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Sample records for reappraisal positive reappraisal

  1. The role of mindfulness in positive reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric; Gaylord, Susan; Park, Jongbae

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation is increasingly well known for therapeutic efficacy in a variety of illnesses and conditions, but its mechanism of action is still under debate in scientific circles. In this paper, we propose a hypothetical causal model that argues for the role of mindfulness in positive reappraisal coping. Positive reappraisal is a critical component of meaning-based coping that enables individuals to adapt successfully to stressful life events. Mindfulness, as a metacognitive form of awareness, involves the process of decentering, a shifting of cognitive sets that enables alternate appraisals of life events. We review the concept of positive reappraisal in transactional stress and coping theory, then describe research and traditional literature related to mindfulness and positive reappraisal, and detail the central role of mindfulness in the reappraisal process. With this understanding, we present a causal model explicating the proposed mechanism. The discussion has implications for clinical practice, suggesting how mindfulness-based integrative medicine interventions can be designed to support adaptive coping processes.

  2. Effects of Aging on Experimentally Instructed Detached Reappraisal, Positive Reappraisal, and Emotional Behavior Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Michelle N.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Emotion regulation includes multiple strategies that rely upon different underlying abilities, and that may be affected differently by aging. We assessed young, middle-aged, and older adults' ability to implement three emotion regulation strategies (detached reappraisal, positive reappraisal, and behavior suppression) in a laboratory setting, using standardized emotional stimuli and a multi-method approach to assessing regulation success. Results revealed age-related decline in ability to implement detached reappraisal, enhancement of ability to implement positive reappraisal, and maintenance of ability to implement behavior suppression. We discuss these findings in terms of their implications for emotion theory and for promoting successful aging. PMID:20025404

  3. Turn Down the Volume or Change the Channel?: Emotional Effects of Detached Versus Positive Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Michelle N.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive reappraisal, or changing one’s interpretation of an event in order to alter the emotional response to it, is thought to be a healthy and effective emotion regulation strategy. Although researchers recognize several distinct varieties of reappraisal, few studies have explicitly compared the effects of multiple reappraisal strategies on emotional responding. The present study compares the effects of detached and positive reappraisal on thought content, subjective emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and facial expressions of emotion while viewing film clips evoking sadness and disgust. While both forms of reappraisal reduced overall emotional responding to unpleasant stimuli, the effects of detached reappraisal were stronger in this regard, and positive reappraisal was more likely to maintain subjective experience and facial expression of stimulus-appropriate positive emotions. The two reappraisal strategies also produced somewhat different profiles of physiological responding. Differences between detached and positive reappraisal with respect to subjective experience and facial expression were more pronounced among men than women; the reverse was true for differences with respect to physiological responding. Beyond these effects on individual emotion response systems, detached and positive reappraisal also had somewhat different effects on coherence in change across response systems. Implications for our understanding of emotion regulation processes, and for emotion theory more broadly, are discussed. PMID:22746676

  4. Trait Reappraisal Predicts Affective Reactivity to Daily Positive and Negative Events

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Gul; Selcuk, Emre; Ong, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    Past research on emotion regulation has provided evidence that cognitive reappraisal predicts reactivity to affective stimuli and challenge tests in laboratory settings. However, little is known about how trait reappraisal might contribute to affective reactivity to everyday positive and negative events. Using a large, life-span sample of adults (N = 1755), the present study addressed this important gap in the literature. Respondents completed a measure of trait reappraisal and reported on their daily experiences of positive and negative events and positive and negative affect for eight consecutive days. Results showed that trait reappraisal predicted lower increases in negative affect in response to daily negative events and lower increases in positive affect in response to daily positive events. These findings advance our understanding of the role of reappraisal in emotion regulation by showing how individual differences in the use of this strategy relate to emotional reactions to both positive and negative events outside the laboratory. PMID:27445954

  5. Rethinking emotion: cognitive reappraisal is an effective positive and negative emotion regulation strategy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Gruber, June; Hay, Aleena C; Gross, James J

    2014-04-01

    Bipolar disorder involves difficulties with emotion regulation, yet the precise nature of these emotion regulatory difficulties is unclear. The current study examined whether individuals with remitted bipolar I disorder (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 23) differ in their ability to use one effective and common form of emotion regulation, cognitive reappraisal. Positive, negative, and neutral films were used to elicit emotion, and participants were cued to watch the film carefully (i.e., uninstructed condition) or reappraise while measures of affect, behavior, and psychophysiology were obtained. Results showed that reappraisal was associated with reductions in emotion reactivity across subjective (i.e., positive and negative affect), behavioral (i.e., positive facial displays), and physiological (i.e., skin conductance) response domains across all participants. Results suggest that reappraisal may be an effective regulation strategy for both negative and positive emotion across both healthy adults and individuals with bipolar disorder. Discussion focuses on clinical and treatment implications for bipolar disorder.

  6. Effects of regulating positive emotions through reappraisal and suppression on verbal and non-verbal recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Ortner, Catherine N M; de Koning, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that regulating emotions through reappraisal does not incur cognitive costs. However, in those experiments, cognitive costs were often assessed by recognition memory for information that was contextually related to the emotionally evocative stimuli and may have been incorporated into the reappraisal script, facilitating memory. Furthermore, there is little research on the cognitive correlates of regulating positive emotions. In the current experiment, we tested memory for information that was contextually unrelated to the emotional stimuli and could not easily be related to the reappraisal. Participants viewed neutral and mildly positive slides and either reappraised, suppressed their emotions, or viewed the images with no emotion regulation instruction. At the same time, they heard abstract words that were unrelated to the picture stimuli. Subsequent verbal recognition memory was lower after reappraising than viewing, whereas non-verbal recognition memory (of the slides) was higher after reappraising, but only for positive pictures and when participants viewed the positive pictures first. Suppression had no significant effect on either verbal or non-verbal recognition scores, although there was a trend towards poorer recognition of verbal information. The findings support the notion that reappraisal is effortful and draws on limited cognitive resources, causing decrements in performance in a concurrent memory task.

  7. Reappraisal but not suppression downregulates the experience of positive and negative emotion.

    PubMed

    Kalokerinos, Elise K; Greenaway, Katharine H; Denson, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    The emotion regulation literature is growing exponentially, but there is limited understanding of the comparative strengths of emotion regulation strategies in downregulating positive emotional experiences. The present research made the first systematic investigation examining the consequences of using expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal strategies to downregulate positive and negative emotion within a single design. Two experiments with over 1,300 participants demonstrated that reappraisal successfully reduced the experience of negative and positive affect compared with suppression and control conditions. Suppression did not reduce the experience of either positive or negative emotion relative to the control condition. This finding provides evidence against the assumption that expressive suppression reduces the experience of positive emotion. This work speaks to an emerging literature on the benefits of downregulating positive emotion, showing that suppression is an appropriate strategy when one wishes to reduce positive emotion displays while maintaining the benefits of positive emotional experience.

  8. Mindful regulation of positive emotions: a comparison with reappraisal and expressive suppression

    PubMed Central

    Lalot, Fanny; Delplanque, Sylvain; Sander, David

    2014-01-01

    It is often acknowledged that mindfulness facilitates emotion regulation on a long-term scale. Only few empirical studies support the hypothesis that even a brief mindfulness induction among subjects without previous experience of meditation allows an effective reduction of both positive and negative emotions. To the best of our knowledge, this hypothesis has never been tested when comparing mindfulness to other regulation strategies known to be effective. The current study investigates the effects of mindfulness, reappraisal and expressive suppression during the regulation of positive emotions. Forty-five participants without previous meditation experience watched four positive video clips while applying a specific regulation strategy: mindful attention, reappraisal, expressive suppression or no strategy (control condition). Video clips were matched for intensity and positive emotions index. Each of them was evaluated on two dimensions, valence (negative/positive) and arousal (calming/exciting). Moreover, participants’ facial expressions were recorded during the presentation of the video clips. Results showed that (a) participants report less positive affect in reappraisal and mindful attention conditions compared to expression suppression and a control condition; and (b) the facialexpression – activation of AU12 (lip corner pull) and AU6 (cheek raiser) – varies with the regulation strategy applied. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of mindfulness in decreasing both the evaluative judgment of positive video clips and the related facial expression, among participants without previous mindfulness experience. PMID:24715882

  9. Introduction: Reappraising Paul Feyerabend.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew J; Kidd, Ian James

    2016-06-01

    This volume is devoted to a reappraisal of the philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. It has four aims. The first is to reassess his already well-known work from the 1960s and 1970s in light of contemporary developments in the history and philosophy of science. The second is to explore themes in his neglected later work, including recently published and previously unavailable writings. The third is to assess the contributions that Feyerabend can make to contemporary debate, on topics such as perspectivism, realism, and political philosophy of science. The fourth and final aim is to reconsider Feyerabend's place within the history of philosophy of science in the light of new scholarship.

  10. The value of "negative" appraisals for resilience. Is positive (re)appraisal always good and negative always bad?

    PubMed

    Freund, Alexandra M; Staudinger, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the PASTOR model by Kalisch et al. we point to the potential negative long-term effects of positive (re)appraisals of events for resilience. This perspective posits that emotional reactions to events provide important guidelines as to which events, environments, or social relations should be sought out and which ones should be avoided in the future.

  11. Reappraising the voices of wrath.

    PubMed

    Korb, Sebastian; Frühholz, Sascha; Grandjean, Didier

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive reappraisal recruits prefrontal and parietal cortical areas. Because of the near exclusive usage in past research of visual stimuli to elicit emotions, it is unknown whether the same neural substrates underlie the reappraisal of emotions induced through other sensory modalities. Here, participants reappraised their emotions in order to increase or decrease their emotional response to angry prosody, or maintained their attention to it in a control condition. Neural activity was monitored with fMRI, and connectivity was investigated by using psychophysiological interaction analyses. A right-sided network encompassing the superior temporal gyrus, the superior temporal sulcus and the inferior frontal gyrus was found to underlie the processing of angry prosody. During reappraisal to increase emotional response, the left superior frontal gyrus showed increased activity and became functionally coupled to right auditory cortices. During reappraisal to decrease emotional response, a network that included the medial frontal gyrus and posterior parietal areas showed increased activation and greater functional connectivity with bilateral auditory regions. Activations pertaining to this network were more extended on the right side of the brain. Although directionality cannot be inferred from PPI analyses, the findings suggest a similar frontoparietal network for the reappraisal of visually and auditorily induced negative emotions. PMID:25964502

  12. Neural Basis of Anticipatory Anxiety Reappraisals

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Shinpei; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Machino, Akihiko; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2014-01-01

    Reappraisal is a well-known emotion regulation strategy. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that reappraisal recruits both medial and lateral prefrontal brain regions. However, few studies have investigated neural representation of reappraisals associated with anticipatory anxiety, and the specific nature of the brain activity underlying this process remains unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activity associated with reappraisals of transient anticipatory anxiety. Although transient anxiety activated mainly subcortical regions, reappraisals targeting the anxiety were associated with increased activity in the medial and lateral prefrontal regions (including the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices). Reappraisal decreased fear circuit activity (including the amygdala and thalamus). Correlational analysis demonstrated that reductions in subjective anxiety associated with reappraisal were correlated with orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Reappraisal recruits medial and lateral prefrontal regions; particularly the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices are associated with successful use of this emotion regulation strategy. PMID:25048028

  13. Introduction: Reappraising Paul Feyerabend.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew J; Kidd, Ian James

    2016-06-01

    This volume is devoted to a reappraisal of the philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. It has four aims. The first is to reassess his already well-known work from the 1960s and 1970s in light of contemporary developments in the history and philosophy of science. The second is to explore themes in his neglected later work, including recently published and previously unavailable writings. The third is to assess the contributions that Feyerabend can make to contemporary debate, on topics such as perspectivism, realism, and political philosophy of science. The fourth and final aim is to reconsider Feyerabend's place within the history of philosophy of science in the light of new scholarship. PMID:27269258

  14. Effects of valence and divided attention on cognitive reappraisal processes

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Christina M.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the neural substrates supporting cognitive reappraisal, identifying the importance of cognitive control processes implemented by prefrontal cortex (PFC). This study examined how valence and attention affect the processes used for cognitive reappraisal by asking participants to passively view or to cognitively reappraise positive and negative images with full or divided attention. When participants simply viewed these images, results revealed few effects of valence or attention. However, when participants engaged in reappraisal, there was a robust effect of valence, with the reappraisal of negative relative to positive images associated with more widespread activation, including within regions of medial and lateral PFC. There also was an effect of attention, with more lateral PFC recruitment when regulating with full attention and more medial PFC recruitment when regulating with divided attention. Within two regions of medial PFC and one region of ventrolateral PFC, there was an interaction between valence and attention: in these regions, divided attention reduced activity during reappraisal of positive but not negative images. Critically, participants continued to report reappraisal success even during the Divided Attention condition. These results suggest multiple routes to successful cognitive reappraisal, depending upon image valence and the availability of attentional resources. PMID:24493837

  15. Piece of cake. Cognitive reappraisal of food craving.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Nicole R; Calcott, Rebecca D; Berkman, Elliot T

    2013-05-01

    A common emotion regulation strategy, cognitive reappraisal, involves altering the meaning of a situation so that the emotional response to the situation is changed. Most research on reappraisal has focused on down-regulation of negative emotion; few studies exist on reappraisal of positive affect, and even fewer have examined the cognitive reappraisal of craving for energy-dense (e.g., "junk") foods. In the present study we examined this form of cognitive reappraisal using a new adaptation of a classic emotion regulation task. Subjects chose idiosyncratic categories of craved (and not craved) energy-dense foods as stimuli, and were instructed either to look at the stimulus or to reappraise it in a way that reduced desire to eat the depicted food using a strategy that could be used in the real world. A repeated-measures ANOVA and follow-up tests revealed that reappraisal significantly reduced self-reported desirability of both Craved and Not Craved foods, but for a greater degree in Craved foods. In addition, the degree to which subjects decreased their desire to consume Craved foods positively correlated with the cognitive restraint subscale of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, a measure of self-control of eating in everyday life.

  16. Piece of cake. Cognitive reappraisal of food craving

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Nicole R.; Calcott, Rebecca D.; Berkman, Elliot T.

    2013-01-01

    A common emotion regulation strategy, cognitive reappraisal, involves altering the meaning of a situation so that the emotional response to the situation is changed. Most research on reappraisal has focused on down-regulation of negative emotion; few studies exist on reappraisal of positive affect, and even fewer have examined the cognitive reappraisal of craving for energy-dense (e.g., “junk”) foods. In the present study we examined this form of cognitive reappraisal using a new adaptation of a classic emotion regulation task. Subjects chose idiosyncratic categories of craved (and not craved) energy-dense foods as stimuli, and were instructed either to look at the stimulus or to reappraise it in a way that reduced desire to eat the depicted food using a strategy that could be used in the real world. A repeated-measures ANOVA and follow-up tests revealed that reappraisal significantly reduced self-reported desirability of both Craved and Not Craved foods, but for a greater degree in Craved foods. In addition, the degree to which subjects decreased their desire to consume Craved foods positively correlated with the cognitive restraint subscale of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, a measure of self-control of eating in everyday life. PMID:23313699

  17. Piece of cake. Cognitive reappraisal of food craving.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Nicole R; Calcott, Rebecca D; Berkman, Elliot T

    2013-05-01

    A common emotion regulation strategy, cognitive reappraisal, involves altering the meaning of a situation so that the emotional response to the situation is changed. Most research on reappraisal has focused on down-regulation of negative emotion; few studies exist on reappraisal of positive affect, and even fewer have examined the cognitive reappraisal of craving for energy-dense (e.g., "junk") foods. In the present study we examined this form of cognitive reappraisal using a new adaptation of a classic emotion regulation task. Subjects chose idiosyncratic categories of craved (and not craved) energy-dense foods as stimuli, and were instructed either to look at the stimulus or to reappraise it in a way that reduced desire to eat the depicted food using a strategy that could be used in the real world. A repeated-measures ANOVA and follow-up tests revealed that reappraisal significantly reduced self-reported desirability of both Craved and Not Craved foods, but for a greater degree in Craved foods. In addition, the degree to which subjects decreased their desire to consume Craved foods positively correlated with the cognitive restraint subscale of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, a measure of self-control of eating in everyday life. PMID:23313699

  18. 43 CFR 5473.4-1 - Reappraisal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reappraisal. 5473.4-1 Section 5473.4-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT.... The reappraised unit price for each species shall be effective for the remaining life of the...

  19. Cognitive reappraisal increases neuroendocrine reactivity to acute social stress and physical pain.

    PubMed

    Denson, Thomas F; Creswell, J David; Terides, Matthew D; Blundell, Kate

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive reappraisal can foster emotion regulation, yet less is known about whether cognitive reappraisal alters neuroendocrine stress reactivity. Some initial evidence suggests that although long-term training in cognitive behavioral therapy techniques (which include reappraisal as a primary training component) can reduce cortisol reactivity to stress, some studies also suggest that reappraisal is associated with heightened cortisol stress reactivity. To address this mixed evidence, the present report describes two experimental studies that randomly assigned young adult volunteers to use cognitive reappraisal while undergoing laboratory stressors. Relative to the control condition, participants in the reappraisal conditions showed greater peak cortisol reactivity in response to a socially evaluative speech task (Experiment 1, N=90) and to a physical pain cold pressor task (Experiment 2, N=94). Participants in the cognitive reappraisal group also reported enhanced anticipatory psychological appraisals of self-efficacy and control in Experiment 2 and greater post-stressor self-efficacy. There were no effects of the reappraisal manipulation on positive and negative subjective affect, pain, or heart rate in either experiment. These findings suggest that although cognitive reappraisal fosters psychological perceptions of self-efficacy and control under stress, this effortful emotion regulation strategy in the short-term may increase cortisol reactivity. Discussion focuses on promising psychological mechanisms for these cognitive reappraisal effects. PMID:25063879

  20. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Rumination, Positive Reappraisal, Acceptance, and Distancing when Thinking about a Stressful Event on Affect States in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rood, Lea; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Bogels, Susan M.; Arntz, Arnoud

    2012-01-01

    The current study compares the effects of experimentally induced rumination, positive reappraisal, distancing, and acceptance on affect states in adolescents aged 13-18. Participants (N = 160) were instructed to think about a recent stressful event. Next, they received specific instructions on how to think about that event in each condition.…

  1. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Christian E.; Gross, James J.; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty – defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal – did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered. PMID:24711799

  2. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Salas, Christian E; Gross, James J; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty - defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal - did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered.

  3. Ameliorating intrusive memories of distressing experiences using computerized reappraisal training

    PubMed Central

    Woud, Marcella L.; Holmes, Emily A.; Postma, Peggy; Dalgleish, Tim; Mackintosh, Bundy

    2015-01-01

    The types of appraisals that follow traumatic experiences have been linked to the emergence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Could changing reappraisals following a stressful event reduce the emergence of PTSD symptoms? The present proof-of-principle study examined whether a non-explicit, systematic computerized training in reappraisal style following a stressful event (a highly distressing film) could reduce intrusive memories of the film, and symptoms associated with posttraumatic distress over the subsequent week. Participants were trained to adopt a generally positive or negative post-stressor appraisal style using a series of scripted vignettes after having been exposed to highly distressing film clips. The training targeted self-efficacy beliefs and reappraisals of secondary emotions (emotions in response to the emotional reactions elicited by the film). Successful appraisal induction was verified using novel vignettes and via change scores on the Post Traumatic Cognitions Inventory. Compared with those trained negatively, those trained positively reported fewer intrusive memories of the film during the subsequent week in a diary, and lower scores on the Impact of Event Scale (a widely-used measure of posttraumatic stress symptoms). Results support the use of computerized, non-explicit, reappraisal training after a stressful event has occurred and provide a platform for future translational studies with clinical populations that have experienced significant real-world stress or trauma. PMID:21859193

  4. 43 CFR 5473.4-1 - Reappraisal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) CONTRACT MODIFICATION-EXTENSION-ASSIGNMENT Extension of Time for Cutting and Removal § 5473.4-1 Reappraisal. (a) If an extension is granted under §...

  5. 43 CFR 5473.4-1 - Reappraisal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) CONTRACT MODIFICATION-EXTENSION-ASSIGNMENT Extension of Time for Cutting and Removal § 5473.4-1 Reappraisal. (a) If an extension is granted under §...

  6. 43 CFR 5473.4-1 - Reappraisal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) CONTRACT MODIFICATION-EXTENSION-ASSIGNMENT Extension of Time for Cutting and Removal § 5473.4-1 Reappraisal. (a) If an extension is granted under §...

  7. The Neural Bases of Distraction and Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Kateri; Hughes, Brent; Chopra, Sita; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Gross, James J.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2010-01-01

    Distraction and reappraisal are two commonly used forms of cognitive emotion regulation. Functional neuroimaging studies have shown that each one depends upon interactions between pFC, interpreted as implementing cognitive control, and limbic regions, interpreted as mediating emotional responses. However, no study has directly compared distraction…

  8. Brain structural basis of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andrea; Bieber, Alexandra; Keck, Tanja; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, two major emotion regulation strategies, are differentially related to emotional well-being. The aim of this study was to test the association of individual differences in these two emotion regulation strategies with gray matter volume of brain regions that have been shown to be involved in the regulation of emotions. Based on high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 96 young adults voxel-based morphometry was used to analyze the gray matter volumes of the a priori regions of interest, including amygdala, insula, dorsal anterior cingulate and paracingulate cortex, medial and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their association with cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression usage as well as neuroticism. A positive association of cognitive reappraisal with right and tendentially left amygdala volume and of neuroticism with left amygdala volume (marginally significant) was found. Expressive suppression was related to dorsal anterior cingulate/paracingulate cortex and medial PFC gray matter volume. The results of this study emphasize the important role of the amygdala in individual differences in cognitive reappraisal usage as well as neuroticism. Additionally, the association of expressive suppression usage with larger volumes of the medial PFC and dorsal anterior/paracingulate cortex underpins the role of these regions in regulating emotion-expressive behavior.

  9. Expelling Stress for Primary School Teachers: Self-Affirmation Increases Positive Emotions in Teaching and Emotion Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, James; Atkin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of a brief work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII) on the well-being of primary school teachers. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a WS-AII or one in which they were asked to create a control implementation intention (C-II). State anxiety was measured pre- and post-manipulation, self-efficacy at post-manipulation only, and emotions in teaching and emotion regulation at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Teachers who created work-related self-affirming implementation intentions reported an immediate reduction in state anxiety. Positive effects extended over the two-week period, with teachers in the WS-AII condition also reporting more positive emotions in teaching and the use of reappraisal emotion regulation strategies rather than emotion suppression. Results suggest that the integration of the WS-AII into existing organisational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of teachers and other highly stressed workers. PMID:27187437

  10. Expelling Stress for Primary School Teachers: Self-Affirmation Increases Positive Emotions in Teaching and Emotion Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morgan, James; Atkin, Lisa

    2016-05-13

    The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of a brief work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII) on the well-being of primary school teachers. Participants were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a WS-AII or one in which they were asked to create a control implementation intention (C-II). State anxiety was measured pre- and post-manipulation, self-efficacy at post-manipulation only, and emotions in teaching and emotion regulation at baseline and at a two-week follow-up. There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Teachers who created work-related self-affirming implementation intentions reported an immediate reduction in state anxiety. Positive effects extended over the two-week period, with teachers in the WS-AII condition also reporting more positive emotions in teaching and the use of reappraisal emotion regulation strategies rather than emotion suppression. Results suggest that the integration of the WS-AII into existing organisational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of teachers and other highly stressed workers.

  11. The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

  12. God rest our hearts: Religiosity and cognitive reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Vishkin, Allon; Bigman, Yochanan E; Porat, Roni; Solak, Nevin; Halperin, Eran; Tamir, Maya

    2016-03-01

    Although religiosity is often accompanied by more intense emotions, we propose that people who are more religious may be better at using 1 of the most effective emotion regulation strategies-namely, cognitive reappraisal. We argue that religion, which is a meaning-making system, is linked to better cognitive reappraisal, which involves changing the meaning of emotional stimuli. Four studies (N = 2,078) supported our hypotheses. In Study 1, religiosity was associated with more frequent use of cognitive reappraisal in 3 distinct religions (i.e., Islam, Christianity, Judaism). In Studies 2A-2B, we replicated these findings using 2 indices of cognitive reappraisal and in a large representative sample. In Studies 3-4, individuals more (vs. less) religious were more effective in using cognitive reappraisal in the laboratory. We discuss how these findings inform our understanding of the psychology of religion and of emotion regulation.

  13. God rest our hearts: Religiosity and cognitive reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Vishkin, Allon; Bigman, Yochanan E; Porat, Roni; Solak, Nevin; Halperin, Eran; Tamir, Maya

    2016-03-01

    Although religiosity is often accompanied by more intense emotions, we propose that people who are more religious may be better at using 1 of the most effective emotion regulation strategies-namely, cognitive reappraisal. We argue that religion, which is a meaning-making system, is linked to better cognitive reappraisal, which involves changing the meaning of emotional stimuli. Four studies (N = 2,078) supported our hypotheses. In Study 1, religiosity was associated with more frequent use of cognitive reappraisal in 3 distinct religions (i.e., Islam, Christianity, Judaism). In Studies 2A-2B, we replicated these findings using 2 indices of cognitive reappraisal and in a large representative sample. In Studies 3-4, individuals more (vs. less) religious were more effective in using cognitive reappraisal in the laboratory. We discuss how these findings inform our understanding of the psychology of religion and of emotion regulation. PMID:26461249

  14. Emotion regulation and the temporal dynamics of emotions: Effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on emotional inertia.

    PubMed

    Koval, Peter; Butler, Emily A; Hollenstein, Tom; Lanteigne, Dianna; Kuppens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The tendency for emotions to be predictable over time, labelled emotional inertia, has been linked to low well-being and is thought to reflect impaired emotion regulation. However, almost no studies have examined how emotion regulation relates to emotional inertia. We examined the effects of cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression on the inertia of behavioural, subjective and physiological measures of emotion. In Study 1 (N = 111), trait suppression was associated with higher inertia of negative behaviours. We replicated this finding experimentally in Study 2 (N = 186). Furthermore, in Study 2, instructed suppressors and reappraisers both showed higher inertia of positive behaviours, and reappraisers displayed higher inertia of heart rate. Neither suppression nor reappraisal were associated with the inertia of subjective feelings in either study. Thus, the effects of suppression and reappraisal on the temporal dynamics of emotions depend on the valence and emotional response component in question.

  15. Reappraising the situation and its impact on aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Barlett, Christopher P; Anderson, Craig A

    2011-12-01

    Much work has focused on how reappraisal is related to emotions, but not behaviors. Two experiments advanced aggression theory by (a) testing how cognitive and attributional forms of reappraisal are related to aggressive affect and behavior, (b) testing variables that theoretically mediate the relation between attributional reappraisal and aggressive behavior, (c) testing the moderating influences of cognitive and attributional reappraisal on aggressive behavior, and (d) developing and testing an intervention aimed at reducing vengeance through reappraisal training. Study 1 used an essay writing task in a 3 (feedback: provocation, no feedback, praise) × 2 (mitigating information: present, absent) experimental design. Provoked participants who did not receive mitigating information were significantly more aggressive than provoked participants who received mitigating information. State vengeance was a significant mediator. Study 2 examined an experimental intervention on vengeance over a 16-week semester. Intervention participants who had the largest increase in reappraisal displayed the greatest decrease in vengeance. Overall, these findings suggest that reappraisal reduces vengeance and aggressive behavior. PMID:21975949

  16. Recency, primacy, and memory: reappraising and standardising the serial position curve.

    PubMed

    Capitani, E; Della Sala, S; Logie, R H; Spinnler, H

    1992-09-01

    In this paper we consider the serial position curve in immediate verbal free recall. A large literature has argued that two components of the serial position curve, recency and primacy, reflect the functioning respectively of short-term and of long-term memory. However, there are a number of difficulties in interpreting the recency effect as a phenomenon uniquely associated with short-term memory. Moreover, the serial position curve has been used widely for clinical investigations in patients with memory deficits. This is despite the lack of norms for the measures derived from the curve. We present a set of standardised norms based on 321 Italian normal subjects. These norms are shown to be applicable both to an English speaking population, and to three groups of brain damaged-patients, namely Alzheimer's, amnesics, and frontals. The standardised norms offer a clinical and experimental tool which, coupled with a multiple single case approach, allows us to show dissociations and double dissociations among the performance patterns obtained from all three pathological groups. The paper concludes with a discussion of a possible interpretation of the recency effect as a emergent property of all types of memory system, including verbal short-term memory. Taking into account previous literature as well as our own data, the recency effect in immediate verbal free recall is here interpreted in terms of a two-component view of verbal short-term memory.

  17. Emotion regulation in heavy smokers: experiential, expressive and physiological consequences of cognitive reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingdan; Winkler, Markus H.; Wieser, Matthias J.; Andreatta, Marta; Li, Yonghui; Pauli, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation dysfunctions are assumed to contribute to the development of tobacco addiction and relapses among smokers attempting to quit. To further examine this hypothesis, the present study compared heavy smokers with non-smokers (NS) in a reappraisal task. Specifically, we investigated whether non-deprived smokers (NDS) and deprived smokers (DS) differ from non-smokers in cognitive emotion regulation and whether there is an association between the outcome of emotion regulation and the cigarette craving. Sixty-five participants (23 non-smokers, 22 NDS, and 20 DS) were instructed to down-regulate emotions by reappraising negative or positive pictorial scenarios. Self-ratings of valence, arousal, and cigarette craving as well as facial electromyography and electroencephalograph activities were measured. Ratings, facial electromyography, and electroencephalograph data indicated that both NDS and DS performed comparably to nonsmokers in regulating emotional responses via reappraisal, irrespective of the valence of pictorial stimuli. Interestingly, changes in cigarette craving were positively associated with regulation of emotional arousal irrespective of emotional valence. These results suggest that heavy smokers are capable to regulate emotion via deliberate reappraisal and smokers’ cigarette craving is associated with emotional arousal rather than emotional valence. This study provides preliminary support for the therapeutic use of reappraisal to replace maladaptive emotion-regulation strategies in nicotine addicts. PMID:26528213

  18. Negative attention bias and processing deficits during the cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant emotions in HIV+ women.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Roger C; Tartar, Jaime L; Widmayer, Susan; Rosselli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in emotional processing may be attributed to HIV disease or comorbid psychiatric disorders. Electrocortical markers of emotional attention, i.e., amplitude of the P2 and late positive potential (LPP), were compared between 26 HIV+ women and 25 healthy controls during an emotional regulation paradigm. HIV+ women showed early attention bias to negative stimuli indexed by greater P2 amplitude. In contrast, compared with the passive viewing of unpleasant images, HIV+ women demonstrated attenuation of the early and late LPP during positive reappraisal. This interaction remained significant after adjusting for individual differences in apathy, anxiety, and depression. Post hoc analyses implicated time since HIV diagnosis with LPP attenuation during positive reappraisal. Advancing HIV disease may disrupt neural generators associated with the cognitive reappraisal of emotions independent of psychiatric function. PMID:25541865

  19. A reappraisal of ocean wave studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yeli; Huang, Norden E.

    2012-11-01

    A reappraisal of wave theory from the beginning to the present day is made here. On the surface, the great progress in both theory and applications seems to be so successful that there would be no great challenge in wave studies anymore. On deeper examination, we found problems in many aspects of wave studies starting from the definition of frequency, the governing equations, the various source functions of wave models, the directional development of wind wavefield, the wave spectral form and finally the role of waves as they affect coastal and global ocean dynamics. This is a call for action for the wave research community. For future research, we have to consider these problems seriously and also to examine the basic physics of wave motion to determine their effects on other ocean dynamic processes quantitatively, rather than relying on parameterization in oceanic and geophysical applications.

  20. The influences of reappraisal and suppression instructions on memory for neutral words in negative background.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cui, Lixia; Zhang, Qin

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have investigated the influences of emotion regulation on memory for emotional stimuli. However, whether and how emotion regulation impacts recognition memory for neutral items in negative background is still unclear. Thus, the present study used event-related potentials and the study-recognition memory task to examine the effects of the two commonly used emotion regulation strategies, cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, on recognition memory of neutral words centrally presented on negative pictures. The behavior results showed that, compared with suppression, the reappraisal strategy enhanced the neutral words memory. Moreover, the event-related potential data demonstrated larger FN400 old/new effect indexing familiarity and late positive component old/new effect presenting episodic information recollection for the reappraisal condition relative to view and suppression conditions. These might be due to significant elaboration encouraged by this strategy. PMID:26426858

  1. Behavioral effects of longitudinal training in cognitive reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Bryan T.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    While recent emotion regulation research has identified effective regulatory strategies that participants can employ during single experimental sessions, a critical but unresolved question is whether one can increase the efficacy with which one can deploy these strategies through repeated practice. To address this issue we focused on one strategy, reappraisal, which involves cognitively reframing affective events in ways that modulate one's emotional response to them. With a commonly used reappraisal task, we assessed the behavioral correlates of four laboratory sessions of guided practice in down-regulating responses to aversive photos. Two groups received practice in one of two different types of reappraisal tactics: psychological distancing and reinterpretation. A third no-regulation control group viewed images in each session without instructions to regulate. Three key findings were observed. First, both distancing and reinterpretation training resulted in reductions over time in self-reported negative affect. Second, distancing participants also showed a reduction over time in negative affect on baseline trials where they responded naturally. Only distancing group participants showed such a reduction over and above the reduction observed in the no-regulation control group, indicating that it was not attributable to habituation. Third, only participants who distanced reported less perceived stress in their daily lives. The present results provide the first evidence for the longitudinal trainability of reappraisal in healthy adults using short courses of reappraisal practice, particularly using psychological distancing. PMID:24364856

  2. Reappraisal and Mindfulness: A Comparison of Subjective Effects and Cognitive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Keng, Shian-Ling; Robins, Clive J.; Smoski, Moria J.; Dagenbach, Jana; Leary, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the relative effects of mindfulness and reappraisal in reducing sad mood and whether trait mindfulness and habitual reappraisal moderated the effects. The study also compared the extent to which implementation of these strategies incurred cognitive resources. A total of 129 participants were randomly assigned to receiving training in mindfulness, reappraisal, or no training prior to undergoing an autobiographical sad mood induction. Results showed that mindfulness and reappraisal were superior to no training, and equivalent in their effects in lowering sad mood. Compared to mindfulness, reappraisal resulted in significantly higher interference scores on a subsequent Stroop test, reflecting greater depletion of cognitive resources. Higher trait mindfulness, but not habitual reappraisal, predicted greater reductions in sadness across conditions. The study suggests that although mindfulness and reappraisal are equally effective in down-regulating sad mood, they incur different levels of cognitive costs. PMID:24225174

  3. The moral status of the foetus: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lorette

    1987-01-01

    Fleming reappraises the school of thought that attributes a limited moral standing to the fetus at a certain stage of development. She examines this "minimal rights position" (MRP) in detail, drawing primarily on the writings of Michael Tooley concerning rights, desires, and interests. The MRP consists of claims that, while the fetus does not have a right to life, it does acquire some minimal rights when it develops the capacity for consciousness and desires. Fleming argues that, because these claims are inconsistent and cannot be held conjointly, the framework upon which the MRP is based, while sound, does not in fact support the MRP. She proposes an alternative position on the moral status of the fetus that is consistent with the framework that she believes has been used erroneously to support the minimal rights position.

  4. Differential Effects of Goal Setting and Value Reappraisal on College Women's Motivation and Achievement in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acee, Taylor Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the differential effects of goal setting and value reappraisal on female students' self-efficacy beliefs, value perceptions, exam performance and continued interest in statistics. It was hypothesized that the Enhanced Goal Setting Intervention (GS-E) would positively impact students'…

  5. Feet and Syllables in "Elephants" and "Missiles": A Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zonneveld, Wim; van der Pas, Brigit; de Bree, Elise

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a case study presented in Chiat (1989), Marshall and Chiat (2003) compare two different approaches to account for the realization of intervocalic consonants in child phonology: "coda capture theory" and the "foot domain account". They argue in favour of the latter account. In this note, we present a reappraisal of this argument…

  6. Age differences in poignancy: Cognitive reappraisal as a moderator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Fung, Helene H

    2010-06-01

    Poignancy is defined as a mixed emotional experience that arises when one faces meaningful endings. According to socioemotional selectivity theory (Carstensen, 2006), when people are aware of the finitude of time, they tend to experience more poignancy. In Study 1, we found that Chinese younger, but not older, participants experienced more poignancy under time limitations. In Study 2, we found that an emotion regulation strategy-namely, cognitive reappraisal-moderated the relationship between limited time and poignancy, such that the increases in poignancy under time limitations were found only among older Chinese participants with lower levels of cognitive reappraisal but not among those with higher levels of cognitive reappraisal. These findings contribute to the existing literature on poignancy by showing that not every older adult exhibits poignancy in the face of an ending: The poignancy phenomenon may occur among only older adults who are less likely to use an emotion regulation strategy, such as cognitive reappraisal, to reinterpret the anticipated ending. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:20545416

  7. Intergroup Contact and Ingroup Reappraisal: Examining the Deprovincialization Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Thijs, Jochem; Bekhuis, Hidde

    2010-01-01

    According to the deprovincialization thesis, interethnic contact involves a reappraisal and distancing from the ingroup. Contact can broaden one's horizon by acknowledging and recognizing the value of other cultures and thereby putting the taken-for-granted own cultural standards into perspective. The current research uses data from three surveys…

  8. Testing the effects of suppression and reappraisal on emotional concordance using a multivariate multilevel model.

    PubMed

    Butler, Emily A; Gross, James J; Barnard, Kobus

    2014-04-01

    In theory, the essence of emotion is coordination across experiential, behavioral, and physiological systems in the service of functional responding to environmental demands. However, people often regulate emotions, which could either reduce or enhance cross-system concordance. The present study tested the effects of two forms of emotion regulation (expressive suppression, positive reappraisal) on concordance of subjective experience (positive-negative valence), expressive behavior (positive and negative), and physiology (inter-beat interval, skin conductance, blood pressure) during conversations between unacquainted young women. As predicted, participants asked to suppress showed reduced concordance for both positive and negative emotions. Reappraisal instructions also reduced concordance for negative emotions, but increased concordance for positive ones. Both regulation strategies had contagious interpersonal effects on average levels of responding. Suppression reduced overall expression for both regulating and uninstructed partners, while reappraisal reduced negative experience. Neither strategy influenced the uninstructed partners' concordance. These results suggest that emotion regulation impacts concordance by altering the temporal coupling of phasic subsystem responses, rather than by having divergent effects on subsystem tonic levels. PMID:24055556

  9. Reappraisal writing relieves social anxiety and may be accompanied by changes in frontal alpha asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Wang, Kui; Li, Dongdong; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2015-01-01

    It is widely reported that expressive writing can improve mental and physical health. However, to date, the neural correlates of expressive writing have not been reported. The current study examined the neural electrical correlates of expressive writing in a reappraisal approach. Three groups of participants were required to give a public speech. Before speaking, the reappraisal writing group was asked to write about the current stressful task in a reappraisal manner. The irrelevant writing group was asked to write about their weekly plan, and the non-writing group did not write anything. It was found that following the experimental writing manipulation, both reappraisal and irrelevant writing conditions decreased self-reported anxiety levels. But when re-exposed to the stressful situation, participants in the irrelevant writing group showed increased anxiety levels, while anxiety levels remained lower in the reappraisal group. During the experimental writing manipulation period, participants in the reappraisal group had lower frontal alpha asymmetry scores than those in the irrelevant writing group. However, following re-exposure to stress, participants in the reappraisal group showed higher frontal alpha asymmetry scores than those in the irrelevant writing group. Self-reported anxiety and frontal alpha asymmetry of the non-writing condition did not change significantly across these different stages. It is noteworthy that expressive writing in a reappraisal style seems not to be a fast-acting treatment but may instead take effect in the long run.

  10. Emotion Regulation Strategies That Promote Learning: Reappraisal Enhances Children's Memory for Educational Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elizabeth L.; Levine, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    The link between emotion regulation and academic achievement is well documented. Less is known about specific emotion regulation strategies that promote learning. Six- to 13-year-olds ("N" = 126) viewed a sad film and were instructed to reappraise the importance, reappraise the outcome, or ruminate about the sad events; another group received no…

  11. Reappraisal writing relieves social anxiety and may be accompanied by changes in frontal alpha asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Changming; Yin, Qin; Wang, Kui; Li, Dongdong; Mao, Mengchai; Zhu, Chaozhe; Huang, Yuxia

    2015-01-01

    It is widely reported that expressive writing can improve mental and physical health. However, to date, the neural correlates of expressive writing have not been reported. The current study examined the neural electrical correlates of expressive writing in a reappraisal approach. Three groups of participants were required to give a public speech. Before speaking, the reappraisal writing group was asked to write about the current stressful task in a reappraisal manner. The irrelevant writing group was asked to write about their weekly plan, and the non-writing group did not write anything. It was found that following the experimental writing manipulation, both reappraisal and irrelevant writing conditions decreased self-reported anxiety levels. But when re-exposed to the stressful situation, participants in the irrelevant writing group showed increased anxiety levels, while anxiety levels remained lower in the reappraisal group. During the experimental writing manipulation period, participants in the reappraisal group had lower frontal alpha asymmetry scores than those in the irrelevant writing group. However, following re-exposure to stress, participants in the reappraisal group showed higher frontal alpha asymmetry scores than those in the irrelevant writing group. Self-reported anxiety and frontal alpha asymmetry of the non-writing condition did not change significantly across these different stages. It is noteworthy that expressive writing in a reappraisal style seems not to be a fast-acting treatment but may instead take effect in the long run. PMID:26539146

  12. Emotion regulation strategies that promote learning: reappraisal enhances children's memory for educational information.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth L; Levine, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    The link between emotion regulation and academic achievement is well documented. Less is known about specific emotion regulation strategies that promote learning. Six- to 13-year-olds (N = 126) viewed a sad film and were instructed to reappraise the importance, reappraise the outcome, or ruminate about the sad events; another group received no regulation instructions. Children viewed an educational film, and memory for this was later assessed. As predicted, reappraisal strategies more effectively attenuated children's self-reported emotional processing. Reappraisal enhanced memory for educational details relative to no instructions. Rumination did not lead to differences in memory from the other instructions. Memory benefits of effective instructions were pronounced for children with poorer emotion regulation skill, suggesting the utility of reappraisal in learning contexts.

  13. Habitual suppression relates to difficulty in regulating emotion with cognitive reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Che, Xianwei; Luo, Xi; Tong, Dandan; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Yang, Juan

    2015-12-01

    One common strategy to cope with the difficulties of daily life is suppression. Habitual users of suppression tend to suppress their feelings rather than expressing them. Although this strategy may reduce outward response to emotion, it is not thought to lessen induced negative affect. Moreover, it remains unclear whether people with high suppression scores can reduce negative affect through cognitive reappraisal. In the present study, twenty-nine healthy participants differing in suppression scores were directed to reappraise aversive stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results showed that higher suppression scores correlated with decreased response of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) during cognitive reappraisal. Further, high suppression scores related to enhanced negative affect to stimuli with greater negative affect correlating with decreased dmPFC response during cognitive reappraisal. This study suggests that people with high suppression scores experience difficulty in reducing negative affect through cognitive reappraisal and implicates neurobiological processes that may underlie this difficulty.

  14. Carbonates in Martian Meteorites - A Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    The occurrence of carbonates in martian meteorites was first established after acid dissolution and stepped combustion analyses of whole-rock Nakhla [1]. The release of CO2 after a 24 hr. reaction with 100% H3PO4 at 25 degrees C was taken to imply that the carbonate mineral present was calcite, a proposal subsequently confirmed by petrographic examination [2]. The isotopic composition of the carbon comprising the calcite was enriched in 13C (isotopically heavy) with delta^(l3)C ~ +12 per mil. An extended period of acid attack, also at 25 degrees C, released small quantities of even more 13C-enriched CO2 (delta^(13)C ~ +49 per mil), but the isotopic data were considered uncertain, and thus little significance was attached to the result, beyond the suggestion that some carbonate was perhaps dolomite or iron-bearing. Now, however, following the analysis of Fe-Mg-rich carbonates in ALH 84001 [3-5], it is apparent that previously-reported data might underestimate the abundance and delta^(13)C of carbonates in SNCs [6], and that a much higher proportion might occur as siderite or dolomite end-members. Iron- and magnesium-rich carbonates are only partially attacked at 25 degrees C, even after extended exposure to H3PO4 [7]. Given that the delta^(13)C of carbonates in SNCs has been used to deduce both environmental conditions on Mars [4, 6], and the evolution of the martian atmosphere [8], it is desirable that correct delta^(l3)c values are known. We have undertaken a reappraisal of the chemical and isotopic composition of carbonates in martian meteorites, by a programme of high resolution stepped combustion analyses and high temperature (75 degrees C) acid dissolution . Carbonates in most martian meteorites are extremely fine-grained. and therefore not easv to identify by traditional optical microscopic methods; it is not possible to determine readily the mineralogical composition of the grains. Comparison of combustion data from SNCs with that from pure materials allows

  15. A reappraisal of loop diuretic choice in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J.; Pitt, Bertram; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Velazquez, Eric J.; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The health and economic burden of heart failure is significant, and continues to grow each year. Loop diuretics are an integral part of symptom management in heart failure. Furosemide is used disproportionately compared to other loop diuretics and there is currently no guidance for physicians regarding which agent to choose. However, there exist pharmacologic differences as well as other mechanistic differences that appear to favor torsemide use over furosemide. Compared to furosemide, torsemide improves surrogate markers of heart failure severity such as left ventricular function, plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels, and New York Heart Association functional class and may also reduce hospitalizations, readmissions, and mortality. Data suggest these benefits could be mediated through torsemide’s ability to positively affect the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Specifically, torsemide has been shown to inhibit aldosterone secretion, synthesis, and receptor binding in vitro, as well as decrease transcardiac extraction of aldosterone, myocardial collagen production and cardiac fibrosis in patients with heart failure. We identified pertinent literature using keyword MEDLINE searches and cross-referencing prior bibliographies. We summarize the available data suggesting potential benefits with torsemide over furosemide, and call attention to the need for a reappraisal of diuretic use in heart failure patients and also for a well powered, randomized control trial assessing torsemide versus furosemide use. PMID:25728721

  16. Cognitive emotion regulation in patients with schizophrenia: Evidence for effective reappraisal and distraction.

    PubMed

    Grezellschak, Sarah; Lincoln, Tania M; Westermann, Stefan

    2015-09-30

    Negative emotions trigger psychotic symptoms, according to a growing body of evidence. Thus, there is a need for effective emotion regulation in schizophrenia. Reappraisal is an effective, cognitive emotion regulation strategy in healthy individuals. However, it is an open research question whether individuals with schizophrenia have difficulties in successfully applying reappraisal. This study experimentally tests the efficacy of reappraisal compared to distraction in patients with schizophrenia and non-clinical controls. An experimental design with group as between-subject factor (non-clinical controls versus patients with schizophrenia) and emotion regulation during anxiety induction as within-subject factor (reappraisal, distraction, no regulation). Seventeen patients with schizophrenia and 27 healthy participants were instructed to respond to anxiety-inducing stimuli by either using reappraisal, distraction or by just watching. Both reappraisal and distraction were effective in down-regulating anxiety, compared to no regulation. The main effect of group and the interaction of emotion regulation condition and group were not significant indicating that the efficacy of both cognitive emotion regulation strategies was independent of group. Patients with schizophrenia are able to apply reappraisal successfully under experimental conditions. Conclusions are limited by the small sample size of this pilot study. Clinical implications for cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis are discussed. PMID:26231583

  17. Gut check: reappraisal of disgust helps explain liberal-conservative differences on issues of purity.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Matthew; Antonenko, Olga; Willer, Robb; Horberg, E J; John, Oliver P

    2014-06-01

    Disgust plays an important role in conservatives' moral and political judgments, helping to explain why conservatives and liberals differ in their attitudes on issues related to purity. We examined the extent to which the emotion-regulation strategy reappraisal drives the disgust-conservatism relationship. We hypothesized that disgust has less influence on the political and moral judgments of liberals because they tend to regulate disgust reactions through emotional reappraisal more than conservatives. Study 1a found that a greater tendency to reappraise disgust was negatively associated with conservatism, independent of disgust sensitivity. Study 1b replicated this finding, demonstrating that the effect of reappraisal is unique to disgust. In Study 2, liberals condemned a disgusting act less than conservatives, and did so to the extent that they reappraised their initial disgust response. Study 3 manipulated participants' use of reappraisal when exposed to a video of men kissing. Conservatives instructed to reappraise their emotional reactions subsequently expressed more support for same-sex marriage than conservatives in the control condition, demonstrating attitudes statistically equivalent to liberal participants.

  18. Neural indicators of emotion regulation via acceptance vs reappraisal in remitted major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Smoski, Moria J; Keng, Shian-Ling; Ji, Jie Lisa; Moore, Tyler; Minkel, Jared; Dichter, Gabriel S

    2015-09-01

    Mood disorders are characterized by impaired emotion regulation abilities, reflected in alterations in frontolimbic brain functioning during regulation. However, little is known about differences in brain function when comparing regulatory strategies. Reappraisal and emotional acceptance are effective in downregulating negative affect, and are components of effective depression psychotherapies. Investigating neural mechanisms of reappraisal vs emotional acceptance in remitted major depressive disorder (rMDD) may yield novel mechanistic insights into depression risk and prevention. Thirty-seven individuals (18 rMDD, 19 controls) were assessed during a functional magnetic resonance imaging task requiring reappraisal, emotional acceptance or no explicit regulation while viewing sad images. Lower negative affect was reported following reappraisal than acceptance, and was lower following acceptance than no explicit regulation. In controls, the acceptance > reappraisal contrast revealed greater activation in left insular cortex and right prefrontal gyrus, and less activation in several other prefrontal regions. Compared with controls, the rMDD group had greater paracingulate and right midfrontal gyrus (BA 8) activation during reappraisal relative to acceptance. Compared with reappraisal, acceptance is associated with activation in regions linked to somatic and emotion awareness, although this activation is associated with less reduction in negative affect. Additionally, a history of MDD moderated these effects.

  19. Gut check: reappraisal of disgust helps explain liberal-conservative differences on issues of purity.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Matthew; Antonenko, Olga; Willer, Robb; Horberg, E J; John, Oliver P

    2014-06-01

    Disgust plays an important role in conservatives' moral and political judgments, helping to explain why conservatives and liberals differ in their attitudes on issues related to purity. We examined the extent to which the emotion-regulation strategy reappraisal drives the disgust-conservatism relationship. We hypothesized that disgust has less influence on the political and moral judgments of liberals because they tend to regulate disgust reactions through emotional reappraisal more than conservatives. Study 1a found that a greater tendency to reappraise disgust was negatively associated with conservatism, independent of disgust sensitivity. Study 1b replicated this finding, demonstrating that the effect of reappraisal is unique to disgust. In Study 2, liberals condemned a disgusting act less than conservatives, and did so to the extent that they reappraised their initial disgust response. Study 3 manipulated participants' use of reappraisal when exposed to a video of men kissing. Conservatives instructed to reappraise their emotional reactions subsequently expressed more support for same-sex marriage than conservatives in the control condition, demonstrating attitudes statistically equivalent to liberal participants. PMID:24098928

  20. How to handle anxiety: The effects of reappraisal, acceptance, and suppression strategies on anxious arousal.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Heering, Sanna; Sawyer, Alice T; Asnaani, Anu

    2009-05-01

    It has been suggested that reappraisal strategies are more effective than suppression strategies for regulating emotions. Recently, proponents of the acceptance-based behavior therapy movement have further emphasized the importance of acceptance-based emotion regulation techniques. In order to directly compare these different emotion regulation strategies, 202 volunteers were asked to give an impromptu speech in front of a video camera. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. The Reappraisal group was instructed to regulate their anxious arousal by reappraising the situation; the Suppression group was asked to suppress their anxious behaviors; and the Acceptance group was instructed to accept their anxiety. As expected, the Suppression group showed a greater increase in heart rate from baseline than the Reappraisal and Acceptance groups. Moreover, the Suppression group reported more anxiety than the Reappraisal group. However, the Acceptance and Suppression groups did not differ in their subjective anxiety response. These results suggest that both reappraising and accepting anxiety is more effective for moderating the physiological arousal than suppressing anxiety. However, reappraising is more effective for moderating the subjective feeling of anxiety than attempts to suppress or accept it.

  1. A reappraisal of the morphology and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Sigilmassasaurus from the "middle" Cretaceous of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Evers, Serjoscha W; Rauhut, Oliver W M; Milner, Angela C; McFeeters, Bradley; Allain, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is an enigmatic theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, originally based on a few isolated cervical vertebrae. Ever since its original description, both its taxonomic validity and systematic affinities were contentious. Originally considered to represent its own family, Sigilmassasauridae, the genus has variously been suggested to represent a carcharodontosaurid, an ornithischian, and, more recently, a spinosaurid. Here we describe new remains referrable to this taxon and re-evaluate its taxonomic status and systematic affinities. Based on the new remains, a re-evaluation of the original materials, and comparisons with other spinosaurids, the holotype of Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is identified as an anterior dorsal, rather than a cervical vertebra, and differences between elements referred to this taxon can be explained by different positions of the elements in question within the vertebral column. Many characters used previously to diagnose the genus and species are found to be more widespread among basal tetanurans, and specifically spinosaurids. However, the taxon shows several autapomorphies that support its validity, including the presence of a strongly rugose, ventrally offset triangular platform that is confluent with a ventral keel anteriorly in the mid-cervical vertebral centra and a strongly reduced lateral neural arch lamination, with no or an incomplete distinction between anterior and posterior centrodiapophyseal laminae in the posterior cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae. We argue furthermore that Spinosaurus maroccanus, also described on the basis of isolated cervical vertebrae from the same stratigraphic unit and in the same paper as Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis, is a subjective synonym of the latter. Both a detailed comparison of this taxon with other theropods and a formal phylogenetic analysis support spinosaurid affintities for Sigilmassasaurus. However, we reject the recently

  2. Neural Systems Underlying the Reappraisal of Personally Craved Foods

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Nicole R.; Mann, Traci; Tomiyama, A. Janet; Berkman, Elliot T.

    2014-01-01

    Craving of unhealthy food is a common target of self-regulation, but the neural systems underlying this process are understudied. In this study, participants used cognitive reappraisal to regulate their desire to consume idiosyncratically craved or not craved energy-dense foods, and neural activity during regulation was compared with each other and with the activity during passive viewing of energy-dense foods. Regulation of both food types elicited activation in classic top–down self-regulation regions including the dorsolateral prefrontal, inferior frontal, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices. This main effect of regulation was qualified by an interaction, such that activation in these regions was significantly greater during reappraisal of craved (versus not craved) foods and several regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal, inferior frontal, medial frontal, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices, were uniquely active during regulation of personally craved foods. Body mass index significantly negatively correlated with regulation-related activation in the right dorsolateral PFC, thalamus, and bilateral dorsal ACC and with activity in nucleus accumbens during passive viewing of craved (vs. neutral, low-energy density) foods. These results suggest that several of the brain regions involved in the self-regulation of food craving are similar to other kinds of affective self-regulation and that others are sensitive to the self-relevance of the regulation target. PMID:24392892

  3. A brief intervention to promote conflict reappraisal preserves marital quality over time.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Eli J; Slotter, Erica B; Luchies, Laura B; Walton, Gregory M; Gross, James J

    2013-08-01

    Marital quality is a major contributor to happiness and health. Unfortunately, marital quality normatively declines over time. We tested whether a novel 21-min intervention designed to foster the reappraisal of marital conflicts could preserve marital quality in a sample of 120 couples enrolled in an intensive 2-year study. Half of the couples were randomly assigned to receive the reappraisal intervention in Year 2 (following no intervention in Year 1); half were not. Both groups exhibited declines in marital quality over Year 1. This decline continued in Year 2 among couples in the control condition, but it was eliminated among couples in the reappraisal condition. This effect of the reappraisal intervention on marital quality over time was mediated through reductions in conflict-related distress over time. This study illustrates the potential of brief, theory-based, social-psychological interventions to preserve the quality of intimate relationships over time.

  4. The Unconscious Regulation of Emotion: Nonconscious Reappraisal Goals Modulate Emotional Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; Bargh, John A.; Nocera, Christopher C.; Gray, Jeremy R.

    2009-01-01

    People often encounter difficulty when making conscious attempts to regulate their emotions. We propose that nonconscious self-regulatory processes may be of help in these difficult circumstances, because nonconscious processes are not subject to the same set of limitations as are conscious processes. Two experiments examined the effects of nonconsciously operating goals on people's emotion-regulatory success. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in an anxiety-eliciting task who had a reappraisal emotion-control goal primed and operating nonconsciously achieved the same decrease in physiological reactivity as those explicitly instructed to reappraise, compared to a control group. In Experiment 2, the effect of nonconscious reappraisal priming on physiological reactivity was shown to be most pronounced for those who do not habitually use reappraisal strategies. The findings highlight the potential importance of nonconscious goals for facilitating emotional control in complex real-world environments, and have implications for contemporary models of emotion-regulation. PMID:20001127

  5. The unconscious regulation of emotion: nonconscious reappraisal goals modulate emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lawrence E; Bargh, John A; Nocera, Christopher C; Gray, Jeremy R

    2009-12-01

    People often encounter difficulty when making conscious attempts to regulate their emotions. We propose that nonconscious self-regulatory processes may be of help in these difficult circumstances because nonconscious processes are not subject to the same set of limitations as are conscious processes. Two experiments examined the effects of nonconsciously operating goals on people's emotion regulatory success. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in an anxiety-eliciting task. Participants who had a reappraisal emotion control goal primed and operating nonconsciously achieved the same decrease in physiological reactivity as those explicitly instructed to reappraise. In Experiment 2, the effect of nonconscious reappraisal priming on physiological reactivity was shown to be most pronounced for those who do not habitually use reappraisal strategies. The findings highlight the potential importance of nonconscious goals for facilitating emotional control in complex real-world environments and have implications for contemporary models of emotion regulation.

  6. Lead Me Not into Temptation: Using Cognitive Reappraisal to Reduce Goal Inconsistent Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Véronique; Grégoire, Jacques; Magen, Eran; Gross, James J.; Mikolajczak, Moïra

    2012-01-01

    Temptations besiege us, and we must resist their appeal if we are to achieve our long-term goals. In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that cognitive reappraisal could be used to successfully maintain performance in a task embedded in temptation. In Study 1, 62 participants had to search for information on the Internet while resisting attractive task-irrelevant content on preselected sites. In Study 2, 58 participants had to count target words in a funny TV sequence. Compared to the no-reappraisal condition, participants who understood the situation as a test of willpower (the reappraisal condition) (1) performed better at the task (Studies 1 and 2), and (2) were less tempted by the attractive content of the TV sequence (Study 2). These findings suggest that, by making the temptation less attractive and the task more appealing, cognitive reappraisal can help us resist temptation. PMID:22911686

  7. The unconscious regulation of emotion: nonconscious reappraisal goals modulate emotional reactivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lawrence E; Bargh, John A; Nocera, Christopher C; Gray, Jeremy R

    2009-12-01

    People often encounter difficulty when making conscious attempts to regulate their emotions. We propose that nonconscious self-regulatory processes may be of help in these difficult circumstances because nonconscious processes are not subject to the same set of limitations as are conscious processes. Two experiments examined the effects of nonconsciously operating goals on people's emotion regulatory success. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in an anxiety-eliciting task. Participants who had a reappraisal emotion control goal primed and operating nonconsciously achieved the same decrease in physiological reactivity as those explicitly instructed to reappraise. In Experiment 2, the effect of nonconscious reappraisal priming on physiological reactivity was shown to be most pronounced for those who do not habitually use reappraisal strategies. The findings highlight the potential importance of nonconscious goals for facilitating emotional control in complex real-world environments and have implications for contemporary models of emotion regulation. PMID:20001127

  8. Mind over Matter: Reappraising Arousal Improves Cardiovascular and Cognitive Responses to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Nock, Matthew K.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that changing the way we think about our bodily responses can improve our physiological and cognitive reactions to stressful events. However, the underlying processes through which mental states improve downstream outcomes are not well-understood. To this end, we examined whether reappraising stress-induced arousal could improve cardiovascular outcomes and decrease attentional bias for emotionally-negative information. Participants were randomly assigned to either a reappraisal condition in which they were instructed to think about their physiological arousal during a stressful task as functional and adaptive, or to one of two control conditions: attention reorientation and no instructions. Relative to controls, participants instructed to reappraise their arousal exhibited more adaptive cardiovascular stress responses – increased cardiac efficiency and lower vascular resistance – and decreased attentional bias. Thus, reappraising arousal shows physiological and cognitive benefits. Implications for health and potential clinical applications are discussed. PMID:21942377

  9. Individual differences in the habitual use of cognitive reappraisal predict the reward-related processing

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Liyang; Wang, Sisi; Ward, Anne; Ku, Yixuan; Sang, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that instructed cognitive reappraisal can regulate the neural processing of reward. However, it is still unclear whether the habitual use of cognitive reappraisal in everyday life is related to brain activity involved in reward processing. In the present study, participants’ neural responses to reward were measured using electroencephalography (EEG) recorded during a gambling task and their tendency to use cognitive reappraisal was assessed using the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ). Event-related potential (ERP) results indicated that losses on the gambling task elicited greater negative reward-related feedback negativity (FN) than gains. The differential FN between losses and gains was significantly correlated with cognitive reappraisal scores across participants such that individuals with a higher tendency to use cognitive reappraisal showed stronger reward processing (i.e., amplified FN difference between losses and gains). This correlation remained significant after controlling for expressive suppression scores. However, expressive suppression per se was not correlated with FN differences. Taken together, these results suggest that the habitual use of cognitive reappraisal is associated with increased neural processing of reward. PMID:26388796

  10. Cognitive reappraisal of emotion: a meta-analysis of human neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Buhle, Jason T; Silvers, Jennifer A; Wager, Tor D; Lopez, Richard; Onyemekwu, Chukwudi; Kober, Hedy; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, an explosion of neuroimaging studies has examined cognitive reappraisal, an emotion regulation strategy that involves changing the way one thinks about a stimulus in order to change its affective impact. Existing models broadly agree that reappraisal recruits frontal and parietal control regions to modulate emotional responding in the amygdala, but they offer competing visions of how this is accomplished. One view holds that control regions engage ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), an area associated with fear extinction, that in turn modulates amygdala responses. An alternative view is that control regions modulate semantic representations in lateral temporal cortex that indirectly influence emotion-related responses in the amygdala. Furthermore, while previous work has emphasized the amygdala, whether reappraisal influences other regions implicated in emotional responding remains unknown. To resolve these questions, we performed a meta-analysis of 48 neuroimaging studies of reappraisal, most involving downregulation of negative affect. Reappraisal consistently 1) activated cognitive control regions and lateral temporal cortex, but not vmPFC, and 2) modulated the bilateral amygdala, but no other brain regions. This suggests that reappraisal involves the use of cognitive control to modulate semantic representations of an emotional stimulus, and these altered representations in turn attenuate activity in the amygdala.

  11. The development of emotion regulation: an fMRI study of cognitive reappraisal in children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gross, James J.; Weber, Jochen; Robertson, Elaine R.; Sokol-Hessner, Peter; Ray, Rebecca D.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to use cognitive reappraisal to regulate emotions is an adaptive skill in adulthood, but little is known about its development. Because reappraisal is thought to be supported by linearly developing prefrontal regions, one prediction is that reappraisal ability develops linearly. However, recent investigations into socio-emotional development suggest that there are non-linear patterns that uniquely affect adolescents. We compared older children (10–13), adolescents (14–17) and young adults (18–22) on a task that distinguishes negative emotional reactivity from reappraisal ability. Behaviorally, we observed no age differences in self-reported emotional reactivity, but linear and quadratic relationships between reappraisal ability and age. Neurally, we observed linear age-related increases in activation in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, previously identified in adult reappraisal. We observed a quadratic pattern of activation with age in regions associated with social cognitive processes like mental state attribution (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, anterior temporal cortex). In these regions, we observed relatively lower reactivity-related activation in adolescents, but higher reappraisal-related activation. This suggests that (i) engagement of the cognitive control components of reappraisal increases linearly with age and (ii) adolescents may not normally recruit regions associated with mental state attribution, but (iii) this can be reversed with reappraisal instructions. PMID:22228751

  12. Executive and semantic processes in reappraisal of negative stimuli: insights from a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Irene; Bianco, Simone; Sambin, Marco; Viviani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging investigations have identified the neural correlates of reappraisal in executive areas. These findings have been interpreted as evidence for recruitment of controlled processes, at the expense of automatic processes when responding to emotional stimuli. However, activation of semantic areas has also been reported. The aim of the present work was to address the issue of the importance of semantic areas in emotion regulation by comparing recruitment of executive and semantic neural substrates in studies investigating different reappraisal strategies. With this aim, we reviewed neuroimaging studies on reappraisal and we classified them in two main categories: reappraisal of stimuli (RS) and reappraisal via perspective taking (RPT). We applied a coordinate-based meta-analysis to summarize the results of fMRI studies on different reappraisal strategies. Our results showed that reappraisal, when considered regardless of the specific instruction used in the studies, involved both executive and semantic areas of the brain. When considering different reappraisal strategies separately, in contrast, we found areas associated with executive function to be prominently recruited by RS, even if also semantic areas were activated. Instead, in RPT the most important clusters of brain activity were found in parietal and temporal semantic areas, without significant clusters in executive areas. These results indicate that modulation of activity in semantic areas may constitute an important aspect of emotion regulation in reappraisal, suggesting that semantic processes may be more important to understand the mechanism of emotion regulation than previously thought. PMID:26217277

  13. Worrying about the future: An episodic specificity induction impacts problem solving, reappraisal, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Jing, Helen G; Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that an episodic specificity induction--brief training in recollecting details of a recent experience--enhances performance on various subsequent tasks thought to draw upon episodic memory processes. Existing work has also shown that mental simulation can be beneficial for emotion regulation and coping with stressors. Here we focus on understanding how episodic detail can affect problem solving, reappraisal, and psychological well-being regarding worrisome future events. In Experiment 1, an episodic specificity induction significantly improved participants' performance on a subsequent means-end problem solving task (i.e., more relevant steps) and an episodic reappraisal task (i.e., more episodic details) involving personally worrisome future events compared with a control induction not focused on episodic specificity. Imagining constructive behaviors with increased episodic detail via the specificity induction was also related to significantly larger decreases in anxiety, perceived likelihood of a bad outcome, and perceived difficulty to cope with a bad outcome, as well as larger increases in perceived likelihood of a good outcome and indicated use of active coping behaviors compared with the control. In Experiment 2, we extended these findings using a more stringent control induction, and found preliminary evidence that the specificity induction was related to an increase in positive affect and decrease in negative affect compared with the control. Our findings support the idea that episodic memory processes are involved in means-end problem solving and episodic reappraisal, and that increasing the episodic specificity of imagining constructive behaviors regarding worrisome events may be related to improved psychological well-being. PMID:26820166

  14. [A reappraisal of the works of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross].

    PubMed

    Afonso, Selene Beviláqua Chaves; Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a reappraisal of part of the works of Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, one of the most quoted authors addressing the end of life process, mourning and dying. Her work has contributed to a clearer understanding of these issues by health professionals, families, religious and lay people who handle and/or experience mourning. She has also been the subject of controversy related to ethical issues and the scientific rigor of her work. The books analyzed in this article are: On death and dying (1969); Questions and answers on death and dying (1971); Living with death and dying (1981); On children and death(1983); On life after death (1991) and Life lessons (2000).

  15. [A reappraisal of the works of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross].

    PubMed

    Afonso, Selene Beviláqua Chaves; Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2013-09-01

    This article presents a reappraisal of part of the works of Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, one of the most quoted authors addressing the end of life process, mourning and dying. Her work has contributed to a clearer understanding of these issues by health professionals, families, religious and lay people who handle and/or experience mourning. She has also been the subject of controversy related to ethical issues and the scientific rigor of her work. The books analyzed in this article are: On death and dying (1969); Questions and answers on death and dying (1971); Living with death and dying (1981); On children and death(1983); On life after death (1991) and Life lessons (2000). PMID:23989580

  16. Pericoronitis: a reappraisal of its clinical and microbiologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, D W; Tal, O; Sela, M N; Shteyer, A

    1985-07-01

    Pericoronitis is an infectious disease of the operculum overlying an erupting or semi-impacted tooth. It manifests itself mainly in late adolescence and young adulthood and nearly always occurs around the lower third molar. The distinctive location, age, clinical picture, and link with predisposing factors warranted a reappraisal of pericoronitis and its etiology. Spirochetes and fusobacteria proved prevalent at all stages of the disease. The presence of these microbacteria may provide a clue as to the late appearance, particular location, and singular clinical picture of pericoronitis. The fact that spirochetes and fusobacteria are also found in acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and have been associated with alveolar osteitis, indicates a possible relationship between these disorders and pericoronitis.

  17. The ubiquitous interleukin-6: a time for reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Fisman, Enrique Z; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine regulating humoral and cellular responses and playing a central role in inflammation and tissue injury. Its effects are mediated through interaction with its receptor complex, IL-6Rβ (also known as gp130). It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and large quantities of IL-6 are found in human atherosclerotic plaques. IL-6 levels positively correlate with higher all-cause mortality, unstable angina, left ventricular dysfunction, propensity to diabetes and its complications, hypertension, obesity and several types of cancer. IL-6 levels augmentation demonstrates a remarkable parallel with another biomarkers reflecting harmful processes, like tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukins 8 and 18, YKL-40, C reactive protein and resistin. Due to these facts, IL-6 was classified as a noxious interleukin. Nonetheless, there are several facts that challenge this usually accepted point of view. Since IL-6 has also anti-inflammatory activity, it seems reasonable to assume that favorable aspects exist. These aspects are two: 1. protection against bacterial infections, inactivating proinflammatory mediators, mitigating the course of septic shock and inducing the production of cortisol; and 2. influence on insulin sensitivity during exercise; this aspect is even more important. During exercise IL-6 is synthesized and released by muscles, with enhanced insulin action immediately at early recovery. Skeletal muscle may be considered as an endocrine organ; contracting muscles produce IL-6 and release it into the blood exerting its effects on other organs. The increase in circulating levels of IL-6 after exercise is consistent and proportional to exercise duration, intensity, muscle mass involved and endurance capacity. Thus, the fascinating possibility that the plenteous beneficial health effects of exercise could be ultimately mediated by IL-6 merits further elucidation. Interleukins were termed

  18. Description-based reappraisal regulate the emotion induced by erotic and neutral images in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiaxin; Qu, Chen; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Previous emotion-regulation research has shown that the late positive potential (LPP) is sensitive to the down-regulation of emotion; however, whether LPP is also sensitive to the up-regulation of emotion remains unclear. The present study examined the description-based reappraisal effects on the up-regulation of positive emotions induced by erotic and neutral images in a Chinese population. Self-reported ratings and event-related potential (ERP) were recorded when subjects viewed pleasant and neutral images, which were shown after either a neutral or positive description. Self-reported results showed that images following positive descriptions were rated as more pleasant compared to images following neutral descriptions. ERP results revealed that the P2, P3, and slow wave (SW) components were larger for erotic pictures than for neutral pictures, while the positive description condition yielded attenuated erotic image-induced P2, P3 and SW and increased SW induced by neutral images. The results demonstrated that description-based reappraisal, as a method of reappraisal, significantly modulates the emotional experience and ERP responses to erotic and neutral images. PMID:23335894

  19. A reappraisal of early hominid phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Strait, D S; Grine, F E; Moniz, M A

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the results of a new cladistic analysis of early hominid relationships. Ingroup taxa included Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus aethiopicus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster and Homo sapiens. Outgroup taxa included Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla. Sixty craniodental characters were selected for analysis. These were drawn from the trait lists of other studies and our own observations. Eight parsimony analyses were performed that differed with respect to the number of characters examined and the manner in which the characters were treated. Seven employed ordered characters, and included analyses in which (1) taxa that were variable with respect to a character were coded as having an intermediate state, (2) characters with variable states in any taxon were excluded; (3) a variable taxon was coded as having the state exhibited by the majority of its hypodigm, (4) variable taxa were coded as missing data for that character, (5) some characters were considered irreversible, (6) masticatory characters were excluded, and (7) characters whose states were unknown in some taxa were excluded. In the final analysis, (8) all characters were unordered. All analyses were performed using PAUP 3.0s. Despite the fact that the eight analyses differed with respect to methodology, they produced several consistent results. All agreed that the "robust" australopithecines form a clade, A. afarensis is the sister taxon of all other hominids, and the genus Australopithecus, as conventionally defined, is paraphyletic. All eight also supported trees in which A. africanus is the sister taxon of a joint Homo+ "robust" clade, although in one analysis an equally parsimonious topology found A. africanus to be the sister of the "robust" species. In most analyses, the relationships of A. africanus and H. habilis were unstable, in the sense that their positions vary in trees

  20. A reappraisal of early hominid phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Strait, D S; Grine, F E; Moniz, M A

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the results of a new cladistic analysis of early hominid relationships. Ingroup taxa included Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus aethiopicus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster and Homo sapiens. Outgroup taxa included Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla. Sixty craniodental characters were selected for analysis. These were drawn from the trait lists of other studies and our own observations. Eight parsimony analyses were performed that differed with respect to the number of characters examined and the manner in which the characters were treated. Seven employed ordered characters, and included analyses in which (1) taxa that were variable with respect to a character were coded as having an intermediate state, (2) characters with variable states in any taxon were excluded; (3) a variable taxon was coded as having the state exhibited by the majority of its hypodigm, (4) variable taxa were coded as missing data for that character, (5) some characters were considered irreversible, (6) masticatory characters were excluded, and (7) characters whose states were unknown in some taxa were excluded. In the final analysis, (8) all characters were unordered. All analyses were performed using PAUP 3.0s. Despite the fact that the eight analyses differed with respect to methodology, they produced several consistent results. All agreed that the "robust" australopithecines form a clade, A. afarensis is the sister taxon of all other hominids, and the genus Australopithecus, as conventionally defined, is paraphyletic. All eight also supported trees in which A. africanus is the sister taxon of a joint Homo+ "robust" clade, although in one analysis an equally parsimonious topology found A. africanus to be the sister of the "robust" species. In most analyses, the relationships of A. africanus and H. habilis were unstable, in the sense that their positions vary in trees

  1. Reappraisal and suppression mediate the contribution of regulatory focus to anxiety in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Nicole; Dolcos, Sanda; Iordan, Alexandru D; Rudolph, Karen D; Dolcos, Florin

    2013-08-01

    Theory and research link regulatory focus (RF) in the form of promotion and prevention goal orientation with internalizing symptoms (e.g., anxiety), but the relevant mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of two emotion regulation (ER) strategies (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) as possible mediators. Path analysis using data from 179 healthy young participants (110 women, 69 men) revealed that stronger promotion orientation was significantly associated with less anxiety, and that the use of reappraisal and suppression partially mediated this association. Prevention was associated with more suppression but was not directly associated with anxiety. There were no gender differences in these effects. Collectively, these findings suggest that effective ER, through heightened use of reappraisal and dampened use of suppression, serves as a mechanism through which promotion confers protection against anxiety. This research provides empirical support to initiatives aimed at promoting healthy psychological adjustment and preventing anxiety, by optimizing ER strategies with respect to RF goal orientations.

  2. Distracted by the Unthought - Suppression and Reappraisal of Mind Wandering under Stereotype Threat.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Carolin; Martiny, Sarah E; Schmader, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that subtle reminders of negative stereotypes about one's group can lead individuals to underperform on stereotype-relevant tests (e.g., women in math, ethnic minorities on intelligence tests). This so called stereotype threat effect can contribute to systematic group differences in performance that can obscure the true abilities of certain social groups and thereby sustain social inequalities. In the present study, we examined processes underlying stereotype threat effects on women's math performance, specifically focusing on the role of suppression of mind wandering (i.e., task-irrelevant thinking) in stereotype threat (ST) and no threat (NT) situations. Based on a process model of stereotype threat effects on performance, we hypothesized that women under stereotype threat spontaneously suppress mind wandering, and that this suppression impairs performance. An alternative regulation strategy that prevents suppression (i.e., reappraising task-irrelevant thoughts as normal) was predicted to prevent stereotype threat effects on performance. We manipulated stereotype threat (ST vs. NT) and cognitive regulation strategy (suppression, reappraisal, or no strategy) and measured women's performance on a math and a concentration task (N = 113). We expected three groups to perform relatively more poorly: Those in ST with either no strategy or suppression and those in NT with a suppression strategy. We tested the performance of these groups against the remaining three groups hypothesized to perform relatively better: those in NT with no strategy or reappraisal and those in ST with reappraisal. The results showed the expected pattern for participants' math performance, but not for concentration achievement. This pattern suggests that ineffective self-regulation by suppressing mind wandering can at least partly explain stereotype threat effects on performance, whereas a reappraisal strategy can prevent this impairment. We discuss implications for

  3. The common and distinct neural bases of affect labeling and reappraisal in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Burklund, Lisa J.; Creswell, J. David; Irwin, Michael R.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Emotion regulation is commonly characterized as involving conscious and intentional attempts to change felt emotions, such as, for example, through reappraisal whereby one intentionally decreases the intensity of one's emotional response to a particular stimulus or situation by reinterpreting it in a less threatening way. However, there is growing evidence and appreciation that some types of emotion regulation are unintentional or incidental, meaning that affective modulation is a consequence but not an explicit goal. For example, affect labeling involves simply verbally labeling the emotional content of an external stimulus or one's own affective responses without an intentional goal of altering emotional responses, yet has been associated with reduced affective responses at the neural and experiential levels. Although both intentional and incidental emotional regulation strategies have been associated with diminished limbic responses and self-reported distress, little previous research has directly compared their underlying neural mechanisms. In this study, we examined the extent to which incidental and intentional emotion regulation, namely, affect labeling and reappraisal, produced common and divergent neural and self-report responses to aversive images relative to an observe-only control condition in a sample of healthy older adults (N = 39). Affect labeling and reappraisal produced common activations in several prefrontal regulatory regions, with affect labeling producing stronger responses in direct comparisons. Affect labeling and reappraisal were also associated with similar decreases in amygdala activity. Finally, affect labeling and reappraisal were associated with correlated reductions in self-reported distress. Together these results point to common neurocognitive mechanisms involved in affect labeling and reappraisal, supporting the idea that intentional and incidental emotion regulation may utilize overlapping neural processes. PMID:24715880

  4. Distracted by the Unthought - Suppression and Reappraisal of Mind Wandering under Stereotype Threat.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Carolin; Martiny, Sarah E; Schmader, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that subtle reminders of negative stereotypes about one's group can lead individuals to underperform on stereotype-relevant tests (e.g., women in math, ethnic minorities on intelligence tests). This so called stereotype threat effect can contribute to systematic group differences in performance that can obscure the true abilities of certain social groups and thereby sustain social inequalities. In the present study, we examined processes underlying stereotype threat effects on women's math performance, specifically focusing on the role of suppression of mind wandering (i.e., task-irrelevant thinking) in stereotype threat (ST) and no threat (NT) situations. Based on a process model of stereotype threat effects on performance, we hypothesized that women under stereotype threat spontaneously suppress mind wandering, and that this suppression impairs performance. An alternative regulation strategy that prevents suppression (i.e., reappraising task-irrelevant thoughts as normal) was predicted to prevent stereotype threat effects on performance. We manipulated stereotype threat (ST vs. NT) and cognitive regulation strategy (suppression, reappraisal, or no strategy) and measured women's performance on a math and a concentration task (N = 113). We expected three groups to perform relatively more poorly: Those in ST with either no strategy or suppression and those in NT with a suppression strategy. We tested the performance of these groups against the remaining three groups hypothesized to perform relatively better: those in NT with no strategy or reappraisal and those in ST with reappraisal. The results showed the expected pattern for participants' math performance, but not for concentration achievement. This pattern suggests that ineffective self-regulation by suppressing mind wandering can at least partly explain stereotype threat effects on performance, whereas a reappraisal strategy can prevent this impairment. We discuss implications for

  5. Reappraising Abstract Paintings after Exposure to Background Information

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongmin A.; Yun, Kyongsik; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2015-01-01

    Can knowledge help viewers when they appreciate an artwork? Experts’ judgments of the aesthetic value of a painting often differ from the estimates of naïve viewers, and this phenomenon is especially pronounced in the aesthetic judgment of abstract paintings. We compared the changes in aesthetic judgments of naïve viewers while they were progressively exposed to five pieces of background information. The participants were asked to report their aesthetic judgments of a given painting after each piece of information was presented. We found that commentaries by the artist and a critic significantly increased the subjective aesthetic ratings. Does knowledge enable experts to attend to the visual features in a painting and to link it to the evaluative conventions, thus potentially causing different aesthetic judgments? To investigate whether a specific pattern of attention is essential for the knowledge-based appreciation, we tracked the eye movements of subjects while viewing a painting with a commentary by the artist and with a commentary by a critic. We observed that critics’ commentaries directed the viewers’ attention to the visual components that were highly relevant to the presented commentary. However, attention to specific features of a painting was not necessary for increasing the subjective aesthetic judgment when the artists’ commentary was presented. Our results suggest that at least two different cognitive mechanisms may be involved in knowledge- guided aesthetic judgments while viewers reappraise a painting. PMID:25945789

  6. Reappraising abstract paintings after exposure to background information.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongmin A; Yun, Kyongsik; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2015-01-01

    Can knowledge help viewers when they appreciate an artwork? Experts' judgments of the aesthetic value of a painting often differ from the estimates of naïve viewers, and this phenomenon is especially pronounced in the aesthetic judgment of abstract paintings. We compared the changes in aesthetic judgments of naïve viewers while they were progressively exposed to five pieces of background information. The participants were asked to report their aesthetic judgments of a given painting after each piece of information was presented. We found that commentaries by the artist and a critic significantly increased the subjective aesthetic ratings. Does knowledge enable experts to attend to the visual features in a painting and to link it to the evaluative conventions, thus potentially causing different aesthetic judgments? To investigate whether a specific pattern of attention is essential for the knowledge-based appreciation, we tracked the eye movements of subjects while viewing a painting with a commentary by the artist and with a commentary by a critic. We observed that critics' commentaries directed the viewers' attention to the visual components that were highly relevant to the presented commentary. However, attention to specific features of a painting was not necessary for increasing the subjective aesthetic judgment when the artists' commentary was presented. Our results suggest that at least two different cognitive mechanisms may be involved in knowledge- guided aesthetic judgments while viewers reappraise a painting.

  7. Non-organic failure to thrive: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Skuse, D H

    1985-02-01

    Non-organic failure to thrive has traditionally been regarded as due primarily to maternal rejection and neglect. A critical reappraisal of the evidence suggests a more balanced view of the mother-child relationship should be taken. A classification of the condition, founded on facts not concepts, is urgently required. Non-organic failure to thrive should be viewed in a multidimensional context, in which potential influences upon the symptomatic infant are considered. Inadequacy of nutrition is caused by both a failure of adequate provision of food and by inadequate intake. A vicious circle of maladaptive behavioural interaction between caregiver and infant is often present, sustained by high emotional tensions. Clinical intervention should aim to clarify the contributions made by both caregiver and infant to that interaction and thus break the cycle. The basis on which intervention is made should be direct observation of the parent and child relationship in as many different environmental contexts as feasible, especially during feeding. The multidisciplinary team has an important role to play in management. An emphasis on parental culpability in the aetiology of non-organic failure to thrive, in the absence of direct evidence of neglect, is wrong. PMID:3883912

  8. Functional overlap of top-down emotion regulation and generation: an fMRI study identifying common neural substrates between cognitive reappraisal and cognitively generated emotions.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya; McRae, Kateri

    2014-09-01

    One factor that influences the success of emotion regulation is the manner in which the regulated emotion was generated. Recent research has suggested that reappraisal, a top-down emotion regulation strategy, is more effective in decreasing self-reported negative affect when emotions were generated from the top-down, versus the bottom-up. On the basis of a process overlap framework, we hypothesized that the neural regions active during reappraisal would overlap more with emotions that were generated from the top-down, rather than from the bottom-up. In addition, we hypothesized that increased neural overlap between reappraisal and the history effects of top-down emotion generation would be associated with increased reappraisal success. The results of several analyses suggested that reappraisal and emotions that were generated from the top-down share a core network of prefrontal, temporal, and cingulate regions. This overlap is specific; no such overlap was observed between reappraisal and emotions that were generated in a bottom-up fashion. This network consists of regions previously implicated in linguistic processing, cognitive control, and self-relevant appraisals, which are processes thought to be crucial to both reappraisal and top-down emotion generation. Furthermore, individuals with high reappraisal success demonstrated greater neural overlap between reappraisal and the history of top-down emotion generation than did those with low reappraisal success. The overlap of these key regions, reflecting overlapping processes, provides an initial insight into the mechanism by which generation history may facilitate emotion regulation.

  9. Mind over Matter: Reappraising Arousal Improves Cardiovascular and Cognitive Responses to Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Nock, Matthew K.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that changing the way we think about our bodily responses can improve our physiological and cognitive reactions to stressful events. However, the underlying processes through which mental states improve downstream outcomes are not well understood. To this end, we examined whether reappraising stress-induced arousal could…

  10. Attentional deployment is not necessary for successful emotion regulation via cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression.

    PubMed

    Bebko, Genna M; Franconeri, Steven L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-06-01

    According to appraisal theories of emotion, cognitive reappraisal is a successful emotion regulation strategy because it involves cognitively changing our thoughts, which, in turn, change our emotions. However, recent evidence has challenged the importance of cognitive change and, instead, has suggested that attentional deployment may at least partly explain the emotion regulation success of cognitive reappraisal. The purpose of the current study was to examine the causal relationship between attentional deployment and emotion regulation success. We examined 2 commonly used emotion regulation strategies--cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression-because both depend on attention but have divergent behavioral, experiential, and physiological outcomes. Participants were either instructed to regulate emotions during free-viewing (unrestricted image viewing) or gaze-controlled (restricted image viewing) conditions and to self-report negative emotional experience. For both emotion regulation strategies, emotion regulation success was not altered by changes in participant control over the (a) direction of attention (free-viewing vs. gaze-controlled) during image viewing and (b) valence (negative vs. neutral) of visual stimuli viewed when gaze was controlled. Taken together, these findings provide convergent evidence that attentional deployment does not alter subjective negative emotional experience during either cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression, suggesting that strategy-specific processes, such as cognitive appraisal and response modulation, respectively, may have a greater impact on emotional regulation success than processes common to both strategies, such as attention.

  11. Resisting the Sirens of Temptation while Studying: Using Reappraisal to Increase Focus, Enthusiasm, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy, Veronique; Gregoire, Jacques; Magen, Eran; Gross, James J.; Mikolajczak, Moira

    2012-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in the learning process is temptation, which has the power to divert students from even their most important goals (e.g. getting a degree). In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that cognitive reappraisal could be used to successfully resist temptation. Participants had to memorize tedious material while being tempted…

  12. 26 CFR 403.45 - Re-appraisal of property involved in an allowed petition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Forfeitures § 403.45 Re-appraisal of property involved in an allowed petition. In determining the nature and extent of the relief to be afforded a petitioner pursuant to § 403.44 the value of the property with respect to which the petition has been allowed is the value of such property as determined by...

  13. Morphological and genetic reappraisal of the Orius fauna of the western United States (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Anthocoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Examination of minute pirate bugs, Orius spp. (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Anthocoridae) from a broad geographic range in the western U.S. prompted a reappraisal of the taxonomic composition and geographic distribution of the fauna native to the western U.S. and Canada. Collecting efforts led to the di...

  14. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  15. Face it or hide it: parental socialization of reappraisal and response suppression.

    PubMed

    Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Fäsche, Anika; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; von Suchodoletz, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Mastery of cognitive emotion regulation strategies is an important developmental task. This paper focuses on two strategies that occur from preschool age onwards (Stegge and Meerum Terwogt, 2007): reappraisal and response suppression. Parental socialization of these strategies was investigated in a sample of N = 219 parents and their children. Informed by the tripartite model of family impact on children's emotion regulation, direct relations of emotion socialization components (modeling and reactions to the child's negative emotions) and indirect relations of parental emotion-related beliefs (such as parental emotion regulation self-efficacy) were examined. Data on emotion socialization components and parental beliefs on emotion regulation were collected via self-report. Data on children's emotion regulation strategies were collected via parent report. Findings showed direct effects of parental modeling and parenting practices on children's emotion regulation strategies, with distinct socialization paths for reappraisal and response suppression. An indirect effect of parental emotion regulation self-efficacy on children's reappraisal was found. These associations were not moderated by parent sex. Findings highlight the importance of both socialization components and parental emotion-related beliefs for the socialization of cognitive emotion regulation strategies and suggest a domain-specific approach to the socialization of emotion regulation strategies.

  16. Emotion Regulation as the Foundation of Political Attitudes: Does Reappraisal Decrease Support for Conservative Policies?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooa Julia; Sohn, Yunkyu; Fowler, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive scientists, behavior geneticists, and political scientists have identified several ways in which emotions influence political attitudes, and psychologists have shown that emotion regulation can have an important causal effect on physiology, cognition, and subjective experience. However, no work to date explores the possibility that emotion regulation may shape political ideology and attitudes toward policies. Here, we conduct four studies that investigate the role of a particular emotion regulation strategy – reappraisal in particular. Two observational studies show that individual differences in emotion regulation styles predict variation in political orientations and support for conservative policies. In the third study, we experimentally induce disgust as the target emotion to be regulated and show that use of reappraisal reduces the experience of disgust, thereby decreasing moral concerns associated with conservatism. In the final experimental study, we show that use of reappraisal successfully attenuates the relationship between trait-level disgust sensitivity and support for conservative policies. Our findings provide the first evidence of a critical link between emotion regulation and political attitudes. PMID:24367583

  17. Face it or hide it: parental socialization of reappraisal and response suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Fäsche, Anika; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; von Suchodoletz, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Mastery of cognitive emotion regulation strategies is an important developmental task. This paper focuses on two strategies that occur from preschool age onwards (Stegge and Meerum Terwogt, 2007): reappraisal and response suppression. Parental socialization of these strategies was investigated in a sample of N = 219 parents and their children. Informed by the tripartite model of family impact on children's emotion regulation, direct relations of emotion socialization components (modeling and reactions to the child's negative emotions) and indirect relations of parental emotion-related beliefs (such as parental emotion regulation self-efficacy) were examined. Data on emotion socialization components and parental beliefs on emotion regulation were collected via self-report. Data on children's emotion regulation strategies were collected via parent report. Findings showed direct effects of parental modeling and parenting practices on children's emotion regulation strategies, with distinct socialization paths for reappraisal and response suppression. An indirect effect of parental emotion regulation self-efficacy on children's reappraisal was found. These associations were not moderated by parent sex. Findings highlight the importance of both socialization components and parental emotion-related beliefs for the socialization of cognitive emotion regulation strategies and suggest a domain-specific approach to the socialization of emotion regulation strategies. PMID:24427150

  18. Cognitive reappraisal of negative affect: converging evidence from EMG and self-report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Rebecca D; McRae, Kateri; Ochsner, Kevin N; Gross, James J

    2010-08-01

    Prior psychophysiological studies of cognitive reappraisal have generally focused on the down-regulation of negative affect, and have demonstrated either changes in self-reports of affective experience, or changes in facial electromyography, but not both. Unfortunately, when taken separately, these measures are vulnerable to different sources of bias, and alternative explanations might account for changes in these indicators of negative affect. What is needed is a study that (a) obtains measures of self-reported affect together with facial electromyography, and (b) examines the use of reappraisal to regulate externally and internally generated affective responses. In the present study, participants up- or down-regulated negative affect in the context of both negative and neutral pictures. Up-regulation led to greater self reports of negative affect, as well as greater corrugator and startle responses to both negative and neutral stimuli. Down-regulation led to lesser reports of negative affect, and lesser corrugator responses to negative and neutral stimuli. These results extend prior research by (a) showing simultaneous effects on multiple measures of affect, and (b) demonstrating that cognitive reappraisal may be used both to regulate responses to negative stimuli and to manufacture a negative response to neutral stimuli.

  19. Face it or hide it: parental socialization of reappraisal and response suppression.

    PubMed

    Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Fäsche, Anika; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; von Suchodoletz, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Mastery of cognitive emotion regulation strategies is an important developmental task. This paper focuses on two strategies that occur from preschool age onwards (Stegge and Meerum Terwogt, 2007): reappraisal and response suppression. Parental socialization of these strategies was investigated in a sample of N = 219 parents and their children. Informed by the tripartite model of family impact on children's emotion regulation, direct relations of emotion socialization components (modeling and reactions to the child's negative emotions) and indirect relations of parental emotion-related beliefs (such as parental emotion regulation self-efficacy) were examined. Data on emotion socialization components and parental beliefs on emotion regulation were collected via self-report. Data on children's emotion regulation strategies were collected via parent report. Findings showed direct effects of parental modeling and parenting practices on children's emotion regulation strategies, with distinct socialization paths for reappraisal and response suppression. An indirect effect of parental emotion regulation self-efficacy on children's reappraisal was found. These associations were not moderated by parent sex. Findings highlight the importance of both socialization components and parental emotion-related beliefs for the socialization of cognitive emotion regulation strategies and suggest a domain-specific approach to the socialization of emotion regulation strategies. PMID:24427150

  20. Look before you regulate: differential perceptual strategies underlying expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bebko, Genna M; Franconeri, Steven L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Chiao, Joan Y

    2011-08-01

    Successful emotion regulation is important for maintaining psychological well-being. Although it is known that emotion regulation strategies, such as cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, may have divergent consequences for emotional responses, the cognitive processes underlying these differences remain unclear. Here we used eye-tracking to investigate the role of attentional deployment in emotion regulation success. We hypothesized that differences in the deployment of attention to emotional areas of complex visual scenes may be a contributing factor to the differential effects of these two strategies on emotional experience. Eye-movements, pupil size, and self-reported negative emotional experience were measured while healthy young adult participants viewed negative IAPS images and regulated their emotional responses using either cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression. Consistent with prior work, reappraisers reported feeling significantly less negative than suppressers when regulating emotion as compared to a baseline condition. Across both groups, participants looked away from emotional areas during emotion regulation, an effect that was more pronounced for suppressers. Critically, irrespective of emotion regulation strategy, participants who looked toward emotional areas of a complex visual scene were more likely to experience emotion regulation success. Taken together, these results demonstrate that attentional deployment varies across emotion regulation strategies and that successful emotion regulation depends on the extent to which people look toward emotional content in complex visual scenes. PMID:21707159

  1. Evidence of successful modulation of brain activation and subjective experience during reappraisal of negative emotion in unmedicated depression.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Daniel Gerard; Pizzagalli, Diego Andrea

    2013-05-30

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine cognitive regulation of negative emotion in 12 unmedicated patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 24 controls. The participants used reappraisal to increase (real condition) and reduce (photo condition) the personal relevance of negative and neutral pictures during fMRI as valence ratings were collected; passive viewing (look condition) served as a baseline. Reappraisal was not strongly affected by MDD. Ratings indicated that both groups successfully reappraised negative emotional experience. Both groups also showed better memory for negative vs. neutral pictures 2 weeks later. Across groups, increased brain activation was observed on negative/real vs. negative/look and negative/photo trials in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), rostral anterior cingulate, left parietal cortex, caudate, and right amygdala. Depressive severity was inversely correlated with activation modulation in the left DLPFC, right amygdala, and right cerebellum during negative reappraisal. The lack of group differences suggests that depressed adults can modulate the brain activation and subjective experience elicited by negative pictures when given clear instructions. However, the negative relationship between depression severity and effects of reappraisal on brain activation indicates that group differences may be detectable in larger samples of more severely depressed participants.

  2. Functional overlap of top-down emotion regulation and generation: an fMRI study identifying common neural substrates between cognitive reappraisal and cognitively generated emotions.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya; McRae, Kateri

    2014-09-01

    One factor that influences the success of emotion regulation is the manner in which the regulated emotion was generated. Recent research has suggested that reappraisal, a top-down emotion regulation strategy, is more effective in decreasing self-reported negative affect when emotions were generated from the top-down, versus the bottom-up. On the basis of a process overlap framework, we hypothesized that the neural regions active during reappraisal would overlap more with emotions that were generated from the top-down, rather than from the bottom-up. In addition, we hypothesized that increased neural overlap between reappraisal and the history effects of top-down emotion generation would be associated with increased reappraisal success. The results of several analyses suggested that reappraisal and emotions that were generated from the top-down share a core network of prefrontal, temporal, and cingulate regions. This overlap is specific; no such overlap was observed between reappraisal and emotions that were generated in a bottom-up fashion. This network consists of regions previously implicated in linguistic processing, cognitive control, and self-relevant appraisals, which are processes thought to be crucial to both reappraisal and top-down emotion generation. Furthermore, individuals with high reappraisal success demonstrated greater neural overlap between reappraisal and the history of top-down emotion generation than did those with low reappraisal success. The overlap of these key regions, reflecting overlapping processes, provides an initial insight into the mechanism by which generation history may facilitate emotion regulation. PMID:24430617

  3. Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react. PMID:24027512

  4. Cognitive regulation of food craving: Effects of three cognitive reappraisal strategies on neural response to palatable foods

    PubMed Central

    Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obese versus lean individuals show greater reward region and reduced inhibitory region responsivity to food images, which predict future weight gain. Thinking of the costs of eating palatable foods and craving suppression have been found to modulate this neural responsivity, but these cognitive reappraisal studies have primarily involved lean participants. Herein we evaluated the efficacy of a broader range of reappraisal strategies in modulating neural responsivity to palatable food images among individuals who ranged from lean to obese and tested whether Body Mass Index (BMI) moderates the effects of these strategies. Materials and method functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) assessed the effects of three cognitive reappraisal strategies in response to palatable food images versus an imagined intake comparison condition in a sample of adolescents (N = 21; M age = 15.2). Results Thinking of the long-term costs of eating the food, thinking of the long-term benefits of not eating the food, and attempting to suppress cravings for the food increased activation in inhibitory regions (e.g., superior frontal gyrus, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex) and reduced activation in attention-related regions (e.g., precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex). The reappraisal strategy focusing on the long-term benefits of not eating the food more effectively increased inhibitory region activity and reduced attention region activity compared to the other two cognitive reappraisal strategies. BMI did not moderate the effects. Discussion These novel results imply that cognitive reappraisal strategies, in particular those focusing on the benefits of not eating the food, could potentially increase the ability to inhibit appetitive motivation and reduce unhealthy food intake in overweight individuals. PMID:23567923

  5. A reappraisal of the morphology and systematic position of the theropod dinosaur Sigilmassasaurus from the “middle” Cretaceous of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Rauhut, Oliver W.M.; Milner, Angela C.; McFeeters, Bradley; Allain, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is an enigmatic theropod dinosaur from the early Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Morocco, originally based on a few isolated cervical vertebrae. Ever since its original description, both its taxonomic validity and systematic affinities were contentious. Originally considered to represent its own family, Sigilmassasauridae, the genus has variously been suggested to represent a carcharodontosaurid, an ornithischian, and, more recently, a spinosaurid. Here we describe new remains referrable to this taxon and re-evaluate its taxonomic status and systematic affinities. Based on the new remains, a re-evaluation of the original materials, and comparisons with other spinosaurids, the holotype of Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis is identified as an anterior dorsal, rather than a cervical vertebra, and differences between elements referred to this taxon can be explained by different positions of the elements in question within the vertebral column. Many characters used previously to diagnose the genus and species are found to be more widespread among basal tetanurans, and specifically spinosaurids. However, the taxon shows several autapomorphies that support its validity, including the presence of a strongly rugose, ventrally offset triangular platform that is confluent with a ventral keel anteriorly in the mid-cervical vertebral centra and a strongly reduced lateral neural arch lamination, with no or an incomplete distinction between anterior and posterior centrodiapophyseal laminae in the posterior cervical and anterior dorsal vertebrae. We argue furthermore that Spinosaurus maroccanus, also described on the basis of isolated cervical vertebrae from the same stratigraphic unit and in the same paper as Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis, is a subjective synonym of the latter. Both a detailed comparison of this taxon with other theropods and a formal phylogenetic analysis support spinosaurid affintities for Sigilmassasaurus. However, we reject the recently

  6. Efficacy of a Web-Based, Crowdsourced Peer-To-Peer Cognitive Reappraisal Platform for Depression: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Stephen M; Picard, Rosalind W

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-guided, Web-based interventions for depression show promising results but suffer from high attrition and low user engagement. Online peer support networks can be highly engaging, but they show mixed results and lack evidence-based content. Objective Our aim was to introduce and evaluate a novel Web-based, peer-to-peer cognitive reappraisal platform designed to promote evidence-based techniques, with the hypotheses that (1) repeated use of the platform increases reappraisal and reduces depression and (2) that the social, crowdsourced interactions enhance engagement. Methods Participants aged 18-35 were recruited online and were randomly assigned to the treatment group, “Panoply” (n=84), or an active control group, online expressive writing (n=82). Both are fully automated Web-based platforms. Participants were asked to use their assigned platform for a minimum of 25 minutes per week for 3 weeks. Both platforms involved posting descriptions of stressful thoughts and situations. Participants on the Panoply platform additionally received crowdsourced reappraisal support immediately after submitting a post (median response time=9 minutes). Panoply participants could also practice reappraising stressful situations submitted by other users. Online questionnaires administered at baseline and 3 weeks assessed depression symptoms, reappraisal, and perseverative thinking. Engagement was assessed through self-report measures, session data, and activity levels. Results The Panoply platform produced significant improvements from pre to post for depression (P=.001), reappraisal (P<.001), and perseverative thinking (P<.001). The expressive writing platform yielded significant pre to post improvements for depression (P=.02) and perseverative thinking (P<.001), but not reappraisal (P=.45). The two groups did not diverge significantly at post-test on measures of depression or perseverative thinking, though Panoply users had significantly higher reappraisal scores

  7. Self-compassion enhances the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal as an emotion regulation strategy in individuals with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Alice; Hofmann, Stefan G; Cuijpers, Pim; Berking, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive reappraisal has been shown to be an effective strategy to regulate depressed mood in healthy and remitted depressed individuals. However, individuals currently suffering from a clinical depression often experience difficulties in utilizing this strategy. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine whether the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal in major depressive disorder can be enhanced through the use of self-compassion and emotion-focused acceptance as preparatory strategies. Thereby, explicit cognitive reappraisal refers to purposefully identifying, challenging, and modifying depressiogenic cognitions to reduce depressed mood. To test our hypotheses, we induced depressed mood at four points in time in 54 participants (64.8% female; age M = 35.59, SD = 11.49 years) meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. After each mood induction, participants were instructed to either wait, or employ self-compassion, acceptance, or reappraisal to regulate their depressed mood. Depressed mood was assessed before and after each mood induction and regulation period on a visual analog scale. Results indicated that participants who had utilized self-compassion as a preparatory strategy experienced a significantly greater reduction of depressed mood during reappraisal than did those who had been instructed to wait prior to reappraisal. Participants who had used acceptance as a preparatory strategy did not experience a significantly greater reduction of depressed mood during subsequent reappraisal than those in the waiting condition. These findings provide preliminary evidence that the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal is moderated by the precursory use of other emotion regulation strategies. In particular, they suggest that depressed individuals might benefit from using self-compassion to facilitate the subsequent use of explicit cognitive reappraisal. PMID:27152671

  8. Self-compassion enhances the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal as an emotion regulation strategy in individuals with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Alice; Hofmann, Stefan G; Cuijpers, Pim; Berking, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive reappraisal has been shown to be an effective strategy to regulate depressed mood in healthy and remitted depressed individuals. However, individuals currently suffering from a clinical depression often experience difficulties in utilizing this strategy. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine whether the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal in major depressive disorder can be enhanced through the use of self-compassion and emotion-focused acceptance as preparatory strategies. Thereby, explicit cognitive reappraisal refers to purposefully identifying, challenging, and modifying depressiogenic cognitions to reduce depressed mood. To test our hypotheses, we induced depressed mood at four points in time in 54 participants (64.8% female; age M = 35.59, SD = 11.49 years) meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. After each mood induction, participants were instructed to either wait, or employ self-compassion, acceptance, or reappraisal to regulate their depressed mood. Depressed mood was assessed before and after each mood induction and regulation period on a visual analog scale. Results indicated that participants who had utilized self-compassion as a preparatory strategy experienced a significantly greater reduction of depressed mood during reappraisal than did those who had been instructed to wait prior to reappraisal. Participants who had used acceptance as a preparatory strategy did not experience a significantly greater reduction of depressed mood during subsequent reappraisal than those in the waiting condition. These findings provide preliminary evidence that the efficacy of explicit cognitive reappraisal is moderated by the precursory use of other emotion regulation strategies. In particular, they suggest that depressed individuals might benefit from using self-compassion to facilitate the subsequent use of explicit cognitive reappraisal.

  9. Using critical evaluation to reappraise plausibility judgments: A critical cognitive component of conceptual change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, D.

    2011-12-01

    Plausibility judgments-although well represented in conceptual change theories (see, for example, Chi, 2005; diSessa, 1993; Dole & Sinatra, 1998; Posner et al., 1982)-have received little empirical attention until our recent work investigating teachers' and students' understanding of and perceptions about human-induced climate change (Lombardi & Sinatra, 2010, 2011). In our first study with undergraduate students, we found that greater plausibility perceptions of human-induced climate accounted for significantly greater understanding of weather and climate distinctions after instruction, even after accounting for students' prior knowledge (Lombardi & Sinatra, 2010). In a follow-up study with inservice science and preservice elementary teachers, we showed that anger about the topic of climate change and teaching about climate change was significantly related to implausible perceptions about human-induced climate change (Lombardi & Sinatra, 2011). Results from our recent studies helped to inform our development of a model of the role of plausibility judgments in conceptual change situations. The model applies to situations involving cognitive dissonance, where background knowledge conflicts with an incoming message. In such situations, we define plausibility as a judgment on the relative potential truthfulness of incoming information compared to one's existing mental representations (Rescher, 1976). Students may not consciously think when making plausibility judgments, expending only minimal mental effort in what is referred to as an automatic cognitive process (Stanovich, 2009). However, well-designed instruction could facilitate students' reappraisal of plausibility judgments in more effortful and conscious cognitive processing. Critical evaluation specifically may be one effective method to promote plausibility reappraisal in a classroom setting (Lombardi & Sinatra, in progress). In science education, critical evaluation involves the analysis of how evidentiary

  10. Threat Reappraisal as a Mediator of Symptom Change in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Julian, Kristin; Rosenfield, David; Powers, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Identifying mediators of therapeutic change is important to the development of interventions and augmentation strategies. Threat reappraisal is considered a key mediator underlying the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. The present study systematically reviewed the evidence for the threat reappraisal…

  11. Cognitive Reappraisal Self-Efficacy Mediates the Effects of Individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Philippe R.; Ziv, Michal; Jazaieri, Hooria; Werner, Kelly; Kraemer, Helena; Heimberg, Richard G.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether changes in cognitive reappraisal self-efficacy (CR-SE) mediate the effects of individually administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (I-CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) on severity of social anxiety symptoms. Method: A randomized controlled trial in which 75 adult patients (21-55 years of age; 53% male; 57%…

  12. Neural Systems for Cognitive Reappraisal in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pitskel, Naomi B.; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Kaiser, Martha D.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Crowley, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite substantial clinical and anecdotal evidence for emotion dysregulation in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), little is known about the neural substrates underlying this phenomenon. We sought to explore neural mechanisms for cognitive reappraisal in children and adolescents with ASD using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We studied 16 youth with ASD and 15 age- and IQ-matched typically developing (TD) comparison youth. Participants were instructed in the use of cognitive reappraisal strategies to increase and decrease their emotional responses to disgusting images. Participants in both groups displayed distinct patterns of brain activity for increasing versus decreasing their emotions. TD participants showed downregulation of bilateral insula and left amygdala on decrease trials, whereas ASD participants showed no modulation of insula and upregulation of left amygdala. Furthermore, TD youth exhibited increased functional connectivity between amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex compared to ASD participants when downregulating disgust, as well as decreased functional connectivity between amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex. These findings have important implications for our understanding of emotion dysregulation and its treatment in ASD. In particular, the relative lack of prefrontal-amygdala connectivity provides a potential target for treatment-related outcome measurements. PMID:25198094

  13. Towards Clinical Applications of Anti-endotoxin Antibodies; A Re-appraisal of the Disconnect

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxin is a potent mediator of a broad range of patho-physiological effects in humans. It is present in all Gram negative (GN) bacteria. It would be expected that anti-endotoxin therapies, whether antibody based or not, would have an important adjuvant therapeutic role along with antibiotics and other supportive therapies for GN infections. Indeed there is an extensive literature relating to both pre-clinical and clinical studies of anti-endotoxin antibodies. However, the extent of disconnect between the generally successful pre-clinical studies versus the failures of the numerous large clinical trials of antibody based and other anti-endotoxin therapies is under-appreciated and unexplained. Seeking a reconciliation of this disconnect is not an abstract academic question as clinical trials of interventions to reduce levels of endotoxemia levels are ongoing. The aim of this review is to examine new insights into the complex relationship between endotoxemia and sepsis in an attempt to bridge this disconnect. Several new factors to consider in this reappraisal include the frequency and types of GN bacteremia and the underlying mortality risk in the various study populations. For a range of reasons, endotoxemia can no longer be considered as a single entity. There are old clinical trials which warrant a re-appraisal in light of these recent advances in the understanding of the structure-function relationship of endotoxin. Fundamentally however, the disconnect not only remains, it has enlarged. PMID:24351718

  14. Reappraising the surface anatomy of the pterion and its relationship to the middle meningeal artery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siyan; Baillie, Louisa J M; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-04-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the surface anatomy of the pterion is inconsistently reported. This study reappraises the surface marking of the pterion and its relationship to the middle meningeal artery (MMA). The position and morphology of the pterion were analyzed in the Frankfurt plane in 76 adult skulls and 50 adult cranial cone beam CT scans. Relationship to the anterior branch of the MMA was examined in the skulls. Measurement reproducibility was assessed in a 20% randomly selected sample. In the skulls, the majority of pteria were sphenoparietal (78%), followed by epipteric (16%) and frontotemporal (5%). The center of the pterion was a mean of 26 ± 4 mm behind and 11 ± 4 mm above the posterolateral margin of the frontozygomatic suture; measurements were reproducible and consistent between sides and genders. Distances from the frontozygomatic suture were slightly greater (29 and 16 mm, respectively) in cranial CTs. A one centimeter circle centered on the midpoint of the pterion overlapped the anterior branch of the MMA in 68% of skulls; the artery was a few millimeters posterior in the remainder. Mean skull thickness at the midpoint of the pterion was 4.4 mm compared to 1 mm at its thinnest point in the squamous temporal bone. In conclusion, in most adults, the pterion lies within a one centimeter diameter circle 2.6 cm behind and 1.3 cm above the posterolateral margin of the frontozygomatic suture (which is easily palpable in vivo). This region overlaps the anterior branch of the MMA in two-thirds of cases.

  15. Reappraise the Situation but Express Your Emotions: Impact of Emotion Regulation Strategies on ad libitum Food Intake.

    PubMed

    Taut, Diana; Renner, Britta; Baban, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Research investigating the role of maladaptive emotion regulation (ER) on food intake has exclusively focused on food intake in a forced consumption situation. In contrast, the present study examined the effect of negative emotions (fear, negative affect) and ER strategies (suppression, reappraisal) on food intake in a non-forced, free eating setting where participants (N = 165) could choose whether and how much they ate. This free (ad libitum) eating approach enabled, for the first time, the testing of (1) whether eating (yes/no) is used as a secondary ER strategy and (2) whether the amount of food intake differed, depending on the ER strategy. In order to produce a more ecologically valid design, ER strategy manipulation was realized while exposing participants to emotion induction procedures. To induce an initial negative emotional state, a movie clip was presented without ER instruction. The instructions to regulate emotions (suppression, reappraisal, no ER instruction) then preceded a second clip. The results show that whereas about two-thirds of the control (no ER instruction) and suppression groups began to eat, only one-third of the reappraisal group did. However, when reappraisers began to eat, they ate as much as participants in the suppression and control groups. Accordingly, the results suggest that when people are confronted with a negative event, eating is used as a secondary coping strategy when the enacted ER is ineffective. Conversely, an adaptive ER such as reappraisal decreases the likelihood of eating in the first place, even when ER is employed during rather than before the unfolding of the negative event. Consequently, the way we deal with negative emotions might be more relevant for explaining emotional eating than the distress itself.

  16. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs.

  17. Morphological and molecular analysis calls for a reappraisal of the red rain cells of Kerala.

    PubMed

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Burchell, Mark J; Hogg, Stuart I

    2014-02-01

    Early studies on the coloured particles that fell as red rain over southern India identified them as unicellular eukaryotes such as members of the red algae or fungi; however, the results of the present investigation are not consistent with this designation. Using transmission electron microscopy, we have demonstrated significant differences in the ultrastructure when compared with representative species from these other groups. Most notably, the red rain cells show no evidence of typical eukaryotic internal structures such as mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, comparisons based on elemental composition using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, as well as Raman spectral signatures demonstrate significant dissimilarities in their molecular composition. The identity and origins of the red rain cells remain an enigma; however, our findings are more consistent with an unidentified prokaryote, and thus suggest that previous attempts at their identification should be reappraised.

  18. About hearsay - or reappraisal of the role of the anamnesis as an instrument of meaningful communication.

    PubMed

    van Tellingen, C

    2007-01-01

    As a result of the ICT revolution and enhancement of diagnostic possibilities, the anamnesis, as an instrument of meaningful communication in disease and a cornerstone of medical practice throughout the ages, has lost in importance. Nowadays, we are on the brink of a more patient-tailored and individualised therapy, so there is a growing need for an open dialogue in the doctor-patient relationship, a situation very similar to the beginning of the professionalisation of assistance in disease in ancient medicine. Reappraisal of the anamnesis and awareness of the patient-doctor relationship are therefore warranted and for that reason its roots and evolution are discussed from a historic perspective. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:359-62.).

  19. Impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder on the Neural Dynamics of Cognitive Reappraisal of Negative Self-Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Philippe R.; Ziv, Michal; Jazaieri, Hooria; Hahn, Kevin; Heimberg, Richard; Gross, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for social anxiety disorder is thought to enhance cognitive reappraisal in patients with social anxiety disorder. Such improvements should be evident in cognitive reappraisal-related prefrontal cortex responses. Objective To determine whether Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for social anxiety disorder modifies cognitive reappraisal-related prefrontal cortex neural signal magnitude and timing when implementing cognitive reappraisal with negative self-beliefs. Design Randomized controlled trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for social anxiety disorder versus waitlist control group. Setting Psychology department. Participants Seventy-five patients with generalized social anxiety disorder randomly assigned to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or waitlist. Intervention Sixteen sessions of individual-Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for social anxiety disorder during a study that enrolled patients from 2007 to 2010. Main Outcome Measures Negative emotion ratings and functional magnetic resonance blood oxygen-level dependent signal when reacting to and cognitively reappraising negative self-beliefs embedded in autobiographical social anxiety situations. Results During reactivity trials, compared to waitlist, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy produced (a) greater reduction in negative emotion ratings and (b) greater blood oxygen-level dependent signal magnitude in medial prefrontal cortex. During cognitive reappraisal trials, compared to waitlist, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy produced (c) greater reduction in negative emotion ratings, (d) greater blood oxygen-level dependent signal magnitude in dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, (e) earlier temporal onset of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex activity, and (f) greater dorsomedial prefrontal cortex-amygdala inverse functional connectivity. Conclusions and Relevance Modulation of cognitive reappraisal-related brain responses, timing and functional connectivity may be important brain changes

  20. Judgment Deferred: Reappraisal of Rehabilitation Counseling Movement toward Licensure Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarvydas, Vilia; Leahy, Michael J.; Zanskas, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen years have passed since an analysis of the position of rehabilitation counselors in the national counselor licensure movement by Tarvydas and Leahy. This article addresses the question of how well their efforts to achieve licensure parity with other counselors have fared. This question will be addressed by discussing (a) rehabilitation…

  1. Differences in Insula and Pre-/Frontal Responses during Reappraisal of Food in Lean and Obese Humans.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Grundeis, Felicitas; Brand, Cristin; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Mehnert, Jan; Pleger, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Brain regions involved in the reappraisal of tasty but unhealthy foods are of special interest for the development of new therapeutic interventions for obesity, such as non-invasive brain stimulation or neurofeedback. Here, we visually presented food items (i.e., high/low caloric) to obese and lean individuals during electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, while they either admitted or regulated their food desire. During admitting the desire for low and high calorie foods, obese as well as lean individuals showed higher activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), whereas the right frontal operculum was involved in the reappraisal of the same foods, suggesting interplay between executive control and gustatory regions. Only in lean participants, we found an interaction between calorie content and the regulate/admit conditions in bilateral anterior insular cortices, suggesting that the anterior insula, assumed to primarily host gustatory processes, also underpins higher cognitive processes involved in food choices, such as evaluating the foods' calorie content for its reappraisal. PMID:27458355

  2. Differences in Insula and Pre-/Frontal Responses during Reappraisal of Food in Lean and Obese Humans

    PubMed Central

    Grundeis, Felicitas; Brand, Cristin; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Mehnert, Jan; Pleger, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Brain regions involved in the reappraisal of tasty but unhealthy foods are of special interest for the development of new therapeutic interventions for obesity, such as non-invasive brain stimulation or neurofeedback. Here, we visually presented food items (i.e., high/low caloric) to obese and lean individuals during electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, while they either admitted or regulated their food desire. During admitting the desire for low and high calorie foods, obese as well as lean individuals showed higher activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), whereas the right frontal operculum was involved in the reappraisal of the same foods, suggesting interplay between executive control and gustatory regions. Only in lean participants, we found an interaction between calorie content and the regulate/admit conditions in bilateral anterior insular cortices, suggesting that the anterior insula, assumed to primarily host gustatory processes, also underpins higher cognitive processes involved in food choices, such as evaluating the foods’ calorie content for its reappraisal. PMID:27458355

  3. Frailty, disability and old age: a re-appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Frailty has become a topic of increasing interest in health care. No longer treated as a catch-all term for agedness, decline and disablement it has acquired a more precise definition, applied to those individuals whose 'aged' state is seen to put them at risk of adverse outcomes. This transformation is we argue the outcome of a more general differentiation of terms that were previously used to categorize the weak and marginal within society. Old age re-labelled as 'later life' has become re-articulated as a successful life stage relatively free from impairment. Disability has been re-positioned and its links with impairment attenuated while chronic illness has acquired a new narrative of its own. This has left frailty behind, redolent still with all the old negative attributes of marginality, but now more than ever evacuated of any remaining elements of 'status' or 'agency'. Frailty is defined less by the identities of those who are deemed frail than by what frailty seems to augur in its direction of travel - a journey towards unspecified adverse outcomes. This re-positioning, we suggest, helps lay the foundation of a social imaginary of 'the fourth age' as the new location of old age.

  4. Clinical reappraisal of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Santiago, Patcho N; Colpe, Lisa J; Dempsey, Catherine L; First, Michael B; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Fullerton, Carol S; Gruber, Michael J; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    A clinical reappraisal study was carried out in conjunction with the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) All-Army Study (AAS) to evaluate concordance of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnoses based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist (PCL) with diagnoses based on independent clinical reappraisal interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Diagnoses included: lifetime mania/hypomania, panic disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder; six-month adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; and 30-day major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and substance (alcohol or drug) use disorder (abuse or dependence). The sample (n = 460) was weighted for over-sampling CIDI-SC/PCL screened positives. Diagnostic thresholds were set to equalize false positives and false negatives. Good individual-level concordance was found between CIDI-SC/PCL and SCID diagnoses at these thresholds (area under curve [AUC] = 0.69-0.79). AUC was considerably higher for continuous than dichotomous screening scale scores (AUC = 0.80-0.90), arguing for substantive analyses using not only dichotomous case designations but also continuous measures of predicted probabilities of clinical diagnoses.

  5. Clinical reappraisal of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Screening Scales (CIDI-SC) in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Santiago, Patcho N.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Dempsey, Catherine L.; First, Michael B.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gruber, Michael J.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A clinical reappraisal study was carried out in conjunction with the Army STARRS All-Army Study (AAS) to evaluate concordance of DSM-IV diagnoses based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview screening scales (CIDI-SC) and PTSD Checklist (PCL) with diagnoses based on independent clinical reappraisal interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV [SCID]). Diagnoses included: lifetime mania/hypomania, panic disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder; 6-month adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; and 30-day major depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and substance (alcohol or drug) use disorder (abuse or dependence). The sample (n=460) was weighted for over-sampling CIDI-SC/PCL screened positives. Diagnostic thresholds were set to equalize false positives and false negatives. Good individual-level concordance was found between CIDI-SC/PCL and SCID diagnoses at these thresholds (AUC = .69–.79). AUC was considerably higher for continuous than dichotomous screening scale scores (AUC = .80–.90), arguing for substantive analyses using not only dichotomous case designations but also continuous measures of predicted probabilities of clinical diagnoses. PMID:24318219

  6. Minireview: translocator protein (TSPO) and steroidogenesis: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Stocco, Douglas M; Tu, Lan N

    2015-04-01

    The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a transmembrane protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. TSPO has long been described as being indispensable for mitochondrial cholesterol import that is essential for steroid hormone production. In contrast to this initial proposition, recent experiments reexamining TSPO function have demonstrated that it is not involved in steroidogenesis. This fundamental change has forced a reexamination of the functional interpretations made for TSPO that broadly impacts both basic and clinical research across multiple fields. In this minireview, we recapitulate the key studies from 25 years of TSPO research and concurrently examine their limitations that perhaps led towards the incorrect association of TSPO and steroid hormone production. Although this shift in understanding raises new questions regarding the molecular function of TSPO, these recent developments are poised to have a significant positive impact for research progress in steroid endocrinology.

  7. Reappraisal of HLA antibody analysis and crossmatching in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Chang; Ozawa, Miyuki

    2007-01-01

    It has been established that preformed IgG antibodies specific for donor HLA antigens may accelerate graft failure. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated adverse graft survival in patients who have anti-HLA antibodies, whether preformed or developed post-transplant. More recently, ELISA and flow cytometric techniques were introduced to overcome the limited sensitivity and specificity of the CDC assay. These emerging approaches can be reliably used to predict crossmatches in highly sensitized patients and also to monitor the development of clinically relevant anti-HLA antibody after transplantation. This retrospective study used LAT-M screening and Luminex HLA class I and II specificity assay to re-examine: (a), the impact of pre-transplant HLA antibody on long term graft survival; (b), the accuracy with which detection of HLA antibody and specificity by ELISA predicts pretransplant CDC crossmatch; (c), a comparison of Luminex and ELISA methods in detecting HLA antibodies. In this study, pre-transplant sera from 288 renal patients followed up at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method, LAT-M. The tests showed that 19% had HLA antibodies before transplantation. Among the 234 of the patients who did not have pre-transplant antibodies, 85% enjoyed 5-year functional graft survival, 76% 10-year, and 56% 15-year functional graft survival. The corresponding functional graft survival for the 54 patients who tested HLA antibody-positive was 65%, 53% and 28% (P=0.0021). Sera from 481 patients awaiting kidney transplantation at NCKUH were tested by the ELISA method LAT-M and by CDC to determine how well HLA antibodies detected by ELISA predict the crossmatches shown by CDC. HLA antibodies found by ELISA ranged from 24% weak reactivity (OD "2") to 17% strongly reactive (OD "8"). The positive predictive value (PPV) of ELISA-detected antibodies for positive CDC crossmatch at the time of transplant was found to be 43-54%. The negative predictive value (NPV)-ELISA found

  8. Reappraising Social Insect Behavior through Aversive Responsiveness and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Edith; Carcaud, Julie; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background The success of social insects can be in part attributed to their division of labor, which has been explained by a response threshold model. This model posits that individuals differ in their response thresholds to task-associated stimuli, so that individuals with lower thresholds specialize in this task. This model is at odds with findings on honeybee behavior as nectar and pollen foragers exhibit different responsiveness to sucrose, with nectar foragers having higher response thresholds to sucrose concentration. Moreover, it has been suggested that sucrose responsiveness correlates with responsiveness to most if not all other stimuli. If this is the case, explaining task specialization and the origins of division of labor on the basis of differences in response thresholds is difficult. Methodology To compare responsiveness to stimuli presenting clear-cut differences in hedonic value and behavioral contexts, we measured appetitive and aversive responsiveness in the same bees in the laboratory. We quantified proboscis extension responses to increasing sucrose concentrations and sting extension responses to electric shocks of increasing voltage. We analyzed the relationship between aversive responsiveness and aversive olfactory conditioning of the sting extension reflex, and determined how this relationship relates to division of labor. Principal Findings Sucrose and shock responsiveness measured in the same bees did not correlate, thus suggesting that they correspond to independent behavioral syndromes, a foraging and a defensive one. Bees which were more responsive to shock learned and memorized better aversive associations. Finally, guards were less responsive than nectar foragers to electric shocks, exhibiting higher tolerance to low voltage shocks. Consequently, foragers, which are more sensitive, were the ones learning and memorizing better in aversive conditioning. Conclusions Our results constitute the first integrative study on how aversive

  9. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a reappraisal of its pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ferenc; Aylward, Bill

    2014-01-01

    chorioretinal scar around the tear and aided by some form of intraocular tamponade. The main function of the tamponade is not to temporarily cover the break but to significantly reduce the intraocular currents and thus prevent fluid entry through the break until the chorioretinal adhesion will have become sufficiently strong to seal the retinal edge around the tear; postoperative positioning is therefore not as important as currently assumed. PMID:24158005

  10. Fighting food temptations: the modulating effects of short-term cognitive reappraisal, suppression and up-regulation on mesocorticolimbic activity related to appetitive motivation.

    PubMed

    Siep, Nicolette; Roefs, Anne; Roebroeck, Alard; Havermans, Remco; Bonte, Milene; Jansen, Anita

    2012-03-01

    The premise of cognitive therapy is that one can overcome the irresistible temptation of highly palatable foods by actively restructuring the way one thinks about food. Testing this idea, participants in the present study were instructed to passively view foods, up-regulate food palatability thoughts, apply cognitive reappraisal (e.g., thinking about health consequences), or suppress food palatability thoughts and cravings. We examined whether these strategies affect self-reported food craving and mesocorticolimbic activity as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. It was hypothesized that cognitive reappraisal would most effectively inhibit the mesocorticolimbic activity and associated food craving as compared to suppression. In addition, it was hypothesized that suppression would lead to more prefrontal cortex activity, reflecting the use of more control resources, as compared to cognitive reappraisal. Self-report results indicated that up-regulation increased food craving compared to the other two conditions, but that there was no difference in craving between the suppression and cognitive reappraisal strategy. Corroborating self-report results, the neuroimaging results showed that up-regulation increased activity in important regions of the mesocorticolimbic circuitry, including the ventral tegmental area, ventral striatum, operculum, posterior insular gyrus, medial orbitofrontal cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Contrary to our hypothesis, suppression more effectively decreased activity in the core of the mesocorticolimbic circuitry (i.e., ventral tegmental area and ventral striatum) compared to cognitive reappraisal. Overall, the results support the contention that appetitive motivation can be modulated by the application of short-term cognitive control strategies.

  11. Protein-phytate interactions in pig and poultry nutrition: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Selle, Peter H; Cowieson, Aaron J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Ravindran, V

    2012-06-01

    Protein-phytate interactions are fundamental to the detrimental impact of phytate on protein/amino acid availability. The inclusion of exogenous phytase in pig and poultry diets degrades phytate to more innocuous esters and attenuates these negative influences. The objective of the present review is to reappraise the underlying mechanisms of these interactions and reassess their implications in pig and poultry nutrition. Protein digestion appears to be impeded by phytate in the following manner. Binary protein-phytate complexes are formed at pH levels less than the isoelectric point of proteins and complexed proteins are refractory to pepsin digestion. Once the protein isoelectric points are exceeded binary complexes dissociate; however, the isoelectric point of proteins in cereal grains may be sufficiently high to permit these complexes to persist in the small intestine. Ternary protein-phytate complexes are formed at pH levels above the isoelectric point of proteins where a cationic bridge links the protein and phytate moieties. The molecular weights of protein and polypeptides in small-intestinal digesta may be sufficient to allow phytate to bind nutritionally important amounts of protein in ternary complexes. Thus binary and ternary complexes may impede protein digestion and amino acid absorption in the small intestine. Alternatively, phytate may interact with protein indirectly. Myo-inositol hexaphosphate possesses six phosphate anionic moieties (HPO(4)(2-)) that have strong kosmotropic effects and can stabilise proteins by interacting with the surrounding water medium. Phytate increases mucin secretions into the gut, which increases endogenous amino acid flows as the protein component of mucin remains largely undigested. Phytate promotes the transition of Na(+) into the small-intestinal lumen and this suggests that phytate may interfere with glucose and amino acid absorption by compromising Na(+)-dependent transport systems and the activity of the Na pump (Na

  12. Don't look back in anger: neural correlates of reappraisal, analytical rumination, and angry rumination during recall of an anger-inducing autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Fabiansson, Emma C; Denson, Thomas F; Moulds, Michelle L; Grisham, Jessica R; Schira, Mark M

    2012-02-01

    Despite the enormous costs associated with unrestrained anger, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying anger regulation. Behavioral evidence supports the effectiveness of reappraisal in reducing anger, and demonstrates that rumination typically maintains or augments anger. To further understand the effects of different anger regulation strategies, during functional magnetic resonance imaging 21 healthy male and female undergraduates recalled an anger-inducing autobiographical memory. They then engaged in three counterbalanced anger regulation strategies: reappraisal, analytical rumination, and angry rumination. Reappraisal produced the least self-reported anger followed by analytical rumination and angry rumination. Rumination was associated with increased functional connectivity of the inferior frontal gyrus with the amygdala and thalamus. Understanding how neural regions interact during anger regulation has important implications for reducing anger and violence.

  13. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs. PMID:23712090

  14. A reappraisal of classical archetype theory and its implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Merchant, John

    2009-06-01

    This paper begins with an overview of contemporary approaches to archetype theory and notes the radical nature of certain deductions. Some argue that there is no 'archetype-as-such' as a pre-existing entity at the core of a complex driving its formation whilst the findings of current neuroscience are calling into question one very thing on which the classical theory is built--innatism. Knox's argument for image schemas raises the question as to the extent to which archetypes can be conceived in any preformationist sense. The question is then posed--to what extent can Jung's classical theory of archetypes be read in light of these current models? The case examples Jung uses to evidence the existence of archetypes, his explications of synchronicity and his own Philemon experience are then reappraised. The conclusion is drawn that it is difficult to evidence the existence of autonomous archetypes unrelated to personal affective experience. Not only would this be expected by emergent/developmental models of archetype but it can explain many of Jung's disjunctive statements about archetype constellation; the difficulties in separating personal and collective psychic content and Jung's apparent Lamarckianism. The implications of these models for theory, clinical practice and analyst training are then offered for discussion.

  15. A reappraisal of the use of infrared thermal image analysis in medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, B F

    1998-12-01

    Infrared thermal imaging of the skin has been used for several decades to monitor the temperature distribution of human skin. Abnormalities such as malignancies, inflammation, and infection cause localized increases in temperature which show as hot spots or as asymmetrical patterns in an infrared thermogram. Even though it is nonspecific, infrared thermology is a powerful detector of problems that affect a patient's physiology. While the use of infrared imaging is increasing in many industrial and security applications, it has declined in medicine probably because of the continued reliance on first generation cameras. The transfer of military technology for medical use has prompted this reappraisal of infrared thermology in medicine. Digital infrared cameras have much improved spatial and thermal resolutions, and libraries of image processing routines are available to analyze images captured both statically and dynamically. If thermographs are captured under controlled conditions, they may be interpreted readily to diagnose certain conditions and to monitor the reaction of a patient's physiology to thermal and other stresses. Some of the major areas where infrared thermography is being used successfully are neurology, vascular disorders, rheumatic diseases, tissue viability, oncology (especially breast cancer), dermatological disorders, neonatal, ophthalmology, and surgery.

  16. An integrative approach to reappraising species validity in Pseudexostoma (Teleostei: Sisoridae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunfeng; Jiang, Wansheng; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zhou, Wei; Yang, Junxing

    2016-01-01

    The catfish genus Pseudexostoma (Sisoridae) currently contains three species: P. yunnanensis from the upper Irrawaddy River (Dayingjiang), and P. brachysoma and P. longipterus from the upper Salween River (Nujiang). We adopted an integrative approach combining both morphology-based (traditional measurements, truss-based and geometric morphometrics, fin skeleton examination and X-ray photography) and molecular approaches (genetic distances, haplotype network, phylogenetic relationships) to reappraise species validity in Pseudexostoma. Our results showed that P. longipterus cannot be distinguished from P. brachysoma from either morphological or molecular analyses, and that the former name should thus be considered a junior synonym of the latter. The two remaining geographically isolated species, P. yunnanensis and P. brachysoma, showed a distinct genetic distance equated to the typical 2% sequence divergence threshold delineating different species of fishes, and with a divergence time dated to approximately 1.22-2.14 million years ago. Although P. yunnanensis and P. brachysoma share some morphological characters that appear gradually diverging (body depth at anus and interorbital distance), some degree of overlap still exists, we suggest the two species are distinct based on the total evidence. PMID:27615890

  17. Reappraisal of the extinction of Canariomys bravoi, the giant rat from Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rando, Juan Carlos; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Galván, Bertila; Navarro, Juan Francisco

    2014-06-01

    All the Quaternary endemic rodents of the Canary Islands are currently extinct. The Lava Mouse Malpaisomys insularis inhabited the easternmost islands, whereas the giant rats Canariomys bravoi and Canariomys tamarani lived in the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, respectively. Bones of C. bravoi have appeared in archaeological sites together with shellfish and butchery remains. Traditionally, they have been considered as an evidence of the sporadic consumption of C. bravoi by the aboriginal people, in some instances as recently as the time of the first European contact (14th century AD). Accordingly, the extinction of C. bravoi has been linked to the European colonization of Tenerife. The plausibility of this extinction date has been explored through new radiocarbon dates obtained on selected C. bravoi bones and through a reappraisal of the published dates. Our analysis allowed us to establish an earlier last documented occurrence age for C. bravoi, prior to the third century cal BC, much earlier than previously assumed. The analysis of formerly published 14C dates of archaeological remains from Tenerife shows that samples with confidence intervals (95.54%) that are older or overlap with the last documented record of C. bravoi were performed on materials with large sources of error (such as wood, charcoal or bulk ash-sediments). Conversely, the new radiocarbon dates and analyses presented herein are in agreement with the occurrence of an earlier rapid extinction linked to the first human presence on the island.

  18. A reappraisal of classical archetype theory and its implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Merchant, John

    2009-06-01

    This paper begins with an overview of contemporary approaches to archetype theory and notes the radical nature of certain deductions. Some argue that there is no 'archetype-as-such' as a pre-existing entity at the core of a complex driving its formation whilst the findings of current neuroscience are calling into question one very thing on which the classical theory is built--innatism. Knox's argument for image schemas raises the question as to the extent to which archetypes can be conceived in any preformationist sense. The question is then posed--to what extent can Jung's classical theory of archetypes be read in light of these current models? The case examples Jung uses to evidence the existence of archetypes, his explications of synchronicity and his own Philemon experience are then reappraised. The conclusion is drawn that it is difficult to evidence the existence of autonomous archetypes unrelated to personal affective experience. Not only would this be expected by emergent/developmental models of archetype but it can explain many of Jung's disjunctive statements about archetype constellation; the difficulties in separating personal and collective psychic content and Jung's apparent Lamarckianism. The implications of these models for theory, clinical practice and analyst training are then offered for discussion. PMID:19531124

  19. A reappraisal of success factors for Olympic cross-country skiing.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-01-01

    Cross-country (XC) skiing has been an Olympic event since the first Winter Games in Chamonix, France, in 1924. Due to more effective training and tremendous improvements in equipment and track preparation, the speed of Olympic XC-ski races has increased more than that of any other Olympic endurance sport. Moreover, pursuit, mass-start, and sprint races have been introduced. Indeed, 10 of the 12 current Olympic competitions in XC skiing involve mass starts, in which tactics play a major role and the outcome is often decided in the final sprint. Accordingly, reappraisal of the success factors for performance in this context is required. The very high aerobic capacity (VO2max) of many of today's world-class skiers is similar that of their predecessors. At the same time, the new events provide more opportunities to profit from anaerobic capacity, upper-body power, high-speed techniques, and "tactical flexibility." The wide range of speeds and slopes involved in XC skiing requires skiers to continuously alternate between and adapt different subtechniques during a race. This technical complexity places a premium on efficiency. The relative amounts of endurance training performed at different levels of intensity have remained essentially constant during the past 4 decades. However, in preparation for the Sochi Olympics in 2014, XC skiers are performing more endurance training on roller skis on competition-specific terrain, placing greater focus on upper-body power and more systematically performing strength training and skiing at high speeds than previously.

  20. A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Cognitive Reappraisal Obesity Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Yokum, Sonja; Burger, Kyle; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Evaluate a selective obesity prevention program promoting use of cognitive reappraisals to reduce reward region response and increase inhibitory region response to high-fat/high-sugar foods and reduce intake of fat and sugar to prevent blunted reward region response to intake of such foods. Subjects/Methods Young adults at risk for future weight gain by virtue of weight concerns (N = 148) were randomized to this new prevention program (Minding Health), an alternative prevention program promoting participant-driven gradual reductions in caloric intake and increases in physical activity (Healthy Weight), or an obesity education video control condition, completing assessments at pre, post, and 6-month follow-up. A subset of Minding Health and control participants completed an fMRI scan at pre and post assessing neural response to images of high-fat/sugar foods and to receipt and anticipated receipt of a high-fat/sugar food. Results Minding Health participants showed significantly greater reductions in body fat than controls and caloric intake from fat and sugar than Healthy Weight participants. However, Healthy Weight participants showed greater reductions in BMI and eating disorder symptoms than Minding Health participants and Minding Health participants showed greater activation of an inhibitory control region and reduced activation of an attention/expectation region in response to palatable food images relative to pretest and controls. Conclusions Although the Minding Health intervention produced some of the hypothesized effects, it did not produce lasting reductions in body fat or BMI and showed limited effects on neural responsivity, implying it will be vital to increase the efficacy of this new prevention program. PMID:25447334

  1. A reappraisal of the use of 5-methoxypsoralen in the therapy of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Calzavara-Pinton, P; Ortel, B; Carlino, A; Honigsmann, H; De Panfilis, G

    1992-07-01

    5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) is considered an alternative to 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) for photochemotherapy of psoriasis. We have compared the clinical efficacy and tolerability of 5-MOP (1.2 mg/kg)-UVA versus 8-MOP (0.6 mg/kg)-UVA therapy in 25 patients of skin type III and IV, affected by relapsing plaque-type psoriasis of similar body involvement; indeed, the same patients were given 8-MOP during 1 year and 5-MOP during the subsequent year after relapsing. Both treatments cleared psoriatic lesions with a comparable number of exposures, but 5-MOP required significantly higher cumulative UVA doses. The difference was due to the lower phototoxicity of 5-MOP, as assessed by the determination of the minimal phototoxic dose, and to its higher tanning activity, as assessed by the weekly grading of pigmentation. Nevertheless, therapy by 5-MOP-UVA seemed particularly interesting in that it showed a higher tolerability since only 1 patient experienced nausea, whereas during therapy with 8-MOP-UVA nausea and/or vomiting occurred in 7 patients, sunburn in 6 and itching in 3. Since we have treated the same patients with the two drugs, our results were not influenced by interindividual variations of phototoxic responses, tanning ability and susceptibility to develop psoralen-induced short-term side-effects. It was concluded that, although long-term side-effects of the 5-MOP-UVA treatment have still to be determined, such treatment of psoriasis should be reappraised due to its higher tolerability in comparison to 8-MOP-UVA treatment.

  2. Detaching from the negative by reappraisal: the role of right superior frontal gyrus (BA9/32)

    PubMed Central

    Falquez, Rosalux; Couto, Blas; Ibanez, Agustin; Freitag, Martin T.; Berger, Moritz; Arens, Elisabeth A.; Lang, Simone; Barnow, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The ability to reappraise the emotional impact of events is related to long-term mental health. Self-focused reappraisal (REAPPself), i.e., reducing the personal relevance of the negative events, has been previously associated with neural activity in regions near right medial prefrontal cortex, but rarely investigated among brain-damaged individuals. Thus, we aimed to examine the REAPPself ability of brain-damaged patients and healthy controls considering structural atrophies and gray matter intensities, respectively. Twenty patients with well-defined cortex lesions due to an acquired circumscribed tumor or cyst and 23 healthy controls performed a REAPPself task, in which they had to either observe negative stimuli or decrease emotional responding by REAPPself. Next, they rated the impact of negative arousal and valence. REAPPself ability scores were calculated by subtracting the negative picture ratings after applying REAPPself from the ratings of the observing condition. The scores of the patients were included in a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analysis to identify deficit related areas (ROI). Then, a ROI group-wise comparison was performed. Additionally, a whole-brain voxel-based-morphometry (VBM) analysis was run, in which healthy participant's REAPPself ability scores were correlated with gray matter intensities. Results showed that (1) regions in the right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), comprising the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9) and the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA32), were associated with patient's impaired down-regulation of arousal, (2) a lesion in the depicted ROI occasioned significant REAPPself impairments, (3) REAPPself ability of controls was linked with increased gray matter intensities in the ROI regions. Our findings show for the first time that the neural integrity and the structural volume of right SFG regions (BA9/32) might be indispensable for REAPPself. Implications for neurofeedback research are

  3. Pathology of the adrenal cortex: a reappraisal of the past 25 years focusing on adrenal cortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Papotti, Mauro; Duregon, Eleonora; Volante, Marco; McNicol, Anne Marie

    2014-03-01

    A reappraisal of the major advances in the diagnostic pathology of adrenal cortical lesions and tumors in the last 25 years is presented, with special reference to the definition of malignancy in primary adrenal cancer and its variants. Slightly more than 25 years ago, Weiss proposed his diagnostic scoring system for adrenal cortical carcinoma. This represented a milestone for adrenal pathologists and the starting point for further modifications of the system, either through minor changes in the scoring procedure itself or concentrating on some particular Weiss criterion such as mitotic index, integrated into alternative scoring schemes or algorithms that are currently under validation. Improvements in diagnostic immunohistochemistry have led to the identification of markers of cortical origin, such as Melan-A, alpha-inhibin, and SF-1 and of prognostic factors in carcinoma, such as the Ki-67 proliferation index and SF-1 itself. With regard to hyperplastic conditions, genetic investigations have allowed the association of the majority of cases of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) in Carney complex to mutations in the gene encoding the regulatory subunit 1A of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A). Other hereditary conditions are also associated with adrenal cortical tumors, including the Li-Fraumeni, Beckwith-Wiedemann, Gardner, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, and neurofibromatosis type 1 syndromes. Moreover, several advances have been made in the knowledge of the molecular background of sporadic tumors, and a number of molecules/genes are of particular interest as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:24382573

  4. Could Carlos Chagas' assumption on the relationship between goiter and chronic Chagas heart disease be correct? A historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto; Restini, Carolina B A; Couto, Lucelio B

    2016-01-01

    In 1910, Chagas divided the clinical manifestations of the chronic form of Chagas disease according to heart, Central Nervous System, and thyroid involvement, particularly the presence of goiter. Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with poor houses infested with kissing bugs, the similarity of the clinical picture with that of patients underwent partial thyroidectomy, and with the presence of thyroid sclerosis (inflammation) on histological examination. In addition, Chagas observed that all people living in poor houses infested by sucking bugs had goiter, contrasting with persons who lived in the same region, drinking the same water, but living in good houses, which did not have goiter. Furthermore, Chagas stressed the fact that people without any evidence of thyroid disease that migrated to live in poor houses in areas infested by sucking bugs developed thyroid disease some time later. Finally, and more importantly, Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with cardiac abnormalities in 80% of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. Despite this, other authors working in different regions did not confirm such an association. A reappraisal of data from a work published in 1949 clearly shows that the presence of goiter was statistically associated with chronic Chagas heart disease and with chronic Chagas disease. Our paper highlights once more the grandiosity of Chagas' work, which has been proved to be correct even in the history of goiter, and justifies our claim for a posthumous Nobel Prize inasmuch as his work was not perceived by the Karolinska Institute.

  5. Age and tectonic significance of metamorphic rocks along the axis of the Sierra Nevada batholith: A critical reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Schweickert, R.A.; Lahren, M.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Metamorphic rocks in many roof pendants along the axis of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) between 36 and 38{degree}N lat. have been considered part of the Kings sequence, of probable Mesozoic age. However, most of the pendants are in fact undated by fossils and may contain Paleozoic or Precambrian strata. A critical reappraisal of new and existing data on these pendants has led to the following hypotheses: (1) A continental crustal silver referred to as the Snow Lake block, with the approximate dimensions of the Salinian block, and represented by metamorphosed Proterozoic and Cambrian miogeoclinal rocks, extends 120 mi (200 km) southeastward from northern YNP to the Kaweah River drainage, and includes rocks in the following pendants: Snow Lake, Piute Mountain, Glen Aulin, May Lake, Iron mountain, Shuteye Peak, Dinkey Creek, Patterson Mountain, Boyden Cave, and Sequoia Park. This silver was displaced about 400 km northward along an intrabatholithic dextral strike-slip fault during the Early Cretaceous time. (2) Based on reconnaissance studies, the authors propose that the Shoo Fly Complex, which lies west of the Snow Lake block, continues southeastward to 36{degree}N lat., and includes parts of the following pendants: Oakhurst, Lower Kings River, Kaweah River, Tule River, and Kern Canyon. The apparent juxtaposition of the Shoo Fly Complex with the Snow Lake block requires the presence of a major tectonic break between them. This structure, now largely obliterated by Cretaceous plutons of the SNB, may be the equivalent of the Golconda thrust in north-central Nevada.

  6. Could Carlos Chagas' assumption on the relationship between goiter and chronic Chagas heart disease be correct? A historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto; Restini, Carolina B A; Couto, Lucelio B

    2016-01-01

    In 1910, Chagas divided the clinical manifestations of the chronic form of Chagas disease according to heart, Central Nervous System, and thyroid involvement, particularly the presence of goiter. Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with poor houses infested with kissing bugs, the similarity of the clinical picture with that of patients underwent partial thyroidectomy, and with the presence of thyroid sclerosis (inflammation) on histological examination. In addition, Chagas observed that all people living in poor houses infested by sucking bugs had goiter, contrasting with persons who lived in the same region, drinking the same water, but living in good houses, which did not have goiter. Furthermore, Chagas stressed the fact that people without any evidence of thyroid disease that migrated to live in poor houses in areas infested by sucking bugs developed thyroid disease some time later. Finally, and more importantly, Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with cardiac abnormalities in 80% of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. Despite this, other authors working in different regions did not confirm such an association. A reappraisal of data from a work published in 1949 clearly shows that the presence of goiter was statistically associated with chronic Chagas heart disease and with chronic Chagas disease. Our paper highlights once more the grandiosity of Chagas' work, which has been proved to be correct even in the history of goiter, and justifies our claim for a posthumous Nobel Prize inasmuch as his work was not perceived by the Karolinska Institute. PMID:26433162

  7. Beryllium natural background concentration and mobility: a reappraisal examining the case of high Be-bearing pyroclastic rocks.

    PubMed

    Armiento, Giovanna; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Cremisini, Carlo; Della Ventura, Giancarlo; Nardi, Elisa; Pacifico, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Beryllium is widely distributed in soils at low levels, but it can also occur naturally in higher concentrations in a variety of materials exploited for many industrial applications. Beryllium is also one of the most toxic natural elements and is known to be a human carcinogen. A concise account of the literature data on baseline concentrations of Be in soils illustrates the possibility of worldwide presence of areas with a high natural background concentration of Be (up to 300 mg/kg), the crustal abundance of which is generally estimated to be in the range 2-6 mg/kg. Nevertheless, the number of available data is rather limited in comparison with those about other toxic elements such as Pb, Cd and Cr. This has probably caused the choice of low values of concentration level as the reference for the definition of soil contamination: these values are not always realistic and are not applicable to large areas. As a case study, we report and analyse a diffuse, unusually high (up to 80 mg/kg, average approximately 20 mg/kg), natural occurrence of beryllium in loose and poorly consolidated pyroclastic layers related to the Pleistocene activity of the Vico volcano. Additionally, the analysis of Be leachability has been carried out, providing evidence of a not negligible mobility in contrast with the scarce data presented in the literature that usually indicate beryllium as an element with low mobility in oxidising surface environmental conditions. This research marks the beginning of a possible reappraisal of beryllium geochemical behaviour and background levels, providing more realistic reference values for risk assessment and land management.

  8. Reappraisal of xenobiotic-induced, oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To reappraise the hypothesis of xenobiotic induced, cytochrome P450-mediated, micronutrient-deficient oxidative injury in chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Individual searches of the Medline and Embase databases were conducted for each component of the theory of oxidative-stress mediated cellular injury for the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2012 using appropriate medical subject headings. Boolean operators were used. The individual components were drawn from a recent update on theory of oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS: In relation to the association between exposure to volatile hydrocarbons and chronic pancreatitis the studies fail to adequately control for alcohol intake. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction occurs as a diffuse hepatic and extra-hepatic response to xenobiotic exposure rather than an acinar cell-specific process. GSH depletion is not consistently confirmed. There is good evidence of superoxide dismutase depletion in acute phases of injury but less to support a chronic intra-acinar depletion. Although the liver is the principal site of CYP induction there is no evidence to suggest that oxidative by-products are carried in bile and reflux into the pancreatic duct to cause injury. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic acinar cell injury due to short-lived oxygen free radicals (generated by injury mediated by prematurely activated intra-acinar trypsin) is an important mechanism of cell damage in chronic pancreatitis. However, in contemporary paradigms of chronic pancreatitis this should be seen as one of a series of cell-injury mechanisms rather than a sole mediator. PMID:24659895

  9. Spermatophoric reaction reappraised: novel insights into the functioning of the loliginid spermatophore based on Doryteuthis plei (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Marian, José Eduardo A R

    2012-03-01

    During copulation, spermatophores produced by male coleoid cephalopods undergo the spermatophoric reaction, a complex process of evagination that culminates in the attachment of the spermatangium (everted spermatophore containing the sperm mass) on the female's body. To better understand this complicated phenomenon, the present study investigated the functional morphology of the spermatophore of the squid Doryteuthis plei applying in vitro analysis of the reaction, as well as light and electron microscopy investigation of spermatangia obtained either in vitro, or naturally attached on females. Hitherto unnoticed functional features of the loliginid spermatophore require a reappraisal of some important processes involved in the spermatophoric reaction. The most striking findings concern the attachment mechanism, which is not carried out solely by cement adhesive material, as previously believed, but rather by an autonomous, complex process performed by multiple structures during the spermatophoric reaction. During evagination, the ejaculatory apparatus provides anchorage on the targeted tissue, presumably due to the minute stellate particles present in the exposed spiral filament. Consequently, the ejaculatory apparatus maintains the attachment of the tip of the evaginating spermatophore until the cement body is extruded. Subsequently, the cement body passes through a complex structural rearrangement, which leads to the injection of both its viscid contents and pointed oral region onto the targeted tissue. The inner membrane at the oral region of the cement body contains numerous stellate particles attached at its inner side; eversion of this membrane exposes these sharp structures, which presumably adhere to the tissue and augment attachment. Several naturally attached spermatangia were found with their bases implanted at the deposition sites, and the possible mechanisms of perforation are discussed based on present evidence. The function of the complex squid

  10. Beryllium natural background concentration and mobility: a reappraisal examining the case of high Be-bearing pyroclastic rocks.

    PubMed

    Armiento, Giovanna; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Cremisini, Carlo; Della Ventura, Giancarlo; Nardi, Elisa; Pacifico, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Beryllium is widely distributed in soils at low levels, but it can also occur naturally in higher concentrations in a variety of materials exploited for many industrial applications. Beryllium is also one of the most toxic natural elements and is known to be a human carcinogen. A concise account of the literature data on baseline concentrations of Be in soils illustrates the possibility of worldwide presence of areas with a high natural background concentration of Be (up to 300 mg/kg), the crustal abundance of which is generally estimated to be in the range 2-6 mg/kg. Nevertheless, the number of available data is rather limited in comparison with those about other toxic elements such as Pb, Cd and Cr. This has probably caused the choice of low values of concentration level as the reference for the definition of soil contamination: these values are not always realistic and are not applicable to large areas. As a case study, we report and analyse a diffuse, unusually high (up to 80 mg/kg, average approximately 20 mg/kg), natural occurrence of beryllium in loose and poorly consolidated pyroclastic layers related to the Pleistocene activity of the Vico volcano. Additionally, the analysis of Be leachability has been carried out, providing evidence of a not negligible mobility in contrast with the scarce data presented in the literature that usually indicate beryllium as an element with low mobility in oxidising surface environmental conditions. This research marks the beginning of a possible reappraisal of beryllium geochemical behaviour and background levels, providing more realistic reference values for risk assessment and land management. PMID:22392615

  11. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus evolution in the context of contemporary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2013-11-01

    Recent resurgence of interest in applications of dense plasma focus and doubts about the conventional view of dense plasma focus as a purely irrotational compressive flow have re-opened questions concerning device optimization. In this context, this paper re-appraises and extends the analytical snowplow model of plasma focus sheath evolution developed by F. Gratton and J. M. Vargas [Energy Storage, Compression and Switching, edited by V. Nardi, H. Sahlin, and W. H. Bostick (Plenum, New York, 1983), Vol. 2, p. 353)] and shows its relevance to contemporary research. The Gratton-Vargas (GV) model enables construction of a special orthogonal coordinate system in which the plasma flow problem can be simplified and a model of sheath structure can be formulated. The Lawrenceville Plasma Physics (LPP) plasma focus facility, which reports neutron yield better than global scaling law, is shown to be operating closer to an optimum operating point of the GV model as compared with PF-1000.

  12. Broadening the definition of resilience and "reappraising" the use of appetitive motivation.

    PubMed

    Soenke, Melissa; O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Greenberg, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Kalisch et al.'s PASTOR model synthesizes current knowledge of resilience, focusing on mechanisms as a common pathway to outcomes and highlighting neuroscience as a method for exploring this. We propose the model broaden its definition of resiliency to include positive indices of recovery, include positive affect as a mechanism, and approach motivation as distinct from overcoming aversive motivation. PMID:26785906

  13. Broadening the definition of resilience and "reappraising" the use of appetitive motivation.

    PubMed

    Soenke, Melissa; O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Greenberg, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Kalisch et al.'s PASTOR model synthesizes current knowledge of resilience, focusing on mechanisms as a common pathway to outcomes and highlighting neuroscience as a method for exploring this. We propose the model broaden its definition of resiliency to include positive indices of recovery, include positive affect as a mechanism, and approach motivation as distinct from overcoming aversive motivation.

  14. Reappraising the Importance of Class in Higher Education Entry and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John; Morgan-Klein, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Social class is a major determining factor of people's life chances. Much sociology-based research shows that socio-economic position is still one of the best predictors of who will achieve success, prosperity and social status and, in particular, who will enjoy the highest levels of educational outcomes. Survey data and qualitative studies…

  15. A molecular phylogenetic reappraisal of the Hysteriaceae, Mytilinidiaceae and Gloniaceae (Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetes) with keys to world species

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, E.W.A.; Mugambi, G.K.; Miller, A.N.; Huhndorf, S.M.; Marincowitz, S.; Spatafora, J.W.; Schoch, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    A reappraisal of the phylogenetic integrity of bitunicate ascomycete fungi belonging to or previously affiliated with the Hysteriaceae, Mytilinidiaceae, Gloniaceae and Patellariaceae is presented, based on an analysis of 121 isolates and four nuclear genes, the ribosomal large and small subunits, transcription elongation factor 1 and the second largest RNA polymerase II subunit. A geographically diverse and high density taxon sampling strategy was employed, including multiple isolates/species from the following genera: Anteaglonium (6/4), Encephalographa (1/1), Farlowiella (3/1), Gloniopsis (8/4), Glonium (4/2), Hysterium (12/5), Hysterobrevium (14/3), Hysterographium (2/1), Hysteropatella (2/2), Lophium (4/2), Mytilinidion (13/10), Oedohysterium (5/3), Ostreichnion (2/2), Patellaria (1/1), Psiloglonium (11/3), Quasiconcha (1/1), Rhytidhysteron (8/3), and 24 outgroup taxa. Sequence data indicate that although the Hysteriales are closely related to the Pleosporales, sufficient branch support exists for their separation into separate orders within the Pleosporomycetidae. The Mytilinidiales are more distantly related within the subclass and show a close association with the Gloniaceae. Although there are examples of concordance between morphological and molecular data, these are few. Molecular data instead support the premise of a large number of convergent evolutionary lineages, which do not correspond to previously held assumptions of synapomorphy relating to spore morphology. Thus, within the Hysteriaceae, the genera Gloniopsis, Glonium, Hysterium and Hysterographium are highly polyphyletic. This necessitated the transfer of two species of Hysterium to Oedohysterium gen. nov. (Od. insidens comb. nov. and Od. sinense comb. nov.), the description of a new species, Hysterium barrianum sp. nov., and the transfer of two species of Gloniopsis to Hysterobrevium gen. nov. (Hb. smilacis comb. nov. and Hb. constrictum comb. nov.). While Hysterographium, with the type Hg

  16. Protein Phylogenies and Signature Sequences: A Reappraisal of Evolutionary Relationships among Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, and Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of shared conserved insertion or deletions (indels) in protein sequences is a special type of signature sequence that shows considerable promise for phylogenetic inference. An alternative model of microbial evolution based on the use of indels of conserved proteins and the morphological features of prokaryotic organisms is proposed. In this model, extant archaebacteria and gram-positive bacteria, which have a simple, single-layered cell wall structure, are termed monoderm prokaryotes. They are believed to be descended from the most primitive organisms. Evidence from indels supports the view that the archaebacteria probably evolved from gram-positive bacteria, and I suggest that this evolution occurred in response to antibiotic selection pressures. Evidence is presented that diderm prokaryotes (i.e., gram-negative bacteria), which have a bilayered cell wall, are derived from monoderm prokaryotes. Signature sequences in different proteins provide a means to define a number of different taxa within prokaryotes (namely, low G+C and high G+C gram-positive, Deinococcus-Thermus, cyanobacteria, chlamydia-cytophaga related, and two different groups of Proteobacteria) and to indicate how they evolved from a common ancestor. Based on phylogenetic information from indels in different protein sequences, it is hypothesized that all eukaryotes, including amitochondriate and aplastidic organisms, received major gene contributions from both an archaebacterium and a gram-negative eubacterium. In this model, the ancestral eukaryotic cell is a chimera that resulted from a unique fusion event between the two separate groups of prokaryotes followed by integration of their genomes. PMID:9841678

  17. Reappraisal of the vomeronasal system of catarrhine primates: ontogeny, morphology, functionality, and persisting questions.

    PubMed

    Smith, T D; Siegel, M I; Bhatnagar, K P

    2001-08-15

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory organ that functions in sociosexual communication in many vertebrates. In strepsirhine primates and New World monkeys, the bilateral VNOs are traditionally understood to exist as a well-developed chemosensory epithelial unit. In contrast, the VNOs of catarrhine primates are thought to be absent or exist only as reduced epithelial tubes of uncertain function. However, the VNO of New World monkeys shows substantial variation in the extent of sensory epithelium. Recent findings that the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) possesses a VNO similar to humans suggest the variability of the VNO among haplorhine primates may be more extensive than previously thought, and perhaps more at par with that observed in chiropterans. The atypical histologic structure and location of the human/chimpanzee VNO suggest accessory glandular secretion and transport functions. Other catarrhine primates (e.g., Macaca spp.), may truly be characterized by VNO absence. Unique aspects of facial growth and development in catarrhine primates may influence the position or even presence of the VNO in adults. These recent findings demonstrate that previous investigations on some catarrhine primates may have missed the VNO and underestimated the extent of variability. As an understanding of this variation increases, our view of VNO functionality and associated terminology is changing. Further investigations are needed to consider phylogenetic implications of VNO variability and the association of craniofacial form and VNO anatomic position in primates.

  18. Unhappy endings: a feminist reappraisal of the women's health movement from the vantage of pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Layne, Linda L

    2003-05-01

    This essay contrasts the rosy birth scenarios of the natural childbirth movement with reproductive disaster stories of members of pregnancy loss support groups and women from toxically assaulted communities in the US who have suffered pregnancy loss. I argue that both biomedical obstetrics and the women's health movement critique of it share a belief in the ability to control reproduction so that there will be a positive outcome. I show that this emphasis on happy endings (whether believed to be the result of medical intervention, or women's natural inborn powers to reproduce) exacerbates the experience of those whose pregnancies do not end happily. I show how the women's health movement's emphasis on the importance of women being in control of their own bodies is related to a broader "culture of meritocracy" which contributes to maternal blame (and self-blame) when pregnancies are not perfect.

  19. A reappraisal of the MECT1/MAML2 translocation in salivary mucoepidermoid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R; Dacic, Sanja; Cieply, Kathleen; Kelly, Lindsey M; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2010-08-01

    The MECT1/MAML2 translocation is identified in a large proportion of mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC) of the salivary gland and is an emerging favorable prognosticator. However, there are conflicting data on this translocation's specificity, restriction to low/intermediate MEC, and strength as a prognosticator. We present our experience with the MECT1/MAML2 translocation in a large cohort of MECs to address these issues. We analyzed 55 salivary MEC and 36 potential MEC mimics (24 Warthin tumors, 5 oncocytomas, 3 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 squamoid salivary duct carcinomas, 1 lymphoepithelial cyst, 1 Schneiderian carcinoma ex papilloma) for presence of the MECT1/MAML2 translocation by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time RT-PCR. Overall, MECT1/MAML2 translocation was present in 36/55 (66%) of MEC whereas all 36 non-MEC were negative for translocation. Low or intermediate-grade MEC had a higher frequency of translocation (75%) than high-grade MEC (46%) (P=0.039). Translocation positive cases had a better disease-specific survival (log rank P=0.026) although 2 patients still died of disease. Within high-grade MEC, MECT1/MAML2 positive tumors had lower rates of anaplasia (P=0.001), and mitotic counts (P=0.012). Thus, MECT1/MAML2 translocation is highly specific for MEC and imparts a better prognosis. However, it is frequent even within high-grade MEC and can be seen in lethal cases suggesting that translocation status should not supersede conventional parameters. There are 2 distinct subgroups within high-grade MEC, and the translocation negative tumors may actually be more appropriately categorized as another tumor type (such as adenosquamous carcinoma). PMID:20588178

  20. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Melanoma Diagnosis: A Review and a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; De Vanna, Anna Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Although conventional histopathological examination is the undisputable mainstay for the diagnosis of melanocytic skin neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has the potential to provide important information to morphologically challenging cases. The standard melanoma FISH test targeting RREB1 (6p25), MYB (6q23), CCND1 (11q13), and centromere 6 is an effective compromise between cost, technical complexity, and sensitivity. The authors use the standard FISH-positivity as a tie-breaker for challenging melanocytic neoplasms mainly in a non-Spitzoid morphologic context because the currently available test leaves several unresolved issues: namely, a relatively low diagnostic accuracy in morphologically ambiguous melanocytic neoplasms; a relatively low sensitivity and specificity in Spitzoid neoplasms; and the occurrence of false positives due to tetraploidy in Spitz nevi and in nevi with an atypical epithelioid component. Under investigation is currently a new melanoma probe cocktail targeting RREB1 (6p25), C-MYC (8q24), CDKN2A (9p21), and CCND1 (11q13). However, CDKN2A is a significant parameter only if lost in homozygosis, and this complicates the interpretation of the results. Furthermore, the new melanoma probe cocktail has been tested on cases of atypical Spitzoid proliferations with fatal outcomes which at present are too few to allow definite conclusions. The authors propose the implementation of a FISH algorithm (standard 4-probe test followed by either C-MYC or CDKN2A/centromere 9) to assist the histopathological diagnosis and minimize the technical problems. Nevertheless, because the diagnostic accuracy of the FISH technique is far from being absolute, the overall clinicopathological context must always guide the decision-making process about the management of morphobiologically ambiguous melanocytic proliferations. PMID:26999337

  1. New Early Paleozoic Paleomagnetic Poles From NW Argentina: a Reappraisal of Tectonic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, C. M.; Rapalini, A. E.; Astini, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    A paleomagnetic study carried out on Early Ordovician volcanic units in the Famatina Ranges of NW Argentina yielded a pre-tectonic paleomagnetic pole at 32.7°S, 4.3°E, (5.6°/ 8.6°, N=14 sites) that is consistent with four previous Early Ordovician poles from the Famatina - Eastern Puna Eruptive Belt of NW Argentina. However, these five poles are rotated around 50° clockwise respect to the coeval reference pole of Gondwana. Our new results seem to confirm previous models of this belt as a paraauthocthonous rotated terrane on the southwestern margin of Gondwana. However, a recent paleomagnetic pole from the Late Cambrian Mesón Group, at the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina, corresponding to the Gondwana foreland (4.5°S, 359.0°E, dp=5.5°, dm=8.8°, n=26 samples) and preliminary paleopoles obtained from the same unit and the latest Cambrian - Early Ordovician Santa Victoria Group at other three localities in the same region, also indicate an anomalous pole position rotated some 40° clockwise respect to the reference pole for Gondwana. These results suggest that the postulated model of a rotated terrane for the Famatina-Eastern Puna belt must be reconsidered. Different alternative scenarios including the possibility of an Early Paleozoic displacement of the whole basement of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas of Argentina ("Pampia") will be explored.

  2. Reappraising suppression: subjective and physiological correlates of experiential suppression in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; El-Hage, Wissam; Frangou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emotion regulation strategies based on suppressing behavioral expressions of emotion have been considered maladaptive. However, this may not apply to suppressing the emotional experience (experiential suppression). The aim of this study was to define the effect of experiential suppression on subjective and physiological emotional responses. Methods: Healthy adults (N = 101) were characterized in terms of the temperament, personality, and hedonic capacity using the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Fawcett–Clark Pleasure Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Participants were shown positive, negative, and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System under two conditions, passive viewing, and experiential suppression. During both conditions, subjective ratings of the intensity and duration of emotional responses and physiological measures of skin conductance (SC) and cardiac inter-beat interval (IBI) to each picture were recorded. Results: Negative pictures elicited the most intense physiological and emotional responses regardless of experimental condition. Ratings of emotional intensity were not affected by condition. In contrast, experiential suppression, compared to passive viewing, was associated with decreased duration of the emotional response, reduced maximum SC amplitude and longer IBIs independent of age, picture valence, personality traits, hedonic capacity, and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that experiential suppression may represent an adaptive emotion regulation mechanism associated with reduced arousal and cardiovascular activation. PMID:24966844

  3. How does Stroop interference change with practice? A reappraisal from the musical Stroop paradigm.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Laurent; Perruchet, Pierre; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte

    2015-03-01

    Most earlier studies investigating the evolution of the Stroop effect with the amount of reading practice have reported data consistent with an inverted U-shaped curve, whereby the Stroop effect appears early during reading acquisition, reaches a peak after 2 or 3 years of practice, and then continuously decreases until adulthood. The downward component of the curve suggests that skilled performers would be able to control their performance better than less-skilled performers. However, in these studies, the level of reading practice entirely coincides with age due to obvious practical and ethical constraints, and it is possible that the observed reduction in the Stroop interference is due to a growing ability of older children to inhibit nonrelevant information. In the present study, word reading, as source of interference, was replaced by note naming in musicians. The major advantage is that musical training can be easily decoupled from age. In 2 experiments exploiting the musical Stroop paradigm (Grégoire, Perruchet, & Poulin-Charronnat, 2013), we observed an early appearance of the interference effect, as reported for the color-word and picture-word Stroop tasks, but we did not replicate the inverted U-shaped curve. Experiment 2 revealed a linear and positive relation between the amplitude of the musical Stroop effect and the amount of musical practice across 5 years of musical training. These results suggest that reading practice in itself does not lead to increased control over reading and that the usual pattern of results is most likely due to the strong correlation between age and reading practice. PMID:25068858

  4. Reappraisal of the taxonomy of Streptococcus suis serotypes 20, 22 and 26: Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R; Maruyama, F; Ishida, S; Tohya, M; Sekizaki, T; Osawa, Ro

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the taxonomic position of serotypes 20, 22 and 26 of Streptococcus suis, biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on isolates (SUT-7, SUT-286(T), SUT-319, SUT-328 and SUT-380) reacted with specific antisera of serotypes 20, 22 or 26 from the saliva of healthy pigs as well as reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26. Comparative recN gene sequencing showed high genetic relatedness among our isolates, but marked differences from the type strain S. suis NCTC 10234(T), i.e. 74.8-75.7 % sequence similarity. The genomic relatedness between the isolates and other strains of species of the genus Streptococcus, including S. suis, was calculated using the average nucleotide identity values of whole genome sequences, which indicated that serotypes 20, 22 and 26 should be removed taxonomically from S. suis and treated as a novel genomic species. Comparative sequence analysis revealed 99.0-100 % sequence similarities for the 16S rRNA genes between the reference strains of serotypes 20, 22 and 26, and our isolates. Isolate STU-286(T) had relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with S. suis NCTC 10234(T) (98.8 %). SUT-286(T) could be distinguished from S. suis and other closely related species of the genus Streptococcus using biochemical tests. Due to its phylogenetic and phenotypic similarities to S. suis we propose naming the novel species Streptococcus parasuis sp. nov., with SUT-286(T) ( = JCM 30273(T) = DSM 29126(T)) as the type strain.

  5. Enoxacin: a reappraisal of its clinical efficacy in the treatment of genitourinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Patel, S S; Spencer, C M

    1996-01-01

    Enoxacin is a 6-fluoronaphthyridinone antibacterial agent with good in vitro activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae and most Gram-negative urinary tract pathogens. It is less active in vitro against Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and most Gram-positive bacteria, than against Gram-negative organisms. Enoxacin is rapidly absorbed, with a high oral bioavailability (87 to 91%). Of the absorbed dose, 44 to 56% is excreted unchanged in the urine, with peak urinary concentrations (>500 mg/L within 4 hours) remaining high (>100 mg/L) for up to 24 hours, sufficient to inhibit most urinary tract pathogens. Single (400 mg) and multiple oral dose regimens (100 to 600 mg twice or 3 times daily for 5 to 14 days) of enoxacin are as effective for the treatment of patients with complicated or uncomplicated urinary tract infections as other antibacterial agents such as amoxicillin, cefuroxime axetil, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) or trimethoprim. Noncomparative data suggest that enoxacin is also an effective agent for the treatment of prostatitis. Single 400 mgoral doses of enoxacin produce >/- 95% bacteriological cure rates in gonococcal infections, comparable to those produced by single intramuscular doses of ceftriaxone 250 mg. Perioperative doses of oral enoxacin 200 mg provide effective prophylaxis against postoperative bacteriuria after transurethral resection of the prostate. Concomitant administration of enoxacin with a number of commonly used therapeutic agents (e.g. antacids, methylxanthines, warfarin) affects the pharmacokinetic properties of either enoxacin or the coadministered agents. Enoxacin is reasonably well tolerated, with the incidence of adverse experiences ranging from 0 to 24%. Adverse events are mainly gastrointestinal, neurological or dermatological and resolve with minimal intervention. Overall, although enoxacin exhibits a number of clinical characteristics that are similar to those of other agents for the treatment of

  6. How does Stroop interference change with practice? A reappraisal from the musical Stroop paradigm.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Laurent; Perruchet, Pierre; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte

    2015-03-01

    Most earlier studies investigating the evolution of the Stroop effect with the amount of reading practice have reported data consistent with an inverted U-shaped curve, whereby the Stroop effect appears early during reading acquisition, reaches a peak after 2 or 3 years of practice, and then continuously decreases until adulthood. The downward component of the curve suggests that skilled performers would be able to control their performance better than less-skilled performers. However, in these studies, the level of reading practice entirely coincides with age due to obvious practical and ethical constraints, and it is possible that the observed reduction in the Stroop interference is due to a growing ability of older children to inhibit nonrelevant information. In the present study, word reading, as source of interference, was replaced by note naming in musicians. The major advantage is that musical training can be easily decoupled from age. In 2 experiments exploiting the musical Stroop paradigm (Grégoire, Perruchet, & Poulin-Charronnat, 2013), we observed an early appearance of the interference effect, as reported for the color-word and picture-word Stroop tasks, but we did not replicate the inverted U-shaped curve. Experiment 2 revealed a linear and positive relation between the amplitude of the musical Stroop effect and the amount of musical practice across 5 years of musical training. These results suggest that reading practice in itself does not lead to increased control over reading and that the usual pattern of results is most likely due to the strong correlation between age and reading practice.

  7. A reappraisal of Microthyriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai X.; Schoch, Conrad L.; Boonmee, Saranyaphat; Bahkali, Ali H.; Chomnunti, Putarak

    2012-01-01

    The family Microthyriaceae sensu Lumbsch and Huhndorf 2010 is a poorly known but interesting family comprising 50 genera consisting of foliar epiphytes or saprobes on dead leaves and stems. We re-visited the family based on examinations of generic types where possible. Members are distributed in Aulographaceae, Asterinaceae, Microthyriaceae, Micropeltidaceae and Palmulariaceae and notes are provided on each of these families. Nine genera are transferred from Microthyriaceae to Asterinaceae, and two to Aulographaceae based on the splitting or dissolving nature of the thyriothecia to release ascospores. New sequence data for a number of species and genera are provided. Microthyriaceous members growing on other fungi and lichens differ from Microthyriaceae sensu stricto and the family Trichothyriaceae is reinstated to accommodate these taxa. Other genera of Microthyriaceae belong in Rhytismataceae, Stictidaceae, Venturiales incertae cedis, Dothideomyetes genera incertae cedis, Hypocreales incertae cedis and Ascomycota genera incertae cedis. The family Microthyriaceae is reduced to seven genera characterised by superficial, flattened thyriothecia, with the cells of the upper wall radiating in parallel arrangement from the distinct central ostiolar opening, while the lower peridium is generally poorly developed. Sequence data is provided for five species with thyriothecia and Paramicrothyrium and Neomicrothyrium are described as new genera and Micropeltis zingiberacicola is introduced as a new species. Our phylogenetic analysis underscores the high genetic diversity for thyriotheciate species and there is no clear clade that can be well defined as Microthyriales. Nuclear ribosomal data support multiple polyphyletic lineages within Microthyriaceae and Micropeltidaceae. Some unexpected DNA based phylogenetic relationships such as those between Muyocopron and Saccardoella will require corroboration with more complete taxon sampling as well as additional non ribosomal markers. There are few differences between Aulographaceae, Asterinaceae and Palmulariaceae and these families may need synonymising. PMID:22408574

  8. Archie's law - a reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.

    2016-07-01

    When scientists apply Archie's first law they often include an extra parameter a, which was introduced about 10 years after the equation's first publication by Winsauer et al. (1952), and which is sometimes called the "tortuosity" or "lithology" parameter. This parameter is not, however, theoretically justified. Paradoxically, the Winsauer et al. (1952) form of Archie's law often performs better than the original, more theoretically correct version. The difference in the cementation exponent calculated from these two forms of Archie's law is important, and can lead to a misestimation of reserves by at least 20 % for typical reservoir parameter values. We have examined the apparent paradox, and conclude that while the theoretical form of the law is correct, the data that we have been analysing with Archie's law have been in error. There are at least three types of systematic error that are present in most measurements: (i) a porosity error, (ii) a pore fluid salinity error, and (iii) a temperature error. Each of these systematic errors is sufficient to ensure that a non-unity value of the parameter a is required in order to fit the electrical data well. Fortunately, the inclusion of this parameter in the fit has compensated for the presence of the systematic errors in the electrical and porosity data, leading to a value of cementation exponent that is correct. The exceptions are those cementation exponents that have been calculated for individual core plugs. We make a number of recommendations for reducing the systematic errors that contribute to the problem and suggest that the value of the parameter a may now be used as an indication of data quality.

  9. The Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5 (AUDADIS-5): procedural validity of substance use disorders modules through clinical re-appraisal in a general population sample

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Greenstein, Eliana; Aivadyan, Christina; Stohl, Malka; Aharonovich, Efrat; Saha, Tulshi; Goldstein, Rise; Nunes, Edward V.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the procedural validity of the substance disorder modules of the lay-administered Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Version (AUDADIS-5) through clinician re-appraisal re-interviews. Methods The study employed a test-retest design among 712 respondents from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III). A clinician-administered, semi-structured interview, the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders, DSM-5 version (PRISM-5) was used as the re-appraisal. Kappa coeffients indicated concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and PRISM-5 for DSM-5 substance use disorder diagnoses, while intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) indicated concordance on dimensional scales indicating the DSM-5 criteria count for each disorder. Results With few exceptions, concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and the PRISM-5 for DSM-5 diagnoses of substance use disorders ranged from fair to good (κ=0.40–0.72). Concordance on dimensional scales was excellent (ICC≥0.75) for the majority of DSM-5 SUD diagnoses, and fair to good (ICC=0.43–0.72) for most of the rest. Conclusions As indicated by concordance with a semi-structured clinician-administered re-appraisal, the procedural validity of the AUDADIS-5 DSM-5 substance use disorder diagnoses found in this study indicates that these AUDADIS-5 diagnoses are useful tools in epidemiologic studies. The considerably stronger concordance of the AUDADIS-5 and PRISM-5 dimensional DSM-5 SUD measures supports a current movement to place more emphasis on dimensional measures of psychopathology, and suggests that such measures may be more informative than binary diagnoses for research, and possibly for clinical purposes as well. PMID:25595052

  10. Listening to victims: use of a Critical Incident Reporting System to enable adult victims of childhood sexual abuse to participate in a political reappraisal process in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rassenhofer, Miriam; Spröber, Nina; Schneider, Thekla; Fegert, Jörg M

    2013-09-01

    Recent revelations about the scope and severity of past child sexual abuse in German institutions set off a broad public debate on this issue, and led to the establishment of a politically appointed Round Table committee and an Independent Commissioner whose mandates were to reappraise the issue and develop recommendations for future policies. A media campaign was launched to publicize the establishment of a Critical Incident Reporting System (CIRS) whereby now-adult victims of past abuse could anonymously provide testimonials and let policy makers know what issues were important to them. Respondents could either call a hotline number or communicate by mail or email. The information collected was documented and analyzed by a research team, and the results of interim reports were included in the recommendations of the Independent Commissioner and the Round Table committee. Most of the respondents described severe and repeated occurrences of childhood sexual abuse. For many, priorities were improvements in therapy and counseling services, the abolishment of the statute of limitations on prosecuting offenders, and financial compensation. Based on the recommendations of the Round Table and the Independent Commissioner, two new laws were adopted as well as an action plan and some guidelines. In addition to rules for recompensation of victims in an institutional context a fund for victims of sexual abuse in intrafamilial context was established by the Federal Government. Another effect of this process was raising societal sensitivity to the problem of child sexual abuse. The use of a CIRS enabled those directly affected by childhood sexual abuse to have some input into a political process designed to address this issue. Such an approach could have applicability in other countries or in other domains of public health and other forms of societal conflict as well.

  11. The Late Positive Potential Predicts Emotion Regulation Strategy Use in School-Aged Children Concurrently and Two Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Babkirk, Sarah; Rios, Victor; Dennis, Tracy A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to use cognitive emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal may be a core component of emotional competence across development, but due to methodological challenges in measuring such strategies, they are rarely studied in young children. One neurophysiological measure, the late positive potential (LPP) has been examined in response to reappraisal as a potential neurosignature for emotion regulatory capacity in adults. The association between the LPP and emotion regulatory capacity in children is unknown. The present study examined whether the LPP during reappraisal could predict greater observed adaptive emotion regulation strategy use in school-aged children over a two-year period. Thirty-two five- to seven- year- olds participated in two identical lab visits spaced two years apart. EEG was continuously recorded during a computerized reappraisal task in which children viewed unpleasant images paired with either reappraisal or negative stories. Next they completed a disappointing and a frustrating task during which emotion regulation strategies was observed. As predicted, children who showed reappraisal-induced reductions in the LPP at the first assessment used significantly more adaptive ER strategies concurrently and two years later. These findings provide observation-based evidence that the LPP may be a viable neurosignature for emotion regulatory capacity in children. PMID:25438825

  12. Toward determining the uncertainties associated with the seismic histories retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide fault scarp dating: model reappraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla

    2016-04-01

    How the past seismic activity of faults has varied over the last 20 ky is a crucial information for seismic hazard assessment and for the understanding of fault-interaction processes. Chlorine 36 in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide is increasingly used to retrieve past earthquakes histories on seismically exhumed limestone normal fault-scarps. Schlagenhauf et al. in 2010 developed a modeling code with a forward approach enabling the test of scenarii generated with a priori constraints (number of events, age and slip of events and pre-exposure time). The main shortcomings of this forward approach were the limited number of testable scenarii and the difficulty to derive the associated uncertainties. We present here a reappraisal methodology with an inverse approach using an optimization algorithm. This modelling approach enables 1-exploring the parameter space (age and slip of events), 2-finding the best scenario without a priori constraints and 3-precisely quantifying the associated uncertainties by determining the range of plausible models. Through a series of synthetic tests, we observed that the algorithm revealed a great capacity to constrain event slips and ages in a short computational time (several hours) with an accuracy that can reach 0.1 ky and 0.5 m for the age and slip of exhumation event, respectively. We also explore the influence of the pre-exposure history (amount of 36Cl accumulated when the sampled fault-plane was still buried under the colluvial wedge) and show that it has an important impact on the generated scenarii. This new modeling also allows now to accurately determining this parameter. Finally, the results show that any given [36Cl] profile results in a unique exhumation solution. We then apply this new model to the Magnola fault (Italy) dataset (Schlgenhauf et al. 2011). In agreement the previously published results, our model also results in 3 intense periods of seismic activity. However, the contribution of the pre-exposure history is

  13. Reappraisal of the role of postoperative radiation therapy in patients with pIIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer: A propensity score matching analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qinchen; Zhang, Baozhong; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Changli; Gong, Liqun; Wang, Jun; Pang, Qingsong; Li, Kai; Liu, Weishuai; Li, Xue; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Reappraisal of the role of postoperative radiotherapy in pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients according to N1 lymph node involvement. Methods A total of 218 pIIIa-N2 NSCLC patients who underwent complete surgical resection with systematic nodal dissections were enrolled. Propensity scores were used for matching N1 involvement. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed retrospectively. Results After matching, pN2b patients without N1 involvement (pN0N2b) exhibited better prognoses than those with N1 involvement (pN1N2b) (5-year OS: 37.5% vs. 7.1%, P = 0.008; 5-year DFS: 31.8% vs. 4.6%, P = 0.004). Similar results were not detected in pN2a disease (5-year OS: 37.8% vs. 31.0%, P = 0.517; 5-year DFS: 27.1% vs. 20.2%, P = 0.788). The five-year OS of patients who received no adjuvant therapy (22 pN2a cases, 7 pN0N2b, 5 pN1N2b), adjuvant chemotherapy alone (74 pN2a cases, 11 pN0N2b, 17 pN1N2b) or chemoradiotherapy (25 pN2a cases, 7 pN0N2b, 6 pN1N2b) were compared (pN2a: 31.3%, 37.0%, and 32.0%, P = 0.808; pN0N2b: 0.0%, 18.2%, and 71.4%, P = 0.108; pN1N2b: 0.0%, 0.0%, and 33.3%, P < 0.0001). The five-year DFS was also analyzed (pN2a: 31.6%, 24.0%, and 18.3%, P = 0.410; pN0N2b: 0.0%, 11.1%, and 57.1%, P = 0.192; pN1N2b: 0.0%, 0.0%, and 16.7%, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the novel classification based on N1 involvement and pN2a/pN2b staging was an independent prognostic factor of OS and DFS. Conclusion N1 involvement significantly impacted the prognosis of pN2b NSCLC patients. The benefit of adjuvant therapy in pN2a and pN0N2b patients requires confirmation by further study. PMID:26445605

  14. The Ban Don Mun artifacts: a chronological reappraisal of human occupations in the Lampang province of Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Valery; Forestier, Hubert; Rasse, Michel; Auetrakulvit, Prasit; Kim, Jeongmin; Tiamtinkrit, Chaturaporn

    2013-07-01

    Despite recent stone tool evidence demonstrating a much older Early Pleistocene human presence in India, the timing and geography of human demographic expansions in continental Southeast Asia remains ambiguous. The recent discovery of a series of stone artifacts spread over a basalt level at Ban Don Mun in the Lampang province of northern Thailand presents an ideal opportunity for reevaluating lithic assemblages documented during the 1970s and 1980s in the same region. Both the position of these stone tools and new absolute dates indicate a Middle Pleistocene age and call into question the status of these artifacts as the oldest yet found in Southeast Asia. The uncertain geo-chronological context and technological analysis of the chopper industry from previous work in the Lampang area prompted us to undertake new surveys in continental Southeast Asia in order to help clarify the route and timing of Pleistocene human expansions in this part of the world.

  15. A further investigation and reappraisal of the thio effect in the cleavage reaction catalyzed by a hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinari, Koichi; Taira, Kazunari

    2000-01-01

    We synthesized three types of 11mer substrate, namely the natural substrate S11O and the thiosubstituted substrates S11SpS and S11RpS, in which the respective pro-Sp and pro-Rp oxygen atoms were replaced by sulfur, and subjected them to detailed kinetic analysis in the cleavage reaction catalyzed by a hammerhead ribozyme. In agreement with previous findings, in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+ ions the rate of ribozyme-catalyzed cleavage of S11SpS was as high as that of S11O, whereas the corresponding rate for S11RpS was nearly four orders of magnitude lower than that for either S11O or S11SpS. However, the rate of the ribozyme-catalyzed reaction with each of the three substrates was enhanced by Cd2+ ions. Such results have generally been taken as evidence that supports the direct interaction of the sulfur atom at the Rp position of the cleavage site with the added Cd2+ ion. However, our present analysis demonstrates that (i) the added Cd2+ ion binds at the P9 site; (ii) the bound Cd2+ ion at the P9 site replaces two Mg2+ or two Ca2+ ions, an observation that suggests a different mode of interaction with the added Cd2+ ion; and, most importantly and in contrast to the conclusion reached by other investigators, (iii) the Cd2+ ion does not interact with the sulfur atom at the Rp position of the scissile phosphate either in the ground state or in the transition state. PMID:10734192

  16. p16 expression predicts neoadjuvant tumor necrosis in osteosarcomas: reappraisal with a larger series using whole sections.

    PubMed

    Kosemehmetoglu, Kemal; Ardic, Fisun; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Kandemir, Olcay; Ozcan, Ayhan

    2016-04-01

    The presence of greater than or equal to 90% necrosis after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a favorable prognostic factor in osteosarcomas. A recent study using tissue microarrays of 40 conventional osteosarcomas showed that p16 expression independently predicted the necrotic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated this finding using whole sections in a larger group of osteosarcomas. Cases of 83 patients who had pretreatment biopsies and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection were collected from 3 reference hospital archives. Age, sex, tumor size, tumor subtype, location, and percentage of tumor necrosis were recorded; 4-μm sections from pretreatment biopsies were stained for p16. More than 30% strong nuclear staining was regarded as positive. The median age was 17 years (5-68 years), and male/female ratio was 2.3. The mean tumor diameter was 9.9 cm (2-30 cm). Tumors were most commonly of the osteoblastic type (60%) and located at the femur (47%). p16 positivity was seen in 66% of the patients. The median pathologic necrosis was 65%, and 39% of the patients responded favorably (≥%90 necrosis) to neoadjuvant therapy. In univariate analysis, p16 expression significantly correlated with greater than or equal to 90% response (P = .022). On multivariate analysis, p16 expression (odds ratio [OR], 7.71; P = .008), female sex (OR, 8.62; P = .006), and smaller tumor size (OR, 0.86; P = .023) were independent predictors of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We confirmed the finding that p16 expression predicts postchemotherapy necrotic response in conventional osteosarcomas. PMID:26997452

  17. Revertant Fibers in the mdx Murine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Age- and Muscle-Related Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Pigozzo, Sarah R.; Da Re, Lorena; Romualdi, Chiara; Mazzara, Pietro G.; Galletta, Eva; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Stephen D.; Vitiello, Libero

    2013-01-01

    Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed “revertant fibers”) positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s) behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of “revertant” myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle. PMID:24015212

  18. Reappraisal of bovril as a source of arginine in the arginine stimulation test for growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Loh, H H; Norlela, S; Nor Azmi, K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this case study is to report the use of oral Bovril (a food supplement which contains arginine) as an alternative test for growth hormone stimulation test. We performed oral Bovril test in 3 patients -- one with suspected growth hormone deficiency in whom insulin tolerance test could not be performed (subject A), one sex-matched control (subject B), and one with confirmed growth hormone deficiency (subject C). 14g/m(2) of oral Bovril was mixed with 150ml of warm water and was given to all three subjects. Blood for growth hormone was taken at baseline, and every 30 minutes till 150 minutes after ingestion of oral Bovril. The ingestion of oral Bovril showed a positive response in subjects A and B, with highest growth hormone levels of 28.4mIU/L and 42.0mIU/L respectively at 150 minutes. Subject C had suppressed growth hormone throughout the test. Oral Bovril is readily available and is a safe alternative for standard growth hormone stimulation test. PMID:26248787

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are short-lived: reappraising the influence of migration, genetic factors and activation on estimation of lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yifan; Chow, Kevin V.; Soo, Priscilla; Xu, Zhen; Brady, Jamie L.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Masters, Seth L.; O’keeffe, Meredith; Shortman, Ken; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Lew, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play an important role in immunity to certain pathogens and immunopathology in some autoimmune diseases. They are thought to have a longer lifespan than conventional DCs (cDCs), largely based on a slower rate of BrdU labeling by splenic pDCs. Here we demonstrated that pDC expansion and therefore BrdU labeling by pDCs occurs in bone marrow (BM). The rate of labeling was similar between BM pDCs and spleen cDCs. Therefore, slower BrdU labeling of spleen pDCs likely reflects the “migration time” (∼2 days) for BrdU labeled pDCs to traffic to the spleen, not necessarily reflecting longer life span. Tracking the decay of differentiated DCs showed that splenic pDCs and cDCs decayed at a similar rate. We suggest that spleen pDCs have a shorter in vivo lifespan than estimated utilizing some of the previous approaches. Nevertheless, pDC lifespan varies between mouse strains. pDCs from lupus-prone NZB mice survived longer than C57BL/6 pDCs. We also demonstrated that activation either positively or negatively impacted on the survival of pDCs via different cell-death mechanisms. Thus, pDCs are also short-lived. However, the pDC lifespan is regulated by genetic and environmental factors that may have pathological consequence. PMID:27112985

  20. Reappraisal of the palaeomagnetism of the Miocene intramontane Pag and Drniš-Sinj basins, External Dinarides (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emő; Pavelić, Davor; Vranjković, Alan; Ćosović, Vlasta

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents palaeomagnetic results from the Miocene offshore Pag and the twin onshore (Drniš-Sinj) basins. Earlier magnetostratigraphic results were published from both basins, which documented that the lake sediments were good targets for palaeomagnetism. From the Pag basin, we sampled the oldest and youngest segments of the 1200 m long Crnika section and obtained statistically different palaeomagnetic directions from the two parts. During a repeated visit to the section it was revealed that modern gravity-driven creeping can account for this, i.e. the results from the Pag basin should be rejected from regional tectonic interpretation. The overall-mean palaeomagnetic direction for the Drniš-Sinj basin has excellent statistical parameters, its high quality is further supported by positive regional fold/tilt and reversal tests, based on seven geographically distributed localities. The results suggests 13-20° CCW rotation with respect to Africa and 21-27° with respect to stable Europe, during the last 15 million years. As the External Dinarides are the loci of a complicated network of Miocene and even younger tectonic zones, we cannot export the observed rotation for the whole unit, but consider our results as one step in obtaining robust kinematic constraints for the post-Oligocene tectonic history of the External Dinarides.

  1. A reappraisal of hemangiopericytoma of bone; analysis of cases reclassified as synovial sarcoma and solitary fibrous tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Alberghini, Marco; Daugaard, Søren; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Parratt, Tim; Kroon, Herman M; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2010-06-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) was first described as a neoplasm with distinct morphologic features, presumably composed of pericytes. In soft tissue, it is accepted that most such lesions are solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), monophasic synovial sarcomas (SSs), or myofibromatoses. It is unclear whether HPC of bone exists. We reviewed 9 primary "HPC" of bone from 4 institutions diagnosed between 1952 and 2002. Immunohistochemistry was performed for CD31, CD34, von Willebrand factor, smooth muscle actin, keratin AE1/AE3, and epithelial membrane antigen. There were 4 male and 5 female patients between 21 and 73 years. All tumors were located within bone, either sited within spine or extremities. All tumors showed thin-walled branching vessels surrounded by undifferentiated spindle or round cells. These cells showed variation in their morphologic pattern: 6 tumors showed a pattern-less architecture and varying cellularity, consistent with SFT; 3 of 5 cases examined were CD34-positive. Three tumors showed more densely packed sheets and fascicles of poorly differentiated cells, resembling SS, of which 2 showed focal staining for keratin AE1/AE3 or epithelial membrane antigen. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization confirmed the presence of SS18 rearrangement in 1 of 2 tumors examined. In conclusion, similar to their soft-tissue counterpart, HPC-like features in bone are a nonspecific growth pattern rather than a true diagnosis. We confirm the existence of 2 entities: SFT and SS of bone. Both are characterized by distinct morphology and immunohistochemical profile. SFT of bone is located within spine and has a better prognosis, whereas SS of bone is located within long bones having a poor prognosis.

  2. Early identification and management of psychological risk factors ("yellow flags") in patients with low back pain: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Michael K; Linton, Steven J; Watson, Paul J; Main, Chris J

    2011-05-01

    Originally the term "yellow flags" was used to describe psychosocial prognostic factors for the development of disability following the onset of musculoskeletal pain. The identification of yellow flags through early screening was expected to prompt the application of intervention guidelines to achieve secondary prevention. In recent conceptualizations of yellow flags, it has been suggested that their range of applicability should be confined primarily to psychological risk factors to differentiate them from other risk factors, such as social and environmental variables. This article addresses 2 specific questions that arise from this development: (1) Can yellow flags influence outcomes in people with acute or subacute low back pain? and (2) Can yellow flags be targeted in interventions to produce better outcomes? Consistent evidence has been found to support the role of various psychological factors in prognosis, although questions remain about which factors are the most important, both individually and in combination, and how they affect outcomes. Published early interventions have reported mixed results, but, overall, the evidence suggests that targeting yellow flags, particularly when they are at high levels, does seem to lead to more consistently positive results than either ignoring them or providing omnibus interventions to people regardless of psychological risk factors. Psychological risk factors for poor prognosis can be identified clinically and addressed within interventions, but questions remain in relation to issues such as timing, necessary skills, content of treatments, and context. In addition, there is still a need to elucidate mechanisms of change and better integrate this understanding into the broader context of secondary prevention of chronic pain and disability.

  3. Blood Lactate Levels Cutoff and Mortality Prediction in Sepsis—Time for a Reappraisal? a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Roberto Rabello; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Colombo, Giancarlo; Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to identify the initial value of blood lactate that best correlates with 28-day mortality in resuscitated septic shock patients. This was a retrospective cohort study including 443 patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with severe sepsis or septic shock from the emergency department. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to obtain the best cutoff value for initial blood lactate associated with 28-day mortality. Patients were then dichotomized according to the chosen lactate cutoff, and sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Baseline blood lactate level more than 2.5 mmol/L showed the largest area under the ROC curve to predict 28-day mortality (ROC area, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62–0.79), with sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of 67.4%, 61.7%, and 94.2%, respectively. Mortality at 28 days was 16.9% (31/183) in patients with initial lactate more than 2.5 mmol/L and 5.8% (15/260) in patients with initial lactate at most 2.5 mmol/L (relative risk, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.63–5.28; P < 0.001). Initial blood lactate levels more than 2.5 mmol/L (hazard ratio [HR], 2.86; 95% CI, 1.53–5.33; P = 0.001) and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score at ICU admission (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09–1.27; P < 0.001) were associated with increased 28-day mortality in the adjusted Cox regression. In this retrospective cohort study, a lactate level more than 2.5 mmol/L was the best threshold to predict 28-day mortality among severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Further prospective studies should address the impact on morbidity and mortality of this threshold as a trigger to resuscitation in this population of critically ill patients. PMID:27380535

  4. Kennebunk glacial advance: A reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey W.

    1981-06-01

    Evidence for the Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) in southwestern Maine is discussed in light of recent geologic mapping. Orientations of glacially produced lineations record the response of ice to major topographic controls and do not indicate glacial readvance. Minor end moraines and large stratified end moraines associated with deformed marine sediments of the Presumpscot Formation occur throughout the southwestern coastal zone. These features outline the general pattern of ice retreat from this part of the coastal zone and suggest that withdrawal of the last ice from southwestern Maine occurred with minor stillstands and local frontal fluctuations but without significant readvance. The Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) appears to have been one of many local fluctuations of the ice front during general recession, occurring at about 13,200 yr B.P.

  5. Vascular Thalamic Amnesia: A Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Lombardi, Maria Giovanna; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In humans lacunar infarcts in the mesial and anterior regions of the thalami are frequently associated with amnesic syndromes. In this review paper, we scrutinized 41 papers published between 1983 and 2009 that provided data on a total of 83 patients with the critical ischemic lesions (i.e. 17 patients with right-sided lesions, 25 with left-sided…

  6. Vascular thalamic amnesia: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Lombardi, Maria Giovanna; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2011-04-01

    In humans lacunar infarcts in the mesial and anterior regions of the thalami are frequently associated with amnesic syndromes. In this review paper, we scrutinized 41 papers published between 1983 and 2009 that provided data on a total of 83 patients with the critical ischemic lesions (i.e. 17 patients with right-sided lesions, 25 with left-sided lesions and 41 with bilateral lesions). We aimed to find answers to the following questions concerning the vascular thalamic amnesia syndrome: (i) Which qualitative pattern of memory impairment (and associated cognitive and behavioral deficits) do these patients present? (ii) Which lesioned intrathalamic structures are primarily responsible for the amnesic syndrome? (iii) Are the recollection and familiarity components of declarative memory underlain by the same or by different thalamic structures? Results of the review indicate that, similar to patients with amnesic syndromes due to mesio-temporal lobe damage, patients with vascular thalamic amnesia display a prevalent deficit of declarative anterograde long-term memory, a less consistent deficit of declarative retrograde long-term memory and substantially spared short-term and implicit memory. Unlike mesio-temporal lobe patients, however, vascular thalamic amnesics often present dysexecutive and behavioral deficits similar to those observed in patients with frontal damage. The presence of an amnesic syndrome in patients with thalamic lacunar infarcts is strongly predicted by involvement of the mammillo-thalamic tract, which connects the anterior nuclei complex to the hippocampus proper via the fornix and the mammillary bodies. Finally, data reported in a few single cases provide support for the hypothesis that thalamic regions connected to distinct areas of the mesio-temporal lobe play differential roles in recollection and familiarity processes. The mammillo-thalamic tract/anterior nuclei axis seems primarily implicated in recollective processes, whereas the ventroamygdalofugal pathway/medio-dorsal axis primarily underlies familiarity processes.

  7. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  8. Brief report: Attention to positive information mediates the relationship between hope and psychosocial well-being of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dannii Y; Ho, Samuel M Y; Mak, Christine W Y

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the mediating roles of cognitive reappraisal and attentional preferences in the relationship between hope and psychosocial well-being among 712 adolescents. Results of the structural equation modeling revealed that the beneficial relation of hope to subjective happiness, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and interpersonal difficulties was partially mediated by attention to positive information but not cognitive reappraisal. Findings of this study may inform the design of intervention research by highlighting the importance of hopeful thinking style and attention to positive information in mental health of adolescents.

  9. Brief report: Attention to positive information mediates the relationship between hope and psychosocial well-being of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dannii Y; Ho, Samuel M Y; Mak, Christine W Y

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the mediating roles of cognitive reappraisal and attentional preferences in the relationship between hope and psychosocial well-being among 712 adolescents. Results of the structural equation modeling revealed that the beneficial relation of hope to subjective happiness, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and interpersonal difficulties was partially mediated by attention to positive information but not cognitive reappraisal. Findings of this study may inform the design of intervention research by highlighting the importance of hopeful thinking style and attention to positive information in mental health of adolescents. PMID:25968107

  10. Compassion-based emotion regulation up-regulates experienced positive affect and associated neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation research has primarily focused on techniques that attenuate or modulate the impact of emotional stimuli. Recent evidence suggests that this mode regulation can be problematic in the context of regulation of emotion elicited by the suffering of others, resulting in reduced emotional connectedness. Here, we investigated the effects of an alternative emotion regulation technique based on the up-regulation of positive affect via Compassion-meditation on experiential and neural affective responses to depictions of individuals in distress, and compared these with the established emotion regulation strategy of Reappraisal. Using fMRI, we scanned 15 expert practitioners of Compassion-meditation either passively viewing, or using Compassion-meditation or Reappraisal to modulate their emotional reactions to film clips depicting people in distress. Both strategies effectively, but differentially regulated experienced affect, with Compassion primarily increasing positive and Reappraisal primarily decreasing negative affect. Imaging results showed that Compassion, relative to both passive-viewing and Reappraisal increased activation in regions involved in affiliation, positive affect and reward processing including ventral striatum and medial orbitfrontal cortex. This network was shown to be active prior to stimulus presentation, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism of Compassion is the stimulus-independent endogenous generation of positive affect. PMID:25698699

  11. Compassion-based emotion regulation up-regulates experienced positive affect and associated neural networks.

    PubMed

    Engen, Haakon G; Singer, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Emotion regulation research has primarily focused on techniques that attenuate or modulate the impact of emotional stimuli. Recent evidence suggests that this mode regulation can be problematic in the context of regulation of emotion elicited by the suffering of others, resulting in reduced emotional connectedness. Here, we investigated the effects of an alternative emotion regulation technique based on the up-regulation of positive affect via Compassion-meditation on experiential and neural affective responses to depictions of individuals in distress, and compared these with the established emotion regulation strategy of Reappraisal. Using fMRI, we scanned 15 expert practitioners of Compassion-meditation either passively viewing, or using Compassion-meditation or Reappraisal to modulate their emotional reactions to film clips depicting people in distress. Both strategies effectively, but differentially regulated experienced affect, with Compassion primarily increasing positive and Reappraisal primarily decreasing negative affect. Imaging results showed that Compassion, relative to both passive-viewing and Reappraisal increased activation in regions involved in affiliation, positive affect and reward processing including ventral striatum and medial orbitfrontal cortex. This network was shown to be active prior to stimulus presentation, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism of Compassion is the stimulus-independent endogenous generation of positive affect. PMID:25698699

  12. Compassion-based emotion regulation up-regulates experienced positive affect and associated neural networks.

    PubMed

    Engen, Haakon G; Singer, Tania

    2015-09-01

    Emotion regulation research has primarily focused on techniques that attenuate or modulate the impact of emotional stimuli. Recent evidence suggests that this mode regulation can be problematic in the context of regulation of emotion elicited by the suffering of others, resulting in reduced emotional connectedness. Here, we investigated the effects of an alternative emotion regulation technique based on the up-regulation of positive affect via Compassion-meditation on experiential and neural affective responses to depictions of individuals in distress, and compared these with the established emotion regulation strategy of Reappraisal. Using fMRI, we scanned 15 expert practitioners of Compassion-meditation either passively viewing, or using Compassion-meditation or Reappraisal to modulate their emotional reactions to film clips depicting people in distress. Both strategies effectively, but differentially regulated experienced affect, with Compassion primarily increasing positive and Reappraisal primarily decreasing negative affect. Imaging results showed that Compassion, relative to both passive-viewing and Reappraisal increased activation in regions involved in affiliation, positive affect and reward processing including ventral striatum and medial orbitfrontal cortex. This network was shown to be active prior to stimulus presentation, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism of Compassion is the stimulus-independent endogenous generation of positive affect.

  13. Against All Odds: Positive Life Experiences of People with Advanced Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jenny M.; McNicoll, Paule

    1998-01-01

    Describes the nature of positive life experiences of 13 people coping exceptionally well while living with advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's, disease and the resulting significant physical disabilities. Emerging themes were the use of cognitive reappraisal, reframing, and intellectual stimulation as coping mechanisms;…

  14. Current state of HIV/AIDS in Taiwan and reappraisal of early diagnostic value of serial and comparative analyses of western blot patterns of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Yuan; Chuang, Che-Yen

    2002-02-01

    Since Taiwan is not a member of the World Health Organization (WHO), the problems of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Taiwan are not well known to the world. In this report we summarize the trend and current status of HIV/AIDS in Taiwan and also analyze Western blot (WB) patterns. The application of serial and comparative WB analyses is important in establishing an early diagnosis of neonatal HIV infection. These analyses will be useful as well in evaluating the clinical status of adults infected with HIV in developing countries. When there are "indeterminate" WBs in adults with recent HIV infection, it is imperative to perform a WB weekly to attain the earliest possible diagnosis and treatment. Usually anti-gag antibodies, most frequently the anti-p24, are followed by anti-env and anti-pol antibodies. When the set point is attained, WB studies may also be repeated if the clinical status changes or if the patients are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In the advanced stages of HIV infection, usually the anti-gag antibodies will fade first and then disappear, this occurs next in the anti-pol and in the anti-env antibodies. During HAART, viral replication is usually controlled and there will thus be a partial restoration of the immunological function that will induce changes in the antigen-antibody ratio and, in the end, this will result in changes in the WB patterns. In the mid 1980s all the hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) used in Taiwan was anti-HIV positive. However, follow-up ELISA and WB studies of the HBIG injected newborns proved that HBIG was anti-HIV positive but that there was no replicable HIV in HBIG. Monthly WB tests of newborns and anti-HIV positive mothers were used to differentiate HIV infection from the passive placental transference by comparing their WB patterns. Comparative WB analyses was also done between blood donors and recipients, and also between husbands and wives

  15. Lung cancer risk of low-level exposures to alpha emitters: critical reappraisal and experiments based on a new cytodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1999-02-20

    Ecologic U.S. county data suggest negative associations between residential radon exposure and lung cancer mortality (LCM)-inconsistent with clearly positive associations revealed by occupational data on individual miners, but perhaps explained by competing effects of cell killing vs. mutations in alpha-exposed bronchial epithelium. To assess the latter possibility, a biologically based "cytodynamic 2-stage" (CD2) cancer-risk model was fit to combined 1950-54 age- specific person-year data on lung cancer mortality (LCM) in white females of age 40+ y in 2,821 U.S. counties (-90% never-smokers), and in 5 cohorts of underground miners who never smoked. New estimates of household annual average radon exposure in U.S. counties were used, which were found to have a significant negative ecologic association with 1950-54 LCM in U.S. white females, adjusted for age and all subsets of two among 21 socioeconomic, climatic and other factors considered. A good CD2 fit was obtained to the combined residential/miner data, using biologically plausible parameter values. Without further optimization, the fit also predicted independent inverse dose-rate effects shown (for the first time) to occur in nonsmoking miners. Using the same U.S. county-level LCM data, a separate study revealed a positive ecologic association between LCM and bituminous coal use in the U.S., in agreement with epidemiological data on LCM in women in China. The modeling results obtained are consistent with the CD2-based hypothesis that residential radon exposure has a nonlinear U-shaped relation to LCM risk, and that current linear no-threshold extrapolation models substantially overestimate such risk. A U-shaped dose-response corresponds to a CD2-model prediction that alpha radiation kills more premalignant cells than it generates at low exposure levels, but not at higher levels. To test this hypothesis, groups of Japanese medaka (ricefish minnows) were exposed for 10 to 14 weeks to different concentrations of

  16. Myxoid Leiomyosarcoma of the Uterus: A Clinicopathologic Analysis of 30 Cases and Review of the Literature With Reappraisal of Its Distinction From Other Uterine Myxoid Mesenchymal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Parra-Herran, Carlos; Schoolmeester, John K; Yuan, Liping; Dal Cin, Paola; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Quade, Bradley J; Nucci, Marisa R

    2016-03-01

    Myxoid leiomyosarcoma (mLMS) of the uterus is a rare neoplasm; thus, knowledge of its clinical behavior and morphology remains limited. We therefore reviewed 30 cases initially diagnosed as uterine mLMS to better characterize its clinicopathologic features. Diagnosis was confirmed in 25 subjects (average age 51.5 y), of whom 80% were stage 1 at presentation. The average tumor size was 10.8 cm. An infiltrative tumor border was observed microscopically in 24 cases (96%); the border in 1 case could not be assessed. Fourteen cases (56%) had >10 mitoses per 10 high-power fields, 8 (32%) had between 2 and 10, and 3 cases (12%) had <2 mitoses. Geographic tumor necrosis and moderate to severe nuclear pleomorphism were seen concurrently in 12 cases (48%). All tumors expressed smooth muscle markers. Estrogen receptor was expressed in 29.4% of cases. Eighteen of 21 cases (85.7%) were negative for ALK by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up information was available in 18 subjects: 8 died of disease, 6 were alive with local and/or distant recurrence, and 4 were alive with no evidence of disease. Individuals who died of disease tended to have tumors with >10 mitoses per 10 high-power fields. Among cases with ≥5-year follow-up, overall survival was 11.1%, significantly worse compared with reported survival rates for conventional LMS. The initial diagnosis of mLMS was revised in 5 cases. Four had a distinctive loose myxoid appearance, nuclei with vesicular chromatin, and ALK positivity by immunohistochemistry, suggesting, suggesting inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. This diagnosis was confirmed by in situ hybridization in 2 cases. One additional myxoid tumor lacked smooth muscle or myofibroblastic features and could not be classified further. mLMS is an aggressive neoplasm characterized by infiltrative tumor borders and variability of other features (mitotic count, atypia, and necrosis). The differential diagnosis includes myxoid leiomyoma and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

  17. Reappraisal of velocity criteria for carotid bulb/internal carotid artery stenosis utilizing high-resolution B-mode ultrasound validated with computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Shaalan, Wael E.; Wahlgren, Carl M.; Desai, Tina; Piano, Giancarlo; Skelly, Christopher; Bassiouny, Hisham S.

    2012-01-01

    (κ) for B-mode imaging measurements were 0.8 and 0.9, respectively, and for CTA measurements 0.8 and 0.9, respectively. When both PSV of ≥155 cm/s and ICA/CCA ratio of ≥2 were combined for the detection of ≥50% bulb ICA stenosis, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 97% and an accuracy of 82% were obtained. For a ≥80% bulb ICA stenosis, an EDV of ≥140 cm/s, a PSV of ≥370 cm/s and an ICA/CCA ratio of ≥6 had acceptable probability values. Conclusion Compared with established velocity thresholds commonly applied in practice, a substantially higher PSV (155 vs 125 cm/s) was more accurate for detecting ≥50% bulb/ICA stenosis. In combination, a PSV of ≥155 cm/s and an ICA/CCA ratio of ≥2 have excellent predictive value for this stenosis category. For ≥80% bulb ICA stenosis (NASCET 60% stenosis), an EDV of 140 cm/s, a PSV of ≥370 cm/s, and an ICA/CCA ratio of ≥6 are equally reliable and do not indicate any major change from the established criteria. Current DUS ≥50% bulb ICA stenosis criteria appear to overestimate carotid bifurcation disease and may predispose patients with asymptomatic carotid disease to untoward costly diagnostic imaging and intervention. PMID:18486416

  18. In the footsteps of Darwin at Santiago (Cape Verde Island): new insights from a field reappraisal of the (white sedimentary layer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Giovanni; Bertocchini, Federico; Chiesura, Guido; Bini, Monica; Cascella, Antonio; Ribolini, Adriano; Patacca, Etta; Casacchia, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    -rich deposits, characterized by the abundance of Oyster colony and Turritella, from a white limestone/sandstone layer that commonly shows at its base accumulation of rodholits (the "Nulliporae" of Darwin). This obviously implies that a significant chronological hiatus is recorded in the section. As a whole the white limestone/sandstone layer is organized in a fining and deepening upward sequence that is abruptly truncated by a subaerial basalt unit in the Eastern side of the Praia Harbour and by a subaqueous pillows lava unit to the West. In addition the limestone/sandstone layer outcrops patchily at different quotes, from more than 30 m above sea level down to plunge below the sea. Ours study highlights how the white sedimentary layer, that so much aroused the curiosity of Darwin, records more than one depositional event. At least the position of four palaeoshores can be identified, evidencing how the island undergone to several phases of relative sea-level variations driven by eustatic and/ or tectonic factors.

  19. Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic tectonic evolution of SW Japan: A review - Reappraisal of the accretionary orogeny and revalidation of the collisional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    exhumation story of Sanbagawa HP schists suggests the setting of a continental subduction. The petrological and new geochemical data from the literature strongly support the existence, beneath the nappes of accretionary complexes, of continental bodies showing affinities with South China, from which they were once separated. The episodic collision, underthrusting, of such blocks was responsible for the tectonic piling. Tectonic erosion plaid likely a major role in removing material during the intervening subduction stages. A revised geodynamic model, implying the collision of the Honshu, South Kitakami-Kurosegawa, and Shimanto Blocks, is proposed for explaining the three orogenic crises which took place respectively at around 240, 130, and 80-60 Ma ago in SW Japan. The paleogeographic position and affinity of the Hida block with surrounding units, in the hinterland, are still unclear. More work is needed to solve this question.

  20. Does Rubella Cause Autism: A 2015 Reappraisal?

    PubMed

    Hutton, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In the 1970s, Stella Chess found a high prevalence of autism in children with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), 200 times that of the general population at the time. Many researchers quote this fact to add proof to the current theory that maternal infection with immune system activation in pregnancy leads to autism in the offspring. This rubella and autism association is presented with the notion that rubella has been eliminated in today's world. CRS cases are no longer typically seen; yet, autistic children often share findings of CRS including deafness, congenital heart defects, and to a lesser extent visual changes. Autistic children commonly have hyperactivity and spasticity, as do CRS children. Both autistic and CRS individuals may develop type 1 diabetes as young adults. Neuropathology of CRS infants may reveal cerebral vasculitis with narrowed lumens and cerebral necrosis. Neuroradiological findings of children with CRS show calcifications, periventricular leukomalacia, and dilated perivascular spaces. Neuroradiology of autism has also demonstrated hyperintensities, leukomalacia, and prominent perivascular spaces. PET studies of autistic individuals exhibit decreased perfusion to areas of the brain similarly affected by rubella. In both autism and CRS, certain changes in the brain have implicated the immune system. Several children with autism lack antibodies to rubella, as do children with CRS. These numerous similarities increase the probability of an association between rubella virus and autism. Rubella and autism cross many ethnicities in many countries. Contrary to current belief, rubella has not been eradicated and globally affects up to 5% of pregnant women. Susceptibility continues as vaccines are not given worldwide and are not fully protective. Rubella might still cause autism, even in vaccinated populations.

  1. Reappraisal and neotypification of Phyllachora feijoae.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lilian C; Macedo, Davi M; Barreto, Robert W

    2012-06-01

    Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae), feijoa (in Brazil, goiaba da serra), is a native southern South America tree that produces edible fruits which, although only occasionally cultivated in South America, became a significant fruit crop in New Zealand. Recently, during surveys for fungal pathogens of feijoa in southern Brazil, several plants were found bearing tar-spot symptoms caused by a species of Phyllachora. A literature search enabled us to identify the fungus as Phyllachora feijoae, a little-known species originally described in the 19(th) century by H. Rehm and later transferred to the genus Catacauma. The name Catacauma feijoae, although now regarded as a later synonym of P. feijoae is still mistakenly in use (as, for instance, in the Brazilian list of fungi on plants). The type specimen was most probably deposited in the Botanisches Garten und Museum Berlin-Dahlem (B) and lost or destroyed during World War II, and could not be located. The recent recollection of abundant material of this fungus in the vicinity of Pelotas (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) allowed its re-examination and neotypification. Phyllachora feijoae is also illustrated here for the first time.

  2. Does Rubella Cause Autism: A 2015 Reappraisal?

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In the 1970s, Stella Chess found a high prevalence of autism in children with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), 200 times that of the general population at the time. Many researchers quote this fact to add proof to the current theory that maternal infection with immune system activation in pregnancy leads to autism in the offspring. This rubella and autism association is presented with the notion that rubella has been eliminated in today’s world. CRS cases are no longer typically seen; yet, autistic children often share findings of CRS including deafness, congenital heart defects, and to a lesser extent visual changes. Autistic children commonly have hyperactivity and spasticity, as do CRS children. Both autistic and CRS individuals may develop type 1 diabetes as young adults. Neuropathology of CRS infants may reveal cerebral vasculitis with narrowed lumens and cerebral necrosis. Neuroradiological findings of children with CRS show calcifications, periventricular leukomalacia, and dilated perivascular spaces. Neuroradiology of autism has also demonstrated hyperintensities, leukomalacia, and prominent perivascular spaces. PET studies of autistic individuals exhibit decreased perfusion to areas of the brain similarly affected by rubella. In both autism and CRS, certain changes in the brain have implicated the immune system. Several children with autism lack antibodies to rubella, as do children with CRS. These numerous similarities increase the probability of an association between rubella virus and autism. Rubella and autism cross many ethnicities in many countries. Contrary to current belief, rubella has not been eradicated and globally affects up to 5% of pregnant women. Susceptibility continues as vaccines are not given worldwide and are not fully protective. Rubella might still cause autism, even in vaccinated populations. PMID:26869906

  3. Amtolmetin: A Reappraisal of NSAID with Gastroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amit; Shoeb, Ahsan; Moodahadu, Latha Subramanya; Sharma, Akhilesh; Gandhi, Arul; Akku, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the gastrosparing effect of amtolmetin guacyl (AMG) against other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. A literature search was done in the electronic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scopus) with key words “amtolmetin guacyl”, “amtolmetin”, and “arthritis”; filters were applied to obtain publications between 01-Jan-1985 and 01-Oct-2015, which were “clinical trials” in osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis patients and in “English language.” Studies were assessed using the Jadad criteria and trials with score ≥ 3 were included in the analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of AMG against other NSAIDs. Results. Search yielded 19 publications of which 3 were included for analysis. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable between the AMG group and other NSAIDs (diclofenac, celecoxib, and piroxicam) groups in all trials. Efficacy of AMG was similar to the other NSAIDs compared in the trials. The number of adverse events (AEs) reported was similar between both the groups; however, severe AEs reported were significantly lower in the AMG group. Of note was the significant lower number of duodenal ulcers after treatment in the AMG group. Conclusions. AMG has efficacy similar to other NSAIDs and a safer gastrointestinal AE profile when compared to the other NSAIDs. PMID:27092274

  4. Reappraisal of the significance of volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    "Volcanic field" is a term commonly used to loosely describe a group of volcanoes. Often, it is implicitly assumed that the volcanoes on a volcanic field are small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic, but none of those attributes is indispensable on some definitions of the term. Actually, the term "volcanic field" can be used to describe a group of purely monogenetic edifices, a group of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices, or even a group formed only by purely polygenetic edifices. Differences between each of those alternatives might be important, but the extent to which those differences are truly relevant remains still to be explored. Furthermore, there are several limitations on the current knowledge of this type of volcanic activity that explain the lack of a comprehensive effort to study volcanic fields in global contexts. In this work, issues concerning current definitions of a volcanic field are examined, and some criteria that can be used to distinguish volcanic fields from non-field volcanoes are suggested. Special attention is given to the role played by spatial scale on such a distinction. Also, the tectonic implications of their spatial distribution are explored. In particular, it is shown that volcanic fields are an important component of volcanic activity at a global scale that is closely associated to diffuse plate boundaries, and might well be considered the archetypical volcanic form of such tectonic scenarios.

  5. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    PubMed

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  6. "Causal reasoning" in rats: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, D M; Starns, J; Honey, R C

    2009-10-01

    It has recently been argued that rats engage in causal reasoning and they do so in a way that is consistent with Bayes net theories (Blaisdell, Sawa, Leising & Waldmann, 2006). This argument was based upon the finding that the tendency of cues to elicit approach to a food-well was reduced when their presentation was contingent on lever pressing. There is, however, an alternative interpretation of the critical experimental findings that is based on the simple principle of response competition: wherein lever pressing interferes with the tendency to approach the food well. Here the authors replicated Experiments 1 and 2a of Blaisdell et al. (2006) and found reciprocal patterns of lever pressing and food well approach during the critical cues. These results lend direct support for an interpretation in terms of response competition while providing evidence contrary to Bayes net theories, and are readily interpreted within the theoretical framework provided by traditional associative learning theory.

  7. A reappraisal of the CHARGE association.

    PubMed Central

    Oley, C A; Baraitser, M; Grant, D B

    1988-01-01

    We describe 14 boys and six girls, including monozygotic twins, with the CHARGE association. All of the children had at least four of the seven major features included in the mnemonic CHARGE and all had ear anomalies or deafness or both and either coloboma or choanal atresia or both. All the boys had evidence of hypogonadism. A characteristic facial appearance (unusually shaped ears, unilateral facial palsy, square face, malar flattening, pinched nostrils) was observed in many of our cases. The aetiology remains unknown. All our cases are sporadic. Images PMID:3351900

  8. Does Rubella Cause Autism: A 2015 Reappraisal?

    PubMed

    Hutton, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In the 1970s, Stella Chess found a high prevalence of autism in children with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), 200 times that of the general population at the time. Many researchers quote this fact to add proof to the current theory that maternal infection with immune system activation in pregnancy leads to autism in the offspring. This rubella and autism association is presented with the notion that rubella has been eliminated in today's world. CRS cases are no longer typically seen; yet, autistic children often share findings of CRS including deafness, congenital heart defects, and to a lesser extent visual changes. Autistic children commonly have hyperactivity and spasticity, as do CRS children. Both autistic and CRS individuals may develop type 1 diabetes as young adults. Neuropathology of CRS infants may reveal cerebral vasculitis with narrowed lumens and cerebral necrosis. Neuroradiological findings of children with CRS show calcifications, periventricular leukomalacia, and dilated perivascular spaces. Neuroradiology of autism has also demonstrated hyperintensities, leukomalacia, and prominent perivascular spaces. PET studies of autistic individuals exhibit decreased perfusion to areas of the brain similarly affected by rubella. In both autism and CRS, certain changes in the brain have implicated the immune system. Several children with autism lack antibodies to rubella, as do children with CRS. These numerous similarities increase the probability of an association between rubella virus and autism. Rubella and autism cross many ethnicities in many countries. Contrary to current belief, rubella has not been eradicated and globally affects up to 5% of pregnant women. Susceptibility continues as vaccines are not given worldwide and are not fully protective. Rubella might still cause autism, even in vaccinated populations. PMID:26869906

  9. Reappraising Learning Support in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avramidis, Elias; Skidmore, David

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing number of disabled students entering the higher education sector, much research work has focused on the support services arena and the elimination of barriers that the disabled students have encountered. While producing useful advice on meeting the needs of disabled students, this line of research has done little to locate…

  10. Pavlov as a psychologist. A reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1987-01-01

    American psychologists are informed on Pavlov's work on conditional reflexes but not on the full development of his theory of higher nervous activity. This article shows that Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity dealt with concepts that concerned contemporary psychologists. Pavlov used the conditioning of the salivary reflex for methodological purposes. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity encompassed overt behavior, neural processes, and the conscious experience. The strong Darwinian element of Pavlov's theory, with its stress on the higher organisms' adaptation, is described. With regard to learning, Pavlov, at the end of his scholarly career, proposed that although all learning involves the formation of associations, the organism's adaptation to the environment is established through conditioning, but the accumulation of knowledge is established by trial and error.

  11. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    PubMed Central

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories. PMID:25918387

  12. Reappraisal of Vipera aspis Venom Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ferquel, Elisabeth; de Haro, Luc; Jan, Virginie; Guillemin, Isabelle; Jourdain, Sabine; Teynié, Alexandre; d'Alayer, Jacques; Choumet, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Background The variation of venom composition with geography is an important aspect of intraspecific variability in the Vipera genus, although causes of this variability remain unclear. The diversity of snake venom is important both for our understanding of venomous snake evolution and for the preparation of relevant antivenoms to treat envenomations. A geographic intraspecific variation in snake venom composition was recently reported for Vipera aspis aspis venom in France. Since 1992, cases of human envenomation after Vipera aspis aspis bites in south-east France involving unexpected neurological signs were regularly reported. The presence of genes encoding PLA2 neurotoxins in the Vaa snake genome led us to investigate any neurological symptom associated with snake bites in other regions of France and in neighboring countries. In parallel, we used several approaches to characterize the venom PLA2 composition of the snakes captured in the same areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an epidemiological survey of snake bites in various regions of France. In parallel, we carried out the analysis of the genes and the transcripts encoding venom PLA2s. We used SELDI technology to study the diversity of PLA2 in various venom samples. Neurological signs (mainly cranial nerve disturbances) were reported after snake bites in three regions of France: Languedoc-Roussillon, Midi-Pyrénées and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Genomes of Vipera aspis snakes from south-east France were shown to contain ammodytoxin isoforms never described in the genome of Vipera aspis from other French regions. Surprisingly, transcripts encoding venom neurotoxic PLA2s were found in snakes of Massif Central region. Accordingly, SELDI analysis of PLA2 venom composition confirmed the existence of population of neurotoxic Vipera aspis snakes in the west part of the Massif Central mountains. Conclusions/Significance The association of epidemiological studies to genetic, biochemical and immunochemical analyses of snake venoms allowed a good evaluation of the potential neurotoxicity of snake bites. A correlation was found between the expression of neurological symptoms in humans and the intensity of the cross-reaction of venoms with anti-ammodytoxin antibodies, which is correlated with the level of neurotoxin (vaspin and/or ammodytoxin) expression in the venom. The origin of the two recently identified neurotoxic snake populations is discussed according to venom PLA2 genome and transcriptome data. PMID:18030329

  13. The Concept of Teaching: A Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fumoto, Hiroko; Hargreaves, David J.; Maxwell, Shirley

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of "teaching" in early education and childcare and argues that the activity of teaching, broadly defined, concerns all adults who work in this area and occurs in all phases of the educational system. Bronfenbrenner's (1979) ecological perspective on human development is applied to conceptualise teaching as (1)…

  14. A Reappraisal of the Nobody's Perfect Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennett, Deborah J.; Chislett, Gail; Olver, Ashley L. S.

    2012-01-01

    Nobody's Perfect Program (NP), involving 46 participants, was conducted from the spring of 2007 to the fall of 2009 in Peterborough, Canada. Prior to the program, parents completed demographic information, along with self-report measures assessing learned resourcefulness, the types of interactions with their children, parent resourcefulness,…

  15. A Reappraisal of Leadership Theory and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, James

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and organizes modern leadership theories. Notes the research supporting the main thesis of contingency theory and that effective leadership style is contingent upon situational factors. Characteristics of management training based on the contingency approach are identified. (Author/MLF)

  16. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  17. A reappraisal of herbal medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sarah; Da-Costa-Rocha, Ines; Lawrence, M Jayne; Cable, Colin; Heinrich, Michael

    Complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly popular, and encompasses a number of systems and therapies based on diverse theories and practices, such as homoeopathy, traditional herbalism, reiki, ayurvedic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine. While many are based on metaphysical concepts for which there is no sound evidence, for herbal medicines there is a rational, scientific basis and increasing clinical evidence. This article suggests herbal medicines should no longer be considered part of CAM, but instead sit alongside conventional medicines. PMID:23155905

  18. Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Stanley

    2009-02-01

    Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle offers an attractive surgical solution to the problem of end-stage heart failure, yet it is widely regarded as a failed approach. I argue here that this is an outdated assessment. Systematic progress has been made over the last 25 years in understanding the relevant basic science. In the light of these advances we should be reconsidering the place of skeletal muscle assist in the surgical armamentarium. PMID:18954996

  19. Edwin Smith Papyrus Case 8: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-05-01

    There are 3 translations of the Edwin Smith Papyrus: Breasted's (1930), Allen's (2005), and Sanchez and Meltzer's (2012). Case 8 is similarly presented in all 3 translations, although with increasing detail in the later works. The patient in Case 8 had a comminuted skull fracture under intact skin. There were palpable pulsations at the fracture site. There was deviation of the eye on the side of the injury and an ipsilateral spastic hemiparesis in an ambulant patient with bleeding from the nose and ear. Explanations of the paralysis have included a contrecoup lesion and compression of the contralateral cerebral peduncle against the tentorial incisura. Brainstem compression due to herniation is accompanied by loss of consciousness. Extensive contrecoup lesions consistent with the extent of the described paresis would also be associated with probable coma. The paralysis was spastic, but spasticity takes weeks to develop after trauma. Yet this patient's trauma was fresh, as there was still bleeding from the nose and the ear. It is suggested the paresis antedated the trauma, which was not its cause. The reasons for this suggestion are presented in this paper. PMID:24484229

  20. Bacterial Morphologies Supporting Cometary Panspermia: a Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    It is nearly 30 years since the first decisive evidence of microbial morphologies in carbonaceous chondrites was discovered and reported by Hans Dieter Pflug. In addition to morphology other data, notably laser mass spectroscopy, served to confirm the identification of such structures as putative bacterial fossils. Recent examinations of cometary dust collected in the stratosphere and further studies of carbonaceous meteorites reaffirm the presence of putative microbial fossils. Since carbonaceous chondrites (particularly Type 1 chondrites) are thought to be extinct comets the data reviewed in this article provide strong support for theories of cometary panspermia.

  1. Bacterial morphologies supporting cometary panspermia: a reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    It is nearly 30 years since the first decisive evidence of microbial morphologies in carbonaceous chondrites was discovered and reported by Hans Dieter Pflug. In addition to morphology, other data, notably laser mass spectroscopy, served to confirm the identification of such structures as putative bacterial fossils. Recent examinations of cometary dust collected in the stratosphere and further studies of carbonaceous meteorites reaffirm the presence of putative microbial fossils. Since carbonaceous chondrites (particularly Type 1 chondrites) are thought to be extinct comets the data reviewed in this article provide strong support for theories of cometary panspermia.

  2. "Causal reasoning" in rats: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, D M; Starns, J; Honey, R C

    2009-10-01

    It has recently been argued that rats engage in causal reasoning and they do so in a way that is consistent with Bayes net theories (Blaisdell, Sawa, Leising & Waldmann, 2006). This argument was based upon the finding that the tendency of cues to elicit approach to a food-well was reduced when their presentation was contingent on lever pressing. There is, however, an alternative interpretation of the critical experimental findings that is based on the simple principle of response competition: wherein lever pressing interferes with the tendency to approach the food well. Here the authors replicated Experiments 1 and 2a of Blaisdell et al. (2006) and found reciprocal patterns of lever pressing and food well approach during the critical cues. These results lend direct support for an interpretation in terms of response competition while providing evidence contrary to Bayes net theories, and are readily interpreted within the theoretical framework provided by traditional associative learning theory. PMID:19839709

  3. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks.

    PubMed

    French, Katherine L; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M; Schoon, Petra L; Zumberge, J Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A; George, Simon C; Love, Gordon D; Brocks, Jochen J; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E

    2015-05-12

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼ 2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories. PMID:25918387

  4. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Alberto O.; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  5. The decline in child mortality: a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, O. B.; Lopez, A. D.; Inoue, M.

    2000-01-01

    The present paper examines, describes and documents country-specific trends in under-five mortality rates (i.e., mortality among children under five years of age) in the 1990s. Our analysis updates previous studies by UNICEF, the World Bank and the United Nations. It identifies countries and WHO regions where sustained improvement has occurred and those where setbacks are evident. A consistent series of estimates of under-five mortality rate is provided and an indication is given of historical trends during the period 1950-2000 for both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that 10.5 million children aged 0-4 years died in 1999, about 2.2 million or 17.5% fewer than a decade earlier. On average about 15% of newborn children in Africa are expected to die before reaching their fifth birthday. The corresponding figures for many other parts of the developing world are in the range 3-8% and that for Europe is under 2%. During the 1990s the decline in child mortality decelerated in all the WHO regions except the Western Pacific but there is no widespread evidence of rising child mortality rates. At the country level there are exceptions in southern Africa where the prevalence of HIV is extremely high and in Asia where a few countries are beset by economic difficulties. The slowdown in the rate of decline is of particular concern in Africa and South-East Asia because it is occurring at relatively high levels of mortality, and in countries experiencing severe economic dislocation. As the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues in Africa, particularly southern Africa, and in parts of Asia, further reductions in child mortality become increasingly unlikely until substantial progress in controlling the spread of HIV is achieved. PMID:11100613

  6. Reappraising factors affecting mourning dove perch coos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, M.W.; Atkinson, R.D.; Baskett, T.S.; Haas, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Results confirmed pairing as the primary factor influencing perch-cooing rates of wild mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). Marked unmated males cooed at substantially higher rates (6.2x) than mated males, had greater probability of cooing (2.3x) during 3-minute periods, and continued cooing longer each morning than mated males. Population density was not a major factor affecting cooing. Unmated males cooed more frequently in the presence of other cooing doves (P < 0.05) than when alone, but the number of additional doves above 1 was unimportant. Cooing rates of both mated and unmated males on areas with dissimilar dove densities were not significantly different. Within limits of standard call-count procedure, weather exerted no detectable influence on cooing.

  7. Shock - A reappraisal: The holistic approach

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Shock as reaction to life-threatening condition needs to be reclassified in a timely and more scientific synopsis. It is not possible or beneficial any longer to avoid a holistic approach in critical illness. Semantics of critical illness has often been unfriendly in the literature and a simplification with the elimination of conceptual pleonasms and misnomers under the exclusive light of physiology and physiopathology would be advantageous. Speaking one language to describe the same phenomenon worldwide is essential for understanding; moreover, it increases focus on characterization and significance of the phenomena. PMID:22787348

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome with Heart Disease: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, P. J.; Jones, N. F.; Tighe, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    The evidence that heart failure alone may cause a nephrotic syndrome is inconclusive. Mercurial diuretics, which have also been implicated as a cause of the nephrotic syndrome, had been given in 23 of the 24 well-documented cases. Two cases of heart disease and nephrotic syndrome are described. Glomerular lesions were minimal on light microscopy, but thickening of the glomerular tuft basement membrane and partial fusion of the epithelial cell foot processes were apparent on elecronmicroscopy. The response to prednisone was such as to justify a trial of corticosteroid therapy in such cases despite the presence of cardiac disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5667991

  9. English in India: Need for a Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayal, P. P.

    The English spoken in India is too close to standard English to be characterized as a separate variety. Although phonological variations give English in India some regional flavors, they do not have any structural or semantic base and do not constitute a new language. Cultural differences have not caused English-language literature written in…

  10. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Alberto O; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-10-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  11. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (<37.9 pg per gram of rock) and total sterane (<32.9 pg per gram of rock) concentrations comparable to those measured in blanks and negative control samples. In contrast, hopanes and steranes measured in the exteriors of conventionally drilled and curated rocks of stratigraphic equivalence reach concentrations of 389.5 pg per gram of rock and 1,039 pg per gram of rock, respectively. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamondoids, which exceed blank concentrations, exhibit individual concentrations up to 80 ng per gram of rock in rock extracts and up to 1,000 ng per gram of rock in hydropyrolysates from the ultraclean cores. These results demonstrate that previously studied Archean samples host mixtures of biomarker contaminants and indigenous overmature hydrocarbons. Therefore, existing lipid biomarker evidence cannot be invoked to support the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  12. Haemophilus ducreyi infections--time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    McEntegart, M. G.; Hafiz, S.; Kinghorn, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    As the literature on Haemophilus ducreyi and clinical chancroid is reviewed, it becomes obvious that many significant findings have been forgotten over the years. As a result, from the time of Ducrey's original description of the organism in 1890 until about 1977, both clinical and laboratory experts in the United Kingdom believed that H. ducreyi infections were rare, generally acquired abroad, and almost impossible to confirm in the routine laboratory! In consequence it was a common view that it was not worth looking for H. ducreyi until all other possible causes of genital ulceration had been excluded. Moreover, the search for such an infection stopped as soon as any other cause for the patient's lesions had been found. A decision to ignore this 'rule' in Sheffield led to our looking for H. ducreyi in specimens from an unselected series of patients with genital ulceration including a number with herpes genitalis infections. The surprise finding of H. ducreyi in circumstances suggesting that it was a secondary invader made us re-examine the whole question of H. ducreyi infections and chancroid and wonder if the same organism can act as a primary pathogen and as a secondary invader. An account of the media and methods we used and of the characteristics of the organism is presented. In an attempt to find out more about the characteristic coherent colonies of H. ducreyi we studied them with the scanning electron microscope. It is clear that the whole subject of H. ducreyi infections has been neglected in the United Kingdom, but we believe that interest has now been aroused and progress will surely follow. Some areas for further investigation are suggested. Images Plate 1 PMID:7153512

  13. Social anxiety and emotion regulation in daily life: spillover effects on positive and negative social events.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Antonina Savostyanova; Kashdan, Todd B

    2012-01-01

    To minimize the possibility of scrutiny, people with social anxiety difficulties exert great effort to manage their emotions, particularly during social interactions. We examined how the use of two emotion regulation strategies, emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal, predict the generation of emotions and social events in daily life. Over 14 consecutive days, 89 participants completed daily diary entries on emotions, positive and negative social events, and their regulation of emotions. Using multilevel modeling, we found that when people high in social anxiety relied more on positive emotion suppression, they reported fewer positive social events and less positive emotion on the subsequent day. In contrast, people low in social anxiety reported fewer negative social events on days subsequent to using cognitive reappraisal to reduce distress; the use of cognitive reappraisal did not influence the daily lives of people high in social anxiety. Our findings support theories of emotion regulation difficulties associated with social anxiety. In particular, for people high in social anxiety, maladaptive strategy use contributed to diminished reward responsiveness. PMID:22428662

  14. Lipophyllodes of the breast. A reappraisal of fat-rich tumors of the breast based on 22 cases integrated by immunohistochemical study, molecular pathology insights, and clinical follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Carlos E; Wludarski, Sheila C; Lamovec, Janez; Ben Dor, David; Ober, Elisa; Salviato, Tiziana; Zanconati, Fabrizio; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Sioletic, Stefano; Falconieri, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We have studied 22 cases of mammary lipophyllodes tumors (LPT), analyzing their clinicopathologic features along with available follow-up. All cases were tested for cytokeratins, S100 protein, and MDM2, and in selected cases for estrogen receptor, smooth muscle actin, bcl2, desmin, and myogenin. Patients were women aged 21 to 69 years (average, 45 years), and LPT size ranged from 1.6 to 30 cm (average, 9.7 cm). Microscopically, LPT segregated as follows: atypical lipoma-like tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (ALT/WDL), 8 cases; myxoid, 6; and pleomorphic/poorly differentiated/round cell, 8, including a case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Immunohistochemistry studies showed focal positive staining for S100 and CD34 in most ALT/WDL, and desmin and myogenin in 2 cases with evidence of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. MDM2 positivity was focally seen in 1 case. Follow-up was available in 8 cases. Multiple recurrent tumors were seen in 2 patients, and metastatic disease to the lung was seen in 2 patients. In 4 patients with a follow-up between 2 and 15 years there was no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease. Patients with ALT/WDL (2/2) were alive with no evidence of disease; 2 of 4 patients with myxoid liposarcoma component experienced tumor recurrence, whereas pleomorphic liposarcoma LPT pursued a less favorable course although only 1 patient died of the condition. Absence of MDM2 reactivity in most cases seems not as meaningful as in fatty tumors of somatic soft parts. PMID:27040923

  15. Lipophyllodes of the breast. A reappraisal of fat-rich tumors of the breast based on 22 cases integrated by immunohistochemical study, molecular pathology insights, and clinical follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Carlos E; Wludarski, Sheila C; Lamovec, Janez; Ben Dor, David; Ober, Elisa; Salviato, Tiziana; Zanconati, Fabrizio; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Sioletic, Stefano; Falconieri, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We have studied 22 cases of mammary lipophyllodes tumors (LPT), analyzing their clinicopathologic features along with available follow-up. All cases were tested for cytokeratins, S100 protein, and MDM2, and in selected cases for estrogen receptor, smooth muscle actin, bcl2, desmin, and myogenin. Patients were women aged 21 to 69 years (average, 45 years), and LPT size ranged from 1.6 to 30 cm (average, 9.7 cm). Microscopically, LPT segregated as follows: atypical lipoma-like tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (ALT/WDL), 8 cases; myxoid, 6; and pleomorphic/poorly differentiated/round cell, 8, including a case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Immunohistochemistry studies showed focal positive staining for S100 and CD34 in most ALT/WDL, and desmin and myogenin in 2 cases with evidence of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. MDM2 positivity was focally seen in 1 case. Follow-up was available in 8 cases. Multiple recurrent tumors were seen in 2 patients, and metastatic disease to the lung was seen in 2 patients. In 4 patients with a follow-up between 2 and 15 years there was no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease. Patients with ALT/WDL (2/2) were alive with no evidence of disease; 2 of 4 patients with myxoid liposarcoma component experienced tumor recurrence, whereas pleomorphic liposarcoma LPT pursued a less favorable course although only 1 patient died of the condition. Absence of MDM2 reactivity in most cases seems not as meaningful as in fatty tumors of somatic soft parts.

  16. Reward positivity elicited by predictive cues.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Krigolson, Olav E; Lee, Seung

    2011-03-30

    A recent theory holds that a component of the human event-related brain potential called the reward positivity reflects a reward prediction error signal. We investigated this idea in gambling-like task in which, on each trial, a visual stimulus predicted a subsequent rewarding or nonrewarding outcome with 80% probability. Consistent with earlier results, we found that the reward positivity was larger to unexpected than to expected outcomes. In addition, we found that the predictive cues also elicited a reward positivity, as proposed by the theory. These results indicate that the reward positivity reflects the initial assessment of whether a trial will end in success or failure and the reappraisal of that information once the outcome actually occurs.

  17. Reappraisal of the Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement Factor for Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2011-05-20

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) enhancement factor of atomic Tl is of considerable interest as it has been used in determining the most accurate limit on the electron EDM to date. However, its value varies from -179 to -1041 in different approximations. In view of the large uncertainties associated with many of these calculations, we perform an accurate calculation employing the relativistic coupled-cluster theory and obtain -466, which in combination with the most accurate measurement of Tl EDM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 071805 (2002)] yields a new limit for the electron EDM: |d{sub e}|<2.0x10{sup -27}e cm.

  18. A Reappraisal of the 4/3/2 Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boers, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the 4/3/2 activity learners deliver the same talk three times under increasing time pressure. The activity is intended first and foremost to foster fluency, but accuracy and complexity have also been said to benefit from this activity. The present study investigates whether immediate repetition of monologues under increasing time pressure…

  19. Welding and rheomorphism reappraised: valley-confined ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branney, M. J.; Barry, T. L.

    2003-04-01

    Some pyroclastic density currents are so hot that the pyroclasts weld rapidly to form a layer of agglutinate that continues to flow in a ductile manner, a process known as rheomorphism. Previous studies of rheomorphic ignimbrites have inferred that folds are orientated with axes perpendicular to the direction of rheomorphic transport. For example, in a seminal study of the Wall Mountain Tuff in Gribbles Run palaeovalley, Colorado, Chapin and Lowell (1979) interpreted an apparently complex pattern of rheomorphic deformation structures as the product of two phases of deformation: (1) pyroclastic flow along the valley caused "primary" welding and folding, with fold axes perpendicular to the valley axis; and (2) already deposited ignimbrite underwent "secondary mass flowage" down local valley sides, producing "secondary" folds with axes parallel to the valley axis. A new structural analysis of the welding fabrics in the Wall Mountain Tuff has revealed the presence of abundant sheath folds, a structure hitherto little reported from pyroclastic rocks. The majority of sheathfold axes lie sub-parallel to the palaeovalley, and sub-parallel to a pervasive valley-parallel elongation lineation. There is no evidence of a second phase of deformation; valley-normal lineations are absent and folds with axes at high angles to the valley axis are markedly curvilinear. We interpret the latter as having developed within the same shearing system as the valley-parallel folds, but they nucleated slightly later and so were less transposed and attenuated. We conclude that the ignimbrite underwent only one deformation event. We then re-visited 10 classic examples of rheomorphic ignimbrites in the USA, Canary Islands and Italy. All exhibited abundant sheath folds. Structural analysis reveals a common pattern of progressive ductile deformation. Folds initiate at various angles to the flow direction and to the elongation lineations, such as prolate fiamme and stretched vesicles. Axial planes initiate at high angles to the welding fabric. As rheomorphism proceeds axial planes and fold axes progressively rotate towards the elongation direction. High shear strain produces transposed intrafolial sheath folds, exhibited as eye structures when viewed in the transport direction. Their orientation reflects the local transport direction. Late nucleated folds preserve axes at high angles to this. Thus, folds with contrasting orientations may develop within the same shearing regime. This simplifies the structural interpretation of rheomorphism - just one progressive phase of deformation is required. REF: Chapin CE and Lowell GR (1979). Geol. Soc. Am, Sp. Pap. 180: 466-483.

  20. Welding and rheomorphism reappraised: valley-confined ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branney, M. J.; Barry, T. L.

    2003-04-01

    Some pyroclastic density currents are so hot that the pyroclasts weld rapidly to form a layer of agglutinate that continues to flow in a ductile manner, a process known as rheomorphism. Previous studies of rheomorphic ignimbrites have inferred that folds are orientated with axes perpendicular to the direction of rheomorphic transport. For example, in a seminal study of the Wall Mountain Tuff in Gribbles Run palaeovalley, Colorado, Chapin and Lowell (1979) interpreted an apparently complex pattern of rheomorphic deformation structures as the product of two phases of deformation: (1) pyroclastic flow along the valley caused 'primary' welding and folding, with fold axes perpendicular to the valley axis; and (2) already deposited ignimbrite underwent 'secondary mass flowage'down local valley sides, poducing 'econdary'folds with axes parallel to the valley axis. A new structural analysis of the welding fabrics in the Wall Mountain Tuff has revealed the presence of abundant sheath folds, a structure hitherto little reported from pyroclastic rocks. The majority of sheathfold axes lie sub-parallel to the palaeovalley, and sub-arallel to a pervasive valley-arallel elongation lineation. There is no evidence of a second phase of deformation; valley-ormal lineations are absent and folds with axes at high angles to the valley axis are arkedly curvilinear. We interpret the latter as having developed within the same shearing system as the valley-arallel folds, but they nucleated slightly later and so were less transposed and attenuated. We conclude that the ignimbrite underwent only one deformation event. We then re-visited 10 classic examples of rheomorphic ignimbrites in the USA, Canary Islands and Italy. All exhibited abundant sheath folds. Structural analysis reveals a common pattern of progressive ductile deformation. Folds initiate at various angles to the flow direction and to the elongation lineations, such as prolate fiamme and stretched vesicles. Axial planes initiate at high angles to the welding fabric. As rheomorphism proceeds axial planes and fold axes progressively rotate towards the elongation direction. High shear strain produces transposed intrafolial sheath folds, exhibited as eye structures when viewed in the transport direction. Their orientation reflects the local transport direction. Late nucleated folds preserve axes at high angles to this. Thus, folds with contrasting orientations may develop within the same shearing regime. This simplifies the structural interpretation of rheomorphism - just one progressive phase of deformation is required. REF: Chapin CE and Lowell GR (1979). Geol. Soc. Am, Sp. Pap. 180: 466-483.

  1. A reappraisal of the possible seizures of Vincent van Gogh.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2005-06-01

    The tragic life of Vincent van Gogh is summarized, emphasizing his early departure from formal education, failure as a successful salesman in the art world, attempt at religious studies, difficulty with female and family relationships, return to the art world, and tendencies toward extremes of poor nutrition or near self-starvation and excessive drinking and smoking. In Paris he joined the Impressionists, but drank very heavily both absinthe and cognac. Southward he went to Arles and was joined by Paul Gauguin, with whom he had major personality problems, causing van Gogh to cut off part of his left ear. He experienced paranoid ideation and confinement in mental institutions in Arles, and then returned to Paris and onto Auvers-sur-Oise, where he committed suicide at age 37. Possible physical diagnoses include glaucoma, Meniere's disease, acute intermittent porphyria, and chronic lead poisoning, but these diagnoses seem unlikely. Possible psychiatric diagnoses include borderline personality disorder, anxiety-depressive disorder with episodes of depression and hypomania, and also paranoid schizophrenia. Van Gogh did not have spontaneous seizures and, therefore, did not have epilepsy. Before he began to drink heavily, when he was near starvation, he had "fainting fits," and after drinking, especially absinthe, a convulsant drug, he continued to have similar attacks. His episodes of unconsciousness can be well explained by chronic malnutrition and alcohol abuse, only possibly exacerbated by drinking large quantities of absinthe. Although van Gogh is an excellent example of the Geschwind syndrome, at times associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, this fact does not establish such an epilepsy. Thus, the syndrome is an orphan without the parent condition.

  2. Bion, basic assumptions, and violence: a corrective reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Roth, Bennett

    2013-10-01

    Group psychoanalytic theory rests on many of the same psychoanalytic assumptions as individual psychoanalytic theory but has been slow in developing its own language and unique understanding of conflict within the group, as many group phenomena are not the same as individual psychic events. Regressive fantasies and alliances within and to the group are determined by group composition and the interaction of fantasies among members and leader. Bion's useful but incomplete early abstract formulation of psychic regression in groups was the initial attempt to move beyond Freud's largely sociological view. This paper explores some of the origins of Bion's neglect of murderous violence in groups as a result of his own experiences in the first European war. In the following, I present evidence for the existence of a violent basic assumption and offer evidence as to Bion's avoidance of murderous and violent acts. PMID:24004012

  3. Sonographic assessment of renal length in children: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Zerin, J M; Blane, C E

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has largely replaced the intravenous urogram as the first modality for the evaluation of the kidneys in children suspected of having urinary tract abnormalities. Because many renal disorders are associated with changes in the sizes of the kidneys, normative standards for assessing renal size have been developed. These standards rely upon comparison of the renal lengths or calculated volumes or both, with various assessments of overall body size, including body surface area, weight, height, and chronological age. We discuss some of the limitations of US in assessing renal size in children. Practical recommendations are offered for optimizing the measurement and interpretation of sonographic renal sizes in children.

  4. Electromyography in musculoskeletal pain: A reappraisal and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lazaro, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with musculoskeletal pain (MSP) and local tenderness in the back and extremities are frequently referred to electromyography (EMG) laboratory to assess the integrity of the spinal nerve roots, peripheral nerves, and skeletal muscles. When focal muscle weakness and anatomical sensory deficits are clinically evident, this procedure is almost always abnormal. In some situations, when the presenting symptoms consist of local pain and tenderness without neuromuscular deficits, its diagnostic utility becomes questionable as illustrated in the present study. Methods: EMG findings of 75 patients referred for evaluation of local MSP and tenderness in the neck and lower back and in the upper and lower extremities were reviewed. These patients were selected from a group of 200 patients referred for evaluation of unilateral local pain and tenderness in various parts of the body. All EMG procedures and clinical neurologic examination were performed by the author and all underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the affected parts of the body prior to the procedure. None of the 75 patients studied had concurrent medical disorders or had previous spinal root injuries or surgeries to the spine. Results: All 75 patients in this study showed normal EMG of the affected extremities and normal peripheral nerve conduction study. Those with herniated disc in the cervical or lumbar spine presenting with local pain and tenderness in the neck and lower back but without neurologic deficits or clear radicular symptoms, had normal study also. The remaining 125 patients excluded from the study, had various EMG and peripheral nerve abnormalities that can be attributed to concurrent medical disorders and previous injuries to the spinal roots. Conclusions: Use of EMG in the diagnosis of local MSP, unless associated with clinical neurologic deficits, almost always yields negative results. The utility of this procedure is limited to pathology in the motor unit. It cannot assess the function of the sensory components of the spinal roots, small-diameter sensory nerves, and the sensory innervation of the spine via sinuvertebral nerve. Therefore, if the motor unit is anatomically and physiologically intact, the procedure is of little value in the diagnosis of MSP. Likewise, peripheral nerve conduction study is likely to be normal unless clear neurologic deficits are present. The present study illustrates that a good history and meticulous neurologic examination should be an integral part of an ideal electrodiagnostic procedure. PMID:26417485

  5. A reappraisal of vector control strategies for babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, R D; Kakoma, I

    1989-01-01

    This review suggests that we are on the threshold of a new epoch in the control of ticks and the diseases transmitted by them. Ecological studies of parasitic and non-parasitic stages of the tick life cycle have shown how strategic dipping can lead to effective control of Boophilus ticks. However, this approach can lead to drastic reduction in tick populations which may favour the development of enzootic instability. On the other hand, mathematical models and field studies indicate that we can eradicate babesiosis without eradicating the tick vector. As no well-established vaccine exists for babesiosis or its vectors, it is important to anticipate the possible effects of low or fluctuating populations of ticks caused by strategic control programmes. Under these conditions, it is probable that babesiosis will disappear before the tick vector does. Prudent use of tick bionomic data from several centres of field research, as well as models to analyse these data, should accelerate the latter process. Epidemiological models should be included in the analysis of babesiosis in areas that run the risk of converting from stable zones to unstable zones due to strategic dipping. These observations and projections underscore the value of integration of traditional and modern techniques in the control of babesiosis and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:2696160

  6. A Reappraisal of Lexical Cohesion in Conversational Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez Gonzalez, Maria De Los Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Cohesion, or the connectedness of discourse, has been recognized as playing a crucial role in both language production and comprehension processes. Researchers have debated about the "right" number and classification of cohesive devices, as well as about their interaction with coherence and/or genre. The present study proposes an integrative model…

  7. Infant brain tumors: a neuropathologic population-based institutional reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Christopher; Pillai, Shibu; Steinbok, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The factors that impact the long-term functional outcome for infants with brain tumor are unclear. The clinicopathologic features of all infant brain tumors occurring at our institution (1982-2005) were reexamined to explore the factors influencing prognosis. The details of the neuropathologic review are reported herein. Thirty-five cases were identified and included 7 astrocytomas (6 low grade and 1 glioblastoma), 6 atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors, 5 choroid plexus papillomas, 4 ependymomas (3 anaplastic), 4 teratomas (3 immature), 2 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, 2 gangliogliomas, 2 desmoplastic tumors of infancy, and 1 each of "medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity," adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma, and 1 "malignancy not otherwise specified." The original diagnosis was changed in 8 cases (23%), and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors was the most common revision (n = 5). Case 9 was unusual in that both the patient and her 2-year-old sister displayed INI-1 immunonegative posterior fossa tumors and extended survival. Tumor grade was altered in 6 cases (17%), the most significant instance being the downgrading from the World Health Organization grade IV to I (case 18: supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors to desmoplastic tumors of infancy). As opposed to other reports in the literature, our cohort contained a substantially higher frequency of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and a lower frequency of medulloblastoma. Changes in the histologic diagnosis/grade in a significant subset of cases most likely reflect the continual evolution of brain tumor classification schemes. INI-1 immunohistochemistry was instrumental in the pathologic assessment of select cases and raised the possibility that atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors may be the most common infant brain malignancy.

  8. Chapter 11. The Economics of Group Care Practice: A Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Martin

    2006-01-01

    For the past two decades, economic influences have significantly impacted the provision of health and welfare services for children, young people and their families in communities around the world. The dynamic of cost has reshaped both the nature and provision of group care services, promoting de-institutionalization and transforming the nature of…

  9. Bronchial thermoplasty: reappraising the evidence (or lack thereof).

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vivek N; Lim, Kaiser G

    2014-07-01

    Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) involves the application of radiofrequency energy to visible proximal airways to selectively ablate airway smooth muscle. BT is the first nonpharmacologic interventional therapy approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for severe asthma. This approval was based on the results of the pivotal Asthma Intervention Research (AIR)-2 trial, which is the only randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial of BT. The primary end point of the AIR-2 trial was improvement in the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). The results of the AIR-2 trial have generated enormous interest, controversy, and confusion regarding the true efficacy of BT for severe asthma. Current marketing of BT highlights its use for patients with "severe" asthma, which is interpreted by most practicing clinicians as meaning oral corticosteroid dependence, frequent exacerbations, or a significantly reduced FEV1 with a poor quality of life. Did the AIR-2 trial include patients with a low FEV1, oral steroid dependence, or frequent exacerbations? Did the trial show efficacy for any of the primary or secondary end points? The FDA approved the device based on the reduction in severe asthma exacerbations. However, were the rates of asthma exacerbations, ED visits, or hospitalizations truly different between the two groups, and was this type of analysis even justified given the original study design? This commentary is designed to specifically answer these questions and help the practicing clinician navigate the thermoplasty literature with confidence and clarity. We carefully dissect the design, conduct, and results of the AIR-2 trial and raise serious questions about the efficacy of bronchial thermoplasty.

  10. Parenteral use of medium-chain triglycerides: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, H; Pastores, S M; Katz, D P; Kvetan, V

    1996-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the clinical use of intravenous fat emulsions for the nutritional support of hospitalized patients has become routine. During this time long-chain triglycerides (LCT) derived from soybean and/or safflower oils were the exclusive lipid source for these emulsions, providing both a safe calorically dense alternative to dextrose and essential fatty acids needed for biologic membranes and the maintenance of immune function. During the past decade, the availability of novel experimental triglycerides for parenteral use has generated interest in the use of these substrates for nutritional and metabolic support. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), long advocated as a superior substrate for parenteral use, possess many unique physiochemical and metabolic properties that make them theoretically advantageous over their LCT counterparts. Although not yet approved in the United States, preparations containing MCT have been widely available in Europe. Intravenous MCT preparations, either as physical mixtures or structured lipids, have been used clinically in patients with immunosuppresion, critical illness, liver and pulmonary disease and in premature infants. Despite great promise, the clinical data comparing the efficacy of MCT-based lipid emulsions to their LCT counterparts has been equivocal. This may be due in part to the limited nature of the published clinical trials. Measures of efficacy for parenteral or enteral nutritional products has taken on new meaning, in light of the reported experience using immunomodulatory nutrients. Current concerns about cost of medical care and resource use warrant careful deliberation about the utility of any new and expensive therapy. Until clinical data can fulfill expectations derived from animal studies, it is difficult to advocate the general use of MCT-based lipid emulsions. Future clinical studies with MCT-based emulsions should have clear outcome objectives sufficient to prove their theorized metabolic superiority. PMID:8862527

  11. A Reappraisal of Legislative Privilege and American Colonial Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffery A.

    1984-01-01

    Argues that, while legal historians have contended that legislatures presented a serious threat to press freedom in Colonial America, even a brief review of cases indicates that the use of legislative privilege was sporadic, inconsistent, and largely ineffectual. (FL)

  12. A reappraisal of azhdarchid pterosaur functional morphology and paleoecology.

    PubMed

    Witton, Mark P; Naish, Darren

    2008-05-28

    Azhdarchid pterosaurs were among the most widespread and successful of pterosaur clades, but their paleoecology remains controversial. Morphological features common to all azhdarchids include a long, shallow rostrum; elongate, cylindrical cervical vertebrae that formed a long and unusually inflexible neck; and proportionally short wings with an abbreviated fourth phalanx. While azhdarchids have been imagined as vulture-like scavengers, sediment probers, swimmers, waders, aerial predators, or stork-like generalists, most recent authors have regarded them as skim-feeders, trawling their lower jaws through water during flight and seizing aquatic prey from the water's surface. Although apparently widely accepted, the skim-feeding model lacks critical support from anatomy and functional morphology. Azhdarchids lack the many cranial specialisations exhibited by extant skim-feeding birds, most notably the laterally compressed lower jaw and shock absorbing apparatus required for this feeding style. Well-preserved azhdarchid skulls are rare, but their rostra and lower jaws appear to have been sub-triangular in cross-section, and thus dissimilar to those of skim-feeders and sediment probers. Taphonomic data indicates that azhdarchids predominately inhabited inland settings, and azhdarchid morphology indicates that they were poorly suited for all proposed lifestyles bar wading and terrestrial foraging. However, azhdarchid footprints show that their feet were relatively small, padded and slender, and thus not well suited for wading. We argue that azhdarchids were stork- or ground hornbill-like generalists, foraging in diverse environments for small animals and carrion. Proficient terrestrial abilities and a relatively inflexible neck are in agreement with this interpretation.

  13. Deep space telecommunications and the solar cycle: A reappraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of density enhancement in the near corona at solar cycle (sunspot) maximum have rather uncritically been interpreted to apply equally well to the extended corona, thus generating concern about the quality of outer planet navigational data at solar cycle maximum. Spacecraft have been deployed almost continuously during the recently completed solar cycle 20, providing two powerful new coronal investigatory data sources: (1) in-situ spacecraft plasma measurements at approximately 1 AU, and (2) plasma effects on monochromatic spacecraft signals at all signal closest approach points. A comprehensive review of these (solar cycle 20) data lead to the somewhat surprising conclusions that for the region of interest of navigational data, the highest levels of charged particle corruption of navigational data can be expected to occur at solar cycle minimum, rather than solar cycle maximum, as previously believed.

  14. A TACTful reappraisal of chelation therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Mandeep S; Saour, Basil M; Boden, William E

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is highly prevalent and, despite therapeutic advances, remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Many patients with CVD seek additional alternative therapies when symptoms are not controlled with evidence-based therapies. Although its therapeutic efficacy is unproven, chelation therapy with ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) is increasingly being used in patients with CVD. Early studies of chelation in atherosclerotic CVD provided the basis for the randomized Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT), in which chelation with disodium EDTA was compared with placebo in patients who had experienced a myocardial infarction. Here, we discuss the results, limitations, and implications of TACT in the context of other studies in the field. We believe that the findings from TACT are not robust and do not marshal evidence in support of the potential clinical use of chelation therapy for CVD, with the potential exception of certain high-risk cohorts such as patients with diabetes mellitus. Therefore, chelation is unlikely to become a widely-accepted approach until additional data are available.

  15. b-initiated processes at the LHC: a reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltoni, Fabio; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Ubiali, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Several key processes at the LHC in the standard model and beyond that involve b quarks, such as single-top, Higgs, and weak vector boson associated production, can be described in QCD either in a 4-flavor or 5-flavor scheme. In the former, b quarks appear only in the final state and are typically considered massive. In 5-flavor schemes, calculations include b quarks in the initial state, are simpler and allow the resummation of possibly large initial state logarithms of the type log {{{Q}^2}}/{m_{{^b}^2}} into the b parton distribution function (PDF), {Q} being the typical scale of the hard process. In this work we critically reconsider the rationale for using 5-flavor improved schemes at the LHC. Our motivation stems from the observation that the effects of initial state logs are rarely very large in hadron collisions: 4-flavor computations are pertubatively well behaved and a substantial agreement between predictions in the two schemes is found. We identify two distinct reasons that explain this behaviour, i.e., the resummation of the initial state logarithms into the b-PDF is relevant only at large Bjorken x and the possibly large ratios {{{Q}^2}}/{m_{{^b}^2}} 's are always accompanied by universal phase space suppression factors. Our study paves the way to using both schemes for the same process so to exploit their complementary advantages for different observables, such as employing a 5-flavor scheme to accurately predict the total cross section at NNLO and the corresponding 4-flavor computation at NLO for fully exclusive studies.

  16. Radical re-appraisal of water structure in hydrophilic confinement☆

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of water confined in MCM41 silica cylindrical pores is studied to determine whether confined water is simply a version of the bulk liquid which can be substantially supercooled without crystallisation. A combination of total neutron scattering from the porous silica, both wet and dry, and computer simulation using a realistic model of the scattering substrate is used. The water in the pore is divided into three regions: core, interfacial and overlap. The average local densities of water in these simulations are found to be about 20% lower than bulk water density, while the density in the core region is below, but closer to, the bulk density. There is a decrease in both local and core densities when the temperature is lowered from 298 K to 210 K. The radical proposal is made here that water in hydrophilic confinement is under significant tension, around −100 MPa, inside the pore. PMID:25843963

  17. Health hazards and nitrous oxide: a time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Yagiela, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent adoption by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists of a Threshold Limit Value of 50 ppm for an 8-hour average exposure to nitrous oxide (N2O) increases the likelihood for its regulation by state and federal occupational health agencies. This review outlines current information on the health risks of N2O inhalation to provide a basis from which safe and reasonably attainable exposure limits can be proposed. Although N2O was for many years believed to have no toxicity other than that associated with its anesthetic action, bone marrow depression in patients administered N2O for extended periods of time and neurological abnormalities in health care workers who inhaled N2O recreationally have disproved this notion. Retrospective surveys of dental and medical personnel have also linked occupational exposure to N2O with a number of health problems and reproductive derangements. Nitrous oxide reacts with the reduced form of vitamin B12, thereby inhibiting the action of methionine synthase, an enzyme that indirectly supports methylation reactions and nucleic acid synthesis. Many, if not all, of the nonanesthetic-related adverse effects of N2O may be ascribed to this action. Animal and human studies indicate that the toxic effects of N2O are concentration- and time-dependent. It is suggested that a time-weighted average of 100 ppm for an 8-hour workday and/or a time-weighted average of 400 ppm per anesthetic administration would provide adequate protection of dental personnel and be achievable with existing pollution control methods. PMID:1809046

  18. Dating of pregnancy by trimesters: a review and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Sawin, S W; Morgan, M A

    1996-04-01

    Many patients and obstetricians divide the events of human pregnancy into three intervals traditionally termed "trimesters." This system presumably arose from an equal division of the "9 months of pregnancy" into 3-month intervals. There are several problems with this system that follows pregnancy by months or trimesters. First, the average human pregnancy lasting 280 days or 40 weeks is not evenly divisible by three, leaving one to wonder how long each trimester is. Second, conversion from "weeks pregnant" to "months pregnant" is often an estimate that can foster misunderstanding between the patient and her obstetrician. Last, following pregnancy by the Gregorian calendar does not reflect embryonic or fetal developmental milestones. We propose a revision of this system to one in which natural embryonic and fetal developmental landmarks are used instead of trimesters to define the progressive stages of pregnancy. These landmarks occur approximately at 5-week intervals allowing a more simple division of pregnancy into four 10-week quartiles, each with two 5-week intervals. This article reviews many of these important landmarks within this framework. This system emphasizes a developmentally based way of understanding the events of pregnancy for both the patient and the obstetrician. PMID:8657403

  19. Clinician-Educators as Dual Professionals: A Contemporary Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Hugh A; Brownfield, Erica D

    2016-07-01

    Physicians who teach face unique responsibilities and expectations because they must educate learners while simultaneously caring for patients. Recently this has become even more difficult as the environment for clinician-educators has been undermined by public antipathy toward both the education profession and the medicine profession.Erosion of public confidence in both professions is evidenced by three trends. First, the democratizing nature of the Internet and the availability of technical knowledge to laypeople have encroached on the domain of professional knowledge. Second, the responsibility of a professional to make decisions has been undercut by legal interpretations regarding how physicians are paid for patient care and how teachers are evaluated on performance. And finally, altruistic motivations in both professions have been called into question by external forces promoting "accountability" rather than trusting professionals to act for the best interest of their patients or students.In this climate of increasing accountability and decreasing trust for professionals, clinician-educators can best serve patients and learners through transdisciplinary collaboration with professional educators. Clinician-educators should rely on professional educators for judgment and specialized knowledge in the field of education rather than embodying both professions by themselves. Health care practice has become more team oriented; health care education should do likewise to counteract the social and political trends eroding public confidence in medicine and education. Relying on collaboration with education professionals constitutes a substantial change to how clinician-educators define themselves, but it holds the best promise for medical training in the current social milieu. PMID:27119327

  20. Reappraisal of the management of cholelithiasis in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Guraya, Salman Y

    2005-11-01

    Recently, dramatic advances in research have elucidated the prognosis of gallstone disease and have permitted a more selective choice of persons for treatment based on symptom status and projected prognosis. Ultrasound- detected-incidental gallstones are infrequently clinically significant, but this finding has prompted the surgeons to have a liberal attitude towards the operative indications for cholelithiasis particularly after the advent of laparoscopy. At the same time, the management of gallstones in the diabetics still remains controversial. Early retrospective studies reported an alarmingly high incidence of gallstones in diabetics as compared with the general population and in view of profound morbidity and mortality rates observed in the diabetics, prophylactic cholecystectomy was generally recommended. However, recent evidence-based studies challenged this approach and concluded that prophylactic cholecystectomy is not justified in diabetic patients with asymptomatic gallstones. It is inferred that, as in the general population, asymptomatic cholelithiasis in diabetics should be managed expectantly and preemptive surgery should not be routinely performed. However, early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is preferred in cases of symptomatic cholelithiasis.

  1. Reappraisal of biosafety risks posed by PERVs in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2008-01-01

    Donor materials of porcine origin could potentially provide an alternative source of cells, tissues or whole organs for transplantation to humans, but is hampered by the health risk posed by infection with porcine viruses. Although pigs can be bred in such a way that all known exogenous microorganisms are eliminated, this is not feasible for all endogenous pathogens, such as the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are present in the germline of pigs as proviruses. Upon transplantation, PERV proviruses would be transferred to the human recipient along with the xenograft. If xenotransplantation stimulates or facilitates replication of PERVs in the new hosts, a risk exists for adaptation of the virus to humans and subsequent spread of these viruses. In a worst-case scenario, this might result in the emergence of a new viral disease. Although the concerns for disease potential of PERVs are easing, only limited pre-clinical and clinical data are available. Small-scale, well-designed and carefully controlled clinical trials would provide more evidence on the safety of this approach and allow a better appreciation of the risks involved. It is therefore important to have a framework of protective measures and monitoring protocols in place to facilitate such initially small scale clinical trials. This framework will raise ethical and social considerations regarding acceptability. PMID:17987669

  2. A re-appraisal of wood-fired combustion.

    PubMed

    McIlveen-Wright, D R; Williams, B C; McMullan, J T

    2001-02-01

    Targets for a considerable increase in electricity generation from renewables have been set in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel dependence. Extensive planting of willow, poplar and alder as energy crops has been planned for power generation plants which use wood as the fuel. The current trend is to use gasification or pyrolysis technology, but alternatively a case may be made for wood combustion, if wood becomes readily available. A range of wood-fired circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC) plants, using from 10 to 10,000 dry tonne equivalent (DTE)/day, was examined using the ECLIPSE process simulation package. Various factors, such as wood moisture content, harvest yield, afforestation level (AL) and discounted cash flow rate (DCF) were investigated to test their influence on the efficiency and the economics of the systems. Steam cycle conditions and wood moisture content were found to have the biggest effects on the system efficiencies; DCF and AL had the largest influences on the economics. Plants which could handle more than 500 dry tonnes/day could be economically viable; those using more than 1000 dry tonnes wood/day could be competitive with large-scale, conventional coal-fired plants, if sufficient wood were available.

  3. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2016-06-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and the addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of two, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  4. Oral Insulin and Buccal Insulin: A Critical Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Jacques, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Despite the availability of modern insulin injection devices with needles that are so sharp and thin that practically no injection pain takes place, it is still the dream of patients with diabetes to, for example, swallow a tablet with insulin. This is not associated with any pain and would allow more discretion. Therefore, availability of oral insulin would not only ease insulin therapy, it would certainly increase compliance. However, despite numerous attempts to develop such a “tablet” in the past 85 years, still no oral insulin is commercially available. Buccal insulin is currently in the last stages of clinical development by one company and might become available in the United States and Europe in the coming years (it is already on the market in some other countries). The aim of this review is to critically describe the different approaches that are currently under development. Optimal coverage of prandial insulin requirements is the aim with both routes of insulin administration (at least with most approaches). The speed of onset of metabolic effect seen with some oral insulin approaches is rapid, but absorption appears to be lower when the tablet is taken immediately prior to a meal. With all approaches, considerable amounts of insulin have to be applied in order to induce therapeutically relevant increases in the metabolic effect because of the low relative biopotency of buccal insulin. Unfortunately, the number of publications about clinical–experimental and clinical studies is surprisingly low. In addition, there is no study published in which the variability of the metabolic effect induced (with and without a meal) was studied adequately. In summary, after the failure of inhaled insulin, oral insulin and buccal insulin are hot candidates to come to the market as the next alternative routes of insulin administration. PMID:20144297

  5. Lung cancer mortality among U. S. uranium miners: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; McMillan, A.

    1983-09-01

    This report examines lung cancer mortality among a cohort of white underground uranium miners in the Colorado plateau and is based on mortality follow-up through December 31, 1977. The analytic methods represent a miner's annual age-specific lung cancer mortality rate as the (unspecified) rate among nonsmoking men born at the same time and with no mining history, multiplied by the relative risk factor R. This factor depends on the miner's total exposures to radon daughters (in working level months (WLM) and to cigarettes (in packs), accumulated from start of exposure until 10 years before his current age. Among those examined, the relative risk function giving the highest likelihood of the data was R . (1 + 0.31 X 10(-/sup 2/) WLM)(1 + 0.51 X 10(-/sup 3/) packs). This multiplicative function specifies that ratios of mortality rates for miners versus nonminers with similar age and smoking characteristics do not depend on smoking status. By contrast, differences between miners' and nonminers' mortality rates are substantially higher for smokers than for nonsmokers. The data rejected (P . .01) several additive functions for R that specify relative risk as a sum of components due to radiation and to cigarette smoking. Cumulative exposures to both radiation and cigarettes gave better fits to the data than did average annual exposure rates. Age at start of underground mining had no effect on risk, after controlling for age at lung cancer death, year of birth, and cumulative radiation and smoking exposures.

  6. A reappraisal of azhdarchid pterosaur functional morphology and paleoecology.

    PubMed

    Witton, Mark P; Naish, Darren

    2008-01-01

    Azhdarchid pterosaurs were among the most widespread and successful of pterosaur clades, but their paleoecology remains controversial. Morphological features common to all azhdarchids include a long, shallow rostrum; elongate, cylindrical cervical vertebrae that formed a long and unusually inflexible neck; and proportionally short wings with an abbreviated fourth phalanx. While azhdarchids have been imagined as vulture-like scavengers, sediment probers, swimmers, waders, aerial predators, or stork-like generalists, most recent authors have regarded them as skim-feeders, trawling their lower jaws through water during flight and seizing aquatic prey from the water's surface. Although apparently widely accepted, the skim-feeding model lacks critical support from anatomy and functional morphology. Azhdarchids lack the many cranial specialisations exhibited by extant skim-feeding birds, most notably the laterally compressed lower jaw and shock absorbing apparatus required for this feeding style. Well-preserved azhdarchid skulls are rare, but their rostra and lower jaws appear to have been sub-triangular in cross-section, and thus dissimilar to those of skim-feeders and sediment probers. Taphonomic data indicates that azhdarchids predominately inhabited inland settings, and azhdarchid morphology indicates that they were poorly suited for all proposed lifestyles bar wading and terrestrial foraging. However, azhdarchid footprints show that their feet were relatively small, padded and slender, and thus not well suited for wading. We argue that azhdarchids were stork- or ground hornbill-like generalists, foraging in diverse environments for small animals and carrion. Proficient terrestrial abilities and a relatively inflexible neck are in agreement with this interpretation. PMID:18509539

  7. The entropy of the life table: A reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Oscar E; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2015-09-01

    The life table entropy provides useful information for understanding improvements in mortality and survival in a population. In this paper we take a closer look at the life table entropy and use advanced mathematical methods to provide additional insights for understanding how it relates to changes in mortality and survival. By studying the entropy (H) as a functional, we show that changes in the entropy depend on both the relative change in life expectancy lost due to death (e(†)) and in life expectancy at birth (e0). We also show that changes in the entropy can be further linked to improvements in premature and older deaths. We illustrate our methods with empirical data from Latin American countries, which suggests that at high mortality levels declines in H (which are associated with survival increases) linked with larger improvements in e0, whereas at low mortality levels e(†) made larger contributions to H. We additionally show that among countries with low mortality level, contributions of e(†) to changes in the life table entropy resulted from averting early deaths. These findings indicate that future increases in overall survival in low mortality countries will likely result from improvements in e(†).

  8. Malnutrition in South Asia-A Critical Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-10-25

    Malnutrition continues to be a major public health challenge especially in South Asian developing countries. The aim of the present review is to spotlight the magnitude of the prevalence of malnutrition and its dynamics in South Asian region and to suggest potential approaches for the prevention and control of this issue of public health significance. An extensive review of literature, covering malnutrition and its determinants, health and economic consequences and pragmatic preventive strategies was performed on computer based bibliographic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Medline and Sciencedirect.com ) to retrieve abstracts and full texts for India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. All relevant titles and abstracts were examined and evaluated for malnutrition and its prevalence in South Asia. The results revealed malnutrition to be a major public health problem and a potential cause of high disease burden and mortality in South Asia. Compelling evidence suggests malnutrition to be the leading cause of stunting, wasting and underweight with drastic economic consequences among vulnerable populations. Reduced cognitive performance and low productivity have also been associated with micronutrients malnutrition. Suboptimal breastfeeding, inadequate food supply, micronutrient deficiencies, low household income, poor health care system, increased healthcare costs, illiteracy, unhygienic and substandard living, inappropriate child's care and the caregiver, food insecurity and on top of that vicious cycle of poverty, have been recognized as principal indicators for growing malnutrition prevalence in South Asia. Global organizations, local governments, program managers, NGOs, academia, industry in particular and the society at large need to take up the challenge to completely confiscate malnutrition from the region for economic prosperity and a healthier future.

  9. Genetic effects of the atomic bombs: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Schull, W J; Otake, M; Neel, J V

    1981-09-11

    Data are presented on four indicators of genetic effects from studies of children born to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indicators are frequency of untoward pregnancy outcomes (stillbirth, major congenital defect, death during the first postnatal weak); occurrence of death in live-born children, through an average of life expectancy of 17 years; frequency of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy; and frequency of children with mutation resulting in an eletrophoretic variant. In no instance is there a statistically significant effect of parental exposure; but for all indicators the observed effect is in the direction suggested by the hypothesis that genetic damage resulted from the exposure. On the basis of assumptions concerning the contribution that spontaneous mutation in the preceding generation makes to the indicators in question, it is possible to estimate the genetic doubling dose for radiation for the first three indicators (the data base is still too small for the fourth). The average of these estimates is 156 rems. This is some four times higher than the results from experimental studies on the mouse with comparable radiation sources, which have been the principal guide to the presumed human sensitivities. The relevance of these data in setting permissible limits for human exposures is discussed briefly.

  10. Genetic effects of the atomic bombs: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, M.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-11

    Data are presented on four indicators of genetic effects from studies of children born to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Negasaki. The indicators are frequency of un toward pregnancy outcomes (stillbirth, major congenital defect, death during first postnatal week); occurrence of death in live-born children, through an average life expectancy of 17 years; frequency of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy; and frequency of children with mutation resulting in an electrophoretic variant. In no instance is there a statistically significant effect of parental exposure; but for all indicators the observed effect is in the direction suggested by the hypothesis that genetic damage resulted from the exposure. On the basis of assumptions concerning the contribution that spontaneous mutation in the preceding generation makes to the indicators in question, it is possible to estimate the genetic doubling dose for radiation for the first three indicators (the data base is still too small for the fourth). The average of these estimates is 156 rems. This is some four times higher than the results from experimental studies on the mouse with comparable radiation sources, which have been the principal guide to the presumed human sensitivities. The relevance of these data in setting permissible limits for human exposures is discussed briefly.

  11. Genetic effects of the atomic bombs: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, M.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-11

    Data are presented on four indicators of genetic effects from studies of children born to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indicators are frequency of untoward pregnancy outcomes (stillbirth, major congenital defect, death during the first postnatal weak); occurrence of death in live-born children, through an average of life expectancy of 17 years; frequency of children with sex chromosome aneuploidy; and frequency of children with mutation resulting in an eletrophoretic variant. In no instance is there a statistically significant effect of parental exposure; but for all indicators the observed effect is in the direction suggested by the hypothesis that genetic damage resulted from the exposure. On the basis of assumptions concerning the contribution that spontaneous mutation in the preceding generation makes to the indicators in question, it is possible to estimate the genetic doubling dose for radiation for the first three indicators (the data base is still too small for the fourth). The average of these estimates is 156 rems. This is some four times higher than the results from experimental studies on the mouse with comparable radiation sources, which have been the principal guide to the presumed human sensitivities. The relevance of these data in setting permissible limits for human exposures is discussed briefly.

  12. Are seasonalities in suicide dependent on suicide methods? A reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Wang, Jen; Bopp, Matthias; Eich, Dominique; Rössler, Wulf; Gutzwiller, Felix

    2003-10-01

    In general, suicide frequencies peak in spring and early summer and depict a low in autumn and winter months. Suicide seasonality is a ubiquitous phenomenon; however, recent studies have indicated that it is related particularly to violent suicide methods. We investigated differences in suicide seasonalities by suicide methods using Swiss mortality data. The suicide data were extracted from the Swiss cause of death statistics and cover the period 1969-1994. In this period 37,518 suicides (ICD-8 codes 950-959) were registered in the mortality statistics. The data were analysed by the Edwards' method, which examines unimodal sinusoidal patterns in aggregated monthly data, and by spectral analysis with disaggregated monthly data. Overall, Swiss suicide data in 1969-1994 depict the expected pattern with a peak in May and June and a low in December. However, analyses by suicide methods show that there is no common pattern. Suicide seasonalities are absent or weak in some violent as well as non-violent methods (firearms, cutting, crashing, poisoning). Even if clearly present (hanging, drowning, jumping from high places, unspecified/other), the seasonalities show distinct patterns and cycles. Apart from sinusoidal patterns, there are also outliers: in overall data as well as in most method-specific data, the December frequencies fall more than 10% below the neighbouring months. The decrease of the frequencies culminates at Christmas/New Year and then returns to average levels. Hence, the seasonality of the overall Swiss suicide frequencies is but a compound seasonality. It largely depends on specific suicide methods and different cyclical dynamics.

  13. Reappraising Personal Experience in the Preparation of School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the thesis that individual learning and growth are based on actual life experiences, proposes a model in preparation programs for school administrators. Discusses how the inclusion of personal experience helps to bridge a critical gap between professors of school administration and practicing administrators. (13 references) (MLF)

  14. Douglas-fir rotations--Time for reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.O. ); Marshall, D.D. )

    1993-07-01

    The combination of social and political pressures (stemming largely from the visual impacts of current forest practices) and concerns raised by some scientists about certain biological aspects of current practices is forcing major changes in forest management practices, with increased emphasis on amenity, wildlife, and recreational values. A variety of alternative practices are being proposed or applied, often referred to under the collective name of New Forestry. A general shortcoming of many of these practices is that the authors have little basis for quantitative estimates of the long-term results--either costs or benefits (if any). For some, this is totally lacking. Yet, this is certainly a time to re-examine entrenched ideas. This paper discusses extended rotations as a possible means of reducing conflicts between timber production and other forest values.

  15. The era of optimism, 1850-1870: a preliminary reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J F

    1993-04-01

    Hervey B. Wilbur founded the Barre School, the first private residential school in the United States, in 1848. Samuel G. Howe began the Massachusetts School for Idiotic and Feeble Minded Youth, the first residential public school in the United States, in 1850. Correspondence of the period indicates educational results were less than expected and that strains of pessimism surfaced quite early. By the late 1850s, both Howe and Wilbur raised the possibility of custodial care. The primary source material suggests that the disillusionment with the residential facility as a vehicle for reform and habilitation reflected the decreased faith in moral education and remediation of problems associated with insanity, criminal behavior, and the poverty in the pre-Civil War period.

  16. Reappraisal of risk factors for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Boursi, Ben; Weiss, Brendan M; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated associations between obesity and diabetes and the risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, since MGUS is an asymptomatic condition we evaluated whether these are true associations or the result of detection-bias. We conducted a nested case-control study using a large primary-care database. Cases were defined as those with incident diagnosis of MGUS. For every case, four eligible controls matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up were selected. Exposure variables included obesity and diabetes (including antidiabetic therapies) as well as other metabolic risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The study included 2363 MGUS patients and 9193 matched controls. In the primary analysis, obesity and diabetes were associated with higher MGUS risk with an adjusted ORs of 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.29) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.13-1.50), respectively. However, after adjustment to the number of laboratory tests prior to the MGUS diagnosis, there was no association between obesity and diabetes and MGUS risk (ORs of 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.25, respectively). In an additional analysis of antidiabetic therapies and MGUS risk, there was a nonsignificant decrease in MGUS risk among diabetes patients treated with metformin alone compared to subjects without diabetes (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.56-1.05). In summary, while previously described risk factors for MGUS might be the result of detection bias, metformin should be further evaluated as a possible chemoprevention modality. Am. J. Hematol. 91:581-584, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953904

  17. Imitation, Imagination and Re-Appraisal: Educating the Moral Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce; Reichenbach, Roland

    2005-01-01

    No observer of research currents in the human sciences can fail to detect a new appreciation for the contribution of emotions to descriptions of such wide-ranging psychological phenomena as moral judgement, personal and social development and learning. Despite this, we claim that educating the emotions as a dimension of moral education remains…

  18. No rheumatoid arthritis in ancient Egypt: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2016-06-01

    Antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains controversial, and its origins in Americas or in the Old World are disputed. Proponents of the latter frequently refer to RA in ancient Egypt, but validity of those claims has never been examined. Review of all reported RA cases from ancient Egypt revealed that none of them represent real RA, instead being either examples of changing naming conventions or of imprecise diagnostic criteria. Most cases represented osteoarthritis or spondyloarthropathies. Also review of preserved ancient Egyptian medical writings revealed many descriptions of musculoskeletal disorders, but none of them resembled RA. This suggests that RA was absent in ancient Egypt and supports the hypothesis of the New World origin of RA and its subsequent global spread in the last several centuries. PMID:26650735

  19. Implementation science: a reappraisal of our journal mission and scope.

    PubMed

    Foy, Robbie; Sales, Anne; Wensing, Michel; Aarons, Gregory A; Flottorp, Signe; Kent, Bridie; Michie, Susan; O'Connor, Denise; Rogers, Anne; Sevdalis, Nick; Straus, Sharon; Wilson, Paul

    2015-04-17

    The implementation of research findings into healthcare practice has become increasingly recognised as a major priority for researchers, service providers, research funders and policymakers over the past decade. Nine years after its establishment, Implementation Science, an international online open access journal, currently publishes over 150 articles each year. This is fewer than 30% of those submitted for publication. The majority of manuscript rejections occur at the point of initial editorial screening, frequently because we judge them to fall outside of journal scope. There are a number of common reasons as to why manuscripts are rejected on grounds of scope. Furthermore, as the field of implementation research has evolved and our journal submissions have risen, we have, out of necessity, had to become more selective in what we publish. We have also expanded our scope, particularly around patient-mediated and population health interventions, and will monitor the impact of such changes. We hope this editorial on our evolving priorities and common reasons for rejection without peer review will help authors to better judge the relevance of their papers to Implementation Science.

  20. Origin of hydrocarbons in Gulf of Mexico basin: A reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Bissada, K.K.; Katz, B.J.; Barnicle, S.C.; Schunk, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of hydrocarbons in the Gulf of Mexico basin has been a subject of controversy for many years. One argument invokes source rocks of average organic enrichment, pervasively distributed throughout the Tertiary sequence and closely associated with the reservoir system. Another argument invokes exceptionally rich, discrete source rocks not in contact with the reservoirs, possibly in pre-Tertiary sequences. Continued exploration success in the basin hinges on the resolution of this controversy because of implications on patterns of hydrocarbon migration within the basin and the timing of petroleum generation relative to reservoir and trap development. Geochemical analyses of hundreds of crude oils, natural gases, and nonreservoir rocks from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic trends along the northern Gulf of Mexico basin indicate the general inadequacy of the Tertiary section to source the huge oil accumulations within Cenozoic reservoirs. Furthermore, other than the biogenic gas, isotopic data indicate that the majority of nonassociated gases found in Cenozoic accumulations have been thermogenically derived from much greater depths where maturation is consistent with dry gas generation. Geochemical data from several Mesozoic units in the basin, but outside the Cenozoic trend proper, indicate the existence of excellent Mesozoic source rocks. It is proposed that such units extend below the Cenozoic producing trends and are drained by deep-seated faults and piercement salt structures. Maturation history, structural style, and patterns of migration and remigration control the variable productivity along the various trends.

  1. Hepatic encephalopathy and Helicobacter pylori: a critical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Morini, Sergio

    2003-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, and plasma ammonia plays a pivotal role in its pathogenesis. Ammonia disposal in cirrhotics depend on intricately balanced enzyme and transport systems, involving liver, large and small bowel, muscle, and kidney. Recently, it has been suggested that Helicobacter pylori could contribute to hyperammonemia in cirrhotics, but conflicting data are available in the literature. This is a systematic review of experimental (animals and humans), epidemiological, case-control, and prospective studies, to evaluate the arguments in favor and against the role of H. pylori in HE pathogenesis. Although H. pylori produces ammonia in the stomach, several studies have shown that both basal ammonia levels and HE prevalence did not significantly differ between cirrhotics with and without infection. Moreover, some prospective studies have documented that both blood ammonia levels and mental status in HE cirrhotics are not significantly affected by H. pylori eradication. Even if a small sub-group of cirrhotics with both a high bacterial density and more severe hepatic impairment seems to benefit by bacterial eradication, data indicate that ammonia production in the stomach by H. pylori urease appears to be inadequate to clinically affect ammonia disposal in the majority of cirrhotic patients. Further studies are warranted in this field.

  2. Genes without prominence: a reappraisal of the foundations of biology

    PubMed Central

    Annila, Arto; Baverstock, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome raises two intriguing questions: why has the prediction of the inheritance of common diseases from the presence of abnormal alleles proved so unrewarding in most cases and how can some 25 000 genes generate such a rich complexity evident in the human phenotype? It is proposed that light can be shed on these questions by viewing evolution and organisms as natural processes contingent on the second law of thermodynamics, equivalent to the principle of least action in its original form. Consequently, natural selection acts on variation in any mechanism that consumes energy from the environment rather than on genetic variation. According to this tenet cellular phenotype, represented by a minimum free energy attractor state comprising active gene products, has a causal role in giving rise, by a self-similar process of cell-to-cell interaction, to morphology and functionality in organisms, which, in turn, by a self-similar process entailing Darwin's proportional numbers are influencing their ecosystems. Thus, genes are merely a means of specifying polypeptides: those that serve free energy consumption in a given surroundings contribute to cellular phenotype as determined by the phenotype. In such natural processes, everything depends on everything else, and phenotypes are emergent properties of their systems. PMID:24554573

  3. A reappraisal of Polyptychodon (Plesiosauria) from the Cretaceous of England

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pliosauridae is a globally distributed clade of aquatic predatory amniotes whose fossil record spans from the Lower Jurassic to the Upper Cretaceous. However, the knowledge of pliosaurid interrelationships remains limited. In part, this is a consequence of a few key taxa awaiting detailed reassessment. Among them, the taxon Polyptychodon is of special importance. It was established on isolated teeth from the mid-Cretaceous strata of East and South East England and subsequently associated with numerous finds of near-cosmopolitan distribution. Here the taxon is reassessed based on the original dental material from England, with special focus on a large collection of late Albian material from the Cambridge Greensand near Cambridge. The dental material is reviewed here from historical and stratigraphic perspective, described in detail, and discussed in terms of its diagnostic nature. The considerable morphological variability observed in the teeth attributed to Polyptychodon, together with a wide stratigraphic range of the ascribed material, possibly exceeding 35 Ma (early Aptian to ?middle Santonian), suggests that the taxon is based on a multispecies assemblage, possibly incorporating members of different plesiosaur clades. Due to the absence of any autapomorphic characters or unique character combinations in the original material, Polyptychodon interruptus, the type species of Polyptychodon, is considered nomen dubium. From a global perspective, Polyptychodon is viewed as a wastebasket taxon whose material originating from different localities should be reconsidered separately. PMID:27190712

  4. A reappraisal of Kendell and Jablensky's account of validity.

    PubMed

    Fellowes, Sam

    2016-08-01

    Kendell and Jablensky argue that validity in psychiatry requires either unique biological characteristics or a zone of rarity, where few symptoms of one syndrome are present in another syndrome. Meeting either of these criteria allows the inference that the syndrome is caused by a specific biological mechanism not present in other syndromes. Failing to meet either of these criteria means the syndrome has been arbitrarily grouped and is invalid. Kendell and Jablensky's account of validity is too restrictive. Scientific phenomena are generally produced by a multiplicity of unstable overlapping causes, the causes for one phenomenon typically also present in other phenomena. Despite this, scientific phenomena are not automatically arbitrary. Science employs idealistic models that can successfully describe phenomena produced by overlapping causes and can gain approximately true knowledge of that phenomenon. The specific biological mechanisms that Kendell and Jablensky see as delivering validity are only specific in an idealized sense. Also, approximate truth means Kendell and Jablensky are mistaken to see validity as invariant and independent of context. An alternative approach to inferring causes is the common cause and unifications. Scientists often see otherwise unrelated phenomena regularly co-occur, and this legitimizes inferring common causes responsible for the phenomena. Applied to psychiatry, I show how syndromes that cover many different unrelated phenomena allow an inference to common causes, and this delivers validity. Zones of rarity can actually decrease validity. Idealized models often produce more information about causes by covering more phenomena, whereas zones of rarity often reduce the number of symptoms covered by a syndrome. Ignoring zones of rarity in favour of syndromes that cover many symptoms can sometimes increase validity. This can also occur when validating syndromes through corroborations with other factors. Increasing corroborations may require reducing the number of symptoms, potentially reducing validity.

  5. Omental infarction: a reappraisal of conservative management in children.

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José; Alvarenga, Ana Sofia; Fragoso, Ana Catarina; Garcia, Maria; Campos, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A melhoria da acuidade diagnóstica do enfarte do omento resultou num incremento da atitude conservadora no seu tratamento. Com o objectivo de avaliar a eficácia e segurança da abordagem não-operatória, analisámos os casos de enfarte do omento tratados num hospital terciário. Material e Métodos: Incluímos os casos de enfarte do omento primários tratados entre 2004 e 2011. Os enfartes do omento diagnosticados por imagiologia foram submetidos a tratamento conservador que constou de analgésicos e antibioterapia intravenosa. Avaliámos os dados demográficos, apresentação clínica, dados laboratoriais, imagiologia e resultado. Resultados: Ocorreram nove casos de enfarte do omento. Oito pacientes (4 rapazes), com uma idade mediana de 8,5 anos, apresentaram- se na fase inicial da doença por dor abdominal à direita; a contagem leucocitária era normal ou ligeiramente elevada. Seis casos, diagnosticados por TC após ecografia suspeita de enfarte do omento em quatro, foram trados conservadoramente sem complicações, tendo alta ao terceiro dia (mediana). Dois doentes foram apenas diagnosticados durante a intervenção cirúrgica por suposta apendicite. O nono caso apresentou-se com uma obstrução intestinal devida a hérnia interna que foi resolvida por laparoscopia. Discussão: A imagiologia foi diagnóstica na maioria dos casos de enfarte do omento, permitindo a adoção de uma abordagem conservadora. O tratamento não-operatório foi eficaz e sem complicações em todos os doentes que se apresentaram na fase inicial da doença. Um doente apresentou-se com uma complicação grave que requereu intervenção cirúrgica. Conclusão: Na ausência de um tratamento consensual para o enfarte do omento, a abordagem não-operatória é uma alternativa não invasiva e eficaz, mas requer uma vigilância clínica ativa.

  6. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  7. A re-appraisal of wood-fired combustion.

    PubMed

    McIlveen-Wright, D R; Williams, B C; McMullan, J T

    2001-02-01

    Targets for a considerable increase in electricity generation from renewables have been set in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel dependence. Extensive planting of willow, poplar and alder as energy crops has been planned for power generation plants which use wood as the fuel. The current trend is to use gasification or pyrolysis technology, but alternatively a case may be made for wood combustion, if wood becomes readily available. A range of wood-fired circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC) plants, using from 10 to 10,000 dry tonne equivalent (DTE)/day, was examined using the ECLIPSE process simulation package. Various factors, such as wood moisture content, harvest yield, afforestation level (AL) and discounted cash flow rate (DCF) were investigated to test their influence on the efficiency and the economics of the systems. Steam cycle conditions and wood moisture content were found to have the biggest effects on the system efficiencies; DCF and AL had the largest influences on the economics. Plants which could handle more than 500 dry tonnes/day could be economically viable; those using more than 1000 dry tonnes wood/day could be competitive with large-scale, conventional coal-fired plants, if sufficient wood were available. PMID:11198168

  8. Ethical reappraisal of 15 years of cord-blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Giuseppe Roberto; Gluckman, Eliane; Locatelli, Franco

    2003-01-18

    Since the first successful use of cord blood as source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in 1988, more than 2000 patients with malignant or non-malignant disorders have been treated with this procedure. Collection and storage of cord blood has prompted ethical considerations, mainly dealing with the issues of autonomy in making decisions about donation of cord blood, and of privacy and confidentiality in the tests required before use of placental cells for transplantation. The ethical implications of possible storage of cord-blood cells for autologous use has also been discussed. Preimplantation selection of HLA-matched embryos to obtain a donor of cells for cord-blood transplantation of a sibling with a life-threatening disease has raised the issue of the extent to which this approach complies with the principles of bioethics. PMID:12547553

  9. What Is Religious Education All about? A Hermeneutic Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, David

    2011-01-01

    There has been limited engagement with Gadamer in the pedagogy of English religious education (RE) to date. Currently there remains confusion about the subject matter of RE and the application of the National Framework attainment targets, learning about and learning from. Instrumental justifications of RE are in tension with the desire to defend…

  10. Ethical reappraisal of 15 years of cord-blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Giuseppe Roberto; Gluckman, Eliane; Locatelli, Franco

    2003-01-18

    Since the first successful use of cord blood as source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in 1988, more than 2000 patients with malignant or non-malignant disorders have been treated with this procedure. Collection and storage of cord blood has prompted ethical considerations, mainly dealing with the issues of autonomy in making decisions about donation of cord blood, and of privacy and confidentiality in the tests required before use of placental cells for transplantation. The ethical implications of possible storage of cord-blood cells for autologous use has also been discussed. Preimplantation selection of HLA-matched embryos to obtain a donor of cells for cord-blood transplantation of a sibling with a life-threatening disease has raised the issue of the extent to which this approach complies with the principles of bioethics.

  11. Dating of pregnancy by trimesters: a review and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Sawin, S W; Morgan, M A

    1996-04-01

    Many patients and obstetricians divide the events of human pregnancy into three intervals traditionally termed "trimesters." This system presumably arose from an equal division of the "9 months of pregnancy" into 3-month intervals. There are several problems with this system that follows pregnancy by months or trimesters. First, the average human pregnancy lasting 280 days or 40 weeks is not evenly divisible by three, leaving one to wonder how long each trimester is. Second, conversion from "weeks pregnant" to "months pregnant" is often an estimate that can foster misunderstanding between the patient and her obstetrician. Last, following pregnancy by the Gregorian calendar does not reflect embryonic or fetal developmental milestones. We propose a revision of this system to one in which natural embryonic and fetal developmental landmarks are used instead of trimesters to define the progressive stages of pregnancy. These landmarks occur approximately at 5-week intervals allowing a more simple division of pregnancy into four 10-week quartiles, each with two 5-week intervals. This article reviews many of these important landmarks within this framework. This system emphasizes a developmentally based way of understanding the events of pregnancy for both the patient and the obstetrician.

  12. [Reappraise the value of orbital decompression for thyroid associated ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-hua

    2012-08-01

    Compressive optic neuropathy and exposure keratopathy is classical indications of orbital decompression surgery for thyroid associated ophthalmopathy. Recently, its therapeutic value should extend to cosmetic requirement, the entity of congestive orbitopathy, ocular hypertension and hormonal resistance. In order to improve the safe and efficacy of orbital decompressions, we need the graded decompression plans and the modified areas of bone removal. The preferred area of bone removal is deep lateral wall. In serious patients, a combined medial, inferior and deep lateral wall decompression is recommended. There have also been technical advances in the cosmetic incisions such as transconjunctival, eyelid crease or endoscopic access. Removing periorbital fat is a supplement skill for bony decompression. The removed amount and indications should be regulated strictly. Individual operative project is the tendency of development of orbital decompressions.

  13. No rheumatoid arthritis in ancient Egypt: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2016-06-01

    Antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains controversial, and its origins in Americas or in the Old World are disputed. Proponents of the latter frequently refer to RA in ancient Egypt, but validity of those claims has never been examined. Review of all reported RA cases from ancient Egypt revealed that none of them represent real RA, instead being either examples of changing naming conventions or of imprecise diagnostic criteria. Most cases represented osteoarthritis or spondyloarthropathies. Also review of preserved ancient Egyptian medical writings revealed many descriptions of musculoskeletal disorders, but none of them resembled RA. This suggests that RA was absent in ancient Egypt and supports the hypothesis of the New World origin of RA and its subsequent global spread in the last several centuries.

  14. A reappraisal of the structure of normal canine articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J; Shackleton, D R; Billingham, M E; Bitensky, L; Chayen, J; Muir, I H

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that some of the controversy over the structure of articular cartilage may be due to slight differences in the orientation of the sample that has been studied. As our decisive criterion we have used the simple physical fact that elongate proteins, such as collagen micelles, that can exhibit form-birefringence, had to show virtually straight extinction when viewed under crossed polars. The use of a variably adjustable microtome chuck facilitated small adjustments in the orientation of the cartilage to meet this criterion. Under these conditions, the collagen of the matrix has been shown to be aligned mainly perpendicularly to the surface which was bounded by a thin lamina in which the collagen showed birefringence at 90 degrees to that of the matrix. The conventionally described zonation of articular cartilage has been shown to be inadequate for that of the dog tibial plateau. The conventional Zone 2 has been shown to consist of two zones, Zones 2a and 2b, with different cell sizes, cell concentrations, and concentration of matrix components. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3198487

  15. A reappraisal of the controversy of Dax and Broca.

    PubMed

    Cubelli, R; Montagna, C G

    1994-10-01

    Paul Broca is unanimously recognized as the founder of neuropsychology. Helis development of the scientific method to map mental functions onto brain topographpy has been enormously influential. Nevertheless, Dax's paper on the left hemisphere dominance for speech was written and published before Broca explicitely proposed the same theory. Probably, Broca was aware of the paper prior to 1865, but he never acknowledged Dax's original theoretical contribution. On the contrary, he always claimed to be the first to espouse the theory of left hemisphere dominance for language and never quoted Marc Dax (Broca, 1877 p 536), 'I do not like dealing with the questions of priority concerning myself. That is the reason why I did not mention the name of Dax in my paper'. In our opinion, the weight of evidence reported here suggests that the theory of the left hemisphere dominance for speech must be attributed equally to Dax and Broca, and henceforth should be called 'the theory of Dax-Broca'. PMID:11618822

  16. Neocytolysis: none, one or many? A reappraisal and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Risso, Angela; Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Neocytolysis is the hypothesis formulated to explain experimental evidence of selective lysis of young red blood cells (RBCs) (neocytes) associated with decreased plasma levels of erythropoietin (EPO). In humans, it appears to take place whenever a fast RBC mass reduction is required, i.e., in astronauts during the first days of spaceflight under weightlessness, where a fast reduction in plasma volume and increase in haematocrit occur. EPO plasma levels then decline and a decrease in RBC mass takes place, apparently because of the selective lysis of the youngest, recently generated RBCs (neocytes). The same process seems to occur in people descending to sea level after acclimatization at high altitude. After descent, the polycythaemia developed at high altitude must be abrogated, and a rapid reduction in the number of circulating RBCs is obtained by a decrease in EPO synthesis and the lysis of what seem to be young RBCs. In vivo, neocytolysis seems to be abolished by EPO administration. More recent research has ascribed to neocytolysis the RBC destruction that occurs under such disparate pathophysiologic conditions as nephropathy, severe obstructive pulmonary disease, blood doping, and even malaria anaemia. According to the theory, EPO's central role would be not only to stimulate the production of new RBCs in conditions of anaemia, as maintained by the orthodox view, but also that of a cytoprotective factor for circulating young RBCs. Why neocytes are specifically destroyed and how is this related to decreased EPO levels has not yet been elucidated. Changes in membrane molecules of young RBCs isolated from astronauts or mountain climbers upon return to normal conditions seem to indicate a higher susceptibility of neocytes to ingestion by macrophages. By limiting the context to space missions and high altitude expeditions, this review will address unresolved and critical issues that in our opinion have not been sufficiently highlighted in previous works. PMID:24592241

  17. A Reappraisal of Azhdarchid Pterosaur Functional Morphology and Paleoecology

    PubMed Central

    Witton, Mark P.; Naish, Darren

    2008-01-01

    Azhdarchid pterosaurs were among the most widespread and successful of pterosaur clades, but their paleoecology remains controversial. Morphological features common to all azhdarchids include a long, shallow rostrum; elongate, cylindrical cervical vertebrae that formed a long and unusually inflexible neck; and proportionally short wings with an abbreviated fourth phalanx. While azhdarchids have been imagined as vulture-like scavengers, sediment probers, swimmers, waders, aerial predators, or stork-like generalists, most recent authors have regarded them as skim-feeders, trawling their lower jaws through water during flight and seizing aquatic prey from the water's surface. Although apparently widely accepted, the skim-feeding model lacks critical support from anatomy and functional morphology. Azhdarchids lack the many cranial specialisations exhibited by extant skim-feeding birds, most notably the laterally compressed lower jaw and shock absorbing apparatus required for this feeding style. Well-preserved azhdarchid skulls are rare, but their rostra and lower jaws appear to have been sub-triangular in cross-section, and thus dissimilar to those of skim-feeders and sediment probers. Taphonomic data indicates that azhdarchids predominately inhabited inland settings, and azhdarchid morphology indicates that they were poorly suited for all proposed lifestyles bar wading and terrestrial foraging. However, azhdarchid footprints show that their feet were relatively small, padded and slender, and thus not well suited for wading. We argue that azhdarchids were stork- or ground hornbill-like generalists, foraging in diverse environments for small animals and carrion. Proficient terrestrial abilities and a relatively inflexible neck are in agreement with this interpretation. PMID:18509539

  18. Culture, biology, and the near-death experience. A reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Kellehear, A

    1993-03-01

    Life review and tunnel sensation in near-death experiences appear to be culture-bound phenomena, confined largely to societies where historic religions are dominant. The clinical literature postulating biological theories for life review and tunnel sensations, therefore, may have been developed somewhat prematurely. The present review argues that social and historical explanations are more persuasive in the context of the available evidence presented here.

  19. A Reappraisal of Bennett Reimer and His Meanings of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett; Lewis, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Consistent throughout his writings on aesthetics and education, Bennett Reimer maintained the idea that music must be understood and studied as non-conceptual. Music's forms of knowing point to the subjective realms of life and operate effectively without the assistance or necessity of language. An education in the arts is an education in…

  20. Interruptions and Distractions in Healthcare: Review and Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, A. Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare settings can be hectic, demanding, time-constrained environments. Within these environments, health care professionals (HCP) are expected to perform tasks that often require their undivided attention. However, HCPs are frequently interrupted, which can distract their attention and add to the complexity of their work. That said, not all interruptions are bad; many interruptions are essential to the patient care process and provide HCPs with necessary information. This paper systematically reviews the peer-reviewed literature on interruptions in healthcare settings to determine the state of the science and to identify gaps. It then provides a complex sociotechnical systems approach to understanding interruptions in healthcare. PMID:20378621

  1. Cyclothymia reloaded: A reappraisal of the most misconceived affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Perugi, Giulio; Hantouche, Elie; Vannucchi, Giulia; Pinto, Olavo

    2015-09-01

    Data emerging from both academic centers and from public and private outpatient facilities indicate that from 20% to 50% of all subjects that seek help for mood, anxiety, impulsive and addictive disorders turn out, after careful screening, to be affected by cyclothymia. The proportion of patients who can be classified as cyclothymic rises significantly if the diagnostic rules proposed by the DSM-5 are reconsidered and a broader approach is adopted. Unlike the DSM-5 definition based on the recurrence of low-grade hypomanic and depressive symptoms, cyclothymia is best identified as an exaggeration of cyclothymic temperament (basic mood and emotional instability) with early onset and extreme mood reactivity linked with interpersonal and separation sensitivity, frequent mixed features during depressive states, the dark side of hypomanic symptoms, multiple comorbidities, and a high risk of impulsive and suicidal behavior. Epidemiological and clinical research have shown the high prevalence of cyclothymia and the validity of the concept that it should be seen as a distinct form of bipolarity, not simply as a softer form. Misdiagnosis and consequent mistreatment are associated with a high risk of transforming cyclothymia into severe complex borderline-like bipolarity, especially with chronic and repetitive exposure to antidepressants and sedatives. The early detection and treatment of cyclothymia can guarantee a significant change in the long-term prognosis, when appropriate mood-stabilizing pharmacotherapy and specific psychological approaches and psychoeducation are adopted. The authors present and discuss clinical research in the field and their own expertise in the understanding and medical management of cyclothymia and its complex comorbidities. PMID:26005206

  2. A reappraisal of Polyptychodon (Plesiosauria) from the Cretaceous of England.

    PubMed

    Madzia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pliosauridae is a globally distributed clade of aquatic predatory amniotes whose fossil record spans from the Lower Jurassic to the Upper Cretaceous. However, the knowledge of pliosaurid interrelationships remains limited. In part, this is a consequence of a few key taxa awaiting detailed reassessment. Among them, the taxon Polyptychodon is of special importance. It was established on isolated teeth from the mid-Cretaceous strata of East and South East England and subsequently associated with numerous finds of near-cosmopolitan distribution. Here the taxon is reassessed based on the original dental material from England, with special focus on a large collection of late Albian material from the Cambridge Greensand near Cambridge. The dental material is reviewed here from historical and stratigraphic perspective, described in detail, and discussed in terms of its diagnostic nature. The considerable morphological variability observed in the teeth attributed to Polyptychodon, together with a wide stratigraphic range of the ascribed material, possibly exceeding 35 Ma (early Aptian to ?middle Santonian), suggests that the taxon is based on a multispecies assemblage, possibly incorporating members of different plesiosaur clades. Due to the absence of any autapomorphic characters or unique character combinations in the original material, Polyptychodon interruptus, the type species of Polyptychodon, is considered nomen dubium. From a global perspective, Polyptychodon is viewed as a wastebasket taxon whose material originating from different localities should be reconsidered separately. PMID:27190712

  3. Acute interstitial nephritis – a reappraisal and update

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an under recognized and under diagnosed cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). It is estimated to account for 15 – 20% of cases of AKI; it is the reported diagnosis in 2.8% of all kidney biopsies, and 13.5% of biopsies done specifically for acute renal failure. Considerable evidence implicates antigen initiated cell-mediated injury in the pathogenesis of AIN. Drugs account for 70% of all cases, with over 150 different agents incriminated. The remaining cases are due to infections, autoimmune diseases, and rarely idiopathic. The central component of renal injury in AIN is altered tubular function, which usually precedes decrements in filtration rate. The key to early diagnosis is vigilance for the presence of tubular dysfunction in non-oliguric individuals, especially in patients with modest but gradual increments in creatinine level. The utility of urinary biomarkers to diagnose AIN in its early nascent and potentially reversible stage remains to be determined. Prompt recognition, elimination of the offending source of antigen, and use of a limited course of steroid therapy where indicated, will result in complete resolution in ~ 65% of cases, partial resolution in up to 20%, and irreversible damage in the rest. PMID:25079860

  4. Reappraisal of biosafety risks posed by PERVs in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2008-01-01

    Donor materials of porcine origin could potentially provide an alternative source of cells, tissues or whole organs for transplantation to humans, but is hampered by the health risk posed by infection with porcine viruses. Although pigs can be bred in such a way that all known exogenous microorganisms are eliminated, this is not feasible for all endogenous pathogens, such as the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) which are present in the germline of pigs as proviruses. Upon transplantation, PERV proviruses would be transferred to the human recipient along with the xenograft. If xenotransplantation stimulates or facilitates replication of PERVs in the new hosts, a risk exists for adaptation of the virus to humans and subsequent spread of these viruses. In a worst-case scenario, this might result in the emergence of a new viral disease. Although the concerns for disease potential of PERVs are easing, only limited pre-clinical and clinical data are available. Small-scale, well-designed and carefully controlled clinical trials would provide more evidence on the safety of this approach and allow a better appreciation of the risks involved. It is therefore important to have a framework of protective measures and monitoring protocols in place to facilitate such initially small scale clinical trials. This framework will raise ethical and social considerations regarding acceptability.

  5. Prolactin and Psychopathology in Schizophrenia: A Literature Review and Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Secretion of the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin can be significantly increased by antipsychotic drugs, leading to a range of adverse effects in patients with schizophrenia. However, there is evidence from a variety of studies that prolactin may also be related to symptom profile and treatment response in these patients, and recent work has identified variations in prolactin secretion even in drug-free patients. In this paper, a selective review of all relevant studies pertaining to prolactin and schizophrenia, including challenge and provocation studies, is presented. The implications of this work are discussed critically. A tentative model, which synthesizes these findings and argues for a significant role for prolactin in the development of schizophrenia, is outlined. PMID:24800074

  6. [Identification, during development, of a methodology targeted at determining the positioning of new drugs for therapeutic strategies: examples of rheumatoid arthritis and cardiac insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Le Jeunne, C; Plétan, Y; Boissel, J P

    2002-01-01

    The Marketing Authorization (MA) granted to a new molecular entity does not allow for proper anticipation of its future positioning within the therapeutic strategy. A specific methodology should be devised as early as during the pre-MA development phase that could result in an initial positioning that should be subjected to further reappraisal with regard to scientific advances, the arrival of new treatments and further developments with this molecule. A methodology is thus proposed, based on early optimisation of the development plan, the granting of subsequent MAs, and reappraisal of the positioning within the strategy, based on analysis of all available data. It should be possible to take into account the economic context, within an agreed system with pre-defined medico-economic criteria. This may in turn raise the issue of the role of the various parties involved in this assessment, as well as how to understand the respective opinions of stakeholders: authorities, sponsors, prescribers and patients, each of whom has a specific view of the definition of the strategic objective that should apply to the disease concerned.

  7. Faith as a Resource in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Is Associated with a Positive Interpretation of Illness and Experience of Gratitude/Awe

    PubMed Central

    Büssing, Arndt; Wirth, Anne-Gritli; Humbroich, Knut; Gerbershagen, Kathrin; Schimrigk, Sebastian; Haupts, Michael; Baumann, Klaus; Heusser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional anonymous survey with standardized questionnaires was to investigate which resources to cope were used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We focussed on patients' conviction that their faith might be a strong hold in difficult times and on their engagement in different forms of spirituality. Consecutively 213 German patients (75% women; mean age 43 ± 11 years) were enrolled. Fifty-five percent regarded themselves as neither religious nor spiritual (R−S−), while 31% describe themselves as religious. For 29%, faith was a strong hold in difficult times. This resource was neither related to patients' EDSS scores, and life affections, fatigue, negative mood states, life satisfaction nor to Positive attitudes. Instead it was moderately associated with a Reappraisal strategy (i.e., and positive interpretation of illness) and experience of gratitude/awe. Compared to spiritual/religious patients, R−S− individuals had significantly (P < .0001) lower Reappraisal scores and lower engagement in specific forms of spiritual practices. The ability to reflect on what is essential in life, to appreciate and value life, and also the conviction that illness may have meaning and could be regarded as a chance for development was low in R−S− individuals which either may have no specific interest or are less willing to reflect these issues. PMID:24319471

  8. Spontaneous Emotion Regulation to Positive and Negative Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volokhov, Rachael N.; Demaree, Heath A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to regulate one's emotions is an integral part of human social behavior. One antecedent emotion regulation strategy, known as reappraisal, is characterized by cognitively evaluating an emotional stimulus to alter its emotional impact and one response-focused strategy, suppression, is aimed at reducing behavioral output. People are…

  9. Mindfulness Broadens Awareness and Builds Eudaimonic Meaning: A Process Model of Mindful Positive Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Farb, Norman A.; Goldin, Philippe; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary scholarship on mindfulness casts it as a form of purely non-evaluative engagement with experience. Yet, traditionally mindfulness was not intended to operate in a vacuum of dispassionate observation, but was seen as facilitative of eudaimonic mental states. In spite of this historical context, modern psychological research has neglected to ask the question of how the practice of mindfulness affects downstream emotion regulatory processes to impact the sense of meaning in life. To fill this lacuna, here we describe the Mindfulness-to-Meaning Theory, from which we derive a novel process model of mindful positive emotion regulation informed by affective science, in which mindfulness is proposed to introduce flexibility in the generation of cognitive appraisals by enhancing interoceptive attention, thereby expanding the scope of cognition to facilitate reappraisal of adversity and savoring of positive experience. This process is proposed to culminate in a deepened capacity for meaning-making and greater engagement with life. PMID:27087765

  10. Positive interpretation bias predicts well-being in medical interns

    PubMed Central

    Kleim, Birgit; Thörn, Hanna A.; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive theories of emotion posit that affective responses may be shaped by how individuals interpret emotion-eliciting situations. This study tested whether individual differences in interpretation bias (i.e., interpreting ambiguous scenarios in a more negative or positive manner) independently predict trait resilience and depression in medical interns. Interpretation bias and trait resilience scores were assessed in 47 interns prior to their first internship. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice during internship. Nearly half of the sample (42%) scored above the cut-off for mild depressive symptoms during internship, a significant rise compared to the initial assessment. Those with a more positive interpretation bias had higher trait resilience (β = 0.44, p = 0.004) and a 6-fold decreased depressive symptom risk during internship (OR = 6.41, p = 0.027). The predictive power of a positive interpretation bias for decreased depression symptoms held over and above initial depressive symptoms, demographics and trait reappraisal. Assessing positive interpretation bias may have practical utility for predicting future well-being in at risk-populations. PMID:25009521

  11. Predictors of positive psychosocial functioning of older adults in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Schanowitz, Jeff Y; Nicassio, Perry M

    2006-04-01

    This research examined the contributions of active and passive coping for health problems, and meaning-based coping, to positive psychosocial functioning in a sample of 100 individuals in residential care with a mean age of 83.11 years old. Study participants resided in skilled care, intermediate care, or assisted living facilities. Based on interview data collected on site in participants' residential settings, hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that active and passive coping and meaning-based coping had separate influences on measures of positive psychosocial functioning. Active coping was correlated with higher positive affect, whereas passive coping was associated with higher negative affect and self-acceptance. Positive reappraisal, a meaning-based coping strategy, was uniquely associated with higher positive affect, positive social relations, and self-acceptance. Positive religious coping was not independently associated with positive psychosocial functioning indices, whereas negative religious coping was related to higher negative affect. Health functioning did not contribute to positive psychosocial functioning in this sample. The results confirm the separate importance of health-related and meaning-based coping strategies in explaining positive psychosocial functioning in older adults living in residential care settings. PMID:16453068

  12. A reappraisal of the role of mosquitoes in the transmission of myxomatosis in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Service, M. W.

    1971-01-01

    Field experiments were made in southern England to re-examine the possibility that mosquitoes in Britain might feed on wild rabbits and hence be vectors of myxomatosis. Mosquitoes of several species were attracted to rabbits enclosed in cylindrical traps and in a trap in which the animal was placed in a wire mesh cage. Substantial numbers of mosquitoes were also caught biting, or attempting to bite, tethered rabbits which were not in cages or traps. Evidence that mosquitoes fed on wild rabbits under natural conditions was obtained from results of precipitin tests made on blood-smears collected from mosquitoes caught resting amongst vegetation. On a few evenings mosquitoes were seen to be attracted to healthy wild rabbits and apparently attempting to feed on them. Batches of two mosquito species collected from the field were infected with myxoma virus. It was concluded that contrary to previous beliefs mosquitoes in Britain feed to a certain extent on wild rabbits, and therefore are potential vectors of myxomatosis. No attempts were made to assess their relative importance in the transmission of the disease, which in Britain is transmitted mainly by the rabbit flea. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:4401995

  13. Reappraising Stress Arousal Improves Performance and Reduces Evaluation Anxiety in Classroom Exam Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Peters, Brett J.; Greenwood, Emily J.; Altose, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    For students to thrive in the U.S. educational system, they must successfully cope with omnipresent demands of exams. Nearly all students experience testing situations as stressful, and signs of stress (e.g., racing heart) are typically perceived negatively. This research tested the efficacy of a psychosituational intervention targeting cognitive…

  14. Resurrecting Van Leeuwenhoek's rotifers: a reappraisal of the role of disaccharides in anhydrobiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunnacliffe, A; Lapinski, J

    2003-01-01

    In 1702, Van Leeuwenhoek was the first to describe the phenomenon of anhydrobiosis in a species of bdelloid rotifer, Philodina roseola. It is the purpose of this review to examine what has been learned since then about the extreme desiccation tolerance in rotifers and how this compares with our understanding of anhydrobiosis in other organisms. Remarkably, much of what is known today about the requirements for successful anhydrobiosis, and the degree of biostability conferred by the dry state, was already determined in principle by the time of Spallanzani in the late 18th century. Most modern research on anhydrobiosis has emphasized the importance of the non-reducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose, one or other sugar being present at high concentrations during desiccation of anhydrobiotic nematodes, brine shrimp cysts, bakers' yeast, resurrection plants and plant seeds. These sugars are proposed to act as water replacement molecules, and as thermodynamic and kinetic stabilizers of biomolecules and membranes. In apparent contradiction of the prevailing models, recent experiments from our laboratory show that bdelloid rotifers undergo anhydrobiosis without producing trehalose or any analogous molecule. This has prompted us to critically re-examine the association of disaccharides with anhydrobiosis in the literature. Surprisingly, current hypotheses are based almost entirely on in vitro data: there is very limited information which is more than simply correlative in the literature on living systems. In many species, disaccharide accumulation occurs at approximately the same time as desiccation tolerance is acquired. However, several studies indicate that these sugars are not sufficient for anhydrobiosis; furthermore, there is no conclusive evidence, through mutagenesis or functional knockout experiments, for example, that sugars are necessary for anhydrobiosis. Indeed, some plant seeds and micro-organisms, like the rotifer, exhibit excellent desiccation tolerance in the absence of high intracellular sugar concentrations. Accordingly, it seems appropriate to call for a re-evaluation of our understanding of anhydrobiosis and to embark on new experimental programmes to determine the key molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:14561331

  15. Reappraisal of inhibition and summation with a single conditioning stimulus in man.

    PubMed

    Saihara, S; Inoue, H; Toda, I; Usui, M; Sugimoto, T

    1990-02-01

    A noncapturing conditioning stimulus is known to exert inhibitory effect on a subsequent suprathreshold stimulus, while summation occurs rarely in man. The present study was conducted to revaluate whether conditioning stimulus at a relatively low intensity produced inhibition and summation in man. Thirteen patients with various arrhythmias, 47 +/- 19 years old, were studied. Basic ventricular driving stimuli (S1S1 = 600 msec), a conditioning stimulus (Sc), and extrastimulus (S2) were introduced from a catheter electrode. Sc at an intensity of twice the late diastolic threshold inhibited suprathreshold S2 from evoking a response in all 13 patients. The ScS2 interval producing inhibition was from 11 +/- 4 to 38 +/- 26 msec. When Sc preceded S2 by 5 msec, effective refractory period was shortened by 16 +/- 7 msec in 7 of 13 patients, a phenomenon of summation. The present study demonstrates that inhibition and summation are common phenomena with a single conditioning stimulus at relatively low intensities.

  16. Reappraisal of the Trophic Ecology of One of the World's Most Threatened Spheniscids, the African Penguin.

    PubMed

    Connan, Maëlle; Hofmeyr, G J Greg; Pistorius, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of seabirds, including the only penguin species breeding on the African continent, are threatened with extinction. The world population of the endangered African penguin Spheniscus demersus has decreased from more than 1.5 million individuals in the early 1900s to c.a. 23 000 pairs in 2013. Determining the trophic interactions of species, especially those of conservation concern, is important when declining numbers are thought to be driven by food limitation. By and large, African penguin dietary studies have relied on the identification of prey remains from stomach contents. Despite all the advantages of this method, it has well known biases. We therefore assessed the African penguin's diet, using stable isotopes, at two colonies in Algoa Bay (south-east coast of South Africa). These represent over 50% of the world population. Various samples (blood, feathers, egg membranes) were collected for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses. Results indicate that the trophic ecology of African penguins is influenced by colony, season and age class, but not adult sex. Isotopic niches identified by standard Bayesian ellipse areas and convex hulls, highlighted differences among groups and variability among individual penguins. Using Bayesian mixing models it was for the first time shown that adults target chokka squid Loligo reynaudii for self-provisioning during particular stages of their annual cycle, while concurrently feeding their chicks primarily with small pelagic fish. This has important ramifications and means that not only pelagic fish, but also squid stocks, need to be carefully managed in order to allow population recovery of African penguin. PMID:27434061

  17. Aviation-related respiratory gas disturbances affect dark adaptation: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Desmond M; Hosking, Sarah L

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the time course of early scotopic threshold sensitivity during dark adaptation under mild to moderate hypoxia, moderate hypocapnia and hyperoxia, measuring detection time displacement relative to normoxia. Cone rod inflection and early rod adaptation were highlighted using progressively dimmer green flash stimuli. Early scotopic sensitivity was significantly delayed by hypoxia and hastened by hypocapnia and hyperoxia. Effects of respiratory disturbance on dark adaptation include temporal shifts of early scotopic sensitivity while human rod photoreceptors appear functionally hypoxic when breathing air at one atmosphere. At night, supplementary oxygen may benefit aircrew visual sensitivity, even at ground level. PMID:16375944

  18. The Edwin Smith papyrus: a clinical reappraisal of the oldest known document on spinal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M.; Burridge, Alwyn L.

    2010-01-01

    Dating from the seventeenth century b.c. the Edwin Smith papyrus is a unique treatise containing the oldest known descriptions of signs and symptoms of injuries of the spinal column and spinal cord. Based on a recent “medically based translation” of the Smith papyrus, its enclosed treasures in diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic reasoning are revisited. Although patient demographics, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic options considerably changed over time, the documented rationale on spinal injuries can still be regarded as the state-of-the-art reasoning for modern clinical practice. PMID:20697750

  19. A Multidimensional Reappraisal of Language in Autism: Insights from a Discourse Analytic Study.

    PubMed

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we leverage theoretical insights and methodological guidelines of discourse analytic scholarship to re-examine language phenomena typically associated with autism. Through empirical analysis of the verbal behavior of three children with autism, we engage the question of how prototypical features of autistic language-notably pronoun atypicality, pragmatic deficit, and echolalia-might conceal competencies and interactional processes that are largely invisible in mainstream research. Our findings offer a complex picture of children with autism in their use of language to communicate, interact and experience others. Such a picture also deepens our understanding of the interactional underpinnings of autistic children's speech. Finally, we describe how our findings offer fruitful suggestions for clinical intervention. PMID:26701673

  20. A Reappraisal of the Mechanism by Which Plant Sterols Promote Neutral Sterol Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brufau, Gemma; Kuipers, Folkert; Lin, Yuguang; Trautwein, Elke A.; Groen, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary plant sterols (PS) reduce serum total and LDL-cholesterol in hyperlipidemic animal models and in humans. This hypocholesterolemic effect is generally ascribed to inhibition of cholesterol absorption. However, whether this effect fully explains the reported strong induction of neutral sterol excretion upon plant sterol feeding is not known. Recent data demonstrate that the intestine directly mediates plasma cholesterol excretion into feces, i.e., without involvement of the hepato-biliary route. Objective Aim of this study was to determine whether stimulation of fecal neutral sterol loss during PS feeding is (partly) explained by increased intestinal cholesterol excretion and to assess the role of the cholesterol transporter Abcg5/Abcg8 herein. Methods and Results Wild-type mice were fed a control diet or diets enriched with increasing amounts of PS (1%, 2%, 4% or 8%, wt/wt) for two weeks. In addition, Abcg5-/- mice were fed either control or 8% PS diet. PS feeding resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of fractional cholesterol absorption (∼2–7-fold reduction) in wild-type mice and ∼80% reduction in Abcg5-/- mice. Furthermore, PS feeding led to a strong, dose-independent induction of neutral sterol excretion (3.4-fold in wild-types and 2.7-fold in Abcg5-/- mice) without changes in biliary cholesterol secretion. It was calculated that PS feeding stimulated intestinal cholesterol excretion by ∼500% in wild-type mice and by ∼250% in Abcg5-/-. Conclusions Our data indicate that in mice the cholesterol-lowering effects of PS are to a large extent attributable to stimulation of intestinal, non-bile derived, cholesterol excretion. The Abcg5/Abcg8 heterodimer is involved in facilitating this PS-induced flux of cholesterol. PMID:21738715

  1. The use of amalgam in pediatric dentistry: new insights and reappraising the tradition.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Anna B

    2015-01-01

    The debate on amalgam led to its being phased out in some countries. Results of clinical trials report failure rates of amalgams ranging from 12 percent to over 70 percent. Treatment of caries should meet the needs of each particular patient, based on his/her caries risk. In general, for small occlusal lesions, a conservative preventive resin restoration would be more appropriate than the classic Class I amalgam preparation. For proximal lesions, amalgam would be indicated for two-surface Class II preparations that do not extend beyond the line angles of primary teeth. This recommendation might not be appropriate for high-risk patients or restoring primary first molars in children four years old and younger where stainless steel crowns have demonstrated better longevity. Currently, amalgam demonstrates the best clinical success for Class II restorations that extend beyond the proximal line angles of permanent molars. The need to reduce the use of amalgam as a mercury-containing material is inevitable when aiming to reduce environmental contamination. It is important always to praise prevention and constantly search for biologically safe materials regarding health, clinical work, and environment. The purpose of this report was to summarize several factors that affect the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of using dental amalgam in primary teeth.

  2. A Re-Appraisal of the Early Andean Human Remains from Lauricocha in Peru.

    PubMed

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Llamas, Bastien; Lindauer, Susanne; Tomasto-Cagigao, Elsa; Kuzminsky, Susan; Rohland, Nadin; Santos, Fabrício R; Kaulicke, Peter; Valverde, Guido; Richards, Stephen M; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Seidenberg, Verena; Mallick, Swapan; Cooper, Alan; Reich, David; Haak, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of human remains from the Lauricocha cave in the Central Andean highlands in the 1960's provided the first direct evidence for human presence in the high altitude Andes. The skeletons found at this site were ascribed to the Early to Middle Holocene and represented the oldest known population of Western South America, and thus were used in several studies addressing the early population history of the continent. However, later excavations at Lauricocha led to doubts regarding the antiquity of the site. Here, we provide new dating, craniometric, and genetic evidence for this iconic site. We obtained new radiocarbon dates, generated complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear SNP data from five individuals, and re-analyzed the human remains of Lauricocha to revise the initial morphological and craniometric analysis conducted in the 1960's. We show that Lauricocha was indeed occupied in the Early to Middle Holocene but the temporal spread of dates we obtained from the human remains show that they do not qualify as a single contemporaneous population. However, the genetic results from five of the individuals fall within the spectrum of genetic diversity observed in pre-Columbian and modern Native Central American populations.

  3. Reappraisal of field dynamics of motor cortex during self-paced finger movements

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Wasaka, Toshiaki; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2013-01-01

    Background The exact origin of neuronal responses in the human sensorimotor cortex subserving the generation of voluntary movements remains unclear, despite the presence of characteristic but robust waveforms in the records of electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography (MEG). Aims To clarify this fundamental and important problem, we analyzed MEG in more detail using a multidipole model during pulsatile extension of the index finger, and made some important new findings. Results Movement-related cerebral fields (MRCFs) were confirmed over the sensorimotor region contralateral to the movement, consisting of a temporal succession of the first premovement component termed motor field, followed by two or three postmovement components termed movement evoked fields. A source analysis was applied to separately model each of these field components. Equivalent current diploes of all components of MRCFs were estimated to be located in the same precentral motor region, and did not differ with respect to their locations and orientations. The somatosensory evoked fields following median nerve stimulation were used to validate these findings through comparisons of the location and orientation of composite sources with those specified in MRCFs. The sources for the earliest components were evoked in Brodmann's area 3b located lateral to the sources of MRCFs, and those for subsequent components in area 5 and the secondary somatosensory area were located posterior to and inferior to the sources of MRCFs, respectively. Another component peaking at a comparable latency with the area 3b source was identified in the precentral motor region where all sources of MRCFs were located. Conclusion These results suggest that the MRCF waveform reflects a series of responses originating in the precentral motor area. PMID:24363977

  4. A Multidimensional Reappraisal of Language in Autism: Insights from a Discourse Analytic Study.

    PubMed

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we leverage theoretical insights and methodological guidelines of discourse analytic scholarship to re-examine language phenomena typically associated with autism. Through empirical analysis of the verbal behavior of three children with autism, we engage the question of how prototypical features of autistic language-notably pronoun atypicality, pragmatic deficit, and echolalia-might conceal competencies and interactional processes that are largely invisible in mainstream research. Our findings offer a complex picture of children with autism in their use of language to communicate, interact and experience others. Such a picture also deepens our understanding of the interactional underpinnings of autistic children's speech. Finally, we describe how our findings offer fruitful suggestions for clinical intervention.

  5. Critical reappraisal of primary osseous composite sarcoma (malignant mesenchymoma) - analysis of four cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis T C

    2016-06-01

    In accordance with recent terminology, it is proposed that malignant mesenchymoma should be renamed 'composite sarcoma' and defined as 'a sarcoma composed of two or more cellular types each of which is sufficiently differentiated to permit clear recognition of its histogenetic type microscopically, immunohistochemically or ultrastructurally; excluding fibrosarcomatous and high-grade pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcomatous component, dedifferentiated sarcoma and the combination of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma which is regarded as a single histogenetic type'. Four cases of primary osseous composite sarcoma (POCS) were identified among 928 primary bone sarcomas. Their age ranged from 10 to 87 years, peak incidence in the second decade with equal sex distribution. Most presented with pain, commonest in the knee, affecting the metaphysis, appearing radiologically as expansile infiltrative osteolytic lesions with cortical erosion, periosteal reaction, variable extent of osteoblastic areas and soft tissue extension. All contained variable amounts of conventional high-grade osteosarcoma with or without chondrosarcoma component; the other constituents were liposarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. In all cases, Ki67 proliferative index was over 35%, there was no CDK4 and MDM2 amplification. The absence of low-grade component supported the de novo origin of POCS rather than derivation from divergent dedifferentiation. The two older patients with hitherto undescribed osteoleiomyosarcoma died 2 and 10 months after operation, whereas the two younger with osteorhabdomyosarcoma and osteoliposarcoma enjoyed disease-free survival at 16 and 6 years after chemotherapy despite the latter showing lung metastasis at presentation. Identification of the different lines of differentiation together with their approximate amounts and histological grades is therefore mandatory for POCS as multi-agent chemotherapy catered for each sarcoma component might offer hope for long-term disease-free survival. PMID:27102568

  6. A taxonomic and phylogenetic re-appraisal of the genus Curvularia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species of Curvularia are important plant and human pathogens worldwide. In this study, the genus Curvularia is re-assessed based on molecular phylogenetic analysis and morphological observations of available isolates and specimens. A multi-gene phylogenetic tree inferred from ITS, TEF and GPDH gene...

  7. A reappraisal of the risks and benefits of treating to target with cholesterol lowering drugs.

    PubMed

    Alla, Venkata M; Agrawal, Vrinda; DeNazareth, Andrew; Mohiuddin, Syed; Ravilla, Sudha; Rendell, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death globally, and lipid modification, particularly lowering of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), is one of the cornerstones of prevention and treatment. However, even after lowering of LDLc to conventional goals, a sizeable number of patients continue to suffer cardiovascular events. More aggressive lowering of LDLc and optimization of other lipid parameters like triglycerides (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) have been proposed as two potential strategies to address this residual risk. These strategies entail use of maximal doses of highly potent HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and combination therapy with other lipid modifying agents. Though statins in general are fairly well tolerated, adverse events like myopathy are dose related. There are further risks with combination therapy. In this article, we review the adverse effects of lipid modifying agents used alone and in combination and weigh these effects against the evidence demonstrating their efficacy in reducing cardiovascular events, cardiovascular mortality, and all cause mortality. For patients with established CVD, statins are the only group of drugs that have shown consistent reductions in hard outcomes. Though more aggressive lipid lowering with high dose potent statins can reduce rates of non fatal events and need for interventions, the incremental mortality benefits remain unclear, and their use is associated with a higher rate of drug related adverse effects. Myopathy and renal events have been a significant concern with the use of high potency statin drugs, in particular simvastatin and rosuvastatin. For patients who have not reached target LDL levels or have residual lipid abnormalities on maximal doses of statins, the addition of other agents has not been shown to improve clinical outcomes and carries an increased risk of adverse events. The clinical benefits of drugs to raise HDLc remain unproven. In patients without known cardiovascular disease, there is conflicting evidence as to the benefits of aggressive pursuit of numerical lipid targets, particularly with respect to all cause mortality. Certainly, in statin intolerant patients, alternative agents with a low side effect profile are desirable. Bile acid sequestrants are an effective and safe choice for decreasing LDLc, and omega-3 fatty acids are safe agents to decrease TG. There remains an obvious need to design and carry out large scale studies to help determine which agents, when combined with statins, have the greatest benefit on cardiovascular disease with the least added risk. These studies should be designed to assess the impact on clinical outcomes rather than surrogate endpoints, and require a comprehensive assessment and reporting of safety outcomes. PMID:23754124

  8. Plausibility Reappraisals and Shifts in Middle School Students' Climate Change Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Doug; Sinatra, Gale M.; Nussbaum, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Plausibility is a central but under-examined topic in conceptual change research. Climate change is an important socio-scientific topic; however, many view human-induced climate change as implausible. When learning about climate change, students need to make plausibility judgments but they may not be sufficiently critical or reflective. The…

  9. Plaque and systemic disease: a reappraisal of the focal infection concept.

    PubMed

    Thoden van Velzen, S K; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Moorer, W R

    1984-04-01

    The review presented here covers metastatic local and systemic disease secondary to the accumulation of plaque or the formation of other pathogenic microbial depots in the mouth. At least 3 pathways may link oral infection to secondary disease, to wit metastatic infection due to transient bacteremia, metastatic immunological injury, and metastatic toxic injury. The available evidence is presented and examples are provided. They concern among others such divergent diseases as acute bacterial myocarditis, infective endocarditis, brain abscess, uveitis and iridocyclitis, trigeminal and atypical facial neuralgia, unilateral facial paralysis, fever of "unknown' origin, and neutrophil dysfunction.

  10. Sequential developmental programmes for retractor muscles of a caenogastropod: reappraisal of evolutionary homologues

    PubMed Central

    Page, L. R.

    1998-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in the development of shell-attached retractor muscles in gastropods are of fundamental importance to theories about the early evolution and subsequent diversification of this molluscan class. Development of the shell-attached retractor muscle (columellar muscle) in a caenogastropod has been studied at the ultrastructural level to test the hypothesis of homology with the post-torsional left retractor muscle (larval velar retractor) in vetigastropod larvae. The vetigastropod muscle has been implicated in the generation of ontogenetic torsion, a morphogenetic twist between body regions that is important to theories about early gastropod evolution. Two shell-attached retractor muscles develop sequentially in the caenogastropod, Polinices lewisii, which is a pattern that has been also identified in previous ultrastructural studies on a vetigastropod and several nudibranch gastropods. The pattern may be a basal and conserved characteristic of gastropods. I found that the first-formed retractor in larvae of P. lewisii is comparable to the larval velar retractor that exists at the time of ontogenetic torsion in the vetigastropod, Haliotis kamtschatkana. However, the post-metamorphic columellar muscle of P. lewisii is derived exclusively from part of the second-formed muscle, which is comparable to the second-formed pedal muscle system in the vetigastropod. I conclude that the post-metamorphic columellar muscle of P. lewisii, is not homologous to the larval velar retractor of the vetigastropod, H. kamtschatkana.

  11. A Re-Appraisal of the Early Andean Human Remains from Lauricocha in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminsky, Susan; Rohland, Nadin; Santos, Fabrício R.; Kaulicke, Peter; Valverde, Guido; Richards, Stephen M.; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Seidenberg, Verena; Mallick, Swapan; Cooper, Alan; Reich, David; Haak, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of human remains from the Lauricocha cave in the Central Andean highlands in the 1960’s provided the first direct evidence for human presence in the high altitude Andes. The skeletons found at this site were ascribed to the Early to Middle Holocene and represented the oldest known population of Western South America, and thus were used in several studies addressing the early population history of the continent. However, later excavations at Lauricocha led to doubts regarding the antiquity of the site. Here, we provide new dating, craniometric, and genetic evidence for this iconic site. We obtained new radiocarbon dates, generated complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear SNP data from five individuals, and re-analyzed the human remains of Lauricocha to revise the initial morphological and craniometric analysis conducted in the 1960’s. We show that Lauricocha was indeed occupied in the Early to Middle Holocene but the temporal spread of dates we obtained from the human remains show that they do not qualify as a single contemporaneous population. However, the genetic results from five of the individuals fall within the spectrum of genetic diversity observed in pre-Columbian and modern Native Central American populations. PMID:26061688

  12. Chaos Theory and Its Application to Vocational Counseling: A Critical Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Andrew L.

    1997-01-01

    Chaos theory is critically examined from the perspective of the philosophy of science. Chaos theory is summarized and related to the principle distinctions of scientific methodology. The relationship of worldviews, values and scientific theory is discussed. Conceptual and terminological issues are clarified; usefulness in counseling is discussed.…

  13. A reappraisal of the uncanny valley: categorical perception or frequency-based sensitization?

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, Tyler J.; Schoenherr, Jordan R.

    2015-01-01

    The uncanny valley (UCV) hypothesis describes a non-linear relationship between perceived human-likeness and affective response. The “uncanny valley” refers to an intermediate level of human-likeness that is associated with strong negative affect. Recent studies have suggested that the uncanny valley might result from the categorical perception of human-like stimuli during identification. When presented with stimuli sharing human-like traits, participants attempt to segment the continuum in “human” and “non-human” categories. Due to the ambiguity of stimuli located at a category boundary, categorization difficulty gives rise to a strong, negative affective response. Importantly, researchers who have studied the UCV in terms of categorical perception have focused on categorization responses rather than affective ratings. In the present study, we examined whether the negative affect associated with the UCV might be explained in terms of an individual's degree of exposure to stimuli. In two experiments, we tested a frequency-based model against a categorical perception model using a category-learning paradigm. We manipulated the frequency of exemplars that were presented to participants from two categories during a training phase. We then examined categorization and affective responses functions, as well as the relationship between categorization and affective responses. Supporting previous findings, categorization responses suggested that participants acquired novel category structures that reflected a category boundary. These category structures appeared to influence affective ratings of eeriness. Crucially, participants' ratings of eeriness were additionally affected by exemplar frequency. Taken together, these findings suggest that the UCV is determined by both categorical properties as well as the frequency of individual exemplars retained in memory. PMID:25653623

  14. Epilepsy and seizure classification in 63 dogs: a reappraisal of veterinary epilepsy terminology.

    PubMed

    Berendt, M; Gram, L

    1999-01-01

    The human definitions of epilepsy and seizure classification were applied rigidly to epileptic dogs to investigate whether the distribution of the seizure types and epilepsies of dogs is comparable to that of human beings. Sixty-three dogs were referred because of recurrent (> 2) epileptic seizures. Only dogs without previous or ongoing antiepileptic treatment were included. All dogs had a physical and neurologic examination and blood work that included a CBC and a biochemical profile. All owners were asked to complete a questionnaire, focusing on seizure development. In addition, video recordings of suspected seizure episodes were analyzed if available. In the majority of dogs where an intracranial lesion was suspected, a computerized tomography scan was performed. Sixty-five percent of the dogs experienced partial seizures with or without secondary generalization and 32% exhibited primary generalized seizures; in 3% of the dogs the seizures could not be classified. Twenty-five percent of these cases were classified as idiopathic, 16% as symptomatic, and 45% as cryptogenic epilepsy; in 14% of these a classification was not possible. Applying human definitions, the distribution of seizure types and epilepsy classifications in these dogs differed widely from those in previous reports of canine epilepsy, where generalized seizures and idiopathic epilepsy were most frequently reported. However, our findings are consistent with the results of several large studies of human epilepsy patients. In dogs with epilepsy, closer attention must be given to the detection of a partial onset of seizures. In this study, detailed questioning of the owners and when possible analysis of video recorded seizures, proved to be sufficient for diagnosing seizures with a partial onset in a significant number of dogs. Partial onset of seizures may be an indication of underlying cerebral pathology. Some adjustments of veterinary epilepsy terminology are suggested.

  15. The Angola-Gabon rifted margin: reappraisal of the upper- and lower-plate concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron-Pinvidic, Gwenn; Manatschal, Gianreto; Masini, Emmanuel; Sutra, Emilie; Flament, Jean Marie; Haupert, Isabelle; Unternehr, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we summarize observations from the South Atlantic Angola-Gabon rifted margin. Our study is based on interpretation of a selection of deep penetration depth migrated seismic reflection profiles. We describe the dip architecture of the margin under five structural domains (proximal, necking, distal, outer and oceanic), listing their characteristics. We further explain the necking domain and discuss the architecture of the distal domain as a combination of hyper-extended crust and exhumed mantle. The mapping and characterization of these domains permit to illustrate the along strike structural and stratigraphic variability of the margin. We interpret this variability as the result of a shift from an upper-plate setting (central segment, South Congo to North Angola) to lower-plate settings (southward with the inner Kwanza Basin, and northward with the Gabon Basin). The transfer from one setting to the other is either sharp, typified by a major regional normal fault on the northern flank of a (residual) H-block, identified offshore Cabinda-Zaire, or more diffuse southward. First order screening of conjugate profiles confirmed the segmentation and the structural characteristics of the transfer zones. The studied dataset also permitted identifying key sections that can be considered as type-examples of upper-plate and lower-plate settings, what permits us reviewing the characteristics of upper- and lower-plate rifted margins.

  16. A re-appraisal of nunatak survival in arctic-alpine phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Schönswetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A long standing and at times fervid debate in biogeography revolves around the question whether arctic and high alpine organisms survived Pleistocene ice ages on small island-like areas protruding above the ice-sheet, socalled nunataks, or whether they did so in peripheral nonglaciated refugial areas. A common picture emerging from a plethora of molecular phylogeographic studies in the last decade is that both in the Arctic and in temperate mountain ranges such as the European Alps nunatak survival needs to be only rarely invoked to explain observed genetic patterns (for a rare example see Stehlik et al. 2002). As two studies in this issue show, depreciation of the nunatak hypothesis is, however, not warranted. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Westergaard et al. (2011) investigate genetic patterns of two arctic-alpine plant species distributed on both sides of the Atlantic exclusively in areas that were mostly covered by ice-sheets during Pleistocene glacial advances. In both species, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data identified divergent and partly genetically diverse groups east and west of the Atlantic. This suggests, for the first time in Arctic plants, in situ survival on nunataks. In an entirely different geographic setting and on a different geographic scale, Lohse et al. (2011, this issue) study the colonization of high alpine areas in the Orobian Alps, situated within and adjacent to a prominent peripheral refugial area (massif de refuge) in the Southern Alps of northern Italy, by dispersal-limited carabid ground beetles. Using explicit hypothesis testing and inference of ancestral locations in a Bayesian framework, stepwise colonization from two separate southern refugia is found to shape the genetic pattern of these beetles, but at the northern edge, populations survived at least parts of the last glaciation in situ on nunataks. PMID:21265053

  17. Reappraising the Relationships between Physics Students' Mental Models and Predictions: An Example of Heat Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guo-Li

    2013-01-01

    Although prediction is claimed to be a prime function of mental models, to what extent students can run their mental models to make predictions of physical phenomena remains uncertain. The purpose of this study, therefore, was first to investigate 30 physics students' mental models of heat convection, and then to examine the relationship between…

  18. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section in pregnant women with fetal distress: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, J M; Olajumoke, T O; Esangbedo, S E; Edomwonyi, N P

    2014-06-01

    Residents' competency-based training and multidisciplinary cooperation are needed for rapid sequence spinal anaesthesia for fetal distress. Multiple standard but 'crash' spinal anaesthesia for non-obstetric procedures is imperative for acquisition of experienced hands. The purpose of this review is to share our modest experiences in the use of rapid spinal anaesthesia for emergency Caesarean delivery in pregnant women complicated with fetal distress. Fetal distress diagnosis is made promtly, intravenous line put in place in labour ward. Pre-loading or not, one-touch, non-touch spinal technique prevents unnecessary delay and further fetal hypoxic injury. Spinal pack is on stand by in the operating room at all time. Preloading is possible during the waiting period for other care providers otherwise coloading is used. A single wipe of the back with chlorhexidine lotion is frequently used for scrubbing. Lidocaine infiltration or spay is essential and does not waste time but opioid as adjuvant to bupivacaine wastes a lot of time to constitute and measure. So, opioid should be avoided. Average of 2.5 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine is frequently used in our centres. Surgery starts almost immediately after cleaning and drapping of the patient by the obstetrician. Ephedrine is made handy and constituted in case there is hypotension which fluid alone cannot treat.

  19. A Reappraisal of the Purported Gastric Pellet with Pterosaurian Bones from the Upper Triassic of Italy.

    PubMed

    Holgado, Borja; Dalla Vecchia, Fabio Marco; Fortuny, Josep; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    A small accumulation of bones from the Norian (Upper Triassic) of the Seazza Brook Valley (Carnic Prealps, Northern Italy) was originally (1989) identified as a gastric pellet made of pterosaur skeletal elements. The specimen has been reported in literature as one of the very few cases of gastric ejecta containing pterosaur bones since then. However, the detailed analysis of the bones preserved in the pellet, their study by X-ray microCT, and the comparison with those of basal pterosaurs do not support a referral to the Pterosauria. Comparison with the osteology of a large sample of Middle-Late Triassic reptiles shows some affinity with the protorosaurians, mainly with Langobardisaurus pandolfii that was found in the same formation as the pellet. However, differences with this species suggest that the bones belong to a similar but distinct taxon. The interpretation as a gastric pellet is confirmed.

  20. Efficacy of rational emotive therapy (RET) with children: a critical re-appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gossette, R L; O'Brien, R M

    1993-03-01

    Proponents of rational-emotive therapy (RET) advocate its use within the school curriculum to forestall future maladjustment through the early detection and eradication of irrational beliefs. A review of 33 unpublished dissertations and four published reports found RET effective in about 25% of comparisons with wait-list, placebo, and other treatment conditions. The major effects of RET were changes in scores on self-report measures of irrational beliefs, less on emotional distress, and little or no change in behavior; essentially the same pattern of effects previously found in a similar analysis of RET in adult populations. Little justification was found for continued use of RET in schools.

  1. Rural Development: Patchwork of Federal Programs Needs To Be Reappraised. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    This report identifies factors that influence a rural area's economic success or failure, and evaluates whether federal programs efficiently address rural economic problems. Data collection included a review of federal programs that provide funding to rural areas, and interviews with federal and state agency officials involved with rural…

  2. Familial renal glycosuria: a genetic reappraisal of hexose transport by kidney and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Elsas, Louis J.; Rosenberg, Leon E.

    1969-01-01

    Renal glucose titration studies were carried out in 10 members of two pedigrees with familial renal glycosuria to test the accepted hypothesis of autosomal dominant inheritance and to investigate the genetic significance of “type A” and “type B” renal glycosuria. In one family, a brother and sister each had a moderately reduced threshold and tubular maximum for glucose (type A), but both of their parents reabsorbed glucose normally. In the second family, two brothers had severe type A renal glycosuria, their mother and one brother had a mild type A defect, and another brother demonstrated a reduced threshold, an exaggerated splay, and a normal tubular maximum, indicative of type B glycosuria. Hexose transport by intestinal mucosa was also investigated in controls and in the three brothers with the most severe renal glycosuria. D-glucose-14C and 3-O-methylglucose-14C were accumulated by jejunal mucosa from controls by processes which were saturable and concentrative. No differences in hexose transport were observed in the patients with renal glycosuria. We conclude that familial renal glycosuria can be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; that mild and severe type A renal glycosuria and type B renal glycosuria can occur in the same pedigree; and that defective reabsorption of glucose by the kidney need not be accompanied by abnormalities in intestinal glucose transport. These findings indicate that glucose transport in the gut and kidney are not mediated by identical mechanisms, and that several different mutations are responsible for the phenotypic variability in familial renal glycosuria. PMID:5822589

  3. Mechanistic reappraisal of early stage photochemistry in the light-driven enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Derren J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Mansell, David; Gardiner, John M; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2012-01-01

    The light-driven enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) to chlorophyllide (Chlide). This reaction is a key step in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll. Ultrafast photochemical processes within the Pchlide molecule are required for catalysis and previous studies have suggested that a short-lived excited-state species, known as I675*, is the first catalytic intermediate in the reaction and is essential for capturing excitation energy to drive subsequent hydride and proton transfers. The chemical nature of the I675* excited state species and its role in catalysis are not known. Here, we report time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy measurements to study the involvement of the I675* intermediate in POR photochemistry. We show that I675* is not unique to the POR-catalyzed photoreduction of Pchlide as it is also formed in the absence of the POR enzyme. The I675* species is only produced in samples that contain both Pchlide substrate and Chlide product and its formation is dependent on the pump excitation wavelength. The rate of formation and the quantum yield is maximized in 50∶50 mixtures of the two pigments (Pchlide and Chlide) and is caused by direct energy transfer between Pchlide and neighboring Chlide molecules, which is inhibited in the polar solvent methanol. Consequently, we have re-evaluated the mechanism for early stage photochemistry in the light-driven reduction of Pchlide and propose that I675* represents an excited state species formed in Pchlide-Chlide dimers, possibly an excimer. Contrary to previous reports, we conclude that this excited state species has no direct mechanistic relevance to the POR-catalyzed reduction of Pchlide.

  4. Is This Trip Necessary? Needs Assessment: A Personal Memoir and Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Belle Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Continuing an earlier historical review of educational needs assessment (ENA) in the United States, this article considers certain criticisms of ENA in light of basic assumptions about the process; the relationship between ENA theories and practices; and their impact on schools and students. ENA's role in educational planning and renewal is also…

  5. Peace Education in the Nineties: A Reappraisal of Values and Options. Peace Education Miniprints No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vriens, Lennart

    Current efforts towards peace education in Europe and the potential barriers to those efforts need to be understood in the context of the political history of the continent and prior discussion on peace education itself. Beginning with a brief overview of the political situation in Europe at the beginning of the 1990s, some concepts of peace…

  6. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP 3-year and first MINOS results

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2007-03-01

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and nonoscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2{sigma}) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses {sigma} ranging from {approx}2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to {approx}0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2{sigma}, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter {sigma}{sub 8}. We show how the partial degeneracy between {sigma} and {sigma}{sub 8} in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of {sigma}{sub 8} pushes the upper bound of {sigma} in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  7. Comments on the diphoton excess: critical reappraisal of effective field theory interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenik, Jernej F.; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Soreq, Yotam; Zupan, Jure

    2016-07-01

    We consider the diphoton excess observed by ATLAS and CMS using the most up-to-date data and estimate the preferred enhancement in the production rate between 8 TeV and 13 TeV. Within the framework of effective field theory (EFT), we then show that for both spin-0 and spin-2 Standard Model (SM) gauge-singlet resonances, two of the three processes S → ZZ, S → Zγ, and S → W W must occur with a non-zero rate. Moreover, we demonstrate that these branching ratios are highly correlated in the EFT. Couplings of S to additional SM states may be constrained and differentiated by comparing the S production rates with and without the vector-boson fusion (VBF) cuts. We find that for a given VBF to inclusive production ratio there is maximum rate of S to gauge bosons, boverline{b} , and lighter quark anti-quark pairs. Simultaneous measurements of the width and the VBF ratio may be able to point towards the existence of hidden decays.

  8. Earth is (mostly) flat: Apportionment of continental mass flux over millennial time scales. A reappraisal (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J.; Codilean, A. T.; Kirchner, J. W.; McElroy, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Mountainous topography only occupies a small fraction of the Earth's surface (Fig.1) and understanding natural rates of erosion in the more gently sloping terrains, making up around 90% of Earth's continental area, is critical for understanding how such areas have been transformed by human activities. In expansive, flat areas, modest rates of chemical weathering lead to gross denudation rates taking place even in zones of sediment accumulation[1]. We cite previously published denudation estimates from cosmogenic nuclides[2], which measure total mass loss. Such measurements circumvent problems with noise inherent in other short-term measurements, but introduce other issues related to extrapolating outside measured data ranges. These cosmogenic nuclide-derived rates allow us to calculate the apportionment and the sum of mass flux from Earth by extrapolation of a statistically significant correlation between denudation rates and basin slopes to watersheds without denudation rate data. We will present updates to our past results[1] (Fig. 2) using a new topographic dataset, which illustrates the critical impact of grid size on slope. We find that non-mountainous areas contribute a significant proportion of the total fluxes (Fig. 1) though the total fluxes are split almost evenly between the steepest 10% of topography and the rest of the continental land mass. [1] Bouchez, J., et al. 2012. Chemical Geology, v. 332-333, p. 166-184. [2] Willenbring, J.K., et al. 2013, Geology, v. 41, p. 343-346. Figure 1. Global slopes (GMTED 250 m) of the Earth. Legend indicates area these slopes make up and the apportionment of fluxes from those areas. Figure 2. Q-Q plot of the areal contributions of mass fluxes from the Earth's variably sloped continents.

  9. The "bicameral mind" 30 years on: a critical reappraisal of Julian Jaynes' hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio; Trimble, Michael; Cinti, Federico; Monaco, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In 1976 Julian Jaynes published his controversial book The Origins of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, introducing the hypothesis of a two-chambered brain-mind model that preceded the evolutionary development of the conscious mind. Jaynes' speculative model gave rise to a huge debate, which has reverberated throughout the current neuroscientific and neurophilosophical literature. Has the bicameral mind stood the test of time? To answer this question, the present paper adopts a multidisciplinary perspective and, after briefly summarizing Jaynes' hypothesis, addresses two main critical issues: the neurological basis of the bicameral model and the philological accuracy of Jaynes' arguments. Finally, the concept of a non-unitary Self is presented as one of the most relevant contemporary legacies of the bicameral mind.

  10. Vulval and Vaginal Rhabdomyosarcoma in Children: Update and Reappraisal of Institut Gustave Roussy Brachytherapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, Nicolas; Oberlin, Odile; Martelli, Helene; Gerbaulet, Alain; Chassagne, Daniel; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the Institut Gustave Roussy brachytherapy (BT) experience in the management of vulval and vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma with special emphasis on long-term outcome. Patients and Methods: Between 1971 and 2005, the data concerning 39 girls who had undergone BT as a part of their treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 39 girls, 20 had been treated before 1990, when the BT volume encompassed the initial tumor extension. After 1990, only residual disease was included in the BT volume. Side effects were classified using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The median age was 16.3 months at diagnosis. Vaginal or vulvar rhabdomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 26 and 6 patients, respectively. The median follow-up was 8.4 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was 91%. Of the 39 patients, 6 developed a relapse. Of the 20 patients treated before 1990, 6 experienced Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms and 75% developed sequelae, in the form of vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Four patients received follow-up treatment for psychological disorders. Of the 19 patients treated after 1990, 2 developed acute side effects, with maximal Grade 1-2 renal/genitourinary function symptoms, and 20% developed vaginal or urethral sclerosis or stenosis. Two cases of psychological disturbances were also documented. Conclusion: Reducing the BT volume coverage, better indications for surgery, and more efficient chemotherapy, all combined within a multidisciplinary approach, tended to improve results in terms of both survival and long-term sequelae.

  11. Epidemiologic and clinical impact of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  12. Reappraisal of the clinical use of leflunomide in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter BB; White, Douglas HN

    2010-01-01

    Leflunomide is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) that has been in routine clinical use for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis for a decade. In RA, clinical trials of up to two years’ duration showed that leflunomide monotherapy was equivalent to methotrexate in clinical and radiographic disease outcomes (tender and swollen joint counts, physician and patient global assessments, American College of Rheumatology and Disease Activity Score responses, slowing or halting of radiographic progression). In a number of studies, quality of life measurements indicated that leflunomide is superior to methotrexate. Leflunomide has been studied in combination with methotrexate and shows efficacy in patients only partly responsive to this agent. Recent trials have shown that leflunomide can be used safely with biologic DMARDs, including antitumor necrosis factor agents and rituximab as part of the treatment algorithm in place of methotrexate as a cotherapy. Leflunomide has demonstrated efficacy as a monotherapy in psoriatic arthritis, and it also has a beneficial effect in psoriasis. Postmarketing studies have shown that retention on treatment with leflunomide is equal to methotrexate and superior to other DMARDs. In general, its side effect profile is acceptable compared with other DMARDS, with nausea, diarrhea, and hair fall occurring commonly, but only rarely leading to discontinuation. Liver toxicity is the most significant problem in clinical use although it is uncommon. Peripheral neuropathy, hypertension, pneumonitis, and cytopenia occur more rarely. Leflunomide is contraindicated in pregnancy and should be used with caution in women during child-bearing years. In this review, the place of leflunomide in therapy is discussed and practical advice informed by evidence is given regarding dosing regimens, safety monitoring, and managing side effects. Leflunomide remains one of the most useful of the nonbiologic DMARDs.

  13. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    PubMed Central

    De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hoogland, Tycho M.

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell (BG) of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the BG in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum. PMID:26190972

  14. Comparison and reappraisal of carbon electrodes for the voltammetric detection of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; Tan, Sze-yin; Miller, Thomas S; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-12-17

    The electro-oxidation of dopamine (DA) is investigated on the unmodified surfaces of five different classes of carbon electrodes: glassy carbon (GC), oxygen-terminated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (pBDD), edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPPG), basal plane pyrolytic graphite (BPPG), and the basal surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), encompassing five distinct grades with step edge density and coverage varying by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Surfaces were prepared carefully and characterized by a range of techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Although pBDD was found to be the least susceptible to surface fouling (even at relatively high DA concentrations), the reaction showed sluggish kinetics on this electrode. In contrast, DA electro-oxidation at pristine basal plane HOPG at concentrations ≤100 μM in 0.15 M PBS, pH 7.2, showed fast kinetics and only minor susceptibility toward surface fouling from DA byproducts, although the extent of HOPG surface contamination by oxidation products increased substantially at higher concentrations (with the response similar on all grades, irrespective of step edge coverage). EPPG also showed a fast response, with little indication of passivation with repeated voltammetric cycling but a relatively high background signal due to the high capacitance of this graphite surface termination. Of all five carbon electrode types, freshly cleaved basal plane HOPG showed the clearest signal (distinct from the background) at low concentrations of DA (<10 μM) as a consequence of the low capacitance. Studies of the electrochemical oxidation of DA in the presence of the common interferents ascorbic acid (AA) and serotonin (5-HT), of relevance to neurochemical analysis, showed that the signals for DA were still clearly and easily resolved at basal plane HOPG surfaces. In the presence of AA, repetitive voltammetry caused products of AA electro-oxidation to adsorb onto the HOPG surface, forming a permselective film that allowed the electrochemical oxidation of DA to proceed unimpeded, while greatly inhibiting the electrochemical response of AA itself. The studies presented provide conclusive evidence that the pristine surface of basal plane HOPG is highly active for the detection of DA, irrespective of the step edge density and method of cleavage, and adds to a growing body of evidence that the basal plane of HOPG is a much more active electrode for many classes of electrode reactions than previously believed.

  15. The spectrum of 'new racism' and discrimination in hospital contexts: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2009-01-01

    In keeping with the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, all people have the right to the highest attainable standard of health. Despite the universal right to health, people of minority racial and ethnic backgrounds experience commonplace and significant unjust inequalities in their health and health care. A key reason for this rests on what might be described as 'the illusion of non-racism in health care' -- an illusion that rests on the frequently articulated belief that 'racism is not an issue any more'. Although there has been increasing recognition in recent years that race and racism have a particular, consistent and complex independent negative effect on the health and health care of racial and ethnic minority groups, racism per se still tends to be under-recognised and poorly addressed in health and nursing care domains. In this paper, it is suggested that a key reason racism in health care has been Largely ignored is because of its 'changing face', making new and different forms of it difficult to recognise and manage. A key premise on which this paper rests -- and also its ultimate conclusion -- is that the problem of racism (to be distinguished from 'culturally insensitive' and 'culturally incongruent' care) needs to be unmasked and managed so that those most at risk of being discriminated against on racialised grounds can rest assured that when in need, they will receive the equitable, safe and quality care they are entitled to receive.

  16. A reappraisal of the ileo-rectal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Myrelid, Pär; Øresland, Tom

    2015-06-01

    Colectomy is still frequently required in the care of ulcerative colitis. The most common indications are either non-responding colitis in the emergency setting, chronic active disease, steroid-dependent disease or neoplastic change like dysplasia or cancer. The use of the ileal pouch anal anastomosis has internationally been the gold standard, substituting the rectum with a pouch. Recently the use of the ileorectal anastomosis has increased in frequency as reconstructive method after subtotal colectomy. Data from centres using ileorectal anastomosis have shown the method to be safe, with functionality and risk of failure comparable to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis. The methods have different advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on a number of patient factors and where in life the patient is at time of reconstruction. The ileorectal anastomosis could, together with the Kock continent ileostomy, in selected cases be a complement to the ileal pouch anal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis and should be discussed with the patient before deciding on reconstructive method.

  17. Reappraisal of Regional Growth Charts in the Era of WHO Growth Standards

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    After the WHO Growth Standards (WHOGS) was published in 2006, many countries in the world endorsed and adopted the new growth references as a standard measure for the growth of infants and young children. Certainly, the WHOGS has an impact on the global policy about obesity and underweight in children. Such WHOGS innovation has influenced many regional health authorities and academies, which have managed their own growth charts for a long time, in changing their strategies to develop and use regional growth charts. In Korea, along with the tradition to create a national growth chart every decade, we now face a new era of advancing with the WHOGS. PMID:24224146

  18. A reappraisal of macrophage polarization in glioblastoma: Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, Chiara; Signorelli, Francesco; Vismara, Marco Flavio Michele; Zeppa, Pio; Camastra, Caterina; Barni, Tullio; Donato, Giuseppe; Di Vito, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The survival rate in glioblastoma multiforme patients has scarcely improved in the last decades; however, many new therapeutic strategies have been theorized or developed for these neoplasias. Recently, the inverse correlation observed between patient prognosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) density in solid tumors has encouraged the development of anti-tumor strategies aiming to target TAMs. As expected, TAMs polarization is influenced by both macrophage localization and tumor microenvironment signals, resulting in a more complex scenario than the simple M1/M2 activation status. Macrophage polarization in glioblastoma has not yet been fully elucidated, and most results have been obtained in experimental non-human settings, with some apparent contradiction. The authors performed a histopathological and immunohistochemical study of 37 cases of glioblastoma in order to characterize the M1 and M2 macrophage populations within TAMs. A high prevalence of CD163+ M2-polarized macrophages was detected in this cohort, whereas iNOS+ macrophages were rarely found. The down-regulation of CD68 expression in microglia/macrophage infiltrating glioblastomas is also reported for the first time. Such a finding is associated with a specific location of TAMs within the lesion, as confirmed by the fact that CD68 staining was lower than CD163, mainly in perivascular areas. The authors discuss the recent literature about the global scenario of macrophage plasticity and polarization in glioblastoma, and suggest some pivotal points for therapeutic applications.

  19. Measures of Narcissism and Their Relations to DSM-5 Pathological Traits: A Critical Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua D; Lynam, Donald R; Campbell, W Keith

    2016-02-01

    There exists substantial debate about how to best assess pathological narcissism with a variety of measures designed to assess grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, as well as the DSM-IV and DSM-5 based conceptualizations of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD). Wright and colleagues published correlations between several narcissism measures (Narcissistic Personality Inventory [NPI]; Pathological Narcissism Inventory [PNI]; Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire [PDQ] NPD) with the traits comprising the DSM-5 Section III personality trait model. In the current study, we examine the agreement manifested by Wright and colleagues' narcissism-DSM-5 trait profiles with expert ratings of the DSM-5 traits most relevant to descriptions of DSM-IV NPD. Despite concerns regarding the NPI's ability to measure pathological narcissism, its trait profile was strongly correlated with expert ratings, as was PDQ NPD's profile. Conversely, the trait profiles associated with the PNI were primarily uncorrelated with the expert rated NPD profile. The implications of these findings with regard to the assessment of narcissism are discussed.

  20. Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Obesity: A Meta-analytic Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, David B.; Faith, Myles S.

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis for six weight-loss studies comparing the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) alone to CBT plus hypnotherapy. Notes that "the addition of hypnosis substantially enhanced treatment outcome." Concludes that the addition of hypnosis to CBT for weight loss results in, at most, a small enhancement of treatment outcome. (KW)

  1. The commercialization of human body parts: a reappraisal from a Protestant perspective.

    PubMed

    Torcello, L; Wear, S

    2000-08-01

    The idea of a market in human organs has traditionally met with widespread and emphatic rejection from both secular and religious fronts alike. However, as numerous human beings continue to suffer an uncertain fate on transplant waiting lists, voices are beginning to emerge that are willing at least to explore the option of human organ sales. Anyone who argues for such a option must contend, however, with what seem to be largely emotional rejections of the idea. Often it seems that rebuffs offered on a secular ground are rooted in nothing more than vague discomforts. We suspect that these discomforts are often based in religious sentiments that have wound their way into the fabric of secular America. Therefore, in order to contribute further to those voices heard in favor of human organ sales, it is worthwhile to show that from a religious perspective, it is just as possible to affirm the appropriateness of human organ sales as it is from a secular basis. Since Protestantism has historically had a powerful influence in American society it is a proper starting point for such an investigation. PMID:12171075

  2. Toward a Reappraisal of the Bonds between Emotional Intelligence and Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavinia, Parviz; Ahmadzadeh, Tala

    2012-01-01

    Though several researchers have thus far attempted to address the viable relationship between EI and burnout, it seems that few have approached the notion of burnout by considering the influence of teachers' coping resources such as EI especially in an EFL context. Thus, in an attempt to bridge this gap, the present study sought to explore the…

  3. Reappraisal of the 1887 Ligurian earthquake (western Mediterranean) from macroseismicity, active tectonics and tsunami modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, C.; Scotti, O.; Ioualalen, M.; Hassoun, V.; Migeon, S.

    2012-04-01

    Early in the morning, of February 23, 1887 a major damaging earthquake hit the towns along the Italian and French Riviera. The earthquake was followed by a tsunami wave with a maximum runup of 2 m near Imperia. At least 600 hundred people died, mainly due to building collapses. The "Ligurian earthquake" occurred at the junction between the Southern French-Italian Alps and the Ligurian Basin in the western Mediterranean. For such historical event, the epicentre and the equivalent magnitude are difficult to characterize with a high degree of precision, and the tectonic fault responsible for the earthquake is still debated today. The recent MALISAR marine geophysical survey allowed identifying a set of N60-70°E recent scarps at the foot of the northern Ligurian margin, revealing a large system of active faults. The scarps correspond to cumulative reverse faulting, with a minor strike-slip component, consistent with the present-day kinematics of earthquakes. Since we have also identified submarine failures in the time-range of the Ligurian earthquake we addressed the question of the submarine slide-induced tsunami. Nevertheless, the maximum volume involved by these submarine slides was in the range of 0.005 km3. Such a volume appears too small to trigger a tsunami with the observed extent and run-up characteristics. Therefore, we propose that the rupture of fault segments belonging to the 80 km-long northern Ligurian Faults system is the source of the 1887 Ligurian earthquake. We investigate the macroseismic data from the historical databases SISFRANCE-08 and DBMI-04 using several models of intensity attenuation with distance and focal depth. Modelling results are consistent with the location offshore, indicating an epicentre around 43.70°-43.78°N and 7.81°-8.07°E with a magnitude Mw in the range of 6.3-7.5. A refinement of this range of magnitude is discussed in the light of the tsunami modelling. Numerous earthquake sources scenarios have been tested with hydrographic data (tsunami modelling and observations). The main material used here is the tide gauge record at Genoa harbour. As a result, we present several characteristic source earthquakes scenarios for a shallow strong earthquake occurring below the northern Ligurian margin. This effort indicates that the scenarios of a magnitude Mw of 6.8-6.9 along a reverse N55°E striking fault are the best candidates that could explain the known characteristics of the induced tsunami. The best-fit scenarios correspond equally to a 70°-dipping southward fault plane with Mw 6.8 and to a 16°-dipping northward fault plane with Mw 6.9. Taking into account the geometry of the active faults, the location of the macroseismic epicentre and the morphotectonic evolution of the continental slope, we propose that the 1887 Ligurian earthquake correspond to the reverse faulting of a N55°E striking fault plane dipping to the North with a co-seismic slip of 1.5 m.

  4. The "Basqueness" of the Basques of Alava: a reappraisal from a multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Manzano, C; Orue, J M; de la Rúa, C

    1996-02-01

    The genetic and linguistic peculiarity of the Basque population is well known. Analysis of the studies published to date on the Basque population reveals that these studies refer basically to the provinces of Vizcaya and Labourd, both in the Northern part of the Basque Country. Multidisciplinary information indicates that the landscape differences of the Basque Country could have conditioned differential population biodynamics in the Atlantic and Mediterranean parts of the Basque area. In order to evaluate this possibility, this study focuses on the genetic constitution of the Basque population of Alava (in the South of the Basque Country) through the analysis of several red-cell systems. The data obtained in this genetic study and those from archaeology, linguistics, ethnography, and skeletal biology suggest that within the "Basque population" there may be at least two distinct groups: an "Atlantic" group and a "Mediterranean" one, divided mainly by the watershed. This geographical feature could have led to a greater genetic isolation of the Northern slopes, with the South more open to population contact. This is reflected nowadays in the different cline distribution detected for most systems in the Alava Basques in comparison with other Basque and Iberian Peninsula series studied to date.

  5. Do Mothers and Teens Disagree about Sexual Communication? A Methodological Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Marcela; Smart, Lori A.; Van Horn, Sarah C.; Hohbein, Angela D.; Kline, Jennifer E.; Chan, Wei-Lik

    1999-01-01

    Studied whether parent-teen disagreement in reports of sexual discussions is due to methodological factors in the studies. Analyses of reports from 44 mothers and their 12-to-15-year-old children (18 daughters and 26 sons) support the notion that methodological limitations are partly responsible for lack of congruence in parent-teen reports. (SLD)

  6. Cytogerontology since 1881: a reappraisal of August Weismann and a review of modern progress.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, T B; Cremer, T

    1982-01-01

    Cytogerontology, the science of cellular ageing, originated in 1881 with the prediction by August Weismann that the somatic cells of higher animals have limited division potential. Weismann's prediction was derived by considering the role of natural selection in regulating the duration of an organism's life. For various reasons, Weismann's ideas on ageing fell into neglect following his death in 1914, and cytogerontology has only reappeared as a major research area following the demonstration by Hayflick and Moorhead in the early 1960s that diploid human fibroblasts are restricted to a finite number of divisions in vitro. In this review we give a detailed account of Weismann's theory, and we reveal that his ideas were both more extensive in their scope and more pertinent to current research than is generally recognised. We also appraise the progress which has been made over the past hundred years in investigating the causes of ageing, with particular emphasis being given to (i) the evolution of ageing, and (ii) ageing at the cellular level. We critically assess the current state of knowledge in these areas and recommend a series of points as primary targets for future research. PMID:7042533

  7. Ultraheavy cosmic ray tracks in meteorites: A reappraisal, based on calibrations with relativistic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perron, C.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on tracks of high energy U ions in olivine, a common meteoritic mineral. The results offer an explanation for the lack of success of previous attempts to derive the Ultraheavy Cosmic Ray composition from the study of tracks in meteorites. They also suggest how such experiments should be performed. The methods tested are described and illustrated.

  8. Of mice and men: a critical reappraisal of the two-stage theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iversen, O H

    1995-01-01

    The two-stage theory of carcinogenesis attempts to reduce a very complex set of data to simple terms: it defines a carcinogen as "an agent that causes a neoplasm by a two-step process involving initiation and promotion". The theory has achieved the status of a paradigm, and all new experiments carried out by two-stage supporters are designed according to its premises and therefore will eo ipso tend to confirm it. Popper's dictum that any scientific hypothesis should be put to the strongest test, namely, by trying to refute it, has rarely (or never) been observed. The two-stage theory was originally based on standard mouse skin-painting experiments. All the original work is grounded on classic skin carcinogenesis, and only later was it extended to also comprise carcinogenesis in other organs, thereby becoming a general theory. On the basis of the same standard skin painting experiments and in accordance with Popper's dictum, the present review shows how the following generally accepted corollaries of the two-stage theory have been refuted: initiation must come first in time; in previously initiated mouse skin promotion always leads to a synergistic increase in tumor crop, whereas complete carcinogens at subthreshold does (regarded as merely initiating) have only an additive effect; the reverse experiment is innocuous; there is a qualitative difference between the effect of initiators and that of promoters; initiators only initiate at low dose levels, but abruptly become rather complete carcinogens at higher doses, promotion must take place over a long period, and repeated exposure without prolonged intervals is essential; pure initiators exist, for example, urethane for the epidermis; pure promoters exist, e.g., TPA; skin inflammation and persistent hyperplasia are essential parts of promotion; increased levels of the enzyme ODC followed by increasing levels of polyamines are casually involved in promotion; the appearance of many dark epidermal cells is a sign of promotion and the dark cells are stem cells from which tumors arise. Carcinogenesis is a very complicated process characterized not only by disturbances in cell cycle control, cell differentiation and/or maturation, but also by changes in the normal ability of cells to respect organ and tissue boundaries. Infiltrative growth and metastases are the most dangerous properties of cancer, and the two-stage theory does not provide an explanation for these two most serious aspects of the disease.

  9. A reappraisal of the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Tarter, Jill C; Backus, Peter R; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Backman, Dana E; Basri, Gibor S; Boss, Alan P; Clarke, Andrew; Deming, Drake; Doyle, Laurance R; Feigelson, Eric D; Freund, Friedmann; Grinspoon, David H; Haberle, Robert M; Hauck, Steven A; Heath, Martin J; Henry, Todd J; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L; Joshi, Manoj M; Kilston, Steven; Liu, Michael C; Meikle, Eric; Reid, I Neill; Rothschild, Lynn J; Scalo, John; Segura, Antigona; Tang, Carol M; Tiedje, James M; Turnbull, Margaret C; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weber, Arthur L; Young, Richard E

    2007-02-01

    Stable, hydrogen-burning, M dwarf stars make up about 75% of all stars in the Galaxy. They are extremely long-lived, and because they are much smaller in mass than the Sun (between 0.5 and 0.08 M(Sun)), their temperature and stellar luminosity are low and peaked in the red. We have re-examined what is known at present about the potential for a terrestrial planet forming within, or migrating into, the classic liquid-surface-water habitable zone close to an M dwarf star. Observations of protoplanetary disks suggest that planet-building materials are common around M dwarfs, but N-body simulations differ in their estimations of the likelihood of potentially habitable, wet planets that reside within their habitable zones, which are only about one-fifth to 1/50th of the width of that for a G star. Particularly in light of the claimed detection of the planets with masses as small as 5.5 and 7.5 M(Earth) orbiting M stars, there seems no reason to exclude the possibility of terrestrial planets. Tidally locked synchronous rotation within the narrow habitable zone does not necessarily lead to atmospheric collapse, and active stellar flaring may not be as much of an evolutionarily disadvantageous factor as has previously been supposed. We conclude that M dwarf stars may indeed be viable hosts for planets on which the origin and evolution of life can occur. A number of planetary processes such as cessation of geothermal activity or thermal and nonthermal atmospheric loss processes may limit the duration of planetary habitability to periods far shorter than the extreme lifetime of the M dwarf star. Nevertheless, it makes sense to include M dwarf stars in programs that seek to find habitable worlds and evidence of life. This paper presents the summary conclusions of an interdisciplinary workshop (http://mstars.seti.org) sponsored by the NASA Astrobiology Institute and convened at the SETI Institute.

  10. Reappraising striatal D1- and D2-neurons in reward and aversion.

    PubMed

    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J

    2016-09-01

    The striatum has been involved in complex behaviors such as motor control, learning, decision-making, reward and aversion. The striatum is mainly composed of medium spiny neurons (MSNs), typically divided into those expressing dopamine receptor D1, forming the so-called direct pathway, and those expressing D2 receptor (indirect pathway). For decades it has been proposed that these two populations exhibit opposing control over motor output, and recently, the same dichotomy has been proposed for valenced behaviors. Whereas D1-MSNs mediate reinforcement and reward, D2-MSNs have been associated with punishment and aversion. In this review we will discuss pharmacological, genetic and optogenetic studies that indicate that there is still controversy to what concerns the role of striatal D1- and D2-MSNs in this type of behaviors, highlighting the need to reconsider the early view that they mediate solely opposing aspects of valenced behaviour. PMID:27235078

  11. Reappraising Personal Experience in the Reform of Curriculum in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    The use of personal administrative experiences as bases for thinking about and effecting curricular reform in educational administration is discussed. The purposeful application of individual past experiences is valuable to the reform effort in that it taps a vital resource of individual knowledge and suggests a way of bridging the chasm between…

  12. A Reappraisal of the Purported Gastric Pellet with Pterosaurian Bones from the Upper Triassic of Italy

    PubMed Central

    Holgado, Borja; Dalla Vecchia, Fabio Marco; Fortuny, Josep; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    A small accumulation of bones from the Norian (Upper Triassic) of the Seazza Brook Valley (Carnic Prealps, Northern Italy) was originally (1989) identified as a gastric pellet made of pterosaur skeletal elements. The specimen has been reported in literature as one of the very few cases of gastric ejecta containing pterosaur bones since then. However, the detailed analysis of the bones preserved in the pellet, their study by X-ray microCT, and the comparison with those of basal pterosaurs do not support a referral to the Pterosauria. Comparison with the osteology of a large sample of Middle-Late Triassic reptiles shows some affinity with the protorosaurians, mainly with Langobardisaurus pandolfii that was found in the same formation as the pellet. However, differences with this species suggest that the bones belong to a similar but distinct taxon. The interpretation as a gastric pellet is confirmed. PMID:26560101

  13. From morality to madness: a reappraisal of the asylum movement in psychiatry 1800-1940.

    PubMed

    Kosky, R

    1986-06-01

    This essay outlines the history of the asylum movement in psychiatry, but from a somewhat different angle than usual. It attempts to delineate the historical interactions between perceptions of morality and of madness. Changes in these interactions relate to the rise of the asylum movement, around 1800, and its demise, just after World War II. I argue that, whilst insanity was defined against the rational, secular morality of the eighteenth century, it could be separated from immorality and put aside into its asylum. Once mechanistic science and medical scientism began, during the nineteenth century, to include immorality in the systems of disease, the distinction could not hold. The asylums became flooded with the immoral, and management became custodial and nihilistic. This nexus was broken when the asylums were defined, by a few revolutionary superintendents, as instruments of social control. Nevertheless, intellectual paradigms derived from asylum psychiatry persist.

  14. Reappraising Positivism and Education: The Arguments of Philipp Frank and Herbert Feigl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Michaelr.

    This paper documents some of the `bad press' that Positivism has received in science education; it delineates the varied, and sometimes contradictory, ways in which educationalists characterize positivism; it indicates that Constructivism shares the same philosophical commitments as the instrumentalist tradition in positivism; and it suggests that there is considerable educational gain in reconsidering the philosophical and educational commitments of the non-instrumentalist, logical empiricist, tradition in positivism. The paper proceeds by examining and elaborating upon two educational papers of Vienna Circle members Philipp Frank and Herbert Feigl. It is argued that a number of the philosophical and educational `principles' of these foundational positivists are of value to educators facing a worldwide drift from natural sciences in schools and universities, and an increasingly strident anti-science lobby in universities and society. There are at least some positivist babies that should not be thrown out with the educational bathwater.

  15. Large scale mitochondrial sequencing in Mexican Americans suggests a reappraisal of Native American origins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Asian origin of Native Americans is largely accepted. However uncertainties persist regarding the source population(s) within Asia, the divergence and arrival time(s) of the founder groups, the number of expansion events, and migration routes into the New World. mtDNA data, presented over the past two decades, have been used to suggest a single-migration model for which the Beringian land mass plays an important role. Results In our analysis of 568 mitochondrial genomes, the coalescent age estimates of shared roots between Native American and Siberian-Asian lineages, calculated using two different mutation rates, are A4 (27.5 ± 6.8 kya/22.7 ± 7.4 kya), C1 (21.4 ± 2.7 kya/16.4 ± 1.5 kya), C4 (21.0 ± 4.6 kya/20.0 ± 6.4 kya), and D4e1 (24.1 ± 9.0 kya/17.9 ± 10.0 kya). The coalescent age estimates of pan-American haplogroups calculated using the same two mutation rates (A2:19.5 ± 1.3 kya/16.1 ± 1.5 kya, B2:20.8 ± 2.0 kya/18.1 ± 2.4 kya, C1:21.4 ± 2.7 kya/16.4 ± 1.5 kya and D1:17.2 ± 2.0 kya/14.9 ± 2.2 kya) and estimates of population expansions within America (~21-16 kya), support the pre-Clovis occupation of the New World. The phylogeography of sublineages within American haplogroups A2, B2, D1 and the C1b, C1c andC1d subhaplogroups of C1 are complex and largely specific to geographical North, Central and South America. However some sub-branches (B2b, C1b, C1c, C1d and D1f) already existed in American founder haplogroups before expansion into the America. Conclusions Our results suggest that Native American founders diverged from their Siberian-Asian progenitors sometime during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and expanded into America soon after the LGM peak (~20-16 kya). The phylogeography of haplogroup C1 suggest that this American founder haplogroup differentiated in Siberia-Asia. The situation is less clear for haplogroup B2, however haplogroups A2 and D1 may have differentiated soon after the Native American founders divergence. A moderate population bottle neck in American founder populations just before the expansion most plausibly resulted in few founder types in America. The similar estimates of the diversity indices and Bayesian skyline analysis in North America, Central America and South America suggest almost simultaneous (~ 2.0 ky from South to North America) colonization of these geographical regions with rapid population expansion differentiating into more or less regional branches across the pan-American haplogroups. PMID:21978175

  16. B → K∗ ℓ + ℓ - decays at large recoil in the Standard Model: a theoretical reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuchini, Marco; Fedele, Marco; Franco, Enrico; Mishima, Satoshi; Paul, Ayan; Silvestrini, Luca; Valli, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    We critically reassess the theoretical uncertainties in the Standard Model calculation of the B → K ∗ ℓ + ℓ - observables, focusing on the low q 2 region. We point out that even optimized observables are affected by sizable uncertainties, since hadronic contributions generated by current-current operators with charm are difficult to estimate, especially for q 2 ˜ 4 m c 2 ≃ 6.8 GeV2. We perform a detailed numerical analysis and present both predictions and results from the fit obtained using most recent data. We find that non-factorizable power corrections of the expected order of magnitude are sufficient to give a good description of current experimental data within the Standard Model. We discuss in detail the q 2 dependence of the corrections and their possible interpretation as shifts of the Standard Model Wilson coefficients.

  17. A Multidimensional Reappraisal of Language in Autism: Insights from a Discourse Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterponi, Laura; de Kirby, Kenton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we leverage theoretical insights and methodological guidelines of discourse analytic scholarship to re-examine language phenomena typically associated with autism. Through empirical analysis of the verbal behavior of three children with autism, we engage the question of how prototypical features of autistic language--notably…

  18. A molecular, morphological and ecological re-appraisal of Venturiales—a new order of Dothideomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Crous, Pedro W.; Schoch, Conrad L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Guo, Liang Dong

    2012-01-01

    The Venturiaceae was traditionally assigned to Pleosporales although its diagnostic characters readily distinguish it from other pleosporalean families. These include a parasitic or saprobic lifestyle, occurring on leaves or stems of dicotyledons; small to medium-sized ascomata, often with setae; deliquescing pseudoparaphyses; 8-spored, broadly cylindrical to obclavate asci; 1-septate, yellowish, greenish or pale brown to brown ascospores; and hyphomycetous anamorphs. Phylogenetically, core genera of Venturiaceae form a monophyletic clade within Dothideomycetes, and represent a separate sister lineage from current orders, thus a new order—Venturiales is introduced. A new family, Sympoventuriaceae, is introduced to accommodate taxa of a well-supported subclade within Venturiales, which contains Sympoventuria, Veronaeopsis simplex and Fusicladium-like species. Based on morphology and DNA sequence analysis, eight genera are included in Venturiaceae, viz. Acantharia, Apiosporina (including Dibotryon), Caproventuria, Coleroa, Pseudoparodiella, Metacoleroa, Tyrannosorus and Venturia. Molecular phylogenetic information is lacking for seven genera previously included in Venturiales, namely Arkoola, Atopospora, Botryostroma, Lasiobotrys, Trichodothella, Trichodothis and Rhizogenee and these are discussed, but their inclusion in Venturiaceae is doubtful. Crotone, Gibbera, Lineostroma, Phaeocryptopus, Phragmogibbera, Platychora, Polyrhizon, Rosenscheldiella, Uleodothis and Xenomeris are excluded from Venturiales, and their ordinal placement needs further investigation. Zeuctomorpha is treated as a synonym of Acantharia. PMID:22368534

  19. Essential Psychoanalysis: Toward a Re-Appraisal of the Relationship between Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Freud stated that any line of investigation which recognizes transference and resistance, regardless of its results, was entitled to call itself psychoanalysis (Freud, 1914a, p. 16). Separately he wrote that psychoanalysis was the science of unconscious mental processes (Freud, 1925, p. 70). Combining these two ideas defines Essential Psychoanalysis: Any line of treatment, theory, or science which recognizes the facts of unconscious, transference, or resistance, and takes them as the starting point of its work, regardless of its results, is psychoanalysis. Freud formulated two conflicting definitions of psychoanalysis: Essential Psychoanalysis, applicable to all analysts regardless of their individuality and Extensive Psychoanalysis, modeled on his individuality. They differ in how psychoanalytic technique is viewed. For Essential Psychoanalysis, flexible recommendations constitute psychoanalytic technique, whereas for Extensive Psychoanalysis, rules constitute a key part of psychoanalytic technique. PMID:26301760

  20. Reappraised list of historical earthquakes that affected Israel and its close surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Motti; Salamon, Amos; Rubin, Rehav

    2016-07-01

    Numerous historical reports of damaging earthquakes in the Levant have accumulated over the last 3000 years. Here, we screen that information and focus on the damaging earthquakes that affected Israel from the second millennia BCE to the 1927 CE Jericho earthquake and list the earthquakes by date, of major damage, type of sequence, and degree of size. The compilation results in three different lists: (i) 71 reliable earthquakes that in our opinion were most probably associated with the Dead Sea Transform (DST) and affected Israel and its close surroundings; (ii) 41 questionable earthquakes that should be re-evaluated or ignored; and (iii) 46 earthquakes that probably occurred but were erroneously associated with damage in Israel. What emerges from the list of the reliable earthquakes is that (i) Israel and its close surroundings suffered damage about 32 times during the last two millennia, that is, once in about 60 years, although not regularly; (ii) 21 of the earthquakes occurred during the last millennia, i.e., an event every ˜45 years; and (iii) three intervals of increased reporting are noticed: between the fourth and the mid-eighth century, from the beginning of the eleventh to the end of the thirteenth century, and from the end of the eighteenth century up to the last entry in 1927, though this period may be extended until today. In-depth evaluation of the changing regimes over time within the study area, the historical reports of earthquake damage outside of Israel, and comparison with physical paleo- and archaeo-seismology evidence, such as the "137-206" and "165-236" paleoseismic earthquakes for which there is no historical match, indicates that the historical list is far from being complete. Thus, we argue that the apparent cycles of historical reporting do not necessarily reflect the actual rate of seismic activity and further investigation is needed to establish a compiled, multi-sourced list to decipher the true nature of cycles of strong earthquakes in this region during historical times.

  1. The 9-point hedonic scale and hedonic ranking in food science: some reappraisals and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wichchukit, Sukanya; O'Mahony, Michael

    2015-08-30

    The 9-point hedonic scale has been used routinely in food science, the same way for 60 years. Now, with advances in technology, data from the scale are being used for more and more complex programs for statistical analysis and modeling. Accordingly, it is worth reconsidering the presentation protocols and the analyses associated with the scale, as well as some alternatives. How the brain generates numbers and the types of numbers it generates has relevance for the choice of measurement protocols. There are alternatives to the generally used serial monadic protocol, which can be more suitable. Traditionally, the 'words' on the 9-point hedonic scale are reassigned as 'numbers', while other '9-point hedonic scales' are purely numerical; the two are not interchangeable. Parametric statistical analysis of scaling data is examined critically and alternatives discussed. The potential of a promising alternative to scaling itself, simple ranking with a hedonic R-Index signal detection analysis, is explored in comparison with the 9-point hedonic scale.

  2. Transfusion transmitted infections in thalassaemics: need for reappraisal of blood screening strategy in India.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, V

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the blood safety in India through prevalence in thalassaemic population. Safety of the blood supply is a subject of great concern for all recipients. This review attempts to assess the relevance and format of tests for viruses in the context of transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) prevalence in India. Serological marker testing for human immunodeficiency virus-1/2 (HIV-1/2), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is mandatory in India. Numerous TTI incidents in the repeat recipients supported by results from nucleic acid technology (NAT) testing indicate the deficiencies in blood safety. The β-thalassaemic population (3-17%) in India has been used to reflect on blood safety. The prevalence of HIV-1/2, HCV and HBV in the Indian donor population, the limitations in accessing safe donors, quality of serological tests and the impact on repeat recipients is evaluated. The reports point to prevalence of ˜2% of viral diseases in the blood donor population, and the insufficiency of serology testing resulting in up to 45% TTIs in thalassaemics. The revelation by individual donation (ID) NAT testing, of 1 per 310 units being serology negative-NAT reactive is alarming. Extrapolating the serology negative NAT reactive yields, for an annual blood supply of 7.9 million units, 23,700 units or nearly 100,000 blood components are likely to be infectious. Though the cost for ID-NAT testing is considered unaffordable for a medium development country such as India, the enormity of TTIs will place an unmanageable cost burden on the society.

  3. The anatomy of cerebral achromatopsia: a reappraisal and comparison of two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bartolomeo, Paolo; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel

    2014-07-01

    Brain damage can produce acquired deficits of color perception, or cerebral achromatopsia. In these patients, lesions tend to overlap on a restricted region in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex, close to the reported locations of the putative V4 complex and to foci of increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity related to color perception in normal participants. Unilateral lesions give rise to achromatopsia in the contralateral visual field (hemiachromatopsia). Here we present a partial English translation of the first case report of a hemiachromatopsic patient with detailed anatomical evidence (Madame R., Verrey, 1888), and discuss these results in relation to a more recent case report (Madame D., Bartolomeo et al., 1997) of a patient with two consecutive hemorrhagic lesions in the occipitotemporal regions of the two hemispheres. Strikingly, Madame D. developed full-field achromatopsia after the second lesion in the right hemisphere, without having shown any signs of hemiachromatopsia after the first lesion in the left hemisphere. Thanks to the comparison of the reconstructed lesion patterns between the two patients and with the putative location of color-related areas in the human brain, we offer a possible, if speculative, account of this puzzling pattern of anatomo-clinical correlations, based on intra- and inter-hemispheric connectivity.

  4. A reappraisal of successive negative contrast in two populations of domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Ellis, Sarah L H; Ryan, Sian; Thompson, Hannah; Burman, Oliver H P

    2016-05-01

    When an anticipated food reward is unexpectedly reduced in quality or quantity, many mammals show a successive negative contrast (SNC) effect, i.e. a reduction in instrumental or consummatory responses below the level shown by control animals that have only ever received the lower-value reward. SNC effects are believed to reflect an aversive emotional state, caused by the discrepancy between the expected and the actual reward. Furthermore, how animals respond to such discrepancy has been suggested to be a sign of animals' background mood state. However, the occurrence and interpretation of SNC effects are not unequivocal, and there is a relative lack of studies conducted outside of laboratory conditions. Here, we tested two populations of domestic dogs (24 owned pet dogs and 21 dogs from rescue kennels) in a SNC paradigm following the methodology by Bentosela et al. (J Comp Psychol 123:125-130, 2009), using a design that allowed a within-, as well as a between-, subjects analysis. We found no evidence of a SNC effect in either population using a within- or between-subjects design. Indeed, the within-subjects analysis revealed a reverse SNC effect, with subjects in the shifted condition showing a significantly higher level of response, even after they received an unexpected reduction in reward quality. Using a within-, rather than a between-, subjects design may be beneficial in studies of SNC due to higher sensitivity and statistical power; however, order effects on subject performance need to be considered. These results suggest that this particular SNC paradigm may not be sufficiently robust to replicate easily in a range of environmental contexts and populations. PMID:26742929

  5. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: is it time to reappraise the role of sugar consumption?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Gold, Mark S; Johnson, David R; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Zahniser, Nancy R; Avena, Nicole M

    2011-09-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects nearly 10% of children in the United States, and the prevalence of this disorder has increased steadily over the past decades. The cause of ADHD is unknown, although recent studies suggest that it may be associated with a disruption in dopamine signaling whereby dopamine D2 receptors are reduced in reward-related brain regions. This same pattern of reduced dopamine-mediated signaling is observed in various reward-deficiency syndromes associated with food or drug addiction, as well as in obesity. While genetic mechanisms are likely contributory to cases of ADHD, the marked frequency of the disorder suggests that other factors are involved in the etiology. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that excessive sugar intake may have an underlying role in ADHD. We review preclinical and clinical data suggesting overlaps among ADHD, sugar and drug addiction, and obesity. Further, we present the hypothesis that the chronic effects of excessive sugar intake may lead to alterations in mesolimbic dopamine signaling, which could contribute to the symptoms associated with ADHD. We recommend further studies to investigate the possible relationship between chronic sugar intake and ADHD. PMID:21904085

  6. Reappraisal of the Trophic Ecology of One of the World's Most Threatened Spheniscids, the African Penguin.

    PubMed

    Connan, Maëlle; Hofmeyr, G J Greg; Pistorius, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of seabirds, including the only penguin species breeding on the African continent, are threatened with extinction. The world population of the endangered African penguin Spheniscus demersus has decreased from more than 1.5 million individuals in the early 1900s to c.a. 23 000 pairs in 2013. Determining the trophic interactions of species, especially those of conservation concern, is important when declining numbers are thought to be driven by food limitation. By and large, African penguin dietary studies have relied on the identification of prey remains from stomach contents. Despite all the advantages of this method, it has well known biases. We therefore assessed the African penguin's diet, using stable isotopes, at two colonies in Algoa Bay (south-east coast of South Africa). These represent over 50% of the world population. Various samples (blood, feathers, egg membranes) were collected for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses. Results indicate that the trophic ecology of African penguins is influenced by colony, season and age class, but not adult sex. Isotopic niches identified by standard Bayesian ellipse areas and convex hulls, highlighted differences among groups and variability among individual penguins. Using Bayesian mixing models it was for the first time shown that adults target chokka squid Loligo reynaudii for self-provisioning during particular stages of their annual cycle, while concurrently feeding their chicks primarily with small pelagic fish. This has important ramifications and means that not only pelagic fish, but also squid stocks, need to be carefully managed in order to allow population recovery of African penguin.

  7. Risk for gastric neoplasias in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis: A critical reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Vannella, Lucy; Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is an inflammatory condition characterized by the loss of gastric glandular structures which are replaced by connective tissue (non-metaplastic atrophy) or by glandular structures inappropriate for location (metaplastic atrophy). Epidemiological data suggest that CAG is associated with two different types of tumors: Intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC) and type I gastric carcinoid (TIGC). The pathophysiological mechanisms which lead to the development of these gastric tumors are different. It is accepted that a multistep process initiating from Helicobacter pylori-related chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa progresses to CAG, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and, finally, leads to the development of GC. The TIGC is a gastrin-dependent tumor and the chronic elevation of gastrin, which is associated with CAG, stimulates the growth of enterochromaffin-like cells with their hyperplasia leading to the development of TIGC. Thus, several events occur in the gastric mucosa before the development of intestinal-type GC and/or TIGC and these take several years. Knowledge of CAG incidence from superficial gastritis, its prevalence in different clinical settings and possible risk factors associated with the progression of this condition to gastric neoplasias are important issues. This editorial intends to provide a brief review of the main studies regarding incidence and prevalence of CAG and risk factors for the development of gastric neoplasias. PMID:22493541

  8. Reappraisal of the traditional Wenckebach phenomenon with a modified ladder diagram.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge; Stroobandt, Roland X; Sinnaeve, Alfons F; Andries, E; Herweg, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the traditional Wenckebach phenomenon is enhanced by using a modified ladder diagram where AV conduction in any cycle is represented by a slanted line in the AV bar together with similar AV conduction lines of all the preceding cycles. The diagram facilitates calculation of the duration of RR intervals (equal to the basic PP or sinus interval minus the PR or AV increment applied to this particular cycle) and the duration of the pause (equal to 2 × PP or sinus interval minus the sum of all the increments applied to the AV delay). The modified Wenckebach diagram should help students understand the mysterious clustering of QRS complexes or "paradoxical" increase of the ventricular rate that occurs during a Wenckebach sequence. PMID:22276622

  9. Do metformin a real anticarcinogen? A critical reappraisal of experimental data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has emerged that antidiabetic biguanides [phenformin (PF), buformin (BF) and metformin (MF)] are promising candidates for prevention of cancer. It was shown that antidiabetic biguanides postpone spontaneous carcinogenesis as well as inhibit carcinogenesis induced by chemical, radiation and biological factors (virus, transgene, genetic modifications, special diet, etc.) in a number of organs and tissues in various strains of mice and rats. The present review focused on some details of experiments such as design of studies, dose and route of administration of biguanide, and age of animals at start of treatment etc. Conclusion may be done that there are rather sufficient evidence of cancer-preventive activity of antidiabetic biguanides in experimental animals. PMID:25333035

  10. Timing of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease: a need for reappraisal?

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ruth-Mary; Moro, Elena; Lang, Anthony E; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2013-05-01

    We review the current application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) and consider the evidence that earlier use of DBS confers long-term symptomatic benefit for patients compared to best medical therapy. Electronic searches were performed of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify all article types relating to the timing of DBS in PD. Current evidence suggests that DBS is typically performed in late stage PD, a mean of 14 to 15 years after diagnosis. Current guidelines recommend that PD patients who are resistant to medical therapies, have significant medication side effects and lengthening off periods, but are otherwise cognitively intact and medically fit for surgery be considered for DBS. If these criteria are rigidly interpreted, it may be that, by the time medical treatment options have been exhausted, the disease has progressed to the point that the patient may no longer be fit for neurosurgical intervention. From the evidence available, we conclude that surgical management of PD alone or in combination with medical therapy results in greater improvement of motor symptoms and quality of life than medical treatment alone. There is evidence to support the use of DBS in less advanced PD and that it may be appropriate for earlier stages of the disease than for which it is currently used. The improving short and long-term safety profile of DBS makes early application a realistic possibility.

  11. Reappraising Positivism and Education: The Arguments of Philippa Frank and Herbert Feigl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents some of the "bad press" that Positivism has received in science education; it delineates the varied, and sometimes contradictory, ways in which educationalists characterize positivism; it indicates that Constructive shares the same philosophical commitments as the instrumentalist tradition in positivism; and it suggests that…

  12. Essential Psychoanalysis: Toward a Re-Appraisal of the Relationship between Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Freud stated that any line of investigation which recognizes transference and resistance, regardless of its results, was entitled to call itself psychoanalysis (Freud, 1914a, p. 16). Separately he wrote that psychoanalysis was the science of unconscious mental processes (Freud, 1925, p. 70). Combining these two ideas defines Essential Psychoanalysis: Any line of treatment, theory, or science which recognizes the facts of unconscious, transference, or resistance, and takes them as the starting point of its work, regardless of its results, is psychoanalysis. Freud formulated two conflicting definitions of psychoanalysis: Essential Psychoanalysis, applicable to all analysts regardless of their individuality and Extensive Psychoanalysis, modeled on his individuality. They differ in how psychoanalytic technique is viewed. For Essential Psychoanalysis, flexible recommendations constitute psychoanalytic technique, whereas for Extensive Psychoanalysis, rules constitute a key part of psychoanalytic technique.

  13. A re-appraisal of nunatak survival in arctic-alpine phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Schönswetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A long standing and at times fervid debate in biogeography revolves around the question whether arctic and high alpine organisms survived Pleistocene ice ages on small island-like areas protruding above the ice-sheet, socalled nunataks, or whether they did so in peripheral nonglaciated refugial areas. A common picture emerging from a plethora of molecular phylogeographic studies in the last decade is that both in the Arctic and in temperate mountain ranges such as the European Alps nunatak survival needs to be only rarely invoked to explain observed genetic patterns (for a rare example see Stehlik et al. 2002). As two studies in this issue show, depreciation of the nunatak hypothesis is, however, not warranted. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Westergaard et al. (2011) investigate genetic patterns of two arctic-alpine plant species distributed on both sides of the Atlantic exclusively in areas that were mostly covered by ice-sheets during Pleistocene glacial advances. In both species, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data identified divergent and partly genetically diverse groups east and west of the Atlantic. This suggests, for the first time in Arctic plants, in situ survival on nunataks. In an entirely different geographic setting and on a different geographic scale, Lohse et al. (2011, this issue) study the colonization of high alpine areas in the Orobian Alps, situated within and adjacent to a prominent peripheral refugial area (massif de refuge) in the Southern Alps of northern Italy, by dispersal-limited carabid ground beetles. Using explicit hypothesis testing and inference of ancestral locations in a Bayesian framework, stepwise colonization from two separate southern refugia is found to shape the genetic pattern of these beetles, but at the northern edge, populations survived at least parts of the last glaciation in situ on nunataks.

  14. The survival of platypus in captivity: a reappraisal with recommendations for veterinary management and future research.

    PubMed

    Serena, M; Williams, G A

    1993-02-01

    Data are presented on the duration of survival of platypus held in the collections of the 5 Australian zoos displaying the species over the period 1987-1991. Of 10 living platypus, five had survived for 7 or more years. Similarly, of 10 captive animals that died during the period, six had survived for 6 or more years. Five purpose-caught animals were integrated into captive collections over the period; all of these were alive at the end of 1991. The high survival of captive platypus documented in this study contrasts with the conclusion of Whittington (1991) that the duration of survival of platypus in captivity is generally short. This primarily reflects differences in the nature of the two sets of data: Whittington's analysis was based on incomplete records dating back to 1934, and also categorised as 'managed in captivity' those wild platypus that died at zoos while under veterinary care. A series of recommendations on current captive management issues includes the need for improved veterinary knowledge of platypus.

  15. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. PMID:26929664

  16. On Pulchritia new genus, with a reappraisal of the genera of Trichotriidae (Rotifera, Monogononta)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongting; Segers, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Abstract During the study of rotifers collected in Eastern DR Congo, we rediscovered specimens that correspond to Monostyla dorsicornuta Van Oye, 1926. This species, which we redescribe, had not been seen since it’s summary description, and lacked type material. Our analysis reveals that the animal belongs to Trichotriidae rather than to Lecane (presently considered to include Monostyla) or Lecanidae, but is nevertheless characterised by a foot structure that is remarkably convergent to that of Lecanidae, and different from all other genera of Trichotriidae. We conclude that the species and the closely related South American Macrochaetus kostei (José de Paggi, Branco & Kozlowsky-Suzuki, 2000) belong to a new genus of Trichotriidae; the two offer a rare example of African-South American vicariance in rotifers.We further provide emended diagnoses of the remaining genera of Trichotriidae, to conform these to the new information and to address some inconsistencies in these. PMID:24194651

  17. Quantitative reappraisal of the helmholtz-guyton resonance theory of frequency tuning in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Babbs, Charles F

    2011-01-01

    To explore the fundamental biomechanics of sound frequency transduction in the cochlea, a two-dimensional analytical model of the basilar membrane was constructed from first principles. Quantitative analysis showed that axial forces along the membrane are negligible, condensing the problem to a set of ordered one-dimensional models in the radial dimension, for which all parameters can be specified from experimental data. Solutions of the radial models for asymmetrical boundary conditions produce realistic deformation patterns. The resulting second-order differential equations, based on the original concepts of Helmholtz and Guyton, and including viscoelastic restoring forces, predict a frequency map and amplitudes of deflections that are consistent with classical observations. They also predict the effects of an observation hole drilled in the surrounding bone, the effects of curvature of the cochlear spiral, as well as apparent traveling waves under a variety of experimental conditions. A quantitative rendition of the classical Helmholtz-Guyton model captures the essence of cochlear mechanics and unifies the competing resonance and traveling wave theories.

  18. Hydrocarbon possibilities of concealed Mesozoic-Paleogene sediments below Himalayan nappes - reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Acharyya, S.K.; Ray, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration of the Ganga (Ganges) and Sub-Himalayan basins indicates the presence of upper Neogene-Quaternary continental molasse and the absence of Paleogene sediments regarded as hydrocarbon source beds. Marine to brackish water Paleogene-lower Neogene sediments, closely fringing the Sub-Himalayan foothills, increase in thickness northward. Their presence and facies in the frontal schuppen zone and in the Lesser Himalayan windows, commonly in close association with upper Mesozoic shelf sediments, indicate a formerly greater width for the late Mesozoic-early Neogene shelf-miogeosynclinal basin. The pre-Tertiary rocks of the Lesser Himalayas are in nappes floored by the flat-lying sole thrust redesignated the Main Boundary thrust (MBT). Schuppen structure and lateral shortening complicate the geometry of the MBT. Pre-Tertiary tectonic grain and metamorphism, ubiquitously developed within the Lesser Himalayan cover rocks, are typically absent in the subjacent Paleogene-lower Neogene window-zone sediments. This opinion is corroborated by a few oil and gas shows from the Eocene limestone outcrops close to the MBT and also from the Lesser Himalayan pre-Tertiary metamorphic cover rocks.

  19. Critical reappraisal confirms that Mitofusin 2 is an endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria tether

    PubMed Central

    Naon, Deborah; Zaninello, Marta; Giacomello, Marta; Varanita, Tatiana; Grespi, Francesca; Lakshminaranayan, Sowmya; Serafini, Annalisa; Semenzato, Martina; Herkenne, Stephanie; Hernández-Alvarez, Maria Isabel; Zorzano, Antonio; De Stefani, Diego; Dorn, Gerald W.; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the multiple roles of mitochondria–endoplasmic reticulum (ER) juxtaposition in cell biology often relied upon the exploitation of Mitofusin (Mfn) 2 as an ER–mitochondria tether. However, this established Mfn2 function was recently questioned, calling for a critical re-evaluation of Mfn2’s role in ER–mitochondria cross-talk. Electron microscopy and fluorescence-based probes of organelle proximity confirmed that ER–mitochondria juxtaposition was reduced by constitutive or acute Mfn2 deletion. Functionally, mitochondrial uptake of Ca2+ released from the ER was reduced following acute Mfn2 ablation, as well as in Mfn2−/− cells overexpressing the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate and extent were normal in isolated Mfn2−/− liver mitochondria, consistent with the finding that acute or chronic Mfn2 ablation or overexpression did not alter mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex component levels. Hence, Mfn2 stands as a bona fide ER–mitochondria tether whose ablation decreases interorganellar juxtaposition and communication. PMID:27647893

  20. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Jallow, Muminatou; Conway, David J.; Bojang, Kalifa A.; Pinder, Margaret; Usen, Stanley; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Sirugo, Giorgio; Toure, Ousmane; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Konate, Salimata; Sissoko, Sibiry; Niangaly, Amadou; Poudiougou, Belco; Mangano, Valentina D.; Bougouma, Edith C.; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Modiano, David; Amenga-Etego, Lucas N.; Ghansah, Anita; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Wilson, Michael D.; Enimil, Anthony; Evans, Jennifer; Amodu, Olukemi; Olaniyan, Subulade; Apinjoh, Tobias; Mugri, Regina; Ndi, Andre; Ndila, Carolyne M.; Uyoga, Sophie; Macharia, Alexander; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Riley, Eleanor; Drakeley, Chris; Reyburn, Hugh; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Ngoc Quyen, Nguyen Thi; Thai, Cao Quang; Hien, Tran Tinh; Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Siba, Peter; Karunajeewa, Harin; Allen, Steve; Allen, Angela; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Green, Angie; Molloy, Sile; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Cornelius, Victoria; Hart, Lee; Vanderwal, Aaron; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Band, Gavin; Le, Si Quang; Pirinen, Matti; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Clark, Taane G.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Achidi, Eric; Doumbo, Ogobara; Farrar, Jeremy; Marsh, Kevin; Taylor, Terrie; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2015-01-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. There was strong evidence of association with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multi-centre analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anaemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed. PMID:25261933

  1. Reappraisal of the Immunogenicity and Safety of Three Hepatitis A Vaccines in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo Hee; Kim, Han Wool; Ahn, Jong Gyun; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Kim, Kyung-Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Although the overall incidence of hepatitis A in Korea has been decreasing, adolescents remain highly vulnerable to its outbreaks. This study was conducted to compare the immunogenicity and safety of three hepatitis A vaccines in Korean adolescents. Healthy anti-hepatitis A virus seronegative subjects aged 13 to 19 yr were randomized in three equal groups to receive two doses of Avaxim™, Epaxal®, or Havrix®, 6 to 12 months apart. Seroconversion rates one month after the first dose were 98%, 95%, and 93% for Avaxim™, Epaxal®, and Havrix®, respectively. Seroconversion rates reached 100% for all vaccine groups one month after the second dose. Anti-HAV geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were 7,207.7 mIU/mL (95% CI, 6023.1-8684.7), 1,750.5 mIU/mL (95% CI, 1362.9-2248.3), and 1,953.5 mIU/mL (95% CI, 1459.4-2614.7) after two doses of Avaxim™, Epaxal®, and Havrix® respectively. Avaxim™ was significantly more immunogenic than Epaxal® and Havrix®, whereas there were no significant differences in antibody responses between Epaxal® and Havrix®. Local and systemic solicited adverse events (AEs) were mostly of mild-to-moderate intensity and resolved within 5 days. No serious AEs were reported. In conclusion, all three vaccines are highly immunogenic and well-tolerated in Korean adolescents. (Clinical Trial Registry NCT00483470).

  2. Reappraisal: The Problems and Prospects of Studying the Micropolitics of Leadership in Reforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Hanne B.

    1999-01-01

    Examines current micropolitics literature in the context of educational reform leadership. Discusses implications of disassociated research and policymaking for systemic change, particularly when macro directions meet micro realities. Conceptual pluralism in organizational research has enriched and limited our micropolitical understanding. School…

  3. Reappraisal of the A/B Therapist "Type" Distinction in Terms of the Personality Research Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Study data supported the hypothesis that A-B status is explicable in personality terms: so-called A-type Ss were characterized by cautious self-expression, social ineptness, and a restricted cognitive scope; B-type Ss appeared socially ascendant and "open" to complex experiences. Also, the variables differentiating A-B statuses appeared to involve…

  4. A molecular, morphological and ecological re-appraisal of Venturiales-a new order of Dothideomycetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Crous, Pedro W; Schoch, Conrad L; Bahkali, Ali H; Guo, Liang Dong; Hyde, Kevin D

    2011-11-01

    The Venturiaceae was traditionally assigned to Pleosporales although its diagnostic characters readily distinguish it from other pleosporalean families. These include a parasitic or saprobic lifestyle, occurring on leaves or stems of dicotyledons; small to medium-sized ascomata, often with setae; deliquescing pseudoparaphyses; 8-spored, broadly cylindrical to obclavate asci; 1-septate, yellowish, greenish or pale brown to brown ascospores; and hyphomycetous anamorphs. Phylogenetically, core genera of Venturiaceae form a monophyletic clade within Dothideomycetes, and represent a separate sister lineage from current orders, thus a new order-Venturiales is introduced. A new family, Sympoventuriaceae, is introduced to accommodate taxa of a well-supported subclade within Venturiales, which contains Sympoventuria, Veronaeopsis simplex and Fusicladium-like species. Based on morphology and DNA sequence analysis, eight genera are included in Venturiaceae, viz. Acantharia, Apiosporina (including Dibotryon), Caproventuria, Coleroa, Pseudoparodiella, Metacoleroa, Tyrannosorus and Venturia. Molecular phylogenetic information is lacking for seven genera previously included in Venturiales, namely Arkoola, Atopospora, Botryostroma, Lasiobotrys, Trichodothella, Trichodothis and Rhizogenee and these are discussed, but their inclusion in Venturiaceae is doubtful. Crotone, Gibbera, Lineostroma, Phaeocryptopus, Phragmogibbera, Platychora, Polyrhizon, Rosenscheldiella, Uleodothis and Xenomeris are excluded from Venturiales, and their ordinal placement needs further investigation. Zeuctomorpha is treated as a synonym of Acantharia.

  5. Where do we go from here? Reappraising the data on anticoagulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cirulis, Meghan M; Ryan, John J

    2016-05-01

    The use of anticoagulation as part of the treatment regimen in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a topic of debate. A recently published analysis of anticoagulation use in the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL) study offers conflicting conclusions regarding the benefit of this therapeutic strategy. There remains no robust randomized trial in PAH weighing the risks versus benefits of including anticoagulation in treatment regimens, leaving clinicians to surmise value in individual patients. Reexamination of available data may help to provide guidance on this controversial topic in the absence of future dedicated investigations. PMID:27162687

  6. The Edwin Smith papyrus: a clinical reappraisal of the oldest known document on spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    van Middendorp, Joost J; Sanchez, Gonzalo M; Burridge, Alwyn L

    2010-11-01

    Dating from the seventeenth century B.C: . the Edwin Smith papyrus is a unique treatise containing the oldest known descriptions of signs and symptoms of injuries of the spinal column and spinal cord. Based on a recent "medically based translation" of the Smith papyrus, its enclosed treasures in diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic reasoning are revisited. Although patient demographics, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic options considerably changed over time, the documented rationale on spinal injuries can still be regarded as the state-of-the-art reasoning for modern clinical practice. PMID:20697750

  7. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: critical reappraisal of a potentially under-recognized condition.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Somanath; Varghese, Renu G' Boy; Ramdas, Anita; Phansalkar, Manjiri Dilip; Sarangi, RajLaxmi

    2013-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an uncommon, potentially life threatening, hyper inflammatory syndrome of diverse etiologies. Cardinal signs include prolonged fever, organomegaly, and persistent unexplained cytopenias. In spite of the well known diagnostic criteria put forth by HLH society, this continues to pose great diagnostic challenge in both pediatric and adult intensive care settings. We describe 4 adult (2 males, 2 females, aged 19, 29, 40, and 17 years) and 3 pediatric (2 males, 1 female, aged 1 month, 6 months, and 12 years) patients with secondary HLH who satisfied the HLH-2004 diagnostic criteria. Definite evidence of hemophagocytosis was noted in 4 patients on initial bone marrow examination. The underlying etiologies were as follows: Rickettsia tsutsugamushi (case 1), autoimmune disorder (case 2), systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) (case 3), unknown bite (possibly a venomous snake) (case 4), Plasmodium vivax (case 5), Cytomegalo virus (case 6), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (case 7). In one patient, hemophagocytosis was presumed to have been exacerbated by administration of granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) for severe neutropenia. Two patients died with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and multi organ failure within few days of HLH diagnosis. Immunosuppressive therapy was started in 3 patients, and etoposide was started in one patient only. Due to lack of specificity of diagnostic criteria, diagnosing and differentiating HLH from its closest mimickers like sepsis/septic shock may be quite challenging in critically ill patients. Therefore, increasing awareness among physicians is essential for early diagnosis and effective therapy to reduce the mortality.

  8. Regulation of lac Operon Expression: Reappraisal of the Theory of Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Barry L.; Kodaira, Ryoji; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1978-01-01

    The physiological state of Escherichia coli with respect to (permanent) catabolite repression was assessed by measuring the steady-state level of β-galactosidase in induced or in constitutive cells under a variety of growth conditions. Four results were obtained. (i) Catabolite repression had a major effect on fully induced or constitutive expression of the lac gene, and the magnitude of this effect was found to be dependent on the promoter structure; cells with a wild-type lac promoter showed an 18-fold variation in lac expression, and cells with the lacP37 (formerly lac-L37) promoter exhibited several hundred-fold variation. (ii) Exogenous adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-monophosphoric acid (cAMP) could not abolish catabolite repression, even though several controls demonstrated that cAMP was entering the cells in significant amounts. (Rapid intracellular degradation of cAMP could not be ruled out.) (iii) Neither the growth rate nor the presence of biosynthetic products altered the degree of catabolite repression; all variation could be related to the catabolites present in the growth medium. (iv) Slowing by imposing an amino acid restriction decreased the differential rate of β-galactosidase synthesis from the wild-type lac promoter when bacteria were cultured in either the absence or presence of cAMP; this decreased lac expression also occurred when the bacteria harbored the catabolite-insensitive lacP5 (formerly lacUV5) promoter mutation. These findings support the idea that (permanent) catabolite repression is set by the catabolites in the growth medium and may not be related to an imbalance between catabolism and anabolism. PMID:214424

  9. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in acute lead encephalopathy: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Mushak, P; O'Tuama, L A; Krigman, M R

    1975-12-01

    Acute lead encephalopathy was induced in adult guinea pigs by administering daily oral doses of lead carbonate. During the development of the encephalopathy, the structural and functional integrity of the blood-brain barrier was evaluated with electron microscopy and tracer probes. Blood, cerebral gray matter, liver, and kidney were analyzed for lead, calcium, and magnesium content. The animals regularly developed an encephalopathy after four doses of lead. There were no discernible pathomorphologic alterations in the cerebral capillaries or perivascular glial sheaths. Furthermore, no evidence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction was demonstrated with Evans blue-albumin complex or horseradish peroxidase. Blood-brain barrier permeability to radiolead was not increased in the intoxicated animals. During the development of the encephalopathy there was a progressive rise in the lead concentration in all tissues. Concurrently, there was a significant rise in brain calcium. These results suggest that the encephalopathic effects of lead may be mediated directly at the neuronal level.

  10. Erythema nodosum of non-lower extremity sites - a histopathologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chua, T; Miller, D D; Mahalingam, M

    2014-11-19

    We recently saw a 51 year--old female with a tender, erythematous nodule on the left elbow and histopathology consistent with Erythema nodosum (EN). A subsequent literature review of EN in non--lower extremity (LE) sites identified only three reports, with minimal histopathology, prompting the current study. We identified nine EN cases on non--LE sites over a 14--year period. Histopathology typical of EN observed included septal panniculitis, fibrosis and edema, a mixed septal inflammatory infiltrate with and spillover into adjacent lobules and Miescher's radial granulomas. Atypical features observed included a mixed (septal and lobular) panniculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, changes in septal small vessels (lymphocytic cuffing of septal venules, endothelial swelling), lipomembranous cystic change and asteroid bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to detail the histopathologic findings of EN on non--LE sites. Similar to that noted in classical EN in the LE, findings from the current study indicate that EN in non--LE sites display typical as well as atypical features. Limitations include retrospective design and the unspecified duration of biopsied lesions relative to clinical presentation. PMID:25407105

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection and chronic kidney disease: Time for reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Cacoub, Patrice; Desbois, Anne Claire; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne; Rocatello, Dario; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with tremendous morbidity and mortality due to liver complications. HCV infection is also associated with many extrahepatic manifestations including cardiovascular diseases, glucose metabolism impairment, cryoglobulinemia vasculitis, B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many studies have shown a strong association between HCV and CKD, by reporting (i) an increased prevalence of HCV infection in patients on haemodialysis, (ii) an increased incidence of CKD and proteinuria in HCV-infected patients, and (iii) the development of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to HCV-induced cryoglobulinemia vasculitis. HCV seropositivity is found to be associated with an increased relative risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the dialysis population. HCV seropositivity is linked to lower patient and graft survival after kidney transplantation. Such poor HCV-associated prognosis should have encouraged clinicians to treat HCV in CKD patients. However, due to frequent side effects and the poor efficacy of interferon-based treatments, very few HCV dialysis patients have received HCV medications until now. The emergence of new direct acting, interferon-free antiviral treatment, leading to HCV cure in most cases with a satisfactory safety profile, will shortly modify the management of HCV infection in CKD patients. In patients with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) >30ml/min, the choice of DAA is not restricted. In those with a GFR <30 and >15ml/min, only paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir or a grazoprevir plus elbasvir regimen are approved. In patients with end stage renal disease (GFR <15ml/min or dialysis), current data only allows for the use of a grazoprevir plus elbasvir combination. No doubt these data will be modified in the future with the advent of new studies including larger cohorts of HCV patients with renal impairment. PMID:27641990

  12. Quantitative Reappraisal of the Helmholtz-Guyton Resonance Theory of Frequency Tuning in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Babbs, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    To explore the fundamental biomechanics of sound frequency transduction in the cochlea, a two-dimensional analytical model of the basilar membrane was constructed from first principles. Quantitative analysis showed that axial forces along the membrane are negligible, condensing the problem to a set of ordered one-dimensional models in the radial dimension, for which all parameters can be specified from experimental data. Solutions of the radial models for asymmetrical boundary conditions produce realistic deformation patterns. The resulting second-order differential equations, based on the original concepts of Helmholtz and Guyton, and including viscoelastic restoring forces, predict a frequency map and amplitudes of deflections that are consistent with classical observations. They also predict the effects of an observation hole drilled in the surrounding bone, the effects of curvature of the cochlear spiral, as well as apparent traveling waves under a variety of experimental conditions. A quantitative rendition of the classical Helmholtz-Guyton model captures the essence of cochlear mechanics and unifies the competing resonance and traveling wave theories. PMID:22028708

  13. The 9-point hedonic scale and hedonic ranking in food science: some reappraisals and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Wichchukit, Sukanya; O'Mahony, Michael

    2015-08-30

    The 9-point hedonic scale has been used routinely in food science, the same way for 60 years. Now, with advances in technology, data from the scale are being used for more and more complex programs for statistical analysis and modeling. Accordingly, it is worth reconsidering the presentation protocols and the analyses associated with the scale, as well as some alternatives. How the brain generates numbers and the types of numbers it generates has relevance for the choice of measurement protocols. There are alternatives to the generally used serial monadic protocol, which can be more suitable. Traditionally, the 'words' on the 9-point hedonic scale are reassigned as 'numbers', while other '9-point hedonic scales' are purely numerical; the two are not interchangeable. Parametric statistical analysis of scaling data is examined critically and alternatives discussed. The potential of a promising alternative to scaling itself, simple ranking with a hedonic R-Index signal detection analysis, is explored in comparison with the 9-point hedonic scale. PMID:25378223

  14. Risk for gastric neoplasias in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis: a critical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Lucy; Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-03-28

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is an inflammatory condition characterized by the loss of gastric glandular structures which are replaced by connective tissue (non-metaplastic atrophy) or by glandular structures inappropriate for location (metaplastic atrophy). Epidemiological data suggest that CAG is associated with two different types of tumors: Intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC) and type I gastric carcinoid (TIGC). The pathophysiological mechanisms which lead to the development of these gastric tumors are different. It is accepted that a multistep process initiating from Helicobacter pylori-related chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa progresses to CAG, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and, finally, leads to the development of GC. The TIGC is a gastrin-dependent tumor and the chronic elevation of gastrin, which is associated with CAG, stimulates the growth of enterochromaffin-like cells with their hyperplasia leading to the development of TIGC. Thus, several events occur in the gastric mucosa before the development of intestinal-type GC and/or TIGC and these take several years. Knowledge of CAG incidence from superficial gastritis, its prevalence in different clinical settings and possible risk factors associated with the progression of this condition to gastric neoplasias are important issues. This editorial intends to provide a brief review of the main studies regarding incidence and prevalence of CAG and risk factors for the development of gastric neoplasias.

  15. A reappraisal of Aspergillus section Nidulantes with descriptions of two new sterigmatocystin producing species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus section Nidulantes is a speciose group of microscopic fungi whose species are important in indoor air quality, food spoilage, mycotoxin production and human pathogenicity. We assembled as many species from the section as possible with either type specimens or protologues for analysis. DN...

  16. "Melanocytic Nests Arising in Lichenoid Inflammation": Reappraisal of the Terminology "Melanocytic Pseudonests".

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye Jin; Simkin, A David; Bhawan, Jag; Wolpowitz, Deon

    2015-12-01

    Pseudonests or pseudomelanocytic nests represent aggregates of cells and cell fragments, including keratinocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, and occasional melanocytes. Pseudomelanocytic nests in the setting of lichenoid inflammation can mimic atypical melanocytic proliferations. Several reports documented nonspecific staining of pseudonests with melanoma antigen recognized by T cells-1/Melan-A, which can be detected in the cytoplasm of nonmelanocytic cells. In contrast, nuclear stains, such as MITF and SOX10, avoid this nonmelanocyte cytoplasmic staining. The authors have previously proposed the term melanocytic pseudonests to describe junctional nests with numerous (>2) true melanoma antigen recognized by T cells-1/Melan-A, SOX10, and MITF in a nonmelanocytic lesion with lichenoid inflammation (unilateral lichen planus pigmentosus/erythema dyschromicum perstans). In this study, the authors report another case of this phenomenon arising in a different lichenoid inflammatory dermatitis (lichen planus). The immunophenotype and number of clustered true melanocytes indicate that these dermoepidermal aggregates represent true melanocytic nests and not pseudonests of any type. Therefore, the authors propose the revised terminology of "melanocytic nests arising in lichenoid inflammation" to describe this novel pattern of benign melanocytic reorganization or proliferation in a subset of lichenoid dermatitides. Because this phenomenon can mimic atypical melanocytic proliferations, clinicopathologic correlation is essential for the correct diagnosis.

  17. The sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life: towards a critical reappraisal of an autotrophic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perezgasga, L.; Silva, E.; Lazcano, A.; Negrin-Mendoza, A.

    2003-10-01

    In the early 1930s, Alfonso L. Herrera proposed his so-called sulfocyanic theory on the origin of life, an autotrophic proposal on the first living beings according to which NH4SCN and H2CO acted as raw materials for the synthesis of bio-organic compounds inside primordial photosynthetic protoplasmic structures. Although the work of Herrera is frequently cited in historical analysis of the development of the origin of life studies, very little attention has been given to the chemical significance of the reactions he published. In this paper we report the results of our search for amino acids obtained from a reactive mixture used by Herrera from 1933 onwards. Chromatograms using the high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique suggest the presence of several amino acids, the total yield being 2% of the initial thiocyanate used. Preliminary identification based on HPLC retention times suggests the presence of glycine, alanine, cysteine and methionine. Alanine was the most abundant amino acid in all samples of fractionated material analysed. Although the starting materials used by Herrera were determined by his autotrophic hypothesis on the origin of cells, our results show that his experiments may provide insights into the abiotic synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acids within the framework of a heterotrophic emergence of life.

  18. How Does Stroop Interference Change with Practice? A Reappraisal from the Musical Stroop Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grégoire, Laurent; Perruchet, Pierre; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Most earlier studies investigating the evolution of the Stroop effect with the amount of reading practice have reported data consistent with an inverted U-shaped curve, whereby the Stroop effect appears early during reading acquisition, reaches a peak after 2 or 3 years of practice, and then continuously decreases until adulthood. The downward…

  19. Oxidative Stress and Respiratory System: Pharmacological and Clinical Reappraisal of N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Santus, Pierachille; Corsico, Angelo; Solidoro, Paolo; Braido, Fulvio; Di Marco, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    The large surface area for gas exchange makes the respiratory system particularly susceptible to oxidative stress-mediated injury. Both endogenous and exogenous pro-oxidants (e.g. cigarette smoke) trigger activation of leukocytes and host defenses. These mechanisms interact in a “multilevel cycle” responsible for the control of the oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidants (e.g. reduced glutathione [GSH]) in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of COPD is generally only minimally discussed. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases, particularly COPD, and to examine the available clinical and experimental evidence on the use of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH, as an adjunct to standard therapy for the treatment of COPD. The proposed concept of “multilevel cycle” helps understand the relationship between respiratory diseases and oxidative stress, thus clarifying the rationale for using NAC in COPD. Until recently, antioxidant drugs such as NAC have been regarded only as mucolytic agents. Nevertheless, several clinical trials indicate that NAC may reduce the rate of COPD exacerbations and improve small airways function. The most plausible explanation for the beneficial effects observed in patients with COPD treated with NAC lies in the mucolytic and antioxidant effects of this drug. Modulation of bronchial inflammation by NAC may further account for these favorable clinical results. PMID:24787454

  20. Oral Midazolam Sedation For Uncooperative Children In Outpatient Paedodontics: Time For Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Aditi; Jain, Kajal; Goyal, A; Mahoney, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Sedation is frequently desired to facilitate dental procedures in uncooperative paediatric patients. Oromucosal Midazolam sedation is a popular choice among paediatric dentists world wide due to its many advantages such as ease of administration, good efficacy, presence of reversal agents and a wide margin of safety. On the other hand, many investigators have reported that midazolam sedation may not be successful for carrying out all types of dental procedures. This may be attributed to diverse nature of various treatment plans coupled with the extent of behavioural changes in the child and operator's experience. Due to the heterogeneity involved in treatment of paediatric dental procedures, the specific indications for oral midazolam use that ensure its success rate, probably need to be defined. This may enable the clinicians to have a convenient and quicker option for managing the cases rather than facing sedation failure or at times, ending up giving general anaesthetics. This article therefore brings forth the possible causes of midazolam sedation failure and proposes a 'case selection criterion'. PMID:27145554

  1. Deliberate termination of life of newborns with spina bifida, a critical reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objects Deliberate termination of life of newborns (involuntary euthanasia) with meningomyelocele (MMC) is practiced openly only in the Netherlands. ‘Unbearable and hopeless suffering’ is the single most cited criterion for this termination, together with the notion that ‘there are no other proper medical means to alleviate this suffering’. In this paper, both (and other) statements are questioned, also by putting them in a broader perspective. Methods First, a historical overview of the treatment of newborns with MMC is presented, concentrating on the question of selection for treatment. Second, a thorough analysis is made of the criteria used for life termination. Third, a case of a newborn with a very severe MMC is presented as a ‘reference case’. Conclusion ‘Unbearable and hopeless suffering’ cannot be applied to newborns with MMC. They are not ‘terminally ill’ and do have ‘prospects of a future’. In these end-of-life decisions, ‘quality of life judgments’ should not be applied. When such a newborn is not treated, modern palliative care always will suffice in eliminating possible discomfort. There is no reason whatsoever for active life-termination of these newborns. PMID:17929034

  2. Reappraisal of the limit on the variation in α implied by the Oklo natural fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Edward D.; Hamdan, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Background: A signature of many dynamical models of dark energy is that they admit variation in the fine structure constant α over cosmological time scales. Purpose: We reconsider the analysis of the sensitivity of neutron resonance energies Ei to changes in α with a view to resolving uncertainties that plague earlier treatments. Methods: We point out that with more appropriate choices of nuclear parameters, the standard estimate (from Damour and Dyson) of the sensitivity for resonances in Sm is increased by a factor of 2.5. We go on to identify and compute excitation, Coulomb, and deformation corrections. To this end, we use deformed Fermi density distributions fitted to the output of Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS calculations (with both the SLy4 and SkM* Skyrme functionals), the energetics of the surface diffuseness of nuclei, and thermal properties of their deformation. We also invoke the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, performing the requisite microcanonical averages with two phenomenological level densities which, via the leptodermous expansion of the level density parameter, include the effect of increased surface diffuseness. Theoretical uncertainties are assessed with the inter-model prescription of Dobaczewski et al. [J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 41, 074001 (2014), 10.1088/0954-3899/41/7/074001]. Results: The corrections diminish the revised Sm sensitivity but not by more than 25%. Subject to a weak and testable restriction on the change in mq/Λ (relative to the change in α ) since the time when the Oklo reactors were active (mq is the average of the u and d current quark masses, and Λ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics), we deduce that | αOklo-αnow|<1.1 × 10-8αnow (95% confidence level). The corresponding bound on the present-day time variation of α is tighter than the best limit to date from atomic clock experiments. Conclusions: The order of magnitude of our Oklo bound on changes in α is reliable. It is one order of magnitude lower than the Oklo-based bound most commonly adopted in earlier attempts to identify phenomenologically successful models of α variation.

  3. Evolution of social organization: a reappraisal for primates by using phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, A; Rendall, D

    1994-01-01

    For many animal taxa, the extent to which phylogeny can account for the form of species' social systems has seldom been investigated formally. A quantitative phylogenetic analysis of social systems in the order Primates reveals that social organization may be strongly conserved in some lineages, even in the face of considerable ecological variability. This result has important implications for efforts to understand the evolution of animal societies and for attempts to reconstruct the social organization of early humans. PMID:7937922

  4. Dating the Shift to English in the Financial Accounts of Some London Livery Companies: A Reappraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcolado Carnicero, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A mixed-language phenomenon such as language shift has been acknowledged to constitute one of the hallmarks of the manuscripts in which the members of the City of London livery companies recorded their financial transactions during the late medieval period. Despite these texts having been studied by scholars in very diverse disciplines,…

  5. Aeromagnetic interpretation in the south-central Zimbabwe Craton: (reappraisal of) crustal structure and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.

    2015-12-01

    Regional aeromagnetic data from the south-central Zimbabwe Craton have been digitally processed and enhanced for geological and structural mapping and tectonic interpretation integrated with gravity data, to constrain previous interpretations based on tentative geologic maps and provide new information to link these structural features to known tectonic events. The derived maps show excellent correlation between magnetic anomalies and the known geology, and extend lithological and structural mapping to the shallow/near subsurface. In particular, they reveal the presence of discrete crustal domains and several previously unrecognised dykes, faults, and ultramafic intrusions, as well as extensions to others. Five regional structural directions (ENE, NNE, NNW, NW, and WNW) are identified and associated with trends of geological units and cross-cutting structures. The magnetic lineament patterns cut across the >2.7 Ga greenstone belts, which are shown by gravity data to be restricted to the uppermost 10 km of the crust. Therefore, the greenstone belts were an integral part of the lithosphere before much of the upper crustal (brittle) deformation occurred. Significantly, the observed magnetic trends have representatives craton-wide, implying that our interpretation and inferences can be applied to the rest of the craton with confidence. Geological-tectonic correlation suggests that the interpreted regional trends are mainly 2.5 Ga (Great Dyke age) and younger, and relate to tectonic events including the reactivation of the Limpopo Belt at 2.0 Ga and the major regional igneous/dyking events at 1.8-2.0 Ga (Mashonaland), 1.1 Ga (Umkondo), and 180 Ma (Karoo). Thus, their origin is here inferred to be inter- and intra-cratonic collisions and block movements involving the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons and the Limpopo Belt, and later lithospheric heating and extension associated with the break-up of Gondwana. The movements produced structures, or reactivated older fractures, that were exploited by Late Archaean and Proterozoic mafic intrusions. There was interplay between vertical and horizontal tectonics as seen in similar terrains worldwide.

  6. Studies of a Murine Monoclonal Antibody Directed against DARC: Reappraisal of Its Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Smolarek, Dorota; Hattab, Claude; Buczkowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Jarząb, Anna; Cochet, Sylvie; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Jachymek, Wojciech; Niedziela, Tomasz; Grodecka, Magdalena; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Colin Aronovicz, Yves; Bertrand, Olivier; Czerwinski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) plays multiple roles in human health as a blood group antigen, a receptor for chemokines and the only known receptor for Plasmodium vivax merozoites. It is the target of the murine anti-Fy6 monoclonal antibody 2C3 which binds to the first extracellular domain (ECD1), but exact nature of the recognized epitope was a subject of contradictory reports. Here, using a set of complex experiments which include expression of DARC with amino acid substitutions within the Fy6 epitope in E. coli and K562 cells, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and flow cytometry, we have resolved discrepancies between previously published reports and show that the basic epitope recognized by 2C3 antibody is 22FEDVW26, with 22F and 26W being the most important residues. In addition, we demonstrated that 30Y plays an auxiliary role in binding, particularly when the residue is sulfated. The STD-NMR studies performed using 2C3-derived Fab and synthetic peptide corroborated most of these results, and together with the molecular modelling suggested that 25V is not involved in direct interactions with the antibody, but determines folding of the epitope backbone. PMID:25706384

  7. Full Session DRL as an "Alternative to Punishment:" A Theoretical Discussion and Reappraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Thomas S.

    The notion of differentially reinforcing low rates of undesirable behavior (DRL) is examined. Further, the status of the full session DRL strategy as alternative to punishment is questioned in context of a strictly operant definition of punishment. A reexamination of the data from some studies reveals the possibility that Ss respond to said DRL…

  8. The Southern Urals radiation studies. A reappraisal of the current status.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A M

    2002-12-01

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s the nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association in the Southern Urals were exposed to high doses from gamma-rays and from incorporated plutonium. In addition, the population of the Techa riverside downstream of the plutonium-production sites received continued exposures from external gamma-rays due to fission products released into the river and from the internal radiation due to incorporation of the fission products. Based on two international coordination meetings in 1998 and 2000, a synopsis has been given recently in this journal of the radioepidemiological studies on these exposed populations. This commentary describes the current status of these singular investigations with regard to the dosimetry, the assessment of late health effects, and the risk estimation both for the Mayak nuclear workers and the Techa riverside population. A central issue are newly published reduced estimates of the external dose to the Techa riverside population which imply substantially increased risk coefficients for solid cancer. Unless the new dosimetry system, TRDS-2000, has missed a major dose contribution, there is now conspicuous disagreement with current risk estimates. Unaccounted doses from atmospheric releases of fission products and from radiological screening of the Techa riverside population need to be explored, but underestimation of the short lived fission products released into the river appears to be a more critical factor. It is furthermore argued that even if TRDS-2000 were confirmed it would remain questionable whether risk estimates can be based on organ-specific doses when they are obtained in a population with a much higher bone-marrow exposure that may possibly have caused an 'abscopal' radiation effect.

  9. Monomorphic adenoma of minor salivary glands: a reappraisal and report of nine new cases.

    PubMed

    Levine, J; Krutchkoff, D J; Eisenberg, E

    1981-02-01

    A search of intraoral lesions on which biopsies were performed within a five-year period at the University of Connecticut disclosed 26 benign neoplasms of minor salivary gland origin, of which nine were classified as variants of monomorphic adenoma. Of these, eight were considered to be basal cell, basaloid, or canalicular types. As there was no clear histologic distinction between these histologic subtypes, and as all such lesions (basal cell, basaloid, or canalicular adenomas) displayed a noticeable predilection for the upper lip, it was concluded that the three are variants of one entity and need not be separated. It is recommended that the term basal cell adenoma henceforth be adapted to describe all of such variants.

  10. Reappraisal of early CT signs to predict the arterial occlusion site in acute embolic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koga, M; Saku, Y; Toyoda, K; Takaba, H; Ibayashi, S; Iida, M

    2003-01-01

    Patients: 105 consecutive patients with acute embolic stroke affecting the anterior circulation. Methods: Four early signs were evaluated on cranial CT within six hours of stroke onset: loss of the insular ribbon (LIR); attenuation of the lentiform nucleus (ALN); hemispherical sulcus effacement (HSE); and the hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS). The arterial occlusion site was definitively identified on cerebral angiography within two hours of the CT examination. Results: LIR was present in 55% of patients with internal carotid artery occlusion. ALN was present in 65% of patients with occlusion of the sphenoidal portion (M1) of the middle cerebral artery. HSE was present in 47% of patients with middle cerebral artery branch occlusion. LIR was related independently to internal carotid artery occlusion (odds ratio (OR) 2.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 6.8)), ALN to M1 occlusion (OR 2.9 (1.2 to 7.4)), and isolated HSE without ALN or LIR to branch occlusion (OR 12.8 (3.2 to 51.5)). The combined presence of the three signs was indicative of internal carotid artery occlusion (p < 0.05), and the presence of ALN and LIR without HSE was indicative of M1 occlusion (p < 0.05) by univariate analysis. HMCAS bore no relation to either arterial occlusion site. Conclusions: LIR, ALS, HSE, and combinations of these were useful predictors of the arterial occlusion site. PMID:12700311

  11. Assessment of the validation of blood pressure monitors: a statistical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce A; Alpert, Bruce S; Osborn, David; Prisant, L Michael; Quinn, David E; Seller, John

    2008-08-01

    Protocols to determine the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure monitors have been published by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, the British Hypertension Society, and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH). We compared the statistical basis for each of these protocols. Although the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and British Hypertension Society protocols require a minimum of 85 participants, the ESH protocol requires only 33 participants. The reduced sample size results in a reduction in statistical power from 98 to 70%, which brings into question the applicability of the ESH (International) protocol. PMID:18635972

  12. Treatment of hay fever with alum precipitated pyridine (Allpyral) ragweed pollen extracts--a clinical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Tuft, L

    1980-05-01

    This report reviews the results of prophylactic immunotherapy carried out on 105 ragweed hay fever patients treated for at least two years with an alum-precipitated pyridine ragweed (Allpyral) extracts prepared from equal parts of low and giant ragweed pollen. Good or excellent clinical results were obtained in most patients with a minimum of reaction, notably constitutional ones, even when the interval between injections was quite prolonged. Seasonal asthma rarely occurred in the treated patients. In the author's opinion, the advantages offered by these extracts, notably their relative safety and at least equal clinical effectiveness, seem to warrant their preference over similar aqueous ragweed extracts currently employed or over attempted modifications of aqueous extracts.

  13. Neuromyelitis optica: a positive appraisal of seronegative cases.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Valnet, R; Liblau, R S; Vukusic, S; Marignier, R

    2015-12-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. The hallmark of NMO is the presence of specific autoantibodies directed against aquaporin 4 (AQP4-IgG). AQP4-IgG, included in diagnostic criteria, has enlarged the clinical spectrum of NMO and serves to predict relapses. Moreover AQP4-IgG has provided unprecedented insight in the immunopathology of NMO, representing a rationale for therapeutic intervention with relevant novel treatment strategies specific for NMO. However, some patients remain seronegative for AQP4-IgG despite a definite diagnosis of NMO and the use of the finest methods for antibody detection. Interestingly, seronegative NMO (NMO(neg)) patients exhibit different demographic and disease-related characteristics in comparison to seropositive patients. The recent association with autoantibodies specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is the main indication that disease mechanisms might differ in NMO(pos) and NMO(neg), challenging the position of NMO(neg) patients in the spectrum of demyelinating diseases and therapeutic strategies to be adopted. Thus, a reappraisal of the NMO(neg) population is needed to improve NMO care. Here the current knowledge regarding NMO(neg) is reviewed and hypotheses on its pathogenesis are made including a comprehensive description of detection methods and the prevalence of AQP4-IgG and a review of the epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical characteristics of NMO(neg); finally an integrated view of the general pathophysiological mechanisms underlying NMO(neg) is provided.

  14. Neuromyelitis optica: a positive appraisal of seronegative cases.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Valnet, R; Liblau, R S; Vukusic, S; Marignier, R

    2015-12-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. The hallmark of NMO is the presence of specific autoantibodies directed against aquaporin 4 (AQP4-IgG). AQP4-IgG, included in diagnostic criteria, has enlarged the clinical spectrum of NMO and serves to predict relapses. Moreover AQP4-IgG has provided unprecedented insight in the immunopathology of NMO, representing a rationale for therapeutic intervention with relevant novel treatment strategies specific for NMO. However, some patients remain seronegative for AQP4-IgG despite a definite diagnosis of NMO and the use of the finest methods for antibody detection. Interestingly, seronegative NMO (NMO(neg)) patients exhibit different demographic and disease-related characteristics in comparison to seropositive patients. The recent association with autoantibodies specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is the main indication that disease mechanisms might differ in NMO(pos) and NMO(neg), challenging the position of NMO(neg) patients in the spectrum of demyelinating diseases and therapeutic strategies to be adopted. Thus, a reappraisal of the NMO(neg) population is needed to improve NMO care. Here the current knowledge regarding NMO(neg) is reviewed and hypotheses on its pathogenesis are made including a comprehensive description of detection methods and the prevalence of AQP4-IgG and a review of the epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical characteristics of NMO(neg); finally an integrated view of the general pathophysiological mechanisms underlying NMO(neg) is provided. PMID:25689634

  15. Cognitive, Emotional, and Social Processes in Psychosis: Refining Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Persistent Positive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa; Fowler, David; Freeman, Daniel; Dunn, Graham; Bebbington, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Psychosis used to be thought of as essentially a biological condition unamenable to psychological interventions. However, more recent research has shown that positive symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations are on a continuum with normality and therefore might also be susceptible to adaptations of the cognitive behavioral therapies found useful for anxiety and depression. In the context of a model of cognitive, emotional, and social processes in psychosis, the latest evidence for the putative psychological mechanisms that elicit and maintain symptoms is reviewed. There is now good support for emotional processes in psychosis, for the role of cognitive processes including reasoning biases, for the central role of appraisal, and for the effects of the social environment, including stress and trauma. We have also used virtual environments to test our hypotheses. These developments have improved our understanding of symptom dimensions such as distress and conviction and also provide a rationale for interventions, which have some evidence of efficacy. Therapeutic approaches are described as follows: a collaborative therapeutic relationship, managing dysphoria, helping service users reappraise their beliefs to reduce distress, working on negative schemas, managing and reducing stressful environments if possible, compensating for reasoning biases by using disconfirmation strategies, and considering the full range of evidence in order to reduce high conviction. Theoretical ideas supported by experimental evidence can inform the development of cognitive behavior therapy for persistent positive symptoms of psychosis. PMID:16885206

  16. Family functioning and posttraumatic growth among parents and youth following wildfire disasters.

    PubMed

    Felix, Erika; Afifi, Tamara; Kia-Keating, Maryam; Brown, Laurel; Afifi, Walid; Reyes, Gil

    2015-03-01

    A conceptual model was used to investigate how demographic characteristics, perceived fire stress, aspects of the recovery environment (life stressors since the disaster, social support), mental health, and coping influences parent and youth reports of family functioning and posttraumatic growth (PTG) following multiple wildfires. Participants included 50 parent-youth dyads (M = 14.5 years) who had been evacuated because of the fire, many of whom had homes that were damaged (60%) or destroyed (30%). For youth, younger age, being female, greater fire stress, more life stressors, and those using more positive reappraisal coping reported greater PTG. For parents, family type and perceived fire stress were positively related to PTG, and positive reappraisal approached significance. For family functioning, only the youth model was significant. Younger age and more life stressors were negatively related, and positive reappraisal coping was positively related, to family functioning. Overall, the results support the important role of positive reappraisal in postdisaster outcomes.

  17. GH safety workshop position paper: a critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Allen, D B; Backeljauw, P; Bidlingmaier, M; Biller, B M K; Boguszewski, M; Burman, P; Butler, G; Chihara, K; Christiansen, J; Cianfarani, S; Clayton, P; Clemmons, D; Cohen, P; Darendeliler, F; Deal, C; Dunger, D; Erfurth, E M; Fuqua, J S; Grimberg, A; Haymond, M; Higham, C; Ho, K; Hoffman, A R; Hokken-Koelega, A; Johannsson, G; Juul, A; Kopchick, J; Lee, P; Pollak, M; Radovick, S; Robison, L; Rosenfeld, R; Ross, R J; Savendahl, L; Saenger, P; Toft Sorensen, H; Stochholm, K; Strasburger, C; Swerdlow, A; Thorner, M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that ‘for approved indications, GH is safe’; however, the statement highlighted a number of areas for on-going surveillance of long-term safety, including cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and use of high dose pharmacological rhGH treatment. Over the intervening years, there have been a number of publications addressing the safety of rhGH with regard to mortality, cancer and cardiovascular risk, and the need for long-term surveillance of the increasing number of adults who were treated with rhGH in childhood. Against this backdrop of interest in safety, the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE), the GRS, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) convened a meeting to reappraise the safety of rhGH. The ouput of the meeting is a concise position statement. PMID:26563978

  18. GH safety workshop position paper: a critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Allen, D B; Backeljauw, P; Bidlingmaier, M; Biller, B M K; Boguszewski, M; Burman, P; Butler, G; Chihara, K; Christiansen, J; Cianfarani, S; Clayton, P; Clemmons, D; Cohen, P; Darendeliler, F; Deal, C; Dunger, D; Erfurth, E M; Fuqua, J S; Grimberg, A; Haymond, M; Higham, C; Ho, K; Hoffman, A R; Hokken-Koelega, A; Johannsson, G; Juul, A; Kopchick, J; Lee, P; Pollak, M; Radovick, S; Robison, L; Rosenfeld, R; Ross, R J; Savendahl, L; Saenger, P; Toft Sorensen, H; Stochholm, K; Strasburger, C; Swerdlow, A; Thorner, M

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, the statement highlighted a number of areas for on-going surveillance of long-term safety, including cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and use of high dose pharmacological rhGH treatment. Over the intervening years, there have been a number of publications addressing the safety of rhGH with regard to mortality, cancer and cardiovascular risk, and the need for long-term surveillance of the increasing number of adults who were treated with rhGH in childhood. Against this backdrop of interest in safety, the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE), the GRS, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) convened a meeting to reappraise the safety of rhGH. The ouput of the meeting is a concise position statement.

  19. The geological links of the ancient Delphic Oracle (Greece): A reappraisal of natural gas occurrence and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Papatheodorou, G.; Christodoulou, D.; Geraga, M.; Favali, P.

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies have speculated that the prophetic powers of Pythia, the woman of the Delphic Oracle, at the Temple of Apollo in Greece, were induced by hydrocarbon vapors, specifically ethylene, rising from bedrock fissures at the intersection of the E-W Delphi fault with the NNW-SSE Kerna fault, and producing neurotoxic effects, including trance and delirium. New surveys including gas flux from soil, gas in groundwater, and isotopic analyses of spring scales, provide the experimental confirmation of the gas release in the Delphi area. Presently, methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide are being released from a thermogenic (catagenetic) hydrocarbon-prone environment. This environment is not prone to biogenic production of ethylene in amounts inducing neurotoxic effects (hundreds or thousands of ppmv). A WNW-ESE trending subsidiary fault within the Delphi fault zone, extending for ˜2 km, passes under the Temple of Apollo and shrine of Athena. The Temple of Apollo, located above this fault, may have been the site of enhanced degassing in the past. If gas-linked neurotoxic effects upon Pythia need to be invoked, they should be sought in the possibility of oxygen depletion due to CO2-CH4 exhalation in the indoor temple. Alternatively, a plausible geological explanation behind the natural presence of sweet scents could be the occurrence of aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, dissolved in the groundwater spring.

  20. Scientific surgeon of the Enlightenment or 'plagiarist in everything': a reappraisal of Benjamin Bell (1749-1806).

    PubMed

    Macintyre, I M C

    2011-06-01

    The Edinburgh surgeon Benjamin Bell has been regarded as a scientific thinker in the Enlightenment tradition, despite being accused during his lifetime of both plagiarism and a failure to be innovative. Yet subsequent historical accounts regard him much more favourably. A review of his life and work discusses possible explanations for this apparent lack of concordance.

  1. A Reappraisal of the Mechanism of Pion Exchange and Its Implications for the Teaching of Particle Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The origins of the pion exchange model of nuclear forces are described and the exchange process is reinterpreted in the light of current views on the quark-gluon structure of nucleons. It is suggested that the reinterpretation might provide a picture of cohesive nuclear forces that is more intellectually satisfying than that produced by the…

  2. Group-based and personalized care in an age of genomic and evidence-based medicine: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Maglo, Koffi N

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the philosophical and moral foundations of group-based and individualized therapy in connection with population care equality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently modified its public health policy by seeking to enhance the efficacy and equality of care through the approval of group-specific prescriptions and doses for some drugs. In the age of genomics, when individualization of care increasingly has become a major concern, investigating the relationship between population health, stratified medicine, and personalized therapy can improve our understanding of the ethical and biomedical implications of genomic medicine. I suggest that the need to optimize population health through population substructure-sensitive research and the need to individualize care through genetically targeted therapies are not necessarily incompatible. Accordingly, the article reconceptualizes a unified goal for modern scientific medicine in terms of individualized equal care.

  3. Policies on U.S. Citizens Studying Medicine Abroad Need Review and Reappraisal. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Policies on U.S. citizens studying medicine abroad are reviewed, based on visits to six foreign medical schools in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Europe, which have about 5,400 U.S. citizens studying medicine, or about half of the total estimated number. The following areas are considered: education and training provided, clinical training in U.S.…

  4. Lack of support for the association between facial shape and aggression: a reappraisal based on a worldwide population genetics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Paschetta, Carolina; de Azevedo, Soledad; González, Marina F; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Pucciarelli, Héctor M; Salzano, Francisco M; Bau, Claiton H D; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; González-José, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Antisocial and criminal behaviors are multifactorial traits whose interpretation relies on multiple disciplines. Since these interpretations may have social, moral and legal implications, a constant review of the evidence is necessary before any scientific claim is considered as truth. A recent study proposed that men with wider faces relative to facial height (fWHR) are more likely to develop unethical behaviour mediated by a psychological sense of power. This research was based on reports suggesting that sexual dimorphism and selection would be responsible for a correlation between fWHR and aggression. Here we show that 4,960 individuals from 94 modern human populations belonging to a vast array of genetic and cultural contexts do not display significant amounts of fWHR sexual dimorphism. Further analyses using populations with associated ethnographical records as well as samples of male prisoners of the Mexico City Federal Penitentiary condemned by crimes of variable level of inter-personal aggression (homicide, robbery, and minor faults) did not show significant evidence, suggesting that populations/individuals with higher levels of bellicosity, aggressive behaviour, or power-mediated behaviour display greater fWHR. Finally, a regression analysis of fWHR on individual's fitness showed no significant correlation between this facial trait and reproductive success. Overall, our results suggest that facial attributes are poor predictors of aggressive behaviour, or at least, that sexual selection was weak enough to leave a signal on patterns of between- and within-sex and population facial variation. PMID:23326328

  5. Group-based and personalized care in an age of genomic and evidence-based medicine: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Maglo, Koffi N

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the philosophical and moral foundations of group-based and individualized therapy in connection with population care equality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently modified its public health policy by seeking to enhance the efficacy and equality of care through the approval of group-specific prescriptions and doses for some drugs. In the age of genomics, when individualization of care increasingly has become a major concern, investigating the relationship between population health, stratified medicine, and personalized therapy can improve our understanding of the ethical and biomedical implications of genomic medicine. I suggest that the need to optimize population health through population substructure-sensitive research and the need to individualize care through genetically targeted therapies are not necessarily incompatible. Accordingly, the article reconceptualizes a unified goal for modern scientific medicine in terms of individualized equal care. PMID:22643722

  6. A reappraisal of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle: what can we learn by extracting concepts from Gaia theory?

    PubMed

    Cresser, Malcolm S; Aitkenhead, Matthew J; Mian, Ishaq A

    2008-08-01

    Although soil scientists and most environmental scientists are acutely aware of the interactions between the cycling of carbon and nitrogen, for conceptual convenience when portraying the nitrogen cycle in text books the N cycle tends to be considered in isolation from its interactions with the cycling of other elements and water, usually as a snap shot at the current time; the origins of dinitrogen are rarely considered, for example. The authors suggest that Lovelock's Gaia hypothesis provides a useful and stimulating framework for consideration of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle. If it is used, it suggests that urbanization and management of sewage, and intensive animal rearing are probably bigger global issues than nitrogen deposition from fossil fuel combustion, and that plant evolution may be driven by the requirement of locally sustainable and near optimal soil mineral N supply dynamics. This may, in turn, be partially regulating global carbon and oxygen cycles. It is suggested that pollutant N deposition may disrupt this essential natural plant and terrestrial ecosystem evolutionary process, causing biodiversity change. Interactions between the Earth and other bodies in the solar system, and possibly beyond, also need to be considered in the context of the global N cycle over geological time scales. This is because of direct potential impacts on the nitrogen content of the atmosphere, potential long-term impacts of past boloid collisions on plate tectonics and thus on global N cycling via subduction and volcanic emissions, and indirect effects upon C, O and water cycling that all may impact upon the N cycle in the long term.

  7. Pulmonary function loss in Vermont granite workers. A long-term follow-up and critical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Graham, W G; O'Grady, R V; Dubuc, B

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies of Vermont granite workers averred that pulmonary function loss was occurring at 2 to 3 times the normal rate. The excess loss was attributed to the current, relatively low concentrations of dust prevailing in the stone sheds. Because the Vermont State Health Department had traditionally provided surveillance of granite workers to detect evidence of occupationally related illness, we offered pulmonary function screening to any currently employed worker. Spirometric data from the first 150 workers, compared with data from the previous studies, showed a large increase in the FVC and a smaller increase in the FEV1. We therefore undertook a survey of the entire stone shed work force, as well as of retired workers tested previously. The results in 487 current workers indicated an overall increase in FVC from 1974 to 1979 of 0.540 L, and an increase in FEV1 of 0.030 L: predicted losses based on the previous studies were 0.350 to 0.400 L in FVC and 0.250 to 0.350 L in the FEV1. Analysis of data in various subgroups, such as retired workers or those with more than 20 yr of work experience, also showed increases in FVC, and either slight gains or minimal losses in FEV1. The possible reasons for apparent improvement in pulmonary function are discussed. We concluded that technical deficiencies in the previous studies led to exaggerated and erroneous estimates of loss. At this time, the actual decrement in pulmonary function values for exposed granite workers is not known and requires further investigation. Because the newly proposed, stricter standard, for silica was importantly influenced by the previous studies, we believe that adoption of this standard would be premature.

  8. A molecular re-appraisal of taxa in the Sordariomycetidae and a new species of Rimaconus from New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, S.M.; Miller, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    Several taxa that share similar ascomatal and ascospore characters occur in monotypic or small genera throughout the Sordariomycetidae with uncertain relationships based on their morphology. Taxa in the genera Duradens, Leptosporella, Linocarpon, and Rimaconus share similar morphologies of conical ascomata, carbonised peridia and elongate ascospores, while taxa in the genera Caudatispora, Erythromada and Lasiosphaeriella possess clusters of superficial, obovoid ascomata with variable ascospores. Phylogenetic analyses of 28S large-subunit nrDNA sequences were used to test the monophyly of these genera and provide estimates of their relationships within the Sordariomycetidae. Rimaconus coronatus is described as a new species from New Zealand; it clusters with the type species, R. jamaicensis. Leptosporella gregaria is illustrated and a description is provided for this previously published taxon that is the type species and only sequenced representative of the genus. Both of these genera occur in separate, well-supported clades among taxa that form unsupported groups near the Chaetosphaeriales and Helminthosphaeriaceae. Lasiosphaeriella and Linocarpon appear to be polyphyletic with species occurring in several clades throughout the subclass. Caudatispora and Erythromada represented by single specimens and two putative Duradens spp. have unclear affinities in the Sordariomycetidae. PMID:21523195

  9. A reappraisal of seismic Q evaluated at Mt. Etna volcano. Receipt for the application to risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Bianco, Francesca; Giampiccolo, Elisabetta; Tusa, Giuseppina; Tuvé, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in dealing with seismic risk in the volcanic areas of Italy, by taking into account the possible occurrence of damaging pre- or syn-eruptive seismic events, is exciting the scientific interest and is actually the topic developed in several research projects funded by the European Community (e.g., UPStrat-MAFA, www.upstrat-mafa.ov.ingv.it/UPstrat/) and the Civil Defense Department of Italy. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the local attenuation-distance relations. In the present paper, we make a survey of the estimates of the seismic quality factor of the medium reported in literature for the Etna area. In the framework of a similar paper published for the Campi Flegrei zone in Southern Italy, we first review the results on seismic attenuation already obtained for Etna and then apply a standard technique to separately measure intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients from passive seismic data recorded by the Etna seismological network. Indications are then given for the correct utilization of the attenuation parameters to obtain the best candidate quality factor Q to be used in this area for seismic risk purposes.

  10. A reappraisal of seismic Q evaluated in Campi Flegrei caldera. Receipt for the application to risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Bianco, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The civil defense of Italy and the European community have planned to reformulate the volcanic risk in several volcanic areas of Italy, among which Mt. Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, by taking into account the possible occurrence of damaging pre- or syn-eruptive seismic events. Necessary to achieve this goal is the detailed knowledge of the local attenuation-distance relations. In the present note, we make a survey of the estimates of seismic quality factor (the inverse is proportional to the attenuation coefficient with distance) reported in literature for the area of Campi Flegrei where many, but sometimes contradictory results have been published on this topic. We try to review these results in order to give indications for their correct use when calculating the attenuation laws for this area.

  11. Vertebral Pneumaticity in the Ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) Revealed by Computed Tomography Imaging and Reappraisal of Axial Pneumaticity in Ornithomimosauria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akinobu; Eugenia Leone Gold, Maria; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Benson, Roger B. J.; Choiniere, Jonah; Davidson, Amy; Norell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Among extant vertebrates, pneumatization of postcranial bones is unique to birds, with few known exceptions in other groups. Through reduction in bone mass, this feature is thought to benefit flight capacity in modern birds, but its prevalence in non-avian dinosaurs of variable sizes has generated competing hypotheses on the initial adaptive significance of postcranial pneumaticity. To better understand the evolutionary history of postcranial pneumaticity, studies have surveyed its distribution among non-avian dinosaurs. Nevertheless, the degree of pneumaticity in the basal coelurosaurian group Ornithomimosauria remains poorly known, despite their potential to greatly enhance our understanding of the early evolution of pneumatic bones along the lineage leading to birds. Historically, the identification of postcranial pneumaticity in non-avian dinosaurs has been based on examination of external morphology, and few studies thus far have focused on the internal architecture of pneumatic structures inside the bones. Here, we describe the vertebral pneumaticity of the ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus with the aid of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Complementary examination of external and internal osteology reveals (1) highly pneumatized cervical vertebrae with an elaborate configuration of interconnected chambers within the neural arch and the centrum; (2) anterior dorsal vertebrae with pneumatic chambers inside the neural arch; (3) apneumatic sacral vertebrae; and (4) a subset of proximal caudal vertebrae with limited pneumatic invasion into the neural arch. Comparisons with other theropod dinosaurs suggest that ornithomimosaurs primitively exhibited a plesiomorphic theropod condition for axial pneumaticity that was extended among later taxa, such as Archaeornithomimus and large bodied Deinocheirus. This finding corroborates the notion that evolutionary increases in vertebral pneumaticity occurred in parallel among independent lineages of bird-line archosaurs. Beyond providing a comprehensive view of vertebral pneumaticity in a non-avian coelurosaur, this study demonstrates the utility and need of CT imaging for further clarifying the early evolutionary history of postcranial pneumaticity. PMID:26682888

  12. A reappraisal of the stratigraphy and chronology of Early Pliocene palaeontological sites from Lanzarote Island containing fossil terrestrial animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomoschitz, Alejandro; Sánchez Marco, Antonio; Huertas, María José; Betancort, Juan F.; Isern, Arnau; Sanz, Elena; Meco, Joaquín

    2016-11-01

    The Famara massif, in the north of Lanzarote Island, constitutes the remains of a former island inhabited by the oldest known vertebrate fauna of the Canary archipelago off the coast of Africa. In this study, new ages are offered for the underlying and overlying basaltic lava flows of two paleontological sites. The island's three major palaeontological sites, which contain remains of this ancient fauna (Valle Grande, Valle Chico and Fuente de Gusa), are intercorrelated according to their lithologies, sedimentology, palaeontological content and geochronology. The new K/Ar age interval for the fossiliferous sedimentary deposits ranges between 4.3 ± 0.7 and 3.78 ± 0.71 Ma, within the Early Pliocene, and shows that the first known terrestrial animals in Lanzarote were present on the island for about 500 ka. The principal component of the deposits is a bioclastic calcarenite of aeolian origin (sand sheet deposits), which is present in all three sites and constitutes 65% of the beds. The remaining 35% is of fluvial-aeolian origin (mainly stream deposits). All the beds contain the same fossils (insect egg pods, land snails, avian eggshells and tortoise eggshells). The local palaeogeography and the formation of the deposits were conditioned by a flat plain, larger than 16 km2, over which aeolian sands moved freely with a prevailing NNE-WSW wind direction. In agreement with previous investigations, the palaeoclimate in this interval (ca. 4.3 to 3.8 Ma) must have been mainly dry with some rainy episodes.

  13. A reappraisal of transport aircraft needs 1985 - 2000: Perceptions of airline management in a changing economic, regulatory, and technological environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Views of the executives of 24 major, national, regional, and commuter airlines concerning the effect of recent regulatory, economic, and technological changes on the roles they see for their airlines, and consequent changes in their plans for acquiring aircraft for the 1985 to 2000 period were surveyed. Differing perceptions on the economic justification for new-technology jets in the context of the carriers' present and projected financial conditions are outlined. After examining the cases for new or intermediate size jets, the study discusses turboprop powered transports, including the carriers' potential interest in an advanced technology, high-speed turboprop or prop-fan. Finally, the implications of foreign competition are examined in terms of each carrier's evaluation of the quality and financial offerings, as well as possible 'Buy American' policy predisposition.

  14. Reappraisal of Hydatigera taeniaeformis (Batsch, 1786) (Cestoda: Taeniidae) sensu lato with description of Hydatigera kamiyai n. sp.

    PubMed

    Lavikainen, Antti; Iwaki, Takashi; Haukisalmi, Voitto; Konyaev, Sergey V; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Dokuchaev, Nikolai E; Galimberti, Andrea; Halajian, Ali; Henttonen, Heikki; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi; Krivopalov, Anton V; Meri, Seppo; Morand, Serge; Näreaho, Anu; Olsson, Gert E; Ribas, Alexis; Terefe, Yitagele; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-05-01

    The common cat tapeworm Hydatigera taeniaeformis is a complex of three morphologically cryptic entities, which can be differentiated genetically. To clarify the biogeography and the host spectrum of the cryptic lineages, 150 specimens of H. taeniaeformis in various definitive and intermediate hosts from Eurasia, Africa and Australia were identified with DNA barcoding using partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene sequences and compared with previously published data. Additional phylogenetic analyses of selected isolates were performed using nuclear DNA and mitochondrial genome sequences. Based on molecular data and morphological analysis, Hydatigera kamiyai n. sp. Iwaki is proposed for a cryptic lineage, which is predominantly northern Eurasian and uses mainly arvicoline rodents (voles) and mice of the genus Apodemus as intermediate hosts. Hydatigera taeniaeformis sensu stricto (s.s.) is restricted to murine rodents (rats and mice) as intermediate hosts. It probably originates from Asia but has spread worldwide. Despite remarkable genetic divergence between H. taeniaeformis s.s. and H. kamiyai, interspecific morphological differences are evident only in dimensions of rostellar hooks. The third cryptic lineage is closely related to H. kamiyai, but its taxonomic status remains unresolved due to limited morphological, molecular, biogeographical and ecological data. This Hydatigera sp. is confined to the Mediterranean and its intermediate hosts are unknown. Further studies are needed to classify Hydatigera sp. either as a distinct species or a variant of H. kamiyai. According to previously published limited data, all three entities occur in the Americas, probably due to human-mediated introductions. PMID:26956060

  15. Reappraisal of effects of serum chemerin and adiponectin levels and nutritional status on cardiovascular outcomes in prevalent hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yuan; Chiu, Yen-Lin; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Yu-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Although chemerin, an adipokine, increases the cardiovascular (CV) risk in obese people, it is associated with a survival advantage in incident hemodialysis (HD) patients. We explored the potential effects of chemerin on CV outcomes in prevalent HD patients. This prospective study included 343 prevalent HD patients. The composite outcome was the occurrence of CV events and death during follow-up. We used multivariate Cox regression analysis to test the predictive power of different chemerin and adiponectin levels and geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) for the outcomes. HD patients with higher chemerin levels (≥211.4 ng/mL) had a lower risk of CV events (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41–0.98) and composite CV outcome (adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.45–0.99) than those with lower chemerin levels (<211.4 ng/mL). When evaluating CV outcomes, we identified an interaction between chemerin levels and GNRI, but not between chemerin and adiponectin levels. The findings remained robust in the sensitivity analysis. Thus, in prevalent HD patients with negligible residual renal function, higher chemerin levels predict more favourable CV outcomes. PMID:27667092

  16. On the orientation of pre-islamic temples of north Africa: a re-appraisal (new data in Africa proconsularis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, J. A.; Gaspar, A. T.; Betancort, A. P.; Marrero, R.

    Since the late 1990s, our research group has embarked on a systematic archaeoastronomical study of archaeological sites in the Maghreb. Earlier campaigns were devoted to Tunisia, Morocco and Libya (see e.g. Belmonte et. Al.1998, 1999 and 2002). In this short report we will present part of the data obtained in a field campaign carried out in winter 2002, analyzing the results yielded on early 50 ancient sacred structures (temples, churches, earlier mosques and mausoleums) of an extended area in Northern Tunisia (ancient Africa Proconsularis). These data were not discussed in previous reports on similar structures (e.g. Esteban at.al.2001) , although in a previous paper (Belmonte et.al.2003) we reported our results on the contemporary measured megalithic monuments. This paper will present the data of more than 30 temples and mausoleums of Roman era, 10 pre-Islamic Christian churches and a few earlier mosques. These new data will be discussed together with those obtained in previous campaigns in an attempt to shed some light on the possibility of astronomical alignments within this extended set of monuments (more than a hundred). Our results show that some astronomical patterns could be interpreted as solar ones. Interestingly, this solar tendency was continued by Christian churches until the arrival of Islam. This is a common feature to the other regions of early Christianity (see e.g. Romano 1992). Other curious patterns, including the planning of important cities could presumably be associated to the brightest stars of the sky, Sirius and Canopus. Finally, we will analyse how this astronomical tendencies managed to survive within the first Islamic orienting traditions.

  17. A reappraisal of parameters for the putative planet PTFO 8-8695b and its potentially precessing parent star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2016-04-01

    Published photometry of fading events in the PTFO8-8695 system is modelled using improved treatments of stellar geometry, surface intensities, and, particularly, gravity darkening, with a view to testing the planetary-transit hypothesis. Variability in the morphology of fading events can be reproduced by adopting convective-envelope gravity darkening, but near-critical stellar rotation is required. This leads to inconsistencies with spectroscopic observations; the model also predicts substantial photometric variability associated with stellar precession, contrary to observations. Furthermore, the empirical ratio of orbital to rotational angular momenta is at odds with physically plausible values. An exoplanet transiting a precessing, gravity-darkened star may not be the correct explanation of periodic fading events in this system.

  18. A reappraisal of the age, origin and structural setting of sulphide mineralisation in the UK North Pennines Orefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Bob; Dempsey, Eddie; Selby, David; Le Cornu, Chris; Young, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The North Pennines Orefield (NPO) is centred on the Alston block, a structural high of fractured Carboniferous sedimentary rocks that unconformably overlie a Devonian age (ca. 399 Ma) granite pluton buried at shallow depths (<0.5 km). The orefield has long been considered to be a classic example of a Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) deposit where the source of the metals and sulphur are derived by hydrothermal leaching of the host sedimentary (carbonate-rich) rocks. The vein-hosted part of the orefield consists of linked systems of shear and tensile fractures with a variety of regionally recognised orientations (ESE-WNW Quarter Point, NE-SW, NW-SE Cross Veins). These are associated with lead (galena), iron (pyrite, pyrrhotite, marcasite), copper (chalcopyrite), zinc (sphalerite), fluorite, barite and quartz mineralization. New Rhenium-Osmium (Re-Os) isotope geochemical analysis of the vein-hosted pyrite mineralization suggests that: (i) the metalliferous ores of the NPO formed ca. 294Ma (earliest Permian); and (ii) that they carry an initial Os ratio indicative of a mantle source similar to that indicated by the initial Os ratio of the Whin Sill dolerite suite (emplacement ages ca. 297-294 Ma). New field observations and stress inversion analyses show that at least two regional deformation events are recognised in the Carboniferous host rocks of the NPO. A initial phase of Late Carboniferous ('Variscan') N-S compression pre-dates mineralisation and leads to formation of the NW-SE fractures, initiation of the Burtreeford Disturbance as a N-S fault and compressional reactivation of the previously extensional E-W Lunedale Fault. A later phase of dextral transtension (NNE-SSW extension, ESE-WNW compression) leads to the formation of the ESE-WNW and NE-SW veins, together with compressional reactivation of the Burtreeford Disturbance and Lunedale Fault. Field and microstructural analyses show that the transtensional deformation is synchronous with the main phases of NPO mineralisation and also with emplacement of the Whin Sill and associated intrusions. We conclude that: (i) the main phase of NPO mineralization occurred synchronously with regional dextral transtension during the earliest Permian; (ii) that mineralization is genetically linked to a mantle source and (iii) that the genesis of the NPO is closely linked to that of the broadly penecontemporaneous Whin Sill and associated intrusions in northern England. Our new findings are consistent with structural histories recognised in adjacent regions (e.g. Dent-Pennine Fault systems; Northumberland Basin) and point to a major regional phase of mantle-sourced mineralization, igneous intrusion and transtensional deformation in the early Permian. Previous models suggesting that the NPO is a classic example of a MVT mineral deposit or that the mineralizing fluids are related to the influx of Mesozoic brines are largely incorrect.

  19. Brainy stuff of long-gone dogs: a reappraisal of the supposed Canis endocranial cast from the Pliocene of Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanoff, Dmitry V.; Wolsan, Mieczysław; Marciszak, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    The pre-Quaternary fossil record of Canis in the Old World is scarce, and the first appearance of this genus in Europe remains an enigma. Amongst the oldest fossils assigned to this genus, there is a natural cast of the brain (endocast) collected in Węże 1, Poland, from Pliocene deposits dated between 3.3 and 4.0 Ma. We reexamined this specimen and found that it differs from the brain of Canis in having its region medial to the coronal sulcus heart-shaped in dorsal view, its region rostral to the presylvian sulcus shorter and less constricted laterally, and its cerebellum less overlapped by the cerebrum and lacking a lateral twist of the posterior vermis. We identified this fossil, as well as another fossil canid endocast from Węże 1, as representing the raccoon dog genus Nyctereutes. The previously reported presence of Canis in Węże 1 is therefore not confirmed. Specifically, both endocasts can be referred to N. donnezani because this is the only species of Nyctereutes that has been recognised in this locality on the basis of craniomandibular and dental fossils. Our study represents a taxonomic application of comparative neuroanatomical and palaeoneurological data, an approach that may become increasingly useful with the growing knowledge of the endocranial morphology of fossil mammals.

  20. A re-appraisal of the stratigraphy and volcanology of the Cerro Galán volcanic system, NW Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folkes, Christopher B.; Wright, Heather M.; Cas, Ray A.F.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Lesti, Chiara; Viramonte, Jose G.

    2011-01-01

    From detailed fieldwork and biotite 40Ar/39Ar dating correlated with paleomagnetic analyses of lithic clasts, we present a revision of the stratigraphy, areal extent and volume estimates of ignimbrites in the Cerro Galán volcanic complex. We find evidence for nine distinct outflow ignimbrites, including two newly identified ignimbrites in the Toconquis Group (the Pitas and Vega Ignimbrites). Toconquis Group Ignimbrites (~5.60–4.51 Ma biotite ages) have been discovered to the southwest and north of the caldera, increasing their spatial extents from previous estimates. Previously thought to be contemporaneous, we distinguish the Real Grande Ignimbrite (4.68 ± 0.07 Ma biotite age) from the Cueva Negra Ignimbrite (3.77 ± 0.08 Ma biotite age). The form and collapse processes of the Cerro Galán caldera are also reassessed. Based on re-interpretation of the margins of the caldera, we find evidence for a fault-bounded trapdoor collapse hinged along a regional N-S fault on the eastern side of the caldera and accommodated on a N-S fault on the western caldera margin. The collapsed area defines a roughly isosceles trapezoid shape elongated E-W and with maximum dimensions 27 × 16 km. The Cerro Galán Ignimbrite (CGI; 2.08 ± 0.02 Ma sanidine age) outflow sheet extends to 40 km in all directions from the inferred structural margins, with a maximum runout distance of ~80 km to the north of the caldera. New deposit volume estimates confirm an increase in eruptive volume through time, wherein the Toconquis Group Ignimbrites increase in volume from the ~10 km3 Lower Merihuaca Ignimbrite to a maximum of ~390 km3 (Dense Rock Equivalent; DRE) with the Real Grande Ignimbrite. The climactic CGI has a revised volume of ~630 km3 (DRE), approximately two thirds of the commonly quoted value.

  1. What the volcanism of the East African Rift tells us on its evolution and dynamics: a reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The East African Rift (EAR) is one of the most studied tectonic structures on Earth. Classically, it is described as extending from Afar in the North to the Malawi rift in the South, along the eastern and western branches, respectively. A widely accepted consensus also exists on two main points: 1- the rift initiated first with plume emplacement below the northern part of the eastern branch and 2- extension and volcanism subsequently migrated southward along the western branch (e.g., Ebinger, 1989). However, an increasing amount of new geochronological data on the volcanic activity in the southern part of the East African Rift tends to weaken these interpretations and imposes a reassessment of the rift dynamics. The volcanic activity being one of the main characteristics of this rift, I use it here to determine the lateral extension of the rift system and to assess the rift activity through times. First, the volcanism unambiguously indicates that the rift is not limited to the African continent but can be traced in the Mozambique Channel and in Madagascar where it is closely related to active tectonics (graben and transfer faults) initiated since at least the Miocene. Moreover, the synthesis of more than 800 published geochronological data of volcanic products distributed over the overal East African Rift allows the distinction of two parts. The first part, the Northern EAR, corresponds to the sole eastern branch, which is characterized by volcanic plateaus resulting from huge magma flux during three main periods (32-28, 18-12, 6-0 Ma). Provinces of the second part, the Southern EAR (the western branch, the Mozambique Channel and Madagascar), share rift-related scattered volcanic centres characterized by coeval periods of activity since the Oligocene (28-24, 20-16 and 12-0 Ma). This synthesis highlights the lack of southward migration of the volcanism during the evolution of the East African Rift and instead reveals the almost synchronous development of the volcanism all along the rift system. Moreover, it suggests the existence of two parts that experienced different evolutions since around 30 Ma. The volcanism of the Northern EAR shows characteristics, which agrees with a mantle plume origin. On the contrary, the development of stationary volcanic centres in the Southern EAR despite the northward motion of the African plate disagrees with such an interpretation and instead suggests a tectonically-assisted origin of the volcanism along main Precambrian lithospheric structures. The occurrence of several pulses of volcanism in each part of the East African Rift, coeval with periods of crustal uplift, could stem from successive main tectonic phases favoured by mantle bursts fed by the African superswell. Reference: Ebinger, C.J., 1989, Tectonic development of the western branch of the East African rift system: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 101, p. 885-903.

  2. A-type granites in the Internal Hellenides (Macedonia, Greece): rift-related or post-orogenic? A reappraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Giampiero; Christofides, Georgios; Koroneos, Antonis

    2010-05-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif belongs to the Internal Hellenides, and is subdivided into two units: the Kerdyllia and Vertiskos Unit in the eastern and central and northwest Chalkidiki Peninsula (Macedonia, Greece), respectively. The Vertiskos Unit mostly comprises various types of gneisses, associated with amphibolites and metasediments, and it is intruded mainly by Mesozoic leucocratic granites and dykes. The largest granitic bodies are those of the Arnea and Kerkini complexes, which were studied using new and literature U-Pb geochronological zircon data as well as new whole rock geochemical data, aiming at investigating the origin and evolution of the two complexes as well as providing constraints on their geodynamic environment. Arnea complex shows differences in ages between the rocks cropping out at South and North of Volvi Lake, with 254 Ma and 244 Ma, respectively, whereas Kerkini has an age of 247 Ma. Arnea and Kerkini complexes are two-mica syenogranite and alkali-feldspar granites containing quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, and biotite, and allanite, titanite, zircon, and fluorite as typical main and accessory minerals, respectively. They are variably peraluminous with molar Al2O3/CaO+Na2O+K2O values of 0.96 - 1.34. Both complexes evolved mainly by Fractional Crystallization, separating assemblages consisting of feldspars, biotite, allanite and zircon. Parental magmas are crustal melts derived by partial melting of TTG sources. The smaller bodies and the dykes intruding the Vertiskos Unit were studied using geochemical literature data. They are mainly white mica granites, rich in quartz and albitic feldspar with molar Al2O3/CaO+Na2O+K2O values invariably higher than 1.1. They are considered as the product of partial melting of crust-dominated sources. All the granitic magmatism in the Vertiskos Unit has been considered as A-type, linked to the rift, which led to the formation of a branch of Neotethys (Vardar-Meliata Ocean). This was based mainly on the previously considered Middle Triassic age, and on single petrotectonic diagrams. Our new U-Pb geochronological data, obtained on zircon oscillatory rims and having an excellent concordance, indicate that the obtained ages can be considered as the crystallization ages, at the boundary between Permian and Triassic. Employing a statistical approach, using all the main features able to discriminate A-type granite igneous suites, all the rocks belonging to the magmatism intruding the Vertiskos Unit show variable behaviour: some parameters indicate a clear A-type affinity for both the complexes, but conversely other parameters indicate a clear differentiated I-type affinity. This contrasting behaviour is common in the A-type granites because of their variable petrogenetic processes. In addition, all the rocks plot in the A2 subtype, indicating that the magmatism is connected with a post-collisional rather than an intra-plate rifting environment. Some fundamental constraints on the geodynamic evolution of the region can be gained by the time distribution, the geochemical and petrological features of the plutonic rocks intruding the Vertiskos Unit. We suggest that, at the boundary between Permian and Triassic, the area was in an incipient rift environment, and as such oceanization had not still occurred. Continental crust accreted during previous continental collision, is present at the rift floor. Such a crust could melt partially to produce batches of magma similar to the studied magmatism. It is worth noting that a submarine rhyolitic magmatism of similar age and geochemistry to the granitoid magmatism, exists, outcropping on the floor of the epicontinental sea, indicating that granitic melts, produced by partial melting of the crust, either remained at depth, generating the granitic complexes, or extruded as rhyolitic lavas. Magmatism intruding the Vertiskos Unit emplaced, hence, in the post-orogenic environment that follows the subduction of Godwana under Eurasia, at the beginning of the rifting leading to the opening of the Vardar-Meliata Ocean.

  3. Reappraisal of the Trophic Ecology of One of the World’s Most Threatened Spheniscids, the African Penguin

    PubMed Central

    Connan, Maëlle; Hofmeyr, G. J. Greg; Pistorius, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of seabirds, including the only penguin species breeding on the African continent, are threatened with extinction. The world population of the endangered African penguin Spheniscus demersus has decreased from more than 1.5 million individuals in the early 1900s to c.a. 23 000 pairs in 2013. Determining the trophic interactions of species, especially those of conservation concern, is important when declining numbers are thought to be driven by food limitation. By and large, African penguin dietary studies have relied on the identification of prey remains from stomach contents. Despite all the advantages of this method, it has well known biases. We therefore assessed the African penguin’s diet, using stable isotopes, at two colonies in Algoa Bay (south-east coast of South Africa). These represent over 50% of the world population. Various samples (blood, feathers, egg membranes) were collected for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses. Results indicate that the trophic ecology of African penguins is influenced by colony, season and age class, but not adult sex. Isotopic niches identified by standard Bayesian ellipse areas and convex hulls, highlighted differences among groups and variability among individual penguins. Using Bayesian mixing models it was for the first time shown that adults target chokka squid Loligo reynaudii for self-provisioning during particular stages of their annual cycle, while concurrently feeding their chicks primarily with small pelagic fish. This has important ramifications and means that not only pelagic fish, but also squid stocks, need to be carefully managed in order to allow population recovery of African penguin. PMID:27434061

  4. The inverted Triassic rift of the Marrakech High Atlas: A reappraisal of basin geometries and faulting histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Mireia; Teixell, Antonio; Babault, Julien; Arboleya, Maria-Luisa

    2015-11-01

    The High Atlas of Morocco is an aborted rift developed during the Triassic-Jurassic and moderately inverted during the Cenozoic. The Marrakech High Atlas, with large exposures of basement and Triassic early syn-rift deposits, is ideal to investigate the geometries of the deepest parts of a rift, constituting a good analogue for pre-salt domains. It allows unraveling geometries and kinematics of the extensional and compressional structures and the influence that they exert over one another. A detailed structural study of the main Triassic basins and basin-margin faults of the Marrakech High Atlas shows that only a few rift faults were reactivated during the Cenozoic compressional stage in contrast to previous interpretations, and emphasizes that fault reactivation cannot be taken for granted in inverted rift systems. Preserved extensional features demonstrate a dominant dip-slip opening kinematics with strike-slip playing a minor role, at variance to models proposing a major strike-slip component along the main basin-bounding faults, including faults belonging to the Tizi n'Test fault zone. A new Middle Triassic paleogeographic reconstruction shows that the Marrakech High Atlas was a narrow and segmented orthogonal rift (sub-perpendicular to the main regional extension direction which was ~ NW-SE), in contrast to the central and eastern segments of the Atlas rift which developed obliquely. This difference in orientation is attributed to the indented Ouzellarh Precambrian salient, part of the West African Craton, which deflected the general rift trend in the area evidencing the major role of inherited lithospheric anisotropies in rift direction and evolution. As for the Cenozoic inversion, total orogenic shortening is moderate (~ 16%) and appears accommodated by basement-involved large-scale folding, and by newly formed shortcut and by-pass thrusting, with rare left-lateral strike-slip indicators. Triassic faults commonly acted as buttresses.

  5. Short-period circumnutations found in sunflower hypocotyls in satellite orbit. A reappraisal of data from Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardal, Tom Kr; Johnsson, Anders; Chapman, David K.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have further analysed data from an experiment performed in satellite orbit, in Spacelab-1. In micro-gravity the hypocotyls of Helianthus annuus, cv. "Teddy Bear", showed short period circumnutations (periods around 30 minutes) as well as the already reported long period nutations (with an average period of about 115 minutes). We applied various types of signal analysis (Fourier and wavelet analysis) to the data series. The long period circumnutations have a larger amplitude than the short term circumnutations. Both short and long period circumnutations exist in one and the same hypocotyl. (This is in contrast to our ground control experiments, where were found only the long-period nutations.) The period of the nutations changed throughout the experiment. These results are extending the conclusions drawn after the Spacelab experiment (Brown et al. 1990). In particular they emphasize the existence of both short- and long-period circumnutations in micro-gravity.

  6. Potential Role of Uric Acid in Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension, Kidney Injury, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Is It Time for Reappraisal?

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Zohreh; Rasheed, Kashef; Kapusta, Daniel R.; Reisin, Efrain

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid concentration is a common laboratory finding in subjects with metabolic syndrome/obesity, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Hyperuricemia has been attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and to decreased uric acid excretion in kidney dysfunction and is not acknowledged as a main mediator of metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder development. However, more recent investigations have altered this traditional view and shown by providing compelling evidence to support an independent link between hyperuricemia and increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorders. However, despite these new findings, controversy regarding the exact role of uric acid in inducing these diseases remains to be unfolded. Furthermore, recent data suggest that the high-fructose diet in the United State, as a major cause of hyperuricemia, may be contributing to the metabolic syndrome/obesity epidemic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorder. Our focus in this review is to discuss the available evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder; and the potential pathophysiology mechanisms involved. PMID:23588856

  7. Students' Conceptions about Climate Change: Using Critical Evaluation to Influence Plausibility Reappraisals and Knowledge Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Douglas Adler

    2012-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) reported a greater than 90% chance that human activities are responsible for global temperature increases over the last 50 years, as well as other climatic changes. The scientific report also states that alternative explanations (e.g., increasing energy received from the Sun) are less plausible…

  8. A reappraisal of the evolution of Asian snakehead fishes (Pisces, Channidae) using molecular data from multiple genes and fossil calibration.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Eleanor A S; Hurwood, David A; Mather, Peter B

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater snakehead fishes (Channidae) provide an interesting target for phylogenetic analysis for the following reasons, their unusual biology, potential for cryptic diversity and availability of a good fossil record. Here, a multi-locus molecular phylogeny was constructed and calibrated using two fossil dates to estimate divergence times within the family. Sampling aimed to explore interspecific divergence of Channa species across Southeast Asia and intra-specific variation where species possessed natural geographical ranges that were extensive. Results contradict divergence times estimated previously independently from single locus mitochondrial data or the fossil record and suggest that after divergence from African taxa 40-50 Ma, evolution of Asian snakeheads has been heavily influenced by multiple broad scale dispersal events across India and Southeast Asia. A similar pattern of divergence within multiple clades suggests that west-east dispersal was limited for many taxa during the Miocene. Deep intra-specific divergence was inferred for C. striata, indicating that long historical periods of isolation ( approximately 8Ma) have not resulted in the evolution of reproductive isolation within this species. Results support suggestions that C. marulia like fishes in northern Cambodia may constitute an undescribed species, and that Indian C. diplogramma warrants taxonomic recognition as being distinct from Southeast Asian C. micropeltes, with the two taxa last sharing a common ancestor in the mid- to late-Miocene. PMID:20359539

  9. Reappraisal of two-loop contributions to the fermion electric dipole moments in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    We reexamine the R-parity violating contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments in the two-loop diagrams. It is found that the leading Barr-Zee-type two-loop contribution is smaller than the result found in previous works, and that electric dipole moment experimental data provide looser limits on R-parity violating couplings.

  10. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy for thick uveal melanoma: reappraisal of apex and base dose radiation and dose rate

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi, Ramin; Sedaghat, Ahad; Azma, Zohreh; Nojomi, Marzieh; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Nazari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of ruthenium-106 (106Ru) brachytherapy in terms of radiation parameters in patients with thick uveal melanomas. Material and methods Medical records of 51 patients with thick (thickness ≥ 7 mm and < 11 mm) uveal melanoma treated with 106Ru brachytherapy during a ten-year period were reviewed. Radiation parameters, tumor regression, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and treatment-related complications were assessed. Results Fifty one eyes of 51 consecutive patients including 25 men and 26 women with a mean age of 50.5 ± 15.2 years were enrolled. Patients were followed for 36.1 ± 26.5 months (mean ± SD). Mean radiation dose to tumor apex and to sclera were 71 (± 19.2) Gy and 1269 (± 168.2) Gy. Radiation dose rates to tumor apex and to sclera were 0.37 (± 0.14) Gy/h and 6.44 (± 1.50) Gy/h. Globe preservation was achieved in 82.4%. Preoperative mean tumor thickness of 8.1 (± 0.9) mm decreased to 4.5 (± 1.6) mm, 3.4 (± 1.4) mm, and 3.0 (± 1.46) mm at 12, 24, and 48 months after brachytherapy (p = 0.03). Four eyes that did not show regression after 6 months of brachytherapy were enucleated. Secondary enucleation was performed in 5 eyes because of tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma. Tumor recurrence was evident in 6 (11.8%) patients. Mean Log MAR (magnification requirement) visual acuity declined from 0.75 (± 0.63) to 0.94 (± 0.5) (p = 0.04). Best corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or worse was recorded in 37% of the patients at the time of diagnosis and 61.7% of the patients at last exam (p = 0.04). Non-proliferative and proliferative radiation-induced retinopathy was observed in 20 and 7 eyes. Conclusions Thick uveal melanomas are amenable to 106Ru brachytherapy with less than recommended apex radiation dose and dose rates. PMID:26985199

  11. The role of malic enzyme as the provider of NADPH in oleaginous microorganisms: a reappraisal and unsolved problems.

    PubMed

    Ratledge, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Malic enzyme (ME; NADP(+)-dependent; EC 1.1.40) provides NADPH for lipid biosynthesis in oleaginous microorganisms. Its role in vivo depends on there being an adequate supply of NADH to drive malate dehydrogenase to convert oxaloacetate to malate as a component of a cycle of three reactions: pyruvate → oxaloacetate → malate and, by the action of ME, back to pyruvate. However, the availability of cytosolic NADH is limited and, consequently, ancillary means of producing NADPH are necessary. Stoichiometries are given for the conversion of glucose to triacylglycerols involving ME with and without the reactions of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as an additional source of NADPH. Some oleaginous microorganisms (such as Yarrowia lipolytica), however, lack a cytosolic ME and, if the PPP is the sole provider of NADPH, the theoretical yield of triacylglycerol from glucose falls to 27.6 % (w/w) from 31.6 % when ME is present. An alternative route for NADPH generation via a cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-dependent) is then discussed.

  12. Reappraisal of DL/V4 boundaries based on connectivity patterns of dorsolateral visual cortex in macaques.

    PubMed

    Stepniewska, Iwona; Collins, Christine E; Kaas, Jon H

    2005-06-01

    We placed injections of 3-5 distinguishable tracers in different dorsolateral locations in the visual cortex of four macaque monkeys to help define the extent of the dorsolateral visual complex (DL) commonly known as area V4. Injections well within DL/V4 region labeled neurons in V2, V3, MT, IT, and sometimes V1. In contrast, injections in caudal area 7a dorsal to current descriptions of DL/V4 produced a different pattern of labeled neurons largely involving posterior parietal and adjoining occipital cortex, as well as cortex of the medial wall. Injections placed in the dorsal prelunate cortex (DP), near the expected location of the dorsal border of DL/V4, labeled neurons in a third pattern, including regions of the posterior parietal and occipital cortex, inferior temporal (IT) cortex, and sometimes parts of dorsal area V2, DL/V4 complex and MT. Injections placed near or ventral to previous estimates of the ventral border of the rostral divisions of DL (DLr) and near the expected rostroventral border of V4 with TEO labeled cells in a pattern distinctively different from either central DL/V4 injections or those dorsal to DL/V4. Injections placed rostroventral to DL/V4 labeled neurons over a large extent of the IT cortex, while failing to label neurons in V1, V2 and MT. Injections that partially involved the rostroventral border of DL/V4 produced a similar pattern of labeled neurons, but also labeled a few cells in ventral V1 and V2, as well as many in DL/V4. Dorsal and rostroventral injections also labeled different regions of the prefrontal cortex, but only DL/V4 injections that included area DP labeled neurons in the prefrontal cortex. The results revealed contrasting and transitional connection patterns for four regions of the dorsolateral visual cortex, and they provided evidence for the locations of dorsal and rostroventral borders of the DL/V4 complex. PMID:15459077

  13. Reappraisal of nuclear quadrupole moments of atomic halogens via relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory for the ionization process.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha

    2013-11-27

    The coupled cluster based linear response theory (CCLRT) with four-component relativistic spinors is employed to compute the electric field gradients (EFG) of (35)Cl, (79)Br, and (127)I nuclei. The EFGs resulting from these calculations are combined with experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCC) to determine the nuclear quadrupole moments (NQM), Q of the halide nuclei. Our estimated NQMs [(35)Cl = -81.12 mb, (79)Br = 307.98 mb, and (127)I = -688.22 mb] agree well with the new atomic values [(35)Cl = -81.1(1.2), (79)Br = 302(5), and (127)I = -680(10) mb] obtained via Fock space multireference coupled cluster method with the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian. Although our estimated Q((79)Br) value deviates from the accepted reference value of 313(3) mb, it agrees well with the recently recommended value, Q((79)Br) = 308.7(20) mb. Good agreement with current reference data indicates the accuracy of the proposed value for these halogen nuclei and lends credence to the results obtained via CCLRT approach. The electron affinities yielded by this method with no extra cost are also in good agreement with experimental values, which bolster our belief that the NQMs values for halogen nuclei derived here are reliable.

  14. Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

  15. The Vredefort Pseudotachylytes: A Centennial Reappraisal of S. J. Shand (1916). Shaken, not Stirred by Meteorite Impacting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garde, A. A.; Klausen, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    The famous pseudotachylytes in theVredefort Dome were formed by impact-induced seismic shaking, a common but overlooked deformation process in terrestrial cratering. Seismic shaking is a fundamental geophysical process and well-known from the moon.

  16. Centenarians’ offspring as a model of healthy aging: a reappraisal of the data on Italian subjects and a comprehensive overview

    PubMed Central

    Cevenini, Elisa; Pini, Elisa; Scurti, Maria; Vitale, Giovanni; Mari, Daniela; Caruso, Calogero; Sansoni, Paolo; Fanelli, Flaminia; Pasquali, Renato; Gueresi, Paola; Franceschi, Claudio; Monti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Within the scenario of an increasing life expectancy worldwide it is mandatory to identify determinants of healthy aging. Centenarian offspring (CO) is one of the most informative model to identify trajectories of healthy aging and their determinants (genetic and environmental), being representative of elderly in their 70th whose lifestyle can be still modified to attain a better health. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of the health status of 267 CO (mean age: 70.2 years) and adopts the innovative approach of comparing CO with 107 age-matched offspring of non-long-lived parents (hereafter indicated as NCO controls), recruited according to strict inclusion demographic criteria of Italian population. We adopted a multidimensional approach which integrates functional and cognitive assessment together with epidemiological and clinical data, including pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. CO have a lower prevalence of stroke, cerebral thrombosis-hemorrhage, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and other minor diseases, lower BMI and waist circumference, a better functional and cognitive status and lower plasma level of FT4 compared to NCO controls. We conclude that a multidimensional approach is a reliable strategy to identify the health status of elderly at an age when interventions to modify their health trajectory are feasible. PMID:26979133

  17. Cognitive dysfunction in the dystrophin-deficient mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A reappraisal from sensory to executive processes.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, Rémi; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Le Bec, Benoit; El Massioui, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Vaillend, Cyrille

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with language disabilities and deficits in learning and memory, leading to intellectual disability in a patient subpopulation. Recent studies suggest the presence of broader deficits affecting information processing, short-term memory and executive functions. While the absence of the full-length dystrophin (Dp427) is a common feature in all patients, variable mutation profiles may additionally alter distinct dystrophin-gene products encoded by separate promoters. However, the nature of the cognitive dysfunctions specifically associated with the loss of distinct brain dystrophins is unclear. Here we show that the loss of the full-length brain dystrophin in mdx mice does not modify the perception and sensorimotor gating of auditory inputs, as assessed using auditory brainstem recordings and prepulse inhibition of startle reflex. In contrast, both acquisition and long-term retention of cued and trace fear memories were impaired in mdx mice, suggesting alteration in a functional circuit including the amygdala. Spatial learning in the water maze revealed reduced path efficiency, suggesting qualitative alteration in mdx mice learning strategy. However, spatial working memory performance and cognitive flexibility challenged in various behavioral paradigms in water and radial-arm mazes were unimpaired. The full-length brain dystrophin therefore appears to play a role during acquisition of associative learning as well as in general processes involved in memory consolidation, but no overt involvement in working memory and/or executive functions could be demonstrated in spatial learning tasks. PMID:26190833

  18. A reappraisal of the role of Pityrosporum orbiculare in pityriasis versicolor and the significance of extracellular lipase.

    PubMed

    Catterall, M D; Ward, M E; Jacobs, P

    1978-12-01

    Pityrosporum orbiculare is an obligate lipophilic yeast in vitro, which suggests it possesses an extracellular lipase crucial for nutrition. If present in vivo, the enzyme would enable the yeast to utilize skin surface lipids, which may therfore play an important role in the pathogenesis of pityriasis versicolor. Cultured P. orbiculare and biopsy material from patients with pityriasis versicolor were investigated for the presence of lipase by electron microscope histochemistry. At sites of lipase activity, fatty acid hydrolyzed from Tween 80 substrate reacts with Ca++ ions to form an insoluble Ca++ soap. Exchange of Ca++ with Pb++ enables the sites of lipase activity to be visualized as electron dense deposits of insoluble lead soap. Surface lipase activity was apparent when the technique was applied to P. orbiculare grown on lipid containing medium and its specificity confirmed by removal of substrate and inhibition by di-isopropyl fluorophosphate and quinine hydrochloride, but not by sodium fluoride. When the same technique was applied to stratum corneum infected with Pityrosporum furfur (Malassez), no reaction product could be detected. It is postulated that lipase, although critical for fungal nutrition in vitro, is unlikely to be of importance in vivo. Skin surface lipids are therefore probably not relevant to the pathogenesis of pityriasis versicolor.

  19. Evaluation of factors controlling the distribution of organic matter and phosphorus in the Eastern Arabian Shelf: A geostatistical reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shiba Shankar; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.

    2016-09-01

    The Eastern Arabian Shelf (EAS) is a region of high primary production and a part of an intense oxygen minimum zone as well. The EAS is a zone of significant accumulation of organic matter that is ascribable to either the prevalent anoxic condition or high primary productivity, There has been a considerable amount of debate on the dominant factor responsible for the enrichment of organic matter in the sediments in EAS. The present study is an attempt to resolve the issue through robust geostatistical analysis of published and unpublished data. Results of Empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) of available data help to get a refined distribution of organic carbon and phosphorus in the Eastern Arabian Shelf as compared to the earlier known distribution patterns. The primary productivity, evaluated through the latest satellite dataset using Vertically Generalized Production Model, does not show any similarity with the distribution pattern of either organic carbon (Corg) or phosphorus, that was determined based on the in situ data. The negative correlations of primary production with Corg (r=-0.14) and P (r=-0.4) indicate that primary productivity is the most unlikely modulator of organic matter accumulation in the EAS. The negative correlation of bottom water oxygen concentration with Corg (r=-0.39) and Ti-normalized fraction of organic carbon (r=-0.56) indicates that anoxia plays a major role in the preservation of organic matter in the EAS. The mass accumulation rates of Corg and phosphorus show a strong dependency on sedimentation rate (r>0.88), which indicates that the accumulation rate of sediments outweighs the other depositional parameters in controlling the accumulation of organic matter in the EAS.

  20. Accounting for Regressive Eye-Movements in Models of Sentence Processing: A Reappraisal of the Selective Reanalysis Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Don C.; Shen, Xingjia; Green, Matthew J.; Hodgson, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    When people read temporarily ambiguous sentences, there is often an increased prevalence of regressive eye-movements launched from the word that resolves the ambiguity. Traditionally, such regressions have been interpreted at least in part as reflecting readers' efforts to re-read and reconfigure earlier material, as exemplified by the Selective…

  1. After the Gold Rush: Questioning the "Gold Standard" and Reappraising the Status of Experiment and Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The past few years have seen a resurgence of faith in experimentation in education inquiry, and particularly in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Proponents of such research have succeeded in bringing into common parlance the term "gold standard," which suggests that research emerging from any other design frame fails to achieve the…

  2. Homology of the reptilian coracoid and a reappraisal of the evolution and development of the amniote pectoral apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Vickaryous, Matthew K; Hall, Brian K

    2006-01-01

    As in monotreme mammals, the pectoral apparatus of basal (fossil) amniotes includes two coracoid elements, the procoracoid and metacoracoid. Among extant reptiles the metacoracoid has long been assumed lost; this notion is herein challenged. A comprehensive review of data from numerous sources, including the fossil record, experimental embryology, genetic manipulations and an analysis of morphology at the level cell condensations, supports the conclusion that the metacoracoid gives rise to the majority of the reptilian coracoid. By contrast, the reptilian procoracoid remains as a rudiment that is incorporated as a process of the (meta)coracoid and/or the glenoid region of the scapula early during development, prior to skeletogenesis. Application of this integrated approach corroborates and enhances previous work describing the evolution of the pectoral apparatus in mammals. A revised scenario of amniote coracoid evolution is presented emphasizing the importance of considering cell condensations when evaluating the homology of a skeletal complex. PMID:16533312

  3. Re-appraisal of old and new diagnostic tools in the current management of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Bessone, Fernando

    2014-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a very complex and intricate DNA structure associated with a particular genomic organization and replication cycle. However, many years of investigations allowed clarification of the real HBV natural history, through a deeper knowledge of the behavior of HBV antigens and viral structures. Several of the old diagnostic tools, such as HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV e antigen (HBeAg) determinations, gained prominence now, since the variation of both HBsAg and HBeAg plasma levels was shown to predict treatment response. In addition, the availability of more sensitive methods, such as HBV DNA detection by real-time PCR, has improved the current knowledge of the relationships between HBV replication levels and the natural history of the disease. It is now well established that some HBV genotypes are associated with a better response to treatment with pegylated interferon. Despite the widely accepted value of liver biopsy as a staging tool, transient elastography is being increasingly acknowledged as a non-invasive method to assess liver stiffness, chiefly for detection of advanced fibrosis. Current international guidelines for the management of chronic hepatitis B have provided several accurate biochemical and serological criteria for selecting patients for treatment, allowing a higher number of cases to be enrolled into antiviral therapy. This review describes the different serological markers used for the study of HBV and their clinical significance. It also deals with methods used for detection of genotypes and HBV DNA, emphasizing the effectiveness of such determinations for both patient selection and chronic hepatitis B therapy/monitoring.

  4. Malnutrition and Environmental Enrichment: A Statistical Reappraisal of the Findings of the Adoption Study of Winick et al. (1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueman, Mark

    1985-01-01

    Critically reviews the influential study "Malnutrition and Environmental Enrichment" by Winick et al. (1975) and highlights what are considered to be statistical flaws in its analysis. Data in the classic study of height, weight, and IQ changes in three groups of adopted, malnourished Korean girls are reanalysed and conclusions considered…

  5. Centenarians' offspring as a model of healthy aging: a reappraisal of the data on Italian subjects and a comprehensive overview.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Laura; Ostan, Rita; Cevenini, Elisa; Pini, Elisa; Scurti, Maria; Vitale, Giovanni; Mari, Daniela; Caruso, Calogero; Sansoni, Paolo; Fanelli, Flaminia; Pasquali, Renato; Gueresi, Paola; Franceschi, Claudio; Monti, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Within the scenario of an increasing life expectancy worldwide it is mandatory to identify determinants of healthy aging. Centenarian offspring (CO) is one of the most informative model to identify trajectories of healthy aging and their determinants (genetic and environmental), being representative of elderly in their 70th whose lifestyle can be still modified to attain a better health. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of the health status of 267 CO (mean age: 70.2 years) and adopts the innovative approach of comparing CO with 107 age-matched offspring of non-long-lived parents (hereafter indicated as NCO controls), recruited according to strict inclusion demographic criteria of Italian population. We adopted a multidimensional approach which integrates functional and cognitive assessment together with epidemiological and clinical data, including pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. CO have a lower prevalence of stroke, cerebral thrombosis-hemorrhage, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and other minor diseases, lower BMI and waist circumference, a better functional and cognitive status and lower plasma level of FT4 compared to NCO controls. We conclude that a multidimensional approach is a reliable strategy to identify the health status of elderly at an age when interventions to modify their health trajectory are feasible. PMID:26979133

  6. A Reappraisal of Developing Permanent Tooth Length as an Estimate of Age in Human Immature Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Spake, Laure; Liversidge, Helen M

    2016-09-01

    This study expands on existing juvenile age prediction models from tooth length by increasing sample size and using classical calibration. A sample of 178 individuals from two European known sex and age skeletal samples was used to calculate prediction formulae for each tooth for each sex separately and combined. Prediction errors, residuals, and percentage of individuals whose real age fell within the 95% prediction interval were calculated. An ANCOVA was used to test sex and sample differences. Tooth length for age does not differ between the samples except for the canine and second premolar, and no statistically significant sex differences were detected. The least prediction error was found in the incisors and the first molar, and the highest prediction error was found in the third molar. Age prediction formulae provided here can be easily used in a variety of contexts where tooth length is measured from any isolated tooth. PMID:27320642

  7. Reappraisal of the outcome of healthcare-associated and community-acquired bacteramia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare-associated (HCA) bloodstream infections (BSI) have been associated with worse outcomes, in terms of higher frequencies of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms and inappropriate therapy than strict community-acquired (CA) BSI. Recent changes in the epidemiology of community (CO)-BSI and treatment protocols may have modified this association. The objective of this study was to analyse the etiology, therapy and outcomes for CA and HCA BSI in our area. Methods A prospective multicentre cohort including all CO-BSI episodes in adult patients was performed over a 3-month period in 2006–2007. Outcome variables were mortality and inappropriate empirical therapy. Adjusted analyses were performed by logistic regression. Results 341 episodes of CO-BSI were included in the study. Acquisition was HCA in 56% (192 episodes) of them. Inappropriate empirical therapy was administered in 16.7% (57 episodes). All-cause mortality was 16.4% (56 patients) at day 14 and 20% (71 patients) at day 30. After controlling for age, Charlson index, source, etiology, presentation with severe sepsis or shock and inappropriate empirical treatment, acquisition type was not associated with an increase in 14-day or 30-day mortality. Only an stratified analysis of 14th-day mortality for Gram negatives BSI showed a statically significant difference (7% in CA vs 17% in HCA, p = 0,05). Factors independently related to inadequate empirical treatment in the community were: catheter source, cancer, and previous antimicrobial use; no association with HCA acquisition was found. Conclusion HCA acquisition in our cohort was not a predictor for either inappropriate empirical treatment or increased mortality. These results might reflect recent changes in therapeutic protocols and epidemiological changes in community pathogens. Further studies should focus on recognising CA BSI due to resistant organisms facilitating an early and adequate treatment in patients with CA resistant BSI. PMID:23883281

  8. Brainy stuff of long-gone dogs: a reappraisal of the supposed Canis endocranial cast from the Pliocene of Poland.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Dmitry V; Wolsan, Mieczysław; Marciszak, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    The pre-Quaternary fossil record of Canis in the Old World is scarce, and the first appearance of this genus in Europe remains an enigma. Amongst the oldest fossils assigned to this genus, there is a natural cast of the brain (endocast) collected in Węże 1, Poland, from Pliocene deposits dated between 3.3 and 4.0 Ma. We reexamined this specimen and found that it differs from the brain of Canis in having its region medial to the coronal sulcus heart-shaped in dorsal view, its region rostral to the presylvian sulcus shorter and less constricted laterally, and its cerebellum less overlapped by the cerebrum and lacking a lateral twist of the posterior vermis. We identified this fossil, as well as another fossil canid endocast from Węże 1, as representing the raccoon dog genus Nyctereutes. The previously reported presence of Canis in Węże 1 is therefore not confirmed. Specifically, both endocasts can be referred to N. donnezani because this is the only species of Nyctereutes that has been recognised in this locality on the basis of craniomandibular and dental fossils. Our study represents a taxonomic application of comparative neuroanatomical and palaeoneurological data, an approach that may become increasingly useful with the growing knowledge of the endocranial morphology of fossil mammals. PMID:24969730

  9. Reappraisal of diffusion, solubility, and consumption of oxygen in frog skeletal muscle, with applications to muscle energy balance

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Previously we tested the validity of the one-dimensional diffusion equation for O2 in the excised frog sartorius muscle and used it to measure the diffusion coefficient (D) for O2 in this muscle and the time course of its rate of O2 consumption (Qo2) after a tetanus (Mahler, 1978, 1979, J. Gen. Physiol., 71:533-557, 559-580, 73:159- 174). A transverse section of the frog sartorius is in fact well fit by a hemi-ellipse with width divided by maximum thickness averaging 5.1 +/- 0.2. Using the previous techniques with the two-dimensional diffusion equation and this hemi-elliptical boundary yields a value for D that is 30% smaller than reported previously; the revised values at 0, 10, and 22.8 degrees C are 6.2, 7.9, and 10.8 X 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. After a tetanus at 20 degrees C, Qo2 rose quickly to a peak and then declined exponentially, with a time constant (tau) approximately 15% faster than that reported previously; tau averaged 2.1 min in Rana temporaria and 2.6 min in Rana pipiens. A technique was devised to measure the solubility (alpha) of O2 in intact, respiring muscles, and yielded alpha (muscle)/alpha (H2O) = 1.26 +/- 0.04. With these modifications, the values for O2 consumption obtained with the diffusion method were in agreement with those measured by the direct method of Kushmerick and Paul (1976, J. Physiol. [Lond.]., 254:693- 709). Using results from both methods, at 20 degrees C the ratio of phosphorylcreatine split during a tetanus to O2 consumption during recovery ranged from 5.2 to 6.2 mumol/mumol, and postcontractile ATP hydrolysis was estimated to be 13.6 +/- 4.1 (n = 3) nmol/mumol total creatine. PMID:4031823

  10. Reappraisal of p53 mutations in human malignant astrocytic neoplasms by p53 functional assay: comparison with conventional structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Tada, M; Iggo, R D; Waridel, F; Nozaki, M; Matsumoto, R; Sawamura, Y; Shinohe, Y; Ikeda, J; Abe, H

    1997-03-01

    We previously reported clonal expansion of p53 mutations in malignant astrocytic tumors detected with a yeast p53 functional assay that measures mutant p53 alleles quantitatively and loss of p53 transcriptional competence qualitatively (Tada et al., Int J Cancer 67:447-450, 1996). This method selectively detects inactivating mutations and is relatively insensitive to contamination of tumor samples with normal tissue. To determine whether the mutation frequency and spectrum detected in this way differ from those seen with conventional techniques, 54 malignant astrocytomas were tested with the yeast assay, and the abnormalities detected were characterized by DNA sequencing. Inactivating p53 mutations were found in 67% of anaplastic astrocytomas and 41% of glioblastomas. Overall, mutations were found in 48% of tumors, compared with only 29% in previous studies (P < 0.005), a difference that probably reflects the greater sensitivity of the yeast assay than of conventional techniques. The frequency of mutations in anaplastic astrocytomas (in our study plus published studies) was significantly higher than in glioblastomas (39% vs 29%; P < 0.05). This suggests that acquisition of p53 mutations is not rate limiting for progression to glioblastoma and that many glioblastomas develop by p53-independent pathways. Sequencing of mutant p53 cDNAs rescued from yeast showed that the mutation spectrum for functionally inactive mutants was nearly identical to the spectra from previous studies on structural mutants, indicating that transcriptional activity is the critical biological target of p53 mutation in malignant astrocytomas.

  11. Transmission and dose–response experiments for social animals: a reappraisal of the colonization biology of Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response experiments characterize the relationship between infectious agents and their hosts. They are used to estimate the minimum e'ective infectious dose (ID50), compare between di'erent agents and quantify the e'ect of treatment regimes. The statistical analysis of dose-response data typica...

  12. Reappraisal of the geology of Kangimut Sammisoq, Ameralik Fjord, Southern West Greenland: Crustal structure and interpretation of isotopic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutman, Allen P.; Friend, Clark R. L.; Mcgregor, Vic R.

    1988-01-01

    In Godthabsfjord, in the North Atlantic Archean Craton, early Archean Amitsoq gneisses are found in association with the mid to late Archean Nuk gneisses. The Amitsoq gneisses contain the Ameralik dykes, now subconcordant strips of amphibolite. The Nuk and Amitsoq gneisses have amphibolite facies polymetamorphic assemblages. To the southeast of Godthabsfjord, there is an extensive region affected by granulite facies metamorphism at 2800 Ma. Early models of crustal evolution for Godthabsfjord and the region to the SE are discussed. Recent detailed mapping combined with U-Pb zircon dating is examined.

  13. A reappraisal of the evolution of Asian snakehead fishes (Pisces, Channidae) using molecular data from multiple genes and fossil calibration.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Eleanor A S; Hurwood, David A; Mather, Peter B

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater snakehead fishes (Channidae) provide an interesting target for phylogenetic analysis for the following reasons, their unusual biology, potential for cryptic diversity and availability of a good fossil record. Here, a multi-locus molecular phylogeny was constructed and calibrated using two fossil dates to estimate divergence times within the family. Sampling aimed to explore interspecific divergence of Channa species across Southeast Asia and intra-specific variation where species possessed natural geographical ranges that were extensive. Results contradict divergence times estimated previously independently from single locus mitochondrial data or the fossil record and suggest that after divergence from African taxa 40-50 Ma, evolution of Asian snakeheads has been heavily influenced by multiple broad scale dispersal events across India and Southeast Asia. A similar pattern of divergence within multiple clades suggests that west-east dispersal was limited for many taxa during the Miocene. Deep intra-specific divergence was inferred for C. striata, indicating that long historical periods of isolation ( approximately 8Ma) have not resulted in the evolution of reproductive isolation within this species. Results support suggestions that C. marulia like fishes in northern Cambodia may constitute an undescribed species, and that Indian C. diplogramma warrants taxonomic recognition as being distinct from Southeast Asian C. micropeltes, with the two taxa last sharing a common ancestor in the mid- to late-Miocene.

  14. A reappraisal of Theroteinus (Haramiyida, Mammaliaformes) from the Upper Triassic of Saint-Nicolas-de-Port (France)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The earliest mammaliaforms are difficult to assess because the fossil record is poor and because their distinctive morphologies cannot be directly compared with more recent mammaliaforms. This is especially true for the haramiyid genus Theroteinus, only known in the Saint-Nicolas-de-Port locality (Rhaetian, France). This study presents a new definition of the type-species Theroteinus nikolai. A new species Theroteinus rosieriensis, sp. nov., is named and distinguished by the lingual shift of distal cusps, a larger size, and a stockier occlusal outline. Comparisons with Eleutherodon, Megaconus and Millsodon suggest that Theroteinus has potential close relatives among the Jurassic haramiyids. PMID:27781174

  15. Reappraisal of the geothermal potential at Colli Albani volcano (Italy): a new approach to the volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Ramazzotti, P.; Bonamico, A.; Mattei, M.

    2012-04-01

    High enthalpy geothermal reservoirs are usually associated with fractured rocks. Secondary permeability is however difficult to be predicted thus making it difficult to locate the most productive volumes of the reservoirs. The calculation of the energetic potential in geothermal areas suffers of the large uncertainties associated with secondary permeability issues, facing the task of the interplay between stratification and fracturing on the anisotropic distribution of secondary permeability. The object of this work is the research and informatization of available data for the Colli Albani (Latium, Central Italy) geothermal system, in order to propose a qualitative approach and quantitative identification and description of geothermal systems, applied to the Colli Albani area as a case history. The identification of the rock volumes most promising in terms of industrial exploitation needs the definition of an evaluation matrix. The considered data can be placed in a three dimensional matrix with A axis that accounts for the modeling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data, and a B axis that accounts for the thermal modeling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are strongly influenced by the geological model therefore, as for the case of Colli Albani, there is certainly a lot of scope into revising existing geological reconstructions of the reservoirs in Central Italy and accordingly reconsidering the interpolation and modeling of both thermal and geophysical data. For the scope of this work, we have taken into account the maps descriptive the thermal structure and the deep distribution of the top of the geothermal reservoirs produced by ENEL and AGIP between the 1970s and 1990s for Cental Italy, and we have detailed the internal structure of the substrate, considering more recent direct and indirect data on the nature of the substratum. Finally, we discuss the implementation of a C axis which aims at evaluating the surface data that are evidence of geothermal fluid circulation in the geothermal reservoir. We considered datasets on: i) distribution and density of tectonic lineaments (ENEL, 1972 and original data); ii) temperature and electric conductivity of groundwaters (Capelli and Mazza, 2005); iii) partial pressure of dissolved CO2 in the groundwaters (Chiodini and Frondini, 2001). These data may give guidance on areas where the cap rocks are affected by permeable faults and fractures, and on the presence at depth of permeable fractured volumes and fluid circulation inside the reservoir. All data sets on the A, B and C axes of the conceptual matrix have been treated in a GIS platform, and thematic maps have been calculated over a grid with 200 meters side, from a proposed general formula able to approach the feasibility of geothermal exploration on each grid cell.

  16. Learning to re-appraise the self during video feedback for social anxiety: Does depth of processing matter?

    PubMed

    Orr, Elizabeth M J; Moscovitch, David A

    2010-08-01

    Video feedback (VF) with cognitive preparation (CP) has been widely integrated into cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocols for social anxiety disorder (SAD) due to its presumed efficacy in improving negative self-perception. However, previous experimental studies have demonstrated that improvements in negative self-perception via VF+CP do not typically facilitate anxiety reduction during subsequent social interactions - a troubling finding for proponents of cognitive models of social anxiety. We examined whether VF+CP could be optimized to enhance participants' processing of corrective self-related information through the addition of a post-VF cognitive review (CR). Sixty-eight socially anxious individuals were randomly assigned to perform two public speeches in one of the following conditions: a) exposure alone (EXP); b) CP+VF; and c) CP+VF+CR. Those in the CP+VF+CR condition demonstrated marginally significant reductions in anxiety from speech 1 to speech 2 relative to those who received EXP - an improvement not shown for those in the CP+VF condition. Furthermore, only those who received CP+VF+CR demonstrated significant improvements in self-perception and performance expectations relative to EXP. Decreases in anxiety among participants who received CP+VF+CR relative to EXP were fully mediated by improvements in self-perception. Implications are discussed in the context of cognitive models of social anxiety and mechanisms of exposure-based learning. PMID:20462568

  17. Revisiting the Sheepbed Mudstone of Gale Crater, Mars - A comprehensive reappraisal of its depositional, diagenetic, and burial history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.; Bish, D. L.; Coleman, M. L.; Reed, M. H.; Edgett, K. S.; Malin, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Sheepbed mudstone forms the base of the succession examined by the Curiosity rover and is also the first bona fide mudstone known on another planet. Many initial papers have discussed a lacustrine depositional setting, geochemical features, and implications for habitability. Careful review of all collected images and associated data prompts us to update interpretations of depositional regime, diagenesis, and burial history. The lake basin received sediment pulses associated with localized scouring, lateral thinning of beds, and decelerating flows. Bed cross sections suggest mm-cm scale layering to be the norm, probably recording distal pulses of fluvial sediment injections (fine grained hyperpycnites), fall-out from river plumes, and some eolian supply. Prior diagenesis studies focused on synaeresis cracks and mm-scale nodules but contrary to other genetic models we consider centrifugal diffusion could have formed hollow nodule shells, some continuing until filled. There is also an element of stratiform cementation and formation of thin, laterally extensive concretions that establish outcrop appearance of the uppermost meter of the Sheepbed mudstone. Typical surface mud with 80 vol% water has a water/rock ratio of about 1.4 (assuming basaltic debris), and this ratio declines with further compaction. Given that clay formation is thought to require rather higher w/r, the observation of around 20% clays in these rocks seems to argue against in situ clay generation, and instead suggests that they were derived from the crater's periphery and carried into the basin by fluvial discharge. This view is also supported by the presence of significant amounts (>30%) of likely highly reactive amorphous component(s) and Fe-forsterite in John Klein, and the need for an initial presence of clay minerals to enable synaeresis. The virtual lack of Fe-forsterite in Cumberland is more supportive of in situ alteration, although significant amorphous material exists in Cumberland.

  18. Lack of Support for the Association between Facial Shape and Aggression: A Reappraisal Based on a Worldwide Population Genetics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Hünemeier, Tábita; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Paschetta, Carolina; de Azevedo, Soledad; González, Marina F.; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Pucciarelli, Héctor M.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bau, Claiton H. D.; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; González-José, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Antisocial and criminal behaviors are multifactorial traits whose interpretation relies on multiple disciplines. Since these interpretations may have social, moral and legal implications, a constant review of the evidence is necessary before any scientific claim is considered as truth. A recent study proposed that men with wider faces relative to facial height (fWHR) are more likely to develop unethical behaviour mediated by a psychological sense of power. This research was based on reports suggesting that sexual dimorphism and selection would be responsible for a correlation between fWHR and aggression. Here we show that 4,960 individuals from 94 modern human populations belonging to a vast array of genetic and cultural contexts do not display significant amounts of fWHR sexual dimorphism. Further analyses using populations with associated ethnographical records as well as samples of male prisoners of the Mexico City Federal Penitentiary condemned by crimes of variable level of inter-personal aggression (homicide, robbery, and minor faults) did not show significant evidence, suggesting that populations/individuals with higher levels of bellicosity, aggressive behaviour, or power-mediated behaviour display greater fWHR. Finally, a regression analysis of fWHR on individual's fitness showed no significant correlation between this facial trait and reproductive success. Overall, our results suggest that facial attributes are poor predictors of aggressive behaviour, or at least, that sexual selection was weak enough to leave a signal on patterns of between- and within-sex and population facial variation. PMID:23326328

  19. Reappraisal of the relationship between the northern Nevada rift and Miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Nevada rift is a prominent mafic dike swarm and magnetic anomaly in north-central Nevada inferred to record the Middle Miocene (16.5-15.0 Ma) extension direction in the northern Basin and Range province in the western United States. From the 245°-250° rift direction, Basin and Range extension is inferred to have shifted 45° clockwise to a modern direction of 290°-300° during the late Miocene. The region surrounding the northern Nevada rift was actively extending while the rift formed, and these domains are all characterized by extension oriented 280°-300°. This direction is distinctly different from the rift direction and nearly identical to the modern Basin and Range direction. Although the rate, structural style, and distribution of Basin and Range extension appear to have undergone a significant change in the late Miocene (ca. 10 Ma), the overall spreading direction does not. Middle Miocene extension was directed perpendicular to the axis of the thickest crust formed during Mesozoic shortening and this orientation may reflect gravitational collapse of this thick crust. Orientation of northern Nevada rift dikes may reflect a short-lived regional stress field related to the onset of Yellowstone hotspot volcanism.

  20. The thermal-mechanical evolution of crustal orogenic belts at convergent plate boundaries: A reappraisal of the orogenic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhaeghe, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    Convergent plate boundaries are characterized by the development of crustal orogenic wedges and orogenic plateaus but also by gravitational collapse of previously thickened crust leading to the opening of intermontane and eventually oceanic back-arc basins. Foreland and extensional sedimentary basins in the plate boundary region are filled by the erosional products of the orogenic crust. Metamorphic rocks forming orogenic crust attest to burial and exhumation under contrasted geothermal gradients. These features portray the crustal orogenic cycle and are first-order indicators of the thermal and mechanical evolution of the crust within the plate boundary region. This evolution is controlled by complex interactions among (i) the dynamic balance among forces that arise from plate-tectonic, gravitational potential energy, and buoyancy, (ii) the thermal balance between deformation-induced and radioactive heat production and heat advection related to subduction, orogenic deformation, and magma transfer, and (iii) the mass transfer balance between uplift and erosion. To account for these geological characteristics, a generic model, that integrates results from physical modeling, is proposed for the thermal-mechanical evolution of crustal orogenic belts and for its implication in controlling the transition between the different phases of the orogenic cycle. In this model, the transition from low to high geothermal gradient is associated with increased heat production in the thickened crust owing to radioactive decay and deformation. Partial melting and rheologic weakening of the thermally mature thickened crust triggers gravity-driven lateral flow of the lower crust and controls the transition from wedge to orogenic plateau. Destruction of the orogenic crust is achieved in part by erosion but mostly by gravitational collapse. The style of extension is controlled by the rheology of the crust at the onset of gravitational collapse and its evolution as the crust thins and cools. Gravitational collapse is permitted by a modification of lithosphere dynamics in the convergence zone and might eventually lead to opening of a new oceanic basin if collapse is followed by thinning of the lithospheric mantle.