measure based, non-engineering measures and the combinations of engineering measures," the mitigation system. The latest progresses on global torrential flood early warning and forecasting techniques are reviewed in this paper, and then an early warning and forecasting approach is proposed on the basis of a distributed hydrological model according to dynamic critical rainfall index. This approach has been applied in Suichuanjiang River basin in Jiangxi province, which is expected to provide valuable reference for building a national flash flood early warning and forecasting system as well as control of such flooding.

  19. A high-resolution real-time forecasting system for predicting the fate of oil spills in the Strait of Bonifacio (western Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Cucco, A; Sinerchia, M; Ribotti, A; Olita, A; Fazioli, L; Perilli, A; Sorgente, B; Borghini, M; Schroeder, K; Sorgente, R

    2012-06-01

    The Strait of Bonifacio is a long and narrow area between Corsica and Sardinia. To manage environmental emergencies related to the spill of oil from vessels, an innovative forecasting system was developed. This tool is capable of operationally predicting the dispersion of hydrocarbon spills in the coastal area of the Bonifacio Strait, either from an instantaneous or continuous spill and either in forward or backward mode. Experimental datasets, including ADCP water current measurements and the trajectories of drifter buoys released in the area, were used to evaluate the accuracy of this system. A comparison between the simulation results and experimental data revealed that both the water circulation and the surface transport processes are accurately reproduced by the model. The overall accuracy of the system in reproducing the transport of an oil spill at sea was estimated for both forward and backward prediction mode and in relation to different forecasting time lags.

  20. Uncertainty estimation of long-range ensemble forecasts of snowmelt flood characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchment, L.

    2012-04-01

    Long-range forecasts of snowmelt flood characteristics with the lead time of 2-3 months have important significance for regulation of flood runoff and mitigation of flood damages at almost all large Russian rivers At the same time, the application of current forecasting techniques based on regression relationships between the runoff volume and the indexes of river basin conditions can lead to serious errors in forecasting resulted in large economic losses caused by wrong flood regulation. The forecast errors can be caused by complicated processes of soil freezing and soil moisture redistribution, too high rate of snow melt, large liquid precipitation before snow melt. or by large difference of meteorological conditions during the lead-time periods from climatologic ones. Analysis of economic losses had shown that the largest damages could, to a significant extent, be avoided if the decision makers had an opportunity to take into account predictive uncertainty and could use more cautious strategies in runoff regulation. Development of methodology of long-range ensemble forecasting of spring/summer floods which is based on distributed physically-based runoff generation models has created, in principle, a new basis for improving hydrological predictions as well as for estimating their uncertainty. This approach is illustrated by forecasting of the spring-summer floods at the Vyatka River and the Seim River basins. The application of the physically - based models of snowmelt runoff generation give a essential improving of statistical estimates of the deterministic forecasts of the flood volume in comparison with the forecasts obtained from the regression relationships. These models had been used also for the probabilistic forecasts assigning meteorological inputs during lead time periods from the available historical daily series, and from the series simulated by using a weather generator and the Monte Carlo procedure. The weather generator consists of the stochastic

  1. Evaluation of flash-flood discharge forecasts in complex terrain using precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, D.; Warner, T.T.; Brandes, E.A.; Leavesley, G.H.; Sun, Jielun; Mueller, C.K.

    2001-01-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods produced by thunderstorm (convective) precipitation in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the precipitation distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds are generally small in size, and small position errors in the forecast or observed placement of the precipitation can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good precipitation estimates and predictions, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the precipitation-rate input data. Different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective precipitation will be applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado flash flood of July 1996, where over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the precipitation was exacerbated by the fact that a significant fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event. Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service's operational Weather Surveillance Radar-Doppler 1988 and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, research, dual-polarization radar, colocated to the east of Denver, are compared. In addition, very short range forecasts from a convection-resolving dynamic model, which is initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds, are compared with forecasts from an automated-algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate, and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data, have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the radar data and forecasts from the dynamic model and the automated algorithm could be operationally useful for input to surface

  2. On the reliable use of satellite-derived surface water products for global flood monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirpa, F. A.; Revilla-Romero, B.; Thielen, J.; Salamon, P.; Brakenridge, R.; Pappenberger, F.; de Groeve, T.

    2015-12-01

    Early flood warning and real-time monitoring systems play a key role in flood risk reduction and disaster response management. To this end, real-time flood forecasting and satellite-based detection systems have been developed at global scale. However, due to the limited availability of up-to-date ground observations, the reliability of these systems for real-time applications have not been assessed in large parts of the globe. In this study, we performed comparative evaluations of the commonly used satellite-based global flood detections and operational flood forecasting system using 10 major flood cases reported over three years (2012-2014). Specially, we assessed the flood detection capabilities of the near real-time global flood maps from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS), and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the operational forecasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) for the major flood events recorded in global flood databases. We present the evaluation results of the global flood detection and forecasting systems in terms of correctly indicating the reported flood events and highlight the exiting limitations of each system. Finally, we propose possible ways forward to improve the reliability of large scale flood monitoring tools.

  3. An evaluation of real-time air quality forecasts and their urban emissions over eastern Texas during the summer of 2006 Second Texas Air Quality Study field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, S.; Grell, G.; Peckham, S.; Wilczak, J.; Djalalova, I.; Hsie, E.-Y.; Frost, G.; Peischl, J.; Schwarz, J.; Spackman, R.; Holloway, J.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Gong, W.; Bouchet, V.; Gaudreault, S.; Racine, J.; McHenry, J.; McQueen, J.; Lee, P.; Tang, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Mathur, R.

    2009-04-01

    Forecasts of ozone (O3) and particulate matter (diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5) from seven air quality forecast models (AQFMs) are statistically evaluated against observations collected during August and September of 2006 (49 days) through the Aerometric Information Retrieval Now (AIRNow) network throughout eastern Texas and adjoining states. Ensemble O3 and PM2.5 forecasts created by combining the seven separate forecasts with equal weighting, and simple bias-corrected forecasts, are also evaluated in terms of standard statistical measures, threshold statistics, and variance analysis. For O3 the models and ensemble generally show statistical skill relative to persistence for the entire region, but fail to predict high-O3 events in the Houston region. For PM2.5, none of the models, or ensemble, shows statistical skill, and all but one model have significant low bias. Comprehensive comparisons with the full suite of chemical and aerosol measurements collected aboard the NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the summer 2006 Second Texas Air Quality Study and the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS II/GoMACCS) field study are performed to help diagnose sources of model bias at the surface. Aircraft flights specifically designed for sampling of Houston and Dallas urban plumes are used to determine model and observed upwind or background biases, and downwind excess concentrations that are used to infer relative emission rates. Relative emissions from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999 National Emission Inventory (NEI-99) version 3 emissions inventory (used in two of the model forecasts) are evaluated on the basis of comparisons between observed and model concentration difference ratios. Model comparisons demonstrate that concentration difference ratios yield a reasonably accurate measure (within 25%) of relative input emissions. Boundary layer height and wind data are combined with the observed up-wind and downwind concentration

  4. Evaluating the co-production of a near real time Earthquake Aftershock forecasting tool for humanitarian risk assessment and emergency planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Keira; Hope, Max; McCloskey, John; NicBhloscaidh, Mairead; Jimenez, Abigail; Dunlop, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Concern Worldwide and the University of Ulster Geophysics Research Group are engaged in a project to co-produce a suite of software and mapping tools to assess aftershock hazard in near real-time during the emergency response phase of earthquake disaster, and inform humanitarian emergency planning and response activities. This paper uses a social learning approach to evaluate this co-production process. Following Wenger (1999) we differentiate between the earthquake science and humanitarian communities of practice (CoP) along three dimensions: enterprise (the purpose of CoPs and the problems participants are working to address), repertoire (knowledge, skills, language), and identity (values and boundaries). We examine the effectiveness of learning between CoP, focusing on boundary work and objects, and various organisational structures and aspects of the wider political economy of learning that enable and hinder the co-production process. We conclude by identifying a number of ways to more effectively integrate earthquake science into humanitarian decision-making, policy development and programme design.

  5. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  6. A pan-African medium-range ensemble flood forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemig, Vera; Bisselink, Bernard; Pappenberger, Florian; Thielen, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    The African Flood Forecasting System (AFFS) is a probabilistic flood forecast system for medium- to large-scale African river basins, with lead times of up to 15 days. The key components are the hydrological model LISFLOOD, the African GIS database, the meteorological ensemble predictions of the ECMWF and critical hydrological thresholds. In this study the predictive capability is investigated, to estimate AFFS' potential as an operational flood forecasting system for the whole of Africa. This is done in a hindcast mode, by reproducing pan-African hydrological predictions for the whole year of 2003 where important flood events were observed. Results were analysed in two ways, each with its individual objective. The first part of the analysis is of paramount importance for the assessment of AFFS as a flood forecasting system, as it focuses on the detection and prediction of flood events. Here, results were verified with reports of various flood archives such as Dartmouth Flood Observatory, the Emergency Event Database, the NASA Earth Observatory and Reliefweb. The number of hits, false alerts and missed alerts as well as the Probability of Detection, False Alarm Rate and Critical Success Index were determined for various conditions (different regions, flood durations, average amount of annual precipitations, size of affected areas and mean annual discharge). The second part of the analysis complements the first by giving a basic insight into the prediction skill of the general streamflow. For this, hydrological predictions were compared against observations at 36 key locations across Africa and the Continuous Rank Probability Skill Score (CRPSS), the limit of predictability and reliability were calculated. Results showed that AFFS detected around 70 % of the reported flood events correctly. In particular, the system showed good performance in predicting riverine flood events of long duration (> 1 week) and large affected areas (> 10 000 km2) well in advance, whereas

  7. Integrating Fluvial and Oceanic Drivers in Operational Flooding Forecasts for San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdman, Liv; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick; Kim, Jungho; Cifelli, Rob; Johnson, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    The nine counties that make up the San Francisco Bay area are home to 7.5 million people and these communties are susceptible to flooding along the bay shoreline and inland creeks that drain to the bay. A forecast model that integrates fluvial and oceanic drivers is necessary for predicting flooding in this complex urban environment. The U.S. Geological Survey ( USGS) and National Weather Service (NWS) are developing a state-of-the-art flooding forecast model for the San Francisco Bay area that will predict watershed and ocean-based flooding up to 72 hours in advance of an approaching storm. The model framework for flood forecasts is based on the USGS-developed Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) that was applied to San Francisco Bay under the Our Coast Our Future project. For this application, we utilize Delft3D-FM, a hydrodynamic model based on a flexible mesh grid, to calculate water levels that account for tidal forcing, seasonal water level anomalies, surge and in-Bay generated wind waves from the wind and pressure fields of a NWS forecast model, and tributary discharges from the Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM), developed by the NWS Office of Hydrologic Development. The flooding extent is determined by overlaying the resulting water levels onto a recently completed 2-m digital elevation model of the study area which best resolves the extensive levee and tidal marsh systems in the region. Here we present initial pilot results of hindcast winter storms in January 2010 and December 2012, where the flooding is driven by oceanic and fluvial factors respectively. We also demonstrate the feasibility of predicting flooding on an operational time scale that incorporates both atmospheric and hydrologic forcings.

  8. Real time obscuration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agricola, Koos

    2016-09-01

    Recently a real time particle deposition monitoring system is developed. After discussions with optical system engineers a new feature has been added. This enables the real time monitoring of obscuration of exposed optical components by counting the deposited particles and sizing the obscuration area of each particle. This way the Particle Obscuration Rate (POR) can be determined. The POR can be used to determine the risk of product contamination during exposure. The particle size distribution gives information on the type of potential particle sources. The deposition moments will indicate when these sources were present.

  9. Validating quantitative precipitation forecast for the Flood Meteorological Office, Patna region during 2011-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, R. K.; Panda, Jagabandhu; Rath, Sudhansu S.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2016-06-01

    In order to issue an accurate warning for flood, a better or appropriate quantitative forecasting of precipitation is required. In view of this, the present study intends to validate the quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) issued during southwest monsoon season for six river catchments (basin) under the flood meteorological office, Patna region. The forecast is analysed statistically by computing various skill scores of six different precipitation ranges during the years 2011-2014. The analysis of QPF validation indicates that the multi-model ensemble (MME) based forecasting is more reliable in the precipitation ranges of 1-10 and 11-25 mm. However, the reliability decreases for higher ranges of rainfall and also for the lowest range, i.e., below 1 mm. In order to testify synoptic analogue method based MME forecasting for QPF during an extreme weather event, a case study of tropical cyclone Phailin is performed. It is realized that in case of extreme events like cyclonic storms, the MME forecasting is qualitatively useful for issue of warning for the occurrence of floods, though it may not be reliable for the QPF. However, QPF may be improved using satellite and radar products.

  10. A New Method for Near Real Time Precipitation Estimates Using a Derived Statistical Relationship between Precipitable Water Vapor and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The IPCC 5th Assessment found that the predicted warming of 1oC would increase the risk of extreme events such as heat waves, droughts, and floods. Weather extremes, like floods, have shown the vulnerability and susceptibility society has to these extreme weather events, through impacts such as disruption of food production, water supply, health, and damage of infrastructure. This paper examines a new way of near-real time forecasting of precipitation. A 10-year statistical climatological relationship was derived between precipitable water vapor (PWV) and precipitation by using the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder daily gridded PWV product and the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission daily gridded precipitation total. Forecasting precipitation estimates in real time is dire for flood monitoring and disaster management. Near real time PWV observations from AIRS on Aqua are available through the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center. In addition, PWV observations are available through direct broadcast from the NASA Suomi-NPP ATMS/CrIS instrument, the operational follow on to AIRS. The derived climatological relationship can be applied to create precipitation estimates in near real time by utilizing the direct broadcasting capabilities currently available in the CONUS region. The application of this relationship will be characterized through case-studies by using near real-time NASA AIRS Science Team v6 PWV products and ground-based SuomiNet GPS to estimate the current precipitation potential; the max amount of precipitation that can occur based on the moisture availability. Furthermore, the potential contribution of using the direct broadcasting of the NUCAPS ATMS/CrIS PWV products will be demonstrated. The analysis will highlight the advantages of applying this relationship in near-real time for flash flood monitoring and risk management. Relevance to the NWS River Forecast Centers will be discussed.

  11. Development of roughness updating based on artificial neural network in a river hydraulic model for flash flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J. C.; Hsu, M. H.; Duann, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Flood is the worst weather-related hazard in Taiwan because of steep terrain and storm. The tropical storm often results in disastrous flash flood. To provide reliable forecast of water stages in rivers is indispensable for proper actions in the emergency response during flood. The river hydraulic model based on dynamic wave theory using an implicit finite-difference method is developed with river roughness updating for flash flood forecast. The artificial neural network (ANN) is employed to update the roughness of rivers in accordance with the observed river stages at each time-step of the flood routing process. Several typhoon events at Tamsui River are utilized to evaluate the accuracy of flood forecasting. The results present the adaptive n-values of roughness for river hydraulic model that can provide a better flow state for subsequent forecasting at significant locations and longitudinal profiles along rivers.

  12. Clustering-based hybrid inundation model for forecasting flood inundation depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Chiu; Shen, Hung-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fung; Huang, Jing-Yu; Lin, Yen-Tso

    2010-05-01

    SummaryEstimation of flood depths and extents may provide disaster information for dealing with contingency and alleviating risk and loss of life and property. We present a two-stage procedure underlying CHIM (clustering-based hybrid inundation model), which is composed of linear regression models and ANNs (artificial neural networks) to build the regional flood inundation forecasting model. The two-stage procedure mainly includes data preprocessing and model building stages. In the data preprocessing stage, K-means clustering is used to categorize the data points of the different flooding characteristics in the study area and to identify the control point(s) from individual flooding cluster(s). In the model building stage, three classes of flood depth forecasting models are built in each cluster: the back-propagation neural network (BPNN) for each control point, the linear regression models for the grids that have highly linear correlation with the control point, and a multi-grid BPNN for the grids that do not have highly linear correlation with the control point. The practicability and effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested in the Dacun Township, Changhua County in Central Taiwan. The results show that the proposed CHIM can continuously and adequately provide 1-h-ahead flood inundation maps that well match the simulation flood inundation results and very effectively reduce 99% CPU time.

  13. A Methodology for Forecasting Damage & Economic Consequences to Floods: Building on the National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tootle, G. A.; Gutenson, J. L.; Zhu, L.; Ernest, A. N. S.; Oubeidillah, A.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    The National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE) held June 3-July 17, 2015 at the National Water Center (NWC) in Tuscaloosa, Alabama sought to demonstrate an increase in flood predictive capacity for the coterminous United States (CONUS). Accordingly, NFIE-derived technologies and workflows offer the ability to forecast flood damage and economic consequence estimates that coincide with the hydrologic and hydraulic estimations these physics-based models generate. A model providing an accurate prediction of damage and economic consequences is a valuable asset when allocating funding for disaster response, recovery, and relief. Damage prediction and economic consequence assessment also offer an adaptation planning mechanism for defending particularly valuable or vulnerable structures. The NFIE, held at the NWC on The University of Alabama (UA) campus led to the development of this large scale flow and inundation forecasting framework. Currently, the system can produce 15-hour lead-time forecasts for the entire coterminous United States (CONUS). A concept which is anticipated to become operational as of May 2016 within the NWC. The processing of such a large-scale, fine resolution model is accomplished in a parallel computing environment using large supercomputing clusters. Traditionally, flood damage and economic consequence assessment is calculated in a desktop computing environment with a ménage of meteorology, hydrology, hydraulic, and damage assessment tools. In the United States, there are a range of these flood damage/ economic consequence assessment software's available to local, state, and federal emergency management agencies. Among the more commonly used and freely accessible models are the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Flood Damage Reduction Analysis (HEC-FDA), Flood Impact Assessment (HEC-FIA), and Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) United States Multi-Hazard (Hazus-MH). All of which exist only in a desktop environment. With this

  14. The Ensemble Framework for Flash Flood Forecasting: Global and CONUS Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamig, Z.; Vergara, H. J.; Clark, R. A.; Gourley, J. J.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Ensemble Framework for Flash Flood Forecasting (EF5) is a distributed hydrologic modeling framework combining water balance components such as the Variable Infiltration Curve (VIC) and Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) with kinematic wave channel routing. The Snow-17 snow pack model is included as an optional component in EF5 for basins where snow impacts are important. EF5 also contains the Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) parameter estimation scheme for model calibration. EF5 is made to be user friendly and as such training has been developed into a weeklong course. This course has been tested in modeling workshops held in Namibia and Mexico. EF5 has also been applied to specialized applications including the Flooded Locations and Simulated Hydrographs (FLASH) project. FLASH aims to provide flash flood monitoring and forecasting over the CONUS using Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor precipitation forcing. Using the extensive field measurements database from the 10,000 USGS measurement locations across the CONUS, parameters were developed for the kinematic wave routing in FLASH. This presentation will highlight FLASH performance over the CONUS on basins less than 1,000 km2 and discuss the development of simulated streamflow climatology over the CONUS for data mining applications. A global application of EF5 has also been developed using satellite based precipitation measurements combined with numerical weather prediction forecasts to produce flood and impact forecasts. The performance of this global system will be assessed and future plans detailed.

  15. Estimating the impact of satellite observations on large-scale river flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, Konstantinos; Schumann, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Floods are one of the costliest natural disasters, posing severe risks to human population. Hydraulic models are able to predict flood characteristics, such as water surface elevations and inundated area, and are being used for forecasting operationally although there are many uncertainties. In this work, the potential value of satellite observations to initialize these hydraulic models (and their forecasts correspondingly) is explored. The Ensemble Sensitivity method is adapted to evaluate the impact of potential satellite observations on the forecasting of flood characteristics. The estimation of the impact is based on the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, allowing for the forecast error reductions to be computed without additional model runs. The study area was located in the Ohio River basin, and the model used was the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model. The experimental design consisted of two configurations of the LISFLOOD-FP model. The first (baseline) simulation represents a calibrated 'best effort' model based on a sub-grid channel structure using observations for parameters and boundary conditions, whereas the second (background) simulation consists of estimated parameters and SRTM-based boundary conditions. Results showed that the forecast skill was improved for water heights up to lead times of 11 days, while even partial observations of the river contained information for the entire river's water surface profile and allowed forecasting 5 to 7 days ahead. On the other hand, discharge forecasts were not improved as much when assimilating water height observations although forecast errors were reduced. Finally, the potential for identifying errors in the model structure and parameterizations via the ensemble sensitivity method is discussed.

  16. Integration of Remote Sensing Data In Operational Flood Forecast In Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, H.; Appel, F.; Schulz, W.; Merkel, U.; Ludwig, R.; Mauser, W.

    Methods to accurately assess and forecast flood discharge are mandatory to minimise the impact of hydrological hazards. However, existing rainfall-runoff models rarely accurately consider the spatial characteristics of the watershed, which is essential for a suitable and physics-based description of processes relevant for runoff formation. Spatial information with low temporal variability like elevation, slopes and land use can be mapped or extracted from remote sensing data. However, land surface param- eters of high temporal variability, like soil moisture and snow properties are hardly available and used in operational forecasts. Remote sensing methods can improve flood forecast by providing information on the actual water retention capacities in the watershed and facilitate the regionalisation of hydrological models. To prove and demonstrate this, the project 'InFerno' (Integration of remote sensing data in opera- tional water balance and flood forecast modelling) has been set up, funded by DLR (50EE0053). Within InFerno remote sensing data (optical and microwave) are thor- oughly processed to deliver spatially distributed parameters of snow properties and soil moisture. Especially during the onset of a flood this information is essential to estimate the initial conditions of the model. At the flood forecast centres of 'Baden- Württemberg' and 'Rheinland-Pfalz' (Southwest Germany) the remote sensing based maps on soil moisture and snow properties will be integrated in the continuously op- erated water balance and flood forecast model LARSIM. The concept is to transfer the developed methodology from the Neckar to the Mosel basin. The major challenges lie on the one hand in the implementation of algorithms developed for a multisensoral synergy and the creation of robust, operationally applicable remote sensing products. On the other hand, the operational flood forecast must be adapted to make full use of the new data sources. In the operational phase of the

  17. Extending flood forecasting lead time in a large watershed by coupling WRF QPF with a distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Chen, Yangbo; Wang, Huanyu; Qin, Jianming; Li, Jie; Chiao, Sen

    2017-03-01

    Long lead time flood forecasting is very important for large watershed flood mitigation as it provides more time for flood warning and emergency responses. The latest numerical weather forecast model could provide 1-15-day quantitative precipitation forecasting products in grid format, and by coupling this product with a distributed hydrological model could produce long lead time watershed flood forecasting products. This paper studied the feasibility of coupling the Liuxihe model with the Weather Research and Forecasting quantitative precipitation forecast (WRF QPF) for large watershed flood forecasting in southern China. The QPF of WRF products has three lead times, including 24, 48 and 72 h, with the grid resolution being 20 km  × 20 km. The Liuxihe model is set up with freely downloaded terrain property; the model parameters were previously optimized with rain gauge observed precipitation, and re-optimized with the WRF QPF. Results show that the WRF QPF has bias with the rain gauge precipitation, and a post-processing method is proposed to post-process the WRF QPF products, which improves the flood forecasting capability. With model parameter re-optimization, the model's performance improves also. This suggests that the model parameters be optimized with QPF, not the rain gauge precipitation. With the increasing of lead time, the accuracy of the WRF QPF decreases, as does the flood forecasting capability. Flood forecasting products produced by coupling the Liuxihe model with the WRF QPF provide a good reference for large watershed flood warning due to its long lead time and rational results.

  18. Impact of Different Data Assimilation Strategies for SMOS Observations on Flood Forecasting Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, V. R. N.; Verhoest, N.; Lievens, H.; Martens, B.; van Den Berg, M. J.; Al-Bitar, A.; Merlin, O.; Kumar Tomer, S.; Cabot, F.; Kerr, Y. H.; Pan, M.; Wood, E. F.; Drusch, M.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Vereecken, H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Dumedah, G.; Walker, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, significant efforts have been directed towards establishing and improving flood forecasting systems for large river basins. Examples include the European Flood Alert System, and the Bureau of Meteorology Flood Warning Systems in Australia. A number of attempts have also been made to increase the accuracy of the forecasted flood volumes from these systems. One attractive way in which this can be achieved is to use remotely sensed surface soil moisture contents to constrain the hydrologic model predictions. Satellite missions such as SMOS can provide very useful information on the wetness conditions of these basins, which in many cases is an important initial condition for discharge generation. Assimilation of these satellite data is thus a logical way to proceed. We will present results from two different assimilation strategies for the Murray-Darling basin in Australia using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. Firstly, the SMOS soil moisture data are assimilated into the hydrologic model at their original spatial resolution. As the spatial resolution of the remote sensing data (25 km) is coarser than the spatial resolution of the model (10 km), a multiscale data assimilation algorithm needs to be implemented. Secondly, the SMOS data are downscaled to the model resolution, prior to their assimilation. In this presentation, the impact of the assimilation of both products on the accuracy of the forecasted flood volumes is assessed.

  19. Real-time cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quercellini, Claudia; Amendola, Luca; Balbi, Amedeo; Cabella, Paolo; Quartin, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, improved astrometric and spectroscopic techniques have opened the possibility of measuring the temporal change of radial and transverse position of sources in the sky over relatively short time intervals. This has made at least conceivable to establish a novel research domain, which we dub “real-time cosmology”. We review for the first time most of the work already done in this field, analysing the theoretical framework as well as some foreseeable observational strategies and their capability to constrain models. We first focus on real-time measurements of the overall redshift drift and angular separation shift in distant sources, which allows the observer to trace the background cosmic expansion and large scale anisotropy, respectively. We then examine the possibility of employing the same kind of observations to probe peculiar and proper accelerations in clustered systems, and therefore their gravitational potential. The last two sections are devoted to the future change of the cosmic microwave background on “short” time scales, as well as to the temporal shift of the temperature anisotropy power spectrum and maps. We conclude revisiting in this context the usefulness of upcoming experiments (like CODEX and Gaia) for real-time observations.

  20. Climate forecasts in disaster management: Red Cross flood operations in West Africa, 2008.

    PubMed

    Braman, Lisette Martine; van Aalst, Maarten Krispijn; Mason, Simon J; Suarez, Pablo; Ait-Chellouche, Youcef; Tall, Arame

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) used a seasonal forecast for West Africa for the first time to implement an Early Warning, Early Action strategy for enhanced flood preparedness and response. Interviews with disaster managers suggest that this approach improved their capacity and response. Relief supplies reached flood victims within days, as opposed to weeks in previous years, thereby preventing further loss of life, illness, and setbacks to livelihoods, as well as augmenting the efficiency of resource use. This case demonstrates the potential benefits to be realised from the use of medium-to-long-range forecasts in disaster management, especially in the context of potential increases in extreme weather and climate-related events due to climate variability and change. However, harnessing the full potential of these forecasts will require continued effort and collaboration among disaster managers, climate service providers, and major humanitarian donors.

  1. Enhancing the quality of hydrologic model calibrations and their transfer to operational flood forecasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggett, Graeme; Spies, Ryan; Szfranski, Bill; Hahn, Claudia; Weil, Page

    2016-04-01

    An adequate forecasting model may not perform well if it is inadequately calibrated. Model calibration is often constrained by the lack of adequate calibration data, especially for small river basins with high spatial rainfall variability. Rainfall/snow station networks may not be dense enough to accurately estimate the catchment rainfall/SWE. High discharges during flood events are subject to significant error due to flow gauging difficulty. Dynamic changes in catchment conditions (e.g., urbanization; losses in karstic systems) invariably introduce non-homogeneity in the water level and flow data. This presentation will highlight some of the challenges in reliable calibration of National Weather Service (i.e. US) operational flood forecast models, emphasizing the various challenges in different physiographic/climatic domains. It will also highlight the benefit of using various data visualization techniques to transfer information about model calibration to operational forecasters so they may understand the influence of the calibration on model performance under various conditions.

  2. Improvement of operational flood forecasting through the assimilation of satellite observations and multiple river flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Fabio; Ercolani, Giulia

    2016-05-01

    Data assimilation has the potential to improve flood forecasting. However, it is rarely employed in distributed hydrologic models for operational predictions. In this study, we present variational assimilation of river flow data at multiple locations and of land surface temperature (LST) from satellite in a distributed hydrologic model that is part of the operational forecasting chain for the Arno river, in central Italy. LST is used to estimate initial condition of soil moisture through a coupled surface energy/water balance scheme. We present here several hindcast experiments to assess the performances of the assimilation system. The results show that assimilation can significantly improve flood forecasting, although in the limit of data error and model structure.

  3. Potentialities of ensemble strategies for flood forecasting over the Milano urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravazzani, Giovanni; Amengual, Arnau; Ceppi, Alessandro; Homar, Víctor; Romero, Romu; Lombardi, Gabriele; Mancini, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of ensemble forecasting strategies, which can provide a tangible backing for flood early warning procedures and mitigation measures over the Mediterranean region, is one of the fundamental motivations of the international HyMeX programme. Here, we examine two severe hydrometeorological episodes that affected the Milano urban area and for which the complex flood protection system of the city did not completely succeed. Indeed, flood damage have exponentially increased during the last 60 years, due to industrial and urban developments. Thus, the improvement of the Milano flood control system needs a synergism between structural and non-structural approaches. First, we examine how land-use changes due to urban development have altered the hydrological response to intense rainfalls. Second, we test a flood forecasting system which comprises the Flash-flood Event-based Spatially distributed rainfall-runoff Transformation, including Water Balance (FEST-WB) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. Accurate forecasts of deep moist convection and extreme precipitation are difficult to be predicted due to uncertainties arising from the numeric weather prediction (NWP) physical parameterizations and high sensitivity to misrepresentation of the atmospheric state; however, two hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) have been designed to explicitly cope with uncertainties in the initial and lateral boundary conditions (IC/LBCs) and physical parameterizations of the NWP model. No substantial differences in skill have been found between both ensemble strategies when considering an enhanced diversity of IC/LBCs for the perturbed initial conditions ensemble. Furthermore, no additional benefits have been found by considering more frequent LBCs in a mixed physics ensemble, as ensemble spread seems to be reduced. These findings could help to design the most appropriate ensemble strategies before these hydrometeorological extremes, given the computational

  4. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  5. Flood monitoring for ungauged rivers: the power of combining space-based monitoring and global forecasting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Netgeka, Victor; Raynaud, Damien; Thielen, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Flood warning systems typically rely on forecasts from national meteorological services and in-situ observations from hydrological gauging stations. This capacity is not equally developed in flood-prone developing countries. Low-cost satellite monitoring systems and global flood forecasting systems can be an alternative source of information for national flood authorities. The Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) has been develop jointly with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the Joint Research Centre, and it is running quasi operational now since June 2011. The system couples state-of-the art weather forecasts with a hydrological model driven at a continental scale. The system provides downstream countries with information on upstream river conditions as well as continental and global overviews. In its test phase, this global forecast system provides probabilities for large transnational river flooding at the global scale up to 30 days in advance. It has shown its real-life potential for the first time during the flood in Southeast Asia in 2011, and more recently during the floods in Australia in March 2012, India (Assam, September-October 2012) and Chad Floods (August-October 2012).The Joint Research Centre is working on further research and development, rigorous testing and adaptations of the system to create an operational tool for decision makers, including national and regional water authorities, water resource managers, hydropower companies, civil protection and first line responders, and international humanitarian aid organizations. Currently efforts are being made to link GloFAS to the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS). GFDS is a Space-based river gauging and flood monitoring system using passive microwave remote sensing which was developed by a collaboration between the JRC and Dartmouth Flood Observatory. GFDS provides flood alerts based on daily water surface change measurements from space. Alerts are shown on a

  6. Parcel-scale urban coastal flood mapping: Leveraging the multi-scale CoSMoS model for coastal flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallien, T.; Barnard, P. L.; Sanders, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    California coastal sea levels are projected to rise 1-1.4 meters in the next century and evidence suggests mean tidal range, and consequently, mean high water (MHW) is increasing along portions of Southern California Bight. Furthermore, emerging research indicates wind stress patterns associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) have suppressed sea level rise rates along the West Coast since 1980, and a reversal in this pattern would result in the resumption of regional sea level rise rates equivalent to or exceeding global mean sea level rise rates, thereby enhancing coastal flooding. Newport Beach is a highly developed, densely populated lowland along the Southern California coast currently subject to episodic flooding from coincident high tides and waves, and the frequency and intensity of flooding is expected to increase with projected future sea levels. Adaptation to elevated sea levels will require flood mapping and forecasting tools that are sensitive to the dominant factors affecting flooding including extreme high tides, waves and flood control infrastructure. Considerable effort has been focused on the development of nowcast and forecast systems including Scripps Institute of Oceanography's Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) and the USGS Multi-hazard model, the Southern California Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS). However, fine scale local embayment dynamics and overtopping flows are needed to map unsteady flooding effects in coastal lowlands protected by dunes, levees and seawalls. Here, a recently developed two dimensional Godunov non-linear shallow water solver is coupled to water level and wave forecasts from the CoSMoS model to investigate the roles of tides, waves, sea level changes and flood control infrastructure in accurate flood mapping and forecasting. The results of this study highlight the important roles of topographic data, embayment hydrodynamics, water level uncertainties and critical flood processes required for

  7. Interpolation of observed rainfall fields for flood forecasting in data poor areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogelis Prada, M. C.; Werner, M. G. F.

    2010-09-01

    Observed rainfall fields constitute a crucial input for operational flood forecasting, providing boundary conditions to hydrological models for prediction of flows and levels in relevant forecast points. Such observed fields are derived through interpolation from available observed data from rain gauges. The reliability of the derived rainfall field depends on the density of the gauge network within the basin, as well as on the variability of the rainfall itself, and the interpolation method. In this paper interpolation methods to estimate rainfall fields under data- poor environments are researched, with the derived rainfall fields being used in operational flood warnings. Methods are applied in a small catchment in Bogotá, Colombia. This catchment has a complex climatology, which is strongly influenced by the inter-tropical convergence zone and orographic enhancement. As is common in such catchments in developing countries, the rainfall gauging network is sparse, while the need for reliable rainfall in flood forecasting is high. The extensive high flood risk zones in the lower areas of the catchment, where urbanization processes are characterized by unplanned occupation of areas close to rivers, is common in developing countries. Results show the sensitivity of interpolated rainfall fields to the interpolation methods chosen, and the importance of the use of indicator variables for improving the spatial distribution of interpolated rainfall. The value of these methods in establishing optimal new gauging sites for augmenting the sparse gauge network is demonstrated.

  8. Uncertainty in flood forecasting: A distributed modeling approach in a sparse data catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Pablo A.; McPhee, James; Vargas, Ximena

    2012-09-01

    Data scarcity has traditionally precluded the application of advanced hydrologic techniques in developing countries. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a flood forecasting scheme in a sparsely monitored catchment based on distributed hydrologic modeling, discharge assimilation, and numerical weather predictions with explicit validation uncertainty analysis. For the hydrologic component of our framework, we apply TopNet to the Cautin River basin, located in southern Chile, using a fully distributed a priori parameterization based on both literature-suggested values and data gathered during field campaigns. Results obtained from this step indicate that the incremental effort spent in measuring directly a set of model parameters was insufficient to represent adequately the most relevant hydrologic processes related to spatiotemporal runoff patterns. Subsequent uncertainty validation performed over a six month ensemble simulation shows that streamflow uncertainty is better represented during flood events, due to both the increase of state perturbation introduced by rainfall and the flood-oriented calibration strategy adopted here. Results from different assimilation configurations suggest that the upper part of the basin is the major source of uncertainty in hydrologic process representation and hint at the usefulness of interpreting assimilation results in terms of model input and parameterization inadequacy. Furthermore, in this case study the violation of Markovian state properties by the Ensemble Kalman filter did affect the numerical results, showing that an explicit treatment of the time delay between the generation of surface runoff and the arrival at the basin outlet is required in the assimilation scheme. Peak flow forecasting results demonstrate that there is a major problem with the Weather Research and Forecasting model outputs, which systematically overestimate precipitation over the catchment. A final analysis performed for a large flooding

  9. Development of an Operational Typhoon Swell Forecasting and Coastal Flooding Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y. M.; Wu, L. C.; Doong, D. J.; Kao, C. C.; Wang, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    Coastal floods and typhoon swells are a consistent threat to oceanfront countries, causing major human suffering and substantial economic losses, such as wrecks, ship capsized, and marine construction failure, etc. Climate change is exacerbating the problem. An early warning system is essential to mitigate the loss of life and property from coastal flooding and typhoon swells. The purpose of this study is to develop a typhoon swell forecasting and coastal flooding early warning system by integrating existing sea-state monitoring technology, numerical ocean forecasting models, historical database and experiences, as well as computer science. The proposed system has capability offering data for the past, information for the present, and for the future. The system was developed for Taiwanese coast due to its frequent threat by typhoons. An operational system without any manual work is the basic requirement of the system. Integration of various data source is the system kernel. Numerical ocean models play the important role within the system because they provide data for assessment of possible typhoon swell and flooding. The system includes regional wave model (SWAN) which nested with the large domain wave model (NWW III), is operationally set up for coastal waves forecasting, especially typhoon swell forecasting before typhoon coming, and the storm surge predicted by a POM model. Data assimilation technology is incorporated for enhanced accuracy. A warning signal is presented when the storm water level that accumulated from astronomical tide, storm surge, and wave-induced run-up exceeds the alarm sea level. This warning system has been in practical use for coastal flooding damage mitigation in Taiwan for years. Example of the system operation during Typhoon Haitung struck Taiwan in 2005 is illustrated in this study.

  10. Remodeling and Flood Forecasting due to Climate Change and Land Used:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Munira; Bárdossy, András.

    2010-05-01

    This study is to review the impact of climate change and land used on flooding through the SMART Project. It also simulate the Flood Forecasting in Klang River Basin in order to compare the changes in the existing river system in Klang River Basin with the Storm water Management and Road Tunnel (SMART) which is now already operating in the city center of Kuala Lumpur.The catchment area of the Klang River basin is 1,288 square kilometers (km2), and it is the most urbanized region in Malaysia, encompassing the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur and part of the state of Selangor. The basin spreads over nine local government authorities and faces serious environmental degradation and flooding problems from urbanization, industrialization, and population growth. More than half of the basin has been urbanized, and much of this continuing urban development has taken place on land that is prone to flooding. Flooding problem in Klang River Basin is still exist even measures and numerous flood mitigation projects and programs has been carried out by many parties. Even though that the new drainage guideline has been proposed since year 2000, flood reduction for Klang River basins is not successful enough. This problem contributed to the needs of this research to enhance the existing flood forecasting and mitigation project. This study analyzed and quantified the spatial patterns and time-variability of daily, monthly and yearly rainfall in Kuala Lumpur. An overview of rainfall patterns will be obtained through the analysis of 12 point data sources. Statistical properties of annual, monthly, and daily rainfall were derived. Spatial correlation fields for the annual and monthly rainfalls were studied.

  11. Long-Lead Quantitative Flood Forecasts in Ungauged Basins Using Bayesian Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Yoo, J.

    2004-05-01

    Previously, Kim and Barros (2001) demonstrated the use of a hierarchy of neural network models to forecast flood peaks in four small and medium size ungauged basins (750 to about 9,000 km-sq) in the Northern Appalachian Mountains in Pennsylvania. Using regional rainfall, radiosonde and mesoscale infrared (IR) satellite imagery, their approach consisted of identifying the presence and type of convective activity from the IR imagery, information which was subsequently used to characterize the dominant synoptic scale weather patters and predict storm path and evolution using rainfall and radiosonde data far away from the forecast location. In this regard, the organizational skeleton of the inputs is built to mimic our understanding of physical processes associated with rainstorms. The approach was very successful with skill scores on the order of 80-90 per cent for 18-hour lead-time forecasts of winter and spring floods in response to heavy rainfall (i.e. not associated with snowmelt alone). One weakness of this work was however the lack of a measure of forecast uncertainty, or alternatively a measure of forecast reliability that could be used in hydrometeorological operations. To address this question, we have modified and adapted the existing neural network models according to the principles of Bayesian statistics. In this context, forecasts are issued along with an error bar and are associated with a known probability distribution. One additional advantage of this methodology is that it provides an objective basis for selecting the best model during learning based on the posterior distribution of the parameters. In this context, forecasts are issued along with an error bar and are associated with a known probability distribution. An intercomparison study against Kim and Barros (2001) shows that the 18- and 24-hour lead time BNN forecasts are statistically more robust than those generated by the standard backward-learning NNs. We submit that given the consistently

  12. Development of a model-based flood emergency management system in Yujiang River Basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yong; Cai, Yanpeng; Jia, Peng; Mao, Jiansu

    2014-06-01

    Flooding is the most frequent disaster in China. It affects people's lives and properties, causing considerable economic loss. Flood forecast and operation of reservoirs are important in flood emergency management. Although great progress has been achieved in flood forecast and reservoir operation through using computer, network technology, and geographic information system technology in China, the prediction accuracy of models are not satisfactory due to the unavailability of real-time monitoring data. Also, real-time flood control scenario analysis is not effective in many regions and can seldom provide online decision support function. In this research, a decision support system for real-time flood forecasting in Yujiang River Basin, South China (DSS-YRB) is introduced in this paper. This system is based on hydrological and hydraulic mathematical models. The conceptual framework and detailed components of the proposed DSS-YRB is illustrated, which employs real-time rainfall data conversion, model-driven hydrologic forecasting, model calibration, data assimilation methods, and reservoir operational scenario analysis. Multi-tiered architecture offers great flexibility, portability, reusability, and reliability. The applied case study results show the development and application of a decision support system for real-time flood forecasting and operation is beneficial for flood control.

  13. Flood early warning along the East Coast of Scotland and the Storm of December 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranston, Michael; Hu, Keming

    2013-04-01

    Flood warning is at the heart of improved approaches to flood risk management in Scotland. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) is committed to reducing the impact of coastal flooding through the provision of reliable and timely flood warnings. They have specifically set out a programme of enhancing coastal flood forecasting through modelling and improved understanding of coastal flooding processes and improved approaches to wind and wave forecasting in coastal and tidal waters. In 2011, SEPA commissioned a project to develop a flood forecasting and warning system for the Firths of Forth and Tay along Scotland's North East coast. The new approach to flood forecasting has just been implemented into the Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) (Cranston and Tavendale, 2012) to contribute to the real-time flood forecasting and warning service from November 2012. The new system enables the prediction of coastal and tidal flooding and allows SEPA to warn people about potential flooding, using the latest advances in coastal modelling. The approach to the forecasting system includes: the transformation of tidal surge forecasts from Leith to 28 flood warning sites along the coast and inside the Firths of Forth and Tay; the transformation of offshore wave forecasts to inshore locations including the Firths of Forth and Tay; and the transformation of inshore wave forecasts to mean wave overtopping forecasts at six key communities at risk. In December 2012, some communities along the east coast of Scotland experienced their most severe storm damage since the Great 1953 Storm. This paper will discuss how the flood forecasting system was developed and how the system was utilised in real time during the recent storm. References Cranston, M. D. and Tavendale, A. C. W. (2012) Advances in operational flood forecasting in Scotland. Proceedings of the ICE - Water Management, 165, 2, 79-87.

  14. Real-Time Assimilation of Goes-Derived Products into A Mesoscale Model and It's Impact on Short-Term (06-36hr) Forecasts from 17 October 1998 through the Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; Jedlovec, Gary; McNider, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    As the parameterizations of surface energy budgets in regional models have become more complete physically, models have the potential to be much more realistic in simulations of coupling between surface radiation, hydrology, and surface energy transfer. Realizing the importance of properly specifying the surface energy budget, many institutions are using land-surface models to represent the lower boundary forcing associated with biophysical processes and soil hydrology. However, the added degrees of freedom due to inclusion of such land-surface schemes require the specification of additional parameters within the model system such as vegetative resistances, green vegetation fraction, leaf area index, soil physical and hydraulic characteristics, stream flow, runoff, and the vertical distribution of soil moisture. Spatial heterogeneity of these parameters makes correct specification problematic since measurements are not routinely available. A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-IR skin temperature tendencies, solar insolation, and surface albedo into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. The technique has been successfully employed in a number of mesoscale models in case-study mode. We have taken the next step and developed a study to determine if assimilating these types of data into mesoscale models in real-time can improve short-term (648h) forecasts of temperature, relative humidity, and QPF on a daily basis over relatively large regions. Therefore, an operational modeling/assimilation system has been developed at the GHCC during the past summer that allows us to produce simulations out to 48 hours in a timely manor. The PSU/NCAR MM5 is used in a nested configuration with a 25 km grid covering the southeastern third of the US. The model has been on-line since 1 July 1998 and forecast products are posted on our web site. The satellite

  15. Bias correction of satellite precipitation products for flood forecasting application at the Upper Mahanadi River Basin in Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beria, H.; Nanda, T., Sr.; Chatterjee, C.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite precipitation products such as Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), etc., offer a promising alternative to flood forecasting in data scarce regions. At the current state-of-art, these products cannot be used in the raw form for flood forecasting, even at smaller lead times. In the current study, these precipitation products are bias corrected using statistical techniques, such as additive and multiplicative bias corrections, and wavelet multi-resolution analysis (MRA) with India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded precipitation product,obtained from gauge-based rainfall estimates. Neural network based rainfall-runoff modeling using these bias corrected products provide encouraging results for flood forecasting upto 48 hours lead time. We will present various statistical and graphical interpretations of catchment response to high rainfall events using both the raw and bias corrected precipitation products at different lead times.

  16. Development of Flood Forecasting Using Statistical Method in Four River Basins in Terengganu, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, M. S. F. M.; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Husni, M. M. M.; Jaafar, A. S.; Kamaluddin, M. H.; Majid, W. H. A. W. A.; Mohammad, A. H.; Osman, S.

    2016-03-01

    One of the critical regions in Malaysia is Terengganu which is located at east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. In Terengganu, flood is experienced regularly because of attributed topography and climate including northeast monsoon. Moreover, rainfall is with high intensity during the November to February in Terengganu as forcing factor to produce of flood. In this study, main objectives are water stage forecasting and deriving the related equations based on least squared method. For this study, it is used two methods which called inclusion of residual (Method A) and non-inclusion residual (Method B) respectively. Result depicts that Method B outperformed to forecast the water stage at selected case studies (Besut, Dungun, Kemaman, Terengganu).

  17. Potential application of wavelet neural network ensemble to forecast streamflow for flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiviswanathan, K. S.; He, Jianxun; Sudheer, K. P.; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2016-05-01

    Streamflow forecasting, especially the long lead-time forecasting, is still a very challenging task in hydrologic modeling. This could be due to the fact that the forecast accuracy measured in terms of both the amplitude and phase or temporal errors and the forecast precision/reliability quantified in terms of the uncertainty significantly deteriorate with the increase of the lead-time. In the model performance evaluation, the conventional error metrics, which primarily quantify the amplitude error and do not explicitly account for the phase error, have been commonly adopted. For the long lead-time forecasting, the wavelet based neural network (WNN) among a variety of advanced soft computing methods has been shown to be promising in the literature. This paper presented and compared WNN and artificial neural network (ANN), both of which were combined with the ensemble method using block bootstrap sampling (BB), in terms of the forecast accuracy and precision at various lead-times on the Bow River, Alberta, Canada. Apart from conventional model performance metrics, a new index, called percent volumetric error, was proposed, especially for quantifying the phase error. The uncertainty metrics including percentage of coverage and average width were used to evaluate the precision of the modeling approaches. The results obtained demonstrate that the WNN-BB consistently outperforms the ANN-BB in both the categories of the forecast accuracy and precision, especially in the long lead-time forecasting. The findings strongly suggest that the WNN-BB is a robust modeling approach for streamflow forecasting and thus would aid in flood management.

  18. Simulating and Forecasting Flooding Events in the City of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghostine, Rabih; Viswanadhapalli, Yesubabu; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-05-01

    Metropolitan cities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, as Jeddah and Riyadh, are more frequently experiencing flooding events caused by strong convective storms that produce intense precipitation over a short span of time. The flooding in the city of Jeddah in November 2009 was described by civil defense officials as the worst in 27 years. As of January 2010, 150 people were reported killed and more than 350 were missing. Another flooding event, less damaging but comparably spectacular, occurred one year later (Jan 2011) in Jeddah. Anticipating floods before they occur could minimize human and economic losses through the implementation of appropriate protection, provision and rescue plans. We have developed a coupled hydro-meteorological model for simulating and predicting flooding events in the city of Jeddah. We use the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model assimilating all available data in the Jeddah region for simulating the storm events in Jeddah. The resulting rain is then used on 10 minutes intervals to feed up an advanced numerical shallow water model that has been discretized on an unstructured grid using different numerical schemes based on the finite elements or finite volume techniques. The model was integrated on a high-resolution grid size varying between 0.5m within the streets of Jeddah and 500m outside the city. This contribution will present the flooding simulation system and the simulation results, focusing on the comparison of the different numerical schemes on the system performances in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  19. Real time polarimetric dehazing.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Jason; Virgen, Miguel

    2013-03-20

    Remote sensing is a rich topic due to its utility in gathering detailed accurate information from locations that are not economically feasible traveling destinations or are physically inaccessible. However, poor visibility over long path lengths is problematic for a variety of reasons. Haze induced by light scatter is one cause for poor visibility and is the focus of this article. Image haze comes about as a result of light scattering off particles and into the imaging path causing a haziness to appear on the image. Image processing using polarimetric information of light scatter can be used to mitigate image haze. An imaging polarimeter which provides the Stokes values in real time combined with a "dehazing" algorithm can automate image haze removal for instant applications. Example uses are to improve visual display providing on-the-spot detection or imbedding in an active control loop to improve viewing and tracking while on a moving platform. In addition, removing haze in this manner allows the trade space for a system operational waveband to be opened up to bands which are object matched and not necessarily restricted by scatter effects.

  20. Application of tank, NAM, ARMA and neural network models to flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingsanchali, Tawatchai; Gautam, Mahesh Raj

    2000-10-01

    Two lumped conceptual hydrological models, namely tank and NAM and a neural network model are applied to flood forecasting in two river basins in Thailand, the Wichianburi on the Pasak River and the Tha Wang Pha on the Nan River using the flood forecasting procedure developed in this study. The tank and NAM models were calibrated and verified and found to give similar results. The results were found to improve significantly by coupling stochastic and deterministic models (tank and NAM) for updating forecast output. The neural network (NN) model was compared with the tank and NAM models. The NN model does not require knowledge of catchment characteristics and internal hydrological processes. The training process or calibration is relatively simple and less time consuming compared with the extensive calibration effort required by the tank and NAM models. The NN model gives good forecasts based on available rainfall, evaporation and runoff data. The black-box nature of the NN model and the need for selecting parameters based on trial and error or rule-of-thumb, however, characterizes its inherent weakness. The performance of the three models was evaluated statistically.

  1. First steps in incorporating data-driven modelling to flood early warning in Norway's Flood Forecasting Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Péter; Hamududu, Byman; Wong Kwok, Wai; Magnusson, Jan; Shi, Min

    2016-04-01

    The national Flood Early Warning Services (FEWS) in Norway use time-series of precipitation and temperature data as input to conceptual physically based rainfall-runoff models for forecasts. Runoff is forecasted in selected catchments and the warnings are based on regionalization of these. This concept proved useful in many catchments, however there are some exceptions, where forecasts are of worse quality. To improve this, data-driven modelling (DDM) techniques are sought applied. The first objective of the study is to identify those DDM methods, which are feasible for application and can easily be fit in the present, well-developed procedures of the operational FEWS. Therefore an experiment is conducted, where about thirty years of daily accumulated precipitation and daily mean temperature as input and observed runoff as output data are used. This was repeated from five, regionally and physically different catchments. In each case different DDMs were developed and their simulation results compared to those generated by the operational (conceptual based) models and to the observations. The methods of Artificial Neural Networks, Genetic Programming, Evolutionary Polynomial Regression and Support Vector Machines were used in the experiment. Various combinations of the last, the last two and the last three timesteps (in this case: days) of the data was tested as possible inputs. Forecast quality was described by Absolute Accumulated Error, Root Mean Square Error, Nash-Sutcliff Efficiency, the Ideal Point Error (combination of the previous) as well as by Taylor-diagrams. The first comparisons show promising results, which need to be further examined. The follow-up study will first focus on standardizing and automating the tests on forecast quality to be able to perform the studies on a larger number of datasets, as well as for other forecast periods. We expect the DDM to perform better in cases where conceptual models don't perform well. In these cases the quality

  2. Assimilation of multiple river flow data for enhanced operational flood forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolani, Giulia; Castelli, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) is widely recognized as a powerful tool to improve flood forecasts, and the need for an effective transition of research advances into operational forecasting systems has been increasingly claimed in recent years. Nevertheless, the majority of studies investigates DA capabilities through synthetic experiments, while applications conducted from an operational perspective are rare. In this work we present variational assimilation of discharge data at multiple locations in a distributed hydrologic model (Mobidic) that is part of the operational forecasting chain for the Arno river, in central Italy.The variational approach needs the derivation of an adjoint model, that is challenging for hydrologic models, but it requires less restrictive hypothesis than Kalman and Monte Carlo filters and smoothers. The developed assimilation system adjusts on a distributed basis initial condition of discharge, initial condition of soil moisture and a parameter representing the frequency of no-rainfall in a time step. The correction evaluated at discharge measurement stations spreads upstream thanks to the coupling between equations of flow channel routing, that results into the coupling between equations of the adjoint model. Sequential assimilations are realized on windows of 6 hours. We extensively examine the performances of the DA system through several hindcast experiments that mimic operational conditions. The case studies include both flood events and false alarms that occurred in the period 2009-2010 in the Arno river basin (about 8230 km2).The hydrologic model is run with the spatial and temporal resolutions that are employed operationally, i.e. 500 m and 15 minutes.The enhancement in discharge forecasts is evaluated through classical performance indexes as error on peak flow and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, with strong emphasis on the dependence on lead time. In addition, uncertainty of the estimations is assessed using the Hessian of the cost function

  3. The total probabilities from high-resolution ensemble forecasting of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olav Skøien, Jon; Bogner, Konrad; Salamon, Peter; Smith, Paul; Pappenberger, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble forecasting has for a long time been used in meteorological modelling, to give an indication of the uncertainty of the forecasts. As meteorological ensemble forecasts often show some bias and dispersion errors, there is a need for calibration and post-processing of the ensembles. Typical methods for this are Bayesian Model Averaging (Raftery et al., 2005) and Ensemble Model Output Statistics (EMOS) (Gneiting et al., 2005). There are also methods for regionalizing these methods (Berrocal et al., 2007) and for incorporating the correlation between lead times (Hemri et al., 2013). To make optimal predictions of floods along the stream network in hydrology, we can easily use the ensemble members as input to the hydrological models. However, some of the post-processing methods will need modifications when regionalizing the forecasts outside the calibration locations, as done by Hemri et al. (2013). We present a method for spatial regionalization of the post-processed forecasts based on EMOS and top-kriging (Skøien et al., 2006). We will also look into different methods for handling the non-normality of runoff and the effect on forecasts skills in general and for floods in particular. Berrocal, V. J., Raftery, A. E. and Gneiting, T.: Combining Spatial Statistical and Ensemble Information in Probabilistic Weather Forecasts, Mon. Weather Rev., 135(4), 1386-1402, doi:10.1175/MWR3341.1, 2007. Gneiting, T., Raftery, A. E., Westveld, A. H. and Goldman, T.: Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting Using Ensemble Model Output Statistics and Minimum CRPS Estimation, Mon. Weather Rev., 133(5), 1098-1118, doi:10.1175/MWR2904.1, 2005. Hemri, S., Fundel, F. and Zappa, M.: Simultaneous calibration of ensemble river flow predictions over an entire range of lead times, Water Resour. Res., 49(10), 6744-6755, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20542, 2013. Raftery, A. E., Gneiting, T., Balabdaoui, F. and Polakowski, M.: Using Bayesian Model Averaging to Calibrate Forecast Ensembles, Mon. Weather Rev

  4. Willingness-to-pay for a probabilistic flood forecast: a risk-based decision-making game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Louise; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Cloke, Hannah Louise; Stephens, Elisabeth; Wetterhall, Fredrik; van Andel, Schalk Jan; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Probabilistic hydro-meteorological forecasts have over the last decades been used more frequently to communicate forecast uncertainty. This uncertainty is twofold, as it constitutes both an added value and a challenge for the forecaster and the user of the forecasts. Many authors have demonstrated the added (economic) value of probabilistic over deterministic forecasts across the water sector (e.g. flood protection, hydroelectric power management and navigation). However, the richness of the information is also a source of challenges for operational uses, due partially to the difficulty in transforming the probability of occurrence of an event into a binary decision. This paper presents the results of a risk-based decision-making game on the topic of flood protection mitigation, called "How much are you prepared to pay for a forecast?". The game was played at several workshops in 2015, which were attended by operational forecasters and academics working in the field of hydro-meteorology. The aim of this game was to better understand the role of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making processes and their perceived value by decision-makers. Based on the participants' willingness-to-pay for a forecast, the results of the game show that the value (or the usefulness) of a forecast depends on several factors, including the way users perceive the quality of their forecasts and link it to the perception of their own performances as decision-makers.

  5. A Web-based Data Intensive Visualization of Real-time River Drainage Network Response to Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-04-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to and visualization of flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, and other flood-related data for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS streams rainfall data from NEXRAD radar, and provides three interfaces including animation for rainfall intensity, daily rainfall totals and rainfall accumulations for past 14 days for Iowa. A real-time interactive visualization interface is developed using past rainfall intensity data. The interface creates community-based rainfall products on-demand using watershed boundaries of each community as a mask. Each individual rainfall pixel is tracked in the interface along the drainage network, and the ones drains to same pixel location are accumulated. The interface loads recent rainfall data in five minute intervals that are combined with current values. Latest web technologies are utilized for the development of the interface including HTML 5 Canvas, and JavaScript. The performance of the interface is optimized to run smoothly on modern web browsers. The interface controls allow users to change internal parameters of the system, and operation conditions of the animation. The interface will help communities understand the effects of rainfall on water transport in stream and river networks and make better-informed decisions regarding the threat of floods. This presentation provides an overview of a unique visualization interface and discusses future plans for real-time dynamic presentations of streamflow forecasting.

  6. Semi-distributed flood forecasting system for the Middle Vistula reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, Renata; Karamuz, Emilia; Osuch, Marzena

    2014-05-01

    project "Stochastic flood forecasting system (The River Vistula reach from Zawichost to Warsaw)" carried by the Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences on the order of the National Science Centre (contract No. 2011/01/B/ST10/06866). The water level data were provided by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW), Poland.

  7. Pre- and post-processing of hydro-meteorological ensembles for the Norwegian flood forecasting system in 145 basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr Hegdahl, Trine; Steinsland, Ingelin; Merete Tallaksen, Lena; Engeland, Kolbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Probabilistic flood forecasting has an added value for decision making. The Norwegian flood forecasting service is based on a flood forecasting model that run for 145 basins. Covering all of Norway the basins differ in both size and hydrological regime. Currently the flood forecasting is based on deterministic meteorological forecasts, and an auto-regressive procedure is used to achieve probabilistic forecasts. An alternative approach is to use meteorological and hydrological ensemble forecasts to quantify the uncertainty in forecasted streamflow. The hydrological ensembles are based on forcing a hydrological model with meteorological ensemble forecasts of precipitation and temperature. However, the ensembles of precipitation are often biased and the spread is too small, especially for the shortest lead times, i.e. they are not calibrated. These properties will, to some extent, propagate to hydrological ensembles, that most likely will be uncalibrated as well. Pre- and post-processing methods are commonly used to obtain calibrated meteorological and hydrological ensembles respectively. Quantitative studies showing the effect of the combined processing of the meteorological (pre-processing) and the hydrological (post-processing) ensembles are however few. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of pre- and post-processing on the skill of streamflow predictions, and we will especially investigate if the forecasting skill depends on lead-time, basin size and hydrological regime. This aim is achieved by applying the 51 medium-range ensemble forecast of precipitation and temperature provided by the European Center of Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). These ensembles are used as input to the operational Norwegian flood forecasting model, both raw and pre-processed. Precipitation ensembles are calibrated using a zero-adjusted gamma distribution. Temperature ensembles are calibrated using a Gaussian distribution and altitude corrected by a constant gradient

  8. Benchmarking an operational procedure for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Francesco; Salamon, Peter; Kalas, Milan; Bianchi, Alessandra; Feyen, Luc

    2016-04-01

    The development of real-time methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is crucial to improve emergency response and mitigate flood impacts. This work describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on the flood predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). The daily forecasts produced for the major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations, based on the hydro-meteorological dataset of EFAS. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in near real-time in terms of flood prone areas, potential economic damage, affected population, infrastructures and cities. An extensive testing of the operational procedure is carried out using the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-derived flood footprints, while ground-based estimations of economic damage and affected population is compared against modelled estimates. We evaluated the skill of flood hazard and risk estimations derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations. The assessment includes a comparison of several alternative approaches to produce and present the information content, in order to meet the requests of EFAS users. The tests provided good results and showed the potential of the developed real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  9. Rapid setup of the high resolution interactive hydrological / hydraulic model for flood forecasting at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Haag, A.; Winsemius, H.; Baart, F.; Hut, R.; Drost, N.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid predictions of flood using high resolution process-based numerical models applied at global scale is a useful tool for flood forecasting. Usually it requires days or even months to create such a model for a specific area and in most cases the process assumes a lot of manual work. Our goal is to significantly decrease the time required for this process by means of software integration of data processing tools, numerical models and global data sets. The methodology is based on the use of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB to identify the potential flood areas. An automated set of tools will be applied to generate a coupled hydrological / hydraulic model using a high resolution input data based on free global data sets such as SRTM, HydroSHEDS, CORINE, and OpenStreetMaps. This information should be sufficient to generate high resolution input for distributed rainfall-runoff and shallow water flow models. For the detection of potential flood areas, and generation of the unstructured model grid required by the D-Flow FM hydrodynamic model, we will use Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND) dataset derived from SRTM. For coupling the distributed hydrological and shallow water models we will use the Basic Model Interface (BMI). BMI is a lightweight API that enables communication with numerical models at runtime. We will validate benefits of the algorithm by applying it to the San Francisco bay area. The models and data processing tools will be integrated into an interactive user interface that will enable data exploration and will allow generation of new models based on user request or automatic rules. Using our approach we expect to make significant steps towards realizing our goal of global availability of flood forecasting models.

  10. Development of Hydrological Model of Klang River Valley for flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, M.; Andras, B.

    2012-12-01

    This study is to review the impact of climate change and land used on flooding through the Klang River and to compare the changes in the existing river system in Klang River Basin with the Storm water Management and Road Tunnel (SMART) which is now already operating in the city centre of Kuala Lumpur. Klang River Basin is the most urbanized region in Malaysia. More than half of the basin has been urbanized on the land that is prone to flooding. Numerous flood mitigation projects and studies have been carried out to enhance the existing flood forecasting and mitigation project. The objective of this study is to develop a hydrological model for flood forecasting in Klang Basin Malaysia. Hydrological modelling generally requires large set of input data and this is more often a challenge for a developing country. Due to this limitation, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall measurement, initiated by the US space agency NASA and Japanese space agency JAXA was used in this study. TRMM data was transformed and corrected by quantile to quantile transformation. However, transforming the data based on ground measurement doesn't make any significant improvement and the statistical comparison shows only 10% difference. The conceptual HYMOD model was used in this study and calibrated using ROPE algorithm. But, using the whole time series of the observation period in this area resulted in insufficient performance. The depth function which used in ROPE algorithm are then used to identified and calibrated using only unusual event to observed the improvement and efficiency of the model.

  11. River Ice and Flood Detection Products Derived from Suomi NPP VIIRS Satellite Data to Support Hydrologic Forecast Operations in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, C. M.; Plumb, E. W.; Li, S.; Holloway, E.; Stevens, E.

    2015-12-01

    A lack of river ice data during spring break-up in Alaska creates many forecast challenges for National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters. Limited and infrequent ice conditions and flood observations are provided by river observers, community officials, and pilots. Although these observations are invaluable, there are extensive spatial and temporal data gaps across Alaska during spring break-up. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellite imagery has proved to be an extremely beneficial situational awareness and decision support tool for NWS forecast operations. In particular, the VIIRS satellite imagery became highly effective in identifying extensive flooding of many Alaskan rivers due to ice jams during the 2013 spring breakup season. A devastating ice jam flood in the Yukon River community of Galena prompted the development of river ice and flood detection products derived from the VIIRS satellite imagery with the support of the Joint Polar Satellite System/Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (JPSS/PGRR) Program. The two new products from S-NPP/VIIRS imagery provided critical decision making information to NWS forecasters responsible for issuing flood warnings for the region. Since 2013, the NWS continues to evaluate the use of these products in an operational forecast setting, and has expanded the evaluation period to include summertime flooding. There are limitations of these products due to cloud cover, sun zenith angles, product validation, and other issues unique to Alaska. The NWS will continue to provide feedback to the JPSS/PGRR Program in order to further refine and improve the algorithms used to create the river ice and flood detection products. This presentation will demonstrate how these products have been integrated into the NWS forecast process for several types of flood events in Alaska.

  12. A Distributed Hydrologic Model, HL-RDHM, for Flash Flood Forecasting in Hawaiian Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, A.; Awal, R.; Michaud, J.; Chu, P.; Fares, S.; Kevin, K.; Rosener, M.

    2012-12-01

    Hawai'i's watersheds are flash flood prone due to their small contributing areas, and frequent intense spatially variable precipitation. Accurate simulation of the hydrology of these watersheds should incorporate spatial variability of at least the major input data, e.g., precipitation. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Weather Service Hydrology Laboratory Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) in flash flood forecasting at Hanalei watershed, Kauai, Hawai'i. Some of the major limitations of using HL-RDHM in Hawaii are: i) Hawaii lies outside the Hydrologic Rainfall Analysis Project (HRAP) coordinate system of the continental US (CONUS), unavailability of a priori SAC-SMA parameter grids, and absence of hourly multi-sensor NEXRAD based precipitation grids. The specific objectives of this study were to i) run HL-RDHM outside CONUS domain, and ii) evaluate the performance of HL-RDHM for flash flood forecasting in the flood prone Hanalei watershed, Kauai, Hawai'i. We i) modified HRAP coordinate system; ii) generated input data of precipitation grids at different resolutions using data from 20 precipitation gauges five of which were within Hanalei watershed; iii) and generated SAC-SMA and routing parameter grids for the modified HRAP coordinate system. The one HRAP resolution grid (4 km x 4 km) was not accurate; thus, the basin averaged annual hourly precipitation of 1 HRAP grid is comparatively lower than that of ½ and ¼ HRAP grids. The performance of HL-RDHM using basin averaged a priori grids and distributed a priori grids was reasonable even using non-optimized a priori parameter values for 2008 data. HL-RDHM reasonably matched the observed streamflow magnitudes of peaks and time to peak during the calibration and validation periods. Overall, HL-RDHM performance is "good" to "very good" if we use input data of finer resolution grids (½ HRAP or ¼ HRAP) and precipitation grids interpolated from sufficient data of

  13. Comparing One-way and Two-way Coupled Hydrometeorological Forecasting Systems for Flood Forecasting in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givati, Amir; Gochis, David; Rummler, Thomas; Kunstmann, Harald; Yu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    A pair of hydro-meteorological modeling systems were calibrated and evaluated for the Ayalon basin in central Israel to assess the advantages and limitations of one-way versus two-way coupled modeling systems for flood prediction. The models used included the Hydrological Engineering Center-Hydrological Modeling System (HEC-HMS) model and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Hydro modeling system. The models were forced by observed, interpolated precipitation from rain-gauges within the basin, and with modeled precipitation from the WRF atmospheric model. Detailed calibration and evaluation was carried out for two major winter storms in January and December 2013. Then both modeling systems were executed and evaluated in an operational mode for the full 2014/2015 rainy season. Outputs from these simulations were compared to observed measurements from hydrometric stations at the Ayalon basin outlet. Various statistical metrics were employed to quantify and analyze the results: correlation, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and the Nash-Sutcliffe (NS) efficiency coefficient. Foremost, the results presented in this study highlight the sensitivity of hydrological responses to different sources of precipitation data, and less so, to hydrologic model formulation. With observed precipitation data both calibrated models closely simulated the observed hydrographs. The two-way coupled WRF/WRF-Hydro modeling system produced improved both the precipitation and hydrological simulations as compared to the one-way WRF simulations. Findings from this study suggest that the use of two-way atmospheric-hydrological coupling has the potential to improve precipitation and, therefore, hydrological forecasts for early flood warning applications. However more research needed in order to better understand the land-atmosphere coupling mechanisms driving hydrometeorological processes on a wider variety precipitation and terrestrial hydrologic systems.

  14. Correction of upstream flow and hydraulic state with data assimilation in the context of flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S.; Piacentini, A.; Thual, O.; Le Pape, E.; Jonville, G.

    2010-11-01

    The present study describes the assimilation of river water level observations and the resulting improvement of the river flood forecast. The BLUE algorithm was built on top of the one-dimensional hydraulics model MASCARET. The assimilation algorithm folds in two steps: the first one is based on the assumption that the upstream flow can be adjusted using a three-parameter correction, the second one consists in directly correcting the hydraulic state. This procedure is applied on a four-day sliding window over the whole flood event. The background error covariances for water level and discharge are represented with asymmetric correlation functions where the upstream correlation length is bigger than the downstream correlation length. This approach is motivated by the implementation of a Kalman Filter algorithm on top of an advection-diffusion toy model. The assimilation study with MASCARET is carried out on the Adour and the Marne Vallage (France) catchments. The correction of the upstream flow as well as the control of the hydraulic state along the flood event leads to a significant improvement of the water level and discharge in analysis and forecast modes.

  15. A national framework for flood forecasting model assessment for use in operations and investment planning over England and Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Robert J.; Wells, Steven C.; Cole, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    It has been common for flood forecasting systems to be commissioned at a catchment or regional level in response to local priorities and hydrological conditions, leading to variety in system design and model choice. As systems mature and efficiencies of national management are sought, there can be a drive towards system rationalisation, gaining an overview of model performance and consideration of simplification through model-type convergence. Flood forecasting model assessments, whilst overseen at a national level, may be commissioned and managed at a catchment and regional level, take a variety of forms and be large in number. This presents a challenge when an integrated national assessment is required to guide operational use of flood forecasts and plan future investment in flood forecasting models and supporting hydrometric monitoring. This contribution reports on how a nationally consistent framework for flood forecasting model performance has been developed to embrace many past, ongoing and future assessments for local river systems by engineering consultants across England & Wales. The outcome is a Performance Summary for every site model assessed which, on a single page, contains relevant catchment information for context, a selection of overlain forecast and observed hydrographs and a set of performance statistics with associated displays of novel condensed form. One display provides performance comparison with other models that may exist for the site. The performance statistics include skill scores for forecasting events (flow/level threshold crossings) of differing severity/rarity, indicating their probability and likely timing, which have real value in an operational setting. The local models assessed can be of any type and span rainfall-runoff (conceptual and transfer function) and flow routing (hydrological and hydrodynamic) forms. Also accommodated by the framework is the national G2G (Grid-to-Grid) distributed hydrological model, providing area

  16. Technical Note: Initial assessment of a multi-method approach to spring-flood forecasting in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, J.; Uvo, C. B.; Foster, K.; Yang, W.

    2016-02-01

    Hydropower is a major energy source in Sweden, and proper reservoir management prior to the spring-flood onset is crucial for optimal production. This requires accurate forecasts of the accumulated discharge in the spring-flood period (i.e. the spring-flood volume, SFV). Today's SFV forecasts are generated using a model-based climatological ensemble approach, where time series of precipitation and temperature from historical years are used to force a calibrated and initialized set-up of the HBV model. In this study, a number of new approaches to spring-flood forecasting that reflect the latest developments with respect to analysis and modelling on seasonal timescales are presented and evaluated. Three main approaches, represented by specific methods, are evaluated in SFV hindcasts for the Swedish river Vindelälven over a 10-year period with lead times between 0 and 4 months. In the first approach, historically analogue years with respect to the climate in the period preceding the spring flood are identified and used to compose a reduced ensemble. In the second, seasonal meteorological ensemble forecasts are used to drive the HBV model over the spring-flood period. In the third approach, statistical relationships between SFV and the large-sale atmospheric circulation are used to build forecast models. None of the new approaches consistently outperform the climatological ensemble approach, but for early forecasts improvements of up to 25 % are found. This potential is reasonably well realized in a multi-method system, which over all forecast dates reduced the error in SFV by ˜ 4 %. This improvement is limited but potentially significant for e.g. energy trading.

  17. iCRESTRIGRS: a coupled modeling system for cascading flood-landslide disaster forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Xue, Xianwu; Hong, Yang; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Lu, Ning; Wan, Zhanming; Hong, Zhen; Wooten, Rick

    2016-12-01

    Severe storm-triggered floods and landslides are two major natural hazards in the US, causing property losses of USD 6 billion and approximately 110-160 fatalities per year nationwide. Moreover, floods and landslides often occur in a cascading manner, posing significant risk and leading to losses that are significantly greater than the sum of the losses from the hazards when acting separately. It is pertinent to couple hydrological and geotechnical modeling processes to an integrated flood-landslide cascading disaster modeling system for improved disaster preparedness and hazard management. In this study, we developed the iCRESTRIGRS model, a coupled flash flood and landslide initiation modeling system, by integrating the Coupled Routing and Excess STorage (CREST) model with the physically based Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability (TRIGRS) landslide model. The iCRESTRIGRS system is evaluated in four river basins in western North Carolina that experienced a large number of floods, landslides and debris flows triggered by heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan during 16-18 September 2004. The modeled hourly hydrographs at four USGS gauge stations show generally good agreement with the observations during the entire storm period. In terms of landslide prediction in this case study, the coupled model has a global accuracy of 98.9 % and a true positive rate of 56.4 %. More importantly, it shows an improved predictive capability for landslides relative to the stand-alone TRIGRS model. This study highlights the important physical connection between rainfall, hydrological processes and slope stability, and provides a useful prototype model system for operational forecasting of flood and landslide.

  18. A grid-based distributed flood forecasting model for use with weather radar data: Part 1. Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, V. A.; Moore, R. J.

    A practical methodology for distributed rainfall-runoff modelling using grid square weather radar data is developed for use in real-time flood forecasting. The model, called the Grid Model, is configured so as to share the same grid as used by the weather radar, thereby exploiting the distributed rainfall estimates to the full. Each grid square in the catchment is conceptualised as a storage which receives water as precipitation and generates water by overflow and drainage. This water is routed across the catchment using isochrone pathways. These are derived from a digital terrain model assuming two fixed velocities of travel for land and river pathways which are regarded as model parameters to be optimised. Translation of water between isochrones is achieved using a discrete kinematic routing procedure, parameterised through a single dimensionless wave speed parameter, which advects the water and incorporates diffusion effects through the discrete space-time formulation. The basic model routes overflow and drainage separately through a parallel system of kinematic routing reaches, characterised by different wave speeds but using the same isochrone-based space discretisation; these represent fast and slow pathways to the basin outlet, respectively. A variant allows the slow pathway to have separate isochrones calculated using Darcy velocities controlled by the hydraulic gradient as estimated by the local gradient of the terrain. Runoff production within a grid square is controlled by its absorption capacity which is parameterised through a simple linkage function to the mean gradient in the square, as calculated from digital terrain data. This allows absorption capacity to be specified differently for every grid square in the catchment through the use of only two regional parameters and a DTM measurement of mean gradient for each square. An extension of this basic idea to consider the distribution of gradient within the square leads analytically to a Pareto

  19. Willingness-to-pay for a probabilistic flood forecast: a risk-based decision-making game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Louise; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Coughlan, Erin; Cloke, Hannah L.; Stephens, Elisabeth; Wetterhall, Fredrik; van Andel, Schalk-Jan; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Forecast uncertainty is a twofold issue, as it constitutes both an added value and a challenge for the forecaster and the user of the forecasts. Many authors have demonstrated the added (economic) value of probabilistic forecasts over deterministic forecasts for a diversity of activities in the water sector (e.g. flood protection, hydroelectric power management and navigation). However, the richness of the information is also a source of challenges for operational uses, due partially to the difficulty to transform the probability of occurrence of an event into a binary decision. The setup and the results of a risk-based decision-making experiment, designed as a game on the topic of flood protection mitigation, called ``How much are you prepared to pay for a forecast?'', will be presented. The game was played at several workshops in 2015, including during this session at the EGU conference in 2015, and a total of 129 worksheets were collected and analysed. The aim of this experiment was to contribute to the understanding of the role of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making processes and their perceived value by decision-makers. Based on the participants' willingness-to-pay for a forecast, the results of the game showed that the value (or the usefulness) of a forecast depends on several factors, including the way users perceive the quality of their forecasts and link it to the perception of their own performances as decision-makers. Balancing avoided costs and the cost (or the benefit) of having forecasts available for making decisions is not straightforward, even in a simplified game situation, and is a topic that deserves more attention from the hydrological forecasting community in the future.

  20. Storm surge forecasting for operating the Venice Flood Barrier with minimal impact on port activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    The operation of the Venice storm barrier, due to enter into operation by the end of 2017 , is particularly demanding in terms of the required accuracy of the forecast of the max water level for the time lead of 3-6 hours. With present sea level and safeguard level established at 1.1 m a.s.l. of 1895 the barrier is expected to be operated 10 times a year to cope with an average of 5 storms with around 15 redirections of the navigation through the locks. The 5 extra closures and the 10 extra interferences with navigation are needed for compensating the present forecast uncertainty of 10 cm in the maximum storm high for the required time lead of three hours, the time needed to stop navigation before the closures of the lagoon inlets. A decision support system based on these rules have been tested along the last four year with satisfactory results in term of reliability easy of operations. The forecast is presently based on a statistical model associated with a deterministic local model; the main source of uncertainty is related to the prediction of the local wind. Due to delays in the completion of Venice local protection till 1.1 m it is expected that the population will urge a reduction of the safeguard level from 1.1m to 0.9m with an exponential increase in the number of closures with greater impact on navigation. The present acceleration in sea level rise will also contribute to the increase in the number of closures. To reduce the impact on port activity, better forecast accuracy is required together with experimenting new operational closures : e.g. activating only the northern barriers. The paper evaluate the problem and the possible solutions in terms of improving storm surge forecast and developing new schemes for partial operation of the barriers for predicted limited floods not requiring complete closures.

  1. Flash Flood Risks and Warning Decisions: A Mental Models Study of Forecasters, Public Officials, and Media Broadcasters in Boulder, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Bostrom, Ann; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Timely warning communication and decision making are critical for reducing harm from flash flooding. To help understand and improve extreme weather risk communication and management, this study uses a mental models research approach to investigate the flash flood warning system and its risk decision context. Data were collected in the Boulder, Colorado area from mental models interviews with forecasters, public officials, and media broadcasters, who each make important interacting decisions in the warning system, and from a group modeling session with forecasters. Analysis of the data informed development of a decision-focused model of the flash flood warning system that integrates the professionals' perspectives. Comparative analysis of individual and group data with this model characterizes how these professionals conceptualize flash flood risks and associated uncertainty; create and disseminate flash flood warning information; and perceive how warning information is (and should be) used in their own and others' decisions. The analysis indicates that warning system functioning would benefit from professionals developing a clearer, shared understanding of flash flood risks and the warning system, across their areas of expertise and job roles. Given the challenges in risk communication and decision making for complex, rapidly evolving hazards such as flash floods, another priority is development of improved warning content to help members of the public protect themselves when needed. Also important is professional communication with members of the public about allocation of responsibilities for managing flash flood risks, as well as improved system-wide management of uncertainty in decisions.

  2. Time Series Models Adoptable for Forecasting Nile Floods and Ethiopian Rainfalls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fandy, M. G.; Taiel, S. M. M.; Ashour, Z. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term rainfall forecasting is used in making economic and agricultural decisions in many countries. It may also be a tool in minimizing the devastation resulting from recurrent droughts. To be able to forecast the total annual rainfall or the levels of seasonal floods, a class of models has first been chosen. The model parameters have then been estimated with an appropriate parameter estimation algorithm. Finally, diagnostic tests have been performed to verify the adequacy of the model. These are the general principles of system identification, which is the most crucial part of the forecasting procedure. In this paper several sets of data have been studied using different statistical procedures. The examined data include a historical 835-year record representing the levels of the seasonal Nile floods in Cairo, Egypt, during the period A.D. 622-1457. These readings were originally carried out by the Arabsto a great degree of accuracy in order to be used in estimating yearly taxes or Zacat (islamic duties). The observations also comprise recent total annual rainfall data over Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) (1907-1984), the total annual discharges of Ethiopian rivers (including the river Sobat discharges at Hillet Doleib, Blue Nile discharge at Roseris, river Dinder, river Rahar, and river Atbara), equatorial lake plateau supply as contributed at Aswan during the period 1912-1982, and the total annual discharges at Aswan during the period 1871-1982. Periodograms have been used to uncover possible peridodicities. Trends of rainfall and discharges of some rivers of east and central Africa have been also estimated.Using the first half of the available record, two autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time series models have been identified, one for the levels of the seasonal Nile floods in Cairo, the second to model the annual rainfall over Ethiopia. The time series models have been applied in 1-year-ahead forecasting to the other hall of the available record and

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the Schoharie Creek at Prattsville, New York, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2016-02-18

    These flood-inundation maps, along with near-real-time stage data from USGS streamgages and forecasted stage data from the National Weather Service, can provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response activities such as evacuations and road closures as well as for postflood recovery efforts.

  4. Real-time flutter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R.; Walker, R.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques and a FORTRAN 77 MOdal Parameter IDentification (MOPID) computer program developed for identification of the frequencies and damping ratios of multiple flutter modes in real time are documented. Physically meaningful model parameterization was combined with state of the art recursive identification techniques and applied to the problem of real time flutter mode monitoring. The performance of the algorithm in terms of convergence speed and parameter estimation error is demonstrated for several simulated data cases, and the results of actual flight data analysis from two different vehicles are presented. It is indicated that the algorithm is capable of real time monitoring of aircraft flutter characteristics with a high degree of reliability.

  5. Petascale Diagnostic Assessment of the Global Portfolio Rainfall Space Missions' Ability to Support Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.; Chaney, N.; Herman, J. D.; Wood, E. F.; Ferringer, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    This research represents a multi-institutional collaboration between Cornell University, The Aerospace Corporation, and Princeton University that has completed a Petascale diagnostic assessment of the current 10 satellite missions providing rainfall observations. Our diagnostic assessment has required four core tasks: (1) formally linking high-resolution astrodynamics design and coordination of space assets with their global hydrological impacts within a Petascale "many-objective" global optimization framework, (2) developing a baseline diagnostic evaluation of a 1-degree resolution global implementation of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to establish the required satellite observation frequencies and coverage to maintain acceptable global flood forecasts, (3) evaluating the limitations and vulnerabilities of the full suite of current satellite precipitation missions including the recently approved Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, and (4) conceptualizing the next generation spaced-based platforms for water cycle observation. Our team exploited over 100 Million hours of computing access on the 700,000+ core Blue Waters machine to radically advance our ability to discover and visualize key system tradeoffs and sensitivities. This project represents to our knowledge the first attempt to develop a 10,000 member Monte Carlo global hydrologic simulation at one degree resolution that characterizes the uncertain effects of changing the available frequencies of satellite precipitation on drought and flood forecasts. The simulation—optimization components of the work have set a theoretical baseline for the best possible frequencies and coverages for global precipitation given unlimited investment, broad international coordination in reconfiguring existing assets, and new satellite constellation design objectives informed directly by key global hydrologic forecasting requirements. Our research poses a step towards realizing the integrated

  6. Quantifying Uncertainty in Distributed Flash Flood Forecasting for a Semiarid Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, S.; Pourreza Bilondi, M.; Ghahraman, B.; Akhoond-Ali, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reliability of semiarid flood forecasting is affected by several factors, including rainfall forcing, the system input-state-output behavior, initial soil moisture conditions and model parameters and structure. This study employed Bayesian frameworks to enable the explicit description and assessment of parameter and predictive uncertainty for convective rainfall-runoff modeling of a semiarid watershed system in Iran. We examined the performance and uncertainty analysis of a mixed conceptual and physical based rainfall-runoff model (AFFDEF) linked with three Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers: the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM), the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM-UA), and DREAM- ZS, to forecast four potential semiarid convective events with varying rainfall duration (<24 hrs) and amount (>20 mm). Calibration results demonstrated that model predictive uncertainty was heavily dominated by error and bias in the soil water storage capacity which reflect inadequate representation of the upper soil zone processes by hydrological model. Furthermore, parameters associated with infiltration and interception capacity along with contributing area threshold for digital river network were identified the key model parameters and more influential on the modeled flood hydrograph. In addition, parameter inference in the DREAM model showed a consistent behavior with the priori assumption by closely matching the inferred error distribution to the empirical distribution of the model residual, indicating that model parameters are well identified. DREAM result further revealed that the uncertainty associated with rainfall of lower magnitudes was higher than rainfall of higher magnitudes. Uncertainty quantification of semiarid convective events provided significant insights into the mathematical relationship and characteristics of short-term forecast error and may be applicable to other semiarid watershed systems with the similar rainfall

  7. Assessment of a fuzzy based flood forecasting system optimized by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyhani Masouleh, Aida; Pakosch, Sabine; Disse, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Flood forecasting is an important tool to mitigate harmful effects of floods. Among the many different approaches for forecasting, Fuzzy Logic (FL) is one that has been increasingly applied over the last decade. This method is principally based on the linguistic description of Rule Systems (RS). A RS is a specific combination of membership functions of input and output variables. Setting up the RS can be implemented either automatically or manually, the choice of which can strongly influence the resulting rule systems. It is therefore the objective of this study to assess the influence that the parameters of an automated rule generation based on Simulated Annealing (SA) have on the resulting RS. The study area is the upper Main River area, located in the northern part of Bavaria, Germany. The data of Mainleus gauge with area of 1165 km2 was investigated in the whole period of 1984 and 2004. The highest observed discharge of 357 m3/s was recorded in 1995. The input arguments of the FL model were daily precipitation, forecasted precipitation, antecedent precipitation index, temperature and melting rate. The FL model of this study has one output variable, daily discharge and was independently set up for three different forecast lead times, namely one-, two- and three-days ahead. In total, each RS comprised 55 rules and all input and output variables were represented by five sets of trapezoidal and triangular fuzzy numbers. Simulated Annealing, which is a converging optimum solution algorithm, was applied for optimizing the RSs in this study. In order to assess the influence of its parameters (number of iterations, temperature decrease rate, initial value for generating random numbers, initial temperature and two other parameters), they were individually varied while keeping the others fixed. With each of the resulting parameter sets, a full-automatic SA was applied to gain optimized fuzzy rule systems for flood forecasting. Evaluation of the performance of the

  8. A flood routing Muskingum type simulation and forecasting model based on level data alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchini, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo

    1994-07-01

    While the use of remote hydrometers for measuring the level in water courses is both economical and widespread, the same cannot be said for cross section and channel profile measurements and, even less, for rating curves at the measuring cross sections, all of which are more often than not incomplete, out of date, and unreliable. The mass of data involved in level measurements alone induces a degree of perplexity in those who try to use them, for example, for flood event simulations or the construction of forecasting models which are not purely statistical. This paper proposes a method which uses recorded level data alone to construct a simulation model and a forecasting model, both of them characterized by an extremely simple structure that can be used on any pocket calculator. These models, referring to a river reach bounded by two measuring sections, furnish the downstream levels, where the upstream levels are known, and the downstream level at time t + Δt*, where the upstream and downstream levels are known at time t, respectively. The numerical applications performed show that while the simulation model is somewhat penalized by the simplifications adopted, giving not consistently satisfactory results on validation, the forecasting model generated good results in all the cases examined and seems reliable.

  9. Large-watershed flood forecasting with high-resolution distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangbo; Li, Ji; Wang, Huanyu; Qin, Jianming; Dong, Liming

    2017-02-01

    A distributed hydrological model has been successfully used in small-watershed flood forecasting, but there are still challenges for the application in a large watershed, one of them being the model's spatial resolution effect. To cope with this challenge, two efforts could be made; one is to improve the model's computation efficiency in a large watershed, the other is implementing the model on a high-performance supercomputer. This study sets up a physically based distributed hydrological model for flood forecasting of the Liujiang River basin in south China. Terrain data digital elevation model (DEM), soil and land use are downloaded from the website freely, and the model structure with a high resolution of 200 m × 200 m grid cell is set up. The initial model parameters are derived from the terrain property data, and then optimized by using the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm; the model is used to simulate 29 observed flood events. It has been found that by dividing the river channels into virtual channel sections and assuming the cross section shapes as trapezoid, the Liuxihe model largely increases computation efficiency while keeping good model performance, thus making it applicable in larger watersheds. This study also finds that parameter uncertainty exists for physically deriving model parameters, and parameter optimization could reduce this uncertainty, and is highly recommended. Computation time needed for running a distributed hydrological model increases exponentially at a power of 2, not linearly with the increasing of model spatial resolution, and the 200 m × 200 m model resolution is proposed for modeling the Liujiang River basin flood with the Liuxihe model in this study. To keep the model with an acceptable performance, minimum model spatial resolution is needed. The suggested threshold model spatial resolution for modeling the Liujiang River basin flood is a 500 m × 500 m grid cell, but the model spatial resolution with a 200 m

  10. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  11. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  12. Iowa Flood Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  13. Real Time Data System (RTDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned from operational real time expert systems are examined. The basic system architecture is discussed. An expert system is any software that performs tasks to a standard that would normally require a human expert. An expert system implies knowledge contained in data rather than code. And an expert system implies the use of heuristics as well as algorithms. The 15 top lessons learned by the operation of a real time data system are presented.

  14. Real-time vision systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Lu, Shin-yee

    1994-11-15

    Many industrial and defence applications require an ability to make instantaneous decisions based on sensor input of a time varying process. Such systems are referred to as `real-time systems` because they process and act on data as it occurs in time. When a vision sensor is used in a real-time system, the processing demands can be quite substantial, with typical data rates of 10-20 million samples per second. A real-time Machine Vision Laboratory (MVL) was established in FY94 to extend our years of experience in developing computer vision algorithms to include the development and implementation of real-time vision systems. The laboratory is equipped with a variety of hardware components, including Datacube image acquisition and processing boards, a Sun workstation, and several different types of CCD cameras, including monochrome and color area cameras and analog and digital line-scan cameras. The equipment is reconfigurable for prototyping different applications. This facility has been used to support several programs at LLNL, including O Division`s Peacemaker and Deadeye Projects as well as the CRADA with the U.S. Textile Industry, CAFE (Computer Aided Fabric Inspection). To date, we have successfully demonstrated several real-time applications: bullet tracking, stereo tracking and ranging, and web inspection. This work has been documented in the ongoing development of a real-time software library.

  15. Forecasting of Storm-Surge Floods Using ADCIRC and Optimized DEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the accuracy of storm-surge flood forecasts is essential for improving preparedness for hurricanes and other severe storms and, in particular, for optimizing evacuation scenarios. An interactive database, developed by WorldWinds, Inc., contains atlases of storm-surge flood levels for the Louisiana/Mississippi gulf coast region. These atlases were developed to improve forecasting of flooding along the coastline and estuaries and in adjacent inland areas. Storm-surge heights depend on a complex interaction of several factors, including: storm size, central minimum pressure, forward speed of motion, bottom topography near the point of landfall, astronomical tides, and, most importantly, maximum wind speed. The information in the atlases was generated in over 100 computational simulations, partly by use of a parallel-processing version of the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model. ADCIRC is a nonlinear computational model of hydrodynamics, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the US Navy, as a family of two- and three-dimensional finite-element-based codes. It affords a capability for simulating tidal circulation and storm-surge propagation over very large computational domains, while simultaneously providing high-resolution output in areas of complex shoreline and bathymetry. The ADCIRC finite-element grid for this project covered the Gulf of Mexico and contiguous basins, extending into the deep Atlantic Ocean with progressively higher resolution approaching the study area. The advantage of using ADCIRC over other storm-surge models, such as SLOSH, is that input conditions can include all or part of wind stress, tides, wave stress, and river discharge, which serve to make the model output more accurate. To keep the computational load manageable, this work was conducted using only the wind stress, calculated by using historical data from Hurricane Camille, as the input condition for the model. Hurricane storm-surge simulations were performed on an

  16. Probabilistic flood forecasting tool for Andalusia (Spain). Application to September 2012 disaster event in Vera Playa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Darío; Baquerizo, Asunción; Ortega, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Ángel Losada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Torrential and heavy rains are frequent in Andalusia (Southern Spain) due to the characteristic Mediterranean climate (semi-arid areas). This, in combination with a massive occupation of floodable (river sides) and coastal areas, produces severe problems of management and damage to the population and social and economical activities when extreme events occur. Some of the most important problems are being produced during last years in Almería (Southeastern Andalusia). Between 27 and 28 September 2012 rainstorms characterized by 240mm in 24h (exceeding precipitation for a return period of 500 years) occurred. Antas River and Jático creek, that are normally dry, became raging torrents. The massive flooding of occupied areas resulted in eleven deaths and two missing in Andalucía, with a total estimated cost of all claims for compensation on the order of 197 million euros. This study presents a probabilistic flood forecasting tool including the effect of river and marine forcings. It is based on a distributed, physically-based hydrological model (WiMMed). For Almería the model has been calibrated with the largest event recorded in Cantoria gauging station (data since 1965) on 19 October 1973. It was then validated with the second strongest event (26 October 1977). Among the different results of the model, it can provide probability floods scenarios in Andalusia with up 10 days weather forecasts. The tool has been applied to Vera, a 15.000 inhabitants town located in the east of Almería along the Antas River at an altitude of 95 meters. Its main economic resource is the "beach and sun" based-tourism, which has experienced an enormous growth during last decades. Its coastal stretch has been completely built in these years, occupying floodable areas and constricting the channel and rivers mouths. Simulations of the model in this area for the 1973 event and published in March 2011 on the internet event already announced that the floods of September 2012 may occur.

  17. Ensemble hydro-meteorological forecasting for early warning of floods and scheduling of hydropower production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solvang Johansen, Stian; Steinsland, Ingelin; Engeland, Kolbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Running hydrological models with precipitation and temperature ensemble forcing to generate ensembles of streamflow is a commonly used method in operational hydrology. Evaluations of streamflow ensembles have however revealed that the ensembles are biased with respect to both mean and spread. Thus postprocessing of the ensembles is needed in order to improve the forecast skill. The aims of this study is (i) to to evaluate how postprocessing of streamflow ensembles works for Norwegian catchments within different hydrological regimes and to (ii) demonstrate how post processed streamflow ensembles are used operationally by a hydropower producer. These aims were achieved by postprocessing forecasted daily discharge for 10 lead-times for 20 catchments in Norway by using EPS forcing from ECMWF applied the semi-distributed HBV-model dividing each catchment into 10 elevation zones. Statkraft Energi uses forecasts from these catchments for scheduling hydropower production. The catchments represent different hydrological regimes. Some catchments have stable winter condition with winter low flow and a major flood event during spring or early summer caused by snow melting. Others has a more mixed snow-rain regime, often with a secondary flood season during autumn, and in the coastal areas, the stream flow is dominated by rain, and the main flood season is autumn and winter. For post processing, a Bayesian model averaging model (BMA) close to (Kleiber et al 2011) is used. The model creates a predictive PDF that is a weighted average of PDFs centered on the individual bias corrected forecasts. The weights are here equal since all ensemble members come from the same model, and thus have the same probability. For modeling streamflow, the gamma distribution is chosen as a predictive PDF. The bias correction parameters and the PDF parameters are estimated using a 30-day sliding window training period. Preliminary results show that the improvement varies between catchments depending

  18. HEVC real-time decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, Benjamin; Alvarez-Mesa, Mauricio; George, Valeri; Chi, Chi Ching; Mayer, Tobias; Juurlink, Ben; Schierl, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The new High Efficiency Video Coding Standard (HEVC) was finalized in January 2013. Compared to its predecessor H.264 / MPEG4-AVC, this new international standard is able to reduce the bitrate by 50% for the same subjective video quality. This paper investigates decoder optimizations that are needed to achieve HEVC real-time software decoding on a mobile processor. It is shown that HEVC real-time decoding up to high definition video is feasible using instruction extensions of the processor while decoding 4K ultra high definition video in real-time requires additional parallel processing. For parallel processing, a picture-level parallel approach has been chosen because it is generic and does not require bitstreams with special indication.

  19. Dependable Real-Time Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-30

    and F. Wang, "On thle Competitiveness of On-Line Real-Time Task Sc~eduling," to appear. Proc. Icai - Time Systemns Symposium, Dec 1991. 6. Biyabaiii, S...Stankovic, and K. Ramrnamritham, "System Support for lRal-’Vi111C Al: A Spring Project Perspective," Workshop on Real-Time .A1, ICAI ., August 198!). 29...Informatics, Computer S,,iety ,f India , t,, aptpear. 41 . Shilh, C. and J. A. Stankovic, "Distributed Deadlock Detection in Ada IRuntinv En vi- ronments," TRI

  20. Sub-Optimal Ensemble Filters and distributed hydrologic modeling: a new challenge in flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroncini, F.; Castelli, F.

    2009-09-01

    Data assimilation techniques based on Ensemble Filtering are widely regarded as the best approach in solving forecast and calibration problems in geophysics models. Often the implementation of statistical optimal techniques, like the Ensemble Kalman Filter, is unfeasible because of the large amount of replicas used in each time step of the model for updating the error covariance matrix. Therefore the sub optimal approach seems to be a more suitable choice. Various sub-optimal techniques were tested in atmospheric and oceanographic models, some of them are based on the detection of a "null space". Distributed Hydrologic Models differ from the other geo-fluid-dynamics models in some fundamental aspects that make complex to understanding the relative efficiency of the different suboptimal techniques. Those aspects include threshold processes , preferential trajectories for convection and diffusion, low observability of the main state variables and high parametric uncertainty. This research study is focused on such topics and explore them through some numerical experiments on an continuous hydrologic model, MOBIDIC. This model include both water mass balance and surface energy balance, so it's able to assimilate a wide variety of datasets like traditional hydrometric "on ground" measurements or land surface temperature retrieval from satellite. The experiments that we present concern to a basin of 700 kmq in center Italy, with hourly dataset on a 8 months period that includes both drought and flood events, in this first set of experiment we worked on a low spatial resolution version of the hydrologic model (3.2 km). A new Kalman Filter based algorithm is presented : this filter try to address the main challenges of hydrological modeling uncertainty. The proposed filter use in Forecast step a COFFEE (Complementary Orthogonal Filter For Efficient Ensembles) approach with a propagation of both deterministic and stochastic ensembles to improve robustness and convergence

  1. The Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum: Forecasting Hurricane Effects at Landfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, A.; Golden, J. H.; Updike, R.

    2004-01-01

    Hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones strike Central American, Caribbean, Southeast Asian and Pacific Island nations even more frequently than the U.S. The global losses of life and property from the floods, landslides and debris flows caused by cyclonic storms are staggering. One of the keys to reducing these losses, both in the U.S. and internationally, is to have better forecasts of what is about to happen from several hours to days before the event. Particularly in developing nations where science, technology and communication are limited, advance-warning systems can have great impact. In developing countries, warnings of even a few hours or days can mitigate or reduce catastrophic losses of life. With the foregoing needs in mind, we propose an initial project of three years total duration that will aim to develop and transfer a warning system for a prototype region in the Central Caribbean, specifically the islands of Puerto Rico and Hispanola. The Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum will include satellite observations to track and nowcast dangerous levels of precipitation, atmospheric and hydrological models to predict near-future runoff, and streamflow changes in affected regions, and landslide models to warn when and where landslides and debris flows are imminent. Since surface communications are likely to be interrupted during these crises, the project also includes the capability to communicate disaster information via satellite to vital government officials in Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Dominican Republic.

  2. Uncertainties due to soil data in Flood Risk Forecasts with the Water Balance Model LARSIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Reliable flood forecasts with quantitative statements about contained uncertainties are essential for far reaching decisions in disaster management. In this paper uncertainties resulting from soil data are analysed for the in the German-speaking world widely used water balance model LARSIM and quantified as far as possible. At the beginning a structural and statistical analysis about the wittingly simple designed soil module is performed. It consists of a storage volume with four separate runoff components only defined by the storage size. Additionally, the model structure is examined with regard to effects of uncertain soil data using a soil map from the Bavarian State Institute for Forestry which already contains estimated minimum and maximum values for important soil parameters. For further analysis, two German catchments in Upper Franconia located at the White Main with a size of 250 km² each, covering a huge variety of soil types are used as case examples. Skeleton is identified as an important source of uncertainty in soil data comparing the quantifiable information of available soil maps and using field and laboratory analysis. Furthermore, surface runoff and fast interflow fluxes show up to be sensitive for peaks of flood events, whereas slow interflow and base flow fluxes have smaller and more long term effects on discharges and the water balance. A reduction of the soil storage basically leads to a more intensified reaction of discharges than an enlargement. The calculation of two extreme scenarios within the statistical analysis result in simulated gage measurements varying from -42 % till +218 % compared to the scenario with the main value of the map. A percental variation of the soil storage shows a doubling of the flood discharges, if the storage size is halved and a reduction up to 20% using a doubled one. Finally, a Monte Carlo Simulation is performed using the statistical data of the soil map combined with a normal distribution, whereby the

  3. Scientific developments within the Global Flood Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groeve, Tom; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Thielen, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    More than 90 scientists, end users, and decision makers in the field of flood forecasting, remote sensing, hazard and risk assessment and emergency management collaborate in the Global Flood Partnership (GFP). The Partnership, launched in 2014, aims at the development of flood observational and modelling infrastructure, leveraging on existing initiatives for better predicting and managing flood disaster impacts and flood risk globally. Scientists collaborate in the GFP in different pillars, respectively focused on (1) development of tools and systems for global flood monitoring (Flood Toolbox), (2) applying the tools for publishing near real-time impact-based flood awareness information (Flood Observatory), and (3) collecting flood maps and impact information in a distributed database (Flood Record). The talk will focus on concrete collaboration results in 2014 and 2015, showing the added value of collaborating under a partnership. These include an overview of 10 services, 5 tools (algorithms or software) and 4 datasets related to global flood forecasting and observation. Through the various results (on interoperability, standards, visualization, integration and system design of integrated systems), it will be shown that a user-centric approach can lead to effective uptake of research results, rapid prototype development and experimental services that fill a gap in global flood response.

  4. Evaluating the one-way coupling of WRF-Hydro for flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Ismail; Onen, Alper; Yilmaz, Koray; Gochis, David

    2016-04-01

    A fully-distributed, multi-physics, multi-scale hydrologic and hydraulic modeling system, WRF-Hydro, is used to assess the potential for skillful flood forecasting based on precipitation inputs derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the EUMETSAT Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimates (MPEs). Similar to past studies it was found that WRF model precipitation forecast errors related to model initial conditions are reduced when the three dimensional atmospheric data assimilation (3DVAR) scheme in the WRF model simulations is used. A comparative evaluation of the impact of MPE versus WRF precipitation estimates, both with and without data assimilation, in driving WRF-Hydro simulated streamflow is then made. The ten rainfall-runoff events that occurred in the Black Sea Region were used for testing and evaluation. With the availability of streamflow data across rainfall-runoff events, the cal- ibration is only performed on the Bartin sub-basin using two events and the calibrated parameters are then transferred to other neighboring three ungauged sub-basins in the study area. The rest of the events from all sub-basins are then used to evaluate the performance of the WRF-Hydro system with the cali- brated parameters. Following model calibration, the WRF-Hydro system was capable of skillfully repro- ducing observed flood hydrographs in terms of the volume of the runoff produced and the overall shape of the hydrograph. Streamflow simulation skill was significantly improved for those WRF model simula- tions where storm precipitation was accurately depicted with respect to timing, location and amount. Accurate streamflow simulations were more evident in WRF model simulations where the 3DVAR scheme was used compared to when it was not used. Because of substantial dry bias feature of MPE, as compared with surface rain gauges, streamflow derived using this precipitation product is in general very poor. Overall, root mean squared errors for runoff were

  5. Real Time Sonic Boom Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Ed

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will provide general information about sonic boom mitigation technology to the public in order to supply information to potential partners and licensees. The technology is a combination of flight data, atmospheric data and terrain information implemented into a control room real time display for flight planning. This research is currently being performed and as such, any results and conclusions are ongoing.

  6. Implementation of Real-Time Bias-Adjusted O3 and PM2.5 Air Quality Forecasts and their Performance Evaluations during 2008 over the Continental United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in partnership with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is operationally implementing an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This program, which couples NOAA's North American Mesoscale (NAM) weather p...

  7. Flooding

    MedlinePlus

    ... flooding Prepare for flooding For communities, companies, or water and wastewater facilities: Suggested activities to help facilities ... con monóxido de carbono. Limit contact with flood water. Flood water may have high levels of raw ...

  8. Flooding and Flood Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  9. Towards a better knowledge of flash flood forecasting at the Three Gorges Region: Progress over the past decade and challenges ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Yang, Dawen; Yang, Hanbo; Wu, Tianjiao; Xu, Jijun; Gao, Bing; Xu, Tao

    2015-04-01

    The study area, the Three Gorges Region (TGR), plays a critical role in predicting the floods drained into the Three Gorges Reservoir, as reported local floods often exceed 10000m3/s during rainstorm events and trigger fast as well as significant impacts on the Three Gorges Reservoir's regulation. Meanwhile, it is one of typical mountainous areas in China, which is located in the transition zone between two monsoon systems: the East Asian monsoon and the South Asian (Indian) monsoon. This climatic feature, combined with local irregular terrains, has shaped complicated rainfall-runoff regimes in this focal region. However, due to the lack of high-resolution hydrometeorological data and physically-based hydrologic modeling framework, there was little knowledge about rainfall variability and flood pattern in this historically ungauged region, which posed great uncertainties to flash flood forecasting in the past. The present study summarize latest progresses of regional flash floods monitoring and prediction, including installation of a ground-based Hydrometeorological Observation Network (TGR-HMON), application of a regional geomorphology-based hydrological model (TGR-GBHM), development of an integrated forecasting and modeling system (TGR-INFORMS), and evaluation of quantitative precipitation estimations (QPE) and quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) products in TGR flash flood forecasting. With these continuing efforts to improve the forecasting performance of flash floods in TGR, we have addressed several critical issues: (1) Current observation network is still insufficient to capture localized rainstorms, and weather radar provides valuable information to forecast flash floods induced by localized rainstorms, although current radar QPE products can be improved substantially in future; (2) Long-term evaluation shows that the geomorphology-based distributed hydrologic model (GBHM) is able to simulate flash flooding processes reasonably, while model

  10. Identifying financial crises in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Eder Lucio; Ferreira, Fernando F.; Muruganandam, Paulsamy; Cerdeira, Hilda A.

    2013-03-01

    Following the thermodynamic formulation of a multifractal measure that was shown to enable the detection of large fluctuations at an early stage, here we propose a new index which permits us to distinguish events like financial crises in real time. We calculate the partition function from which we can obtain thermodynamic quantities analogous to the free energy and specific heat. The index is defined as the normalized energy variation and it can be used to study the behavior of stochastic time series, such as financial market daily data. Famous financial market crashes-Black Thursday (1929), Black Monday (1987) and the subprime crisis (2008)-are identified with clear and robust results. The method is also applied to the market fluctuations of 2011. From these results it appears as if the apparent crisis of 2011 is of a different nature to the other three. We also show that the analysis has forecasting capabilities.

  11. Radiation damping in real time.

    PubMed

    Mendes, A C; Takakura, F I

    2001-11-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a charge interacting with its own radiation, which originates the radiation damping. The real-time equation of motion for the charge and the associated Langevin equation is found in classical limit. The equation of motion for the charge allows one to obtain the frequency-dependent coefficient of friction. In the lowest order we find that although the coefficient of static friction vanishes, there is dynamical dissipation represented by a non-Markovian dissipative kernel.

  12. A flexible hydrological warning system in Denmark for real-time surface water and groundwater simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Stisen, Simon; Wiese, Marianne B.; Jørgen Henriksen, Hans

    2015-04-01

    In Denmark, increasing focus on extreme weather events has created considerable demand for short term forecasts and early warnings in relation to groundwater and surface water flooding. The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) has setup, calibrated and applied a nationwide water resources model, the DK-Model, primarily for simulating groundwater and surface water flows and groundwater levels during the past 20 years. So far, the DK-model has only been used in offline historical and future scenario simulations. Therefore, challenges arise in operating such a model for online forecasts and early warnings, which requires access to continuously updated observed climate input data and forecast data of precipitation, temperature and global radiation for the next 48 hours or longer. GEUS has a close collaboration with the Danish Meteorological Institute in order to test and enable this data input for the DK model. Due to the comprehensive physical descriptions of the DK-Model, the simulation results can potentially be any component of the hydrological cycle within the models domain. Therefore, it is important to identify which results need to be updated and saved in the real-time mode, since it is not computationally economical to save every result considering the heavy load of data. GEUS have worked closely with the end-users and interest groups such as water planners and emergency managers from the municipalities, water supply and waste water companies, consulting companies and farmer organizations, in order to understand their possible needs for real time simulation and monitoring of the nationwide water cycle. This participatory process has been supported by a web based questionnaire survey, and a workshop that connected the model developers and the users. For qualifying the stakeholder engagement, GEUS has selected a representative catchment area (Skjern River) for testing and demonstrating a prototype of the web based hydrological warning system at the

  13. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  14. Real Time Data Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, George G.

    1983-03-01

    By the early 1970s, classical photo-optical range instrumentation technology (as a means of gathering weapons' system performance data) had become a costly and inefficient process. Film costs were increasing due to soaring silver prices. Time required to process, read, and produce optical data was becoming unacceptable as a means of supporting weapon system development programs. NWC investigated the feasibility of utilizing Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) technology as an alternative solution for providing optical data. In 1978 a program entitled Metric Video (measurements from video images) was formulated at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. The purpose of this program was to provide timely data, to reduce the number of operating personnel, and to lower data acquisition costs. Some of the task elements for this program included a near real-time vector miss-distance system, a weapons scoring system, a velocity measuring system, a time-space position system, and a system to replace film cameras for gathering real-time engineering sequential data. These task elements and the development of special hardware and techniques to achieve real-time data will be discussed briefly in this paper.

  15. Challenges of AVHRR Vegetation Data for Real Time Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing data has long been used to monitor global ecosystems for floods and droughts and AVHRR data, as one of the first product, has many users interested in receiving the data within hours of acquisition. With the introduction of a new series of sensors in 2000 (the AVHRR/3 series), the quality of the NDVI datasets available for real time environmental monitoring has declined. This paper provides evidence of problems of cloud contamination, calibration and noise in the real time data which are not present in the historical AVHRR NDVIg dataset. These differences introduce significant uncertainty in the use of the real time data, degrading their utility for detecting climate variations in near real time.

  16. The potential of flood forecasting using a variable-resolution global Digital Terrain Model and flood extents from Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David; Garcia-Pintado, Javier; Cloke, Hannah; Dance, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    A basic data requirement of a river flood inundation model is a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the reach being studied. The scale at which modeling is required determines the accuracy required of the DTM. For modeling floods in urban areas, a high resolution DTM such as that produced by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is most useful, and large parts of many developed countries have now been mapped using LiDAR. In remoter areas, it is possible to model flooding on a larger scale using a lower resolution DTM, and in the near future the DTM of choice is likely to be that derived from the TanDEM-X Digital Elevation Model (DEM). A variable-resolution global DTM obtained by combining existing high and low resolution data sets would be useful for modeling flood water dynamics globally, at high resolution wherever possible and at lower resolution over larger rivers in remote areas. A further important data resource used in flood modeling is the flood extent, commonly derived from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. Flood extents become more useful if they are intersected with the DTM, when water level observations (WLOs) at the flood boundary can be estimated at various points along the river reach. To illustrate the utility of such a global DTM, two examples of recent research involving WLOs at opposite ends of the spatial scale are discussed. The first requires high resolution spatial data, and involves the assimilation of WLOs from a real sequence of high resolution SAR images into a flood model to update the model state with observations over time, and to estimate river discharge and model parameters, including river bathymetry and friction. The results indicate the feasibility of such an Earth Observation-based flood forecasting system. The second example is at a larger scale, and uses SAR-derived WLOs to improve the lower-resolution TanDEM-X DEM in the area covered by the flood extents. The resulting reduction in random height error is significant.

  17. Flood-inundation maps for Big Creek from the McGinnis Ferry Road bridge to the confluence of Hog Wallow Creek, Alpharetta and Roswell, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-20

    The availability of these maps, when combined with real-time stage information from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stage from the NWS, provides emergency management personnel and residents with critical information during flood-response activities such as evacuations and road closures, in addition to post-flood recovery efforts.

  18. Forecasts, warnings and social response to flash floods: Is temporality a major problem? The case of the September 2005 flash flood in the Gard region (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutoff, C.; Anquetin, S.; Ruin, I.; Chassande, M.

    2009-09-01

    Flash floods are complex phenomena. The atmospheric and hydrological generating mechanisms of the phenomenon are not completely understood, leading to highly uncertain forecasts of and warnings for these events. On the other hand warning and crisis response to such violent and fast events is not a straightforward process. In both the social and physical aspect of the problem, space and time scales involved either in hydrometeorology, human behavior and social organizations sciences are of crucial importance. Forecasters, emergency managers, mayors, school superintendents, school transportation managers, first responders and road users, all have different time and space frameworks that they use to take emergency decision for themselves, their group or community. The integration of space and time scales of both the phenomenon and human activities is therefore a necessity to better deal with questions as forecasting lead-time and warning efficiency. The aim of this oral presentation is to focus on the spatio-temporal aspects of flash floods to improve our understanding of the event dynamic compared to the different scales of the social response. The authors propose a framework of analysis to compare the temporality of: i) the forecasts (from Méteo-France and from EFAS (Thielen et al., 2008)), ii) the meteorological and hydrological parameters, iii) the social response at different scales. The September 2005 event is particularly interesting for such analysis. The rainfall episode lasted nearly a week with two distinct phases separated by low intensity precipitations. Therefore the Méteo-France vigilance bulletin where somehow disconnected from the local flood’s impacts. Our analysis focuses on the timings of different types of local response, including the delicate issue of school transportation, in regard to the forecasts and the actual dynamic of the event.

  19. Discharge forecasting using MODIS and radar altimetry: potential application for transboundary flood risk management in Niger-Benue River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpanelli, Angelica; Amarnath, Giriraj; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of most widespread natural disasters in the world. Its impact is particularly severe and destructive in Asia and Africa, because the living conditions of some settlements are inadequate to cope with this type of natural hazard. In this context, the estimation of discharge is extremely important to address water management and flood risk assessment. However, the inadequate monitoring network hampers any control and prediction activity that could improve these disastrous situations. In the last few years, remote sensing sensors have demonstrated their effectiveness in retrieving river discharge, especially in supporting discharge nowcasting and forecasting activities. Recently, the potential of radar altimetry was apparent when used for estimating water levels in an ungauged river site with good accuracy. It has also become a very useful tool for estimation and prediction of river discharge. However, the low temporal resolution of radar altimeter observations (10 or 35 days, depending on the satellite mission) may be not suitable for day-by-day hydrological forecasting. Differently, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), considering its proven potential for quantifying the variations in discharge of the rivers at daily time resolution may be more suited to this end. For these reasons, MODIS and radar altimetry data were used in this study to predicting and forecasting the river discharge along the Niger-Benue River, where severe flooding with extensive damage to property and loss of lives occurred. Therefore, an effective method to forecast flooding can support efforts towards creating an early warning system. In order to estimate river discharge, four MODIS products (daily, 8-day, and from AQUA and TERRA satellites) connected at three sites (two gauged and one ungauged) were used. The capability of remote sensing sensors to forecast discharge a few days in advance at a downstream section using MODIS and ENVISAT radar altimetry data

  20. Real-time pulmonary graphics.

    PubMed

    Mammel, Mark C; Donn, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Real-time pulmonary graphics now enable clinicians to view lung mechanics and patient-ventilator interactions on a breath-to-breath basis. Displays of pressure, volume, and flow waveforms, pressure-volume and flow-volume loops, and trend screens enable clinicians to customize ventilator settings based on the underlying pathophysiology and responses of the individual patient. This article reviews the basic concepts of pulmonary graphics and demonstrates how they contribute to our understanding of respiratory physiology and the management of neonatal respiratory failure.

  1. Real-time flutter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R.; Gupta, N.

    1984-01-01

    The important algorithm issues necessary to achieve a real time flutter monitoring system; namely, the guidelines for choosing appropriate model forms, reduction of the parameter convergence transient, handling multiple modes, the effect of over parameterization, and estimate accuracy predictions, both online and for experiment design are addressed. An approach for efficiently computing continuous-time flutter parameter Cramer-Rao estimate error bounds were developed. This enables a convincing comparison of theoretical and simulation results, as well as offline studies in preparation for a flight test. Theoretical predictions, simulation and flight test results from the NASA Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Test (DAST) Program are compared.

  2. Real-time streamflow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, David J.; Gebert, Warren A.

    1996-01-01

    Would you like to know streamflow conditions before you go fishing in Wisconsin or in more distant locations? Real-time streamflow data throughout Wisconsin and the United States are available on the Internet from the U.S. Geological Survey. You can see if the stream you are interested in fishing is high due to recent rain or low because of an extended dry spell. Flow conditions at more than 100 stream-gaging stations located throughout Wisconsin can be viewed by accessing the Wisconsin District Home Page at: http://wwwdwimdn.er.usgs.gov

  3. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Stanley A.; Reedy, Gerald T.; Kumar, Romesh

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  4. Interactive real time flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    An interactive real time flow simulation technique is developed for an unsteady channel flow. A finite-volume algorithm in conjunction with a Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme was developed for two-dimensional Euler equations. A global time step was used to accelerate convergence of steady-state calculations. A raster image generation routine was developed for high speed image transmission which allows the user to have direct interaction with the solution development. In addition to theory and results, the hardware and software requirements are discussed.

  5. Real-time analysis keratometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adachi, Iwao P. (Inventor); Adachi, Yoshifumi (Inventor); Frazer, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A computer assisted keratometer in which a fiducial line pattern reticle illuminated by CW or pulsed laser light is projected on a corneal surface through lenses, a prismoidal beamsplitter quarterwave plate, and objective optics. The reticle surface is curved as a conjugate of an ideal corneal curvature. The fiducial image reflected from the cornea undergoes a polarization shift through the quarterwave plate and beamsplitter whereby the projected and reflected beams are separated and directed orthogonally. The reflected beam fiducial pattern forms a moire pattern with a replica of the first recticle. This moire pattern contains transverse aberration due to differences in curvature between the cornea and the ideal corneal curvature. The moire pattern is analyzed in real time by computer which displays either the CW moire pattern or a pulsed mode analysis of the transverse aberration of the cornea under observation, in real time. With the eye focused on a plurality of fixation points in succession, a survey of the entire corneal topography is made and a contour map or three dimensional plot of the cornea can be made as a computer readout in addition to corneal radius and refractive power analysis.

  6. Real time analysis under EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    The analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis.

  7. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  8. Development of Integrated Flood Analysis System for Improving Flood Mitigation Capabilities in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Young-Il; Kim, Jong-suk

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the needs of people are growing for a more safety life and secure homeland from unexpected natural disasters. Flood damages have been recorded every year and those damages are greater than the annual average of 2 trillion won since 2000 in Korea. It has been increased in casualties and property damages due to flooding caused by hydrometeorlogical extremes according to climate change. Although the importance of flooding situation is emerging rapidly, studies related to development of integrated management system for reducing floods are insufficient in Korea. In addition, it is difficult to effectively reduce floods without developing integrated operation system taking into account of sewage pipe network configuration with the river level. Since the floods result in increasing damages to infrastructure, as well as life and property, structural and non-structural measures should be urgently established in order to effectively reduce the flood. Therefore, in this study, we developed an integrated flood analysis system that systematized technology to quantify flood risk and flood forecasting for supporting synthetic decision-making through real-time monitoring and prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information in Korea. Keywords: Flooding, Integrated flood analysis system, Rainfall forecasting, Korea Acknowledgments This work was carried out with the support of "Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science & Technology Development (Project No. PJ011686022015)" Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea

  9. Enhancement of EarthScope Infrastructure with Real Time Seismogeodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Y.; Melgar, D.; Geng, J.; Haase, J. S.; Crowell, B. W.; Squibb, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    developed cost-effective hardware and embedded firmware to upgrade existing real-time GPS stations with low-cost MEMS accelerometers. Fifteen PBO and SCIGN stations in southern California have already been upgraded with this technology. We have also developed a software suite to analyze seismogeodetic data in real time using a tightly-coupled precise point positioning (PPP) Kalman filter that supports PPP with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR) throughout the seismically active regions of the Western U.S. The seismogeodetic system contributes directly to collaborative natural hazards research by providing technology for early warning systems for earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis, and for short-term high impact weather forecasting and related flooding hazards (we are also installing MEMS temperature and pressure sensors for GPS meteorology). The systems have also been deployed for earthquake engineering research for large structures (e.g., bridges, buildings, dams). Here we present the components and status of our seismogeodetic earthquake and tsunami monitoring system. Although the analysis techniques are quite advanced, the project lends itself to opportunities for education and outreach, specifically in illustrating concepts in elementary physics of position, velocity, and acceleration. Many of the animations generated in the research are available for development into appealing and accessible educational modules.

  10. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George I.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto-Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner- TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  11. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  12. The Impact of Corps Flood Control Reservoirs in the June 2008 Upper Mississippi Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W. J.; Stiman, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    dissemination. The system uses precipitation and flow data, collected in real-time, along with forecasted flow from the National Weather Service to model and optimize reservoir operations and forecast downstream flows and stages, providing communities accurate and timely information to aid their flood-fighting. This involves integrating several simulation modeling programs, including HEC-HMS to forecast flows, HEC-ResSim to model reservoir operations and HEC-RAS to compute forecasted stage hydrographs. An inundation boundary and depth map of water in the flood plain can be calculated from the HEC-RAS results using ArcInfo. By varying future precipitation and releases, engineers can evaluate different "What if?" scenarios. The effectiveness of this tool and Corps reservoirs are examined.

  13. The Role of Secondary Frontal Waves in Causing Missed or False Alarm Flood Forecasts During Landfalling Atmospheric Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Ralph, F. M.; Lavers, D. A.; Kalansky, J.; Kawzenuk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The previous ten years has seen an explosion in research devoted to the Atmospheric River (AR) phenomena, features of the midlatitude circulation responsible for large horizontal water vapor transport. Upon landfall, ARs can be associated with 30-50% of annual precipitation in some regions, while also causing the largest flooding events in places such as coastal California. Little discussed is the role secondary frontal waves play in modulating precipitation during a landfalling AR. Secondary frontal waves develop along an existing cold front in response to baroclinic frontogenesis, often coinciding with a strong upper-tropospheric jet. If the secondary wave develops along a front associated with a landfalling AR, the resulting precipitation may be much greater or much less than originally forecasted - especially in regions where orographic uplift of horizontally transported water vapor is responsible for a large portion of precipitation. In this study, we present several cases of secondary frontal waves that have occurred in conjunction with a landfalling AR on the US West Coast. We put the impact of these cases in historical perspective using quantitative precipitation forecasts, satellite data, reanalyses, and estimates of damage related to flooding. We also discuss the dynamical mechanisms behind secondary frontal wave development and relate these mechanisms to the high spatiotemporal variability in precipitation observed during ARs with secondary frontal waves. Finally, we demonstrate that even at lead times less than 24 hours, current quantitative precipitation forecasting methods have difficulty accurately predicting the rainfall in the area near the secondary wave landfall, in some cases leading to missed or false alarm flood warnings, and suggest methods which may improve quantitative precipitation forecasts for this type of system in the future.

  14. Can Real-Time Data Also Be Climate Quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, M.; Wentz, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    GMI, AMSR-2 and WindSat herald a new era of highly accurate and timely microwave data products. Traditionally, there has been a large divide between real-time and re-analysis data products. What if these completely separate processing systems could be merged? Through advanced modeling and physically based algorithms, Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) has narrowed the gap between real-time and research-quality. Satellite microwave ocean products have proven useful for a wide array of timely Earth science applications. Through cloud SST capabilities have enormously benefited tropical cyclone forecasting and day to day fisheries management, to name a few. Oceanic wind vectors enhance operational safety of shipping and recreational boating. Atmospheric rivers are of import to many human endeavors, as are cloud cover and knowledge of precipitation events. Some activities benefit from both climate and real-time operational data used in conjunction. RSS has been consistently improving microwave Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs) for several decades, while making near real-time data publicly available for semi-operational use. These data streams have often been produced in 2 stages: near real-time, followed by research quality final files. Over the years, we have seen this time delay shrink from months or weeks to mere hours. As well, we have seen the quality of near real-time data improve to the point where the distinction starts to blur. We continue to work towards better and faster RFI filtering, adaptive algorithms and improved real-time validation statistics for earlier detection of problems. Can it be possible to produce climate quality data in real-time, and what would the advantages be? We will try to answer these questions…

  15. Forecast of muddy floods using high-resolution radar precipitation forcasting data and erosion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsel, Phoebe; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In the federal province of Saxony, Eastern Germany, almost 60 % of the agricultural land is endangered by erosion processes, mainly caused by heavy rainfall events. Beside the primary impact of soil loss and decreasing soil fertility, erosion can cause significant effects if transported sediments are entering downslope settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes. Available radar precipitation data are closing the gap between the conventional rainfall point measurements and enable the nationwide rainfall distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution. By means of the radar precipitation data of the German Weather Service (DWD), high-resolution radar-based rainfall data totals up to 5 minute time steps are possible. The radar data are visualised in a grid-based hourly precipitation map. In particular, the daily and hourly precipitation maps help to identify regions with heavy rainfall and possible erosion events. In case of an erosion event on agricultural land, these areas are mapped with an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV). The camera-equipped UAV delivers high-resolution images of the erosion event, that allow the generation of high-resolution orthophotos. By the application of the high-resolution radar precipitation data as an input for the process-based soil loss and deposition model EROSION 3D, these images are for validation purposes. Future research is focused on large scale soil erosion modelling with the help of the radar forecasting product and an automatic identification of sediment pass over points. The study will end up with an user friendly muddy flood warning tool, which allows the local authorities to initiate immediate measures in order to prevent severe damages in settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes.

  16. Identification of hydrological model parameters for flood forecasting using data depth measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauße, T.; Cullmann, J.

    2011-03-01

    validated for flood forecasting in a small catchment characterised by extreme process dynamics.

  17. Clinical virology in real time.

    PubMed

    Niesters, Hubert G M

    2002-12-01

    The ability to detect nucleic acids has had and still has a major impact on diagnostics in clinical virology. Both quantitative and qualitative techniques, whether signal or target amplification based systems, are currently used routinely in most if not all virology laboratories. Technological improvements, from automated sample isolation to real time amplification technology, have given the ability to develop and introduce systems for most viruses of clinical interest, and to obtain clinical relevant information needed for optimal antiviral treatment options. Both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) can currently be used together with real time detection to generate results in a short turn-around time and to determine whether variants relevant for antiviral resistance are present. These new technologies enable the introduction of an individual patient disease management concept. Within our clinical setting, we have introduced this e.g. for quantitative detection of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in T-dell depleted allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. This enabled us to develop models for pre-emptive anti B-cell immunotherapy for EBV reactivation, thereby effectively reducing not the incidence of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease but the virus related mortality. Furthermore, additional clinically relevant viruses can now easily be detected simultaneously. It also becomes more feasible to introduce molecular testing for those viruses that can easily be detected using classical virological methods, like culture techniques or antigen detection. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the clinical importance of the additional positive samples detected. It should however be made clear that a complete exchange of technologies is unlikely to occur, and that some complementary technologies should stay operational enabling the discovery of new viruses. The implementation of these molecular diagnostic technologies furthermore

  18. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  19. Assimilation of Real-Time Satellite And Human Sensor Networks for Modeling Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulov, O.; Halem, M.; Lary, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of underlying technologies needed to address the merging of a web of real time satellite sensor Web (SSW) and Human Sensor Web (HSW) needed to augment the US response to extreme events. As an initial prototyping step and use case scenario, we consider the development of two major system tools that can be transitioned from research to the responding operational agency for mitigating coastal oil spills. These tools consist of the capture of Situation Aware (SA) Social Media (SM) Data, and assimilation of the processed information into forecasting models to provide incident decision managers with interactive virtual spatial temporal animations superimposed with probabilistic data estimates. The system methodologies are equally applicable to the wider class of extreme events such as plume dispersions from volcanoes or massive fires, major floods, hurricane impacts, radioactive isotope dispersions from nuclear accidents, etc. A successful feasibility demonstration of this technology has been shown in the case of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill where Human Sensor Networks have been combined with a geophysical model to perform parameter assessments. Flickr images of beached oil were mined from the spill area, geolocated and timestamped and converted into geophysical data. This data was incorporated into General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME), a Lagrangian forecast model that uses near real-time surface winds, ocean currents, and satellite shape profiles of oil to generate a forecast of plume movement. As a result, improved estimates of diffusive coefficients and rates of oil spill were determined. Current approaches for providing satellite derived oil distributions are collected from a satellite sensor web of operational and research sensors from many countries, and a manual analysis is performed by NESDIS. A real time SA HSW processing system based on geolocated SM data from sources such as Twitter, Flickr, YouTube etc., greatly

  20. Measuring real-time streamflow using emerging technologies: Radar, hydroacoustics, and the probability concept

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, J.; Ostrowski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasting streamflow during extreme hydrologic events such as floods can be problematic. This is particularly true when flow is unsteady, and river forecasts rely on models that require uniform-flow rating curves to route water from one forecast point to another. As a result, alternative methods for measuring streamflow are needed to properly route flood waves and account for inertial and pressure forces in natural channels dominated by nonuniform-flow conditions such as mild water surface slopes, backwater, tributary inflows, and reservoir operations. The objective of the demonstration was to use emerging technologies to measure instantaneous streamflow in open channels at two existing US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Pennsylvania. Surface-water and instream-point velocities were measured using hand-held radar and hydroacoustics. Streamflow was computed using the probability concept, which requires velocity data from a single vertical containing the maximum instream velocity. The percent difference in streamflow at the Susquehanna River at Bloomsburg, PA ranged from 0% to 8% with an average difference of 4% and standard deviation of 8.81 m3/s. The percent difference in streamflow at Chartiers Creek at Carnegie, PA ranged from 0% to 11% with an average difference of 5% and standard deviation of 0.28 m3/s. New generation equipment is being tested and developed to advance the use of radar-derived surface-water velocity and instantaneous streamflow to facilitate the collection and transmission of real-time streamflow that can be used to parameterize hydraulic routing models.

  1. Real-Time Nonlinear Optical Information Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    operations aree presented. One approach realizes the halftone method of nonlinear optical processing in real time by replacing the conventional...photographic recording medium with a real-time image transducer. In the second approach halftoning is eliminated and the real-time device is used directly

  2. Model Predictive Control application for real time operation of controlled structures for the Water Authority Noorderzijlvest, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeringen, Klaas-Jan; Gooijer, Jan; Knot, Floris; Talsma, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In the Netherlands, flood protection has always been a key issue to protect settlements against storm surges and riverine floods. Whereas flood protection traditionally focused on structural measures, nowadays the availability of meteorological and hydrological forecasts enable the application of more advanced real-time control techniques for operating the existing hydraulic infrastructure in an anticipatory and more efficient way. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a powerful technique to derive optimal control variables with the help of model based predictions evaluated against a control objective. In a project for the regional water authority Noorderzijlvest in the north of the Netherlands, it has been shown that MPC can increase the safety level of the system during flood events by an anticipatory pre-release of water. Furthermore, energy costs of pumps can be reduced by making tactical use of the water storage and shifting pump activities during normal operating conditions to off-peak hours. In this way cheap energy is used in combination of gravity flow through gates during low tide periods. MPC has now been implemented for daily operational use of the whole water system of the water authority Noorderzijlvest. The system developed to a real time decision support system which not only supports the daily operation but is able to directly implement the optimal control settings at the structures. We explain how we set-up and calibrated a prediction model (RTC-Tools) that is accurate and fast enough for optimization purposes, and how we integrated it in the operational flood early warning system (Delft-FEWS). Beside the prediction model, the weights and the factors of the objective function are an important element of MPC, since they shape the control objective. We developed special features in Delft-FEWS to allow the operators to adjust the objective function in order to meet changing requirements and to evaluate different control strategies.

  3. Students Collecting Real time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.

    2006-05-01

    Students Collecting Real-Time Data The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary has created opportunities for middle and high school students to become Student Researchers and to be involved in real-time marine data collection. It is important that we expose students to different fields of science and encourage them to enter scientific fields of study. The Humpback Whale Sanctuary has an education visitor center in Kihei, Maui. Located right on the beach, the site has become a living classroom facility. There is a traditional Hawaiian fishpond fronting the property. The fishpond wall is being restored, using traditional methods. The site has the incredible opportunity of incorporating Hawaiian cultural practices with scientific studies. The Sanctuary offers opportunities for students to get involved in monitoring and data collection studies. Invasive Seaweed Study: Students are collecting data on invasive seaweed for the University of Hawaii. They pull a large net through the shallow waters. Seaweed is sorted, identified and weighed. The invasive seaweeds are removed. The data is recorded and sent to UH. Remote controlled monitoring boats: The sanctuary has 6 boogie board sized remote controlled boats used to monitor reefs. Boats have a camera with lights on the underside. The boats have water quality monitoring devices and GPS units. The video from the underwater camera is transmitted via a wireless transmission. Students are able to monitor the fish, limu and invertebrate populations on the reef and collect water quality data via television monitors or computers. The boat can also pull a small plankton tow net. Data is being compiled into data bases. Artificial Reef Modules: The Sanctuary has a scientific permit from the state to build and deploy artificial reef modules. High school students are designing and building modules. These are deployed out in the Fishpond fronting the Sanctuary site and students are monitoring them on a weekly basis

  4. Real-time optical tweezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Shah Mohammed Tamzidur

    In this thesis a new approach called ‘space-time-wavelength mapping’ has been developed for real-time electronic control of optical tweezers. The proposed technique enables precise control of optical signals in space, time, and frequency through time-domain dispersion and diffractive optics, which in turn enables generation of controlled radiation forces acting on small particles. In this study we show that 150 fs ultrafast optical pulses can be dispersed in time and space to achieve a 20 μm x 2 μm focused elliptical beam. The force field at the focal plane of the beam is dependent on local intensity gradients along the plane. The spatial intensity profile can be electronically controlled by assigning local power levels to each wavelength using time-domain RF modulation of dispersed pulses, and sending each wavelength, and hence the assigned power level, to a specific location in space through diffractive optics. We show that by choosing the appropriate RF waveform, one is able to create force fields for cell stretching and compression as well